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Sample records for depression significantly predicted

  1. Predicting significant torso trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirula, Ram; Talmor, Daniel; Brasel, Karen

    2005-07-01

    Identification of motor vehicle crash (MVC) characteristics associated with thoracoabdominal injury would advance the development of automatic crash notification systems (ACNS) by improving triage and response times. Our objective was to determine the relationships between MVC characteristics and thoracoabdominal trauma to develop a torso injury probability model. Drivers involved in crashes from 1993 to 2001 within the National Automotive Sampling System were reviewed. Relationships between torso injury and MVC characteristics were assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the model to current ACNS models. There were a total of 56,466 drivers. Age, ejection, braking, avoidance, velocity, restraints, passenger-side impact, rollover, and vehicle weight and type were associated with injury (p < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (83.9) was significantly greater than current ACNS models. We have developed a thoracoabdominal injury probability model that may improve patient triage when used with ACNS.

  2. Predictivity of Early Depressive Symptoms for Post-Stroke Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin-Richter, A; Volz, M; Jöbges, M; Werheid, K

    2015-08-01

    Depression is a frequent complication after stroke. However, little is known about the predictive value of early self-reported depressive symptoms (DS) for later development of post-stroke depression (PSD) 6 months after discharge. Using a prospective longitudinal design, we investigated the prevalence of DS and examined their predictive value for depressive disorders 6 months after stroke while statistically controlling major established PSD risk factors. During inpatient rehabilitation, 96 stroke patients were screened for DS. After 6 months, 71 patients were attainable for a follow-up. DS was assessed using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15). At follow-up a telephone interview that included the Structured Clinical Interview for Psychiatric Disorders (SCID), which is based on DSM-IV criteria, and the GDS-15 was conducted. Patients with major depression (MD) at the follow-up were considered to have PSD. Regression analyses were conducted to examine the influence of early DS on PSD after 6 months while controlling for age, premorbid depression, and functional and cognitive impairments. The percentage of patients who scored above the GDS-15 cut-off for clinically relevant DS increased significantly, from 37% to 44%, after 6 months. According to the SCID, 27% of stroke patients fulfilled the criteria for MD, and another 16% fulfilled those for minor depression. Logistic regression showed that DS at baseline significantly predicted PSD at follow-up (odds ratio: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.15-1.8). Self-reported DS during inpatient rehabilitation are predictive for PSD 6 months after discharge. Assessment of early DS contributes to identifying stroke patients at risk for PSD, thereby facilitating prevention and treatment.

  3. Predicting depressive symptoms in unemployed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Zorica

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we review recent research literature focused on relationship between unemployment and depression, and theories emphasizing the mechanisms by which unemployment may contribute to increased levels of depression. Our research investigated depressive symptomatology and its predictors among unemployed people (N = 453 varying in length of unemployment. Results showed that self - mastery, self - esteem, financial strain, gender, intensity of job - seek behavior and length on unemployment were significant predictors of depressive symptoms. Results are discussed in light of current theories of unemployment and mental health and recommendations are made for practice.

  4. Quantitative prediction of mixed-source crude oils and its significance for understanding oils accumulation in subtle pools in the Dongying Depression,Bohai Bay Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Sumei; Liu Keyu; Pang Xiongqi; Li Maowen; Jiang Zhenxue; Qiu Guiqiang; Gao Yongjin

    2008-01-01

    Conventional geochemical approaches were utilized in the quantitative prediction of the proportions of mixed-source crude oils derived from the Es3 and Es4 members of the Paleogene Shahejie Formation.The mixed-source oils are accumulated in the middle interval of the Es3 member(EsM3)in the Niuzhuang Sag,which is one of the sags where subtle traps are primarily of lenticular basin-floor turbidite sands within mudstones mostly developed in the Dongying Depression,Bohai Bay Basin.The result showed that about 18-92% of the mixed-source oils were derived from the Es4 source rocks with an average of 55-60%.Reservoirs associated with deep faults appear to have much more Es4 genetic affinity oils.A high proportion of the Es4-derived oils discovered in the Es3M subtle lithological traps in the Niuzhuang Sag have long migration distances.This suggests that surrounding source rocks might not necessarily control the hydrocarbon supply for subtle traps.Subtle migration pathway may play an important role in the vertical oil migration.The traditional concept of hydrocarbons accumulation in these lenticular turbidite sandstone traps within a short migration distance from the surrounding source rocks is not supported by this study.The present result is also consistent with our previous findings that immature oils in the Bamianhe Oilfield in the south slope of the Niuzhuang Sag were actually mixed-source oils mostly sourced from the Es4 in the depocenter of the Niuzhuang Sag,and the petroleum potential of the Es4 member in the Dongying Depression should therefore be re-evaluated.

  5. Depression Begets Depression: Comparing the Predictive Utility of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms to Later Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Feng, Xin; Hipwell, Alison; Klostermann, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background: The high comorbidity between depressive and anxiety disorders, especially among females, has called into question the independence of these two symptom groups. It is possible that childhood anxiety typically precedes depression in girls. Comparing of the predictive utility of symptoms of anxiety with the predictive utility of symptoms…

  6. Emotional maltreatment and depression: prospective prediction of depressive episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Richard T; Alloy, Lauren B; Abramson, Lyn Y; Iacoviello, Brian M; Whitehouse, Wayne G

    2009-01-01

    Most research to date on the role of maltreatment experiences in depression has focused on physical and sexual maltreatment. However, several researchers have theorized that emotional maltreatment may be more strongly linked to depression. Furthermore, prospective studies in this area are lacking. This study addressed these issues by examining whether experiences of current emotional maltreatment predicted the development of new prospective episodes of major (MD) or minor depression (MiD), and the subtype of hopelessness depression (HD) in young adults. It also assessed whether current emotional maltreatment from peers and from authority figures separately predicted the occurrence of depressive episodes. One hundred and sixty-five participants from the Cognitive Vulnerability to Depression Project were followed prospectively for 2.5 years. Current emotional maltreatment and new depressive episodes were assessed with life event and diagnostic interviews administered every 6 weeks. Greater overall emotional maltreatment predicted shorter time to onset of new MD, MiD, and HD episodes. Peer- and authority-perpetrated emotional maltreatment separately predicted shorter time to development of new HD episodes. Greater emotional maltreatment in young adults prospectively predicts onset of depression, particularly HD. These findings highlight the importance of adult emotional maltreatment experiences in determining targets for prevention and treatment. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Stress sensitivity interacts with depression history to predict depressive symptoms among youth: prospective changes following first depression onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technow, Jessica R; Hazel, Nicholas A; Abela, John R Z; Hankin, Benjamin L

    2015-04-01

    Predictors of depressive symptoms may differ before and after the first onset of major depression due to stress sensitization. Dependent stressors, or those to which characteristics of individuals contribute, have been shown to predict depressive symptoms in youth. The current study sought to clarify how stressors' roles may differ before and after the first depressive episode. Adolescents (N = 382, aged 11 to 15 at baseline) were assessed at baseline and every 3 months over the course of 2 years with measures of stressors and depressive symptoms. Semi-structured interviews were conducted every 6 months to assess for clinically significant depressive episodes. Hierarchical linear modeling showed a significant interaction between history of depression and idiographic fluctuations in dependent stressors to predict prospective elevations of symptoms, such that dependent stressors were more predictive of depressive symptoms after onset of disorder. Independent stressors predicted symptoms, but the strength of the association did not vary by depression history. These results suggest a synthesis of dependent stress and stress sensitization processes that might maintain inter-episode depressive symptoms among youth with a history of clinical depression.

  8. Subthreshold Symptoms of Depression in Preadolescent Girls Are Stable and Predictive of Depressive Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Hipwell, Alsion; Feng, Xin; Babinski, Dara; Hinze, Amanda; Rischall, Michal; Henneberger, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of depression are investigated among 232 preadolescent girls to study if they were predictive and stable of depression. Findings show that early symptoms of depression among preadolescent girls predict depressive disorders. Implications for preventive measures are discussed.

  9. Clinical Significance of the Number of Depressive Symptoms in Major Depressive Disorder: Results from the CRESCEND Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Sakong, Jeongkyu; Koo, Bon Hoon; Kim, Jae-Min; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Park, Yong Chon

    2016-04-01

    Our study aimed to establish the relationship between the number of depressive symptoms and the clinical characteristics of major depressive disorder (MDD). This would enable us to predict the clinical significance of the number of depressive symptoms in MDD patients. Using data from the Clinical Research Center for Depression (CRESCEND) study in Korea, 853 patients with DSM-IV MDD were recruited. The baseline and clinical characteristics of groups with different numbers of depressive symptoms were compared using the χ(2) test for discrete variables and covariance (ANCOVA) for continuous variables. In addition, the scores of these groups on the measurement tools were compared by ANCOVA after adjusting the potential effects of confounding variables. After adjusting the effects of monthly income and history of depression, a larger number of depressive symptoms indicated higher overall severity of depression (F [4, 756] = 21.458, P depressive symptoms (F [4, 767] = 19.145, P symptoms (F [4, 765] = 12.890, P depressive symptoms can be used as an index of greater illness burden in clinical psychiatry.

  10. Depression and exposure to suicide predict suicide attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Sonali; Misch, Diane; Chang, Laura; Henry, David

    2013-10-01

    To examine the role of depression and exposure to peer or family suicide and their interaction as risk factors for adolescent suicide attempts. The study used the public-use data set of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), which is a nationally representative stratified sample of U.S. high school students. Sample size was 4,719. Analyses predicted suicide attempts from preexisting depression and exposure to suicide of a friend or family member, controlling for previous suicide attempts, exposure, and depression. The greatest risk for future suicide attempts (relative risk = 3.3), was attributable to an attempt in the preceding year, controlling for preexisting and current depression and exposure. There was a main effect of exposure with the next highest relative risk of 3.2. A similar risk ratio, 3.2, was found for the difference between no depression and current severe depression, controlling for past depression and attempts. There was no evidence of an interaction between exposure to a peer or family member suicide attempt and depression. Supplementary analyses found that exposure to a friend or family member suicide attempt or completed suicide each added significantly to risk for adolescents regardless of depression levels. Exposure to suicidal behavior in a friend or family member poses risk equivalent to the risk posed by becoming severely depressed. Attending to such risks could benefit clinical practice with adolescence and public health suicide prevention efforts. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Late Pregnancy Thyroid-Binding Globulin Predicts Perinatal Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Cort; Leserman, Jane; Garcia, Nacire; Stansbury, Melissa; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Johnson, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Previously we found that late pregnancy total and free thyroxine (TT4, FT4) concentrations were negatively related to greater pre and/or postpartum depressive symptoms. In a much larger cohort, the current study examined whether these thyroid indices measured earlier in the third trimester (31-33 weeks) predict subsequent perinatal depression and anxiety ratings as well as syndromal depression. Thyroid-binding globulin (TBG) concentrations increase markedly during pregnancy and may be an index of sensitivity to elevated estrogen levels. TBG was examined in this study because prior findings suggest that postpartum depression is related to sensitivity to mood destabilization by elevated sex hormone concentrations during pregnancy. Our cohort was 199 euthyroid women recruited from a public health obstetrics clinic (63.8% Hispanic, 21.6% Black). After screening and blood draws for hormone measures at pregnancy weeks 31-33, subjects were evaluated during home visits at pregnancy weeks 35-36 as well as postpartum weeks 6 and 12. Evaluations included psychiatric interviews for current and life-time DSM-IV psychiatric history (M.I.N.I.-Plus), subject self-ratings and interviewer ratings for depression and anxiety (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, Montgomery-Ǻsberg Depression Rating Scale; Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Hamilton Anxiety Inventory), as well as a standardized interview to obtain life-time trauma history. Numerous covariates were included in all regression analyses. Trauma and major depression history were robustly significant predictors of depression and anxiety ratings over the study period when these variables were analyzed individually or in a combined model including FT4 or TBG (pdepression and anxiety ratings (pdepression history, were significant individual predictors of syndromal depression during the study period (pdepression history, FT4 and TBG generally were not significantly predictive of depression or anxiety ratings, and FT4

  12. Serum biomarkers predictive of depressive episodes in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, M G; Cooper, J D; Chan, M K; Bot, M; Penninx, B W J H; Bahn, S

    2016-02-01

    Panic disorder with or without comorbid agoraphobia (PD/PDA) has been linked to an increased risk to develop subsequent depressive episodes, yet the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders remains poorly understood. We aimed to identify a biomarker panel predictive for the development of a depressive disorder (major depressive disorder and/or dysthymia) within a 2-year-follow-up period. Blood serum concentrations of 165 analytes were evaluated in 120 PD/PDA patients without depressive disorder baseline diagnosis (6-month-recency) in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). We assessed the predictive performance of serum biomarkers, clinical, and self-report variables using receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC) and the area under the ROC curve (AUC). False-discovery-rate corrected logistic regression model selection of serum analytes and covariates identified an optimal predictive panel comprised of tetranectin and creatine kinase MB along with patient gender and scores from the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) rating scale. Combined, an AUC of 0.87 was reached for identifying the PD/PDA patients who developed a depressive disorder within 2 years (n = 44). The addition of biomarkers represented a significant (p = 0.010) improvement over using gender and IDS alone as predictors (AUC = 0.78). For the first time, we report on a combination of biological serum markers, clinical variables and self-report inventories that can detect PD/PDA patients at increased risk of developing subsequent depressive disorders with good predictive performance in a naturalistic cohort design. After an independent validation our proposed biomarkers could prove useful in the detection of at-risk PD/PDA patients, allowing for early therapeutic interventions and improving clinical outcome.

  13. The clinical significance of disordered renal excretion of xanthurenic acid in depressive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoes, M J; Sijben, N

    1981-01-01

    Xanthurenic acid is a metabolite of L-tryptophanicotinic acid ribonucleotide biosynthesis. The excretion of xanthurenic acid from urine 24 h after ingestion of 5 g L-tryptophan is increased in depressive patients, and 17-hydroxycorticosteroids are considered of primary importance to this disorder. However, in this study, the excretion of xanthurenic acid and 17-hydroxycorticosteroids did not correlate with the scores of the Raskin depression scale, Hamilton depression scale, Zung depression scale, or the Zung anxiety scale in depressive patients. The patients were treated with either pyridoxine plus L-tryptophan, a presumably serotonin-enhancing treatment (n = 10) or maprotiline, a noradrenaline-enhancing drug (n = 10). Repeated measurements showed no differences between treatments after 2 or 4 weeks of treatment. The improvement in xanthurenic acid excretion precedes clinical improvements in depression. The excretion of xanthurenic acid only at 2 weeks correlated significantly with the anxiety and depression scores at 4 weeks, making prediction of clinical improvement possible. The neurobiological mode of action on noradrenergic or serotonergic neurons of antidepressant medication is of questionable significance to their therapeutic effect.

  14. Emotionally biased cognitive processes: the weakest link predicts prospective changes in depressive symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaert, Jonas; Duyck, Wouter; Koster, Ernst H W

    2015-01-01

    Emotional biases in attention, interpretation, and memory are predictive of future depressive symptoms. It remains unknown, however, how these biased cognitive processes interact to predict depressive symptom levels in the long-term. In the present study, we tested the predictive value of two integrative approaches to model relations between multiple biased cognitive processes, namely the additive (i.e., cognitive processes have a cumulative effect) vs. the weakest link (i.e., the dominant pathogenic process is important) model. We also tested whether these integrative models interacted with perceived stress to predict prospective changes in depressive symptom severity. At Time 1, participants completed measures of depressive symptom severity and emotional biases in attention, interpretation, and memory. At Time 2, one year later, participants were reassessed to determine depressive symptom levels and perceived stress. Results revealed that the weakest link model had incremental validity over the additive model in predicting prospective changes in depressive symptoms, though both models explained a significant proportion of variance in the change in depressive symptoms from Time 1 to Time 2. None of the integrative models interacted with perceived stress to predict changes in depressive symptomatology. These findings suggest that the best cognitive marker of the evolution in depressive symptoms is the cognitive process that is dominantly biased toward negative material, which operates independent from experienced stress. This highlights the importance of considering idiographic cognitive profiles with multiple cognitive processes for understanding and modifying effects of cognitive biases in depression.

  15. Optimism and death: predicting the course and consequences of depression trajectories in response to heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Bonanno, George A

    2014-12-01

    The course of depression in relation to myocardial infarction (MI), commonly known as heart attack, and the consequences for mortality are not well characterized. Further, optimism may predict both the effects of MI on depression as well as mortality secondary to MI. In the current study, we utilized a large population-based prospective sample of older adults (N=2,147) to identify heterogeneous trajectories of depression from 6 years prior to their first-reported MI to 4 years after. Findings indicated that individuals were at significantly increased risk for mortality when depression emerged after their first-reported MI, compared with resilient individuals who had no significant post-MI elevation in depression symptomatology. Individuals with chronic depression and those demonstrating pre-event depression followed by recovery after MI were not at increased risk. Further, optimism, measured before MI, prospectively differentiated all depressed individuals from participants who were resilient.

  16. Possibility to predict the development of secondary depression in primary alcoholics during abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The relationship between alcoholism and depression is observed in clinical trials. The factors which could predict persistence of secondary depression after alcohol withdrawal are not enough explored on admission. The differences between depressed (DA and non-depressed (NDA alcoholics regarding the degrees of severity of withdrawal, severity of depression and the intensity of cognitive dysfunctions were explored on admission to investigate possibility of prediction of the development of secondary depression in alcoholics. Methods. A group of primary male alcoholics (n=86 was recruited during inpatient treatment. After 4 weeks alcoholics were divided in the DA group (n=43 and NDA (n=43 group according to the score on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D. Clinical assessment of withdrawal, scoring on the Alcohol Dependency Severity Scale- ASD, and scoring on the Mini Mental Scale-MMSE were performed in all the participants on admission. The differences between the groups were tested by the Student's t-test. Results. The DA group showed the significantly higher severity of depression, higher levels of alcohol withdrawal symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions than the NDA group on admission. Conclusion. The specific group of depressive alcoholics was shown to be characterized by the higher severity of alcoholism and depression on admission, which could predict prolonged, secondary depression. Early detection and concurrent therapy of secondary depression could improve the treatment, and reduce the relapse of alcoholism.

  17. Predicting the probability of outbreeding depression.

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    Frankham, Richard; Ballou, Jonathan D; Eldridge, Mark D B; Lacy, Robert C; Ralls, Katherine; Dudash, Michele R; Fenster, Charles B

    2011-06-01

    Fragmentation of animal and plant populations typically leads to genetic erosion and increased probability of extirpation. Although these effects can usually be reversed by re-establishing gene flow between population fragments, managers sometimes fail to do so due to fears of outbreeding depression (OD). Rapid development of OD is due primarily to adaptive differentiation from selection or fixation of chromosomal variants. Fixed chromosomal variants can be detected empirically. We used an extended form of the breeders' equation to predict the probability of OD due to adaptive differentiation between recently isolated population fragments as a function of intensity of selection, genetic diversity, effective population sizes, and generations of isolation. Empirical data indicated that populations in similar environments had not developed OD even after thousands of generations of isolation. To predict the probability of OD, we developed a decision tree that was based on the four variables from the breeders' equation, taxonomic status, and gene flow within the last 500 years. The predicted probability of OD in crosses between two populations is elevated when the populations have at least one of the following characteristics: are distinct species, have fixed chromosomal differences, exchanged no genes in the last 500 years, or inhabit different environments. Conversely, the predicted probability of OD in crosses between two populations of the same species is low for populations with the same karyotype, isolated for <500 years, and that occupy similar environments. In the former case, we recommend crossing be avoided or tried on a limited, experimental basis. In the latter case, crossing can be carried out with low probability of OD. We used crosses with known results to test the decision tree and found that it correctly identified cases where OD occurred. Current concerns about OD in recently fragmented populations are almost certainly excessive. ©2011 Society for

  18. Fear of childbirth predicts postpartum depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räisänen, Sari; Lehto, Soili M; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre

    2013-01-01

    To study how reproductive risks and perinatal outcomes are associated with postpartum depression treated in specialised healthcare defined according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 codes, separately among women with and without a history of depression.......To study how reproductive risks and perinatal outcomes are associated with postpartum depression treated in specialised healthcare defined according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 codes, separately among women with and without a history of depression....

  19. The Real World Significance of Performance Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardos, Zachary A.; Wang, Qing Yang; Trivedi, Shubhendu

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the educational data mining and user modeling communities have been aggressively introducing models for predicting student performance on external measures such as standardized tests as well as within-tutor performance. While these models have brought statistically reliable improvement to performance prediction, the real world…

  20. Predicting missing links via significant paths

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xuzhen; Cai, Shimin; Huang, Junming; Zhou, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Link prediction plays an important role in understanding intrinsic evolving mechanisms of networks. With the belief that the likelihood of the existence of a link between two nodes is strongly related with their similarity, many methods have been proposed to calculate node similarity based on node attributes and/or topological structures. Among a large variety of methods that take into account paths connecting the target pair of nodes, most of which neglect the heterogeneity of those paths. Our hypothesis is that a path consisting of small-degree nodes provides a strong evidence of similarity between two ends, accordingly, we propose a so-called sig- nificant path index in this Letter to leverage intermediate nodes' degrees in similarity calculation. Empirical experiments on twelve disparate real networks demonstrate that the proposed index outperforms the mainstream link prediction baselines.

  1. Instagram photos reveal predictive markers of depression

    CERN Document Server

    Reece, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Using Instagram data from 166 individuals, we applied machine learning tools to successfully identify markers of depression. Statistical features were computationally extracted from 43,950 participant Instagram photos, using color analysis, metadata components, and algorithmic face detection. Resulting models outperformed general practitioners' average diagnostic success rate for depression. These results held even when the analysis was restricted to posts made before depressed individuals were first diagnosed. Photos posted by depressed individuals were more likely to be bluer, grayer, and darker. Human ratings of photo attributes (happy, sad, etc.) were weaker predictors of depression, and were uncorrelated with computationally-generated features. These findings suggest new avenues for early screening and detection of mental illness.

  2. Childhood depressive symptoms predict psychiatric problems in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronen, E T; Soininen, M

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of childhood depressive symptoms for psychiatric symptoms, adaptive functioning, and self-performance in young adults. The study sample consisted of 111 young adults born during 1975-1976 in the Helsinki region. The young adults were assessed in childhood (10 to 11 years of age) using the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and at the age of 20 to 21 years using Achenbach's Young Adult Self Report (YASR), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Wallston Self-Performance Survey. Self-reported depressive symptoms in childhood predicted psychiatric symptoms (especially aggression), poor adaptive functioning, and low self-esteem in young adulthood. Depressive symptoms in children should be addressed to prevent later psychiatric problems. The CDI may be a measure of nonspecific psychopathology rather than of pure depression--thus, it may be a good screening tool for child populations.

  3. Factors predictive of depression in first-year college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandy, Julie M; Penckofer, Sue; Solari-Twadell, Phyllis A; Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Starting college is a challenging time for first-year students and is often accompanied by emotions such as depression, which can negatively affect academic performance and quality of life. This descriptive correlational study examined stress, coping, depressive symptomology, spirituality, and social support in a convenience sample of first-year students (N = 188) from two private colleges. Results indicated that 45% of students demonstrated greater than average levels of stress and 48% reported clinically significant depressive symptomology. Significant relationships existed between depressive symptoms and stress (p stress (p stress reduction in first-year students should be considered for decreasing depressive symptoms to enhance their college experience. \\

  4. Predicting Depression from Marital Distress and Attributional Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Susan Creekmore; Snyder, Douglas K.

    1991-01-01

    Examined the interaction between marital distress and spouses' attributions and expectancies regarding the marital relationship in predicting depressive symptoms in a mixed sample of 59 clinic and nonclinic couples. Best predictor of depression for both sexes was measure of disaffection, reflecting emotional distance and alienation in the…

  5. Psychosocial Factors Predicting Severity of Depression Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-06

    Mar 6, 2017 ... design investigated the role of stigma, anticipated discrimination, self-esteem, ... reduce the severity of depression should consider cultural specificity in its design .... sorted, coded, and entered into the Statistical Package for.

  6. Induced optimism as mental rehearsal to decrease depressive predictive certainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Regina; Weierich, Mariann; Khait, Valerie; Jurska, Justyna; Andersen, Susan M

    2017-03-01

    The present study examined whether practice in making optimistic future-event predictions would result in change in the hopelessness-related cognitions that characterize depression. Individuals (N = 170) with low, mild, and moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms were randomly assigned to a condition in which they practiced making optimistic future-event predictions or to a control condition in which they viewed the same stimuli but practiced determining whether a given phrase contained an adjective. Overall, individuals in the induced optimism condition showed increases in optimistic predictions, relative to the control condition, as a result of practice, but only individuals with moderate-to-severe symptoms of depression who practiced making optimistic future-event predictions showed decreases in depressive predictive certainty, relative to the control condition. In addition, they showed gains in efficiency in making optimistic predictions over the practice blocks, as assessed by response time. There was no difference in depressed mood by practice condition. Mental rehearsal might be one way of changing the hopelessness-related cognitions that characterize depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Perceived criticism and marital adjustment predict depressive symptoms in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson-Post, Kristina M; Rhoades, Galena K; Stanley, Scott M; Markman, Howard J

    2014-07-01

    Depressive symptoms are related to a host of negative individual and family outcomes; therefore, it is important to establish risk factors for depressive symptoms to design prevention efforts. Following studies in the marital and psychiatric literatures regarding marital factors associated with depression, we tested two potential predictors of depressive symptoms: marital adjustment and perceived spousal criticism. We assessed 249 spouses from 132 married couples from the community during their first year of marriage and at three time points over the next 10 years. Initial marital adjustment significantly predicted depressive symptoms for husbands and wives at all follow-ups. Further, perceived criticism significantly predicted depressive symptoms at the 5- and 10-year follow-ups. However, at the 1-year follow-up, this association was significant for men but not for women. Finally, a model where the contributions of marital adjustment and perceived criticism were tested together suggested that both play independent roles in predicting future depressive symptoms. These findings highlight the potential importance of increasing marital adjustment and reducing perceived criticism at the outset of marriage as a way to reduce depressive symptoms during the course of marriage.

  8. The predictive value of somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms for cytokine changes in patients with major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannehl K

    2014-06-01

    significantly predict an increase in TNF-alpha in women with major depression (P<0.05 but not in men. Exploratory ­analyses ­indicated that the stability of TNF-alpha and IL-6 (as indicated by intraclass correlation ­coefficients over 4 weeks was high for TNF-alpha but lower for IL-6.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that a history of somatoform symptoms may be important for predicting future changes in TNF-alpha in women with major depression. Keywords: interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, symptom dimension

  9. Attitude scale and general health questionnaire subscales predict depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Afshar, Hamid; Doost, Hamid Taher Neshat; Mousavi, Seyed Ghafur; Moolavi, Hoseyn

    2012-01-01

    According to Beck theory, dysfunctional attitude has a central role in emergence of depression. The aim of this study was to determine contributions of dysfunctional attitude and general health index to depression. In this case-control study, two groups of subjects participated. The first group consisted of 65 patients with major depression and dysthymic disorder, who were recruited from Noor and Navab Safavi Psychiatry Clinics in Isfahan. The control group was consisted of 65 non-patient individuals who were accompanied or relatives of the patients and was matched with them based on age, sex and education. Both groups completed 26-item Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS-26) and 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Logistic regression and correlation methods were applied for statistical analysis. Logistic regression analysis showed that by an increase of one level in categorized DAS-26 scores and one score in the physical symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and depression subscales of GHQ-28 the risk of depression increase by 6.8, 1.6, 1.9, 3.7, 4.78 times, respectively. Capability of dysfunctional attitude and general health subscales to predict depression supports the Beck's cognitive diathesis stress theory of depression that dysfunctional attitude may be a predisposing risk factor for depression.

  10. A Study of the Predictive Validity of the Children's Depression Inventory for Major Depression Disorder in Puerto Rican Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Medina, Carmen L.; Bernal, Guillermo; Rossello, Jeannette; Cumba-Aviles, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the predictive validity of the Children's Depression Inventory items for major depression disorder (MDD) in an outpatient clinic sample of Puerto Rican adolescents. The sample consisted of 130 adolescents, 13 to 18 years old. The five most frequent symptoms of the Children's Depression Inventory that best predict the…

  11. Predicting levels of Latino depression: acculturation, acculturative stress, and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lucas

    2010-04-01

    Past research has noted that aspects of living in the United States place Latinos at risk for experiencing psychological problems. However, the specific features of the adaptation process that contribute to depression remain unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of acculturation, acculturative stress, and coping to predict membership into low, medium, and high groups of depression among Latinos. Within a group of 148 Latino adults from the community, a multinomial logistic regression revealed that an Anglo orientation, English competency pressures, and active coping differentiated high from low depression and that a Latino orientation and, to some extent, the pressure to acculturate distinguished medium from low depression. These results highlight a pattern of characteristics that function as risk and protective factors in relation to level of symptom severity. The findings are discussed in terms of implications for Latino mental health, including considerations for intervention and prevention.

  12. Software Measurement and Defect Prediction with Depress Extensible Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeyski Lech

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context. Software data collection precedes analysis which, in turn, requires data science related skills. Software defect prediction is hardly used in industrial projects as a quality assurance and cost reduction mean. Objectives. There are many studies and several tools which help in various data analysis tasks but there is still neither an open source tool nor standardized approach. Results. We developed Defect Prediction for software systems (DePress, which is an extensible software measurement, and data integration framework which can be used for prediction purposes (e.g. defect prediction, effort prediction and software changes analysis (e.g. release notes, bug statistics, commits quality. DePress is based on the KNIME project and allows building workflows in a graphic, end-user friendly manner. Conclusions. We present main concepts, as well as the development state of the DePress framework. The results show that DePress can be used in Open Source, as well as in industrial project analysis.

  13. Severity of depression predicts remission rates using transcranial magnetic stimulation

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    Geoffrey eGrammer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple factors likely impact response and remission rates in the treatment of depression with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS. Notably the role of symptom severity in outcomes with rTMS is poorly understood.Objective/Hypothesis: This study investigated the predictors of achieving remission in patients suffering from depression who receive ≥3 rTMS treatments per week. Methods: Available data on 41 patients treated at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center from 2009 to 2014 were included for analysis. Patients received a range of pulse sequences from 3,000 to 5,000 with left sided or bilateral coil placement. Primary outcome measures were total score on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 or the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology—Self Rated (QIDS-SR. Remission was defined as a total score less than five, and response was defined as a 50% decrease in the total score on both outcome metrics. Outcomes in patients diagnosed as suffering from mild or moderate depression were compared to those suffering from severe depression. Results: Of the 41 patients receiving treatment, 16 reached remission by the end of treatment. Remission rate was associated with the initial severity of depression, with patients with mild or moderate depression reaching remission at a significantly higher rate than those with severe depression. Total number of rTMS sessions or length of treatment were not predictors of remission. Conclusion: Patients with a baseline level of depression characterized as mild or moderate had significantly better outcomes following rTMS compared to patients with severe depression.

  14. Theory of mind ability predicts prognosis of outpatients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuo; Inoue, Yumiko; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2015-12-15

    A theory of mind (ToM) deficit in patients with major depressive episodes is associated with difficulty in social adjustment, and thus may indicate a poorer prognosis. We investigated the association between ToM deficits and the outcome in patients who had recovered from major depressive episodes. We evaluated ToM abilities of 100 patients with major depressive disorder during a period of remission. The patients were followed up for one year and their outcomes observed. After one year, patients who had a ToM deficit according to a second-order false belief question relapsed significantly more frequently than did patients who did not have a deficit (Fisher's exact test Pmajor depressive disorder predicts a higher relapse rate and lower social function one year after recovering from a major depressive episode.

  15. The predictive power of depression screening procedures for veterans with coronary artery disease

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    Shankman SA

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Stewart A Shankman1*, Jeffrey Nadelson2*, Sarah Kate McGowan1, Ali A Sovari2, Mladen I Vidovich21Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Illinois, 2Department of Cardiology, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Depression leads to a worse outcome for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Thus, accurately identifying depression in CAD patients is imperative. In many veterans affairs (VA hospitals, patients are screened for depression once a year using the patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9. Although the PHQ-9 is generally considered a specific and sensitive measure of depression, there is reason to believe that these screening procedures may miss a large number of cases of depression within CAD patients and cardiology patients more generally. The goal of this study was to provide data as to the predictive power of this depression screening procedure by (a comparing the prevalence rate of depression identified by the PHQ-9 to known prevalence rates and (b examining whether patients identified as “depressed” also had conditions that consistently co-occur with depression (eg, post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], other medical issues. Participants were 813 consecutive patients who received an angiogram in the cardiac catheterization laboratory at a large VA Medical Center. Prevalence of depression was 6.9% in the overall sample and less than 6% when the sample was restricted to CAD patients with significant stenosis. Depression was significantly associated with PTSD, smoking, and alcohol problems. However, depression was not associated with other medical problems such as diabetes, renal failure, peripheral vascular disease, or anemia. In conclusion, the low prevalence rate of depression and lack of associations with comorbid medical problems may suggest that the VA’s depression screening procedures have low sensitivity for identifying depression in CAD

  16. Do depressive symptoms predict the incidence of myocardial infarction independent of hopelessness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pössel, Patrick; Mitchell, Amanda M; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Kaplan, George A; Kauhanen, Jussi; Valtonen, Maarit

    2015-01-01

    Depression and hopelessness predict myocardial infarction, but it is unclear whether depression and hopelessness are independent predictors of myocardial infarction incidents. Hopelessness, depression, and myocardial infarction incidence rate 18 years later were measured in 2005 men. Cox regressions were conducted with hopelessness and depression serving as individual predictors of myocardial infarction. Another Cox model examined whether the two predictors predict myocardial infarction when adjusting for each other. Depression and hopelessness predicted myocardial infarction in independent regressions, but when adjusting for each other, hopelessness, but not depression, predicted myocardial infarction incidents. Thus, these results suggest that depression and hopelessness are not independent predictors of myocardial infarction. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Altered neural reward and loss processing and prediction error signalling in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubl, Bettina; Kuehner, Christine; Kirsch, Peter; Ruttorf, Michaela; Diener, Carsten; Flor, Herta

    2015-08-01

    Dysfunctional processing of reward and punishment may play an important role in depression. However, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown heterogeneous results for reward processing in fronto-striatal regions. We examined neural responsivity associated with the processing of reward and loss during anticipation and receipt of incentives and related prediction error (PE) signalling in depressed individuals. Thirty medication-free depressed persons and 28 healthy controls performed an fMRI reward paradigm. Regions of interest analyses focused on neural responses during anticipation and receipt of gains and losses and related PE-signals. Additionally, we assessed the relationship between neural responsivity during gain/loss processing and hedonic capacity. When compared with healthy controls, depressed individuals showed reduced fronto-striatal activity during anticipation of gains and losses. The groups did not significantly differ in response to reward and loss outcomes. In depressed individuals, activity increases in the orbitofrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens during reward anticipation were associated with hedonic capacity. Depressed individuals showed an absence of reward-related PEs but encoded loss-related PEs in the ventral striatum. Depression seems to be linked to blunted responsivity in fronto-striatal regions associated with limited motivational responses for rewards and losses. Alterations in PE encoding might mirror blunted reward- and enhanced loss-related associative learning in depression. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Predicting the onset of major depression in subjects with subthreshold depression in primary care: A prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Smit, H.F.E.; Willemse, G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: That subjects with subthreshold depression have an increased probability of developing major depression has been confirmed by many studies. However, the factors which may predict the onset of major depression have yet to be fully examined. Method: We examined the control group of a random

  19. Predicting the onset of major depression in subjects with subthreshold depression in primary care: A prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Smit, H.F.E.; Willemse, G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: That subjects with subthreshold depression have an increased probability of developing major depression has been confirmed by many studies. However, the factors which may predict the onset of major depression have yet to be fully examined. Method: We examined the control group of a

  20. Generalized Pareto Distribution Model and Its Application to Hydrocarbon Resource Structure Prediction of the Huanghua Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The generalized Pareto distribution model is a kind of hydrocarbon pool size probability statistical method for resource assessment. By introducing the time variable, resource conversion rate and the geological variable, resource density, such model can describe not only different types of basins, but also any exploration samples at different phases of exploration, up to the parent population. It is a dynamic distribution model with profound geological significance and wide applicability. Its basic principle and the process of resource assessment are described in this paper. The petroleum accumulation system is an appropriate assessment unit for such method. The hydrocarbon resource structure of the Huanghua Depression in Bohai Bay Basin was predicted by using this model. The prediction results accord with the knowledge of exploration in the Huanghua Depression, and point out the remaining resources potential and structure of different petroleum accumulation systems, which are of great significance for guiding future exploration in the Huanghua Depression.

  1. Risk assessment and predicting outcomes in patients with depressive symptoms: A review of potential role of peripheral blood based biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhautesh Dinesh Jani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Depression is one of the major global health challenges and a leading contributor of health related disability and costs. Depression is a heterogeneous disorder and current methods for assessing its severity in clinical practice rely on symptom count, however this approach is unreliable and inconsistent. The clinical evaluation of depressive symptoms is particularly challenging in primary care, where the majority of patients with depression are managed, due to the presence of co-morbidities. Current methods for risk assessment of depression do not accurately predict treatment response or clinical outcomes. Several biological pathways have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression; however, accurate and predictive biomarkers remain elusive. We conducted a systematic review of the published evidence supporting the use of peripheral biomarkers to predict outcomes in depression, using Medline and Embase. Peripheral biomarkers in depression were found to be statistically significant predictors of mental health outcomes such as treatment response, poor outcome and symptom remission; and physical health outcomes such as increased incidence of cardiovascular events and deaths, and all-cause mortality. However, the available evidence has multiple methodological limitations which must be overcome to make any real clinical progress. Despite extensive research on the relationship of depression with peripheral biomarkers, its translational application in practice remains uncertain. In future, peripheral biomarkers identified with novel techniques and combining multiple biomarkers may have a potential role in depression risk assessment but further research is needed in this area.

  2. Relative Importance of Baseline Pain, Fatigue, Sleep, and Physical Activity: Predicting Change in Depression in Adults With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Karlyn A; Molton, Ivan R; Smith, Amanda E; Ehde, Dawn M; Bombardier, Charles H; Battalio, Samuel L; Jensen, Mark P

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether baseline levels of pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and physical activity measured at the initial assessment predicted the development of or improvement of depression 3.5 years later, while controlling for sex, age, and disease severity. Observational, longitudinal survey study. A community-based population sample. Adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) (N=489). Not applicable. Primary outcome was classification of depression group measured using a Patient Health Questionnaire-9 cutoff score ≥10, indicating probable major depression. Fatigue severity (odds ratio, 1.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.26; P<.0001) and sleep disturbance (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.10; P=.001) predicted probable major depression 3.5 years later among those not depressed at the initial assessment. An effect of age (odds ratio, .96; 95% confidence interval, .92-.99; P=.008) was found among those who developed depression, indicating that younger adults were more likely to develop depression. Pain, fatigue, sleep, and physical activity at baseline were not significantly associated with recovery from depression among those depressed at the initial assessment. Fatigue and sleep may contribute to the development of depression. Clinical trial research targeting these variables to determine their influence on depression is warranted. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictive Model for Anxiety and Depression in Spanish Patients with Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gutiérrez, María Victoria; Guerrero Velázquez, José; Morales García, Concepción; Casas Maldonado, Francisco; Gómez Jiménez, Francisco Javier; González Vargas, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    The association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and anxiety and depression is not yet completely characterized, and differences between countries may exist. We used a predictive model to assess this association in a Spanish population. Prospective transversal descriptive study of 204 patients with stable COPD. Concomitant anxiety or depression were diagnosed by psychiatric assessment, using the diagnostic criteria of the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). Sociodemographic, clinical and lung function parameters were analyzed. In total, 36% of stable COPD patients had psychiatric comorbidities, but 76% were unaware of their diagnosis. Nineteen percent had a pure anxiety disorder, 9.8% had isolated depression, and 7.3% had a mixed anxiety-depression disorder. Predictive variables in the multivariate analysis were younger age, higher educational level, lack of home support, higher BODE index, and greater number of exacerbations. The ROC curve of the model had an AUC of 0.765 (P<0.001). In COPD, concomitant psychiatric disorders are significantly associated with sociodemographic factors. Anxiety disorders are more common than depression. Patients with more severe COPD, according to BODE, younger patients and those with a higher educational level have a greater risk of being diagnosed with anxiety or depression in a structured psychiatric interview. In our population, most patients with psychiatric comorbidities remain unidentified. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Predictive value of Pre-treatment Amygdala volume for Electroconvulsive Therapy Response in Severely Depressed Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freek eTen Doesschate

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is an effective treatment for patients with severe depression. Knowledge on factors predicting therapeutic response may help to identify patients who will benefit most from the intervention. Based on the neuroplasticity hypothesis, volumes of the amygdala and hippocampus are possible candidates for predicting treatment outcome. Therefore, this prospective cohort study examines the predictive value of amygdala and hippocampal volumes for the effectiveness of ECT.Methods Prior to ECT, 53 severely unipolar depressed patients (mean age 57±14 years; 40% [n=21] male received structural magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla. Normalized amygdala and hippocampal volumes were calculated based on automatic segmentation by FreeSurfer. Regression analyses were used to test if the normalized volumes could predict the response to a course of ECT, based on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS scores. ResultsA larger amygdala volume independently and significantly predicted a lower post-ECT MADRS score (β = -0.347, P=0.013. The left amygdala volume had greater predictive value for treatment outcome relative to the right amygdala volume. Hippocampal volume had no independent predictive value.Conclusion A larger pretreatment amygdala volume predicted more effective ECT, independent of other known predictors. Almost all patients continued their medication during the study, which might have influenced the course of treatment in ways that were not taken into account.

  5. Contribution of Self-Esteem and Collective Self-Esteem in Predicting Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha Sharma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted with the purpose to examine the relationship among self-esteem, collective self-esteem and depression. Anotherobjective was to study the contribution of self-esteem and collective self-esteem in predicting depression. Beck Depression Inventory (1996,Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory (1985 and Collective Self-Esteem Inventory by Luhtanen and Crocker (1992 were used to measuredepression, self-esteem and collective self-esteem respectively. Study was carried out on 200 subjects in the age range of 17-23 years,selected from Agra city. The results of the research showed that there was significant positive relationship between self-esteem and collectiveself-esteem (p < .01, significant negative relationship between self-esteem and depression (p < .01. It was also found that collective self-esteemwas a significant predictor of depression. This research implies that an optimum level of self-esteem and high collective self-esteem not onlyprevents depression but also enhances the positive aspects of personality.

  6. Prevalence and Correlates of Clinically Significant Depressive Symptoms in an Urban Hospital Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, William M.; Safren, Steven A.; Losina, Elena; Arbelaez, Christian; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In hospital settings, depression is an underdetected, undertreated, but prevalent and interfering illness that is associated with significant disability, morbidity, and mortality. A general hospital emergency department (ED) setting may be well suited to identify individuals with clinically significant depressive symptoms, facilitating their referral and treatment. Method: Cross-sectional data of adult ED patients in a general hospital enrolling in a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening study between February 2007 and March 2008 were analyzed. Data included demographic factors, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), alcohol and substance use history, sexual risk taking, and brief medical history. The primary outcome was a dichotomous measure of self-reported clinically significant depressive symptoms. Patients who scored ≥ 16 on the CES-D were considered to screen positive for depressive symptoms. Results: Of the 3,262 patients enrolled in the screening trial, 2,588 (79%) completed the survey between February 2007 and March 2008. Among these, 1,945 (75%) completed the psychosocial assessment battery; 596 (31%) survey completers screened positive for clinically significant depressive symptoms. In a multivariable model, female sex (RR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.16–1.57), being unemployed (RR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.32–1.93), and lower annual income (RR from 1.73 to 2.24) were associated with increased rates of clinically significant depressive symptoms (CES-D score ≥ 16). Clinically significant depressive symptoms were more often present in patients who screened positive for alcohol dependence (RR = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.19–1.78), individuals reporting current smoking (RR = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.17–1.62), those with a prior psychiatric disorder diagnosis (RR = 2.20; 95% CI, 1.80–2.57) or history of hypertension (RR = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.18–1.79), and those who reported ever having sex with an HIV-infected partner (RR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.08

  7. Characterization of depression in prodromal Huntington disease in the neurobiological predictors of HD (PREDICT-HD) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epping, Eric A; Mills, James A; Beglinger, Leigh J; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Craufurd, David; Smith, Megan M; Groves, Mark; Bijanki, Kelly R; Downing, Nancy; Williams, Janet K; Long, Jeffrey D; Paulsen, Jane S

    2013-10-01

    Depression causes significant morbidity and mortality, and this also occurs in Huntington Disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative illness with motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. The presentation of depression in this population remains poorly understood, particularly in the prodromal period before development of significant motor symptoms. In this study, we assessed depressive symptoms in a sample of 803 individuals with the HD mutation in the prodromal stage and 223 mutation-negative participants at the time of entry in the Neurobiological Predictors of HD (PREDICT-HD) study. Clinical and biological HD variables potentially related to severity of depression were analyzed. A factor analysis was conducted to characterize the symptom domains of depression in a subset (n=168) with clinically significant depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were found to be more prevalent in HD mutation carriers but did not increase with proximity to HD diagnosis and were not associated with length of the HD mutation. Increased depressive symptoms were significantly associated with female gender, self-report of past history of depression, and a slight decrease in functioning, but not with time since genetic testing. The factor analysis identified symptom domains similar to prior studies in other populations. These results show that individuals with the HD mutation are at increased risk to develop depressive symptoms at any time during the HD prodrome. The clinical presentation appears to be similar to other populations. Severity and progression are not related to the HD mutation.

  8. Clinically significant changes in burden and depression among dementia caregivers following nursing home admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hepburn Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although extensive research exists on informal long-term care, little work has examined the clinical significance of transitions in family caregiving due to a lack of established clinical cut-points on key measures. The objectives of this study were to determine whether clinically significant changes in symptoms of burden and depression occur among caregivers within 12 months of nursing home admission (NHA of their relatives with dementia, and to identify key predictors of clinically persistent burden and depression in the first year after institutionalization. Methods Secondary longitudinal analysis of dementia caregivers were recruited from eight catchment areas in the United States with 6- and 12-month post-placement follow-up data. The sample included data on 1,610 dementia caregivers with pre- and six-month post-placement data and 1,116 with pre-placement, six-month, and 12-month post-placement data. Burden was measured with a modified version of the Zarit Burden Inventory. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Geriatric Depression Scale. Results Chi-square analyses found significant (P Conclusions In addition to suggesting that clinically significant decreases in caregiver burden and depression are likely to occur following institutionalization, the results reveal particular subsets of caregivers who are at continued risk of distress. Such findings can facilitate development of screening processes to identify families at-risk following institutionalization.

  9. Childhood trauma predicts antidepressant response in adults with major depression: data from the randomized international study to predict optimized treatment for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L M; Debattista, C; Duchemin, A-M; Schatzberg, A F; Nemeroff, C B

    2016-05-03

    Few reliable predictors indicate which depressed individuals respond to antidepressants. Several studies suggest that a history of early-life trauma predicts poorer response to antidepressant therapy but results are variable and limited in adults. The major goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of early-life trauma in predicting acute response outcomes to antidepressants in a large sample of well-characterized patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The international Study to Predict Optimized Treatment for Depression (iSPOT-D) is a randomized clinical trial with enrollment from December 2008 to January 2012 at eight academic and nine private clinical settings in five countries. Patients (n=1008) meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD and 336 matched healthy controls comprised the study sample. Six participants withdrew due to serious adverse events. Randomization was to 8 weeks of treatment with escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine with dosage adjusted by the participant's treating clinician per routine clinical practice. Exposure to 18 types of traumatic events before the age of 18 was assessed using the Early-Life Stress Questionnaire. Impact of early-life stressors-overall trauma 'load' and specific type of abuse-on treatment outcomes measures: response: (⩾50% improvement on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, HRSD17 or on the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Rated, QIDS_SR16) and remission (score ⩽7 on the HRSD17 and ⩽5 on the QIDS_SR16). Trauma prevalence in MDD was compared with controls. Depressed participants were significantly more likely to report early-life stress than controls; 62.5% of MDD participants reported more than two traumatic events compared with 28.4% of controls. The higher rate of early-life trauma was most apparent for experiences of interpersonal violation (emotional, sexual and physical abuses). Abuse and notably abuse occurring at ⩽7 years of age predicted poorer outcomes

  10. Predictive factors of depression symptoms among adolescents in the 18-month follow-up after Wenchuan earthquake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Cheryl H K; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Li, Rong-Hui; Fan, Mei; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Yuan-Hao; Ou, Guo Jing; Jiang, Zhe; Tong, Yu-Zhen; Fang, Ding-Zhi

    2017-02-01

    It is unclear about the change and risk factors of depression among adolescent survivors after earthquake. This study aimed to explore the change of depression, and identify the predictive factors of depression among adolescent survivors after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China. The depression among high school students at 6, 12 and 18 months after the Wenchuan earthquake were investigated. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used in this study to assess the severity of depression. Subjects included 548 student survivors in an affected high school. The rates of depression among the adolescent survivors at 6-, 12- and 18-month after the earthquake were 27.3%, 42.9% and 33.3%, respectively, for males, and 42.9%, 61.9% and 53.4%, respectively, for females. Depression symptoms, trauma-related self-injury, suicidal ideation and PTSD symptoms at the 6-month follow-up were significant predictive factors for depression at the 18-month time interval following the earthquake. This study highlights the need for considering disaster-related psychological sequela and risk factors of depression symptoms in the planning and implementation of mental health services. Long-term mental and psychological supports for victims of natural disasters are imperative.

  11. Self-statements, locus of control, and depression in predicting self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpot, V D; Holliman, W B; Madonna, S

    1995-06-01

    The contributions of frequency of positive and negative self-statements and their ratio, locus of control, and depression in prediction of self-esteem were examined. Volunteers were 145 college students (100 women and 45 men) who were administered the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory-Adult Form, Automatic Thought Questionnaire-Revised, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Rotter Internal-External Locus of Control Scale. Intercorrelations suggested significant relationships among variables. The magnitude of the relationship was strongest between the frequency of negative self-statements and self-esteem. These results are consistent with and lend further support to prior studies of Kendall, et al. and Schwartz and Michaelson.

  12. Predictive value of brain perfusion SPECT for rTMS response in pharmacoresistant depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richieri, Raphaelle; Lancon, Christophe [Sainte-Marguerite University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Marseille (France); La Timone University, EA 3279 - Self-perceived Health Assessment Research Unit, School of Medicine, Marseille (France); Boyer, Laurent [La Timone University, EA 3279 - Self-perceived Health Assessment Research Unit, School of Medicine, Marseille (France); La Timone University Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Marseille, Department of Public Health, Marseille (France); Farisse, Jean [Sainte-Marguerite University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Marseille (France); Colavolpe, Cecile; Mundler, Olivier [La Timone University Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Marseille, Service Central de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Centre Europeen de Recherche en Imagerie Medicale (CERIMED), Marseille (France); Guedj, Eric [La Timone University Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Marseille, Service Central de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Centre Europeen de Recherche en Imagerie Medicale (CERIMED), Marseille (France); Hopital de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, Marseille Cedex 5 (France)

    2011-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the predictive value of whole-brain voxel-based regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) response in patients with pharmacoresistant depression. Thirty-three right-handed patients who met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder (unipolar or bipolar depression) were included before rTMS. rTMS response was defined as at least 50% reduction in the baseline Beck Depression Inventory scores. The predictive value of {sup 99m}Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for rTMS response was studied before treatment by comparing rTMS responders to non-responders at voxel level using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) (p < 0.001, uncorrected). Of the patients, 18 (54.5%) were responders to rTMS and 15 were non-responders (45.5%). There were no statistically significant differences in demographic and clinical characteristics (p > 0.10). In comparison to responders, non-responders showed significant hypoperfusions (p < 0.001, uncorrected) in the left medial and bilateral superior frontal cortices (BA10), the left uncus/parahippocampal cortex (BA20/BA35) and the right thalamus. The area under the curve for the combination of SPECT clusters to predict rTMS response was 0.89 (p < 0.001). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for the combination of clusters were: 94, 73, 81 and 92%, respectively. This study shows that, in pharmacoresistant depression, pretreatment rCBF of specific brain regions is a strong predictor for response to rTMS in patients with homogeneous demographic/clinical features. (orig.)

  13. Prediction of Extreme Significant Wave Height from Daily Maxima

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘德辅; 李华军; 温书勤; 宋艳; 王树青

    2001-01-01

    For prediction of the extreme significant wave height in the ocean areas where long term wave data are not available, the empirical method of extrapolating short term data (1 ~ 3 years) is used in design practice. In this paper two methods are proposed to predict extreme significant wave height based on short-term daily maxima. According to the daa recorded by the Oceanographic Station of Liaodong Bay at the Bohai Sea, it is supposed that daily maximum wave heights are statistically independent. The data show that daily maximum wave heights obey log-normal distribution, and that the numbers of daily maxima vary from year to year, obeying binomial distribution. Based on these statistical characteristics, the binomial-log-normal compound extremum distribution is derived for prediction of extreme significant wave heights (50~ 100 years). For examination of its accuracy and validity, the prediction of extreme wave heights is based on 12 years′ data at this station, and based on each 3 years′ data respectively. The results show that with consideration of confidence intervals, the predicted wave heights based on 3 years′ data are very close to those based on 12 years′data. The observed data in some ocean areas in the Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea show it is not correct to assume that daily maximum wave heights are statistically independent; they are subject to Markov chain condition, obeying log-normal distribution. In this paper an analytical method is derived to predict extreme wave heights in these cases. A comparison of the computations shows that the difference between the extreme wave heights based on the assumption that daily maxima are statistically independent and that they are subject to Markov Chain condition is smaller than 10%.

  14. Geological significance of paleo-aulacogen and exploration potential of reef flat gas reservoirs in the Western Sichuan Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Confirming thick hydrocarbon generation center and discovering thick porous reservoirs are two key factors to start the Permian gas exploration of the Western Sichuan Depression. In this paper, the Sinian-Cambrian structures of this area were studied by adopting the layer-flattening technology and the Lower Paleozoic thickness map was prepared in order to describe the Permian hydrocarbon generation center. Then, combined with seismic facies analysis and field outcrop bioherm discovery, the distribution of Middle Permian reef flat reservoirs were predicted. Finally, the favorable conditions for reef flat reservoir dolomitization were analyzed based on fault features. The study indicates that: (1 Sinian top represents a huge depression in the profile flatted by the reflecting interface of Permian bottom, with normal faults filled by thick Lower Paleozoic sediments at both sides, revealing that a aulacogen formed during the Khanka taphrogeny exists in the Western Sichuan Depression, where very thick Cambrian strata may contain hydrocarbon generation center, making Permian strata have the material conditions for the formation of large gas pools; (2 the Middle Permian strata in the Western Sichuan Depression exhibit obvious abnormal response in reef flat facies, where three large abnormal bands are developed, which are predicted as bioherm complex combined with the Middle Permian bioherm outcrop discoveries in surface; and (3 deep and large extensional faults are developed in reef flat margin, manifesting as favorable conditions for the development of dolomite reservoirs. The results show that the Middle Permian traps in the Western Sichuan Depression contain resources up to 7400 × 108 m3, showing significant natural gas exploration prospects. By far, one risk exploration well has been deployed.

  15. When friends make you blue: the role of friendship contingent self-esteem in predicting self-esteem and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambron, M Janelle; Acitelli, Linda K; Steinberg, Lynne

    2010-03-01

    This research examines the role of friendship contingent self-esteem (FCSE), or self-esteem that is dependent on the quality of one's friendships, in predicting depressive symptoms. In Study 1, the authors developed a measure of FCSE. Both FCSE and others' approval correlated with self-esteem and depressive symptoms, but when entered simultaneously in a regression equation, only FCSE significantly predicted self-esteem and depressive symptoms. Study 2 showed that dependency and close friendship competence predicted depressive symptoms only for those high in FCSE. In Study 3, a diary study, FCSE predicted self-esteem instability. Self-esteem instability, in turn, predicted depressive symptoms. Furthermore, a three-way interaction of rumination, FCSE, and the valence of the event predicted momentary self-esteem. Findings are discussed with regard to the importance of considering FCSE when investigating interpersonal risk for depression.

  16. Socioeconomic position predicts long-term depression trajectory: a 13-year follow-up of the GAZEL cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, M; Chastang, J-F; Head, J; Goldberg, M; Zins, M; Nabi, H; Younès, N

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with low socioeconomic position have high rates of depression; however, it is not clear whether this reflects higher incidence or longer persistence of disorder. Past research focused on high-risk samples, and risk factors of long-term depression in the population are less well known. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that socioeconomic position predicts depression trajectory over 13 years of follow-up in a community sample. We studied 12 650 individuals participating in the French GAZEL study. Depression was assessed by the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale in 1996, 1999, 2002, 2005 and 2008. These five assessments served to estimate longitudinal depression trajectories (no depression, decreasing depression, intermediate/increasing depression, persistent depression). Socioeconomic position was measured by occupational grade. Covariates included year of birth, marital status, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, negative life events and preexisting psychological and non-psychological health problems. Data were analyzed using multinomial regression, separately in men and women. Overall, participants in intermediate and low occupational grades were significantly more likely than those in high grades to have an unfavorable depression trajectory and to experience persistent depression (age-adjusted ORs: respectively 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.70 and 2.65, 95% CI 2.04-3.45 in men, 2.48, 95% CI 1.36-4.54 and 4.53, 95% CI 2.38-8.63 in women). In multivariate models, the socioeconomic gradient in long-term depression decreased by 21-59% in men and women. Long-term depression trajectories appear to follow a socioeconomic gradient; therefore, efforts aiming to reduce the burden of depression should address the needs of the whole population rather than exclusively focus on high-risk groups.

  17. The Cultural and Developmental Significance of Parenting Processes in Adolescent Anxiety and Depression Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazsonyi, Alexander T.; Belliston, Lara M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the cultural and developmental significance of maternal and paternal parenting processes (closeness, support, monitoring, communication, conflict, and peer approval) for measures of anxiety and depression symptoms in adolescents from Hungary, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United States (N = 6,935). Across all cultural…

  18. Analysis of significant factors for dengue fever incidence prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriyasatien, Padet; Phumee, Atchara; Ongruk, Phatsavee; Jampachaisri, Katechan; Kesorn, Kraisak

    2016-04-16

    Many popular dengue forecasting techniques have been used by several researchers to extrapolate dengue incidence rates, including the K-H model, support vector machines (SVM), and artificial neural networks (ANN). The time series analysis methodology, particularly ARIMA and SARIMA, has been increasingly applied to the field of epidemiological research for dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and other infectious diseases. The main drawback of these methods is that they do not consider other variables that are associated with the dependent variable. Additionally, new factors correlated to the disease are needed to enhance the prediction accuracy of the model when it is applied to areas of similar climates, where weather factors such as temperature, total rainfall, and humidity are not substantially different. Such drawbacks may consequently lower the predictive power for the outbreak. The predictive power of the forecasting model-assessed by Akaike's information criterion (AIC), Bayesian information criterion (BIC), and the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE)-is improved by including the new parameters for dengue outbreak prediction. This study's selected model outperforms all three other competing models with the lowest AIC, the lowest BIC, and a small MAPE value. The exclusive use of climate factors from similar locations decreases a model's prediction power. The multivariate Poisson regression, however, effectively forecasts even when climate variables are slightly different. Female mosquitoes and seasons were strongly correlated with dengue cases. Therefore, the dengue incidence trends provided by this model will assist the optimization of dengue prevention. The present work demonstrates the important roles of female mosquito infection rates from the previous season and climate factors (represented as seasons) in dengue outbreaks. Incorporating these two factors in the model significantly improves the predictive power of dengue hemorrhagic fever forecasting

  19. Geochemical Characteristics of Oilfield Waters from the Turpan Depression,Xinjiang and Their Petroleum Geological Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 陈晓红; 等

    1996-01-01

    This paper,based on the fundamental inorganic chemical and organic geochemical characteristics of oilfield waters from the Turpan Depression,presents the contents of organic matter,the distribution of low-carbon fatty acids and the contents of aromatic hydrocarbons as well as their principal ultraviolet absorption spectral and fluorescence spectral characteristics in oilfield waters from different oil/gas-bearing areas.The oil/gas reservoirs in this depression are classified in terms of their conserving conditions.In additon,the paper also discusses the chemical characteristics of oilfield waters from different types of oil/gas reservoirs with an emphasis on the characteristics of their localization in the γNa/γCa-γN a/γCl correction diagram.On this basis it is attempted to expound the fundamental geochemical characteristics of oilfield waters from the Turpan Depression and their geological significance.

  20. Overgeneral autobiographical memory at baseline predicts depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with first-episode depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yansong; Zhang, Fuquan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Cao, Leiming; Wang, Jun; Na, Aiguo; Sun, Yujun; Zhao, Xudong

    2016-09-30

    Previous studies have shown that overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) is a characteristic of depression. However, there are no studies to explore the association between baseline OGM and depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with first-episode depression (FE). This study investigated whether baseline OGM predicts depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with FE. We recruited 125 patients with FE. The participants were divided into remitted group and non-remitted group according to the severity of their depression at 12 months follow-up. The measures consisted of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Ruminative Response Scale, and Autobiographical Memory Test. Hierarchical linear regression analyses and bootstrap mediation analyses were conducted. The results showed that non-remitted patients had more OGM at baseline. Baseline OGM predicted depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with FE. Rumination mediated the relationship between baseline OGM and depressive symptoms at follow-up. Our findings highlight OGM as a vulnerability factor involved in the maintenance of depression in patients with FE.

  1. Change in self-esteem predicts depressive symptoms at follow-up after intensive multimodal psychotherapy for major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinger, Ulrike; Ehrenthal, Johannes C; Nikendei, Christoph; Schauenburg, Henning

    2017-01-08

    Reduced self-esteem is a core symptom of depression, but few studies have investigated within-treatment change of self-esteem as a predictor of long-term outcome in depression. This study investigated change in self-esteem during 8 weeks of multimodal, psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy for 40 depressed patients and tested whether it would predict outcome 6 months after termination. Data was drawn from a randomized clinical pilot trial on day-clinic versus inpatient psychotherapy for depression. Findings supported the association between change in self-esteem and follow-up depression severity, even when controlling for within-treatment symptom change. Change in self-esteem was not related to overall symptoms and interpersonal problems at follow-up. Thus, change in self-esteem may be an important variable in preventing relapse for depression. Self-esteem is related to depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems. Improvement of self-esteem during psychotherapy correlates with improvements of symptoms and interpersonal problems. Change of self-esteem during psychotherapy predicts depressive symptoms 6 months after termination of therapy. When treating depressed patients, psychotherapists should work towards an improvement of self-esteem in order to prevent relapse. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Predictive validity of BODE index for anxious and depressive symptoms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Li; LIN Ying-xiang; YANG Ting; ZHANG Hong; JIAO Xia; ZHANG Shu; CHANG Xiao-hong; WANG Zhao-mei; WANG Chen

    2010-01-01

    Background Anxiety and depression are two of the commonest and most modifiable comorbidities of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and have an independent effect on health and prognosis. FEV1% has been shown to be a poor predictor of anxiety and depression. The body mass index, degree of airflow obstruction, dyspnea,and exercise capacity (BODE) index is a multidimensional assessment system which may predict health outcome in COPD patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictive validity of the BODE index for anxious and depressive symptoms in COPD patients.Methods This was a multicenter prospective cross-sectional study in 256 patients with stable COPD. Anxious and depressive symptoms were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The relationships between anxiety, depression and potential predictors (including the BODE index) were analyzed by a binary Logistic regression model. Results Subjects who were anxious and depressive walked a shorter six-minute walking distance (6MWD), had more dyspnea, a higher BODE index, and lower health-related quality of life (P <0.01). Anxiety and depression score was significantly correlated with BODE index, respectively (r=0.335, P <0.001; r=0.306, P <0.001). The prevalence of anxiety and depression increased with BODE stage increasing (P <0.05). On the basis of binary Logistic regression, the BODE index was a good and independent predictor of anxiety and depression because it comprised dyspnea and 6MWD, which were shown to be the main determinants.Conclusions The predictive validity of the BODE index for anxiety and depression was demonstrated. We propose that the BODE index should be included in assessment of COPD severity.

  3. Selective neurocognitive deficits and poor life functioning are associated with significant depressive symptoms in alcoholism-HIV infection comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, Stephanie A; Rosenbloom, Margaret J; Fama, Rosemary; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2012-09-30

    Alcoholism, HIV, and depressive symptoms frequently co-occur and are associated with impairment in cognition and life function. We administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), measures of life function, and neurocognitive tests to 67 alcoholics, 56 HIV+ patients, 63 HIV+ alcoholics, and 64 controls to examine whether current depressive symptom level (significant, BDI-II>14 vs. minimal, BDI-IIalcoholism-HIV comorbidity. Participants with significant depressive symptoms demonstrated slower manual motor speed and poorer visuospatial memory than those with minimal depressive symptoms. HIV patients with depressive symptoms showed impaired manual motor speed. Alcoholics with depressive symptoms showed impaired visuospatial memory. HIV+ alcoholics with depressive symptoms reported the poorest quality of life; alcoholics with depressive symptoms, irrespective of HIV status, had poorest life functioning. Thus, significant depressive symptoms were associated with poorer selective cognitive and life functioning in alcoholism and in HIV infection, even though depressive symptoms had neither synergistic nor additive effects on cognition in alcoholism-HIV comorbidity. The results suggest the relevance of assessing and treating current depressive symptoms to reduce cognitive compromise and functional disability in HIV infection, alcoholism, and their comorbidity.

  4. Prediction of depression in European general practice attendees: the PREDICT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geerlings Mirjam I

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention of depression must address multiple risk factors. Estimating overall risk across a range of putative risk factors is fundamental to prevention of depression. However, we lack reliable and valid methods of risk estimation. This protocol paper introduces PREDICT, an international research study to address this risk estimation. Methods/design This is a prospective study in which consecutive general practice attendees in six European countries are recruited and followed up after six and 12 months. Prevalence of depression is assessed at baseline and each follow-up point. Consecutive attendees between April 2003 and September 2004 who were aged 18 to 75 were asked to take part. The possibility of a depressive episode was assessed using the Depression Section of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. A selection of presumed risk factors was based on our previous work and a systematic review of the literature. It was necessary to evaluate the test-retest reliability of a number of risk factor questions that were developed specifically, or adapted, for the PREDICT study. In a separate reliability study conducted between January and November 2003, consecutive general practice attendees in the six participating European countries completed the risk factor items on two occasions, two weeks apart. The overall response rate at entry to the study was 69%. We exceeded our expected recruitment rate, achieving a total of 10,048 people in all. Reliability coefficients were generally good to excellent. Discussion Response rate to follow-up in all countries was uniformly high, which suggests that prediction will be based on almost a full cohort. The results of our reliability analysis are encouraging and suggest that data collected during the course of PREDICT will have a satisfactory level of stability. The development of a multi-factor risk score for depression will lay the foundation for future research on risk reduction

  5. The effectiveness of prefrontal theta cordance and early reduction of depressive symptoms in the prediction of antidepressant treatment outcome in patients with resistant depression: analysis of naturalistic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, Martin; Novak, Tomas; Kopecek, Miloslav; Brunovsky, Martin; Stopkova, Pavla; Höschl, Cyril

    2015-02-01

    Current studies suggest that an early improvement of depressive symptoms and the reduction of prefrontal theta cordance value predict the subsequent response to antidepressants. The aim of our study was (1) to compare the predictive abilities of early clinical improvement defined as ≥ 20 % reduction in Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score at week 1 and 2, and the decrease of prefrontal theta cordance at week 1 in resistant depressive patients and (2) to assess whether the combination of individual predictors yields more robust predictive power than either predictor alone. Eighty-seven subjects were treated (≥ 4 weeks) with various antidepressants chosen according to the judgment of attending psychiatrists. Areas under curve (AUC) were calculated to compare predictive effect of defined single predictors (≥ 20 % reduction in MADRS total score at week 1 and 2, and the decrease of cordance at week 1) and combined prediction models. AUCs of all three predictors were not statistically different (pair-wise comparison). The model combining all predictors yielded an AUC value 0.91 that was significantly higher than AUCs of each individual predictor. The results indicate that the combined predictor model may be a useful and clinically meaningful tool for the prediction of antidepressant response in patients with resistant depression.

  6. The significance of routine biochemical markers in patients with major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, You-Fan; Xiang, Yang; Wei, Ye-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study is to examine the levels of routine biochemical markers in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and combine multiple biochemical parameters to assess the discriminative power for patients with MDD. We used the Hamilton Depression (HAMD) score to evaluate the severity of depressive symptoms in 228 patients with MDD. The phase of depression severity was between moderate and severe in MDD patients. There were significant differences between MDD patients and healthy controls in alanine transaminase (ALT), urea nitrogen (UN), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), uric acid (UA), total protein (TP), total bile acid (TBA), creatinine (Cr), total bilirubin (Tbil), direct bilirubin (Dbil) and indirect bilirubin (Ibil), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), fasting blood-glucose (FBG) and fructosamine (SF). Multivariate analysis showed that UN, FBG, HDL-C, SF, TP, Cr and Tbil remained independently association with MDD. Further, a logit equation was established to identify patients with MDD. The composite markers exhibited an area under the curve of 0.810 with cut-off values of 0.410. Our results suggest the associations between UN, FBG, HDL-C, TP, Cr, Tbil, SF and MDD, use of these routine biochemical markers in combination may contribute to improve the complete management for patients with MDD. PMID:27683078

  7. Predicting depression outcome in mental health treatment: a recursive partitioning analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Margit I; Hegel, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    Recursive partitioning was applied to a longitudinal dataset of outpatient mental health clinic patients to identify empirically factors and interactions among factors that best predicted clinical improvement and deterioration in symptoms of depression across treatment. Sixty-two variables drawn from an initial patient survey and from chart review were included as covariates in the analysis, representing nearly all of the demographic, treatment, symptom, diagnostic, and social history information obtained from patients at their initial evaluations. Trees estimated the probability of participants' having depression at their last assessment, improving to a clinically significant degree during treatment, or developing a new onset of significant depressive symptoms during treatment. Initial pain, the presence of anxiety, and a history of multiple types of abuse were risk factors for poorer outcome, even among patients who did not initially have significant depressive symptoms. By examining multiple-related outcomes, we were able to create a series of overlapping models that revealed important predictors across trees. Limitations of the study included the lack of cross-validation of the trees and the exploratory nature of the analysis.

  8. Cross-trial prediction of treatment outcome in depression: a machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekroud, Adam Mourad; Zotti, Ryan Joseph; Shehzad, Zarrar; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Johnson, Marcia K; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Cannon, Tyrone D; Krystal, John Harrison; Corlett, Philip Robert

    2016-03-01

    Antidepressant treatment efficacy is low, but might be improved by matching patients to interventions. At present, clinicians have no empirically validated mechanisms to assess whether a patient with depression will respond to a specific antidepressant. We aimed to develop an algorithm to assess whether patients will achieve symptomatic remission from a 12-week course of citalopram. We used patient-reported data from patients with depression (n=4041, with 1949 completers) from level 1 of the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D; ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00021528) to identify variables that were most predictive of treatment outcome, and used these variables to train a machine-learning model to predict clinical remission. We externally validated the model in the escitalopram treatment group (n=151) of an independent clinical trial (Combining Medications to Enhance Depression Outcomes [COMED]; ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00590863). We identified 25 variables that were most predictive of treatment outcome from 164 patient-reportable variables, and used these to train the model. The model was internally cross-validated, and predicted outcomes in the STAR*D cohort with accuracy significantly above chance (64·6% [SD 3·2]; p<0·0001). The model was externally validated in the escitalopram treatment group (N=151) of COMED (accuracy 59·6%, p=0.043). The model also performed significantly above chance in a combined escitalopram-buproprion treatment group in COMED (n=134; accuracy 59·7%, p=0·023), but not in a combined venlafaxine-mirtazapine group (n=140; accuracy 51·4%, p=0·53), suggesting specificity of the model to underlying mechanisms. Building statistical models by mining existing clinical trial data can enable prospective identification of patients who are likely to respond to a specific antidepressant. Yale University. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Significance of bioindicators to predict survival in irradiated minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Maria; Port, Matthias; Koch, Amory; Gulani, Jatinder; Meineke, Viktor; Abend, Michael

    2014-06-01

    The minipig is emerging as a potential alternative non-rodent animal model. Several biological markers (e.g., blood counts, laboratory parameters, and clinical signs) have been proposed for rapid triage of radiation victims. Here, the authors focus on the significance of bio-indicators for prediction of survivors after irradiation and compare it with human data; the relationship between these biomarkers and radiation dose is not part of this study. Male Göttingen minipigs (age 4-5 mo, weight 9-10 kg) were irradiated (or sham-irradiated) bilaterally with gamma-photons (⁶⁰Co, 0.5-0.6 Gy min⁻¹) in the dose range of 1.6-12 Gy. Peripheral blood cell counts, laboratory parameters, and clinical symptoms were collected up to 10 d after irradiation and analyzed using logistic regression analysis and calculating ROC curves. In moribund pigs, parameters such as decreased lymphocyte/granulocyte counts, increased C-reactive protein, alkaline phosphatase values, as well as increased citrulline values and body temperature, significantly (p 0.8). However, most predictive within the first 3 d after exposure was a combination of decreased lymphocyte counts and increased body temperature observed as early as 3 h after radiation exposure (ROC: 0.93-0.96, p < 0.0001). Sham-irradiated animals (corresponding to "worried wells") could be easily discriminated from dying pigs, thus pointing to the diagnostic significance of this analysis. These data corroborate with earlier findings performed on human radiation victims suffering from severe hematological syndrome and provide further evidence for the suitability of the minipig model as a potential alternative non-rodent animal model.

  10. Formalized prediction of clinically significant prostate cancer: is it possible?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carvell T Nguyen; Michael W Kattan

    2012-01-01

    Greater understanding of the biology and epidemiology of prostate cancer in the last several decades have led to significant advances in its management.Prostate cancer is now detected in greater numbers at lower stages of disease and is amenable to multiple forms of efficacious treatment.However,there is a lack of conclusive data demonstrating a definitive mortality benefit from this earlier diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.It is likely due to the treatment of a large proportion of indolent cancers that would have had little adverse impact on health or lifespan if left alone.Due to this overtreatment phenomenon,active surveillance with delayed intervention is gaining traction as a viable management approach in contemporary practice.The ability to distinguish clinically insignificant cancers from those with a high risk of progression and/or lethality is critical to the appropriate selection of patients for surveillance protocols versus immediate intervention.This chapter will review the ability of various prediction models,including risk groupings and nomograms,to predict indolent disease and determine their role in the contemporary management of clinically localized prostate cancer.

  11. Role of Alexithymia, Anxiety, and Depression in Predicting Self-Efficacy in Academic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Little research is available on the predictive factors of self-efficacy in college students. The aim of the present study is to examine the role of alexithymia, anxiety, and depression in predicting self-efficacy in academic students. Design. In a cross-sectional study, a total of 133 students at Babol University of Medical Sciences (Medicine, Dentistry, and Paramedicine) participated in the study between 2014 and 2015. All participants completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), College Academic Self-Efficacy Scale (CASES), and 14 items on anxiety and depression derived from the 28 items of the General Health Questionnaire (28-GHQ). Results. Pearson correlation coefficients revealed negative significant relationships between alexithymia and the three subscales with student self-efficacy. There was no significant correlation between anxiety/depression symptoms and student self-efficacy. A backward multiple regression analysis revealed that alexithymia was a negative significant predictor of self-efficacy in academic students (B = −0.512, P self-efficacy and academic functioning, we suggest it should be routinely evaluated by mental physicians at universities.

  12. Low-grade inflammation predicts persistence of depressive symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Zalli; O. Jovanova; W.J.G. Hoogendijk (Witte); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); L.A. Carvalho (Livia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractRationale: Evidence suggests that depression is cross-sectionally and longitudinally associated with activation of inflammatory response system. A few studies, however, have investigated the longitudinal relationship between raised inflammatory biomarkers and persistence of depressive sy

  13. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Depressants KidsHealth > For Teens > Depressants A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Depressants What Are Depressants? Depressants are drugs that calm nerves and relax ...

  14. Contingent self-esteem and vulnerability to depression: Academic contingent self-esteem predicts depressive symptoms in students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eSchöne

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Low self-esteem has been established as a vulnerability factor for depression. In line with recent research, we suggest that a full understanding of the role of self-esteem in depression requires consideration of contingent self-esteem as well. For most people, competence is an important source of self-esteem. Students in particular link their self-esteem to academic competence. To test the hypothesis that academic contingent self-esteem (aCSE predicts depressive symptoms, two studies were conducted. Preceding the investigation of our hypothesis, the first purpose of Study 1 was to describe the development of aCSE, self-esteem level, and depressive symptoms in adolescence in a sample of German students aged 10–16 (N = 1888 in order to provide a foundation for further analyses. Then, to address the main question, age and gender differences in aCSE, self-esteem level, and depressive symptoms as well as their relations were investigated. The results show that (1 gender differences emerged after the age of 10/11. Girls scored higher on aCSE and depressive symptoms and lower on self-esteem level than did boys, and aCSE and depressive symptoms decreased and self-esteem level increased over time in boys, while the rather disadvantageous pattern in girls remained stable. (2 After controlling for self-esteem level and aCSE, the effects of gender and age × gender interaction on depressive symptoms disappeared, suggesting an influence of aCSE on depressive symptoms. (3 aCSE predicted depressive symptoms over and above self-esteem level.Since the results of Study 1 did not allow for causal conclusions, a longitudinal study (N = 160 was conducted to further investigate the causal role of aCSE. According to the diathesis-stress model, aCSE was expected to serve as a diathesis for developing depressive symptoms in the face of academic stress (daily hassles during an academic semester at university. The results of Study 2 revealed that aCSE interacted with

  15. Peer Victimization and Harsh Parenting Predict Cognitive Diatheses for Depression in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David A.; Sinclair-McBride, Keneisha R.; Zelkowitz, Rachel; Bilsky, Sarah A.; Roeder, Kathryn; Spinelli, Tawny

    2015-01-01

    Objective The current study examined peer victimization and harsh parenting as longitudinal predictors of broadband and narrowband cognitions associated with the etiology of depression in children and adolescents. Method The sample consisted of 214 elementary and middle school students. At the start of the study, their average age was 12.2 years (SD = 1.0). The sex ratio was 112 girls to 102 boys. The sample was ethnically diverse (58.9% Caucasian, 34.1% African American, 10.7% Hispanic, 3.3% Asian, and 5.2% other). Children and their parents completed measures of peer victimization and harsh parenting. At two waves one year apart, children also completed questionnaire measures of negative and positive broadband cognitive style (e.g., personal failure, global self-worth) and narrowband self-perceptions (e.g., perceived social threat, social acceptance). Results Every wave 2 cognitive variable was predicted by peer victimization or harsh parenting or both, even after controlling for a wave 1 measure of the same cognitive variable. Peer victimization more consistently predicted narrowband social/interpersonal cognitions, whereas harsh parenting more consistently predicted broadband positive and negative cognitions. Furthermore, controlling for positive and negative self-cognitions eliminated a statistically significant effect of harsh parenting and peer victimization on depressive symptoms. Conclusions Support emerged for the social learning of negative self-cognitions. Support also emerged for negative self-cognitions as a mediator of depressive symptoms. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:25751612

  16. Peer Victimization and Harsh Parenting Predict Cognitive Diatheses for Depression in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David A; Sinclair-McBride, Keneisha R; Zelkowitz, Rachel; Bilsk, Sarah A; Roeder, Kathryn; Spinelli, Tawny

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined peer victimization and harsh parenting as longitudinal predictors of broadband and narrowband cognitions associated with the etiology of depression in children and adolescents. The sample consisted of 214 elementary and middle school students. At the start of the study, their average age was 12.2 years (SD = 1.0). The sex ratio was 112 girls to 102 boys. The sample was ethnically diverse (58.9% Caucasian, 34.1% African American, 10.7% Hispanic, 3.3% Asian, and 5.2% other). Children and their parents completed measures of peer victimization and harsh parenting. At two waves 1 year apart, children also completed questionnaire measures of negative and positive broadband cognitive style (e.g., personal failure, global self-worth) and narrowband self-perceptions (e.g., perceived social threat, social acceptance). Every Wave 2 cognitive variable was predicted by peer victimization or harsh parenting or both, even after controlling for a Wave 1 measure of the same cognitive variable. Peer victimization more consistently predicted narrowband social/interpersonal cognitions, whereas harsh parenting more consistently predicted broadband positive and negative cognitions. Furthermore, controlling for positive and negative self-cognitions eliminated a statistically significant effect of harsh parenting and peer victimization on depressive symptoms. Support emerged for the social learning of negative self-cognitions. Support also emerged for negative self-cognitions as a mediator of depressive symptoms. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  17. Modifiable risk factors predicting major depressive disorder at four year follow-up: a decision tree approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Helen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relative to physical health conditions such as cardiovascular disease, little is known about risk factors that predict the prevalence of depression. The present study investigates the expected effects of a reduction of these risks over time, using the decision tree method favoured in assessing cardiovascular disease risk. Methods The PATH through Life cohort was used for the study, comprising 2,105 20-24 year olds, 2,323 40-44 year olds and 2,177 60-64 year olds sampled from the community in the Canberra region, Australia. A decision tree methodology was used to predict the presence of major depressive disorder after four years of follow-up. The decision tree was compared with a logistic regression analysis using ROC curves. Results The decision tree was found to distinguish and delineate a wide range of risk profiles. Previous depressive symptoms were most highly predictive of depression after four years, however, modifiable risk factors such as substance use and employment status played significant roles in assessing the risk of depression. The decision tree was found to have better sensitivity and specificity than a logistic regression using identical predictors. Conclusion The decision tree method was useful in assessing the risk of major depressive disorder over four years. Application of the model to the development of a predictive tool for tailored interventions is discussed.

  18. Significance of precordial ST-segment depression in inferior acute myocardial infarction as determined by echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard, L A; Sprynger, M; Gilis, F; Carlier, J

    1986-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, the significance of precordial ST-segment depression in inferior wall acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains unclear. No clinical studies have used 2-dimensional (2-D) echocardiography to compare AMI location in patients with or without so-called reciprocal ST changes. Therefore, the clinical, electrocardiographic, echocardiographic and angiographic features of 22 patients with their first transmural inferior AMI were prospectively examined. During the first day of AMI an echocardiographic mapping of the area of necrosis was obtained using all conventional views and a ventricular segmentation related to anatomic landmarks. Patients were categorized according to the presence (group I, n = 13) or absence (group II, n = 9) of precordial ST-segment depression, defined as more than 1 mm, measured 80 ms after the J point in at least 2 of the leads V1 to V4. Basal posterolateral akinesia was observed in 11 of the 13 patients in group I and in no patient in group II (p less than 0.001). Posterior right ventricular free wall akinesia was more frequent in group II (p less than 0.02). There was no difference in the prevalence of significant left anterior descending artery (LAD) narrowing (group I, 4 patients; group II, 3 patients). Posterolateral involvement should be strongly considered in the presence of precordial ST-segment depression in association with transmural inferior AMI.

  19. [Unipolar versus bipolar depression: clues toward predicting bipolarity disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abla, T; Ellouze, F; Amri, H; Krid, G; Zouari, A; M'Rad, M F

    2006-01-01

    Bipolar and unipolar disorders share a common depressive clinical manifestation. It is important to distinguish between these two forms of depression for several reasons. First, prescribing antidepressors in monotherapy indubitably worsens the prognosis of bipolarity disorders. Second, postponing the prescription of a mood stabilizer reduces the efficacy of the treatment and multiplies the suicidal risks by two. The object of this study is to reveal the factors that distinguish between unipolar and bipolar depression. This is a retrospective study on patients' files. It includes 186 patients divided according to DSM IV criteria into two groups: patients with bipolar disorder type I or II with a recent depressive episode (123 patients) and patients with recurrent depressive disorder (63 patients). A medical record card was filled-in for every patient. It included socio-demographic data, information about the disorder, family antecedents, CGI score (global clinical impressions), physical comorbidity, substance abuse and personality disorder. In order to sort out the categorization variables, the two groups were compared using chi2 test or Fischer's test. With regard to the quantitative variables, the two groups were compared using Krostal Wallis's test or Ancova. Our study has revealed that bipolar disorder differs significantly from unipolar disorder in the following respects: bipolar disorder is prevalent among men (sex-ratio 2) while unipolar disorder is prevailing among women (sex-ratio 0.8); patients with bipolar disorder are younger than patients with unipolar disorder (38.1 +/- 5 years vs. 49.7 +/- years); the age at the onset of bipolar disorder is earlier than that of unipolar disorder (20.8 +/- 2 years vs. 38.7 +/- 5 years); family antecedents are more important in bipolar patients than in unipolar patients (51.1% vs. 33%). More importantly, bipolar disorder differs from unipolar disorder in the following aspects: The number of suicidal attempts (25.3% vs

  20. Structural MRI-Based Predictions in Patients with Treatment-Refractory Depression (TRD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair A Johnston

    Full Text Available The application of machine learning techniques to psychiatric neuroimaging offers the possibility to identify robust, reliable and objective disease biomarkers both within and between contemporary syndromal diagnoses that could guide routine clinical practice. The use of quantitative methods to identify psychiatric biomarkers is consequently important, particularly with a view to making predictions relevant to individual patients, rather than at a group-level. Here, we describe predictions of treatment-refractory depression (TRD diagnosis using structural T1-weighted brain scans obtained from twenty adult participants with TRD and 21 never depressed controls. We report 85% accuracy of individual subject diagnostic prediction. Using an automated feature selection method, the major brain regions supporting this significant classification were in the caudate, insula, habenula and periventricular grey matter. It was not, however, possible to predict the degree of 'treatment resistance' in individual patients, at least as quantified by the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH-S clinical staging method; but the insula was again identified as a region of interest. Structural brain imaging data alone can be used to predict diagnostic status, but not MGH-S staging, with a high degree of accuracy in patients with TRD.

  1. Early adolescent depressive symptoms: prediction from clique isolation, loneliness, and perceived social acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witvliet, Miranda; Brendgen, Mara; van Lier, Pol A C; Koot, Hans M; Vitaro, Frank

    2010-11-01

    This study examined whether clique isolation predicted an increase in depressive symptoms and whether this association was mediated by loneliness and perceived social acceptance in 310 children followed from age 11-14 years. Clique isolation was identified through social network analysis, whereas depressive symptoms, loneliness, and perceived social acceptance were assessed using self ratings. While accounting for initial levels of depressive symptoms, peer rejection, and friendlessness at age 11 years, a high probability of being isolated from cliques from age 11 to 13 years predicted depressive symptoms at age 14 years. The link between clique isolation and depressive symptoms was mediated by loneliness, but not by perceived social acceptance. No sex differences were found in the associations between clique isolation and depressive symptoms. These results suggest that clique isolation is a social risk factor for the escalation of depressive symptoms in early adolescence. Implications for research and prevention are discussed.

  2. Depression vulnerability predicts cigarette smoking among college students: Gender and negative reinforcement expectancies as contributing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Holly E R; Cohen, Lee M; McChargue, Dennis E

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the association between vulnerability to depression and smoking behavior in 1214 college students (54% female), and evaluated gender and expectancies of negative affect reduction as moderators or mediators of this relationship. Depression vulnerability predicted smoking in females, but not males. The relationship between depression vulnerability and smoking status was mediated by expectancies of negative affect reduction in females only. Female college students who are vulnerable to depression may smoke because they expect smoking to relieve negative affect. Smoking interventions for college females may increase in effectiveness by targeting depression and emphasizing mood regulation.

  3. Attitude scale and general health questionnaire subscales predict depression?

    OpenAIRE

    Amrollah Ebrahimi; Hamid Afshar; Hamid Taher Neshat Doost; Seyed Ghafur Mousavi; Hoseyn Moolavi

    2012-01-01

    Background: According to Beck theory, dysfunctional attitude has a central role in emergence of depression. The aim of this study was to determine contributions of dysfunctional attitude and general health index to depression. Methods: In this case-control study, two groups of subjects participated. The first group consisted of 65 patients with major depression and dysthymic disorder, who were recruited from Noor and Navab Safavi Psychiatry Clinics in Isfa-han. The control group was consi...

  4. Insecure attachment predicts depression and death anxiety in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffold, Katharina; Philipp, Rebecca; Koranyi, Susan; Engelmann, Dorit; Schulz-Kindermann, Frank; Härter, Martin; Mehnert, Anja

    2017-05-15

    The prevalence of depression as well as adjustment and anxiety disorders is high in advanced cancer patients, and research exploring intraindividual factors leading to high psychological distress is underrepresented. Cancer patients' feelings about security and trust in their healthcare providers have a significant influence on how they deal with their disease. The perception of social support is affected by patients' attachment styles and influences their reactions to feelings of dependency and loss of control. We therefore aimed to explore attachment and its association with psychological distress in patients with advanced cancer. We obtained data from the baseline measurements of a randomized controlled trial in advanced cancer patients. Patients were sampled from the university medical centers of Hamburg and Leipzig, Germany. The main outcome measures included the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Death and Dying Distress Scale, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and the Experience in Close Relationships Scale for assessing attachment insecurity. A total of 162 patients were included. We found that 64% of patients were insecurely attached (fearful-avoidant 31%, dismissing 17%, and preoccupied 16%). A dismissing attachment style was associated with more physical symptoms but did not predict psychological distress. A fearful-avoidant attachment style significantly predicted higher death anxiety and depression, whereas preoccupied attachment predicted higher death anxiety only. Overall, insecure attachment contributed to the prediction of depression (10%) and death anxiety (14%). The concept of attachment plays a relevant role in advanced cancer patients' mental health. Healthcare providers can benefit from knowledge of advanced cancer patients' attachment styles and how they relate to specific mental distress. Developing a better understanding of patients' reactions to feelings of dependency and distressing emotions can help us to develop individually

  5. Persistent depression is a significant risk factor for the development of arteriosclerosis in middle-aged Japanese male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroki; Fujii, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Depression often coexists with hypertension and various cardiovascular diseases. However, the relationship between depression and the development of arteriosclerosis has not been fully established. We assessed depression and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in 828 middle-aged Japanese male subjects at baseline and during 3 years of follow-up. Depression was assessed using Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression questionnaires, and the study subjects were divided into the following three groups: persistent depression, transient depression and no depression. The number (%) of subjects with persistent, transient and no depression were 104 (12.6), 76 (9.2) and 648 (78.2), respectively. Blood pressure and baPWV did not differ among the three groups at baseline. The changes in the baPWV values (⊿baPWV) correlated significantly and positively with age, body mass index, baseline systolic blood pressure and persistent depression (r = 0.32, P arteriosclerosis in middle-aged Japanese male subjects.

  6. Predicting Response to Depression Treatment: The Role of Negative Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevers, Christopher G.; Wells, Tony T.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2007-01-01

    Repeated experiences with major depressive disorder (MDD) may strengthen associations between negative thinking and dysphoria, rendering negative cognition more accessible and pronounced with each episode. According to cognitive theory, greater negative cognition should lead to a more protracted episode of depression. In this study of 121 adults…

  7. Joint analysis of psychiatric disorders increases accuracy of risk prediction for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Robert; Moser, Gerhard; Chen, Guo-Bo;

    2015-01-01

    approach significantly increases the prediction accuracy for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder in the discovery as well as in independent validation datasets. By grouping SNPs based on genome annotation and fitting multiple random effects, we show that the prediction accuracy...... could be further improved. The gain in prediction accuracy of the multivariate approach is equivalent to an increase in sample size of 34% for schizophrenia, 68% for bipolar disorder, and 76% for major depressive disorders using single trait models. Because our approach can be readily applied to any......Genetic risk prediction has several potential applications in medical research and clinical practice and could be used, for example, to stratify a heterogeneous population of patients by their predicted genetic risk. However, for polygenic traits, such as psychiatric disorders, the accuracy of risk...

  8. Chronotype and Improved Sleep Efficiency Independently Predict Depressive Symptom Reduction after Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Bei; Ong, Jason C; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Manber, Rachel

    2015-09-15

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to improve both sleep and depressive symptoms, but predictors of depression outcome following CBT-I have not been well examined. This study investigated how chronotype (i.e., morningness-eveningness trait) and changes in sleep efficiency (SE) were related to changes in depressive symptoms among recipients of CBT-I. Included were 419 adult insomnia outpatients from a sleep disorders clinic (43.20% males, age mean ± standard deviation = 48.14 ± 14.02). All participants completed the Composite Scale of Morningness and attended at least 4 sessions of a 6-session group CBT-I. SE was extracted from sleep diary; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) prior to (Baseline), and at the end (End) of intervention. Multilevel structural equation modeling revealed that from Baseline to End, SE increased and BDI decreased significantly. Controlling for age, sex, BDI, and SE at Baseline, stronger evening chronotype and less improvement in SE significantly and uniquely predicted less reduction in BDI from Baseline to End. Chronotype did not predict improvement in SE. In an insomnia outpatient sample, SE and depressive symptoms improved significantly after a CBT-I group intervention. All chronotypes benefited from sleep improvement, but those with greater eveningness and/or less sleep improvement experienced less reduction in depressive symptom severity. This suggests that evening preference and insomnia symptoms may have distinct relationships with mood, raising the possibility that the effect of CBT-I on depressive symptoms could be enhanced by assessing and addressing circadian factors. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  9. A Cerebellar Framework for Predictive Coding and Homeostatic Regulation in Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2016-02-01

    Depressive disorder is associated with abnormalities in the processing of reward and punishment signals and disturbances in homeostatic regulation. These abnormalities are proposed to impair error minimization routines for reducing uncertainty. Several lines of research point towards a role of the cerebellum in reward- and punishment-related predictive coding and homeostatic regulatory function in depressive disorder. Available functional and anatomical evidence suggests that in addition to the cortico-limbic networks, the cerebellum is part of the dysfunctional brain circuit in depressive disorder as well. It is proposed that impaired cerebellar function contributes to abnormalities in predictive coding and homeostatic dysregulation in depressive disorder. Further research on the role of the cerebellum in depressive disorder may further extend our knowledge on the functional and neural mechanisms of depressive disorder and development of novel antidepressant treatments strategies targeting the cerebellum.

  10. Significance of Classification Techniques in Prediction of Learning Disabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Balakrishnan, Julie M David And Kannan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to show the importance of two classification techniques, viz. decision tree and clustering, in prediction of learning disabilities (LD) of school-age children. LDs affect about 10 percent of all children enrolled in schools. The problems of children with specific learning disabilities have been a cause of concern to parents and teachers for some time. Decision trees and clustering are powerful and popular tools used for classification and prediction in Data mining. Different rules extracted from the decision tree are used for prediction of learning disabilities. Clustering is the assignment of a set of observations into subsets, called clusters, which are useful in finding the different signs and symptoms (attributes) present in the LD affected child. In this paper, J48 algorithm is used for constructing the decision tree and K-means algorithm is used for creating the clusters. By applying these classification techniques, LD in any child can be identified.

  11. Depression Vulnerability Predicts Cigarette Smoking among College Students: Gender and Negative Reinforcement Expectancies as Contributing Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the association between vulnerability to depression and smoking behavior in college students in 1214 college students (54% female), and evaluated gender and expectancies of negative affect reduction as moderators or mediators of this relationship. Depression vulnerability predicted smoking in females, but not males. The relationship between depression vulnerability and smoking status was mediated by expectancies of negative affect reduction in females only. Female college ...

  12. Contribution of Self-Esteem and Collective Self-Esteem in Predicting Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Shraddha Sharma; Surila Agarwala

    2013-01-01

    This research was conducted with the purpose to examine the relationship among self-esteem, collective self-esteem and depression. Anotherobjective was to study the contribution of self-esteem and collective self-esteem in predicting depression. Beck Depression Inventory (1996),Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory (1985) and Collective Self-Esteem Inventory by Luhtanen and Crocker (1992) were used to measuredepression, self-esteem and collective self-esteem respectively. Study was carried out on 2...

  13. Personality Characteristics as Predictive Factors for the Occurrence of Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajraktarov, Stojan; Gudeva-Nikovska, Dance; Manuševa, Nensi; Arsova, Slavica

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The depressive disorder is one of the most frequent mental disorders, which is often associated with severe dysfunctionality. Personality traits are considered as important factors for the occurrence of depressive disorder. AIM: To determine the specificity of personality dimensions as predictive factors of depressive disorder. METHODS: This research was conducted at the University Psychiatric Clinic Skopje as a “case-control” study. TCI-R (temperament and character inventory – revised) was used as the main research instrument. RESULTS: There are specific personality traits expressed through high scores of Harm Avoidance and low scores of Self –Directedness traits as predictive factors related to an incidence of the depressive disorder. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show that certain personal traits, and more specific HA and SD, are with a specific predictability of the depressive disorder. PMID:28293316

  14. Predicting Improvement in Depression Across Therapies Using Indicators of Romantic Relationship Functioning: A Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Sarah B; Priest, Jacob B; Denton, Wayne H

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a common presenting problem, often affected by couple interactions in unique ways. However, research in the area of romantic relationship functioning and depression often replicates previous research or consists of literature reviews, limiting the clinical relevancy. The purpose of this preliminary study is to expand the research on the effects of relational processes on depression treatment outcomes. We tested whether initiator tendency, attachment anxiety, attachment avoidance, and marital satisfaction predicted improvement in depression for women with Major Depressive Disorder enrolled in a depression treatment clinical trial (n = 17). Women completed treatments of either pharmacotherapy or combined Emotionally Focused Therapy for couples and pharmacotherapy. We found that higher baseline levels of partner initiator tendency resulted in less change in depression (worse outcomes), regardless of treatment type and that higher baseline levels of attachment avoidance predicted better depression outcomes in treatment. Marital satisfaction, however, was not linked to change in depression. Initiator tendency is discussed as a critical romantic relationship factor for depression treatment outcomes.

  15. Depressed and absent from work: Predicting prolonged depressive symptomatology among employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenninkmeijer, V.; Houtman, I.; Blonk, R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization considers depression a major health problem and a leading cause of disability. Aim To identify factors which may help to reduce depressive symptoms in a sample of employees sick listed due to mental health problems. Methods: Longitudinal cohort study of empl

  16. Dose-dependent cannabis use, depressive symptoms, and FAAH genotype predict sleep quality in emerging adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maple, Kristin E; McDaniel, Kymberly A; Shollenbarger, Skyler G; Lisdahl, Krista M

    2016-07-01

    Cannabis has been shown to affect sleep in humans. Findings from animal studies indicate that higher endocannabinoid levels promote sleep, suggesting that chronic use of cannabis, which downregulates endocannabinoid activity, may disrupt sleep. This study sought to determine if past-year cannabis use and genes that regulate endocannabinoid signaling, FAAH rs324420 and CNR1 rs2180619, predicted sleep quality. As depression has been previously associated with both cannabis and sleep, the secondary aim was to determine if depressive symptoms moderated or mediated these relationships. Data were collected from 41 emerging adult (ages 18-25) cannabis users. Exclusion criteria included Axis I disorders (besides SUD) and medical and neurologic disorders. Relationships were tested using multiple regressions, controlling for demographic variables, past-year substance use, and length of cannabis abstinence. Greater past-year cannabis use and FAAH C/C genotype were associated with poorer sleep quality. CNR1 genotype did not significantly predict sleep quality. Depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between cannabis use and sleep at a nonsignificant trend level, such that participants with the higher cannabis use and depressive symptoms reported the more impaired sleep. Depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between FAAH genotype and sleep quality. This study demonstrates a dose-dependent relationship between chronic cannabis use and reported sleep quality, independent of abstinence length. Furthermore, it provides novel evidence that depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between FAAH genotype and sleep quality in humans. These findings suggest potential targets to impact sleep disruptions in cannabis users.

  17. Sleep Duration, but Not Insomnia, Predicts the 2-Year Course of Depressive and Anxiety Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mill, Josine G.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; van Someren, Eus J. W.; Hoogendijk, Witte J. G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the predictive role of insomnia and sleep duration on the 2-year course of depressive and anxiety disorders. Method: This study is a secondary data analysis based on data from the baseline (2004-2007) and 2-year assessment of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Par

  18. Peer Victimization, Depressive Symptoms, and High Salivary Cortisol Predict Poorer Memory in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillancourt, Tracy; Duku, Eric; Becker, Suzanna; Schmidt, Louis A.; Nicol, Jeffrey; Muir, Cameron; MacMillan, Harriet

    2011-01-01

    The predictive relations of peer victimization, depressive symptoms, and salivary cortisol on memory in 168 children aged 12 at Time 1 (T1) were examined using a longitudinal design in which data were collected on four occasions over a 2-year period. Results indicated that: (1) peer victimization, depressive symptoms, and evening cortisol were…

  19. Anhedonia Predicts Poorer Recovery among Youth with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment-Resistant Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMakin, Dana L.; Olino, Thomas M.; Porta, Giovanna; Dietz, Laura J.; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan R.; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Shamseddeen, Wael; Mayes, Taryn; Kennard, Betsy; Spirito, Anthony; Keller, Martin; Lynch, Frances L.; Dickerson, John F.; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify symptom dimensions of depression that predict recovery among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment-resistant adolescents undergoing second-step treatment. Method: The Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial included 334 SSRI treatment-resistant youth randomized to a medication…

  20. Sleep duration, but not insomnia, predicts the 2-year course of depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Mill; N. Vogelzangs (Nicole); E.J.W. van Someren (Eus); W.J.G. Hoogendijk (Witte); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To examine the predictive role of insomnia andsleep duration on the 2-year course of depressive andanxiety disorders. Method: This study is a secondary data analysis based ondata from the baseline (2004-2007) and 2-year assessmentof the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxi

  1. Sleep duration, but not insomnia, predicts the 2-year course of depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mill, Josine G; Vogelzangs, Nicole; van Someren, Eus J W; Hoogendijk, Witte J G; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the predictive role of insomnia and sleep duration on the 2-year course of depressive and anxiety disorders. METHOD: This study is a secondary data analysis based on data from the baseline (2004-2007) and 2-year assessment of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Par

  2. Anhedonia Predicts Poorer Recovery among Youth with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment-Resistant Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMakin, Dana L.; Olino, Thomas M.; Porta, Giovanna; Dietz, Laura J.; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan R.; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Shamseddeen, Wael; Mayes, Taryn; Kennard, Betsy; Spirito, Anthony; Keller, Martin; Lynch, Frances L.; Dickerson, John F.; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify symptom dimensions of depression that predict recovery among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment-resistant adolescents undergoing second-step treatment. Method: The Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial included 334 SSRI treatment-resistant youth randomized to a medication…

  3. The Role of Religiousness/Spirituality and Social Networks in Predicting Depressive Symptoms among Older Korean Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon-Shim; Park, So-Young; Roh, Soonhee; Koenig, Harold G; Yoo, Grace J

    2017-06-01

    This study (1) examined the effects of religiousness/spirituality and social networks as predictors of depressive symptoms in older Korean Americans and (2) compared the best predictors of depressive symptoms. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 200 older Korean Americans residing in the New York City area in 2009. Best-subsets regression analyses were used to evaluate the best predictors of depressive symptoms. Nearly 30% of older Korean participants reported mild or severe depressive symptoms. The best model fit for depressive symptoms involved four predictors: physical health status, religious/spiritual coping skills, social networks, and annual household income. Social networks and religious/spiritual coping skills contributed significantly to the variance of depressive symptoms. Adding additional variables to the model did not enhance predictive and descriptive power. Religiousness/spirituality and social networks are important for coping with life stress and may be useful in developing effective health care strategies in the management of depression among older Korean Americans. Health education and intervention could be framed in ways that strengthen such coping resources for this population. Future research is needed to best guide prevention and intervention strategies.

  4. Perceiving social pressure not to feel negative predicts depressive symptoms in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejonckheere, Egon; Bastian, Brock; Fried, Eiko I; Murphy, Sean C; Kuppens, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Western societies often overemphasize the pursuit of happiness, and regard negative feelings such as sadness or anxiety as maladaptive and unwanted. Despite this emphasis on happiness, the amount of people suffering from depressive complaints is remarkably high. To explain this apparent paradox, we examined whether experiencing social pressure not to feel sad or anxious could in fact contribute to depressive symptoms. A sample of individuals (n = 112) with elevated depression scores (Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-9] ≥ 10) took part in an online daily diary study in which they rated their depressive symptoms and perceived social pressure not to feel depressed or anxious for 30 consecutive days. Using multilevel VAR models, we investigated the temporal relation between this perceived social pressure and depressive symptoms to determine directionality. Primary analyses consistently indicated that experiencing social pressure predicts increases in both overall severity scores and most individual symptoms of depression, but not vice versa. A set of secondary analyses, in which we adopted a network perspective on depression, confirmed these findings. Using this approach, centrality analysis revealed that perceived social pressure not to feel negative plays an instigating role in depression, reflected by the high out- and low instrength centrality of this pressure in the various depression networks. Together, these findings indicate how perceived societal norms may contribute to depression, hinting at a possible malignant consequence of society's denouncement of negative emotions. Clinical implications are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Predictive Roles of Three-Dimensional Psychological Pain, Psychache, and Depression in Suicidal Ideation among Chinese College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanhuan Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available How to develop an effective screening instrument for predicting suicide risk is an important issue in suicidal research. The aim of the present research was to explore the predictive roles of three screening measures in the evaluation of preexisting suicide risk factors in a sample of undergraduate students. We assessed 1,061 students using the Beck depression and suicidal ideation scales (BDI-I (BSI, the Psychache Scale (PAS, and the three-dimensional Psychological Pain Scale (TDPPS. Simultaneous multivariate regression analysis showed that the predictive values of pain avoidance scores and BDI scores for suicidal ideation were more significant than that of the PAS scores. Subsequently, 42 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD, 39 students with subthreshold depression (SD, and 18 healthy controls were voluntarily recruited. Students with SD were divided into high suicidal ideation (HSI-SD and low suicidal ideation (LSI-SD groups. Pain avoidance scores and BDI scores differed significantly among the MDD, HSI-SD, LSI-SD, and healthy control groups. Pain avoidance and BSI scores were significantly higher in the MDD and HSI-SD groups than those in the LSI-SD and healthy control groups. However, no significant difference was observed in BDI scores between the HSI-SD and LSI-SD groups. Pain avoidance and depression, rather than psychache, may be promising predictors of suicidal ideation in a Chinese young adult population.

  6. Early reduction in prefrontal theta QEEG cordance value predicts response to venlafaxine treatment in patients with resistant depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, Martin; Brunovsky, Martin; Kopecek, Miloslav; Novak, Tomas; Stopkova, Pavla; Kozeny, Jiri; Sos, Peter; Krajca, Vladimir; Höschl, Cyril

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies of patients with unipolar depression have shown that early decrease of prefrontal EEG cordance in theta band can predict clinical response to various antidepressants. We have now examined whether decrease of prefrontal quantitative EEG (QEEG) cordance value after 1 week of venlafaxine treatment predicts clinical response to venlafaxine in resistant patients. We analyzed 25 inpatients who finished 4-week venlafaxine treatment. EEG data were monitored at baseline and after 1 week of treatment. QEEG cordance was computed at three frontal electrodes in theta frequency band. Depressive symptoms and clinical status were assessed using Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form (BDI-S) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI). Eleven of 12 responders (reduction of MADRS >or=50%) and only 5 of 13 non-responders had decreased prefrontal QEEG cordance value after the first week of treatment (p=0.01). The decrease of prefrontal cordance after week 1 in responders was significant (p=0.03) and there was no significant change in non-responders. Positive and negative predictive values of cordance reduction for response were 0.7 and 0.9, respectively. The reduction of prefrontal theta QEEG cordance value after first week of treatment might be helpful in the prediction of response to venlafaxine.

  7. Rumination as a Vulnerability Factor to Depression in Adolescents in Mainland China: Lifetime History of Clinically Significant Depressive Episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Abela, John R. Z.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Sheshko, Dana M.; Shi, Xiao Ting; Hamel, Anton Van; Starrs, Claire

    2010-01-01

    The current study tested the vulnerability and sex differences hypotheses of the response styles theory of depression (Nolen-Hoeksema, 1991). Participants included 494 tenth-grade students (M = 15.25 years, SD = 0.47) recruited from two secondary schools in Beijing, China. Participants completed self-report measures assessing rumination and…

  8. Predictive Maintenance (PdM) Centralization for Significant Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Dale

    2010-09-15

    Cost effective predictive maintenance (PdM) technologies and basic energy calculations can mine energy savings form processes or maintenance activities. Centralizing and packaging this information correctly empowers facility maintenance and reliability professionals to build financial justification and support for strategies and personnel to weather global economic downturns and competition. Attendees will learn how to: Systematically build a 'pilot project' for applying PdM and tracking systems; Break down a typical electrical bill to calculate energy savings; Use return on investment (ROI) calculations to identify the best and highest value options, strategies and tips for substantiating your energy reduction maintenance strategies.

  9. Can insomnia in pregnancy predict postpartum depression? A longitudinal, population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe K Dørheim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insomnia and depression are strongly interrelated. This study aimed to describe changes in sleep across childbirth, and to evaluate whether insomnia in pregnancy is a predictor of postpartum depression. METHODS: A longitudinal, population-based study was conducted among perinatal women giving birth at Akershus University Hospital, Norway. Women received questionnaires in weeks 17 and 32 of pregnancy and eight weeks postpartum. This paper presents data from 2,088 of 4,662 women with complete data for insomnia and depression in week 32 of pregnancy and eight weeks postpartum. Sleep times, wake-up times and average sleep durations were self-reported. The Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS was used to measure insomnia. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS was used to measure depressive symptoms. RESULTS: After delivery, sleep duration was reduced by 49 minutes (to 6.5 hours, and mean sleep efficiency was reduced from 84% to 75%. However, self-reported insomnia scores (BIS improved from 17.2 to 15.4, and the reported prevalence of insomnia decreased from 61.6% to 53.8%. High EPDS scores and anxiety in pregnancy, fear of delivery, previous depression, primiparity, and higher educational level were risk factors for both postpartum insomnia and depression. Insomnia did not predict postpartum depression in women with no prior history of depression, whereas women who recovered from depression had residual insomnia. LIMITATIONS: Depression and insomnia were not verified by clinical interviews. Women with depressive symptoms were less likely to remain in the study. CONCLUSIONS: Although women slept fewer hours at night after delivery compared to during late pregnancy, and reported more nights with nighttime awakenings, their self-reported insomnia scores improved, and the prevalence of insomnia according to the DSM-IV criteria decreased. Insomnia in pregnancy may be a marker for postpartum recurrence of depression among women with previous

  10. Cognitive impairment and depression predict mortality in medically ill older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, C L; Lichtenberg, P A; Tancer, M E

    1999-03-01

    Depression and cognitive impairment are common in medically ill older adults. Few studies, however, have investigated the roles of both in predicting mortality for medically ill older adults. We used a cohort of consecutive patients aged 60 or older admitted to a rehabilitation hospital (N = 667) of whom 455 completed a standardized protocol measuring cognition (Dementia Rating Scale), depression (Geriatric Depression Scale), and disabilities (Functional Independence Measure). Burden of medical illnesses was measured with the Charlson Index. Vital status was assessed one year later. Those subjects who did not complete the screening were more likely to die (24% vs 17%; p = .02) during the one-year follow-up. Of those who completed the screening, male sex (odds ratio [OR] = 1.84), depression (mild OR = 1.64; moderate OR = 2.49), and more severe cognitive impairment (OR = 2.13) predicted mortality independent of age, medical illnesses, or disabilities. No interaction of cognitive impairment and depression was detected. In those subjects cognitively intact, moderate depression (OR = 4.95) and male sex (OR = 3.42) were independent risk factors for dying. In those subjects without depression, male sex (OR = 2.24) and elevated Charlson Index (OR = 1.42) predicted mortality. Depression and cognitive impairment are independent predictors of one-year mortality in this subgroup of medically ill older adults.

  11. Prevalence and Clinical Correlators of Undiagnosed Significant Depressive Symptoms Among Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes In A Mediterranean Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, J; Simó, R; Sanchís, P; Ayala, L; Fortuny, R; Rivera, R; Masmiquel, L

    2016-11-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and clinical parameters, of clinically significant depressive symptoms among a type 2 diabetes (T2DM) sample from a Mediterranean area without an established diagnosis of depressive disorder (DD). Methods: 320 subjects with T2DM were recruited randomly from Primary-Care settings and the Endocrine Department from a tertiary center in Mallorca (Spain). 91 healthy individuals matched by age, gender and BMI were used as controls. All participating patients graded by the presence of DD by using the "Beck Depression Inventory" (BDI), considering pathological a cut-off score equal or greater than 16. Results: 27.2% T2DM subjects had significant symptoms of DD compared with 12.1% in the control group (pdepressive symptoms are more prevalent among Mediterranean T2DM subjects than in general population. Main clinical correlators of significant depressive symptoms are gender, marital status and BMI.

  12. Predicting depression in mothers with and without HIV: the role of social support and family dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Typhanye Penniman; Stein, Judith A; Rice, Eric; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2012-11-01

    Many women with HIV are primary caregivers for their children. Social factors, including family dynamics, play a major role in women's depression. We hypothesized an impact of HIV seropositivity on greater depression mediated through poorer family functioning and social support. Participants include 332 Mothers Living with HIV (MLH) and 200 Neighborhood Control Mothers (NCM) recruited in Los Angeles County. The NCM were matched by neighborhood. All had children ages 6 through 20. Analyses using structural equation modeling (SEM) indicated HIV seropositivity was positively correlated with depression and negatively correlated with positive social support and effective family functioning. In a predictive path model, the relationship between having HIV and depressed mood was mediated by social support and family functioning. Findings offer explanation for increased depression resulting from HIV and social and family dynamics, and suggest innovative interventions to abate psychosocial health problems and lower risk for depression among women with HIV.

  13. Mechanisms underlying REBT in mood disordered patients: predicting depression from the hybrid model of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Chris J; Izadikah, Zahra; Oei, Tian P S

    2012-06-01

    Jackson's (2005, 2008a) hybrid model of learning identifies a number of learning mechanisms that lead to the emergence and maintenance of the balance between rationality and irrationality. We test a general hypothesis that Jackson's model will predict depressive symptoms, such that poor learning is related to depression. We draw comparisons between Jackson's model and Ellis' (2004) Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy and Theory (REBT) and thereby provide a set of testable learning mechanisms potentially underlying REBT. Results from 80 patients diagnosed with depression completed the learning styles profiler (LSP; Jackson, 2005) and two measures of depression. Results provide support for the proposed model of learning and further evidence that low rationality is a key predictor of depression. We conclude that the hybrid model of learning has the potential to explain some of the learning and cognitive processes related to the development and maintenance of irrational beliefs and depression. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Prediction of specific depressive symptom clusters in youth with epilepsy: The NDDI-E-Y versus Neuro-QOL SF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Tanja S; Mueller, Martina; Carter, Emma G; Brooks, Byron; Smith, Gigi; Kopp, Olivia J; Wagner, Janelle L

    2017-08-01

    Proper assessment and early identification of depressive symptoms are essential to initiate treatment and minimize the risk for poor outcomes in youth with epilepsy (YWE). The current study examined the predictive utility of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory-Epilepsy for Youth (NDDI-E-Y) and the Neuro-QOL Depression Short Form (Neuro-QOL SF) in explaining variance in overall depressive symptoms and specific symptom clusters on the gold standard Children's Depression Inventory-2 (CDI-2). Cross-sectional study examining 99 YWE (female 68, mean age 14.7 years) during a routine epilepsy visit, who completed self-report measures of depressive symptoms, including the NDDI-E-Y, CDI-2, and the Neuro-QOL SF. Caregivers completed a measure of seizure severity. All sociodemographic and medical information was evaluated through electronic medical record review. After accounting for seizure and demographic variables, the NDDI-E-Y accounted for 45% of the variance in the CDI-2 Total score and the CDI-2 Ineffectiveness subscale. Furthermore, the NDDI-E-Y predicted CDI-2 Total scores and subscales similarly, with the exception of explaining significantly more variance in the CDI-2 Ineffectiveness subscale compared to the Negative Mood subscale. The NDDI-E-Y explained greater variance compared to Neuro-QOL SF across the Total (48% vs. 37%) and all CDI-2 subscale scores; however, the NDDI-E-Y emerged as a stronger predictor of only CDI-2 Ineffectiveness. Both the NDDI-E-Y and Neuro-QOL SF accounted for the lowest amount of variance in CDI-2 Negative Mood. Sensitivity was poor for the Neuro-QOL SF in predicting high versus low CDI-2 scores. The NDDI-E-Y has strong psychometrics and can be easily integrated into routine epilepsy care for quick, brief screening of depressive symptoms in YWE. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Neuroticism Predicts Subsequent Risk of Major Depression for Whites but Not Blacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Assari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cultural and ethnic differences in psychosocial and medical correlates of negative affect are well documented. This study aimed to compare blacks and whites for the predictive role of baseline neuroticism (N on subsequent risk of major depressive episodes (MDD 25 years later. Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL Study, 1986–2011. We used data on 1219 individuals (847 whites and 372 blacks who had data on baseline N in 1986 and future MDD in 2011. The main predictor of interest was baseline N, measured using three items in 1986. The main outcome was 12 months MDD measured using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI at 2011. Covariates included baseline demographics (age and gender, socioeconomics (education and income, depressive symptoms [Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D], stress, health behaviors (smoking and driking, and physical health [chronic medical conditions, obesity, and self-rated health (SRH] measured in 1986. Logistic regressions were used to test the predictive role of baseline N on subsequent risk of MDD 25 years later, net of covariates. The models were estimated in the pooled sample, as well as blacks and whites. In the pooled sample, baseline N predicted subsequent risk of MDD 25 years later (OR = 2.23, 95%CI = 1.14–4.34, net of covariates. We also found a marginally significant interaction between race and baseline N on subsequent risk of MDD (OR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.12–1.12, suggesting a stronger effect for whites compared to blacks. In race-specific models, among whites (OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.22–5.32 but not blacks (OR = 0.90; 95% CI = 0.24–3.39, baseline N predicted subsequent risk of MDD. Black-white differences in socioeconomics and physical health could not explain the racial differences in the link between N and MDD. Blacks and whites differ in the salience of baseline N as a psychological determinant of MDD risk over a long period of time. This finding

  16. Predicting Depression with Psychopathology and Temperament Traits: The Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouko Miettunen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the concurrent, predictive, and discriminate validity of psychopathology scales (e.g., schizotypal and depressive and temperament traits for hospitalisations due to major depression. Temperament, perceptual aberration, physical and social anhedonia, Depression Subscale of Symptom Checklist (SCL-D, Hypomanic Personality Scale, Schizoidia Scale, and Bipolar II Scale were completed as part of the 31-year follow-up survey of the prospective Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort (n=4941; 2214 males. Several of the scales were related to depression. Concurrent depression was especially related to higher perceptual aberration (effect size when compared to controls, d=1.29, subsequent depression to high scores in SCL-D (d=0.48. Physical anhedonia was lower in subjects with subsequent depression than those with other psychiatric disorders (d=−0.33, nonsignificant. Participants with concurrent (d=0.70 and subsequent (d=0.54 depression had high harm avoidance compared to controls, while differences compared to other psychiatric patients were small. Subjects with depression differed from healthy controls in most of the scales. Many of the scales were useful predictors for future hospital treatments, but were not diagnosis-specific. High harm avoidance is a potential indicator for subsequent depression.

  17. Discovery of serum biomarkers predicting development of a subsequent depressive episode in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, M G; Cooper, J D; Chan, M K; Bot, M; Penninx, B W J H; Bahn, S

    2015-08-01

    Although social anxiety disorder (SAD) is strongly associated with the subsequent development of a depressive disorder (major depressive disorder or dysthymia), no underlying biological risk factors are known. We aimed to identify biomarkers which predict depressive episodes in SAD patients over a 2-year follow-up period. One hundred sixty-five multiplexed immunoassay analytes were investigated in blood serum of 143 SAD patients without co-morbid depressive disorders, recruited within the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Predictive performance of identified biomarkers, clinical variables and self-report inventories was assessed using receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC) and represented by the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Stepwise logistic regression resulted in the selection of four serum analytes (AXL receptor tyrosine kinase, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, vitronectin, collagen IV) and four additional variables (Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, Beck Anxiety Inventory somatic subscale, depressive disorder lifetime diagnosis, BMI) as optimal set of patient parameters. When combined, an AUC of 0.86 was achieved for the identification of SAD individuals who later developed a depressive disorder. Throughout our analyses, biomarkers yielded superior discriminative performance compared to clinical variables and self-report inventories alone. We report the discovery of a serum marker panel with good predictive performance to identify SAD individuals prone to develop subsequent depressive episodes in a naturalistic cohort design. Furthermore, we emphasise the importance to combine biological markers, clinical variables and self-report inventories for disease course predictions in psychiatry. Following replication in independent cohorts, validated biomarkers could help to identify SAD patients at risk of developing a depressive disorder, thus facilitating early intervention.

  18. Relationship between obesity and the risk of clinically significant depression: Mendelian randomisation study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hung, Chi-Fa

    2014-07-01

    Obesity has been shown to be associated with depression and it has been suggested that higher body mass index (BMI) increases the risk of depression and other common mental disorders. However, the causal relationship remains unclear and Mendelian randomisation, a form of instrumental variable analysis, has recently been employed to attempt to resolve this issue.

  19. Emotional inertia prospectively predicts the onset of depressive disorder in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppens, Peter; Sheeber, Lisa B; Yap, Marie B H; Whittle, Sarah; Simmons, Julian G; Allen, Nicholas B

    2012-04-01

    Emotional inertia refers to the degree to which a person's current emotional state is predicted by their prior emotional state, reflecting how much it carries over from one moment to the next. Recently, in a cross-sectional study, we showed that high inertia is an important characteristic of the emotion dynamics observed in psychological maladjustment such as depression. In the present study, we examined whether emotional inertia prospectively predicts the onset of first-episode depression during adolescence. Emotional inertia was assessed in a sample of early adolescents (N = 165) based on second-to-second behavioral coding of videotaped naturalistic interactions with a parent. Greater inertia of both negative and positive emotional behaviors predicted the emergence of clinical depression 2.5 years later. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the etiology and early detection of depression are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Structural Characteristics of Paleozoic and Geological Significance of Oil and Gas of Dongpu Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨世刚

    2003-01-01

    The Dongpu depression has experienced a complicated evolution of structure since Mesozoic. The Paleozoic carbonate rock has been strongly reformed and the buried hills with different characteristics of structure are developed in the depression. There exist lots of groups of fault structures with strikes of NNE(or NE),NW, near NS and EW etc., of which the faults with strikes of NNE and NW play an important controlling role on present-day structural framework of the depression. The faults with near NS-striking and EW-striking deeply affect the establishment of structural framework of basement of the depression. Although most of the fractures are filled by calcite and other minerals, under the action of later structural stress, the earlier fractures could change their features into tensional ones. Therefore, much attention should be paid to the exploration and exploitation of Paleozoic oil and gas in Dongpu depression.

  1. Factors Predicting Rural Chinese Adolescents' Anxieties, Fears and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huijun; Zhang, Ying

    2008-01-01

    This study examined age, gender, birth order and self-perceived level of achievement and popularity, as predictors of anxieties, fears and depression in Chinese adolescents. A sample of 398 rural Chinese adolescents participated in this study. Gender, academic performance and popularity have been found to make the greatest contributions to the…

  2. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003213.htm Depression - overview To use the sharing features on this ... older adults Major depression Persistent depressive disorder Postpartum depression Premenstrual ... Review Date 1/4/2016 Updated by: Timothy Rogge, ...

  3. Trauma history and depression predict incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapies in a low income country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Whetten

    Full Text Available As antiretroviral therapy (ART for HIV becomes increasingly available in low and middle income countries (LMICs, understanding reasons for lack of adherence is critical to stemming the tide of infections and improving health. Understanding the effect of psychosocial experiences and mental health symptomatology on ART adherence can help maximize the benefit of expanded ART programs by indicating types of services, which could be offered in combination with HIV care.The Coping with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania (CHAT study is a longitudinal cohort study in the Kilimanjaro Region that included randomly selected HIV-infected (HIV+ participants from two local hospital-based HIV clinics and four free-standing voluntary HIV counselling and testing sites. Baseline data were collected in 2008 and 2009; this paper used data from 36 month follow-up interviews (N = 468. Regression analyses were used to predict factors associated with incomplete self-reported adherence to ART.Incomplete art adherence was significantly more likely to be reported amongst participants who experienced a greater number of childhood traumatic events: sexual abuse prior to puberty and the death in childhood of an immediate family member not from suicide or homicide were significantly more likely in the non-adherent group and other negative childhood events trended toward being more likely. Those with incomplete adherence had higher depressive symptom severity and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. In multivariable analyses, childhood trauma, depression, and financial sacrifice remained associated with incomplete adherence.This is the first study to examine the effect of childhood trauma, depression and PTSD on HIV medication adherence in a low income country facing a significant burden of HIV. Allocating spending on HIV/AIDS toward integrating mental health services with HIV care is essential to the creation of systems that enhance medication adherence and maximize the potential of

  4. [Predictive significance of tissue eosinophilia for nasal polyp recurrence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C S; Lou, H F; Meng, Y F; Piao, Y S; Zhang, L

    2016-04-07

    To evaluate the association between clinical parameters, especially tissue eosinophilia, and chronic sinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) recurrence. To identify optimal criteria of tissue eosinophilia as a predictor for recurrence. Two hundred and forty-eight CRSwNP patients were enrolled in this study. The demographic and clinical features were compared between recurrence and no recurrence groups. Mucosal specimens were assessed for the presence of tissue inflammatory cells. Factors associated with polyp recurrence were analyzed by Logistic regression analysis and optimal cutoff point of the predictor for nasal polyp recurrence was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve. SPSS 19.0 software was used to analyze the data. The recurrence rate was 55.6%(138/248 patients) in this cohort. Tissue and peripheral eosinophilia, comorbid asthma, olfactory score and Lund-Mackay score were significantly correlated with polyp recurrence(all Peosinophilia provides valuable information regarding to polyp recurrence. Tissue eosinophil proportion equal to or over 27% may be regarded as the prognostic criterion for nasal polyp recurrence.

  5. Predictive accuracy of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale assessment during pregnancy for the risk of developing postpartum depressive symptoms : a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J. L.; Beijers, C.; van Pampus, M. G.; Verbeek, T.; Stolk, R. P.; Milgrom, J.; Bockting, C. L. H.; Burger, H.

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate whether the 10-item Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) administered antenatally is accurate in predicting postpartum depressive symptoms, and whether a two-item EPDS has similar predictive accuracy. DesignProspective cohort study. SettingObstetric care in the Netherl

  6. Nursing a case of the blues: an examination of the role of depression in predicting job-related affective well-being in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissy, Laura; Boman, Peter; Mergler, Amanda

    2013-03-01

    The current study explored the effect of depression, optimism, and anxiety on job-related affective well-being in 70 graduate nurses. It was predicted that depression and anxiety would have a significant negative effect on job-related affective well-being, whereas optimism would have a significant positive effect on job-related affective well-being. Questionnaires were completed online or in hard-copy forms. Results revealed that depression, optimism, and anxiety were all significantly correlated to job-related affective well-being in the expected direction, however, depression was found to be the only variable that made a significant unique contribution to the prediction of job-related affective well-being. Possible explanations for these findings are explored.

  7. Joint Analysis of Psychiatric Disorders Increases Accuracy of Risk Prediction for Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Robert; Moser, Gerhard; Chen, Guo-Bo; Ripke, Stephan; Absher, Devin; Agartz, Ingrid; Akil, Huda; Amin, Farooq; Andreassen, Ole A.; Anjorin, Adebayo; Anney, Richard; Arking, Dan E.; Asherson, Philip; Azevedo, Maria H.; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A.; Bailey, Anthony J.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barchas, Jack D.; Barnes, Michael R.; Barrett, Thomas B.; Bass, Nicholas; Battaglia, Agatino; Bauer, Michael; Bayés, Mònica; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E.; Berrettini, Wade; Betancur, Catalina; Bettecken, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Black, Donald W.; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Breen, Gerome; Breuer, René; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bunney, William E.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Byerley, William F.; Caesar, Sian; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Casas, Miguel; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambert, Kimberly; Choudhury, Khalid; Cichon, Sven; Cloninger, C. Robert; Collier, David A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cormand, Bru; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Coryell, William H.; Craddock, Nicholas; Craig, David W.; Craig, Ian W.; Crosbie, Jennifer; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Curtis, David; Czamara, Darina; Daly, Mark J.; Datta, Susmita; Dawson, Geraldine; Day, Richard; De Geus, Eco J.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Devlin, Bernie; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary J.; Doyle, Alysa E.; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Duketis, Eftichia; Ebstein, Richard P.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Elia, Josephine; Ennis, Sean; Etain, Bruno; Fanous, Ayman; Faraone, Stephen V.; Farmer, Anne E.; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Flickinger, Matthew; Fombonne, Eric; Foroud, Tatiana; Frank, Josef; Franke, Barbara; Fraser, Christine; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Freitag, Christine M.; Friedl, Marion; Frisén, Louise; Gallagher, Louise; Gejman, Pablo V.; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Gordon, Scott D.; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Green, Elaine K.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Gross, Magdalena; Grozeva, Detelina; Guan, Weihua; Gurling, Hugh; De Haan, Lieuwe; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hallmayer, Joachim; Hamilton, Steven P.; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Thomas F.; Hartmann, Annette M.; Hautzinger, Martin; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Herms, Stefan; Hickie, Ian B.; Hipolito, Maria; Hoefels, Susanne; Holmans, Peter A.; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogendijk, Witte J.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hultman, Christina M.; Hus, Vanessa; Ingason, Andrés; Ising, Marcus; Jamain, Stéphane; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Kähler, Anna K.; Kahn, René S.; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelsoe, John R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kennedy, James L.; Kenny, Elaine; Kent, Lindsey; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Klauck, Sabine M.; Klei, Lambertus; Knowles, James A.; Kohli, Martin A.; Koller, Daniel L.; Konte, Bettina; Korszun, Ania; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Kuntsi, Jonna; Kwan, Phoenix; Landén, Mikael; Långström, Niklas; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Jacob; Lawson, William B.; Leboyer, Marion; Ledbetter, David H.; Lee, Phil H.; Lencz, Todd; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Li, Jun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Linszen, Don H.; Liu, Chunyu; Lohoff, Falk W.; Loo, Sandra K.; Lord, Catherine; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Lucae, Susanne; MacIntyre, Donald J.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Maestrini, Elena; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mahon, Pamela B.; Maier, Wolfgang; Malhotra, Anil K.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Christa L.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Matthews, Keith; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarroll, Steven A.; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGough, James J.; McGrath, Patrick J.; McGuffin, Peter; McInnis, Melvin G.; McIntosh, Andrew; McKinney, Rebecca; McLean, Alan W.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, William M.; McQuillin, Andrew; Medeiros, Helena; Medland, Sarah E.; Meier, Sandra; Melle, Ingrid; Meng, Fan; Meyer, Jobst; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Middleton, Lefkos; Milanova, Vihra; Miranda, Ana; Monaco, Anthony P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Morken, Gunnar; Morris, Derek W.; Morrow, Eric M.; Moskvina, Valentina; Mowry, Bryan J.; Muglia, Pierandrea; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murtha, Michael; Myers, Richard M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Neale, Benjamin M.; Nelson, Stan F.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Nikolov, Ivan; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Nolen, Willem A.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nurnberger, John I.; Nwulia, Evaristus A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Oades, Robert D.; Olincy, Ann; Oliveira, Guiomar; Olsen, Line; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osby, Urban; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Parr, Jeremy R.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Perlis, Roy H.; Pickard, Benjamin S.; Pimm, Jonathan; Piven, Joseph; Posthuma, Danielle; Potash, James B.; Poustka, Fritz; Propping, Peter; Purcell, Shaun M.; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby J.; Quinn, Emma M.; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rehnström, Karola; Reif, Andreas; Ribasés, Marta; Rice, John P.; Rietschel, Marcella; Ripke, Stephan; Roeder, Kathryn; Roeyers, Herbert; Rossin, Lizzy; Rothenberger, Aribert; Rouleau, Guy; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Santangelo, Susan L.; Schachar, Russell; Schalling, Martin; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Scheftner, William A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schumacher, Johannes; Schwarz, Markus; Scolnick, Edward; Scott, Laura J.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Shi, Jianxin; Shilling, Paul D.; Shyn, Stanley I.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sklar, Pamela; Slager, Susan L.; Smalley, Susan L.; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Erin N.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.S.; St Clair, David; State, Matthew; Steffens, Michael; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Strauss, John S.; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Sutcliffe, James; Szatmari, Peter; Szelinger, Szabocls; Thapar, Anita; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thompson, Robert C.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Tzeng, Jung-Ying; Uhr, Manfred; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Van Grootheest, Gerard; Van Os, Jim; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Vincent, John B.; Visscher, Peter M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Watson, Stanley J.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Werge, Thomas; Wienker, Thomas F.; Wiersma, Durk; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Williams, Nigel; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wray, Naomi R.; Xu, Wei; Young, Allan H.; Yu, Timothy W.; Zammit, Stanley; Zandi, Peter P.; Zhang, Peng; Zitman, Frans G.; Zöllner, Sebastian; Coryell, William; Potash, James B.; Scheftner, William A.; Shi, Jianxin; Weissman, Myrna M.; Hultman, Christina M.; Landén, Mikael; Levinson, Douglas F.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Wray, Naomi R.; Lee, S. Hong

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk prediction has several potential applications in medical research and clinical practice and could be used, for example, to stratify a heterogeneous population of patients by their predicted genetic risk. However, for polygenic traits, such as psychiatric disorders, the accuracy of risk prediction is low. Here we use a multivariate linear mixed model and apply multi-trait genomic best linear unbiased prediction for genetic risk prediction. This method exploits correlations between disorders and simultaneously evaluates individual risk for each disorder. We show that the multivariate approach significantly increases the prediction accuracy for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder in the discovery as well as in independent validation datasets. By grouping SNPs based on genome annotation and fitting multiple random effects, we show that the prediction accuracy could be further improved. The gain in prediction accuracy of the multivariate approach is equivalent to an increase in sample size of 34% for schizophrenia, 68% for bipolar disorder, and 76% for major depressive disorders using single trait models. Because our approach can be readily applied to any number of GWAS datasets of correlated traits, it is a flexible and powerful tool to maximize prediction accuracy. With current sample size, risk predictors are not useful in a clinical setting but already are a valuable research tool, for example in experimental designs comparing cases with high and low polygenic risk. PMID:25640677

  8. The risk of being depressed is significantly higher in cancer patients than in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, T J; Brähler, E; Faller, H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common co-morbidity of cancer that has a detrimental effect on quality of life, treatment adherence and potentially survival. We conducted an epidemiological multi-center study including a population-based random comparison sample and estimated the prevalence.......0), thyroid (M = 7.8, SD = 6.3) and brain tumours (M = 7.6, SD = 4.9) showed the highest prevalence, whereas patients with prostate cancer (M = 4.3, SD = 3.8) and malignant melanoma (M = 5.3, SD = 4.3) had the lowest levels of depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION: Our results help clinicians identify cancer...... of depressive symptoms by cancer site, thereby identifying cancer patients with the highest prevalence of depression. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included 4020 adult cancer inpatients and outpatients from five distinct regions across Germany in a proportional stratified random sample based on the nationwide cancer...

  9. Posttraumatic stress predicting depression and social support among college students: Moderating effects of race and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyraz, Güler; Horne, Sharon G; Armstrong, Aisha P; Owens, Archandria C

    2015-05-01

    More than half of the students entering college report a history of potentially traumatic events; however, little is known about the relationship of trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology to college students' mental health and access to social support or whether these relationships may show variations as a function of race and gender. The purpose of this study was to explore whether the relationships between PTSD symptoms and both depression and social support were moderated by gender and race. Data were collected from 631 African American (AA) and 299 European American (EA) freshmen students attending 2 universities in the Southeast. The majority of the students (74.3% of the AA and 68.2% of the EA sample) reported lifetime exposure to at least 1 traumatic event. PTSD symptomatology was significantly and positively associated with depression symptoms for all groups (i.e., AA and EA males and females); however, the relationship between these 2 variables was strongest for EA men. Similarly, the relationship between PTSD symptoms on the avoidance cluster and social support was stronger for EA males than other groups; avoidance symptoms did not significantly predict social support for AA men.

  10. Positive and negative family emotional climate differentially predict youth anxiety and depression via distinct affective pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebbe, Aaron M; Bell, Debora J

    2014-08-01

    A socioaffective specificity model was tested in which positive and negative affect differentially mediated relations of family emotional climate to youth internalizing symptoms. Participants were 134 7(th)-9(th) grade adolescents (65 girls; 86 % Caucasian) and mothers who completed measures of emotion-related family processes, experienced affect, anxiety, and depression. Results suggested that a family environment characterized by maternal psychological control and family negative emotion expressiveness predicted greater anxiety and depression, and was mediated by experienced negative affect. Conversely, a family emotional environment characterized by low maternal warmth and low positive emotion expressiveness predicted only depression, and was mediated through lowered experienced positive affect. This study synthesizes a theoretical model of typical family emotion socialization with an extant affect-based model of shared and unique aspects of anxiety and depression symptom expression.

  11. What predicts outcome, response, and drop-out in CBT of depressive adults? a naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Amrei; Hiller, Wolfgang; Witthöft, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The efficacy of CBT for unipolar depressive disorders is well established, yet not all patients improve or tolerate treatment. To identify factors associated with symptomatic outcome, response, and drop-out in depressive patients under naturalistic CBT. 193 patients with major depression or dysthymia were tested. Sociodemographic and clinical variables were entered as predictors in hierarchical regression analyses. A higher degree of pretreatment depression, early improvement, and completion of therapy were identified as predictors for symptomatic change and response. Drop-out was predicted by concurrent personality disorder, less positive outcome expectancies, and by failure to improve early in treatment. Our results highlight the importance of early response to predict improvement in routine CBT. Attempts to refine the quality of treatment programs should focus on avoiding premature termination (drop-out) and consider motivational factors in more depth. Routinely administered standardized assessments would enhance symptom monitoring and help to identify persons at risk of not improving under therapy.

  12. Incidence and predictive factors of depressive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease: the REAL.FR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbus, C; Gardette, V; Cantet, C E; Andrieu, S; Nourhashémi, F; Schmitt, L; Vellas, B

    2011-08-01

    Many patients develop psychiatric and behavioral disturbances in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Among these disturbances, depressive symptoms are frequent and affect nearly 40% of patients. The natural history and course of such symptoms in AD, and in particular the predictive factors, are little known. We studied the incidence and risk factors for the development of the first depressive symptoms in AD. Multicenter prospective study. Three hundred twelve AD patients from the French Network on AD (REAL.FR) without depression and without antidepressant treatment at baseline were followed up and assessed every 6 months for 4 years. During follow-up, all events occurring between two visits were carefully recorded. We used the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) for comprehensive evaluation of behavioral and psychological symptoms and depressive symptoms in particular. A multivariate analysis was performed using a backward stepwise Cox proportional hazards model. The incidence of depressive symptoms was 17.45% person/years, 95%CI (13.88-21.02). Among non-time dependent variables, duration of disease (RR=0.51; 95%CI: 0.30-0.85, p=0.0102) and the number of comorbid conditions (RR=0.45; 95%CI: 0.24-0.83, p=0.0115) were protective factors against the development of depressive symptoms. Agitation/aggression (RR=1.96; 95%CI: 1.19-3.23, p=0.0078) and sleep disturbances (RR=2.65; 95%CI: 1.40-5.00, p=0.0026) were time-dependent variables predictive of depressive symptoms. Better knowledge of predictive factors of mood disturbances in AD will enable clinicians to set up appropriate management of their patients. As published longitudinal studies are few, further works should be carried out to improve knowledge of the pattern and course of depression and depressive symptoms in AD.

  13. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  14. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    , that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression......The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued...

  15. Dissatisfaction with performance of valued activities predicts depression in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Hegel, Mark T; Hauck, Walter W; Tasman, William S

    2007-08-01

    To determine whether dissatisfaction with performance of valued activities predicts depression in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Two hundred and six patients with newly diagnosed neovascular AMD in one eye and pre-existing AMD in the fellow eye who were participating in a clinical trial of a psychosocial intervention to prevent depression. Structured clinical evaluations of vision function, depression, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and medical morbidity. Subjects were classified as dissatisfied if they indicated that they were dissatisfied with their performance of a valued activity. Subjects who were dissatisfied with performance of valued activities (n = 71) had similar demographic characteristics to satisfied subjects (n = 135) but had worse visual acuity (p < 0.054), greater medical comorbidity (p < 0.006), and lower vision function (p < 0.001). Dissatisfied subjects were almost 2.5 times more likely (OR = 2.41; [95% CI 1.02, 5.65]; p = 0.044) to become depressed within 2 months than satisfied subjects independent of baseline visual acuity, vision function, and medical comorbidity. Dissatisfaction with performance of valued activities in older persons with AMD predicts depression over a 2-month period. Assessing the ability to pursue valued activities may identify patients at risk for depression and prompt clinicians to initiate rehabilitative interventions and careful surveillance for depression.

  16. Comorbid personality disorder predicts suicide after major depression: a 10-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P E B; Wang, A G; Stage, K B

    2003-01-01

    was significantly higher than for melancholic depressed patients. Comorbid personality disorder was independently associated with an increased suicide rate [relative hazard 3.41(CI: 1.15-10.10)]. CONCLUSION: The study indicates that the non-melancholic aspect of depression, and especially comorbid personality...

  17. Dose-Dependent Cannabis Use, Depressive Symptoms, and FAAH Genotype Predict Sleep Quality in Emerging Adults: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maple, Kristin E.; McDaniel, Kymberly A.; Shollenbarger, Skyler G.; Lisdahl, Krista M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cannabis has been shown to affect sleep in humans. Findings from animal studies indicate that higher endocannabinoid levels promote sleep, suggesting that chronic use of cannabis, which downregulates endocannabinoid activity, may disrupt sleep. Objectives This study sought to determine if past year cannabis use and genes that regulate endocannabinoid signaling, FAAH rs324420 and CNR1 rs2180619, predicted sleep quality. As depression has been previously associated with both cannabis and sleep, the secondary aim was to determine if depressive symptoms moderated or mediated these relationships. Methods Data were collected from 41 emerging adult (ages 18–25) cannabis users. Exclusion criteria included Axis I disorders (besides SUD) and medical and neurologic disorders. Relationships were tested using multiple regressions, controlling for demographic variables, past year substance use, and length of cannabis abstinence. Results Greater past year cannabis use and FAAH C/C genotype were associated with poorer sleep quality. CNR1 genotype did not significantly predict sleep quality. Depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between cannabis use and sleep at a non-significant trend level, such that participants with the greatest cannabis use and most depressive symptoms reported the most impaired sleep. Depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between FAAH genotype and sleep quality. Conclusions This study demonstrates a dose-dependent relationship between chronic cannabis use and reported sleep quality, independent of abstinence length. Furthermore, it provides novel evidence that depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between FAAH genotype and sleep quality in humans. These findings suggest potential targets to impact sleep disruptions in cannabis users. PMID:27074158

  18. Early Depressed mood after stroke predicts long-term disability: the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study (NOMASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Joshua Z.; Disla, Norbelina; Moon, Yeseon Park; Paik, Myunghee C.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Wright, Clinton

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Depression is highly prevalent after stroke, and may influence recovery. We aimed to determine whether depressed mood acutely after stroke predicts subsequent disability and mortality. Methods As part of the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study, a population-based incident stroke case follow-up study performed in a multiethnic urban population, participants were asked about depressed mood within 7–10 days after stroke. Participants were followed every 6 months the first 2 years, and yearly thereafter for 5 years, for death and disability measured by the Barthel Index (BI). We fitted polytomous logistic regression models using canonical link to examine the association between depressed mood after stroke and disability, comparing moderate (BI 60–95) and severe (BI stroke was asked in 340 of 655 ischemic stroke patients enrolled, and 139 reported that they felt depressed. In multivariate analyses controlling for socio-demographic factors, stroke severity, and medical conditions, depressed mood was associated with a greater odds of severe disability compared to no disability at one (OR 2.91, 95% CI 1.07–7.91) and two years (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.29–10.71) after stroke. Depressed mood was not associated with all cause mortality or vascular death. Conclusion Depressed mood after stroke is associated with disability but not mortality after stroke. Early screening and intervention for mood disorders after stroke may improve outcomes and requires further research. PMID:20671256

  19. The dexamethasone suppression test (DST) in predicting response to desipramine and amitriptyline in depressed outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselow, E D; Goldring, N; Stanley, M; Barouche, F; Fieve, R R

    1986-01-01

    The predictive value of the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) was evaluated in two consecutive clinical trials involving 99 individuals treated with amitriptyline or desipramine. Following one week observation, and following one week on low-dose desipramine or amitriptyline (50 mg), all patients who remained depressed (Hamilton score 16 or greater) were given a full clinical trial of either desipramine or amitriptyline (150-300 mg/day) over a minimum 3-5 week period. In all, 68 patients required this trial, 31 receiving amitriptyline and 37 receiving desipramine. For these patients there was no relationship between DST suppression/non-suppression vs clinical response to either desipramine or amitriptyline. There was a non-significant trend for suppressors (negative DST) to respond either spontaneously or to low-dose desipramine or amitriptyline as opposed to non-suppressors (positive DST).

  20. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  1. Subthreshold Depression and Clinically Significant Depression in an Italian Population of 70–74-Year-Olds: Prevalence and Association with Perceptions of Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Paola; Abbondanza, Simona; Davin, Annalisa; Colombo, Mauro; Francesca Vitali, Silvia; Villani, Simona

    2017-01-01

    Estimates of depressive disorders in the elderly vary depending on how cases are defined. We estimated the prevalence of subthreshold depression (SD) and clinically significant depression (D) in a population of 70–74-year-olds. We also looked for associations with sociodemographic factors and perceptions of self. Participants underwent a multidimensional assessment (social, medical, and neuropsychological). The estimated prevalence of SD was 15.71% (95% CI: 13.70–17.72), while that of D was 5.58% (95% CI: 4.31–6.85). Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed that female gender and dissatisfaction with family relationships were related to SD and D. A self-perception of physical age as older than actual age (but not comorbidity) and greater self-perceived stress caused by negative life events both increased the probability of SD. The likelihood of D was decreased in those who perceived their own health as good, whereas a self-perception of mental age as older than actual age and dissatisfaction with relationships with friends were both significantly associated with D. Both SD and D emerged as key problems in our population. Female gender and self-perceptions of various characteristics, which can be explored through simple questions, are associated with late-life depression in elderly people independently of their actual physical condition and other characteristics.

  2. Does Caregiver Well-Being Predict Stroke Survivor Depressive Symptoms? A Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Joan S.; Clay, Olivio J.; Keltner, Norman L.; Haley, William E.; Wadley, Virginia G.; Perkins, Martinique M.; Roth, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Studies suggest that family caregiver well-being (ie,, depressive symptoms and life satisfaction) may affect stroke survivor depressive symptoms. We used mediation analysis to assess whether caregiver well-being might be a factor explaining stroke survivor depressive symptoms, after controlling for demographic factors and stroke survivor impairments and problems. Methods Caregiver/stroke participant dyads (N=146) completed measures of stroke survivor impairments and problems and depressive symptoms and caregiver depressive symptoms and life satisfaction. Mediation analysis was used to examine whether caregiver well-being mediated the relationship between stroke survivor impairments and problems and stroke survivor depressive symptoms. Results As expected, more stroke survivor problems and impairments were associated with higher levels of stroke survivor depressive symptoms (P caregiver life satisfaction (29.29%) and caregiver depressive symptoms (32.95%). Although these measures combined to account for 40.50% of the relationship between survivor problems and impairments and depressive symptoms, the direct effect remained significant. Conclusions Findings indicate that stroke survivor impairments and problems may affect family caregivers and stroke survivors and a high level of caregiver distress may result in poorer outcomes for stroke survivors. Results highlight the likely importance of intervening with both stroke survivors and family caregivers to optimize recovery after stroke. PMID:23340070

  3. Reply to 'Calculation of depth to detachment and its significance in the Kuqa Depression: A discussion'

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yixin; Tang Liangjie; He Chunbo; Chen Xuyun

    2009-01-01

    This paper mainly replies to the discussion by Li et al (2009) on the calculation of the detachment depths in the Kuqa Depression. We think that viscous material flowing into or out of the cross section can affect the validity of the calculation method, yet the number of detachment levels does not bring any drawbacks to the calculation. In the Kuqa Depression, the salt flow influenced the structural deformation to some extent, and affected slightly the accuracy of the calculated depths of the true detachment levels. However, it does not mean that the calculation method loses effectiveness in the study area. Therefore, the calculation results are still relatively believable.

  4. Calculation of Depth to Detachment and Its Significance in the Kuqa Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The depth to detachment level is a critical factor affecting the quality of structural modeling in fold and thrust belts. There are several detachment levels developed in the Kuqa depression. Based on the excess-area diagram, this paper concerns mainly the calculation of the depth to detachment in the Kuqa depression. The result demonstrates that the detachment levels are situated in different strata in varying zones, such as the Paleogene Kugeliemu Formation, the Paleozoic and the crystalline basement. The calculated depth to detachment level is very helpful for testing whether a structural interpretation is reasonable and for defining the depth of deeper detachment levels which were not discerned in seismic profiles.

  5. Lateralization for speech predicts therapeutic response to cognitive behavioral therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishon, Ronit; Abraham, Karen; Alschuler, Daniel M; Keilp, John G; Stewart, Jonathan W; McGrath, Patrick J; Bruder, Gerard E

    2015-08-30

    A prior study (Bruder, G.E., Stewart, J.W., Mercier, M.A., Agosti, V., Leite, P., Donovan, S., Quitkin, F.M., 1997. Outcome of cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression: relation of hemispheric dominance for verbal processing. Journal of Abnormal Psychology 106, 138-144.) found left hemisphere advantage for verbal dichotic listening was predictive of clinical response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression. This study aimed to confirm this finding and to examine the value of neuropsychological tests, which have shown promise for predicting antidepressant response. Twenty depressed patients who subsequently completed 14 weeks of CBT and 74 healthy adults were tested on a Dichotic Fused Words Test (DFWT). Patients were also tested on the National Adult Reading Test to estimate IQ, and word fluency, choice RT, and Stroop neuropsychological tests. Left hemisphere advantage on the DFWT was more than twice as large in CBT responders as in non-responders, and was associated with improvement in depression following treatment. There was no difference between responders and non-responders on neuropsychological tests. The results support the hypothesis that the ability of individuals with strong left hemisphere dominance to recruit frontal and temporal cortical regions involved in verbal dichotic listening predicts CBT response. The large effect size, sensitivity and specificity of DFWT predictions suggest the potential value of this brief and inexpensive test as an indicator of whether a patient will benefit from CBT for depression.

  6. Significant treatment effect of add-on ketamine anesthesia in electroconvulsive therapy in depressive patients: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dian-Jeng; Wang, Fu-Chiang; Chu, Che-Sheng; Chen, Tien-Yu; Tang, Chia-Hung; Yang, Wei-Cheng; Chow, Philip Chik-Keung; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Tseng, Ping-Tao; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Add-on ketamine anesthesia in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been studied in depressive patients in several clinical trials with inconclusive findings. Two most recent meta-analyses reported insignificant findings with regards to the treatment effect of add-on ketamine anesthesia in ECT in depressive patients. The aim of this study is to update the current evidence and investigate the role of add-on ketamine anesthesia in ECT in depressive patients via a systematic review and meta-analysis. We performed a thorough literature search of the PubMed and ScienceDirect databases, and extracted all relevant clinical variables to compare the antidepressive outcomes between add-on ketamine anesthesia and other anesthetics in ECT. Total 16 articles with 346 patients receiving add-on ketamine anesthesia in ECT and 329 controls were recruited. We found that the antidepressive treatment effect of add-on ketamine anesthesia in ECT in depressive patients was significantly higher than that of other anesthetics (p<0.001). This significance persisted in both short-term (1-2 weeks) and moderate-term (3-4 weeks) treatment courses (all p<0.05). However, the side effect profiles and recovery time profiles were significantly worse in add-on ketamine anesthesia group than in control group. Our meta-analysis highlights the significantly higher antidepressive treatment effect of add-on ketamine in depressive patients receiving ECT compared to other anesthetics. However, clinicians need to take undesirable side effects into consideration when using add-on ketamine anesthesia in ECT in depressive patients.

  7. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  8. Mindfulness significantly reduces self-reported levels of anxiety and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, Hanne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Elsass, Peter

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: As the incidence of and survival from breast cancer continue to raise, interventions to reduce anxiety and depression before, during and after treatment are needed. Previous studies have reported positive effects of a structured 8-week group mindfulness-based stress reduction program...

  9. A LONGITUDINAL-STUDY OF DIURNAL MOOD VARIATION IN DEPRESSION - CHARACTERISTICS AND SIGNIFICANCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GORDIJN, MCM; BEERSMA, DGM; BOUHUYS, AL; REININK, E; VANDENHOOFDAKKER, RH

    1994-01-01

    The course of 39 depressed in-patients' daily mood was recorded by means of frequent self-ratings during their entire stay (in total 3718 days). The frequency of diurnal variations largely varies between subjects without clear dichotomy in 'diurnal' and 'non-diurnal' subjects and the occurrence of d

  10. Model predictions of features in microsaccade-related neural responses in a feedforward network with short-term synaptic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Fang; Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Zhao; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-02-08

    Recently, the significant microsaccade-induced neural responses have been extensively observed in experiments. To explore the underlying mechanisms of the observed neural responses, a feedforward network model with short-term synaptic depression has been proposed [Yuan, W.-J., Dimigen, O., Sommer, W. and Zhou, C. Front. Comput. Neurosci. 7, 47 (2013)]. The depression model not only gave an explanation for microsaccades in counteracting visual fading, but also successfully reproduced several microsaccade-related features in experimental findings. These results strongly suggest that, the depression model is very useful to investigate microsaccade-related neural responses. In this paper, by using the model, we extensively study and predict the dependance of microsaccade-related neural responses on several key parameters, which could be tuned in experiments. Particularly, we provide a significant prediction that microsaccade-related neural response also complies with the property "sharper is better" observed in many contexts in neuroscience. Importantly, the property exhibits a power-law relationship between the width of input signal and the responsive effectiveness, which is robust against many parameters in the model. By using mean field theory, we analytically investigate the robust power-law property. Our predictions would give theoretical guidance for further experimental investigations of the functional role of microsaccades in visual information processing.

  11. A retrospective study of predictive factors for effective aripiprazole augmentation of antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugawara H

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hiroko Sugawara,1,2 Kaoru Sakamoto,1 Tsuyoto Harada,3 Satoru Shimizu,4 Jun Ishigooka1 1Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, 2Support Center for Women Health Care Professionals and Researchers, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, 3Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Women’s Medical University Medical Center East, Arakawa-ku, 4Department of Research, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan Background: Several studies have evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of aripiprazole for augmentation of antidepressant therapy for treatment-resistant depression (TRD. Here, we investigated the efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation for TRD including both major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder and the clinical predictors of treatment efficacy in a Japanese population.  Methods: Eighty-five depressed Japanese patients who underwent aripiprazole augmentation therapy after failing to respond satisfactorily to antidepressant monotherapy were included in the study. Treatment responses were evaluated based on Clinical Global Impression Improvement scores assessed 8 weeks after initiation of aripiprazole administration. We compared demographic and diagnostic variables, psychiatric medication variables, and clinical variables between remission and nonremission groups.  Results: The aripiprazole augmentation remission rate was 36.5%. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that aripiprazole augmentation was significantly more effective for bipolar depression than for major depressive disorder, and both absence of comorbid anxiety disorders and current episode duration >3 months were significantly associated with the efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation.  Conclusion: Polarity of depression, comorbidity of anxiety disorders, and current episode duration may predict the efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation for TRD including both major depressive disorder and

  12. Overgeneral autobiographical memory predicts higher prospective levels of depressive symptoms and intrusions in borderline patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Kris; Pieters, Guido; Claes, Laurence; Berens, Ann; Raes, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Overgeneral memory (OGM), the tendency to retrieve categories of events from autobiographical memory instead of single events, is found to be a reliable predictor for future mood disturbances and post-traumatic symptom severity. Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) often report co-morbid episodes of major depressive disorder (MDD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, we investigated whether OGM would predict depression severity and (post-traumatic) stress symptoms in BPD patients. At admission (N = 54) and at six-month follow-up (N ≥ 31), BPD patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders, the Assessment of DSM-IV Personality Disorders, the Autobiographical Memory Test, the Beck Depression Inventory-2nd edition (BDI-II), and the Impact of Event Scale. OGM at baseline predicted (a) higher levels of depressive symptoms at follow-up and (b) more intrusions related to a stressful event over and above baseline levels of borderline symptoms, depressive symptoms, and intrusions, respectively. No association was found between memory specificity and event-related avoidance at follow-up. Despite previous findings suggesting that OGM in BPD is less robust than in MDD and PTSD, our results suggest that memory specificity in BPD patients may have some relevance for the course of depressive and stress symptomatology in BPD.

  13. Information processing biases concurrently and prospectively predict depressive symptoms in adolescents: Evidence from a self-referent encoding task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Samantha L; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2016-01-01

    Negative information processing biases have been hypothesised to serve as precursors for the development of depression. The current study examined negative self-referent information processing and depressive symptoms in a community sample of adolescents (N = 291, Mage at baseline = 12.34 ± 0.61, 53% female, 47.4% African-American, 49.5% Caucasian and 3.1% Biracial). Participants completed a computerised self-referent encoding task (SRET) and a measure of depressive symptoms at baseline and completed an additional measure of depressive symptoms nine months later. Several negative information processing biases on the SRET were associated with concurrent depressive symptoms and predicted increases in depressive symptoms at follow-up. Findings partially support the hypothesis that negative information processing biases are associated with depressive symptoms in a nonclinical sample of adolescents, and provide preliminary evidence that these biases prospectively predict increases in depressive symptoms.

  14. Overgeneral autobiographical memory predicts changes in depression in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Daele, Tom; Griffith, James W; Van den Bergh, Omer; Hermans, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) predicts the course of symptoms of depression and anxiety in a community sample, after 5, 6, 12 and 18 months. Participants (N=156) completed the Autobiographical Memory Test and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21) at baseline and were subsequently reassessed using the DASS-21 at four time points over a period of 18 months. Using latent growth curve modelling, we found that OGM was associated with a linear increase in depression. We were unable to detect changes over time in anxiety. OGM may be an important marker to identify people at risk for depression in the future, but more research is needed with anxiety.

  15. Significance of depression in obstructive sleep apnea patients and the relationship between the comorbidity and continuous positive airway pressure treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Jing; CHEN Bao-yuan; Ambrose An-Po Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is the most common sleep-related breathing disorder and characterized by recurrent collapse of the upper airway,causes repeated arousals from sleep, decreased oxygen saturation of the blood, and excessive daytime sleepiness.Patients with OSA are at increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cognitive impairment, and depression.1,2 Currently, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) had been identified as the standard treatment for patients with OSA. CPAP shows significant improvements in objective and subjective sleepiness and several quality3 of life assessments, cognitive function and depression.3 However,reports of non-adherence to CPAP therapy range from 29% to 83%, and one of the reasons of non-adherence is the comorbidity of depression.4

  16. The Role of Health Locus of Control in Predicting Depression ‎Symptoms in a Sample of ‎Iranian Older Adults with Chronic ‎Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Aziz Aflakseir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the prediction of depression on a group of ‎Iranian older adults based on components of health locus of control.‎Method: Sixty-six men and 42 women over the age of 55 were recruited from the retirement ‎clubs in Shiraz, using convenience sampling. The participants completed the research ‎questionnaires including the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS and the ‎Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC.‎Results: The findings on health locus of control revealed that the highest score was on internal ‎locus of control followed by God, powerful others and chance. The mean score on ‎depression was on a normal range. Multiple regression analysis showed that two ‎independent variables including internal control (ß = -.32, p < 0.01 and God control ‎‎(ß = -.20, = p < 0.03 significantly predicted depression. The other components of ‎health locus of control such as chance and powerful others as well as age did not ‎predict depression. Findings also revealed that the independents variables explained ‎‎26% of the total variance of depression (R2 = .26, p <0.001.‎Conclusion: This study provides more support for the application of theory of health locus of ‎control on depression.‎‎

  17. Repetitive negative thinking predicts depression and anxiety symptom improvement during brief cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz, Sarah J; Koran, Jennifer; Stevens, Kimberly T; Björgvinsson, Thröstur

    2015-05-01

    Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is a common symptom across depression and anxiety disorders and preliminary evidence suggests that decreases in rumination and worry are related to improvement in depression and anxiety symptoms. However, despite its prevalence, relatively little is known about transdiagnostic RNT and its temporal associations with symptom improvement during treatment. The current study was designed to examine the influence of RNT on subsequent depression and anxiety symptoms during treatment. Participants (n = 131; 52% female; 93% White; M = 34.76 years) were patients presenting for treatment in a brief, cognitive behavior therapy based, partial hospitalization program. Participants completed multiple assessments of depression (Center for the Epidemiological Studies of Depression-10 scale), anxiety (the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale), and repetitive negative thinking (Perseverative Thinking Questionnaire) over the course of treatment. Results indicated statistically significant between and within person effects of RNT on depression and anxiety, even after controlling for the effect of time, previous symptom levels, referral source, and treatment length. RNT explained 22% of the unexplained variability in depression scores and 15% of the unexplained variability in anxiety scores beyond that explained by the control variables. RNT may be an important transdiagnostic treatment target for anxiety and depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that depression is000  a common comorbid health issue in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Reviews have also concluded that depression in diabetes is associated with higher HbA1c levels, less optimal self-care behaviours, lower quality of life, incident vascular...... complications and higher mortality rates. However, longitudinal studies into the course of depression in people with type 1 diabetes remain scarce. In this issue of Diabetologia, Kampling and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4123-0 ) report the 5 year trajectories of depression in adults with newly diagnosed...... type 1 diabetes (mean age, 28 years). Their baseline results showed that shortly after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes a major depressive episode was diagnosed in approximately 6% of participants, while 8% suffered from an anxiety disorder. The longitudinal depression data showed that, in a 5 year...

  19. Predicting sulfotyrosine sites using the random forest algorithm with significantly improved prediction accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zheng

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tyrosine sulfation is one of the most important posttranslational modifications. Due to its relevance to various disease developments, tyrosine sulfation has become the target for drug design. In order to facilitate efficient drug design, accurate prediction of sulfotyrosine sites is desirable. A predictor published seven years ago has been very successful with claimed prediction accuracy of 98%. However, it has a particularly low sensitivity when predicting sulfotyrosine sites in some newly sequenced proteins. Results A new approach has been developed for predicting sulfotyrosine sites using the random forest algorithm after a careful evaluation of seven machine learning algorithms. Peptides are formed by consecutive residues symmetrically flanking tyrosine sites. They are then encoded using an amino acid hydrophobicity scale. This new approach has increased the sensitivity by 22%, the specificity by 3%, and the total prediction accuracy by 10% compared with the previous predictor using the same blind data. Meanwhile, both negative and positive predictive powers have been increased by 9%. In addition, the random forest model has an excellent feature for ranking the residues flanking tyrosine sites, hence providing more information for further investigating the tyrosine sulfation mechanism. A web tool has been implemented at http://ecsb.ex.ac.uk/sulfotyrosine for public use. Conclusion The random forest algorithm is able to deliver a better model compared with the Hidden Markov Model, the support vector machine, artificial neural networks, and others for predicting sulfotyrosine sites. The success shows that the random forest algorithm together with an amino acid hydrophobicity scale encoding can be a good candidate for peptide classification.

  20. Predicting relatedness and self-definition depressive experiences in aging women based on personality traits: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques-Calado, Joana; Duarte-Silva, Maria Eugénia; Campos, Rui C; Sacoto, Carlota; Keong, Ana Marta; Junqueira, Diana

    2013-01-01

    As part of the research relating personality and depression, this study seeks to predict depressive experiences in aging women according to Sidney Blatt's perspective based on the Five-Factor Model of Personality. The NEO-Five Factor Inventory and the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire were administered. The domains Neuroticism, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness predicted self-criticism, explaining 68% of the variance; the domains Neuroticism and Extraversion predicted dependency, explaining 62% of the variance. The subfactors Neediness and Connectedness were differently related to personality traits. These findings are relevant to the research relating personality and anaclitic / introjective depressive experiences in late adulthood.

  1. Infants' Temperament and Mothers', and Fathers' Depression Predict Infants' Attention to Objects Paired with Emotional Faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktar, Evin; Mandell, Dorothy J; de Vente, Wieke; Majdandžić, Mirjana; Raijmakers, Maartje E J; Bögels, Susan M

    2016-07-01

    Between 10 and 14 months, infants gain the ability to learn about unfamiliar stimuli by observing others' emotional reactions to those stimuli, so called social referencing (SR). Joint processing of emotion and head/gaze direction is essential for SR. This study tested emotion and head/gaze direction effects on infants' attention via pupillometry in the period following the emergence of SR. Pupil responses of 14-to-17-month-old infants (N = 57) were measured during computerized presentations of unfamiliar objects alone, before-and-after being paired with emotional (happy, sad, fearful vs. neutral) faces gazing towards (vs. away) from objects. Additionally, the associations of infants' temperament, and parents' negative affect/depression/anxiety with infants' pupil responses were explored. Both mothers and fathers of participating infants completed questionnaires about their negative affect, depression and anxiety symptoms and their infants' negative temperament. Infants allocated more attention (larger pupils) to negative vs. neutral faces when the faces were presented alone, while they allocated less attention to objects paired with emotional vs. neutral faces independent of head/gaze direction. Sad (but not fearful) temperament predicted more attention to emotional faces. Infants' sad temperament moderated the associations of mothers' depression (but not anxiety) with infants' attention to objects. Maternal depression predicted more attention to objects paired with emotional expressions in infants low in sad temperament, while it predicted less attention in infants high in sad temperament. Fathers' depression (but not anxiety) predicted more attention to objects paired with emotional expressions independent of infants' temperament. We conclude that infants' own temperamental dispositions for sadness, and their exposure to mothers' and fathers' depressed moods may influence infants' attention to emotion-object associations in social learning contexts.

  2. HPA axis in major depression: cortisol, clinical symptomatology and genetic variation predict cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J; Gomez, R; Williams, G; Lembke, A; Lazzeroni, L; Murphy, G M; Schatzberg, A F

    2016-08-16

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been implicated in the pathophysiology of a variety of mood and cognitive disorders. Neuroendocrine studies have demonstrated HPA axis overactivity in major depression, a relationship of HPA axis activity to cognitive performance and a potential role of HPA axis genetic variation in cognition. The present study investigated the simultaneous roles HPA axis activity, clinical symptomatology and HPA genetic variation play in cognitive performance. Patients with major depression with psychotic major depression (PMD) and with nonpsychotic major depression (NPMD) and healthy controls (HC) were studied. All participants underwent a diagnostic interview and psychiatric ratings, a comprehensive neuropsychological battery, overnight hourly blood sampling for cortisol and genetic assessment. Cognitive performance differed as a function of depression subtype. Across all subjects, cognitive performance was negatively correlated with higher cortisol, and PMD patients had higher cortisol than did NPMDs and HCs. Cortisol, clinical symptoms and variation in genes, NR3C1 (glucocorticoid receptor; GR) and NR3C2 (mineralocorticoid receptor; MR) that encode for GRs and MRs, predicted cognitive performance. Beyond the effects of cortisol, demographics and clinical symptoms, NR3C1 variation predicted attention and working memory, whereas NR3C2 polymorphisms predicted memory performance. These findings parallel the distribution of GR and MR in primate brain and their putative roles in specific cognitive tasks. HPA axis genetic variation and activity were important predictors of cognition across the entire sample of depressed subjects and HR. GR and MR genetic variation predicted unique cognitive functions, beyond the influence of cortisol and clinical symptoms. GR genetic variation was implicated in attention and working memory, whereas MR was implicated in verbal memory.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 16 August 2016; doi

  3. Contingent self-esteem and vulnerability to depression: academic contingent self-esteem predicts depressive symptoms in students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, Claudia; Tandler, Sarah S; Stiensmeier-Pelster, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Low self-esteem has been established as a vulnerability factor for depression. In line with recent research, we suggest that a full understanding of the role of self-esteem in depression requires consideration of contingent self-esteem as well. For most people, competence is an important source of self-esteem. Students in particular link their self-esteem to academic competence. To test the hypothesis that academic contingent self-esteem (aCSE) predicts depressive symptoms (DS), two studies were conducted. Preceding the investigation of our hypothesis, the first purpose of Study 1 was to describe the development of aCSE, self-esteem (SE) level, and DS in adolescence in a sample of German students aged 10-16 (N = 1888) in order to provide a foundation for further analyses. Then, to address the main question, age and gender differences in aCSE, SE level, and DS as well as their relations were investigated. The results show that (1) gender differences emerged after the age of 10/11. Girls scored higher on aCSE and DS and lower on SE level than did boys, and aCSE and DS decreased and SE level increased over time in boys, while the rather disadvantageous pattern in girls remained stable. (2) After controlling for SE level and aCSE, the effects of gender and age × gender interaction on DS disappeared, suggesting an influence of aCSE on DS. (3) aCSE predicted DS over and above SE level. Since the results of Study 1 did not allow for causal conclusions, a longitudinal study (N = 160) was conducted to further investigate the causal role of aCSE. According to the diathesis-stress model, aCSE was expected to serve as a diathesis for developing DS in the face of academic stress (daily hassles) during an academic semester at university. The results of Study 2 revealed that aCSE interacted with corresponding hassles to predict increases in DS. High levels of academic stress led to increases in DS only among students who strongly based their SE on academic competence

  4. Contingent self-esteem and vulnerability to depression: academic contingent self-esteem predicts depressive symptoms in students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, Claudia; Tandler, Sarah S.; Stiensmeier-Pelster, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Low self-esteem has been established as a vulnerability factor for depression. In line with recent research, we suggest that a full understanding of the role of self-esteem in depression requires consideration of contingent self-esteem as well. For most people, competence is an important source of self-esteem. Students in particular link their self-esteem to academic competence. To test the hypothesis that academic contingent self-esteem (aCSE) predicts depressive symptoms (DS), two studies were conducted. Preceding the investigation of our hypothesis, the first purpose of Study 1 was to describe the development of aCSE, self-esteem (SE) level, and DS in adolescence in a sample of German students aged 10–16 (N = 1888) in order to provide a foundation for further analyses. Then, to address the main question, age and gender differences in aCSE, SE level, and DS as well as their relations were investigated. The results show that (1) gender differences emerged after the age of 10/11. Girls scored higher on aCSE and DS and lower on SE level than did boys, and aCSE and DS decreased and SE level increased over time in boys, while the rather disadvantageous pattern in girls remained stable. (2) After controlling for SE level and aCSE, the effects of gender and age × gender interaction on DS disappeared, suggesting an influence of aCSE on DS. (3) aCSE predicted DS over and above SE level. Since the results of Study 1 did not allow for causal conclusions, a longitudinal study (N = 160) was conducted to further investigate the causal role of aCSE. According to the diathesis-stress model, aCSE was expected to serve as a diathesis for developing DS in the face of academic stress (daily hassles) during an academic semester at university. The results of Study 2 revealed that aCSE interacted with corresponding hassles to predict increases in DS. High levels of academic stress led to increases in DS only among students who strongly based their SE on academic competence

  5. Predictive value of self-reported and observer-rated defense style in depression treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van, H.L.; Dekker, J.J.M.; Peen, J.; Abraham, R.E.; Schoevers, R.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the predictive value of observer-rated and self-reported defensive functioning on the outcome of psychotherapy for the treatment of depression. Defense styles were measured according to the Developmental Profile (DP) and the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ) in 81 moderately seve

  6. Negative Affective Spillover from Daily Events Predicts Early Response to Cognitive Therapy for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lawrence H.; Gunthert, Kathleen C.; Butler, Andrew C.; Parrish, Brendt P.; Wenze, Susan J.; Beck, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the predictive role of depressed outpatients' (N = 62) affective reactivity to daily stressors in their rates of improvement in cognitive therapy (CT). For 1 week before treatment, patients completed nightly electronic diaries that assessed daily stressors and negative affect (NA). The authors used multilevel modeling to…

  7. Screening and Predicting Posttraumatic Stress and Depression in Children Following Single-Incident Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Reginald D. V.; Ellis, Alicia A.; Nehmy, Thomas J.; Ball, Shelley-Anne

    2010-01-01

    Three screening methods to predict posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms in children following single-incident trauma were tested. Children and adolescents (N = 90; aged 7-17 years) were assessed within 4 weeks of an injury that led to hospital treatment and followed up 3 and 6 months later. Screening methods were adapted…

  8. The Factors Predicting Stress, Anxiety and Depression in the Parents of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Nicholas Henry; Norris, Kimberley; Quinn, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    The factors predicting stress, anxiety and depression in the parents of children with autism remain poorly understood. In this study, a cohort of 250 mothers and 229 fathers of one or more children with autism completed a questionnaire assessing reported parental mental health problems, locus of control, social support, perceived parent-child…

  9. The Factors Predicting Stress, Anxiety and Depression in the Parents of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Nicholas Henry; Norris, Kimberley; Quinn, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    The factors predicting stress, anxiety and depression in the parents of children with autism remain poorly understood. In this study, a cohort of 250 mothers and 229 fathers of one or more children with autism completed a questionnaire assessing reported parental mental health problems, locus of control, social support, perceived parent-child…

  10. Comorbid personality disorder predicts suicide after major depression: a 10-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P E B; Wang, A G; Stage, K B;

    2003-01-01

    followed prospectively through a maximum of 10 years. Patients with a drug or alcohol abuse were excluded. The association between suicide and the pretreatment psychopathological profile was analysed using survival statistics. RESULTS: The suicide rate for non-melancholic depressed patients...... was significantly higher than for melancholic depressed patients. Comorbid personality disorder was independently associated with an increased suicide rate [relative hazard 3.41(CI: 1.15-10.10)]. CONCLUSION: The study indicates that the non-melancholic aspect of depression, and especially comorbid personality...... disorder, is associated with an increased suicidal vulnerability....

  11. Prognostic significance of functional somatic symptoms in adolescence: a 15-year community-based follow-up study of adolescents with depression compared with healthy peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a lack of population-based long-term longitudinal research on mental health status and functional physical/somatic symptoms. Little is known about the long-term mental health outcomes associated with somatic symptoms or the temporal relationship between depression and such symptoms. This 15-year study followed up adolescents with depression and matched controls, screened from a population-based sample, who reported different numbers of somatic symptoms. Methods The total population of 16–17-year-olds in Uppsala, Sweden, was screened for depression in 1991–1993. Adolescents who screened positive and an equal number of healthy controls took part in a semi-structured diagnostic interview. In addition, 21 different self-rated somatic symptoms were assessed. Sixty-four percent of those adolescents participated in a follow-up structured interview 15 years later. Results Somatic symptoms in adolescence predicted depression and other adult mental disorders regardless of the presence of adolescent depression. In adolescents with depression, the number of functional somatic symptoms predicted, in a dose response relationship, suicidal behavior, bipolar episodes, and psychotic episodes as well as chronic and recurrent depression. Contrary to expectations, the somatic symptoms of abdominal pain and perspiration without exertion better predicted depression than all DSM-IV depressive symptoms. Abdominal pain persisted as an independent strong predictor of depression and anxiety, even after controlling for other important confounders. Conclusions Somatic symptoms in adolescence can predict severe adult mental health disorders. The number of somatic symptoms concurrent with adolescent depression is, in a stepwise manner, linked to suicidal attempts, bipolar disorders, psychotic disorders, and recurrent and chronic depression. These findings can be useful in developing treatment guidelines for patients with somatic symptoms. PMID:22839681

  12. Prognostic significance of functional somatic symptoms in adolescence: a 15-year community-based follow-up study of adolescents with depression compared with healthy peers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohman Hannes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a lack of population-based long-term longitudinal research on mental health status and functional physical/somatic symptoms. Little is known about the long-term mental health outcomes associated with somatic symptoms or the temporal relationship between depression and such symptoms. This 15-year study followed up adolescents with depression and matched controls, screened from a population-based sample, who reported different numbers of somatic symptoms. Methods The total population of 16–17-year-olds in Uppsala, Sweden, was screened for depression in 1991–1993. Adolescents who screened positive and an equal number of healthy controls took part in a semi-structured diagnostic interview. In addition, 21 different self-rated somatic symptoms were assessed. Sixty-four percent of those adolescents participated in a follow-up structured interview 15 years later. Results Somatic symptoms in adolescence predicted depression and other adult mental disorders regardless of the presence of adolescent depression. In adolescents with depression, the number of functional somatic symptoms predicted, in a dose response relationship, suicidal behavior, bipolar episodes, and psychotic episodes as well as chronic and recurrent depression. Contrary to expectations, the somatic symptoms of abdominal pain and perspiration without exertion better predicted depression than all DSM-IV depressive symptoms. Abdominal pain persisted as an independent strong predictor of depression and anxiety, even after controlling for other important confounders. Conclusions Somatic symptoms in adolescence can predict severe adult mental health disorders. The number of somatic symptoms concurrent with adolescent depression is, in a stepwise manner, linked to suicidal attempts, bipolar disorders, psychotic disorders, and recurrent and chronic depression. These findings can be useful in developing treatment guidelines for patients with somatic symptoms.

  13. Predicting survival outcomes using subsets of significant genes in prognostic marker studies with microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsui Shigeyuki

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic markers hold great promise for refining our ability to establish precise prognostic prediction for diseases. The development of comprehensive gene expression microarray technology has allowed the selection of relevant marker genes from a large pool of candidate genes in early-phased, developmental prognostic marker studies. The primary analytical task in such studies is to select a small fraction of relevant genes, typically from a list of significant genes, for further investigation in subsequent studies. Results We develop a methodology for predicting survival outcomes using subsets of significant genes in prognostic marker studies with microarrays. Key components in this methodology include building prediction models, assessing predictive performance of prediction models, and assessing significance of prediction results. As particular specifications, we assume Cox proportional hazard models with a compound covariate. For assessing predictive accuracy, we propose to use the cross-validated log partial likelihood. To assess significance of prediction results, we apply permutation procedures in cross-validated prediction. As an additional key component peculiar to prognostic prediction, we also consider incorporation of standard prognostic factors. The methodology is evaluated using both simulated and real data. Conclusion The developed methodology for prognostic prediction using a subset of significant genes can provide new insights based on predictive capability, possibly incorporating standard prognostic factors, in selecting a fraction of relevant genes for subsequent studies.

  14. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  15. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  16. Children's unique experience of depression: Using a developmental approach to predict variation in symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginicola Misty M

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current clinical knowledge suggests that children can have different types of depressive symptoms (irritability and aggression, but presents no theoretical basis for these differences. Using a developmental approach, the present study sought to test the relationship between developmental level (mental age and expression of depressive symptoms. The primary hypothesis was that as children's mental age increased, so would the number of internalizing symptoms present. Methods Participants were 252 psychiatric inpatients aged 4 to 16 with a diagnosed depressive disorder. All children were diagnosed by trained clinicians using DSM criteria. Patients were predominantly male (61% with varied ethnic backgrounds (Caucasian 54%; African American 22%; Hispanic 19%; Other 5%. Children were given an IQ test (KBIT or WISC while within the hospital. Mental age was calculated by using the child's IQ score and chronological age. Four trained raters reviewed children's records for depressive symptoms as defined by the DSM-IV TR. Additionally, a ratio score was calculated to indicate the number of internalizing symptoms to total symptoms. Results Mental age positively correlated (r = .51 with an internalizing total symptom ratio score and delineated between several individual symptoms. Mental age also predicted comorbidity with anxiety and conduct disorders. Children of a low mental age were more likely to be comorbid with conduct disorders, whereas children with a higher mental age presented more often with anxiety disorders. Gender was independently related to depressive symptoms, but minority status interacted with mental age. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that a developmental approach is useful in understanding children's depressive symptoms and has implications for both diagnosis and treatment of depression. If children experience depression differently, it follows that treatment options may also differ from that which is

  17. Specificity in autobiographical memory narratives correlates with performance on the autobiographical memory test and prospectively predicts depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Jennifer A; Mineka, Susan; McAdams, Dan P

    2013-01-01

    Reduced autobiographical memory specificity (AMS) is an important cognitive marker in depression that is typically measured with the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT; Williams & Broadbent, 1986). The AMT is widely used, but the over-reliance on a single methodology for assessing AMS is a limitation in the field. The current study investigated memory narratives as an alternative measure of AMS in an undergraduate student sample selected for being high or low on a measure of depressive symptoms (N=55). We employed a multi-method design to compare narrative- and AMT-based measures of AMS. Participants generated personally significant self-defining memory narratives, and also completed two versions of the AMT (with and without instructions to retrieve specific memories). Greater AMS in self-defining memory narratives correlated with greater AMS in performance on both versions of the AMT in the full sample, and the patterns of relationships between the different AMS measures were generally similar in low and high dysphoric participants. Furthermore, AMS in self-defining memory narratives was prospectively associated with depressive symptom levels. Specifically, greater AMS in self-defining memory narratives predicted fewer depressive symptoms at a 10-week follow-up over and above baseline symptom levels. Implications for future research and clinical applications are discussed.

  18. Depressive symptoms and pain evaluations among persons with chronic pain: catastrophizing, but not pain acceptance, shows significant effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Elizabeth J; Ness, Timothy J; Doleys, Daniel M; Baños, James H; Cianfrini, Leanne; Richards, J Scott

    2009-12-15

    Cognitive factors such as catastrophic thoughts regarding pain, and conversely, one's acceptance of that pain, may affect emotional functioning among persons with chronic pain conditions. The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of both catastrophizing and acceptance on affective ratings of experimentally induced ischemic pain and also self-reports of depressive symptoms. Sixty-seven individuals with chronic back pain completed self-report measures of catastrophizing, acceptance, and depressive symptoms. In addition, participants underwent an ischemic pain induction procedure and were asked to rate the induced pain. Catastrophizing showed significant effects on sensory and intensity but not affective ratings of the induced pain. Acceptance did not show any significant associations, when catastrophizing was also in the model, with any form of ratings of the induced pain. Catastrophizing, but not acceptance, was also significantly associated with self-reported depressive symptoms when these two variables were both included in a regression model. Overall, results indicate negative thought patterns such as catastrophizing appear to be more closely related to outcomes of perceived pain severity and affect in persons with chronic pain exposed to an experimental laboratory pain stimulus than does more positive patterns as reflected in measures of acceptance.

  19. Toward an online cognitive and emotional battery to predict treatment remission in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon E

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Evian Gordon,1 A John Rush,2 Donna M Palmer,3,4 Taylor A Braund,3 William Rekshan1 1Brain Resource, San Francisco, CA, USA; 2Duke-NUS, Singapore; 3Brain Resource, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4Brain Dynamics Center, Sydney Medical School – Westmead and Westmead Millennium Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a cognitive and emotional test battery in a representative sample of depressed outpatients to inform likelihood of remission over 8 weeks of treatment with each of three common antidepressant medications. Patients and methods: Outpatients 18–65 years old with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder (17 sites were randomized to escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine-XR (extended release. Participants scored ≥12 on the baseline 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology – Self-Report and completed 8 weeks of treatment. The baseline test battery measured cognitive and emotional status. Exploratory multivariate logistic regression models predicting remission (16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology – Self-Report score ≤5 at 8 weeks were developed independently for each medication in subgroups stratified by age, sex, or cognitive and emotional test performance. The model with the highest cross-validated accuracy determined the participant proportion in each arm for whom remission could be predicted with an accuracy ≥10% above chance. The proportion for whom a prediction could be made with very high certainty (positive predictive value and negative predictive value exceeding 80% was calculated by incrementally increasing test battery thresholds to predict remission/non-remission. Results: The test battery, individually developed for each medication, improved identification of remitting and non-remitting participants by ≥10% beyond chance for 243 of 467 participants. The overall remission rates were escitalopram: 40.8%, sertraline: 30.3%, and

  20. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Different people have different symptoms. Some symptoms of depression include: Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness ...

  1. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty may trigger depression in some people. Medical illness – ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary ...

  2. Depressive symptoms predict incident cognitive impairment in cognitive healthy older women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Paul B.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Xue, Qian-Li; Carlson, Michelle C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES There is increasing evidence that depressive symptoms are associated with the development of cognitive impairment and dementia in late life. We sought to examine whether depression increased the risk of incident cognitive impairment in a longitudinal study of older women. DESIGN observational study, up to 6 examinations spanning up to 9 years. SETTING university-based Division of Geriatric Medicine PARTICIPANTS community-based sample of 436 older, non-demented women MEASUREMENTS Participants were followed with regular medical and neuropsychiatric evaluations. Cognitive assessment included episodic immediate and delayed memory, psychomotor speed, and executive functioning. Participants were characterized as having incident impairment on a cognitive test when scores fell below the tenth percentile on age-adjusted norms. Baseline depressive symptoms were measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) (30-item). Discrete-time Cox Proportional hazards regression with generalized linear models were used to determine whether baseline risk factors predicted incident impairment on each cognitive test, defined as performance below the tenth percentile on age-adjusted norms. RESULTS Baseline GDS was highly associated with incident impairment on all cognitive tests (p <.03). These associations were unaffected by vascular conditions except diabetes, which was associated with incident impairment in delayed recall and psychomotor speed. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that depression may be risk factors for cognitive decline, and thus a potential target for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. PMID:20224517

  3. Trauma exposure interacts with impulsivity in predicting emotion regulation and depressive mood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Ceschi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic exposure may modulate the expression of impulsive behavioral dispositions and change the implementation of emotion regulation strategies associated with depressive mood. Past studies resulted in only limited comprehension of these relationships, especially because they failed to consider impulsivity as a multifactorial construct. Objective: Based on Whiteside and Lynam's multidimensional model that identifies four distinct dispositional facets of impulsive-like behaviors, namely urgency, (lack of premeditation, (lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking (UPPS, the current study used a sample of community volunteers to investigate whether an interaction exists between impulsivity facets and lifetime trauma exposure in predicting cognitive emotion regulation and depressive mood. Methods: Ninety-three adults completed questionnaires measuring lifetime trauma exposure, impulsivity, cognitive emotion regulation, and depressive mood. Results: Results showed that trauma-exposed participants with a strong disposition toward urgency (predisposition to act rashly in intense emotional contexts tended to use fewer appropriate cognitive emotion regulation strategies than other individuals. Unexpectedly, participants lacking in perseverance (predisposition to have difficulties concentrating on demanding tasks used more appropriate emotion regulation strategies if they had experienced traumatic events during their life than if they had not. Emotion regulation mediated the path between these two impulsivity facets and depressive mood. Conclusions: Together, these findings suggest that impulsivity has a differential impact on emotion regulation and depressive mood depending on lifetime exposure to environmental factors, especially traumatic events.

  4. Type-D personality but not depression predicts severity of anxiety in heart failure patients at 1-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Angélique A; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Broers, Herman

    2008-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a debilitating condition associated with poor outcome, including increased anxiety. However, anxiety and its determinants have not yet been studied systematically in CHF. We examined whether type-D personality and depressive symptoms would predict clinically...... significant anxiety at 1-year follow-up....

  5. Early prediction of major depression in chronic hepatitis C patients during peg-interferon a-2b treatment by assessment of vegetative-depressive symptoms after four weeks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the predictive value of the vegetativedepressive symptoms of the Zung Depression Rating Scale for the occurrence of depression during treatment with peg-interferon α-2b of chronic hepatitis C (CHC)patients.METHODS: The predictive value of vegetativedepressive symptoms at 4 wk of treatment for the occurrence of a subsequent diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) was studied in CHC patients infected after substance use in a prospective, multicenter treatment trial in Belgium. The presence of vegetative-depressive symptoms was assessed using the Zung Scale before and 4 wk after the start of antiviral treatment.RESULTS: Out of 49 eligible patients, 19 (39%)developed MDD. The area under the ROC curve of the vegetative Zung subscale was 0.73, P = 0.004. The sensitivity at a cut-point of > 15/35 was 95% (95% CI:74-100). The positive predictive value equalled 44% (95%CI: 29-60).CONCLUSION: In this group of Belgian CHC patients infected after substance use, antiviral treatment caused a considerable risk of depression. Seven vegetativedepressive symptoms of the Zung scale at wk 4 of treatment predicted 95% of all emerging depressions, at a price of 56% false positive test results.

  6. Predictive value of self-reported and observer-rated defense style in depression treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Henricus, L; Dekker, Jack; Peen, Jaap; Abraham, Robert E; Schoevers, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the predictive value of observer-rated and self-reported defensive functioning on the outcome of psychotherapy for the treatment of depression. Defense styles were measured according to the Developmental Profile (DP) and the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ) in 81 moderately severely depressed patients. All patients were treated with Short-term Psychodynamic Supportive Psychotherapy (SPSP). At baseline, women appeared to have a more mature level of overall defensive functioning. A lower level of defensive function was found in patients with recurrent depressions. We also found a rather modest relationship between self-reported and observer-rated defense. Remitted patients had a more mature overall defensive functioning on the DP and the DSQ. In particular, patients with a symbiotic defense style (giving up, apathetic withdrawal) were at risk for poor outcome. This exploratory study provides further evidence of the relevance of defense styles for depression. It suggests a differential predictive value of separate defense levels, which may help to tailor psychotherapeutic strategies.

  7. Extreme Attributions Predict Transition from Depression to Mania or Hypomania in Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Jonathan P.; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Magalhães, Pedro Vieira da Silva; Frank, Ellen; Otto, Michael W.; Miklowitz, David J.; Berk, Michael; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Deckersbach, Thilo

    2013-01-01

    Background Relatively little is known about psychological predictors of the onset of mania among individuals with bipolar disorder, particularly during episodes of depression. In the present study we investigated attributional style as a predictor of onset of hypomanic, manic or mixed episodes among bipolar adults receiving psychosocial treatment for depression. We hypothesized that “extreme” (i.e., excessively pessimistic or optimistic) attributions would predict a greater likelihood of developing an episode of mood elevation. Method Outpatients with DSM-IV bipolar I or II disorder (N=105) enrolled in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) were randomly allocated to one of three types of intensive psychotherapy for depression or a brief psychoeducational intervention. Patients completed a measure of attributional style at baseline and were followed prospectively for up to one year. All analyses were by intent to treat. Results Logistic regressions and Cox proportional hazards models indicated that extreme (both positively- and negatively-valenced) attributions predicted a higher likelihood of (and shorter time until) transition from depression to a (hypo)manic or mixed episode (ps bipolar illness, and who may benefit from treatments that introduce greater cognitive flexibility. PMID:23791456

  8. Predicting the onset and persistence of episodes of depression in primary health care. The predictD-Spain study: Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brangier-Wainberg Paulette

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of putative risk factors on the onset and/or persistence of depression remain unclear. We aim to develop comprehensive models to predict the onset and persistence of episodes of depression in primary care. Here we explain the general methodology of the predictD-Spain study and evaluate the reliability of the questionnaires used. Methods This is a prospective cohort study. A systematic random sample of general practice attendees aged 18 to 75 has been recruited in seven Spanish provinces. Depression is being measured with the CIDI at baseline, and at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months. A set of individual, environmental, genetic, professional and organizational risk factors are to be assessed at each follow-up point. In a separate reliability study, a proportional random sample of 401 participants completed the test-retest (251 researcher-administered and 150 self-administered between October 2005 and February 2006. We have also checked 118,398 items for data entry from a random sample of 480 patients stratified by province. Results All items and questionnaires had good test-retest reliability for both methods of administration, except for the use of recreational drugs over the previous six months. Cronbach's alphas were good and their factorial analyses coherent for the three scales evaluated (social support from family and friends, dissatisfaction with paid work, and dissatisfaction with unpaid work. There were 191 (0.16% data entry errors. Conclusion The items and questionnaires were reliable and data quality control was excellent. When we eventually obtain our risk index for the onset and persistence of depression, we will be able to determine the individual risk of each patient evaluated in primary health care.

  9. Anterior cingulate volume predicts response to cognitive behavioral therapy in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Junya; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Miyata, Jun; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Matsukawa, Noriko; Takemura, Ariyoshi; Tei, Shisei; Sugihara, Genichi; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Inoue, Kazuomi; Murai, Toshiya

    2015-03-15

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is widely used to treat major depressive disorder (MDD). Although improved response prediction could facilitate the development of individualized treatment plans, few studies have investigated whether underlying brain structure is related to CBT response in MDD. Ten MDD patients who received individual CBT were studied in this study. We investigated the relationship between the regional gray matter (GM) volume and subsequent responses to CBT using voxel-based morphometry. The degree of improvement in depressive symptoms was positively correlated with GM volume in the caudal portion of the anterior cingulate cortex. The sample size was small, and the effects of medication on the results could not be excluded. Our results, although preliminary, suggest that the anterior cingulate cortex is a key structure whose volume can be used to predict responses to CBT and is thus a potential prognostic marker in MDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. HPA Axis in Major Depression: Cortisol, Clinical Symptomatology, and Genetic Variation Predict Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jennifer; Gomez, Rowena; Williams, Gordon; Lembke, Anna; Lazzeroni, Laura; Murphy, Greer M.; Schatzberg, Alan F.

    2016-01-01

    The Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal (HPA) axis has been implicated in the pathophysiology of a variety of mood and cognitive disorders. Neuroendocrine studies have demonstrated HPA axis overactivity in major depression, a relationship of HPA axis activity to cognitive performance, and a potential role of HPA axis genetic variation in cognition. The present study investigated the simultaneous roles HPA axis activity, clinical symptomatology, and HPA genetic variation play in cognitive performance. Patients with major depression with psychosis (PMD) and without psychosis (NPMD) and healthy controls (HC) were studied. All participants underwent a diagnostic interview and psychiatric ratings, a comprehensive neuropsychological battery, overnight hourly blood sampling for cortisol, and genetic assessment. Cognitive performance differed as a function of depression subtype. Across all subjects, cognitive performance was negatively correlated with higher cortisol, and PMD patients had higher cortisol than did NPMDs and HCs. Cortisol, clinical symptoms, and variation in genes, NR3C1 (glucocorticoid receptor - GR) and NR3C2 (minercorticoid receptor – MR) that encode for glucocorticoid and mineralcorticoid receptors, predicted cognitive performance. Beyond the effects of cortisol, demographics, and clinical symptoms, NR3C1 variation predicted attention and working memory, whereas NR3C2 polymorphisms predicted memory performance. These findings parallel the distribution of GR and MR in primate brain and their putative roles in specific cognitive tasks. HPA axis genetic variation and activity were important predictors of cognition across the entire sample of depressed subjects and healthy controls. GR and MR genetic variation predicted unique cognitive functions, beyond the influence of cortisol and clinical symptoms. GR genetic variation was implicated in attention and working memory, whereas MR was implicated in verbal memory. PMID:27528460

  11. Body Dissatisfaction Prospectively Predicts Depressive Mood and Low Self-Esteem in Adolescent Girls and Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Susan J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Hannan, Peter J.; Eisenberg, Marla E.

    2006-01-01

    This research examined whether body dissatisfaction prospectively predicted depressive mood and low self-esteem in adolescent girls and boys 5 years later. Participants were early-adolescent girls (n = 440, Time 1 M age = 12.7 years) and boys (n = 366, Time 1 M age = 12.8 years) and midadolescent girls (n = 946, Time 1 M age = 15.8 years) and boys…

  12. Body Dissatisfaction Prospectively Predicts Depressive Mood and Low Self-Esteem in Adolescent Girls and Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Susan J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Hannan, Peter J.; Eisenberg, Marla E.

    2006-01-01

    This research examined whether body dissatisfaction prospectively predicted depressive mood and low self-esteem in adolescent girls and boys 5 years later. Participants were early-adolescent girls (n = 440, Time 1 M age = 12.7 years) and boys (n = 366, Time 1 M age = 12.8 years) and midadolescent girls (n = 946, Time 1 M age = 15.8 years) and boys…

  13. Does major depressive disorder in parents predict specific fears and phobias in offspring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biel, Matthew G; Klein, Rachel G; Mannuzza, Salvatore; Roizen, Erica R; Truong, Nhan L; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Pine, Daniel S

    2008-01-01

    Evidence suggests a relationship between parental depression and phobias in offspring as well as links between childhood fears and risk for major depression. This study examines the relationship between major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders in parents and specific fears and phobias in offspring. Three hundred and eighteen children of parents with lifetime MDD, anxiety disorder, MDD+anxiety disorder, or neither were psychiatrically assessed via parent interview. Rates of specific phobias in offspring did not differ significantly across parental groups. Specific fears were significantly elevated in offspring of parents with MDD+anxiety disorder relative to the other groups (MDD, anxiety disorder, and controls, which did not differ). We failed to find increased phobias in offspring of parents with MDD without anxiety disorder. Elevated rates of specific fears in offspring of parents with MDD+anxiety disorder may be a function of more severe parental psychopathology, increased genetic loading, or unmeasured environmental influences. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Atypia of undetermined significance and follicular lesions of undetermined significance: sonographic assessment for prediction of the final diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaya, Aya; Lewis, Gloria Huang; Liu, Yi; Akatsu, Haruko; Kong, Christina; Desser, Terry S

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether radiologic assessment of thyroid nodules can potentially help guide clinical management after a cytologic diagnosis of atypia of undetermined significance or a follicular lesion of undetermined significance. We identified 41 patients with 41 thyroid nodules initially diagnosed as atypia or follicular lesions of undetermined significance on fine-needle aspiration that were subsequently definitively diagnosed by either surgical resection or repeated fine-needle aspiration. All sonograms of nodules were reviewed by 2 blinded board-certifiedradiologists. Lesions were assessed in 3 ways: (1) Mayo pattern classification as benign, indeterminate, or worrisome for malignancy (Ultrasound Q 2005; 21:157-165); (2) thyroid imaging reporting and data system scores (scale of 1-5) based on 2 different previously published scoring criteria (Park et al [Thyroid 2009; 19:1257-1264] and Kwak et al [Radiology 2011; 260:892-899]); and (3) binary classification as benign or malignant. Of the 41 nodules, 25 had benign histologic findings, and 16 were malignant. Mayo pattern classification was 100% accurate for the benign score. Lesions with a Mayo score of indeterminate were malignant in 21% of cases (6 of 28) and benign in 79% (22 of 28). Lesions with a Mayo score of malignant were malignant in 91% of cases (10 of 11) and benign in 9% (1 of 11). Thyroid imaging reporting and data system scores had area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 0.827 for Park scores and 0.822 for Kwak scores. Radiologist binary classification of thyroid nodules showed 88% overall accuracy. Radiologist assessment of thyroid nodules in cases of atypia of undetermined significance or follicular lesions of undetermined significance is highly predictive of the final diagnosis and can help guide management of thyroid nodules of these pathologic types. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Utilizing reliable and clinically significant change criteria to assess for the development of depression during smoking cessation treatment: the importance of tracking idiographic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Andrew M; Wagener, Theodore L; Gregor, Kristin L; Ring, Kevin T; Borrelli, Belinda

    2011-12-01

    Studies typically measure mood changes during smoking cessation treatment in two ways: (a) by tracking mean change in depression scores or (b) by tracking the incidence of major depression development using diagnostic assessments. However, tracking mean change does not capture variability in individual mood trajectories, and diagnosing participants at multiple time points is time and labor intensive. The current study proposes a method of assessing meaningful increases in depression without the use of diagnostic assessments by utilizing reliable and clinically significant change criteria. This method was applied to 212 participants in a smoking cessation trial to explore the relationship between smoking status and depressed mood, assessed at baseline, end-of-treatment, and 2-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. High rates of reliable (24-28%) and both reliable and clinically significant increases (23-24%) in depressed mood were observed across all participants, regardless of whether or not they achieved abstinence. However, when we calculated group mean change in depression during the trial, only decreases in depressed mood where observed across several intervals. Findings indicate that utilizing reliable and clinically significant change criteria to track symptoms of depression during smoking cessation treatment leads to different conclusions than simply tracking mean changes. We propose that a combination of reliable and clinically significant change criteria may serve as a useful proxy measure for the development of major depressive disorder during smoking cessation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Daily activity level improvement with antidepressant medications predicts long-term clinical outcomes in outpatients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha MK

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Manish K Jha,1 Raymond B Teer,2 Abu Minhajuddin,3 Tracy L Greer,1 A John Rush,4 Madhukar H Trivedi1 1Center for Depression Research and Clinical Care, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, 2University of Texas, Austin, 3Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 4Duke-NUS, Singapore, Singapore Background: Major depressive disorder (MDD significantly impacts performance of both work- and nonwork-related routine daily activities. We have shown that work productivity is significantly impaired in employed MDD patients, but the extent of impairments in nonwork-related routine activities and its association with antidepressant treatment outcomes has not been established. Materials and methods: Activity impairment was measured using the sixth item of Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Scale in the Combining Medications to Enhance Depression Outcomes (CO-MED trial (n=665. Published norms were used to define activity impairment levels. The relationship between activity impairment and baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics was evaluated along with changes in activity impairment and its relationship with other clinical outcomes such as symptom severity, function, and side effect burden. Remission status at 3 and 7 months was predicted based on week 6 activity impairment level. Results: Higher psychosocial and cognitive impairments and greater number of comorbid medical conditions were associated with greater activity impairment at baseline. Proportion of participants with severe activity impairment declined from 47.6% at baseline to 18.7% at 3 months, while mean activity impairment decreased from 57.1 at baseline to 32.8 at 3 months. During course of treatment, levels of activity impairment correlated most strongly with psychosocial function among measures of symptom severity, function, quality of life, and side effect burden. No or minimal activity

  17. Predicting the Influence of Social Resources on African American Wife and Daughter Caregivers' Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozario, Philip A.; Chadiha, Letha A.; Proctor, Enola K.; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This study--on 100 African American wife and 258 daughter primary caregivers--uses a contextual approach in its examination of the relationship between social resources and caregiver depressive symptoms. At the bivariate level, significant differences in certain key characteristics of primary caregivers and care receivers underscore the…

  18. Predicting Postpartum Depressive Symptoms in New Mothers: The Role of Optimism and Stress Frequency during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Nancy K.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01

    During the transition to motherhood, women typically show favorable psychological adjustment after the first child is born, whereas 10 percent to 26 percent of women are at risk of developing clinically significant postpartum depressive symptoms. Little is known about which individuals are especially protected against the emergence of postpartum…

  19. Disease stage, but not sex, predicts depression and psychological distress in Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Maria; Maltby, John; Shimozaki, Steve

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Depression and anxiety significantly affect morbidity in Huntington's disease. Mice. models of Huntington's disease have identified sex differences in mood-like behaviours that vary across disease lifespan, but this interaction has not previously been explored in humans with Huntington...

  20. Predicting depression based on dynamic regional connectivity: a windowed Granger causality analysis of MEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Bi, Kun; Liu, Chu; Luo, Guoping; Tang, Hao; Yao, Zhijian

    2013-10-16

    Abnormal inter-regional causalities can be mapped for the objective diagnosis of various diseases. These inter-regional connectivities are usually calculated over an entire scan and used to characterize the stationary strength of the connections. However, the connectivity within networks may undergo substantial changes during a scan. In this study, we developed an objective depression recognition approach using the dynamic regional interactions that occur in response to sad facial stimuli. The whole time-period magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals from the visual cortex, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were separated into sequential time intervals. The Granger causality mapping method was used to identify the pairwise interaction pattern within each time interval. Feature selection was then undertaken within a minimum redundancy-maximum relevance (mRMR) framework. Typical classifiers were utilized to predict those patients who had depression. The overall performances of these classifiers were similar, and the highest classification accuracy rate was 87.5%. The best discriminative performance was obtained when the number of features was within a robust range. The discriminative network pattern obtained through support vector machine (SVM) analyses displayed abnormal causal connectivities that involved the amygdala during the early and late stages. These early and late connections in the amygdala appear to reveal a negative bias to coarse expression information processing and abnormal negative modulation in patients with depression, which may critically affect depression discrimination.

  1. Depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress predict test anxiety in nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Augner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to identify predictors of test anxiety in nursing students. Design: Cross sectional pilot study. Methods: A questionnaire was administered to 112 students of an Austrian nursing school (mean age = 21.42, SD = 5.21. Test anxiety (measured by the standardized PAF Test Anxiety Questionnaire, perceived chronic stress, depressive symptoms, pathological eating and further psychological and health parameters were measured. Results: We found highly significant correlations between test anxiety and working hours (0.25, depression score (0.52, emotional stability (-0.31, and perceived chronic stress (0.65 (p < 0.01, for all. Regression analysis revealed chronic stress and emotional instability as best predictors for test anxiety. Furthermore, path analysis revealed that past negative academic performance outcomes contribute to test anxiety via depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress. Conclusion: Depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress are strongly related to test anxiety. Therefore therapy and training methods that address depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress, and thereby aim to modify appraisal of potential stressful situations, may be successful in addressing test anxiety.

  2. Worry and cognitive control predict course trajectories of anxiety in older adults with late-life depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, P; van der Veen, D C; Voshaar, R C Oude; Comijs, H C

    Background: Many older adults with depressive disorder manifest anxious distress. This longitudinal study examines the predictive value of worry as a maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategy, and resources necessary for successful emotion regulation (i.e., cognitive control and resting

  3. Predicting optimal outcomes in cognitive therapy or interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed individuals using the personalized advantage index approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.H. Huibers; Z.D. Cohen; L.H.J.M. Lemmens; A. Arntz; F.P.M.L. Peeters; P. Cuijpers; R.J. DeRubeis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Although psychotherapies for depression produce equivalent outcomes, individual patients respond differently to different therapies. Predictors of outcome have been identified in the context of randomized trials, but this information has not been used to predict which treatment works b

  4. Interaction between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and traumatic childhood events predicts depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, A; Bockting, C L H; Koeter, M W J; Snieder, H; Assies, J; Mocking, R J T; Vinkers, C H; Kahn, R S; Boks, M P; Schene, A H

    2013-07-30

    Childhood trauma is associated with the onset and recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD). The thermolabile T variant of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) is associated with a limited (oxidative) stress defense. Therefore, C677T MTHFR could be a potential predictor for depressive symptomatology and MDD recurrence in the context of traumatic stress during early life. We investigated the interaction between the C677T MTHFR variant and exposure to traumatic childhood events (TCEs) on MDD recurrence during a 5.5-year follow-up in a discovery sample of 124 patients with recurrent MDD and, in an independent replication sample, on depressive symptomatology in 665 healthy individuals from the general population. In the discovery sample, Cox regression analysis revealed a significant interaction between MTHFR genotype and TCEs on MDD recurrence (P=0.017). Over the 5.5-year follow-up period, median time to recurrence was 191 days for T-allele carrying patients who experienced TCEs (T+ and TCE+); 461 days for T- and TCE+ patients; 773 days for T+ and TCE- patients and 866 days for T- and TCE- patients. In the replication sample, a significant interaction was present between the MTHFR genotype and TCEs on depressive symptomatology (P=0.002). Our results show that the effects of TCEs on the prospectively assessed recurrence of MDD and self-reported depressive symptoms in the general population depend on the MTHFR genotype. In conclusion, T-allele carriers may be at an increased risk for depressive symptoms or MDD recurrence after exposure to childhood trauma.

  5. Using sickness absence records to predict future depression in a working population: prospective findings from the GAZEL cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Maria; Ferrie, Jane E; Alexanderson, Kristina; Goldberg, Marcel; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerlund, Hugo; Zins, Marie; Head, Jenny

    2009-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that sickness absence from work predicts workers' risk of later depression. Study participants (n = 7391) belonged to the French GAZEL cohort of employees of the national gas and electricity company. Sickness absence data (1996-1999) were obtained from company records. Participants' depression in 1996 and 1999 was assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale. The analyses were controlled for baseline age, gender, marital status, occupational grade, tobacco smoking status, alcohol consumption, subthreshold depressive symptoms, and work stress. Among workers who were free of depression in 1996, 13% had depression in 1999. Compared with workers with no sickness absence during the study period, those with sickness absence were more likely to be depressed at follow-up (for 1 period of sickness absence, fully adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.28, 1.82; for 2 or more periods, fully adjusted OR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.61, 2.36). Future depression was predicted both by psychiatric and nonpsychiatric sickness absence (fully adjusted OR = 3.79 [95% CI = 2.81, 5.10] and 1.41 [95% CI = 1.21, 1.65], respectively). Sickness absence records may help identify workers vulnerable to future depression.

  6. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  7. Mothers' depressive symptoms predict both increased and reduced negative reactivity: aversion sensitivity and the regulation of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Theodore; Moed, Anat; Anderson, Edward R

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether, as mothers' depressive symptoms increase, their expressions of negative emotion to children increasingly reflect aversion sensitivity and motivation to minimize ongoing stress or discomfort. In multiple interactions over 2 years, negative affect expressed by 319 mothers and their children was observed across variations in mothers' depressive symptoms, the aversiveness of children's immediate behavior, and observed differences in children's general negative reactivity. As expected, depressive symptoms predicted reduced maternal negative reactivity when child behavior was low in aversiveness, particularly with children who were high in negative reactivity. Depressive symptoms predicted high negative reactivity and steep increases in negative reactivity as the aversiveness of child behavior increased, particularly when high and continued aversiveness from the child was expected (i.e., children were high in negative reactivity). The findings are consistent with the proposal that deficits in parenting competence as depressive symptoms increase reflect aversion sensitivity and motivation to avoid conflict and suppress children's aversive behavior.

  8. A rest-activity biomarker to predict response to SSRIs in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, W Vaughn

    2015-05-01

    Most adults with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) will not experience a remission with the first antidepressant trial. No practical biomarkers presently exist to predict responsiveness to antidepressants. Herein we report pilot data for a rest-activity biomarker of antidepressant response. Fifty-eight medication-free adults with MDD underwent a week-long collection of actigraphic data before beginning a 9 week open label trial of fluoxetine, coupled with blinded randomized assignment to eszopiclone/placebo. Depression severity was repeatedly measured with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). Baseline actigraphic data was analyzed with functional data analysis to create smoothed 24-h curves of activity. The time of the lowest point of activity (the bathyphase) was calculated for each patient, as well the mean difference between bedtime and the bathyphase (BBD). At the end of treatment, patients were characterized as treatment responders (50% reduction in HRSD) or non-responders, and receiver operating curves were calculated to find the optimal cut point of the BBD for prediction of treatment response. The best cut point for BBD was at 260.2 min, resulting in an effect size of 1.45, and with a positive predictive value of 0.75 and a negative predictive value of 0.88. We conclude that actigraphically-determined measures of rest-activity patterns show promise as potential biomarker predictors of antidepressant response. However, this conclusion is based upon a small number of patients who received only one choice of antidepressant, for a single trial. Replication with a larger sample is needed.

  9. Clinical, functional and health-related quality of life correlates of clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients with systemic sclerosis: a cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Nguyen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To identify clinical, functional and health-related quality of life (HRQoL correlates of clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc. METHODS: Three-hundred-and-eighty-one patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology and/or the Leroy and Medsger criteria for SSc were assessed for visceral involvement, disability and HRQoL (assessed by SF-36. Clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HAD (defined cut-off≥8. RESULTS: 9.2% the patients had limited SSc, 50.5% limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc, and 40.3% diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc. Overall, 40.4% and 58.8% of the patients had clinically significant symptoms of depression and anxiety, respectively. Compared to patients without clinically significant symptoms of depression, patients with clinically significant symptoms of depression had poorer health status, HRQoL mental and physical component, and greater global disability, hand disability and aesthetic impairment. Compared to patients without clinically significant symptoms of anxiety, patients with clinically significant symptoms of anxiety had poorer SF-36 mental and physical component scores. On multivariable analysis, excluding mental component score of SF-36, variables independently associated with clinically significant symptoms of depression and anxiety were global disability and physical component of SF-36, plus female gender for clinically significant symptoms of anxiety only. Remarkably, patients with and without clinically significant psychiatric symptoms were comparable for all disease-related clinical features assessed. CONCLUSION: High levels of clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression are observed among SSc patients. Clinically significant psychiatric symptoms are rather associated with increased disability and altered HRQoL, than with disease-specific organ

  10. Mitral annular calcification and aortic valve calcification may help in predicting significant coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acartürk, Esmeray; Bozkurt, Abdi; Cayli, Murat; Demir, Mesut

    2003-01-01

    Mitral annular calcification (MAC) and aortic valve calcification (AVC) are manifestations of atherosclerosis. To determine whether mitral annular calcification and aortic valve calcification detected by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) might help in predicting significant coronary artery disease (CAD), 123 patients with significant CAD and 93 patients without CAD detected by coronary angiography were investigated. MAC and AVC identified CAD with a sensitivity and specificity of 60.2%, 55.9% and 74.8%, 52.7%, respectively, and with a negative and a positive predictive values of 51.5%, 64.3% and 61.3% and 67.6%, respectively. The positive predictive value of MAC was greater than gender, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. AVC showed a positive predictive value greater than gender, hypertension, family history, and hypercholesterolemia. The negative predictive values of MAC and AVC for CAD were greater than those of all risk factors except diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, presence of MAC and AVC on TTE may help in predicting CAD and should be added to conventional risk factors. Absence of MVC and AVC is a stronger predictor for absence of CAD than all conventional risk factors, except diabetes mellitus. Patients with MAC and AVC should be taken into consideration for the presence of significant CAD and thereby for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in order to improve the prognosis.

  11. A simple method to account for natural selection when predicting inbreeding depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Dorado, Aurora

    2008-11-01

    It has been widely appreciated that natural selection opposes the progress of inbreeding in small populations, thus limiting the actual inbreeding depression for fitness traits. However, no method to account for the consequences of this process has been given so far. I give a simple and intuitive method to predict inbreeding depression, taking into account the increase in selection efficiency against recessive alleles during inbreeding. It is based on the use of a "purged inbreeding coefficient" g(t) that accounts for the reduction of the probability of the deleterious homozygotes caused by the excess d of detrimental effect for deleterious alleles in the homozygous condition over its additive expectation. It is shown that the effect of purging can be important even for relatively small populations. For between-loci variable deleterious effects, accurate predictions can be obtained using the effective homozygous deleterious excess d(e), which can be estimated experimentally and is robust against variation of the ancestral effective population size. The method can be extended to any trait and it is used to predict the evolution of the mean viability or fecundity in a conservation program with equal or random family contributions.

  12. Slow identification of facial happiness in early adolescence predicts onset of depression during 8 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijen, Charlotte; Hartman, Catharina A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J

    2016-11-01

    Adolescent onset depression places a high burden on those who suffer from it, and is difficult to treat. An improved understanding of mechanisms underlying susceptibility to adolescent depression may be useful in early detection and as target in treatment. Facial emotion identification bias has been suggested as trait marker for depression, but results have been inconclusive. To explore whether facial emotion identification biases may be trait markers for depression, we tested whether the speed with which young adolescents identified happy, sad, angry and fearful facial emotions predicted the onset of depression during an eight-year follow-up period. We hypothesized that facial emotion identification speed predicts depression in a symptom-congruent way and differentially predicts symptoms of anhedonia and sadness. Data were collected as part of the TRacking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS), and involved 1840 adolescents who participated in a facial emotion identification test at age 11 and were subjected to the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) at age 19. In a multi-emotion model, slow identification of happy facial emotions tentatively predicted onset of depressive disorder within the follow-up period. Slow identification of happy emotions and fast identification of sad emotions predicted symptoms of anhedonia, but not symptoms of sadness. Our results suggest that the relative speed of identification of happiness in relation to the identification of sadness is a better predictor of depression than the identification of either facial emotion alone. A possible mechanism underlying the predictive role of facial emotion identification may be a less reactive reward system.

  13. Major depression in mothers predict reduced ventral striatum activation in adolescent female offspring with and without depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior research has identified reduced reward-related brain activation as a promising endophenotype for the early identification of adolescents with major depressive disorder. However, it is unclear whether reduced reward-related brain activation constitutes a true vulnerability for major depressive ...

  14. DHA serum levels were significantly higher in celiac disease patients compared to healthy controls and were unrelated to depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie J M van Hees

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Celiac disease (CD, a genetically predisposed intolerance for gluten, is associated with an increased risk of major depressive disorder (MDD. We investigated whether dietary intake and serum levels of the essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexanoic acid (DHA found in fatty fish play a role in this association. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in 71 adult CD patients and 31 healthy volunteers, matched on age, gender and level of education, who were not using n-3 PUFA supplements. Dietary intake, as assessed using a 203-item food frequency questionnaire, and serum levels of EPA and DHA were compared in analyses of covariance, adjusting for potential confounders. Serum PUFA were determined using gas chromatography. RESULTS: Mean serum DHA was significantly higher in CD patients (1.72 mass% than controls (1.28 mass% after multivariable adjustment (mean diff. 0.45 mass%; 95% CI: 0.22-0.68; p = 0.001. The mean intake of EPA plus DHA did not differ between CD patients and controls after multivariable adjustment (0.15 and 0.22 g/d, respectively; p = 0.10. There were no significant differences in intake or serum levels of EPA and DHA between any of the CD patient groups (never depressed, current MDD, minor/partially remitted MDD, remitted MDD and controls. CONCLUSIONS: Patients on a long term gluten-free diet had similar intakes of EPA plus DHA compared to controls. Contrary to expectations, DHA serum levels were significantly higher in CD patients compared to healthy controls and were unrelated to MDD status.

  15. Depression and codependency in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Hammer, C; Martsolf, D S; Zeller, R A

    1998-12-01

    Seven million American women are depressed, and 40 million Americans, primarily women, have been labeled as codependent. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of codependency in women undergoing treatment for depression, examine the relationship between codependency and depression, and determine which of the symptoms of codependency are most highly predictive of depression scores. Depression and codependency were measured in a sample of 105 depressed women by using the Beck Depression Inventory and the Codependency Assessment Tool. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's Product Moment Correlation, and multiple regression were used for analysis. Of these depressed women, 36% were moderately to severely codependent. Depression and codependency were strongly related, with the significant gamma = .92 (P codependency subscales, Low Self-Worth and Hiding Self correlate most strongly with depression; Other Focus/Self-Neglect added the least-independent--explanatory power. Thus, future research should be directed toward the relationship of codependency to power, alienation of self, and personality disorders.

  16. Patients' opinions about knowing their risk for depression and what to do about it. The predictD-qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Á Bellón

    Full Text Available The predictD study developed and validated a risk algorithm for predicting the onset of major depression in primary care. We aimed to explore the opinion of patients about knowing their risk for depression and the values and criteria upon which these opinions are based.A maximum variation sample of patients was taken, stratified by city, age, gender, immigrant status, socio-economic status and lifetime depression. The study participants were 52 patients belonging to 13 urban health centres in seven different cities around Spain. Seven Focus Groups (FGs were given held with primary care patients, one for each of the seven participating cities.The results showed that patients generally welcomed knowing their risk for depression. Furthermore, in light of available evidence several patients proposed potential changes in their lifestyles to prevent depression. Patients generally preferred to ask their General Practitioners (GPs for advice, though mental health specialists were also mentioned. They suggested that GPs undertake interventions tailored to each patient, from a "patient-centred" approach, with certain communication skills, and giving advice to help patients cope with the knowledge that they are at risk of becoming depressed.Patients are pleased to be informed about their risk for depression. We detected certain beliefs, attitudes, values, expectations and behaviour among the patients that were potentially useful for future primary prevention programmes on depression.

  17. Patients’ Opinions about Knowing Their Risk for Depression and What to Do about It. The PredictD-Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellón, Juan Á.; Moreno-Peral, Patricia; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Motrico, Emma; Aiarzagüena, José M.; Fernández, Anna; Fernández-Alonso, Carmen; Montón-Franco, Carmen; Rodríguez-Bayón, Antonina; Ballesta-Rodríguez, María Isabel; Rüntel-Geidel, Ariadne; Payo-Gordón, Janire; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Oliván-Blázquez, Bárbara; Araujo, Luz; Muñoz-García, María del Mar; King, Michael; Nazareth, Irwin; Amezcua, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background The predictD study developed and validated a risk algorithm for predicting the onset of major depression in primary care. We aimed to explore the opinion of patients about knowing their risk for depression and the values and criteria upon which these opinions are based. Methods A maximum variation sample of patients was taken, stratified by city, age, gender, immigrant status, socio-economic status and lifetime depression. The study participants were 52 patients belonging to 13 urban health centres in seven different cities around Spain. Seven Focus Groups (FGs) were given held with primary care patients, one for each of the seven participating cities. Results The results showed that patients generally welcomed knowing their risk for depression. Furthermore, in light of available evidence several patients proposed potential changes in their lifestyles to prevent depression. Patients generally preferred to ask their General Practitioners (GPs) for advice, though mental health specialists were also mentioned. They suggested that GPs undertake interventions tailored to each patient, from a “patient-centred” approach, with certain communication skills, and giving advice to help patients cope with the knowledge that they are at risk of becoming depressed. Conclusions Patients are pleased to be informed about their risk for depression. We detected certain beliefs, attitudes, values, expectations and behaviour among the patients that were potentially useful for future primary prevention programmes on depression. PMID:24646951

  18. Exploring the significance of human mobility patterns in social link prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Basma Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Link prediction is a fundamental task in social networks. Recently, emphasis has been placed on forecasting new social ties using user mobility patterns, e.g., investigating physical and semantic co-locations for new proximity measure. This paper explores the effect of in-depth mobility patterns. Specifically, we study individuals\\' movement behavior, and quantify mobility on the basis of trip frequency, travel purpose and transportation mode. Our hybrid link prediction model is composed of two modules. The first module extracts mobility patterns, including travel purpose and mode, from raw trajectory data. The second module employs the extracted patterns for link prediction. We evaluate our method on two real data sets, GeoLife [15] and Reality Mining [5]. Experimental results show that our hybrid model significantly improves the accuracy of social link prediction, when comparing to primary topology-based solutions. Copyright 2014 ACM.

  19. Does Statistical Significance Help to Evaluate Predictive Performance of Competing Models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Bulut

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In Monte Carlo experiment with simulated data, we show that as a point forecast criterion, the Clark and West's (2006 unconditional test of mean squared prediction errors does not reflect the relative performance of a superior model over a relatively weaker one. The simulation results show that even though the mean squared prediction errors of a constructed superior model is far below a weaker alternative, the Clark- West test does not reflect this in their test statistics. Therefore, studies that use this statistic in testing the predictive accuracy of alternative exchange rate models, stock return predictability, inflation forecasting, and unemployment forecasting should not weight too much on the magnitude of the statistically significant Clark-West tests statistics.

  20. Suicide risk in depression and bipolar disorder: Do impulsiveness-aggressiveness and pharmacotherapy predict suicidal intent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Pompili

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Pompili1,2, Marco Innamorati3, Michele Raja4, Ilaria Falcone2, Giuseppe Ducci5, Gloria Angeletti2, David Lester6, Paolo Girardi2, Roberto Tatarelli2, Eleonora De Pisa21McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Sant’Andrea Hospital, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Italy; 3Università Europea di Roma, Italy; 4Diagnostic and Therapeutic Psychiatric Services, Department of Mental Health, Santo Spirito Hospital, Rome, Italy; 5Diagnostic and Therapeutic Psychiatric Services, Department of Mental Health, San Filippo Neri Hospital, Rome, Italy; 6Center for the Study of Suicide, Blackwood, NJ, USAAbstract: The aims of the present study were to examine clinical, personality, and sociodemographic predictors of suicide risk in a sample of inpatients affected by major affective disorders. The participants were 74 inpatients affected by major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder-I. Patients completed a semi-structured interview, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, the Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and the Hamilton scales for depression and anxiety. Over 52% of the patients were high suicide risks. Those at risk reported more severe depressive-anxious symptomatology, more impulsivity and more hostility. Impulsivity, the use of antidepressants, anxiety/somatization, and the use of mood stabilizers (a negative predictor resulted in accurate predicting of suicide intent. Impulsivity and antidepressant use were the strongest predictors even after controlling for several sociodemographic and clinical variables.Keywords: suicide, mood disorders, pharmacotherapy, impulsiveness, aggressiveness

  1. Predicting change in symptoms of depression during the transition to university: the roles of BDNF and working memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoult, Joelle; Carver, Charles S; Johnson, Sheri L; Joormann, Jutta

    2015-03-01

    Studies on depression risk emphasize the importance of both cognitive and genetic vulnerability factors. The present study has provided the first examination of whether working memory capacity, the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, and their interaction predict changes in symptoms of depression during the transition to university. Early in the semester, students completed a self-report measure of depressive symptoms and a modified version of the reading span task to assess working memory capacity in the presence of both neutral and negative distractors. Whole blood was genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism. Students returned at the end of the semester to complete additional self-report questionnaires. Neither working memory capacity nor the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism predicted change in depressive symptoms either independently or in interaction with self-reported semester difficulty. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, however, moderated the association between working memory capacity and symptom change. Among met carriers, lower working memory capacity in the presence of negative-but not neutral-distractors was associated with increased symptoms of depression over the semester. For the val/val group, working memory capacity did not predict symptom change. These findings contribute directly to biological and cognitive models of depression and highlight the importance of examining Gene × Cognition interactions when investigating risk for depression.

  2. Application of neural networks and support vector machine for significant wave height prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadran Berbić

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available For the purposes of planning and operation of maritime activities, information about wave height dynamics is of great importance. In the paper, real-time prediction of significant wave heights for the following 0.5–5.5 h is provided, using information from 3 or more time points. In the first stage, predictions are made by varying the quantity of significant wave heights from previous time points and various ways of using data are discussed. Afterwards, in the best model, according to the criteria of practicality and accuracy, the influence of wind is taken into account. Predictions are made using two machine learning methods – artificial neural networks (ANN and support vector machine (SVM. The models were built using the built-in functions of software Weka, developed by Waikato University, New Zealand.

  3. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Polymorphism (DRD2 TaqIA) Interacts with Maternal Parenting in Predicting Early Adolescent Depressive Symptoms: Evidence of Differential Susceptibility and Age Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxin; Cao, Yanmiao; Wang, Meiping; Ji, Linqin; Chen, Liang; Deater-Deckard, Kirby

    2015-07-01

    Most gene-environment interaction research on depression has largely focused on negative environment and to a lesser extent on positive environment. Moreover, to date few studies have directly examined G × E at different periods in development, particularly during early adolescence. The present study addressed these issues by examining the concurrent and prospective longitudinal effects of maternal parenting, DRD2 TaqIA polymorphism, and their interaction on adolescent depressive symptoms in a sample of 1026 Chinese adolescents (Mage = 11.33 ± 0.47 years at T1, 50.3% girls) in a three-wave longitudinal study from age 11 to 13. Results indicated that maternal positive and negative parenting significantly concurrently predicted adolescent depressive symptoms at all three waves, whereas TaqIA polymorphism had no main effect on depressive symptoms. TaqIA polymorphism interacted with negative parenting in predicting concurrent depressive symptoms at age 11 and 12. A1 carriers were more susceptible to negative parenting compared to A2A2 homozygotes, such that adolescents carrying A1 alleles experiencing high negative parenting reported more depressive symptoms but fared better when experiencing low negative parenting. However, the interaction became nonsignificant at age 13, indicating the interaction of TaqIA polymorphism and maternal parenting may vary with development. Also, there was no G × E effect on longitudinal change in depression. The findings provided evidence in support of the differential susceptibility hypothesis and shed light on the potential for dynamic change in gene-environment interactions over development.

  4. The predictive validity of atypical neurovegetative depressive symptoms identified by the first principal component in the DUAG trial of moclobemide versus clomipramine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Stage, Kurt Bjerregaard; Larsen, Jens Knud

    2012-01-01

    To investigate to what extent the primary depression subtype atypical depression can predict differential outcome of the mono-amino-oxidase inhibitor (MAO-I) moclobemide and the tricyclic antidepressant clomipramine in the Danish University Antidepressant Group Study (DUAG).......To investigate to what extent the primary depression subtype atypical depression can predict differential outcome of the mono-amino-oxidase inhibitor (MAO-I) moclobemide and the tricyclic antidepressant clomipramine in the Danish University Antidepressant Group Study (DUAG)....

  5. Sixth hour transcutaneous bilirubin predicting significant hyperbilirubinemia in ABO incompatible neonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramesh Y Bhat; Pavan CG Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neonates with ABO hemolytic disease are at greater risk for developing significant hyperbilirubinemia. We aimed to determine whether sixth hour transcutaneous bilirubin (TcB) could predict such a risk. Methods: TcB measurements were obtained at the 6th hour of life in blood group A or B neonates born to blood group O, rhesus factor compatible mothers. Subsequent hyperbilirubinemia was monitored and considered significant if a neonate required phototherapy/exchange transfusion. The predictive role of sixth hour TcB was estimated. Results: Of 144 ABO incompatible neonates, 41(OA, 24; O-B, 17) had significant hyperbilirubinemia. Mean sixth hour TcB was significantly higher among neonates who developed significant hyperbilirubinemia than those who did not (5.83±1.35 mg/dL vs. 3.65±0.96 mg/dL, P4 mg/dL had the highest sensitivity of 93.5% and >6 mg/dL had the highest specifi city of 99%. Area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.898. Conclusion: Sixth hour TcB predicts subsequent significant hyperbilirubinemia in ABO incompatible neonates.

  6. The significant other history: an interpersonal-emotional history procedure used with the early-onset chronically depressed patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, James P; Lord, Benjamin D; Martin, Aaron M; Conley, Kathryn A; Schramm, Elisabeth; Klein, Daniel N

    2011-01-01

    An interpersonal-emotional history procedure, the Significant Other History, is administered to the early-onset chronically depressed patient during the second therapy session in the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP). Patients are asked to name up to six significant others and answer two questions: (1) What was it like growing up with or being around this person? (2) What is the emotional "stamp" you take from this relationship that informs who you are today? An interpersonal-emotional theme reflecting the early learning history of the patient is derived from these "stamps" or causal theory conclusions. One transference hypothesis (TH) is derived from the Significant Other History (SOH) and is formulated in one sentence, such as "If I do this, then the therapist will likely do that" (e.g., "If I make a mistake around Dr. E, then Dr. E will label me 'stupid' or 'incompetent"). The transference hypothesis highlights the interpersonal content that most likely informs the patient's expectancy of the therapist's reactions toward him or her. Throughout the therapy process, the therapist will proactively employ the transference hypothesis in a technique known as the Interpersonal Discrimination Exercise to help patients cognitively and emotionally discriminate the practitioner from hurtful significant others. The goal here is to increase the patient's felt safety within the therapeutic dyad and eventually to generalize the felt safety to the patient's other relationships.

  7. Chronic and Acute Stress, Gender, and Serotonin Transporter Gene-Environment Interactions Predicting Depression Symptoms in Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A.; Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Hazel, Nicholas A.; Najman, Jake M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many recent studies of serotonin transporter gene by environment effects predicting depression have used stress assessments with undefined or poor psychometric methods, possibly contributing to wide variation in findings. The present study attempted to distinguish between effects of acute and chronic stress to predict depressive…

  8. Predicting who benefits most from cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Jesse; Russell, Jennifer J; Myhr, Gail

    2014-10-01

    We examined core features of patient suitability for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and their ability to predict CBT outcomes. A sample of 256 outpatients diagnosed with depression and anxiety disorders were assessed using the Suitability for Short-Term Cognitive Therapy (SSCT) scale. Therapists rated patients' symptom severity using the Clinical Global Impression scale before and after therapy. A factor analysis of the SSCT scale yielded 2 factors: (a) Capacity for Participation in CBT Process and (b) Attitudes Relevant to the CBT Process. A multiple regression analysis revealed that only Capacity for Participation in CBT Process uniquely predicted improvement at termination. These findings highlight the importance of assessing the suitability of CBT for individual patients. Specifically, patients with greater capacity to identify and articulate thoughts and feelings and to share them in a nondefensive, focused way benefit most from CBT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy in Predicting Risk for Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Anxiety and Depression Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billur Çalışkan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: An association between psychological factors and cardiovascular disease, has long been suspected. However it is not clear whether chest pain is caused by emotional distress or whether coronary spasms are caused by the onset of coronary artery disease (CAD. We aimed to predict the risk for CAD in patients referred to myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI with chest pain using depression, stress, and anxiety symptoms. METHODS: The emotional status of all patients was evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D, the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-1 and STAI-2, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS, and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (ASI. Myocardial perfusion was measured using a 17-segment model and 5-point scoring system (0: normal perfusion; 4: no perfusion. RESULTS: MPI revealed reversible perfusion defects in 24 of 141 patients and no perfusion defects in 117 patients. The STAI-2 and HADS-A and HADS-D scores were significantly higher in patients with myocardial ischemia than in those without (STAI-2: 50.8 ± 7.5 vs. 46.3 ± 7.1, respectively; p = 0.008; HADS-A: 9.5 ± 3.9 vs. 7.8 ± 3.4, respectively; p = 0.033; HADS-D: 8.7 ± 3.0 vs. 7.3 ± 3.0, respectively; p = 0.05. Unadjusted correlation analysis showed that there was statistically significant correlation between reversible perfusion defects and anxiety scores (r=0.186, p= 0.029. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The patients with symptoms of depression and high-trait anxiety may be at higher risk of myocardial ischemia than patients without such symptoms. Thus, the emotional status of patients should be taken into consideration during clinical evaluation for CAD.

  10. Using biomarkers to predict treatment response in major depressive disorder: evidence from past and present studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thase, Michael E

    2014-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a heterogeneous condition with a variable response to a wide range of treatments. Despite intensive efforts, no biomarker has been identified to date that can reliably predict response or non-response to any form of treatment, nor has one been identified that can be used to identify those at high risk of developing treatment-resistant depression (ie, non-response to a sequence of treatments delivered for adequate duration and intensity). This manuscript reviews some past areas of research that have proved informative, such as studies using indexes of hypercortisolism or sleep disturbance, and more recent research findings using measures of inflammation and different indicators of regional cortical activation to predict treatment response. It is concluded that, although no method has yet been demonstrated to be sufficiently accurate to be applied in clinical practice, progress has been made. It thus seems likely that--at some point in the not-too-distant future--it will be possible to prospectively identify, at least for some MDD patients, the likelihood of response or non-response to cognitive therapy or various antidepressant medications.

  11. Usefulness of a single-item measure of depression to predict mortality: the GAZEL prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Thomas; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Stringhini, Silvia; Dugravot, Aline; Lemogne, Cédric; Consoli, Silla M.; Goldberg, Marcel; Zins, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background: It remains unknown whether short measures of depression perform as well as long measures in predicting adverse outcomes such as mortality. The present study aims to examine the predictive value of a single-item measure of depression for mortality. Methods: A total of 14 185 participants of the GAZEL cohort completed the 20-item Center-for-Epidemiologic-Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale in 1996. One of these items (I felt depressed) was used as a single-item measure of depression. All-cause mortality data were available until 30 September 2009, a mean follow-up period of 12.7 years with a total of 650 deaths. Results: In Cox regression model adjusted for baseline socio-demographic characteristics, a one-unit increase in the single-item score (range 0–3) was associated with a 25% higher risk of all-cause mortality (95% CI: 13–37%, P < 0.001). Further adjustment for health-related behaviours and physical chronic diseases reduced this risk by 36% and 8%, respectively. After adjustment for all these variables, every one-unit increase in the single-item score predicted a 15% increased risk of death (95% CI: 5–27%, P < 0.01). There is also an evidence of a dose–reponse relationship between reponse scores on the single-item measure of depression and mortality. Conclusion: This study shows that a single-item measure of depression is associated with an increased risk of death. Given its simplicity and ease of administration, a very simple single-item measure of depression might be useful for identifying middle-aged adults at risk for elevated depressive symptoms in large epidemiological studies and clinical settings. PMID:21840893

  12. Non-suicidal self-injury prospectively predicts interpersonal stressful life events and depressive symptoms among adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Taylor A; Hamilton, Jessica L; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2015-08-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is the deliberate self-harm of one's tissue, engaged in without lethal intent, and occurs frequently among late adolescents. Although research has indicated that NSSI predicts depression, the potential psychosocial mechanisms through which engagement in NSSI makes one susceptible to future depressive symptoms remain unclear. The present study examined whether NSSI increases the risk of experiencing stressful life events, which, in turn, heightens the risk for subsequent depressive symptoms. Drawn from a sample specifically selected for adolescents at high and low risk for developing bipolar spectrum disorders, a total of 110 late-adolescents (mean age=18.74, SD=.69; 73% female) were administered measures of lifetime and past year engagement in NSSI and current depressive symptomatology. Approximately 6 months later, they completed a measure of depressive symptoms and a questionnaire and interview assessing life events that occurred over the 6-month interval. Results suggest that the frequency of lifetime and past year NSSI predicted the occurrence of interpersonal stressful life events beyond the effects of initial depressive symptoms, but only for late adolescent girls. Results further suggest that higher levels of interpersonal stressful life events mediated the relationship between NSSI frequency and prospective increases in depressive symptoms among girls.

  13. An Aggregate Measure of Sleep Health Is Associated With Prevalent and Incident Clinically Significant Depression Symptoms Among Community-Dwelling Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furihata, Ryuji; Hall, Martica H; Stone, Katie L; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Smagula, Stephen F; Cauley, Jane A; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Uchiyama, Makoto; Buysse, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    Sleep can be characterized along multiple dimensions. We investigated whether an aggregate measure of sleep health was associated with prevalent and incident clinically significant depression symptoms in a cohort of older women. Participants were older women (mean age 80.1 years) who completed baseline (n = 6485) and follow-up (n = 3806) visits, approximately 6 years apart, in the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF). Self-reported sleep over the past 12 months was categorized as "good" or "poor" across 5 dimensions: satisfaction with sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, mid-sleep time, sleep onset latency, and sleep duration. An aggregate measure of sleep health was calculated by summing the number of "poor" dimensions. Clinically significant depression symptoms were defined as a score ≥6 on the Geriatric Depression Scale. Relationships between sleep health and depression symptoms were evaluated with multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for health measures and medications. Individual sleep health dimensions of sleep satisfaction, daytime sleepiness, mid-sleep time, and sleep onset latency were significantly associated with prevalent depression symptoms (odds ratios [OR] = 1.26-2.69). Sleep satisfaction, daytime sleepiness, and sleep onset latency were significantly associated with incident depression symptoms (OR = 1.32-1.79). The number of "poor" sleep health dimensions was associated in a gradient fashion with greater odds of prevalent (OR = 1.62-5.41) and incident (OR = 1.47-3.15) depression symptoms. An aggregate, multidimensional measure of sleep health was associated with both prevalent and incident clinically-significant depression symptoms in a gradient fashion. Future studies are warranted to extend these findings in different populations and with different health outcomes.

  14. Atypia of undetermined significance and follicular lesions of undetermined significance: sonographic assessment for prediction of the final diagnosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamaya, Aya; Lewis, Gloria Huang; Liu, Yi; Akatsu, Haruko; Kong, Christina; Desser, Terry S

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether radiologic assessment of thyroid nodules can potentially help guide clinical management after a cytologic diagnosis of atypia of undetermined significance or a follicular lesion...

  15. Parasympathetic nervous system activity predicts mood repair use and its effectiveness among adolescents with and without histories of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Rottenberg, Jonathan; Bylsma, Lauren M; Jennings, J Richard; George, Charles; Baji, Ildikó; Benák, István; Dochnal, Roberta; Halas, Kitti; Kapornai, Krisztina; Kiss, Enikő; Makai, Attila; Varga, Hedvig; Vetró, Ágnes; Kovacs, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Depressive disorders that onset in the juvenile years have been linked to far-reaching adverse consequences, making it imperative to elucidate key mechanisms and contributory factors. Excessive use of regulatory responses that exacerbate sadness (maladaptive mood repair) or insufficient use of regulatory responses that reduce it (adaptive mood repair) may reflect behavioral mechanisms of depression risk. Cardiac vagal control, indexed by patterns of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), has received attention as a putative physiological risk factor for depression. Although mood repair and RSA are related, the nature of this relationship is not well characterized in the context of depression risk. Therefore, we tested alternative models of the relationships between RSA patterns (at rest and in response to a sad film), trait mood repair, and the effectiveness of a mood repair response in the laboratory (state mood repair) among adolescents with depression histories (n = 210) and emotionally healthy peers (n = 161). In our data, a mediation model best explained the association between the key constructs: Adolescents with normative RSA patterns exhibited lower levels of depression and trait maladaptive mood repair, and benefited more from instructed (state) mood repair in the laboratory. By contrast, adolescents with atypical RSA patterns exhibited higher levels of depression and dispositional maladaptive mood repair, which, in turn, mediated the relations of RSA patterns and depression symptoms. Atypical RSA patterns also predicted reduced benefits from laboratory mood repair.

  16. Does cognitive flexibility predict treatment gains in Internet-delivered psychological treatment of social anxiety disorder, depression, or tinnitus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Lindner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the individual factors that predict outcomes in Internet-administered psychological treatments. We hypothesized that greater cognitive flexibility (i.e. the ability to simultaneously consider several concepts and tasks and switch effortlessly between them in response to changes in environmental contingencies would provide a better foundation for learning and employing the cognitive restructuring techniques taught and exercised in therapy, leading to greater treatment gains. Participants in three trials featuring Internet-administered psychological treatments for depression (n = 36, social anxiety disorder (n = 115 and tinnitus (n = 53 completed the 64-card Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST prior to treatment. We found no significant associations between perseverative errors on the WCST and treatment gains in any group. We also found low accuracy in the classification of treatment responders. We conclude that lower cognitive flexibility, as captured by perseverative errors on the WCST, should not impede successful outcomes in Internet-delivered psychological treatments.

  17. The validity of dysthymia to predict clinical depressive symptoms as measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale at the 5-year follow-up of patients with first episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In long-term follow-up studies on depression, the Eysenck Neuroticism Scale (ENS) at the score level of dysthymia has been found to be valid at predicting poor outcome. AIMS: The ENS dysthymia level was compared with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) level to predict the prevalence......, and HAM-D from 2005-2007. At 5-year follow-up from 2011-2013, the participants were re-assessed by HAM-D. The HAM-D was used to measure depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. The Mokken analysis was used to indicate scalability of the BDI and ENS. RESULTS: A total of 185 participants were available...... as measured by the two self-rating scales ENS and BDI can be considered part of a 'double depression' in patients with first episode depression, implying an existence of depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Evaluation of dysthymia or neuroticism is important to perform, even...

  18. Does Low Self-Esteem Predict Depression and Anxiety? A Meta-Analysis of Longitudinal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowislo, Julia Friederike; Orth, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Low self-esteem and depression are strongly related, but there is not yet consistent evidence on the nature of the relation. Whereas the vulnerability model states that low self-esteem contributes to depression, the scar model states that depression erodes self-esteem. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the models are specific for depression or…

  19. Does Low Self-Esteem Predict Depression and Anxiety? A Meta-Analysis of Longitudinal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowislo, Julia Friederike; Orth, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Low self-esteem and depression are strongly related, but there is not yet consistent evidence on the nature of the relation. Whereas the vulnerability model states that low self-esteem contributes to depression, the scar model states that depression erodes self-esteem. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the models are specific for depression or…

  20. General psychiatric or depressive symptoms were not predictive for mortality in a healthy elderly cohort in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Otilia Cerveira

    Full Text Available Abstract General psychiatric symptoms may interfere with the ability of individuals to take care of their health, to get involved with activities and develop social abilities, thereby increasing risk of death. Objective: To evaluate general psychiatric symptoms as predictive factors for mortality in a community elderly cohort in Southern Brazil. Methods: 345 healthy elderly, aged ³60 years, from the catchment area of Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre were followed from 1996. Data for the present study were drawn from the period 1996-2004. General psychiatric symptoms (Self-Reporting Questionnaire - SRQ, depressive symptoms (Montgomery-Asberg depressive rating scale, and Mini Mental State Examination scores at baseline were included in the study. Socio-demographic, medical conditions, and functional capacity were also analyzed. The outcome was vital status at follow-up obtained from family members, hospital records and checked against official death registers. Results: Of the 345 baseline individuals, 246 were followed-up. The global mortality rate over the study period was 36.9% (N=90. Those who deceased during the period were older (73.5±7.5, more dependent overall, and more cognitively impaired than the living elderly (univariate analyses. In the logistic regression, only age (OR=0.93; p=0.003 and functional capacity (OR=0.22; p=0.007 remained significant in the final equation. Conclusion: Psychiatric symptoms presented no association with mortality in the present sample. Older age and functional incapacity were risk factors for mortality.

  1. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adolescence predicts onset of major depressive disorder through early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Michael C; Lewinsohn, Peter M; Pettit, Jeremy W; Seeley, John R; Gau, Jeff M; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Waxmonsky, James G

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prospective relationship between a history of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) assessed in mid-adolescence and the onset of major depressive disorder (MDD) through early adulthood in a large school-based sample. A secondary aim was to examine whether this relationship was robust after accounting for comorbid psychopathology and psychosocial impairment. One thousand five hundred seven participants from the Oregon Adolescent Depression Project completed rating scales in adolescence and structured diagnostic interviews up to four times from adolescence to age 30. Adolescents with a lifetime history of ADHD were at significantly higher risk of MDD through early adulthood relative to those with no history of ADHD. ADHD remained a significant predictor of MDD after controlling for gender, lifetime history of other psychiatric disorders in adolescence, social and academic impairment in adolescence, stress and coping in adolescence, and new onset of other psychiatric disorders through early adulthood (hazard ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.04, 3.06). Additional significant, robust predictors of MDD included female gender, a lifetime history of an anxiety disorder, and poor coping skills in mid-adolescence, as well as the onset of anxiety, oppositional defiant disorder, and substance-use disorder after mid-adolescence. A history of ADHD in adolescence was associated with elevated risk of MDD through early adulthood and this relationship remained significant after controlling for psychosocial impairment in adolescence and co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Additional work is needed to identify the mechanisms of risk and to inform depression prevention programs for adolescents with ADHD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Significant association of GRM7 and GRM8 genes with schizophrenia and major depressive disorder in the Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjin; Ju, Kang; Li, Zhiqiang; He, Kuanjun; Chen, Jianhua; Wang, Qingzhong; Yang, Beimeng; An, Lin; Feng, Guoyin; Sun, Weiming; Zhou, Juan; Zhang, Shasha; Song, Pingping; Khan, Raja; Ji, Weidong; Shi, Yongyong

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 7 (GRM7) and type 8 (GRM8) are involved in the neurotransmission of glutamate which is supposed to play an important role in the development of schizophrenia (SCZ) and major depressive disorders (MDD). We designed this study to investigate whether common DNA variants or their genetic interactions within GRM7 and GMR8 genes were associated with these disorders in the Han Chinese population. Fourteen SNPs in GRM7 and GRM8 were selected within a sample set comprising 1235 SCZ patients, 1045 MDD patients and 1235 normal controls. Significant association in SCZ case-control subjects was observed for rs2229902 (permutated Pallele=0.0005, OR=1.492 [95% CI=1.231-1.807]) and rs9870680 (permutated Pallele=0.0023, OR=1.262 [95% CI=1.116-1.426]) in GRM7 and rs2237781 (permutated Pallele=0.0027, OR=1.346 [95% CI=1.149-1.575]) in GRM8. Association analysis for MDD case-control subjects revealed positive results in rs779706 (permutated Pallele=0.0099, OR=1.237 [95% CI=1.093-1.399]) of GRM7 and in rs1361995 (permutated Pallele=0.0017, OR=1.488 [95% CI=1.215-1.823]) of GRM8. Moreover, a three-locus model, constituted by polymorphisms in GRM7 and GRM8 significantly correlated with MDD in the gene-gene interaction analysis. Meta-analysis and haplotype analysis further confirmed our significant results. We demonstrated the genetic association of GRM7 and GRM8 with SCZ and MDD in the Han Chinese population. We also found susceptibility interactive effects of these two genes with both psychiatric disorders, which might provide new insights into the etiology of them.

  3. The characteristics of biomarker assemblage and its significance in the immature source rocks from Eastern Depression, Liaohe Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙永革; 盛国英; 傅家谟; 刘德汉; 吴铁生; 李茂芬; 陈振岩

    1996-01-01

    The characteristics of biomarker assemblage in the Early Tertiary immature source rocks from the third member (Es3) and the first member (Es1) of the Shahejie Formation, Eastern Depression, Liaohe Basin, China, are summarized. There is a strong odd-carbon number n-alkane predominance in the C23- C31 range with a maximum at nC27 or nC29. The occurrence of abundant resin-type biterpenoids and angiosperm-derived triterpenoids indicate the importance of higher plant input to sediments, while the presence of 4-methylsteranes in the Es1 and some Es3 samples reflect the significant contributions from aquatic organisms, i.e. dinoflagellates. In contrast, terrigenous higher plant is the major origin of organic matter in Ex3 source rocks, and in ES1 source rocks, the origin of organic matter is characterized by the mixture input of aquatic organisms and higher plants. In both typical terrestrial beds, relatively nigh concentration of dinosteranes, which may be derived from some specific freshwater dinoflagellates

  4. Cooccurrence and bidirectional prediction of sleep disturbances and depression in older adults: Meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yan-Ping; Han, Ying; Ma, Jun; Wang, Ru-Jia; Shi, Le; Wang, Tong-Yu; He, Jia; Yue, Jing-Li; Shi, Jie; Tang, Xiang-Dong; Lu, Lin

    2017-02-06

    The present study pooled the prevalence of sleep disturbances and depression in community-dwelling older adults (mean age≥60years) and quantified the strength of evidence of the relationship between these two problems. From 23 cross-sectional studies and five sets of baseline data, a high pooled prevalence of sleep disturbances (30.5%), depressive symptoms (18.1%) and coexisting disorders (10.6%) were found. In the 23 cohort studies, self-reported sleep disturbances increased the risk of the onset of depression (relative risk [RR]=1.92). Persistent sleep disturbances increased the risk of the development (RR=3.90), recurrence (RR=7.70), and worsening (RR=1.46) of depression in older adults. Little support was found for a predictive role for objective sleep characteristics in the development of depression. Older adults with depression had a higher risk of developing (RR=1.72) and worsening (RR=1.73) symptoms of sleep disturbances. This review emphasizes the importance of timely interventions in incipient sleep disturbances and depression among older adults, preventing the development of more serious comorbidities.

  5. Predicting the onset of major depressive disorder and dysthymia in older adults with subthreshold depression: a community based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Smit, H.F.E.; Deeg, D.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    16) but no DSM mood disorder from a longitudinal study among a large population based cohort aged between 55 and 85 years in The Netherlands. Of these subjects, 31 (20.1%) developed a mood disorder (major depression and/or dysthymia) at three-year or six-year follow-up. We examined risk factors and

  6. Plasma levels of catecholamine metabolites predict the response to sulpiride or fluvoxamine in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, N; Yoshimura, R; Shinkai, K; Nakamura, J

    2002-09-01

    We investigated the relationships between the changes in plasma catecholamine metabolites obtained from depressed patients before and after administration of sulpiride, a benzamide compound, or fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), and between clinical responses to treatment with each of these drugs. Responders to sulpiride had significantly lower plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) levels before administration of sulpiride than did non-responders or controls (responders: 4.5 +/- 3.1 ng/ml, non-responders: 11.1 +/- 5.9 ng/ml, controls: 10.9 +/- 5.3 ng/ml). Positive relationships were observed between changes in pHVA levels and improvement rates in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (Ham-D). In contrast, responders to fluvoxamine had significantly higher plasma free 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (pMHPG) levels before administration of fluvoxamine than did non-responders or controls (responders: 8.5 +/- 1.8 ng/ml, non-responders: 5.9 +/- 2.I ng/ml, controls: 5.2 +/- 2.9 ng/ml). Negative relationships were observed between changes in pMHPG levels and improvement rates in Ham-D. These results suggest that lower pretreatment pHVA levels and higher pretreatment levels of pMHPG might be predictors of response to sulpiride and fluvoxamine, respectively, and that sulpiride might produce a functional increase in the dopaminergic system, resulting in improvement in some depressive symptoms; fluvoxamine, on the other hand, might produce a functional decrease in the noradrenergic system via serotonergic neurons, resulting in improvement of those symptoms.

  7. Predicting borderline personality disorder symptoms in adolescents from childhood physical and relational aggression, depression, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillancourt, Tracy; Brittain, Heather L; McDougall, Patricia; Krygsman, Amanda; Boylan, Khrista; Duku, Eric; Hymel, Shelley

    2014-08-01

    Developmental cascade models linking childhood physical and relational aggression with symptoms of depression and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; assessed at ages 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14) to borderline personality disorder (BPD) features (assessed at age 14) were examined in a community sample of 484 youth. Results indicated that, when controlling for within-time covariance and across-time stability in the examination of cross-lagged relations among study variables, BPD features at age 14 were predicted by childhood relational aggression and symptoms of depression for boys, and physical and relational aggression, symptoms of depression, and symptoms of ADHD for girls. Moreover, for boys BPD features were predicted from age 10 ADHD through age 12 depression, whereas for girls the pathway to elevated BPD features at age 14 was from depression at age 10 through physical aggression symptoms at age 12. Controlling for earlier associations among variables, we found that for girls the strongest predictor of BPD features at age 14 was physical aggression, whereas for boys all the risk indicators shared a similar predictive impact. This study adds to the growing literature showing that physical and relational aggression ought to be considered when examining early precursors of BPD features.

  8. Analytic Methods for Predicting Significant Multi-Quanta Effects in Collisional Molecular Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Ronald J.

    1996-01-01

    Collision-induced transitions can significantly affect molecular vibrational-rotational populations and energy transfer in atmospheres and gaseous systems. This, in turn. can strongly influence convective heat transfer through dissociation and recombination of diatomics. and radiative heat transfer due to strong vibrational coupling. It is necessary to know state-to-state rates to predict engine performance and aerothermodynamic behavior of hypersonic flows, to analyze diagnostic radiative data obtained from experimental test facilities, and to design heat shields and other thermal protective systems. Furthermore, transfer rates between vibrational and translational modes can strongly influence energy flow in various 'disturbed' environments, particularly where the vibrational and translational temperatures are not equilibrated.

  9. SNP-based heritability estimates of the personality dimensions and polygenic prediction of both neuroticism and major depression: findings from CONVERGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, A R; Moscati, A; Peterson, R; Edwards, A C; Adkins, D E; Bacanu, S A; Bigdeli, T B; Webb, B T; Flint, J; Kendler, K S

    2016-10-25

    Biometrical genetic studies suggest that the personality dimensions, including neuroticism, are moderately heritable (~0.4 to 0.6). Quantitative analyses that aggregate the effects of many common variants have recently further informed genetic research on European samples. However, there has been limited research to date on non-European populations. This study examined the personality dimensions in a large sample of Han Chinese descent (N=10 064) from the China, Oxford, and VCU Experimental Research on Genetic Epidemiology study, aimed at identifying genetic risk factors for recurrent major depression among a rigorously ascertained cohort. Heritability of neuroticism as measured by the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) was estimated to be low but statistically significant at 10% (s.e.=0.03, P=0.0001). In addition to EPQ, neuroticism based on a three-factor model, data for the Big Five (BF) personality dimensions (neuroticism, openness, conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness) measured by the Big Five Inventory were available for controls (n=5596). Heritability estimates of the BF were not statistically significant despite high power (>0.85) to detect heritabilities of 0.10. Polygenic risk scores constructed by best linear unbiased prediction weights applied to split-half samples failed to significantly predict any of the personality traits, but polygenic risk for neuroticism, calculated with LDpred and based on predictive variants previously identified from European populations (N=171 911), significantly predicted major depressive disorder case-control status (P=0.0004) after false discovery rate correction. The scores also significantly predicted EPQ neuroticism (P=6.3 × 10(-6)). Factor analytic results of the measures indicated that any differences in heritabilities across samples may be due to genetic variation or variation in haplotype structure between samples, rather than measurement non-invariance. Findings demonstrate that neuroticism

  10. SNP-based heritability estimates of the personality dimensions and polygenic prediction of both neuroticism and major depression: findings from CONVERGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, A R; Moscati, A; Peterson, R; Edwards, A C; Adkins, D E; Bacanu, S A; Bigdeli, T B; Webb, B T; Flint, J; Kendler, K S

    2016-01-01

    Biometrical genetic studies suggest that the personality dimensions, including neuroticism, are moderately heritable (~0.4 to 0.6). Quantitative analyses that aggregate the effects of many common variants have recently further informed genetic research on European samples. However, there has been limited research to date on non-European populations. This study examined the personality dimensions in a large sample of Han Chinese descent (N=10 064) from the China, Oxford, and VCU Experimental Research on Genetic Epidemiology study, aimed at identifying genetic risk factors for recurrent major depression among a rigorously ascertained cohort. Heritability of neuroticism as measured by the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) was estimated to be low but statistically significant at 10% (s.e.=0.03, P=0.0001). In addition to EPQ, neuroticism based on a three-factor model, data for the Big Five (BF) personality dimensions (neuroticism, openness, conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness) measured by the Big Five Inventory were available for controls (n=5596). Heritability estimates of the BF were not statistically significant despite high power (>0.85) to detect heritabilities of 0.10. Polygenic risk scores constructed by best linear unbiased prediction weights applied to split-half samples failed to significantly predict any of the personality traits, but polygenic risk for neuroticism, calculated with LDpred and based on predictive variants previously identified from European populations (N=171 911), significantly predicted major depressive disorder case–control status (P=0.0004) after false discovery rate correction. The scores also significantly predicted EPQ neuroticism (P=6.3 × 10−6). Factor analytic results of the measures indicated that any differences in heritabilities across samples may be due to genetic variation or variation in haplotype structure between samples, rather than measurement non-invariance. Findings demonstrate that neuroticism

  11. The long sunspot cycle 23 predicts a significant temperature decrease in cycle 24

    CERN Document Server

    Solheim, Jan-Erik; Humlum, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Relations between the length of a sunspot cycle and the average temperature in the same and the next cycle are calculated for a number of meteorological stations in Norway and in the North Atlantic region. No significant trend is found between the length of a cycle and the average temperature in the same cycle, but a significant negative trend is found between the length of a cycle and the temperature in the next cycle. This provides a tool to predict an average temperature decrease of at least 1.0 "C from solar cycle 23 to 24 for the stations and areas analyzed. We find for the Norwegian local stations investigated that 25-56% of the temperature increase the last 150 years may be attributed to the Sun. For 3 North Atlantic stations we get 63-72% solar contribution. This points to the Atlantic currents as reinforcing a solar signal.

  12. Depression and suicidal ideation after predictive testing for Huntington's disease: a two-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Maria U; Luszcz, Mary A; Bui, The-Hung; Wahlin, Tarja-Brita Robins

    2006-10-01

    The present study reports a two-year follow-up of psychological effects of predictive testing for Huntington's disease. Questionnaires assessing depression, general health, well-being, self injurious behavior, life satisfaction, and lifestyle were completed by 35 carriers and 58 non-carriers before the predictive test, and 2, 6, 12, and 24 months afterwards. Both carriers and non-carriers showed high suicidal ideation before the predictive testing. Depression scores and frequency of suicidal thoughts increased for carriers, compared to non-carriers, over time. There were no differences regarding life satisfaction or life style between carriers and non-carriers. Predictive testing was beneficial in reducing overall ill-health symptoms and increasing well-being for those initially expressing concern about Huntington's disease. The importance of assessing suicidal ideation and of continuing to provide adequate support is emphasized.

  13. Emotion Regulation Predicts Attention Bias in Maltreated Children At-Risk for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romens, Sarah E.; Pollak, Seth D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Child maltreatment is associated with heightened risk for depression; however, not all individuals who experience maltreatment develop depression. Previous research indicates that maltreatment contributes to an attention bias for emotional cues, and that depressed individuals show attention bias for sad cues. Method: The present study…

  14. Worry and cognitive control predict course trajectories of anxiety in older adults with late-life depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, P; van der Veen, D C; Voshaar, R C Oude; Comijs, H C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many older adults with depressive disorder manifest anxious distress. This longitudinal study examines the predictive value of worry as a maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategy, and resources necessary for successful emotion regulation (i.e., cognitive control and resting hear

  15. Can a one-item mood scale do the trick? Predicting relapse over 5.5-years in recurrent depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, Gerard D.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Berking, Matthias; Koeter, Maarten W.J.; Schene, Aart H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine whether a simple Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) is able to predict time to relapse over 5.5-years. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 187 remitted recurrently depressed out-patients were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) a

  16. Metacognitions and Mindful Attention Awareness in Depression: A Comparison Of Currently Depressed, Previously Depressed and Never Depressed Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solem, Stian; Hagen, Roger; Wang, Catharina E A; Hjemdal, Odin; Waterloo, Knut; Eisemann, Martin; Halvorsen, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to test (1) how metacognition relates to the concept of mindful attention awareness, and (2) whether metacognitions or mindful attention awareness best predicted symptoms of depression. Data was collected from three samples: currently depressed (n = 37), previously depressed (n = 81) and never depressed controls (n = 50). There was a moderate correlation between mindful attention awareness and three of five metacognitive subscales. Both mindful attention awareness and metacognition were significantly correlated with depression severity scores after controlling for anxiety. The depressed group had significantly more dysfunctional metacognitions and less mindful attention awareness than the never depressed group. Negative beliefs about worry and mindful attention awareness were also significantly different in the previously depressed group compared with the never depressed. This suggests that metacognitions and mindful attention awareness can be vulnerability factors for depression. The results also indicated that anxiety symptoms and negative beliefs about worry were the most important factors in predicting depression. In conclusion, the study shows that metacognitions and mindful attention awareness are two related but separate constructs and that metacognitions emerged as the best predictor of depression. These results provide support for the metacognitive model of emotional disorders. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Metacognitions and mindful attention awareness are related but separate constructs Both mindful attention awareness and metacognition are associated with depression Anxiety and negative beliefs about worry (metacognitions) are most important in predicting depression Addressing metacognitions in therapy should be considered in treatment of depression. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. EEG biomarkers in major depressive disorder: discriminative power and prediction of treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbrich, Sebastian; Arns, Martijn

    2013-10-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has high population prevalence and is associated with substantial impact on quality of life, not least due to an unsatisfactory time span of sometimes several weeks from initiation of treatment to clinical response. Therefore extensive research focused on the identification of cost-effective and widely available electroencephalogram (EEG)-based biomarkers that not only allow distinguishing between patients and healthy controls but also have predictive value for treatment response for a variety of treatments. In this comprehensive overview on EEG research on MDD, biomarkers that are either assessed at baseline or during the early course of treatment and are helpful in discriminating patients from healthy controls and assist in predicting treatment outcome are reviewed, covering recent decades up to now. Reviewed markers include quantitative EEG (QEEG) measures, connectivity measures, EEG vigilance-based measures, sleep-EEG-related measures and event-related potentials (ERPs). Further, the value and limitations of these different markers are discussed. Finally, the need for integrated models of brain function and the necessity for standardized procedures in EEG biomarker research are highlighted to enhance future research in this field.

  18. Position Weight Matrix, Gibbs Sampler, and the Associated Significance Tests in Motif Characterization and Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhua Xia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Position weight matrix (PWM is not only one of the most widely used bioinformatic methods, but also a key component in more advanced computational algorithms (e.g., Gibbs sampler for characterizing and discovering motifs in nucleotide or amino acid sequences. However, few generally applicable statistical tests are available for evaluating the significance of site patterns, PWM, and PWM scores (PWMS of putative motifs. Statistical significance tests of the PWM output, that is, site-specific frequencies, PWM itself, and PWMS, are in disparate sources and have never been collected in a single paper, with the consequence that many implementations of PWM do not include any significance test. Here I review PWM-based methods used in motif characterization and prediction (including a detailed illustration of the Gibbs sampler for de novo motif discovery, present statistical and probabilistic rationales behind statistical significance tests relevant to PWM, and illustrate their application with real data. The multiple comparison problem associated with the test of site-specific frequencies is best handled by false discovery rate methods. The test of PWM, due to the use of pseudocounts, is best done by resampling methods. The test of individual PWMS for each sequence segment should be based on the extreme value distribution.

  19. ABCB1 polymorphism predicts escitalopram dose needed for remission in major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A B; Bousman, C A; Ng, C H; Byron, K; Berk, M

    2012-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette family of transporter proteins, subfamily B (MDR/TAP), member 1 (ABCB1) (P-glycoprotein) transporter is a key component of the blood–brain barrier. Many antidepressants are subject to ABCB1 efflux. Functional polymorphisms of ABCB1 may influence central nervous system bioavailability of antidepressants subject to efflux. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at rs1045642 (C3435T) of ABCB1 have been associated with efflux pump efficiency. This may explain part of the interindividual variation in antidepressant dose needed to remit. Individuals (N=113) with DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) major depressive disorder (MDD) were treated with escitalopram (ESC) or venlafaxine (VEN) over 8 weeks. The17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was assessed serially, blind to genotype. SNP rs1045642 of ABCB1 along with two SNPs previously reported to be in linkage disequilibrium with it (rs2032582 and rs1128503) were genotyped. Demographic features, clinical features, P450 metabolizer status and 5-HTTLPR (serotonin-transporter-linked promoter region) genotype were controlled for. Carriers of rs1045642 TT needed on average 11 mg of ESC to remit, whereas TC and CC carriers required 24 and 19 mg, respectively (P=0.0001). This equates to a 2.0- (95% confidence interval=1.5–3.4; P<0.001) fold greater ESC dose needed to remit for C carriers compared with TT carriers at rs1045642. Of VEN-treated subjects carrying TT genotype at rs1045642, 73.3% remitted compared with 12.5% for CC genotype (odds ratio=6.69; 95% confidence interval=1.72–25.9, P=0.006). These data suggest that antidepressant dose needed to remit can be predicted by an ABCB1 SNP. This has the potential clinical translation implications for dose selection and remission from MDD. PMID:23188198

  20. Predictive behaviors for anxiety and depression in female Wistar rats subjected to cafeteria diet and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Estrela, Dieferson; da Silva, Wellington Alves Mizael; Guimarães, Abraão Tiago Batista; de Oliveira Mendes, Bruna; da Silva Castro, André Luis; da Silva Torres, Iraci Lucena; Malafaia, Guilherme

    2015-11-01

    Obesity and chronic stress have been considered important public health problems that affect millions of people worldwide. Our aim was to analyze the effect of obesity associated with chronic stress on neurobehavioral parameters in female rats, considering that the association of these syndromes can enhance the negative effects on homeostasis. The animals were distributed into standard diet (Std), standard diet+stress (Std+stress), cafeteria diet (Cafe), and cafeteria diet+stress (Cafe+stress) groups. The animals of groups Std and Std+stress were fed with rodent standard feed. Groups Cafe and Cafe+stress, additionally to the standard feed, were offered palatable and calorie-rich processed food and cola-type soft drink ad libitum. From the eighth experimental week, groups Std+stress and Cafe+stress were subjected to restraint chronic stress model (50 days). After the stress protocol, predictive anxiety (open-field and elevated plus-maze tests) and depression (forced swim) were applied. The cafeteria diet was effective in inducing obesity. The ratio locomotion in the central quadrants/total locomotion evaluated during the open field test was not indicative of anxiogenic or anxiolytic effect in the animal's behavior. However, the elevated plus maze test showed that obese and stressed animals were prone to higher anxiety levels. In addition, the obese and stressed animals display less climbing behavior than all the other groups, which can be considered an indicator of depression-like behavior. Nevertheless, it is suggested that the mechanisms involved in effects of obesity associated with chronic stress be better investigated in female rats, considering the organic complexity related to these modern illnesses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Barriers to access to treatment for mothers with postpartum depression in primary health care centers: a predictive model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective to develop a predictive model to evaluate the factors that modify the access to treatment for Postpartum Depression (PPD. Methods prospective study with mothers who participated in the monitoring of child health in primary care centers. For the initial assessment and during 3 months, it was considered: sociodemographic data, gyneco-obstetric data, data on the services provided, depressive symptoms according to the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS and quality of life according to the Short Form-36 Health Status Questionnaire (SF-36. The diagnosis of depression was made based on MINI. Mothers diagnosed with PPD in the initial evaluation, were followed-up. Results a statistical model was constructed to determine the factors that prevented access to treatment, which consisted of: item 2 of EPDS (OR 0.43, 95%CI: 0.20-0.93 and item 5 (OR 0.48, 95%CI: 0.21-1.09, and previous history of depression treatment (OR 0.26, 95%CI: 0.61-1.06. Area under the ROC curve for the model=0.79; p-value for the Hosmer-Lemershow=0.73. Conclusion it was elaborated a simple, well standardized and accurate profile, which advises that nurses should pay attention to those mothers diagnosed with PPD, presenting low/no anhedonia (item 2 of EPDS, scarce/no panic/fear (item 5 of EPDS, and no history of depression, as it is likely that these women do not initiate treatment.

  2. Symptom severity, affective and somatic symptom clusters predict poorer social cognition performance in current but not remitted major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy eAir

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the social cognitive functioning of participants with major depressive disorder when compared with healthy controls, and to assess the impact of symptom severity and affective and somatic symptom clusters on social cognition. One hundred and eight adult patients with depression (66 remitted and 42 current and 52 healthy controls were assessed using the Wechsler Advanced Clinical Solutions: Social Perception Subtest, measuring facial affect recognition in isolation and in combination with prosody and body language interpretation. While no associations between the diagnostic status (MDD vs controls and any of the social cognition measures were found, severity of depressive and anxious symptoms predicted performance on all social cognition subscales in currently depressed participants, controlling for age, gender, education and psychotropic medication. Moreover, in the current MDD group, an affective depressive symptom cluster was inversely related to performance on the more complex ACS Pairs and Prosody tasks, while a somatic symptom cluster was inversely related to ACS Affect Recognition and Total scores. In contrast, there were no associations between symptom severity or symptom clusters and the WAIS ACS in remitted depression participants. Given the state like nature social deficits in this study, these impairments may cause problems with day to day functioning and have implications in targeted therapeutic interventions.

  3. Cut points on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) that predict response to cognitive-behavioral treatments for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller, Stephen M; Kwasny, Mary J; Dear, Blake F; Titov, Nickolai; Mohr, David C

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring depressive symptoms during treatment can guide clinical decision making and improve outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore values on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) that could predict response to treatment. Data came from two independent trials, including three treatment modalities of cognitive-behavioral treatment for depression. Four hundred eighty-seven participants who either met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria for major depressive disorder or had PHQ-9 scores consistent with a diagnosis of depression were included in our analyses. Participants either received 18 weeks of telephone or face-to-face (n=279) or 8 weeks of Web-delivered (n=208) cognitive-behavioral therapy. Depressive symptoms, evaluated using the PHQ-9, were reported every 4 weeks in the telephone and face-to-face trial and weekly in the Web-delivered intervention trial. Optimal cut points for predicting end-of-treatment response were consistent in both trials. Our results suggested using cut points of a PHQ-9 ≥17 at Week 4, and PHQ-9 ≥13 at Week 9 and PHQ-9 ≥9 at Week 14. Consistent cut points were found within the included trials. These cut points may be valuable for algorithms to support clinical decision making. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mapping Soil Properties of Africa at 250 m Resolution: Random Forests Significantly Improve Current Predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengl, Tomislav; Heuvelink, Gerard B M; Kempen, Bas; Leenaars, Johan G B; Walsh, Markus G; Shepherd, Keith D; Sila, Andrew; MacMillan, Robert A; Mendes de Jesus, Jorge; Tamene, Lulseged; Tondoh, Jérôme E

    2015-01-01

    80% of arable land in Africa has low soil fertility and suffers from physical soil problems. Additionally, significant amounts of nutrients are lost every year due to unsustainable soil management practices. This is partially the result of insufficient use of soil management knowledge. To help bridge the soil information gap in Africa, the Africa Soil Information Service (AfSIS) project was established in 2008. Over the period 2008-2014, the AfSIS project compiled two point data sets: the Africa Soil Profiles (legacy) database and the AfSIS Sentinel Site database. These data sets contain over 28 thousand sampling locations and represent the most comprehensive soil sample data sets of the African continent to date. Utilizing these point data sets in combination with a large number of covariates, we have generated a series of spatial predictions of soil properties relevant to the agricultural management--organic carbon, pH, sand, silt and clay fractions, bulk density, cation-exchange capacity, total nitrogen, exchangeable acidity, Al content and exchangeable bases (Ca, K, Mg, Na). We specifically investigate differences between two predictive approaches: random forests and linear regression. Results of 5-fold cross-validation demonstrate that the random forests algorithm consistently outperforms the linear regression algorithm, with average decreases of 15-75% in Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) across soil properties and depths. Fitting and running random forests models takes an order of magnitude more time and the modelling success is sensitive to artifacts in the input data, but as long as quality-controlled point data are provided, an increase in soil mapping accuracy can be expected. Results also indicate that globally predicted soil classes (USDA Soil Taxonomy, especially Alfisols and Mollisols) help improve continental scale soil property mapping, and are among the most important predictors. This indicates a promising potential for transferring pedological

  5. Significance of preoperative neutrophil–lymphocyte count ratio on predicting postoperative sepsis after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Sen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the usefulness of preoperative neutrophil–lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR in predicting postoperative sepsis after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL. In total, 487 patients who underwent PCNL for renal stones were included in the present retrospective study. The stone burden, number of tracts and location, operation time, fluoroscopy time, presence of residual stones, and blood transfusion rates were postoperatively recorded in all patients. All patients were followed up for signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and sepsis. The association of sepsis/SIRS with the risk factors of infectious complications, including NLCR, was evaluated. SIRS was detected in 91 (18.7% patients, 25 (5.1% of whom were diagnosed with sepsis. Stone burden, operation time, irrigation rate, previous surgery, nephrostomy time, access number, blood transfusion, residual stone, postoperative urinary culture, renal pelvis urinary culture, and stone culture were found to be predictive factors for SIRS and sepsis development. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed an NLCR cutoff of 2.50 for predicting the occurrence of SIRS/sepsis. We found that the incidence of sepsis was significantly higher in patients with NLCR ≥ 2.50 than in patients with NLCR < 2.50 (p = 0.006. Preoperative and postoperative urine culture positivity were associated with high NLCR (p = 0.039 and p = 0.003, respectively. We believe that preoperative NLCR may be a promising additive predictor of bacteremia and postoperative sepsis in patients who undergo PCNL for renal stones. This marker is simple, easily measured, and easy to use in daily practice without extra costs.

  6. A Mobile Health Application to Predict Postpartum Depression Based on Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Serrano, Santiago; Tortajada, Salvador; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2015-07-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a disorder that often goes undiagnosed. The development of a screening program requires considerable and careful effort, where evidence-based decisions have to be taken in order to obtain an effective test with a high level of sensitivity and an acceptable specificity that is quick to perform, easy to interpret, culturally sensitive, and cost-effective. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to develop classification models for detecting the risk of PPD during the first week after childbirth, thus enabling early intervention; and second, to develop a mobile health (m-health) application (app) for the Android(®) (Google, Mountain View, CA) platform based on the model with best performance for both mothers who have just given birth and clinicians who want to monitor their patient's test. A set of predictive models for estimating the risk of PPD was trained using machine learning techniques and data about postpartum women collected from seven Spanish hospitals. An internal evaluation was carried out using a hold-out strategy. An easy flowchart and architecture for designing the graphical user interface of the m-health app was followed. Naive Bayes showed the best balance between sensitivity and specificity as a predictive model for PPD during the first week after delivery. It was integrated into the clinical decision support system for Android mobile apps. This approach can enable the early prediction and detection of PPD because it fulfills the conditions of an effective screening test with a high level of sensitivity and specificity that is quick to perform, easy to interpret, culturally sensitive, and cost-effective.

  7. DHA Serum Levels Were Significantly Higher in Celiac Disease Patients Compared to Healthy Controls and Were Unrelated to Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, van N.J.M.; Giltay, E.J.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Janssen, N.; Does, van der A.J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Celiac disease (CD), a genetically predisposed intolerance for gluten, is associated with an increased risk of major depressive disorder (MDD). We investigated whether dietary intake and serum levels of the essential n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and

  8. Predicting clinically significant response to cognitive behavior therapy for chronic insomnia in general medical practice: analysis of outcome data at 12 months posttreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espie, C A; Inglis, S J; Harvey, L

    2001-02-01

    The clinical efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for chronic insomnia has been established, yet clinical effectiveness is less clear. This study presents data on 109 patients from general practice during a formal evaluation of clinical effectiveness. Two thirds achieved normative values of or =50%. Logistic regression revealed that initial severity did not contraindicate good outcome. Rather, greater sleep disturbance was positively associated with large symptom reduction, although lower endpoint scores were less likely. Similarly, symptoms of anxiety, depression, and thinking errors positively predicted good outcome. Hypnotic using patients responded equally well to CBT, and demographic factors were of no significant predictive value. It is concluded that CBT is clinically and durably effective for persistent insomnia in routine practice.

  9. Do burnout and work engagement predict depressive symptoms and life satisfaction? A three-wave seven-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakanen, Jari J; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2012-12-10

    Burnout and work engagement have been viewed as opposite, yet distinct states of employee well-being. We investigated whether work-related indicators of well-being (i.e. burnout and work engagement) spill-over and generalize to context-free well-being (i.e. depressive symptoms and life satisfaction). More specifically, we examined the causal direction: does burnout/work engagement lead to depressive symptoms/life satisfaction, or the other way around? Three surveys were conducted. In 2003, 71% of all Finnish dentists were surveyed (n=3255), and the response rate of the 3-year follow-up was 84% (n=2555). The second follow-up was conducted four years later with a response rate of 86% (n=1964). Structural equation modeling was used to investigate the cross-lagged associations between the study variables across time. Burnout predicted depressive symptoms and life dissatisfaction from T1 to T2 and from T2 to T3. Conversely, work engagement had a negative effect on depressive symptoms and a positive effect on life satisfaction, both from T1 to T2 and from T2 to T3, even after adjusting for the impact of burnout at every occasion. The study was conducted among one occupational group, which limits its generalizability. Work-related well-being predicts general wellbeing in the long-term. For example, burnout predicts depressive symptoms and not vice versa. In addition, burnout and work engagement are not direct opposites. Instead, both have unique, incremental impacts on life satisfaction and depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative effectiveness of biomarkers and clinical indicators for predicting outcomes of SSRI treatment in Major Depressive Disorder: results of the BRITE-MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuchter, Andrew F; Cook, Ian A; Marangell, Lauren B; Gilmer, William S; Burgoyne, Karl S; Howland, Robert H; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Zisook, Sidney; Jain, Rakesh; McCracken, James T; Fava, Maurizio; Iosifescu, Dan; Greenwald, Scott

    2009-09-30

    Patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) may not respond to antidepressants for 8 weeks or longer. A biomarker that predicted treatment effectiveness after only 1 week could be clinically useful. We examined a frontal quantitative electroencephalographic (QEEG) biomarker, the Antidepressant Treatment Response (ATR) index, as a predictor of response to escitalopram, and compared ATR with other putative predictors. Three hundred seventy-five subjects meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD had a baseline QEEG study. After 1 week of treatment with escitalopram, 10 mg, a second QEEG was performed, and the ATR was calculated. Subjects then were randomly assigned to continue with escitalopram, 10 mg, or change to alternative treatments. Seventy-three evaluable subjects received escitalopram for a total of 49days. Response and remission rates were 52.1% and 38.4%, respectively. The ATR predicted both response and remission with 74% accuracy. Neither serum drug levels nor 5HTTLPR and 5HT2a genetic polymorphisms were significant predictors. Responders had larger decreases in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (Ham-D(17)) scores at day 7 (P=0.005), but remitters did not. Clinician prediction based upon global impression of improvement at day 7 did not predict outcome. Logistic regression showed that the ATR and early Ham-D(17) changes were additive predictors of response, but the ATR was the only significant predictor of remission. Future studies should replicate these results prior to clinical use.

  11. The prognostic significance of UCA1 for predicting clinical outcome in patients with digestive system malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang-Teng; Dong, Qing; Gao, Hui; Zhu, Zheng-Ming

    2017-06-20

    Urothelial Carcinoma Associated 1 (UCA1) was an originally identified lncRNA in bladder cancer. Previous studies have reported that UCA1 played a significant role in various types of cancer. This study aimed to clarify the prognostic value of UCA1 in digestive system cancers. The meta-analysis of 15 studies were included, comprising 1441 patients with digestive system cancers. The pooled results of 14 studies indicated that high expression of UCA1 was significantly associated with poorer OS in patients with digestive system cancers (HR: 1.89, 95 % CI: 1.52-2.26). In addition, UCA1 could be as an independent prognostic factor for predicting OS of patients (HR: 1.85, 95 % CI: 1.45-2.25). The pooled results of 3 studies indicated a significant association between UCA1 and DFS in patients with digestive system cancers (HR = 2.50; 95 % CI = 1.30-3.69). Statistical significance was also observed in subgroup meta-analysis. Furthermore, the clinicopathological values of UCA1 were discussed in esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer. A comprehensive retrieval was performed to search studies evaluating the prognostic value of UCA1 in digestive system cancers. Many databases were involved, including PubMed, Web of Science, Embase and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and Wanfang database. Quantitative meta-analysis was performed with standard statistical methods and the prognostic significance of UCA1 in digestive system cancers was qualified. Elevated level of UCA1 indicated the poor clinical outcome for patients with digestive system cancers. It may serve as a new biomarker related to prognosis in digestive system cancers.

  12. The changes of inflammatory cytokines and their clinical significance in patients of inferior ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction with anterior ST-segment depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶明

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the level of Hs-CRP,Fib,IL-6,TNF-α,MDA,SOD,and analyze the correlation between the level of plasma inflammatory cytokines and clinical significance in patients with anterior ST-segment depression.Methods We chose 360 patients with inferior ST Segment elavation acute myocardial infarction from May 2007 to Sep 2012 in emergency department of

  13. Socioeconomic Status Is Significantly Associated with the Dietary Intakes of Folate and Depression Scales in Japanese Workers (J-HOPE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuro Shimbo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The association of socioeconomic status (SES with nutrient intake attracts public attention worldwide. In the current study, we examined the associations of SES with dietary intake of folate and health outcomes in general Japanese workers. This Japanese occupational cohort consisted off 2266 workers. SES was assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Intakes of all nutrients were assessed with a validated, brief and self-administered diet history questionnaire (BDHQ. The degree of depressive symptoms was measured by the validated Japanese version of the K6 scale. Multiple linear regression and stratified analysis were used to evaluate the associations of intake with the confounding factors. Path analysis was conducted to describe the impacts of intake on health outcomes. Education levels and household incomes were significantly associated with intake of folate and depression scales (p < 0.05. After adjusting for age, sex and total energy intake, years of education significantly affect the folate intake (β = 0.117, p < 0.001. The structural equation model (SEM shows that the indirect effect of folate intake is statistically significant and strong (p < 0.05, 56% of direct effect in the pathway of education level to depression scale. Our study shows both education and income are significantly associated with depression scales in Japanese workers, and the effort to increase the folate intake may alleviate the harms of social disparities on mental health.

  14. Recent depressive and anxious symptoms predict cortisol responses to stress in men

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Kathryn P.; Robles, Theodore F.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with major depressive disorder show blunted cortisol responses to psychosocial stressors, but the extent to which this pattern of dampened responding characterizes individuals experiencing sub-clinical levels of depressive symptoms is unknown. This study investigated whether self-reports of depressive and anxious symptoms over the previous two weeks were associated with cortisol responses to a laboratory social stress task. In addition, we tested whether these associations were me...

  15. Low and decreasing self-esteem during adolescence predict adult depression two decades later

    OpenAIRE

    grue, Andrea E; Allemand, Mathias; Robins, Richard W.; Fend, Helmut A

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that low self-esteem is prospectively associated with depression. However, self-esteem has been shown to change over time. We thus hypothesized that not only level but also change in self-esteem affect depression. Using data from a 23-year longitudinal study (N = 1,527), we therefore examined the prospective effects of global and domain-specific self-esteem (physical attractiveness, academic competence) level and change on depressive symptoms 2 decades later. Self-es...

  16. Predicting Intentions of a Familiar Significant Other Beyond the Mirror Neuron System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Cacioppo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Inferring intentions of others is one of the most intriguing issues in interpersonal interaction. Theories of embodied cognition and simulation suggest that this mechanism takes place through a direct and automatic matching process that occurs between an observed action and past actions. This process occurs via the reactivation of past self-related sensorimotor experiences within the inferior frontoparietal network (including the mirror neuron system, MNS. The working model is that the anticipatory representations of others' behaviors require internal predictive models of actions formed from pre-established, shared representations between the observer and the actor. This model suggests that observers should be better at predicting intentions performed by a familiar actor, rather than a stranger. However, little is known about the modulations of the intention brain network as a function of the familiarity between the observer and the actor. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI with a behavioral intention inference task, in which participants were asked to predict intentions from three types of actors: A familiar actor (their significant other, themselves (another familiar actor, and a non-familiar actor (a stranger. Our results showed that the participants were better at inferring intentions performed by familiar actors than non-familiar actors and that this better performance was associated with greater activation within and beyond the inferior frontoparietal network i.e., in brain areas related to familiarity (e.g., precuneus. In addition, and in line with Hebbian principles of neural modulations, the more the participants reported being cognitively close to their partner, the less the brain areas associated with action self-other comparison (e.g., inferior parietal lobule, attention (e.g., superior parietal lobule, recollection (hippocampus, and pair bond (ventral tegmental area, VTA were recruited, suggesting that the

  17. Neural Network Based Response Prediction of rTMS in Major Depressive Disorder Using QEEG Cordance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozekes, Serhat; Gultekin, Selahattin; Tarhan, Nevzat; Hizli Sayar, Gokben; Bayram, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective The combination of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a non-pharmacological form of therapy for treating major depressive disorder (MDD), and electroencephalogram (EEG) is a valuable tool for investigating the functional connectivity in the brain. This study aims to explore whether pre-treating frontal quantitative EEG (QEEG) cordance is associated with response to rTMS treatment among MDD patients by using an artificial intelligence approach, artificial neural network (ANN). Methods The artificial neural network using pre-treatment cordance of frontal QEEG classification was carried out to identify responder or non-responder to rTMS treatment among 55 MDD subjects. The classification performance was evaluated using k-fold cross-validation. Results The ANN classification identified responders to rTMS treatment with a sensitivity of 93.33%, and its overall accuracy reached to 89.09%. Area under Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) value for responder detection using 6, 8 and 10 fold cross validation were 0.917, 0.823 and 0.894 respectively. Conclusion Potential utility of ANN approach method can be used as a clinical tool in administering rTMS therapy to a targeted group of subjects suffering from MDD. This methodology is more potentially useful to the clinician as prediction is possible using EEG data collected before this treatment process is initiated. It is worth using feature selection algorithms to raise the sensitivity and accuracy values. PMID:25670947

  18. AGN-2979, an inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase activation, does not affect serotonin synthesis in Flinders Sensitive Line rats, a rat model of depression, but produces a significant effect in Flinders Resistant Line rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemaru, Kazuya; Nishi, Kyoko; Diksic, Mirko

    2009-12-01

    The neurotransmitter, serotonin, is involved in several brain functions, including both normal, physiological functions, and pathophysiological functions. Alterations in any of the normal parameters of serotonergic neurotransmission can produce several different psychiatric disorders, including major depression. In many instances, brain neurochemical variables are not able to be studied properly in humans, thus making the use of good animal models extremely valuable. One of these animal models is the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) of rats, which has face, predictive and constructive validities in relation to human depression. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activation inhibitor, AGN-2979, on the FSL rats (rats with depression-like behaviour), and compare it to the effect on the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) of rats used as the control rats. The effect was evaluated by measuring changes in regional serotonin synthesis in the vehicle treated rats (FSL-VEH and FRL-VEH) relative to those measured in the AGN-2979 treated rats (FSL-AGN and FRL-AGN). Regional serotonin synthesis was measured autoradiographically in more than 30 brain regions. The measurements were performed using alpha-[(14)C]methyl-l-tryptophan as the tracer. The results indicate that AGN-2979 did not produce a significant reduction of TPH activity in the AGN-2979 group relative to the vehicle group (a reduction would have been observed if there had been an activation of TPH by the experimental setup) in the FSL rats. On the other hand, there was a highly significant reduction of synthesis in the FRL rats treated by AGN-2979, relative to the vehicle group. Together, the results demonstrate that in the FSL rats, AGN-2979 does not affect serotonin synthesis. This suggests that there was no activation of TPH in the FSL rats during the experimental procedure, but such activation did occur in the FRL rats. Because of this finding, it could be

  19. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milgrom Jeannette

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Methods Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26–32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161 also completed questionnaires at 10–12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1. Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2. Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3. Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator

  20. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Bronwyn; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2008-04-16

    Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26-32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161) also completed questionnaires at 10-12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1). Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2). Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3). Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator for other risk factors. Risk factor profiles for

  1. Parameter definition using vibration prediction software leads to significant drilling performance improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Dalmo; Hanley, Chris Hanley; Fonseca, Isaac; Santos, Juliana [National Oilwell Varco, Houston TX (United States); Leite, Daltro J.; Borella, Augusto; Gozzi, Danilo [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The understanding and mitigation of downhole vibration has been a heavily researched subject in the oil industry as it results in more expensive drilling operations, as vibrations significantly diminish the amount of effective drilling energy available to the bit and generate forces that can push the bit or the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) off its concentric axis of rotation, producing high magnitude impacts with the borehole wall. In order to drill ahead, a sufficient amount of energy must be supplied by the rig to overcome the resistance of the drilling system, including the reactive torque of the system, drag forces, fluid pressure losses and energy dissipated by downhole vibrations, then providing the bit with the energy required to fail the rock. If the drill string enters resonant modes of vibration, not only does it decreases the amount of available energy to drill, but increases the potential for catastrophic downhole equipment and drilling bit failures. In this sense, the mitigation of downhole vibrations will result in faster, smoother, and cheaper drilling operations. A software tool using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been developed to provide better understanding of downhole vibration phenomena in drilling environments. The software tool calculates the response of the drilling system at various input conditions, based on the design of the wellbore along with the geometry of the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) and the drill string. It identifies where undesired levels of resonant vibration will be driven by certain combinations of specific drilling parameters, and also which combinations of drilling parameters will result in lower levels of vibration, so the least shocks, the highest penetration rate and the lowest cost per foot can be achieved. With the growing performance of personal computers, complex software systems modeling the drilling vibrations using FEA has been accessible to a wider audience of field users, further complimenting with real time

  2. Analysis of potentially predictive factors of efficacy of adjunct extended-release quetiapine fumarate in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Thase, Michael E; Liu, Sherry; Earley, Willie; Eriksson, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Identification of predictors of treatment response in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) may facilitate improved disease management. Data were pooled from two 6-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of extended-release quetiapine (quetiapine XR; 150 or 300 mg/day) as adjunct to ongoing antidepressant therapy. Effects of psychiatric history and baseline demographic and disease characteristics on efficacy outcomes (Week 6 Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale [MADRS] total score reduction) were evaluated in population subgroups (quetiapine XR both doses pooled, n = 616; placebo, n = 303). Baseline Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) score and previous depressive episodes on Week 6 MADRS total score change, and baseline MADRS individual item scores on Week 6 change in CGI-Improvement score, were also evaluated. No major differences between responders and non-responders to quetiapine XR were observed for patient characteristics or demographic and disease characteristics. No suggestion of a predictive association was found between baseline CGI-S score, number of depressive episodes, and baseline MADRS item scores and efficacy outcomes. These analyses showed no major differences between responders and non-responders, and no predictive association between the parameters assessed and efficacy outcomes for adjunct quetiapine XR in patients with MDD and an inadequate response to prior antidepressant therapy.

  3. Serum nucleosomes during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Predictive and prognostic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetina Lucely

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that free DNA circulates in serum plasma of patients with cancer and that at least part is present in the form of oligo- and monucleosomes, a marker of cell death. Preliminary data has shown a good correlation between decrease of nucleosomes with response and prognosis. Here, we performed pre- and post-chemotherapy determinations of serum nucleosomes with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method in a group of patients with cervical cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods From December 2000 to June 2001, 41 patients with cervical cancer staged as FIGO stages IB2-IIIB received three 21-day courses of carboplatin and paclitaxel, both administered at day 1; then, patients underwent radical hysterectomy. Nucleosomes were measured the day before (baseline, at day seven of the first course and day seven of the third course of chemotherapy. Values of nucleosomes were analyzed with regard to pathologic response and to time to progression-free and overall survival. Results All patients completed chemotherapy, were evaluable for pathologic response, and had nucleosome levels determined. At a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 7–26 months, projected progression time and overall survival were 80.3 and 80.4%, respectively. Mean differential values of nucleosomes were lower in the third course as compared with the first course (p >0.001. The decrease in the third course correlated with pathologic response (p = 0.041. Survival analysis showed a statistically significant, better progression-free and survival time in patients who showed lower levels at the third course (p = 0.0243 and p = 0.0260, respectively. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that nucleosome increase in the third course increased risk of death to 6.86 (95% confidence interval [CI 95%], 0.84–56.0. Conclusion Serum nucleosomes may have a predictive role for response and prognostic significance in patients with cervical cancer

  4. DHEAS and cortisol/DHEAS-ratio in recurrent depression : State, or trait predicting 10-year recurrence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocking, R. J. T.; Pellikaan, C. M.; Lok, A.; Assies, J.; Ruhe, H. G.; Koeter, M. W.; Visser, I.; Bockting, C. L.; Olff, M.; Schene, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with low dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate (DHEAS), - particularly relative to high cortisol - although conflicting findings exist. Moreover, it is unclear whether low DHEAS is only present during the depressive state, or manifests as a t

  5. DHEAS and cortisol/DHEAS-ratio in recurrent depression: State, or trait predicting 10-year recurrence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocking, R.J.; Pellikaan, C.M.; Lok, A.; Assies, J.; Ruhe, H.G.; Koeter, M.W.; Visser, I.; Bockting, C.L.H.; Olff, M.; Schene, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with low dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate (DHEAS), - particularly relative to high cortisol - although conflicting findings exist. Moreover, it is unclear whether low DHEAS is only present during the depressive state, or manifests as a t

  6. Predicting Outcome in Computerized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Primary Care: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, L. Esther; Hollon, Steven D.; Huibers, Marcus J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore pretreatment and short-term improvement variables as potential moderators and predictors of 12-month follow-up outcome of unsupported online computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT), usual care, and CCBT combined with usual care for depression. Method: Three hundred and three depressed patients were randomly allocated…

  7. Girls’ challenging social experiences in early adolescence predict neural response to rewards and depressive symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melynda D. Casement

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Developmental models of psychopathology posit that exposure to social stressors may confer risk for depression in adolescent girls by disrupting neural reward circuitry. The current study tested this hypothesis by examining the relationship between early adolescent social stressors and later neural reward processing and depressive symptoms. Participants were 120 girls from an ongoing longitudinal study of precursors to depression across adolescent development. Low parental warmth, peer victimization, and depressive symptoms were assessed when the girls were 11 and 12 years old, and participants completed a monetary reward guessing fMRI task and assessment of depressive symptoms at age 16. Results indicate that low parental warmth was associated with increased response to potential rewards in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, striatum, and amygdala, whereas peer victimization was associated with decreased response to potential rewards in the mPFC. Furthermore, concurrent depressive symptoms were associated with increased reward anticipation response in mPFC and striatal regions that were also associated with early adolescent psychosocial stressors, with mPFC and striatal response mediating the association between social stressors and depressive symptoms. These findings are consistent with developmental models that emphasize the adverse impact of early psychosocial stressors on neural reward processing and risk for depression in adolescence.

  8. Postpartum depression predicts offspring mental health problems in adolescence independently of parental lifetime psychopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Tjitte; Bockting, Claudi L H; van Pampus, Mariëlle G; Ormel, Johan; Meijer, Judith L; Hartman, Catharina A; Burger, Huibert

    BACKGROUND: Postpartum depression (PPD) follows 5-15% of the life births and forms a major threat to the child's mental health and psychosocial development. However, the nature, continuance, and mediators of the association of postpartum depression (PPD) with the child's mental health are not well

  9. The presence of a depressive episode predicts lower return to work rate after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Peter; Zuidersma, Marij; Bultmann, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Context: No studies have evaluated whether the presence of a depressive episode is associated with an increased risk of not returning to work following myocardial infarction (MI). Objectives: To examine the prospective associations between depressive episode and anxiety disorders with return to work

  10. Postpartum depression predicts offspring mental health problems in adolescence independently of parental lifetime psychopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Tjitte; Bockting, Claudi L H; van Pampus, Mariëlle G; Ormel, Johan; Meijer, Judith L; Hartman, Catharina A; Burger, Huibert

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postpartum depression (PPD) follows 5-15% of the life births and forms a major threat to the child's mental health and psychosocial development. However, the nature, continuance, and mediators of the association of postpartum depression (PPD) with the child's mental health are not well u

  11. Predicting Outcome in Computerized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Primary Care: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, L. Esther; Hollon, Steven D.; Huibers, Marcus J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore pretreatment and short-term improvement variables as potential moderators and predictors of 12-month follow-up outcome of unsupported online computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT), usual care, and CCBT combined with usual care for depression. Method: Three hundred and three depressed patients were randomly allocated…

  12. Postpartum depression predicts offspring mental health problems in adolescence independently of parental lifetime psychopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Tjitte; Bockting, Claudi L H; van Pampus, Mariëlle G; Ormel, Johan; Meijer, Judith L; Hartman, Catharina A; Burger, Huibert

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postpartum depression (PPD) follows 5-15% of the life births and forms a major threat to the child's mental health and psychosocial development. However, the nature, continuance, and mediators of the association of postpartum depression (PPD) with the child's mental health are not well u

  13. To what extent do single symptoms from a depression rating scale predict risk of long-term sickness absence among employees who are free of clinical depression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugulies, R; Hjarsbech, PU; Aust, B

    2013-01-01

    symptoms, three predicted LTSA after adjustment for covariates: "felt low in spirits and sad" (HR = 1.41, 95 % CI = 1.05-1.89), "felt lacking in energy and strength" (HR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.08-1.64), and "had trouble sleeping at night" (HR = 1.38, 95 % CI = 1.09-1.74). CONCLUSION: Among female eldercare...... workers free of clinical depression, feelings of low spirits and sadness, feelings of lack of energy and strength, and sleep disturbances predict risk of LTSA. Interventions that decrease the prevalence of these symptoms might contribute to a reduction in LTSA in this population....

  14. Do stressful life events predict medical treatment outcome in first episode of depression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, Camilla; Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Vinberg, Maj

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether medical treatment outcome in first episode depression differ for patients with and without stressful life events prior to onset of depression. METHODS: Patients discharged with a diagnosis of a single depressive episode from a psychiatric in- or outpatient hospital......-II) and the interview of recent life events (IRLE). Medical treatment history was assessed in detail using standardised procedures (TRAQ). Remission was defined as a score Depression Rating Scale, 17 items and a score >or= 4 on TRAQ following (1) first trial of antidepressant treatment (2) two...... adequate trials of antidepressant treatment. RESULTS: A total of 399 patients participated in the interview and among these 301 patients obtained a SCAN diagnosis of a single depressive episode. A total of 62.8% of the 301 patients experienced at least one moderate to severe stressful life event in a 6...

  15. A putatively functional polymorphism in the HTR2C gene is associated with depressive symptoms in white females reporting significant life stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly H Brummett

    Full Text Available Psychosocial stress is well known to be positively associated with subsequent depressive symptoms. Cortisol response to stress may be one of a number of biological mechanisms that links psychological stress to depressive symptoms, although the precise causal pathway remains unclear. Activity of the x-linked serotonin 5-HTR2C receptor has also been shown to be associated with depression and with clinical response to antidepressant medications. We recently demonstrated that variation in a single nucleotide polymorphism on the HTR2C gene, rs6318 (Ser23Cys, is associated with different cortisol release and short-term changes in affect in response to a series of stress tasks in the laboratory. Based on this observation, we decided to examine whether rs6318 might moderate the association between psychosocial stress and subsequent depressive symptoms. In the present study we use cross-sectional data from a large population-based sample of young adult White men (N = 2,366 and White women (N = 2,712 in the United States to test this moderation hypothesis. Specifically, we hypothesized that the association between self-reported stressful life events and depressive symptoms would be stronger among homozygous Ser23 C females and hemizygous Ser23 C males than among Cys23 G carriers. In separate within-sex analyses a genotype-by-life stress interaction was observed for women (p = .022 but not for men (p = .471. Homozygous Ser23 C women who reported high levels of life stress had depressive symptom scores that were about 0.3 standard deviations higher than female Cys23 G carriers with similarly high stress levels. In contrast, no appreciable difference in depressive symptoms was observed between genotypes at lower levels of stress. Our findings support prior work that suggests a functional SNP on the HTR2C gene may confer an increased risk for depressive symptoms in White women with a history of significant life stress.

  16. Predicting Optimal Outcomes in Cognitive Therapy or Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Individuals Using the Personalized Advantage Index Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus J H Huibers

    Full Text Available Although psychotherapies for depression produce equivalent outcomes, individual patients respond differently to different therapies. Predictors of outcome have been identified in the context of randomized trials, but this information has not been used to predict which treatment works best for the depressed individual. In this paper, we aim to replicate a recently developed treatment selection method, using data from an RCT comparing the effects of cognitive therapy (CT and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT.134 depressed patients completed the pre- and post-treatment BDI-II assessment. First, we identified baseline predictors and moderators. Second, individual treatment recommendations were generated by combining the identified predictors and moderators in an algorithm that produces the Personalized Advantage Index (PAI, a measure of the predicted advantage in one therapy compared to the other, using standard regression analyses and the leave-one-out cross-validation approach.We found five predictors (gender, employment status, anxiety, personality disorder and quality of life and six moderators (somatic complaints, cognitive problems, paranoid symptoms, interpersonal self-sacrificing, attributional style and number of life events of treatment outcome. The mean average PAI value was 8.9 BDI points, and 63% of the sample was predicted to have a clinically meaningful advantage in one of the therapies. Those who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment (either CT or IPT had an observed mean end-BDI of 11.8, while those who received their predicted non-optimal treatment had an end-BDI of 17.8 (effect size for the difference = 0.51.Depressed patients who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment fared much better than those randomized to their predicted non-optimal treatment. The PAI provides a great opportunity for formal decision-making to improve individual patient outcomes in depression. Although the utility of the PAI

  17. Predicting Optimal Outcomes in Cognitive Therapy or Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Individuals Using the Personalized Advantage Index Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huibers, Marcus J. H.; Cohen, Zachary D.; Lemmens, Lotte H. J. M.; Arntz, Arnoud; Peeters, Frenk P. M. L.; Cuijpers, Pim; DeRubeis, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although psychotherapies for depression produce equivalent outcomes, individual patients respond differently to different therapies. Predictors of outcome have been identified in the context of randomized trials, but this information has not been used to predict which treatment works best for the depressed individual. In this paper, we aim to replicate a recently developed treatment selection method, using data from an RCT comparing the effects of cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Methods 134 depressed patients completed the pre- and post-treatment BDI-II assessment. First, we identified baseline predictors and moderators. Second, individual treatment recommendations were generated by combining the identified predictors and moderators in an algorithm that produces the Personalized Advantage Index (PAI), a measure of the predicted advantage in one therapy compared to the other, using standard regression analyses and the leave-one-out cross-validation approach. Results We found five predictors (gender, employment status, anxiety, personality disorder and quality of life) and six moderators (somatic complaints, cognitive problems, paranoid symptoms, interpersonal self-sacrificing, attributional style and number of life events) of treatment outcome. The mean average PAI value was 8.9 BDI points, and 63% of the sample was predicted to have a clinically meaningful advantage in one of the therapies. Those who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment (either CT or IPT) had an observed mean end-BDI of 11.8, while those who received their predicted non-optimal treatment had an end-BDI of 17.8 (effect size for the difference = 0.51). Discussion Depressed patients who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment fared much better than those randomized to their predicted non-optimal treatment. The PAI provides a great opportunity for formal decision-making to improve individual patient outcomes in depression. Although

  18. Recognition and Significance of Volcanic Rocks of the Anda Depression of the Songliao Basin in Jurassic-Cretaceous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuhong Gao; Dongpo Wang; Xinrong Zhang; Guixia Ji; Jian Zhao

    2003-01-01

    A series of volcanic rocks were developed in the deep part of Anda faulting depression. The reflection of therocks are mainly stratiform and hummocky. Three kinds of volcanic facies, e.g. explosion facies, effusion facies andsub-volcanic facies,were recognized by different reflecting characteristics in the seismic profile. The volcanic rocks areformed during three episodes of volcanic activities from Shahezi Formation to Yingcheng Formation. The volcanismshave relation to the formation of Songliao Basin and regional tectonics of northeastern China. Some of the volcanic rocksare good oil and gas reservoirs.

  19. A meta-analytic review of depression prevention programs for children and adolescents: factors that predict magnitude of intervention effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather; Bohon, Cara; Marti, C Nathan; Rohde, Paul

    2009-06-01

    In this meta-analytic review, the authors summarized the effects of depression prevention programs for youth as well as investigated participant, intervention, provider, and research design features associated with larger effects. They identified 47 trials that evaluated 32 prevention programs, producing 60 intervention effect sizes. The average effect for depressive symptoms from pre-to-posttreatment (r = .15) and pretreatment to-follow-up (r = .11) were small, but 13 (41%) prevention programs produced significant reductions in depressive symptoms and 4 (13%) produced significant reductions in risk for future depressive disorder onset relative to control groups. Larger effects emerged for programs targeting high-risk individuals, samples with more females, samples with older adolescents, programs with a shorter duration and with homework assignments, and programs delivered by professional interventionists. Intervention content (e.g., a focus on problem-solving training or reducing negative cognitions) and design features (e.g., use of random assignment and structured interviews) were unrelated to effect sizes. Results suggest that depression prevention efforts produce a higher yield if they incorporate factors associated with larger intervention effects (e.g., selective programs with a shorter duration that include homework).

  20. Five-point Likert scaling on MRI predicts clinically significant prostate carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Taisuke; Abe, Takashige; Kato, Fumi; Matsumoto, Ryuji; Fujita, Hiromi; Murai, Sachiyo; Miyajima, Naoto; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Maruyama, Satoru; Kudo, Kohsuke; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2015-09-04

    To clarify the relationship between the probability of prostate cancer scaled using a 5-point Likert system and the biological characteristics of corresponding tumor foci. The present study involved 44 patients undergoing 3.0-Tesla multiparametric MRI before laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Tracing based on pathological and MRI findings was performed. The relationship between the probability of cancer scaled using the 5-point Likert system and the biological characteristics of corresponding tumor foci was evaluated. A total of 102 tumor foci were identified histologically from the 44 specimens. Of the 102 tumors, 55 were assigned a score based on MRI findings (score 1: n = 3; score 2: n = 3; score 3: n = 16; score 4: n = 11 score 5: n = 22), while 47 were not pointed out on MRI. The tracing study revealed that the proportion of >0.5 cm(3) tumors increased according to the upgrade of Likert scores (score 1 or 2: 33%; score 3: 68.8%; score 4 or 5: 90.9%, χ(2) test, p 7 also increased from scale 2 to scale 5 (scale 2: 0%; scale 3: 56.3%; scale 4: 72.7%; 5: 90.9%, χ(2) test, p = 0.0001). On using score 3 or higher as the threshold of cancer detection on MRI, the detection rate markedly improved if the tumor volume exceeded 0.5 cm(3) (Likert scale favobably reflected the corresponding tumor's volume and Gleason score. Our observations show that "score 3 or higher" could be a useful threshold to predict clinically significant carcinoma when considering treatment options.

  1. Gender, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2009-01-01

    Does anxiety lead to depression more for girls than for boys? This study prospectively examines gender differences in the relationship between anxiety and depressive symptoms in early adolescence. One hundred thirteen 11- to 14-year-old middle school students complete questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and three dimensions of anxiety (worry and oversensitivity, social concerns and concentration, and physiological anxiety) as well as total anxiety symptoms at an initial assessment and 1 year later. Total anxiety and worry and oversensitivity symptoms are found to predict later depressive symptoms more strongly for girls than for boys. There is a similar pattern of results for social concerns and concentration symptoms, although this does not reach statistical significance. Physiological anxiety predicts later depressive symptoms for both boys and girls. These findings highlight the importance of anxiety for the development of depression in adolescence, particularly worry and oversensitivity among girls. PMID:19756209

  2. The clinical epidemiology of depression in palliative care and the predictive value of somatic symptoms: cross-sectional survey with four-week follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Lauren; Lee, William; Price, Annabel; Monroe, Barbara; Sykes, Nigel; Hansford, Penny; Higginson, Irene J; Hotopf, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    This cross-sectional survey aimed to determine the prevalence and remission of depression in patients receiving palliative care and to ascertain the predictive value of somatic symptoms in making the diagnosis. Three hundred consecutive patients were interviewed within one week of their initial assessment by a specialist nurse at a palliative care service with in-patient and homecare facilities in south London, UK. Depression was assessed using the PRIME-MD PHQ-9. Presence of somatic symptoms (fatigue, sleep disturbance, poor appetite) was determined using the EORTC-QLQ-C30 quality of life questionnaire. Fifty-eight (19.3% [15.3 to 23.3]) patients met criteria for Major Depressive Disorder; 109 (36.3% [32.3 to 40.3]) met criteria for 'Any depressive syndrome'. Patients with Major Depressive Disorder were more likely to be male, and to have non-malignant disease, pain, poor performance status and desire for an early death. Of those patients with Major Depressive Disorder at baseline, 69% (27/39) had remitted four weeks later. Of those not depressed at baseline, 11% (19/174) met criteria for depression at follow-up. The positive predictive values of sleep disturbance, poor appetite and fatigue were low (values of these symptoms were high (>89%). The high prevalence of depression in palliative care attests to the need for psychological assessment and support. Depression in patients receiving palliative care is unstable, suggesting that symptoms should be carefully monitored.

  3. International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment for Depression (iSPOT-D, a randomized clinical trial: rationale and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinically useful treatment moderators of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD have not yet been identified, though some baseline predictors of treatment outcome have been proposed. The aim of iSPOT-D is to identify pretreatment measures that predict or moderate MDD treatment response or remission to escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine; and develop a model that incorporates multiple predictors and moderators. Methods/Design The International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment - in Depression (iSPOT-D is a multi-centre, international, randomized, prospective, open-label trial. It is enrolling 2016 MDD outpatients (ages 18-65 from primary or specialty care practices (672 per treatment arm; 672 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy controls. Study-eligible patients are antidepressant medication (ADM naïve or willing to undergo a one-week wash-out of any non-protocol ADM, and cannot have had an inadequate response to protocol ADM. Baseline assessments include symptoms; distress; daily function; cognitive performance; electroencephalogram and event-related potentials; heart rate and genetic measures. A subset of these baseline assessments are repeated after eight weeks of treatment. Outcomes include the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (primary and self-reported depressive symptoms, social functioning, quality of life, emotional regulation, and side-effect burden (secondary. Participants may then enter a naturalistic telephone follow-up at weeks 12, 16, 24 and 52. The first half of the sample will be used to identify potential predictors and moderators, and the second half to replicate and confirm. Discussion First enrolment was in December 2008, and is ongoing. iSPOT-D evaluates clinical and biological predictors of treatment response in the largest known sample of MDD collected worldwide. Trial registration International Study to Predict Optimised Treatment - in Depression (iSPOT-D ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

  4. Continuous Auricular Electroacupuncture Can Significantly Improve Heart Rate Variability and Clinical Scores in Patients with Depression: First Results from a Transcontinental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Shi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to investigate the impact and acceptability of providing continuous auricular electroacupuncture as an adjunct to conventional medications for patients with depression. Ten patients with a mean age ± SD of 43.3 ± 10.4 years were able to provide informed consent. The quantitative and qualitative outcome measures were heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV, and different clinical scores. The study documented that a special kind of auricular electro acupuncture, applied over a period of three days, can improve various aspects of quality of life significantly but also highlighted the significant increase of HRV whilst having acupuncture treatment. In conclusion, our study shows stimulation-related and quantifiable clinical and physiological alterations in parameters after continuous auricular acupoint stimulation in patients with depression. Improved access to electro acupuncture treatment would be of major benefit for these patients. Further studies are necessary in order to verify the gained results.

  5. Prediction of perinatal depression from adolescence and before conception (VIHCS): 20-year prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, George C; Romaniuk, Helena; Spry, Elizabeth; Coffey, Carolyn; Olsson, Craig; Doyle, Lex W; Oats, Jeremy; Hearps, Stephen; Carlin, John B; Brown, Stephanie

    2015-08-29

    Perinatal depression is a neglected global health priority, affecting 10-15% of women in high-income countries and a greater proportion in low-income countries. Outcomes for children include cognitive, behavioural, and emotional difficulties and, in low-income settings, perinatal depression is associated with stunting and physical illness. In the Victorian Intergenerational Health Cohort Study (VIHCS), we aimed to assess the extent to which women with perinatal depressive symptoms had a history of mental health problems before conception. VIHCS is a follow-up study of participants in the Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study (VAHCS), which was initiated in August, 1992, in the state of Victoria, Australia. In VAHCS, participants were assessed for health outcomes at nine timepoints (waves) from age 14 years to age 29 years. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule and the General Health Questionnaire. Enrolment to VIHCS began in September, 2006, during the ninth wave of VAHCS; depressive symptoms at this timepoint were measured with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. We contacted women every 6 months (from age 29 years to age 35 years) to identify any pregnancies. We assessed perinatal depressive symptoms with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) by computer-assisted telephone interview at 32 weeks of gestation, 8 weeks after birth, and 12 months after birth. We defined perinatal depression as an EPDS score of 10 or more. From a stratified random sample of 1000 female participants in VAHCS, we enrolled 384 women with 564 pregnancies. 253 (66%) of these women had a previous history of mental health problems at some point in adolescence or young adulthood. 117 women with a history of mental health problems in both adolescence and young adulthood had 168 pregnancies, and perinatal depressive symptoms were reported for 57 (34%) of these pregnancies, compared with 16 (8%) of 201 pregnancies in 131 women

  6. Depressive Symptom Clusters Differentially Predict Cardiovascular Hospitalization in People With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pop, Victor Jozef Marie; Denollet, Johan;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression has been associated with the development of cardiovascular disease in people with type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether symptoms related to the 2 core features of depression--dysphoria and anhedonia--and anxiety were differentially associated with cardiovascular...... hospitalization and whether there were symptom-specific mechanisms (alcohol, smoking, physical activity, body mass index, glucose, cholesterol, and blood pressure) in play. METHOD: A total of 1465 people in Dutch primary care completed the Edinburgh Depression Scale in 2005 and were followed up until first...

  7. Parameter definition using vibration prediction software leads to significant drilling performance improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Dalmo; Hanley, Chris Hanley; Fonseca, Isaac; Santos, Juliana [National Oilwell Varco, Houston TX (United States); Leite, Daltro J.; Borella, Augusto; Gozzi, Danilo [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The understanding and mitigation of downhole vibration has been a heavily researched subject in the oil industry as it results in more expensive drilling operations, as vibrations significantly diminish the amount of effective drilling energy available to the bit and generate forces that can push the bit or the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) off its concentric axis of rotation, producing high magnitude impacts with the borehole wall. In order to drill ahead, a sufficient amount of energy must be supplied by the rig to overcome the resistance of the drilling system, including the reactive torque of the system, drag forces, fluid pressure losses and energy dissipated by downhole vibrations, then providing the bit with the energy required to fail the rock. If the drill string enters resonant modes of vibration, not only does it decreases the amount of available energy to drill, but increases the potential for catastrophic downhole equipment and drilling bit failures. In this sense, the mitigation of downhole vibrations will result in faster, smoother, and cheaper drilling operations. A software tool using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been developed to provide better understanding of downhole vibration phenomena in drilling environments. The software tool calculates the response of the drilling system at various input conditions, based on the design of the wellbore along with the geometry of the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) and the drill string. It identifies where undesired levels of resonant vibration will be driven by certain combinations of specific drilling parameters, and also which combinations of drilling parameters will result in lower levels of vibration, so the least shocks, the highest penetration rate and the lowest cost per foot can be achieved. With the growing performance of personal computers, complex software systems modeling the drilling vibrations using FEA has been accessible to a wider audience of field users, further complimenting with real time

  8. A diagnosis of bipolar spectrum disorder predicts diagnostic conversion from unipolar depression to bipolar disorder: a 5-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Young Sup; Shim, In Hee; Wang, Hee-Ryung; Song, Hoo Rim; Jun, Tae-Youn; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2015-03-15

    The major aims of this study were to identify factors that may predict the diagnostic conversion from major depressive disorder (MDD) to bipolar disorder (BP) and to evaluate the predictive performance of the bipolar spectrum disorder (BPSD) diagnostic criteria. The medical records of 250 patients with a diagnosis of MDD for at least 5 years were retrospectively reviewed for this study. The diagnostic conversion from MDD to BP was observed in 18.4% of 250 MDD patients, and the diagnostic criteria for BPSD predicted this conversion with high sensitivity (0.870) and specificity (0.917). A family history of BP, antidepressant-induced mania/hypomania, brief major depressive episodes, early age of onset, antidepressant wear-off, and antidepressant resistance were also independent predictors of this conversion. This study was conducted using a retrospective design and did not include structured diagnostic interviews. The diagnostic criteria for BPSD were highly predictive of the conversion from MDD to BP, and conversion was associated with several clinical features of BPSD. Thus, the BPSD diagnostic criteria may be useful for the prediction of bipolar diathesis in MDD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Early Prediction of Acute Antidepressant Treatment Response and Remission in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Rongrong; Emslie, Graham; Mayes, Taryn; Nakonezny, Paul; Kennard, Betsy; Hughes, Carroll

    2009-01-01

    The rate of symptom improvement during the early weeks of acute fluoxetine treatment is a good indicator of remission. This finding was made after evaluating the outcome of the fluoxetine treatment on 168 children and adults with depression.

  10. Negative perceptions of ageing predict the onset and persistence of depression and anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freeman, Aislinné Theresa; Santini, Ziggi Ivan; Tyrovolas, Stefanos

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although there is a growing literature on the adverse health outcomes related with negative ageing perceptions, studies on their association with mental disorders such as depression and anxiety are scarce. Thus, the aim of the current study was to prospectively assess the association...... between negative ageing perceptions and incident/persistent depression and anxiety using nationally representative data from Ireland. METHODS: Data from two consecutive waves of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) were analysed. The analytical sample consisted of 6095 adults aged ≥50 years....... Validated scales for negative ageing perceptions, depression, and anxiety were used. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between negative ageing perceptions at baseline and the onset and persistence of depression and anxiety at two-year follow up. RESULTS: After...

  11. Depressive symptoms predict cognitive decline and dementia in older people independently of cerebral white matter changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdelho, Ana; Madureira, Sofia; Moleiro, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC).......Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC)....

  12. Is satisfaction among orthopaedic trauma patients predicted by depression and activation levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Elisa J; Paryavi, Ebrahim; Castillo, Renan C; OʼToole, Robert V

    2015-05-01

    Among orthopaedic trauma patients, little is known regarding the relationship between patient satisfaction and patient levels of depression and "activation" (level of involvement of patient in his or her own care). Our hypothesis was that satisfaction is correlated to levels of depression and activation. Patient questionnaires. Level 1 trauma center. One hundred twenty-four patients with at least one fracture. Patients were evaluated at orthopaedic trauma clinics 6 weeks or longer after injury. Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ), Patient Activation Measure, and Patient Health Questionnaire, a screening and evaluation tool for the presence and severity of depression. Spearman correlation coefficients assessed the relationship between activation level and depression severity with PSQ domains. Bivariate and multivariate linear regression models determined independent effects of depression and activation on general satisfaction. Patient satisfaction was moderate to high in general (mean score, 4.17). Spearman correlation coefficients were high for patient activation and all PSQ domains (generally >0.3, P < 0.05). Correlation coefficients were weaker for depression and PSQ domains (rho range, 0.16-0.33). Final multivariate linear regression model indicated improvement in general satisfaction of 0.14 with increasing patient activation. A decrease in general satisfaction of -0.03 was noted with increasing Patient Health Questionnaire depression score. Patient satisfaction is strongly correlated with patient activation but less correlated with the presence of depression. Patient satisfaction after orthopaedic trauma might be improved by encouraging and coaching patients on how to be more involved in their own health care. Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  13. Defined symptom-change trajectories during acute-phase cognitive therapy for depression predict better longitudinal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R; Clark, Lee Anna; Thase, Michael E; Jarrett, Robin B

    2016-12-01

    Acute-phase cognitive therapy (CT) is an efficacious treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD), but responders experience varying post-acute outcomes (e.g., relapse vs. recovery). Responders' symptom-change trajectories during response to acute-phase CT may predict longer term outcomes. We studied adult outpatients (N = 220) with recurrent MDD who responded to CT but had residual symptoms. Responders with linear (steady improvement), log-linear (quicker improvement earlier and slower later), one-step (a single, relatively large, stable improvement between adjacent assessments), or undefined (not linear, log-linear, or one-step) symptom trajectories were assessed every 4 months for 32 additional months. Defined (linear, log-linear, one-step) versus undefined acute-phase trajectories predicted lower depressive symptoms (d = 0.36), lower weekly probability of being in a major depressive episode (OR = 0.46), higher weekly probabilities of remission (OR = 1.93) and recovery (OR = 2.35), less hopelessness (d = 0.41), fewer dysfunctional attitudes (d = 0.31), and better social adjustment (d = 0.32) for 32 months after acute-phase CT. Differences among defined trajectory groups were nonsignificant. Responding to acute-phase CT with a defined trajectory (orderly pattern) of symptom reduction predicts better longer term outcomes, but which defined trajectory (linear, log-linear, or one-step) appears unimportant. Frequent measurement of depressive symptoms to identify un/defined CT response trajectories may clarify need for continued clinical monitoring and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Do childhood externalizing disorders predict adult depression? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Annemarie K; Drabick, Deborah A G; Leibenluft, Ellen; Hulvershorn, Leslie A

    2014-10-01

    Childhood externalizing disorders have been linked to adult affective disorders, although some studies fail to substantiate this finding. Multiple longitudinal cohort studies identifying childhood psychopathology and their association with adult psychiatric illness have been published. To examine the association between childhood externalizing symptoms or disorders and the development of adult depression across cohorts, a meta-analysis was performed. Potential studies were identified using a PubMed search through November 2013. All published, prospective, longitudinal, community-sampled cohort studies of children (≤ 13 years) with externalizing symptoms or disorders (aggression, conduct problems, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder), reassessed in adulthood (≥ 18 years) for depressive disorders (major depressive disorder, depressive disorder NOS, or dysthymic disorder) were included. A random effects model was used to summarize the pooled effect sizes. Ancillary analyses considered covariates that could account for variance among studies. Ten studies representing eight cohorts of children initially assessed at age 13 or younger (N = 17,712) were included in the meta-analysis. Childhood externalizing behavior was associated with adult depressive disorders (OR = 1.52, 95% confidence interval = 1.27-1.80, p < 0.0001). Utilizing Orwin's Fail-safe N approach, 263 studies with a mean odds ratio of 1.0 would have to be added to the analysis before the cumulative effect would become trivial. Externalizing psychopathology in childhood is associated with the development of unipolar depressive disorders in adulthood.

  15. Low and decreasing self-esteem during adolescence predict adult depression two decades later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Andrea E; Allemand, Mathias; Robins, Richard W; Fend, Helmut A

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies revealed that low self-esteem is prospectively associated with depression. However, self-esteem has been shown to change over time. We thus hypothesized that not only level but also change in self-esteem affect depression. Using data from a 23-year longitudinal study (N = 1,527), we therefore examined the prospective effects of global and domain-specific self-esteem (physical attractiveness, academic competence) level and change on depressive symptoms 2 decades later. Self-esteem was assessed annually from age 12 to 16, and depression was assessed at age 16 and 35. Results from latent growth curve analyses demonstrated that both level and change in self-esteem served as predictors for adult depression. Individuals who entered adolescence with low self-esteem, and/or whose self-esteem declined further during the adolescent years, were more likely to exhibit symptoms of depression 2 decades later as adults; this pattern held both for global and domain-specific self-esteem. These findings highlight the importance of adolescent self-esteem development for mental health outcomes in adulthood. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Inherent vulnerabilities in monoaminergic pathways predict the emergence of depressive impairments in an animal model of chronic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medel-Matus, Jesús-Servando; Shin, Don; Sankar, Raman; Mazarati, Andrey

    2017-08-01

    The objective was to determine whether the depression comorbid with epilepsy could be predicted based on inherent premorbid patterns of monoaminergic transmission. In male Wistar rats, despair-like and anhedonia-like behaviors were examined using forced swimming and taste preference tests, respectively. Serotonergic raphe nucleus (RN)-prefrontal cortex (PFC) and dopaminergic ventral tegmental area (VTA)-nucleus accumbens (NAcc) pathways were interrogated by fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV). The assays were performed before and 2 months after pilocarpine status epilepticus. In a subset of naive rats, FSCV, coupled with the intensity-dependent stimulation paradigm, detected specific deviations in each pathway (six rats for RN-PFC and seven rats for VTA-NAcc, with overlap in two, of 19 total subjects) in the absence of behavioral impairments. During epilepsy, animals with preexisting deviations in RN-PFC invariably developed despair, and rats with deviations in VTA-NAcc developed anhedonia. Serotonergic and dopaminergic pathways, respectively, showed signs of explicit deterioration. We suggest that epilepsy triggers decompensations in the already vulnerable depression-relevant neuronal circuits, which culminate in depression. The established connection between the identified specific signatures in monoamine transmission in naive rats and specific symptoms of epilepsy-associated depression may help in understanding causes of comorbidity and in developing its early biomarkers. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Brain activation predicts treatment improvement in patients with major depressive disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Samson, Andrea C

    2012-02-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with alterations in brain function that might be useful for therapy evaluation. The current study aimed to identify predictors for therapy improvement and to track functional brain changes during therapy. Twenty-one drug-free patients with MDD underwent functional MRI twice during performance of an emotional perception task: once before and once after 4 weeks of antidepressant treatment (mirtazapine or venlafaxine). Twelve healthy controls were investigated once with the same methods. A significant difference between groups was a relative greater activation of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in the patients vs. controls. Before treatment, patients responding better to pharmacological treatment showed greater activation in the dorsomedial PFC (dmPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (pCC) and superior frontal gyrus (SFG) when viewing of negative emotional pictures was compared with the resting condition. Activations in the caudate nucleus and insula contrasted for emotional compared to neutral stimuli were also associated with successful treatment. Responders had also significantly higher levels of activation, compared to non-responders, in a range of other brain regions. Brain activation related to treatment success might be related to altered self-referential processes and a differential response to external emotional stimuli, suggesting differences in the processing of emotionally salient stimuli between those who are likely to respond to pharmacological treatment and those who will not. The present investigation suggests the pCC, dmPFC, SFG, caudate nucleus and insula may have a key role as a biological marker for treatment response and predictor for therapeutic success.

  18. Sustained medically unexplained physical symptoms in euthymic patients with recurrent depression : Predictive value for recurrence and associations with omega 3- and 6 fatty acids and 5-HTTLPR?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lok, Anja; Assies, Johanna; Koeter, Maarten W J; Bockting, Claudi L H; Wouters, Luuk F; Mocking, Roel J T; Schene, Aart H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of potentially modifiable risk factors for recurrence in recurrent depression could provide opportunities to improve preventive interventions. In this study we aimed to examine the predictive value of medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) on time to recurrence in

  19. Cooperation and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendan Clark, C; Thorne, Christopher B; Hardy, Sonya; Cropsey, Karen L

    2013-09-25

    Deficits in pro-social cooperation are common in many individuals with mental illnesses such as depression. For decades, researchers have used economic game paradigms to compare cross-cultural cooperative behavior. However, research using economic games to assess cooperative behavior in clinical populations is in the early stages. We hypothesized that individuals with greater depressive symptoms would struggle to maintain reciprocity in iterative games, but not in single-iteration games measuring personal values. Participants (n=41) played four computer-based economic games (prisoner's dilemma, the public goods game, the ultimatum game, and the trust game) measuring different aspects of cooperation. Participants completed the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) and other measures of personality and demographics. Analyses assessed the relationships between game performance and psychological distress as measured by the DASS. Significant correlations were found between game performance and depressive symptoms, but not symptoms of anxiety or stress. Performance in the prisoner's dilemma and public goods game was significantly related to depression in a linear regression even when known associations with depressive affect such as age, gender, race, education, marital status, and neuroticism were controlled for. Depressive symptoms were associated with an inability to sustain reciprocal cooperation. Participants showed the predicted deficits in cooperation in these economic games. Economic games show the potential for assessing the social deficits associated with depressive symptoms. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Gratitude uniquely predicts lower depression in chronic illness populations: A longitudinal study of inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Fuschia M; Wood, Alex M

    2017-02-01

    Although gratitude has been identified as a key clinically relevant trait for improving well-being, it is understudied within medical populations. The current study addressed this gap and extended previous and limited cross-sectional research by examining the longitudinal associations of gratitude to depression in 2 chronic illness samples, arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Two chronic illness samples, arthritis (N = 423) and IBD (N = 427), completed online surveys at Time 1 (T1). One hundred sixty-three people with arthritis and 144 people with IBD completed the 6-month follow-up survey (T2). Depression, gratitude, illness cognitions, perceived stress, social support, and disease-related variables were assessed at T1 and T2. At T2, 57.2% of the arthritis sample and 53.4% of the IBD sample met the cut off scores for significant depression. T1 gratitude was negatively associated with depressive symptoms at T1 and T2 in both samples (rs from -.43 to -.50). Regression analyses revealed that T1 gratitude remained a significant and unique predictor of lower T2 depression after controlling for T1 depression, relevant demographic variables, illness cognitions, changes in illness-relevant variables, and another positive psychological construct, thriving, in both samples. As the first investigation of the longitudinal associations of gratitude to psychological well-being in the context of chronic illness, the current study provides important evidence for the relevance of gratitude for health-related clinical populations. Further intervention-based research is warranted to more fully understand the potential benefits of gratitude for adjustment to chronic illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Significance of High Resolution GHRSST on prediction of Indian Summer Monsoon

    KAUST Repository

    Jangid, Buddhi Prakash

    2017-02-24

    In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to assess the importance of very high resolution sea surface temperature (SST) on seasonal rainfall prediction. Two different SST datasets available from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) global model analysis and merged satellite product from Group for High Resolution SST (GHRSST) are used as a lower boundary condition in the WRF model for the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) 2010. Before using NCEP SST and GHRSST for model simulation, an initial verification of NCEP SST and GHRSST are performed with buoy measurements. It is found that approximately 0.4 K root mean square difference (RMSD) in GHRSST and NCEP SST when compared with buoy observations available over the Indian Ocean during 01 May to 30 September 2010. Our analyses suggest that use of GHRSST as lower boundary conditions in the WRF model improve the low level temperature, moisture, wind speed and rainfall prediction over ISM region. Moreover, temporal evolution of surface parameters such as temperature, moisture and wind speed forecasts associated with monsoon is also improved with GHRSST forcing as a lower boundary condition. Interestingly, rainfall prediction is improved with the use of GHRSST over the Western Ghats, which mostly not simulated in the NCEP SST based experiment.

  2. Significant increase of Echinococcus multilocularis prevalencein foxes, but no increased predicted risk for humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.; Dam-Deisz, W.D.C.; Roon, van A.M.; Takumi, K.; Giessen, van der J.W.B.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the zoonotic tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, causative agent ofalveolar echinococcosis (AE), poses a public health risk. A previously designed risk mapmodel predicted a spread of E. multilocularis and increasing numbers of alveolar echinococ-cosis patients in the province of L

  3. Significantly improved HIV inhibitor efficacy prediction employing proteochemometric models generated from antivirogram data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard J P van Westen

    Full Text Available Infection with HIV cannot currently be cured; however it can be controlled by combination treatment with multiple anti-retroviral drugs. Given different viral genotypes for virtually each individual patient, the question now arises which drug combination to use to achieve effective treatment. With the availability of viral genotypic data and clinical phenotypic data, it has become possible to create computational models able to predict an optimal treatment regimen for an individual patient. Current models are based only on sequence data derived from viral genotyping; chemical similarity of drugs is not considered. To explore the added value of chemical similarity inclusion we applied proteochemometric models, combining chemical and protein target properties in a single bioactivity model. Our dataset was a large scale clinical database of genotypic and phenotypic information (in total ca. 300,000 drug-mutant bioactivity data points, 4 (NNRTI, 8 (NRTI or 9 (PI drugs, and 10,700 (NNRTI 10,500 (NRTI or 27,000 (PI mutants. Our models achieved a prediction error below 0.5 Log Fold Change. Moreover, when directly compared with previously published sequence data, derived models PCM performed better in resistance classification and prediction of Log Fold Change (0.76 log units versus 0.91. Furthermore, we were able to successfully confirm both known and identify previously unpublished, resistance-conferring mutations of HIV Reverse Transcriptase (e.g. K102Y, T216M and HIV Protease (e.g. Q18N, N88G from our dataset. Finally, we applied our models prospectively to the public HIV resistance database from Stanford University obtaining a correct resistance prediction rate of 84% on the full set (compared to 80% in previous work on a high quality subset. We conclude that proteochemometric models are able to accurately predict the phenotypic resistance based on genotypic data even for novel mutants and mixtures. Furthermore, we add an applicability domain to

  4. Prediction of Depression in Cancer Patients With Different Classification Criteria, Linear Discriminant Analysis versus Logistic Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayan, Zahra; Mohammad Gholi Mezerji, Naser; Shayan, Leila; Naseri, Parisa

    2015-11-03

    Logistic regression (LR) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) are two popular statistical models for prediction of group membership. Although they are very similar, the LDA makes more assumptions about the data. When categorical and continuous variables used simultaneously, the optimal choice between the two models is questionable. In most studies, classification error (CE) is used to discriminate between subjects in several groups, but this index is not suitable to predict the accuracy of the outcome. The present study compared LR and LDA models using classification indices. This cross-sectional study selected 243 cancer patients. Sample sets of different sizes (n = 50, 100, 150, 200, 220) were randomly selected and the CE, B, and Q classification indices were calculated by the LR and LDA models. CE revealed the a lack of superiority for one model over the other, but the results showed that LR performed better than LDA for the B and Q indices in all situations. No significant effect for sample size on CE was noted for selection of an optimal model. Assessment of the accuracy of prediction of real data indicated that the B and Q indices are appropriate for selection of an optimal model. The results of this study showed that LR performs better in some cases and LDA in others when based on CE. The CE index is not appropriate for classification, although the B and Q indices performed better and offered more efficient criteria for comparison and discrimination between groups.

  5. Facing HIV as a family: predicting depressive symptoms with correlated responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Liang, Li-Jung; Ding, Ying Ying; Ji, Guoping

    2011-04-01

    This study makes an effort to go beyond traditional analytical models to explore the complex and interactive nature of family processes. A total of 79 families affected by HIV in China participated in the study (79 persons living with HIV [PLH] and 79 seronegative family members), with in-person interviews conducted in 2009. A higher level of depressive symptoms was reported by PLH participants than their family members. Negative associations between depressive symptoms and social support and family relations were observed for both PLH and their family members. Results from actor-partner interdependence models indicate that the depressive symptoms of PLH and their family members were positively correlated when either the family relations measure or the social support measure was included in the model. Results highlight the link between family experience and individual well-being, with implications for designing and implementing interventions for families impacted by HIV.

  6. Depression among Parents Two to Six Years Following the Loss of a Child by Suicide: A Novel Prediction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hed Myrberg, Ida; Omerov, Pernilla; Steineck, Gunnar; Nyberg, Ullakarin

    2016-01-01

    Background Parents who lose a child by suicide have elevated risks of depression. No clinical prediction tools exist to identify which suicide-bereaved parents will be particularly vulnerable; we aimed to create a prediction model for long-term depression for this purpose. Method During 2009 and 2010 we collected data using a nationwide study-specific questionnaire among parents in Sweden who had lost a child aged 15-30 by suicide in years 2004-2007. Current depression was assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and a single question on antidepressant use. We considered 26 potential predictors assumed clinically assessable at the time of loss, including socio-economics, relationship status, history of psychological stress and morbidity, and suicide-related circumstances. We developed a novel prediction model using logistic regression with all subsets selection and stratified cross-validation. The model was assessed for classification performance and calibration, overall and stratified by time since loss. Results In total 666/915 (73%) participated. The model showed acceptable classification performance (adjusted area under the curve [AUC] = 0.720, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.673-0.766), but performed classification best for those at shortest time since loss. Agreement between model-predicted and observed risks was fair, but with a tendency for underestimation and overestimation for individuals with shortest and longest time since loss, respectively. The identified predictors include female sex (odds ratio [OR] = 1.84); sick-leave (OR = 2.81) or unemployment (OR = 1.64); psychological premorbidity debuting during the last 10 years, before loss (OR = 3.64), or more than 10 years ago (OR = 4.96); suicide in biological relatives (OR = 1.54); with non-legal guardianship during the child’s upbringing (OR = 0.48); and non-biological parenthood (OR = 0.22) found as protective. Conclusions Our prediction model shows promising internal validity, but

  7. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) versus acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for dementia family caregivers with significant depressive symptoms: Results of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losada, Andrés; Márquez-González, María; Romero-Moreno, Rosa; Mausbach, Brent T; López, Javier; Fernández-Fernández, Virginia; Nogales-González, Celia

    2015-08-01

    The differential efficacy of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for dementia family caregivers' is analyzed through a randomized controlled trial. Participants were 135 caregivers with high depressive symptomatology who were randomly allocated to the intervention conditions or a control group (CG). Pre-, postintervention, and follow-up measurements assessed depressive symptomatology, anxiety, leisure, dysfunctional thoughts, and experiential avoidance. Depression: Significant effects of interventions compared with CG were found for CBT (p < .001, d = 0.98, number needed to treat [NNT] = 3.61) and ACT (p < .001, d = 1.17, NNT = 3.53) at postintervention, but were maintained only at follow-up for CBT (p = .02, d = 0.74, NNT = 9.71). Clinically significant change was observed in 26.7% participants in CBT, 24.2% in ACT, and 0% in CG. At follow-up, 10.53% in CBT and 4% in ACT were recovered (0% CG). Anxiety: At postintervention, ACT participants showed lower anxiety than CBT participants (p < .05, d = 0.50) and CG participants (p < .01, d = 0.79, NNT = 3.86), with no effects at follow-up. At postintervention, 23.33% in CBT, 36.36% in ACT, and 6.45% in CG showed clinically significant change. At follow-up, 26.32% in CBT, 36% in ACT, and 13.64% in CG were recovered. Significant changes at postintervention were found in leisure and dysfunctional thoughts in both ACT and CBT, with changes in experiential avoidance only for ACT. Similar results were obtained for ACT and CBT. ACT seems to be a viable and effective treatment for dementia caregivers. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Causal beliefs about depression in different cultural groups – What do cognitive psychological theories of causal learning and reasoning predict?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    York eHagmayer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive psychological research focusses on causal learning and reasoning while cognitive anthropological and social science research tend to focus on systems of beliefs. Our aim was to explore how these two types of research can inform each other. Cognitive psychological theories (causal model theory and causal Bayes nets were used to derive predictions for systems of causal beliefs. These predictions were then applied to lay theories of depression as a specific test case. A systematic literature review on causal beliefs about depression was conducted, including original, quantitative research. Thirty-six studies investigating 13 non-Western and 32 Western cultural groups were analysed by classifying assumed causes and preferred forms of treatment into common categories. Relations between beliefs and treatment preferences were assessed. Substantial agreement between cultural groups was found with respect to the impact of observable causes. Stress was generally rated as most important. Less agreement resulted for hidden, especially supernatural causes. Causal beliefs were clearly related to treatment preferences in Western groups, while evidence was mostly lacking for non-Western groups. Overall predictions were supported, but there were considerable methodological limitations. Pointers to future research, which may combine studies on causal beliefs with experimental paradigms on causal reasoning, are given.

  9. Causal beliefs about depression in different cultural groups-what do cognitive psychological theories of causal learning and reasoning predict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmayer, York; Engelmann, Neele

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive psychological research focuses on causal learning and reasoning while cognitive anthropological and social science research tend to focus on systems of beliefs. Our aim was to explore how these two types of research can inform each other. Cognitive psychological theories (causal model theory and causal Bayes nets) were used to derive predictions for systems of causal beliefs. These predictions were then applied to lay theories of depression as a specific test case. A systematic literature review on causal beliefs about depression was conducted, including original, quantitative research. Thirty-six studies investigating 13 non-Western and 32 Western cultural groups were analyzed by classifying assumed causes and preferred forms of treatment into common categories. Relations between beliefs and treatment preferences were assessed. Substantial agreement between cultural groups was found with respect to the impact of observable causes. Stress was generally rated as most important. Less agreement resulted for hidden, especially supernatural causes. Causal beliefs were clearly related to treatment preferences in Western groups, while evidence was mostly lacking for non-Western groups. Overall predictions were supported, but there were considerable methodological limitations. Pointers to future research, which may combine studies on causal beliefs with experimental paradigms on causal reasoning, are given.

  10. Predicting Terrestrial Flagstone Reservoirs in the Sha-I Member of the Qibei Depression in the Dagang Oilfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Huaiyan; LIU Zhihong; XU Maoquan; GUAN Baocong

    2004-01-01

    There are few 3-D seismic profiles and drillings in the middle part of the Qibei depression in the Dagang oilfield, and more than 70% of the 2-D seismic profiles were completed before the 1980s. Meanwhile, changes in the terrestrial formations in this region have been large and complex. These factors have made it difficult to predict reservoirs in this area. The purpose of this paper is to establish a methodology for predicting potential gas and oil reservoirs. Our research combines sequence stratigraphy, well-logs, and seismic analysis to elucidate the prediction of flagstone reservoirs in the S1 (Sha-I) Member in the middle of the Qibei depression. Previous research indicates that these rocks were deposited in an environment that had a semiarid, northern subtropical, and warm, humid climate. The objective strata currently consist mainly of lake facies, deeper lake facies, and shore-shallow lake facies. The study reveals that the lower section of the S1 Member is an important objective region for exploration.

  11. Classification of Co-Occurring Depression and Substance Abuse Symptoms Predicts Suicide Attempts in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Jenell M.; Stewart, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Although both depression and substance use have been found to contribute to suicide attempts, the synergistic impact of these disorders has not been fully explored. Additionally, the impact of subthreshold presentations of these disorders has not been researched. We utilized the Quadrant Model of Classification (a matrix of severity of two…

  12. Therapist Competence in Cognitive Therapy for Depression: Predicting Subsequent Symptom Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Daniel R.; Brotman, Melissa A.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Hollon, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The efficacy of cognitive therapy (CT) for depression has been well established. Measures of the adequacy of therapists' delivery of treatment are critical to facilitating therapist training and treatment dissemination. While some studies have shown an association between CT competence and outcome, researchers have yet to address…

  13. Prediction of Response to Medication and Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Jay C.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Gallop, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial found nearly equivalent response rates for antidepressant medications and cognitive therapy in a sample of moderate to severely depressed outpatients. In this article, the authors seek to identify the variables that were associated with response across both treatments as well as variables that predicted…

  14. Possible Insomnia Predicts Some Risky Behaviors among Adolescents when Controlling for Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrett, Christina D.; Gaultney, Jane F.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether previously reported links between sleep and risk taking among adolescents (E. M. O'Brien & J. A. Mindell, 2005) are associated--concurrently, longitudinally, or both--with sleep or underlying depression. The present study analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of 4,353 adolescents in the United…

  15. A Prospective Study on How Symptoms in a Network Predict the Onset of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, L.; van Borkulo, C.D.; Borsboom, D.; Schoevers, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    To explain the overt heterogeneous nature of major depressive disorder (MDD), it could be valuable to focus on individual symptoms [1]. Recent research, for example, showed that MDD symptoms differ in their underlying biology, risk factors and psychosocial impairments [for a review, see [2

  16. Predicting Suicidal Ideation with the Depression Hopelessness and Suicide Screening Form (DHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jeremy F.; Kroner, Daryl G.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examines a series of interactions between a prior history of suicidal behavior and cognitions permissive of suicide, and the variables of depression and hopelessness in the relationship with suicidal ideation in two samples of incarcerated offenders. Results indicate that both a prior history of suicidal behavior and cognitions…

  17. Interaction between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and traumatic childhood events predicts depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lok, A; Bockting, C L H; Koeter, M W J; Snieder, H; Assies, J; Mocking, R J T; Vinkers, C H; Kahn, R S; Boks, M P; Schene, A H

    Childhood trauma is associated with the onset and recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD). The thermolabile T variant of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) is associated with a limited (oxidative) stress defense. Therefore, C677T MTHFR could be a

  18. Parental Behaviors during Family Interactions Predict Changes in Depression and Anxiety Symptoms during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Orli S.; Dudgeon, Paul; Sheeber, Lisa B.; Yap, Marie B. H.; Simmons, Julian G.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective, longitudinal relations between parental behaviors observed during parent-adolescent interactions, and the development of depression and anxiety symptoms in a community-based sample of 194 adolescents. Positive and negative parental behaviors were examined, with negative behaviors operationalized to…

  19. Prediction of Response to Medication and Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Jay C.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Gallop, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial found nearly equivalent response rates for antidepressant medications and cognitive therapy in a sample of moderate to severely depressed outpatients. In this article, the authors seek to identify the variables that were associated with response across both treatments as well as variables that predicted…

  20. Lack of association between conversation partners' nonverbal behavior predicts recurrence of depression, independently of personality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, EH; Bouhuys, AL; Geerts, E; Van Os, TWDP; Ormel, J

    2006-01-01

    High neuroticism and low extraversion are related to depression and its recurrence. We investigated whether nonverbal involvement behavior during social interaction is one of the factors via which these relations are effectuated. We measured nonverbal expressions of involvement from videotaped behav

  1. Prediction and prevention of suicide in patients with unipolar depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Xenia; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Kaprinis, George; Rihmer, Zoltan

    2007-09-05

    Epidemiological data suggest that between 59 and 87% of suicide victims suffered from major depression while up to 15% of these patients will eventually commit suicide. Male gender, previous suicide attempt(s), comorbid mental disorders, adverse life-situations, acute psycho-social stressors etc. also constitute robust risk factors. Anxiety and minor depression present with a low to moderate increase in suicide risk but anxiety-depression comorbidity increases this risk dramatically Contrary to the traditional psychoanalytic approach which considers suicide as a retrospective murder or an aggression turned in-wards, more recent studies suggest that the motivations to commit suicide may vary and are often too obscure. Neurobiological data suggest that low brain serotonin activity might play a key role along with the tryptophan hydroxylase gene. Social factors include social support networks, religion etc. It is proven that most suicide victims had asked for professional help just before committing suicide, however they were either not diagnosed (particularly males) or the treatment they received was inappropriate or inadequate. The conclusion is that promoting suicide prevention requires the improving of training and skills of both psychiatrists and many non-psychiatrists and especially GPs in recognizing and treating depression and anxiety. A shift of focus of attention is required in primary care to detect potentially suicidal patients presenting with psychological problems. The proper use of antidepressants, after a careful diagnostic evaluation, is important and recent studies suggest that successful acute and long-term antidepressant pharmacotherapy reduces suicide morbidity and mortality.

  2. Parental Behaviors during Family Interactions Predict Changes in Depression and Anxiety Symptoms during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Orli S.; Dudgeon, Paul; Sheeber, Lisa B.; Yap, Marie B. H.; Simmons, Julian G.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective, longitudinal relations between parental behaviors observed during parent-adolescent interactions, and the development of depression and anxiety symptoms in a community-based sample of 194 adolescents. Positive and negative parental behaviors were examined, with negative behaviors operationalized to…

  3. Possible Insomnia Predicts Some Risky Behaviors among Adolescents when Controlling for Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrett, Christina D.; Gaultney, Jane F.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether previously reported links between sleep and risk taking among adolescents (E. M. O'Brien & J. A. Mindell, 2005) are associated--concurrently, longitudinally, or both--with sleep or underlying depression. The present study analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of 4,353 adolescents in the United States…

  4. Depressive symptoms in elderly patients predict poor adjustment after somatic events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, P; Ormel, J; Slaets, JPJ; Kempen, GIJM; Ranchor, AV; van Jaarsveld, CHM; Scaf-Klomp, W; Sanderman, R

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The authors tested the hypothesis that elderly subjects with premorbid depressive symptoms are at increased risk of poor adjustment after a somatic event. Methods: The GLAS study contains a baseline assessment and a follow-up of subjects who experienced post-baseline acute myocardial infa

  5. Reduced Autobiographical Memory Specificity Predicts Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder after Recent Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleim, Birgit; Ehlers, Anke

    2008-01-01

    In this prospective longitudinal study, the authors examined the relationship between reduced specificity in autobiographical memory retrieval and the development of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and specific phobia after injury in an assault. Assault survivors (N = 203) completed the Autobiographical Memory Test (J. M. G.…

  6. A cerebellar framework for predictive coding and homeostatic regulation in depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.

    2016-01-01

    Depressive disorder is associated with abnormalities in the processing of reward and punishment signals and disturbances in homeostatic regulation. These abnormalities are proposed to impair error minimization routines for reducing uncertainty. Several lines of research point towards a role of the c

  7. Turning the pink cloud grey: Dampening of positive affect predicts postpartum depressive symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raes, Filip; Smets, Jorien; Wessel, Ineke; Van Den Eede, Filip; Nelis, Sabine; Franck, Erik; Jacquemyn, Yves; Hanssens, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Maladaptive response styles to negative affect have been shown to be associated with prospective (postpartum) depression. Whether maladaptive styles to positive affect are also critically involved is understudied, even though anhedonia (a correlate of low positive affectivity) is a cardin

  8. Does depression predict coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease equally well? The Health and Social Support Prospective Cohort Study. : Depression, Coronary heart and cerebrovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Self-reported depression using a standardized questionnaire and clinical markers of mild to severe depression were associated with an increased risk for CHD. There was no clear evidence that depression is a risk factor for CBVD, but this needs further confirmation.

  9. The significance of the ProtDeform score for structure prediction and alignment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Rocha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When a researcher uses a program to align two proteins and gets a score, one of her main concerns is how often the program gives a similar score to pairs that are or are not in the same fold. This issue was analysed in detail recently for the program TM-align with its associated TM-score. It was shown that because the TM-score is length independent, it allows a P-value and a hit probability to be defined depending only on the score. Also, it was found that the TM-scores of gapless alignments closely follow an Extreme Value Distribution (EVD. The program ProtDeform for structural protein alignment was developed recently and is characterised by the ability to propose different transformations of different protein regions. Our goal is to analyse its associated score to allow a researcher to have objective reasons to prefer one aligner over another, and carry out a better interpretation of the output. RESULTS: The study on the ProtDeform score reveals that it is length independent in a wider score range than TM-scores and that PD-scores of gapless (random alignments also approximately follow an EVD. On the CASP8 predictions, PD-scores and TM-scores, with respect to native structures, are highly correlated (0.95, and show that around a fifth of the predictions have a quality as low as 99.5% of the random scores. Using the Gold Standard benchmark, ProtDeform has lower probabilities of error than TM-align both at a similar speed. The analysis is extended to homology discrimination showing that, again, ProtDeform offers higher hit probabilities than TM-align. Finally, we suggest using three different P-values according to the three different contexts: Gapless alignments, optimised alignments for fold discrimination and that for superfamily discrimination. In conclusion, PD-scores are at the very least as valuable for prediction scoring as TM-scores, and on the protein classification problem, even more reliable.

  10. Depression and catastrophizing predict suicidal ideation in tertiary care patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripp, Dean A; Nickel, J Curtis; Krsmanovic, Adrijana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to evaluate psychosocial factors as predictors of suicidal ideation (SI) in a tertiary care outpatient sample of women suffering from interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS). Methods: The patients are women managed at tertiary care centres (n=190). Controls were...... is the first to implicate multiple psychosocial risk factors over and above IC/BPS-specific symptoms and patient pain experience in SI in women with IC/BPS. Depression in particular is uniquely important in predicting suicidality. These results support a multidisciplinary, proactive approach to IC...

  11. Significance of Bioindicators for Early Predictions on Diagnosis and Therapy of Irradiated Minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Maria; Port, Matthias; Gulani, Jatinder; Chappell, Mark; Abend, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Decisions on whether to start a therapeutic intervention for management of the Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) should be made early after exposure, and it should be based on readily available clinical signs and laboratory parameters. Here, the authors use the minipig to assess if early prediction of the later developing clinical outcome and necessity of therapeutic interventions can be determined within the first 3 d after exposure and whether it is comparable to human data. Retrospective analysis of data accumulated in the period 2009-2012 was used. Male Göttingen minipigs (age 4-5 mo, weight 9-10 kg) were irradiated (or sham-irradiated) bilaterally with gamma-photons (Co, 0.5-0.6 Gy min) in the dose range of 1.6-12 Gy. Complete blood counts, serum chemistry, and clinical symptoms were collected up to 60 d after irradiation in untreated minipigs. Changes in these early parameters (up to 3 d after exposure) were correlated with later occurrence (10-60 d after irradiation) of (1) hematological severity scores, (2) severe thrombocytopenia, (3) severe neutropenia, as well as need for (4) therapeutic intervention, (5) administration of cytokines/antibiotics, or (6) thrombocyte transfusions. Binary endpoints were analyzed using logistic regression analysis and calculating receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Most predictive were decreased lymphocyte counts and increases in body temperature at 3 h after irradiation. These data corroborate earlier findings performed on human radiation victims suffering from severe hematological syndrome and provide further evidence for the suitability of the minipig model as a potential alternative non-rodent animal model.

  12. Predictive significance of tissue eosinophilia for nasal polyp recurrence in the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Hongfei; Meng, Yifan; Piao, Yingshi; Wang, Chengshuo; Zhang, Luo; Bachert, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) remains a challenging clinical entity with its propensity for recurrence. Tissue eosinophilia is a hallmark of CRSwNP, and its role in polyp recurrence is a subject of much investigation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between clinical parameters, especially tissue eosinophilia and polyp recurrence, and to identify the optimal cutoff value of tissue eosinophilia as a predictor for polyp recurrence in Chinese subjects. Overall, 387 patients with CRSwNP were enrolled in this retrospective analysis and postoperative follow-up for polyp recurrence was over a period that lasted >24 months (mean [standard deviation], 34.03 ± 4.95 months). The baseline demographic and clinical features and the preoperative computed tomography were compared, and mucosal specimens obtained at endoscopic sinus surgery were assessed for inflammatory cells by using histocytologic staining. Predictive factors associated with polyp recurrence were analyzed by logistic regression analysis, and optimal cutoff points of the predictors were determined by receiver operating characteristic curves and the Youden index. A total of 55.3% patients (214/387) experienced recurrence. Tissue eosinophilia markedly outweighed other parameters and correlated with polyp recurrence. Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated that a cutoff value of 27% tissue eosinophils predicted recurrence with 96.7% sensitivity and 92.5% specificity (area under the curve = 0.969; p 27% of total cells or a tissue eosinophil absolute count of >55 eosinophils per high power field may act as a reliable prognostic indicator for nasal polyp recurrence within 2 years after surgery.

  13. Safety behaviors and sleep effort predict sleep disturbance and fatigue in an outpatient sample with anxiety and depressive disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairholme, Christopher P.; Manber, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Objective Theoretical and empirical support for the role of dysfunctional beliefs, safety behaviors, and increased sleep effort in the maintenance of insomnia has begun to accumulate. It is not yet known how these factors predict sleep disturbance and fatigue occurring in the context of anxiety and mood disorders. It was hypothesized that these three insomnia-specific cognitive–behavioral factors would be uniquely associated with insomnia and fatigue among patients with emotional disorders after adjusting for current symptoms of anxiety and depression and trait levels of neuroticism and extraversion. Methods Outpatients with a current anxiety or mood disorder (N = 63) completed self-report measures including the Dysfunctional Beliefs About Sleep Scale (DBAS), Sleep-Related Safety Behaviors Questionnaire (SRBQ), Glasgow Sleep Effort Scale (GSES), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), NEO Five-Factor Inventory (FFI), and the 21-item Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS). Multivariate path analysis was used to evaluate study hypotheses. Results SRBQ (B = .60, p anxiety and depressive disorders with disturbed sleep. PMID:24529043

  14. MRI-Based Classification Models in Prediction of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Late-Life Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Aleksandra K.; Westman, Eric; Borza, Tom; Beyer, Mona K.; Engedal, Knut; Aarsland, Dag; Selbaek, Geir; Haberg, Asta K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Late-life depression (LLD) is associated with development of different types of dementia. Identification of LLD patients, who will develop cognitive decline, i.e., the early stage of dementia would help to implement interventions earlier. The purpose of this study was to assess whether structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in LLD patients can predict mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia 1 year prior to the diagnosis. Methods: LLD patients underwent brain MRI at baseline and repeated clinical assessment after 1-year. Structural brain measurements were obtained using Freesurfer software (v. 5.1) from the T1W brain MRI images. MRI-based Random Forest classifier was used to discriminate between LLD who developed MCI or dementia after 1-year follow-up and cognitively stable LLD. Additionally, a previously established Random Forest model trained on 185 patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) vs. 225 cognitively normal elderly from the Alzheimer’s disease Neuroimaging Initiative was tested on the LLD data set (ADNI model). Results: MCI and dementia diagnoses were predicted in LLD patients with 76%/68%/84% accuracy/sensitivity/specificity. Adding the baseline Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores to the models improved accuracy/sensitivity/specificity to 81%/75%/86%. The best model predicted MCI status alone using MRI and baseline MMSE scores with accuracy/sensitivity/specificity of 89%/85%/90%. The most important region for all the models was right ventral diencephalon, including hypothalamus. Its volume correlated negatively with the number of depressive episodes. ADNI model trained on AD vs. Controls using SV could predict MCI-DEM patients with 67% accuracy. Conclusion: LDD patients developing MCI and dementia can be discriminated from LLD patients remaining cognitively stable with good accuracy based on baseline structural MRI alone. Baseline MMSE score improves prediction accuracy. Ventral diencephalon, including the hypothalamus

  15. Antenatal depression strongly predicts postnatal depression in primary health care Depressão antenatal prediz fortemente depressão pós-parto na atenção básica à saúde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Faisal-Cury

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between antenatal and postnatal depression and to examine the role of socioeconomic conditions in the risk of postnatal depression. METHODS: A prospective cohort study, conducted between May 2005 and January 2006, with 831 pregnant women recruited from primary care clinics in the public sector in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The presence of antenatal and postnatal depression was measured with the Self Report Questionnaire (SRQ-20. Sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics and obstetric information were obtained through a questionnaire. Crude and adjusted risk ratios (RR, with 95% CI, were calculated using a Poisson regression. RESULTS: The prevalence of postnatal depressive symptoms was 31.2% (95%CI: 27.8-34.8%. Among the 219 mothers who had depressive symptoms, nearly 50% had already shown depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Women who had antenatal depression were 2.4 times more likely to present with postnatal depression than were women who did not have such symptoms during pregnancy. In the multivariate analysis, higher scores for assets (RR: 0.76, 95% CI 0.61-0.96, higher education (RR: 0.75 95%CI 0.59-0.96, daily contact with neighbors (RR: 0.68, 95%CI 0.51-0.90 and antenatal depression (RR: 2.44, 95%CI 1.93-3.08 remained independently associated with postnatal depression. CONCLUSIONS: Antenatal and postnatal depression are highly prevalent in the primary care setting.OBJETIVO: Estimar a associação entre depressão pré-natal e pós-natal, e examinar o papel das condições sócioeconômicas sobre o risco de depressão pós-parto. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte prospectivo, realizado entre maio de 2005 e janeiro de 2006, com 831 gestantes recrutadas de clínicas de cuidados básicos, do setor público, na cidade de São Paulo, Brasil. Presença de depressão pré-natal e pós-natal foi medida com o Self Report Questionnaire (SRQ-20. Características sócio-demográficas e socioecon

  16. Predicting clinically significant changes in motor and functional outcomes after robot-assisted stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-wei; Lin, Keh-chung; Wu, Ching-yi; Lien, Hen-yu; Chen, Jean-lon; Chen, Chih-chi; Chang, Wei-han

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the predictors of minimal clinically important changes on outcome measures after robot-assisted therapy (RT). Observational cohort study. Outpatient rehabilitation clinics. A cohort of outpatients with stroke (N=55). Patients with stroke received RT for 90 to 105min/d, 5d/wk, for 4 weeks. Outcome measures, including the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Motor Activity Log (MAL), were measured before and after the intervention. Potential predictors include age, sex, side of lesion, time since stroke onset, finger extension, Box and Block Test (BBT) score, and FMA distal score. Statistical analysis showed that the BBT score (odds ratio[OR]=1.06; P=.04) was a significant predictor of clinically important changes in the FMA. Being a woman (OR=3.9; P=.05) and BBT score (OR=1.07; P=.02) were the 2 significant predictors of clinically significant changes in the MAL amount of use subscale. The BBT score was the significant predictor of an increased probability of achieving clinically important changes in the MAL quality of movement subscale (OR=1.07; P=.02). The R(2) values for the 3 logistic regression models were low (.114-.272). The results revealed that patients with stroke who had greater manual dexterity measured by the BBT appear to have a higher probability of achieving clinically significant motor and functional outcomes after RT. Further studies are needed to evaluate other potential predictors to improve the models and validate the findings. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Using the IAT to predict ethnic and racial discrimination: small effect sizes of unknown societal significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Frederick L; Mitchell, Gregory; Blanton, Hart; Jaccard, James; Tetlock, Philip E

    2015-04-01

    Greenwald, Banaji, and Nosek (2015) present a reanalysis of the meta-analysis by Oswald, Mitchell, Blanton, Jaccard, and Tetlock (2013) that examined the effect sizes of Implicit Association Tests (IATs) designed to predict racial and ethnic discrimination. We discuss points of agreement and disagreement with respect to methods used to synthesize the IAT studies, and we correct an error by Greenwald et al. that obscures a key contribution of our meta-analysis. In the end, all of the meta-analyses converge on the conclusion that, across diverse methods of coding and analyzing the data, IAT scores are not good predictors of ethnic or racial discrimination, and explain, at most, small fractions of the variance in discriminatory behavior in controlled laboratory settings. The thought experiments presented by Greenwald et al. go well beyond the lab to claim systematic IAT effects in noisy real-world settings, but these hypothetical exercises depend crucially on untested and, arguably, untenable assumptions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Patient recall of specific cognitive therapy contents predicts adherence and outcome in adults with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Ong, Stacie L; Harvey, Allison G

    2017-10-01

    The current study examined whether and which specific contents of patients' memory for cognitive therapy (CT) were associated with treatment adherence and outcome. Data were drawn from a pilot RCT of forty-eight depressed adults, who received either CT plus Memory Support Intervention (CT + Memory Support) or CT-as-usual. Patients' memory for treatment was measured using the Patient Recall Task and responses were coded into cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) codes, such as CBT Model and Cognitive Restructuring, and non-CBT codes, such as individual coping strategies and no code. Treatment adherence was measured using therapist and patient ratings during treatment. Depression outcomes included treatment response, remission, and recurrence. Total number of CBT codes recalled was not significantly different comparing CT + Memory Support to CT-as-usual. Total CBT codes recalled were positively associated with adherence, while non-CBT codes recalled were negatively associated with adherence. Treatment responders (vs. non-responders) exhibited a significant increase in their recall of Cognitive Restructuring from session 7 to posttreatment. Greater recall of Cognitive Restructuring was marginally significantly associated with remission. Greater total number of CBT codes recalled (particularly CBT Model) was associated with non-recurrence of depression. Results highlight the important relationships between patients' memory for treatment and treatment adherence and outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Aerobic Exercise Does Not Predict Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor And Cortisol Alterations in Depressed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamego, Murilo Khede; de Souza Moura, Antonio Marcos; Paes, Flávia; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; Lattari, Eduardo; Rimes, Ridson; Manochio, João; Budde, Henning; Wegner, Mirko; Mura, Gioia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of depression is related to neurobiological changes that occur in the monoamine system, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, neurogenesis system and the neuroimmune system. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the research of the effects of exercise on brain function, with a special focus on its effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cortisol and other biomarkers. Thus, the aim of this study is to present a review investigating the acute and chronic effects of aerobic exercise on BDNF and cortisol levels in individuals with depression. It was not possible to establish an interaction between aerobic exercise and concentration of BDNF and cortisol, which may actually be the result of the divergence of methods, such as type of exercises, duration of the sessions, and prescribed intensity and frequency of sessions.

  20. Do attachment representations predict depression and anxiety in psychiatrically hospitalized prepubertal children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Geoff; Stroh, Martha; Valdez, Adina

    2012-01-01

    Thirty-six prepubertal inpatients were videotaped completing five stories thematically related to attachment experiences and classified by their attachment representations. Children also completed the Children's Depression Inventory and Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents-Revised. Mothers completed demographic questionnaires. Percentage of secure (B) attachment was only about one tenth of the normative percentage, anxious-ambivalent (C) attachment was between two and three times the normative percentage, and disorganized (D) attachment was almost twice the normative percentage. Both D attachment and the total number of disorganized story responses were associated with negative self-esteem and clinical-range depression. Anxious-avoidant (A) attachment decreased the likelihood, while C and D attachment increased the likelihood, of separation anxiety disorder. Clinical intervention needs to focus on the meaning of parental relationships represented in the child's mind, specifically the negative self-esteem and separation anxiety associated with the lack of felt security provided by the parents.

  1. Do depressive traits and hostility predict age-related decline in general intelligence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Barefoot, John Calvin; Avlund, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    on decline in general intelligence over a 30-year period. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory was administered at a 50-year baseline exam, and from this inventory the Obvious Depression Scale and an abbreviated version of the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale were derived. At the 50-year baseline...... and at the 60-, 70-, and 80-year followups the full version of Wechsler's Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) was administered to 673, 513, 136, and 184 participants. Mixed effects statistical models were used to evaluate both the effect of the personality scores on level of intelligence and the interaction between...... the personality scores and the time since followup. Analyses were adjusted for demographic background and a wide range of lifestyle factors. Both obvious depression and hostility were negatively associated with level of intelligence, but personality scores did not influence rate of decline in general intelligence....

  2. Prospective prediction of major depressive disorder from cortisol awakening responses in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, Emma K.; Doane, Leah D.; Zinbarg, Richard E.; Mineka, Susan; Craske, Michelle G.; Griffith, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Levels of the stress-sensitive hormone cortisol increase dramatically in the first 30-40 minutes after waking, an effect known as the cortisol awakening response (CAR). There is considerable cross-sectional evidence that psychosocial stress is associated with an increased CAR, and the CAR has been found to be altered in the presence of stress-related diseases, including Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). To date, no prospective longitudinal studies have examined whether individual differences i...

  3. Prediction and prevention of suicide in patients with unipolar depression and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaprinis George

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epidemiological data suggest that between 59 and 87% of suicide victims suffered from major depression while up to 15% of these patients will eventually commit suicide. Male gender, previous suicide attempt(s, comorbid mental disorders, adverse life-situations, acute psycho-social stressors etc. also constitute robust risk factors. Anxiety and minor depression present with a low to moderate increase in suicide risk but anxiety-depression comorbidity increases this risk dramatically Contrary to the traditional psychoanalytic approach which considers suicide as a retrospective murder or an aggression turned in-wards, more recent studies suggest that the motivations to commit suicide may vary and are often too obscure. Neurobiological data suggest that low brain serotonin activity might play a key role along with the tryptophan hydroxylase gene. Social factors include social support networks, religion etc. It is proven that most suicide victims had asked for professional help just before committing suicide, however they were either not diagnosed (particularly males or the treatment they received was inappropriate or inadequate. The conclusion is that promoting suicide prevention requires the improving of training and skills of both psychiatrists and many non-psychiatrists and especially GPs in recognizing and treating depression and anxiety. A shift of focus of attention is required in primary care to detect potentially suicidal patients presenting with psychological problems. The proper use of antidepressants, after a careful diagnostic evaluation, is important and recent studies suggest that successful acute and long-term antidepressant pharmacotherapy reduces suicide morbidity and mortality.

  4. Personality traits predict job stress, depression and anxiety among junior physicians

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: High levels of stress and deteriorating mental health among medical students are commonly reported. In Bergen, Norway, we explored the impact of personality traits measured early in their curriculum on stress reactions and levels of depression and anxiety symptoms as junior physicians following graduation.Methods: Medical students (n = 201) from two classes participated in a study on personality traits and mental health early in the curriculum. A questionnaire measuring p...

  5. Does sleep disturbance predict depression in elderly people? A study in inner London.

    OpenAIRE

    Livingston, G.; Blizard, B; Mann, A

    1993-01-01

    Insomnia in elderly people has traditionally been regarded as inevitable and trivial. A longitudinal study was undertaken to examine the prevalence of sleep disturbance among elderly people in an inner London community and its association with demographic variables, depression, dementia and disability. Those aged 65 years and over living at home were interviewed using a validated and reliable semi-structured interview schedule. A total of 705 people were interviewed in 1987-88 and 524 were re...

  6. Is the Predictability of New-Onset Postpartum Depression Better During Pregnancy or in the Early Postpartum Period? A Prospective Study in Croatian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakić Radoš, Sandra; Herman, Radoslav; Tadinac, Meri

    2016-01-01

    The researchers' aim was to examine whether it was better to predict new-onset postpartum depression (PPD) during pregnancy or immediately after childbirth. A prospective study conducted in Croatia followed women (N = 272) from the third trimester of pregnancy through the early postpartum period (within the first 3 postpartum days), to 6 weeks postpartum. Questionnaires on depression, anxiety, stress, coping, self-esteem, and social support were administered. Through regression analyses we showed that PPD symptoms could be equally predicted by variables from pregnancy (30.3%) and the early postpartum period (34.0%), with a small advantage of PPD prediction in the early postpartum period.

  7. The predictive significance of CD20 expression in B-cell lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvat Mateja

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our recent study, we determined the cut-off value of CD20 expression at the level of 25 000 molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome (MESF to be the predictor of response to rituximab containing treatment in patients with B-cell lymphomas. In 17.5% of patients, who had the level of CD20 expression below the cut-off value, the response to rituximab containing treatment was significantly worse than in the rest of the patients with the level of CD20 expression above the cut-off value. The proportion of patients with low CD20 expression who might not benefit from rituximab containing treatment was not necessarily representative. Therefore the aim of this study was to quantify the CD20 expression in a larger series of patients with B-cell lymphomas which might allow us to determine more reliably the proportion of patients with the CD20 expression below the cut-off. Methods Cytological samples of 64 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL, 56 follicular lymphomas (FL, 31 chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL, 34 mantle cell lymphomas (MCL, 18 marginal zone lymphomas (MZL and 15 B-cell lymphomas unclassified were analyzed for CD20 expression by quantitative four-color flow cytometric measurements using FACSCalibur flow cytometer (BD Biosciences. Results The range of CD20 expression in different B-cell lymphomas was very broad, varying from 2 737 to 115 623 MESF in CLL and 3 549 to 679 577 MESF in DLBCL. However, when we compared the CD20 expression in the groups of patients with DLBCL, FL, MCL, MZL, CLL and B-cell lymphomas unclassified, it was found to be significantly lower (p = 0.002 only in CLL but did not significantly differ in other lymphoma types (p = NS. Fifty-three out of 218 (24.3% patients with B-cell lymphomas had the CD20 expression below the cut-off value. Conclusions The CD20 expression in CLL is significantly lower than in most histological types of mature B-cell lymphomas in which it appears to be comparable

  8. The Theory of Planned Behavior as it predicts potential intention to seek mental health services for depression among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Lisa M; Cotter, Kelly A; Kravitz, Richard L; Cello, Philip C; Fernandez Y Garcia, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Between 9.5% and 31.3% of college students suffer from depression (American college health association national college health assessment II: reference group executive summary spring 2013. Amer. Coll. Health Assoc. 2013; Eagan K, Stolzenberg EB, Ramirez JJ, Aragon, MC, Suchard, RS, Hurtado S. The American freshman: national norms fall 2014. Higher Educ. Res. Inst.; 2015). Universities need to understand the factors that relate to care-seeking behavior. Across 3 studies, to relate attitudes, social norms, and perceived behavioral control to intention to seek mental health services, and to investigate barriers to care-seeking. University college students (N = 845, 64% female, 26% male, and 10% unspecified). New measures were created in Studies 1 and 2, and were examined using structural equation modeling in Study 3. Partially consistent with the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, I, Fishbein, M. Understanding Attitudes and Predicting Social Behavior. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall; 1980), a model with an excellent fit revealed that more positive attitudes about care and higher perceived behavioral control directly predicted higher intention to seek mental health services. Educating college students about mental health disorders and treatments, enhancing knowledge about available services, and addressing limited access to long-term care might improve treatment rates for students suffering from depression.

  9. Innovative drugs to treat depression: did animal models fail to be predictive or did clinical trials fail to detect effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzung, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    Over recent decades, encouraging preclinical evidence using rodent models pointed to innovative pharmacological targets to treat major depressive disorder. However, subsequent clinical trials have failed to show convincing results. Two explanations for these rather disappointing results can be put forward, either animal models of psychiatric disorders have failed to predict the clinical effectiveness of treatments or clinical trials have failed to detect the effects of these new drugs. A careful analysis of the literature reveals that both statements are true. Indeed, in some cases, clinical efficacy has been predicted on the basis of inappropriate animal models, although the contrary is also true, as some clinical trials have not targeted the appropriate dose or clinical population. On the one hand, refinement of animal models requires using species that have better homological validity, designing models that rely on experimental manipulations inducing pathological features, and trying to model subtypes of depression. On the other hand, clinical research should consider carefully the results from preclinical studies, in order to study these compounds at the correct dose, in the appropriate psychiatric nosological entity or symptomatology, in relevant subpopulations of patients characterized by specific biomarkers. To achieve these goals, translational research has to strengthen the dialogue between basic and clinical science.

  10. Phylogenomic analyses predict sistergroup relationship of nucleariids and Fungi and paraphyly of zygomycetes with significant support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steenkamp Emma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resolving the evolutionary relationships among Fungi remains challenging because of their highly variable evolutionary rates, and lack of a close phylogenetic outgroup. Nucleariida, an enigmatic group of amoeboids, have been proposed to emerge close to the fungal-metazoan divergence and might fulfill this role. Yet, published phylogenies with up to five genes are without compelling statistical support, and genome-level data should be used to resolve this question with confidence. Results Our analyses with nuclear (118 proteins and mitochondrial (13 proteins data now robustly associate Nucleariida and Fungi as neighbors, an assemblage that we term 'Holomycota'. With Nucleariida as an outgroup, we revisit unresolved deep fungal relationships. Conclusion Our phylogenomic analysis provides significant support for the paraphyly of the traditional taxon Zygomycota, and contradicts a recent proposal to include Mortierella in a phylum Mucoromycotina. We further question the introduction of separate phyla for Glomeromycota and Blastocladiomycota, whose phylogenetic positions relative to other phyla remain unresolved even with genome-level datasets. Our results motivate broad sampling of additional genome sequences from these phyla.

  11. Serum NX-DCP as a New Noninvasive Model to Predict Significant Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masaya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Hirano, Hirotaka; Momose, Kenji; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    Finding a noninvasive method to predict liver fibrosis using inexpensive and easy-to-use markers is important. We aimed to clarify whether NX-des-γ-carboxyprothrombin (NX-DCP) could become a new noninvasive model to predict liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV) related liver disease. We performed a prospective cohort study on a consecutive group of 101 patients who underwent liver biopsy for HCV-related liver disease at Kobe University Hospital. Laboratory measurements were performed on the same day as the biopsy. Factors associated with significant fibrosis (F3-4) were assessed by multivariate analyses. A comparison of predictive ability between multivariate factors and abovementioned noninvasive models was also performed. Increase in serum NX-DCP was significantly related to increase in fibrosis stage (P = 0.006). Moreover, NX-DCP was a multivariate factor associated with the presence of significant fibrosis F 3-4 (median 21 of F0-2 group vs. median 22 of F3-4 group with P = 0.002). The AUC of NX-DCP showed no significant differences compared with those of the AST-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), modified-APRI, the Göteborg University Cirrhosis Index (GUCI), the Lok index, the Hui score, cirrhosis discriminating score (CDS) and the Pohl score (P > 0.05). NX-DCP correlated positively with fibrosis stage and could discriminate well between HCV-related patients with or without significant fibrosis. Moreover, NX-DCP had a similar predictive ability to the abovementioned models, and thereby could be a new noninvasive prediction tool for fibrosis.

  12. PREDICTIVE SIGNIFICANCE OF ANTI-HLA AUTOANTIBODIES IN HEART TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Shevchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to define the role of preformed anti-HLA antibodies (anti-HLA in antibody-mediated rejection (AMR and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV after heart transplantation. Materials and Methods. 140 heart transplant recipients were followed after heart transplantation performed for 106 dilated and 34 – ischemic cardiomyopathy. Anti-HLA was determined before transplantation by ELISA. Results. Recipients were divided into 2 groups: anti-HLA positive (n = 45, 32,1% and anti-HLA negative (n = 95, 67,9%. The incidence of AMR in anti-HLA positive group was 12 (26,67% and 11 (11,58% in anti-HLA negative group. Risk of AMR was significantly higher in anti-HLA positive recipients (RR 2,3: 95% CI 1,02–4,81, р = 0,03. During first three years after transplantation CAV was diagnosed in 9 (20% of anti-HLA positive recipients and in 7 (6,8% of patients without anti-HLA. (RR 2,7: 95% CI 1,08–6,82, р = 0,03. Survival in freedom from CAV in anti-HLA negative recipients was much higher than in anti-HLA positive recipients (0,89 ± 0,07, 0,72 ± 0,06, resp. (p = 0,02.Conclusions. The presence of preformed anti-HLA antibodies in candidates for heart transplantation increase the risk of AMR and CAV post transplantation in 2,3 and 2,7 times, respectively. 

  13. A six-month longitudinal evaluation significantly improves accuracy of predicting incipient Alzheimer's disease in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeen, Asim M; Asaei, Ali; Bachman, Alvin H; Sidtis, John J; Ardekani, Babak A

    2017-07-01

    Early prediction of incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is important for timely therapeutic intervention and identifying participants for clinical trials at greater risk of developing AD. Methods to predict incipient AD in MCI have mostly utilized cross-sectional data. Longitudinal data enables estimation of the rate of change of variables, which along with the variable levels have been shown to improve prediction power. While some efforts have already been made in this direction, all previous longitudinal studies have been based on observation periods longer than one year, hence limiting their practical utility. It remains to be seen if follow-up evaluations within shorter intervals can significantly improve the accuracy of prediction in this problem. Our aim was to determine the added value of incorporating 6-month longitudinal data for predicting progression from MCI to AD. Using 6-months longitudinal data from 247 participants with MCI, we trained two Random Forest classifiers to distinguish between progressive MCI (n=162) and stable MCI (n=85) cases. These models utilized structural MRI, neurocognitive assessments, and demographic information. The first model (cross-sectional) only used baseline data. The second model (longitudinal) used data from both baseline and a 6-month follow-up evaluation allowing the model to additionally incorporate biomarkers' rate of change. The longitudinal model (AUC=0.87; accuracy=80.2%) performed significantly better (P<0.05) than the cross-sectional model (AUC=0.82; accuracy=71.7%). Short-term longitudinal assessments significantly enhance the performance of AD prediction models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Do self-referent metacognition and residential context predict depressive symptoms across late-life span? A developmental study in an Italian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastame, Maria Chiara; Hitchcott, Paul Kenneth; Penna, Maria Pietronilla

    2015-01-01

    There is controversial evidence concerning the variables favoring depression in community-dwelling elderly individuals. This study mainly investigates the impact of lifestyle, residential environment, cognitive efficiency and social desirability in predicting self-assessed depressive signs in late adult span. One hundred forty-nine elders were recruited in Northern Italy and Sardinia - an Italian island characterized by the longevity of people living in the inner areas. Participants were presented a battery of questionnaires assessing cognitive efficiency and self-referent measures of depression, metacognition and social desirability. A hierarchical regression analysis showed that residential environment was the most effective predictor of depressive symptoms, along with gardening and spending time for hobbies. In contrast, social desirability and metacognitive scores played a minor role in predicting mental health. An analysis of variance showed that Sardinian elders showed fewer signs of depression than age-matched elders residing in Northern Italy. The Sardinian residential environment is a strong predictor of preserved mental health in late adulthood. In contrast, self-rated metacognitive efficiency and social desirability play a very marginal role in predicting depression among the elderly.

  15. Faculty Decisions on Serials Subscriptions Differ Significantly from Decisions Predicted by a Bibliometric Tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue F. Phelps

    2016-03-01

    of the faculty choices. The p-value for this relationship was less than 0.0001, also indicating that the result was not by chance. A quadratic model plotted alongside the previous linear model follows a similar pattern. The p-value of the comparison is 0.0002, which indicates the quadratic model’s fit cannot be explained by random chance. Main Results – The authors point out three outstanding findings. First, the match rate between faculty valuations and bibliometric scores for serials is 65%. This exceeds the 50% rate that would indicate random association, but also indicates a statistically significant difference between faculty and bibliometric valuations. Secondly, the match rate with the bibliometric scores for titles that faculty chose to keep (73% was higher than those they chose to cancel (54%. Thirdly, the match rate increased with higher bibliometric scores. Conclusions – Though the authors identify only a modest degree of similarity between faculty and bibliometric valuations of serials, it is noted that there is more agreement in the higher valued serials than the lower valued serials. With that in mind, librarians might focus faculty review on the lower scoring titles in the future, taking into consideration that unique faculty interests may drive selection at that level and would need to be balanced with the mission of the library.

  16. The Diagnostic Apathia Scale predicts the ability to return to work following depression or anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Lc; Eplov, Lf; Nordentoft, M

    2014-01-01

    , tiredness/fatigue, insomnia, and reduced ability to work and engage in personal interests. The scale was analysed for psychometric validity (scalability) and for its ability to predict RTW. Finally, the predictive validity of the Diagnostic Apathia Scale regarding RTW was compared with scales measuring...

  17. Do Depressive Traits and Hostility Predict Age-Related Decline in General Intelligence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Lykke Mortensen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Certain personality traits are likely to be associated with stress and distress through the lifespan, and as a consequence these traits may influence the rate of age-related cognitive decline. The present study uses data from the Glostrup 1914 cohort to analyze potential effects of personality on decline in general intelligence over a 30-year period. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory was administered at a 50-year baseline exam, and from this inventory the Obvious Depression Scale and an abbreviated version of the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale were derived. At the 50-year baseline and at the 60-, 70-, and 80-year followups the full version of Wechsler's Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS was administered to 673, 513, 136, and 184 participants. Mixed effects statistical models were used to evaluate both the effect of the personality scores on level of intelligence and the interaction between the personality scores and the time since followup. Analyses were adjusted for demographic background and a wide range of lifestyle factors. Both obvious depression and hostility were negatively associated with level of intelligence, but personality scores did not influence rate of decline in general intelligence.

  18. Surface tensions of multi-component mixed inorganic/organic aqueous systems of atmospheric significance: measurements, model predictions and importance for cloud activation predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the physical properties of aerosol particles, it is necessary to adequately capture the behaviour of the ubiquitous complex organic components. One of the key properties which may affect this behaviour is the contribution of the organic components to the surface tension of aqueous particles in the moist atmosphere. Whilst the qualitative effect of organic compounds on solution surface tensions has been widely reported, our quantitative understanding on mixed organic and mixed inorganic/organic systems is limited.  Furthermore, it is unclear whether models that exist in the literature can reproduce the surface tension variability for binary and higher order multi-component organic and mixed inorganic/organic systems of atmospheric significance. The current study aims to resolve both issues to some extent. Surface tensions of single and multiple solute aqueous solutions were measured and compared with predictions from a number of model treatments. On comparison with binary organic systems, two predictive models found in the literature provided a range of values resulting from sensitivity to calculations of pure component surface tensions.  Results indicate that a fitted model can capture the variability of the measured data very well, producing the lowest average percentage deviation for all compounds studied.  The performance of the other models varies with compound and choice of model parameters. The behaviour of ternary mixed inorganic/organic systems was unreliably captured by using a predictive scheme and this was composition dependent. For more "realistic" higher order systems, entirely predictive schemes performed poorly. It was found that use of the binary data in a relatively simple mixing rule, or modification of an existing thermodynamic model with parameters derived from binary data, was able to accurately capture the surface tension variation with concentration. Thus, it would appear that in order to model

  19. Indicators of a new depression diagnosis in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lorraine J; Rantz, Marilyn; Petroski, Gregory F

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects approximately 30% to 40% of nursing home residents but frequently goes unrecognized. Using the Missouri Minimum Data Set, we aimed to determine whether changes in clinical status, other than mood changes, were associated with new depression diagnosis in residents 65 and older without a recorded depression diagnosis. Of 127,587 potential participants, 14,371 met inclusion criteria and were not depressed at baseline (Time 0). At the next quarterly assessment (Time 1), 1,342 (9.3%) had acquired a new diagnosis of depression. Residents with new depression were significantly younger and less cognitively impaired. Nearly 30% had a decline in activities of daily living (ADL) performance. The multivariate model predicting depression showed that increased verbal aggression, urinary incontinence, increased pain, weight loss, change in care needs, cognitive decline, and ADL decline significantly increased the likelihood of new depression diagnosis. The pattern of decline identified here may provide additional clues to the presence of underlying depression.

  20. Clinical significance of thrombocytosis before preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: predicting pathologic tumor response and oncologic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Jin; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Park, Jun Seok; Park, SooYeun; Kawai, Kazushige; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-02-01

    Thrombocytosis is considered an adverse prognostic factor in various malignancies. However, the clinical significance of thrombocytosis in rectal cancer patients is unknown. We investigated the predictive value of thrombocytosis for pathologic tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and oncologic outcomes in patients with rectal cancer. A total of 314 patients who underwent preoperative CRT and subsequent rectal resection for rectal cancer were retrospectively evaluated at two tertiary institutions. Univariate and multivariate analyses of the clinical parameters were performed to identify markers predictive of a pathologic complete response (pCR). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates. Sixty-nine patients (22 %) had thrombocytosis before CRT, which significantly correlated with a large tumor size and advanced tumor depth. Thirty-nine patients (12.4 %) achieved a pCR. In the multivariate analyses, a platelet count of thrombocytosis had lower 3-year disease-free (P = 0.037) and overall survival (P = 0.001) rates than patients with normal pretreatment platelet counts. Thrombocytosis is a negative predictive factor for a pCR and has an adverse impact on survival in rectal cancer. The predictive value of this easily available clinical factor should not be underestimated, and better therapeutic strategies for these tumors are required.

  1. Overgeneral autobiographical memory as a predictor of the course of depression: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Jennifer A; Griffith, James W; Mineka, Susan

    2010-07-01

    Overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) is a robust phenomenon in depression, but the extent to which OGM predicts the course of depression is not well-established. This meta-analysis synthesized data from 15 studies to examine the degree to which OGM 1) correlates with depressive symptoms at follow-up, and 2) predicts depressive symptoms at follow-up over and above initial depressive symptoms. Although the effects are small, specific and categoric/overgeneral memories generated during the Autobiographical Memory Test significantly predicted the course of depression. Fewer specific memories and more categoric/overgeneral memories were associated with higher follow-up depressive symptoms, and predicted higher follow-up symptoms over and above initial symptoms. Potential moderators were also examined. The age and clinical depression status of participants, as well as the length of follow-up between the two depressive symptom assessments, significantly moderated the predictive relationship between OGM and the course of depression. The predictive relationship between specific memories and follow-up depressive symptoms became greater with increasing age and a shorter length of follow-up, and the predictive relationship was stronger for participants with clinical depression diagnoses than for nonclinical participants. These findings highlight OGM as a predictor of the course of depression, and future studies should investigate the mechanisms underlying this relationship.

  2. Moment-to-moment transfer of positive emotions in daily life predicts future course of depression in both general population and patient samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Höhn

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Positive affect (PA is closely linked to prevention of, and recovery from, depression. Previous studies have investigated PA reactivity to pleasant situations with respect to its protective properties in relation to mood disorder. The purpose of this study was to examine, and replicate, whether moment-to-moment transfer of PA in daily life (PA persistence is relevant to the prediction of future course of depression. METHOD: Individuals from three different studies (one general population sample (n=540, and two patient samples (n=43 and n=50 with matching controls (n=39 and n=21, respectively participated in an Experience Sampling Method (ESM study. Time-lagged multilevel analyses were used to assess the degree of transfer (or persistence of momentary positive affective states over time, in relation to naturalistic outcome (study 1 or treatment outcome (studies 2 and 3. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90R in sample 1 and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS in samples 2 and 3. RESULTS: In study 1, participants with greater momentary PA persistence were less likely to show depressive symptoms at follow-up. In study 2, patients were more likely to respond to treatment if they displayed greater momentary PA persistence, particularly in those with recurrent depression. In study 3, patients with greater momentary PA persistence were similarly more likely to respond to treatment, especially when treated with imipramine rather than placebo. CONCLUSION: The ability to transfer PA from one moment to the next is an important factor in the prevention of and recovery from depressive symptoms. Patients with recurrent depression and those who receive antidepressants rather than placebo may benefit most from this effect. The results suggest that treatment-induced improvement in depression is mediated by increased levels of momentary transfer of PA in daily life, acquisition of which may be contingent on

  3. Depressive symptoms and other risk factors predicting suicide in middle-aged men: a prospective cohort study among Korean Vietnam War veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wook Yi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few studies have prospectively examined whether depressive symptoms and other risk factors are associated with a higher risk of suicide death in individuals other than high-risk populations such as psychiatric patients and individuals with self-harm histories. The purpose of the study is to prospectively examine whether depressive symptoms assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI are associated with greater risk of suicide death and whether depressive symptoms and other risk factors are independent predictors of suicide in general-risk populations. Another aim is to evaluate the sensitivity of the BDI for predicting suicide death.Methods. 10,238 Korean Vietnam War veterans (mean age: 56.3 years who participated in two surveys in 2001 were followed up for suicide mortality over 7.5 years.Results. 41 men died by suicide. Severely depressed participants had a higher adjusted hazard ratio (aHR = 3.4; 95% CI [1.5–7.7] of suicide than non-to-moderately depressed ones. Higher suicide risk was associated with more severe depressive symptoms (p for trend = 0.009. After adjustment for depressive symptoms and other factors, very poor health, low education, and past drinking were associated with higher suicide risk, while good health, body mass index, and marital status were not associated with suicide. The sensitivity at the cut-off score of 31 for detecting suicide was higher during the earlier 3.5 years of the follow-up (75%; 95% CI [50–90] than during the latter 4 years (60%; 95% CI [41–76].Conclusions. Depressive symptoms are a strong independent predictor and very poor health, low education, and drinking status may be independent predictors of future suicide. The BDI may have acceptable diagnostic properties as a risk assessment tool for identifying people with depression and suicidal potential among middle-aged men.

  4. Significance of uncertainties derived from settling tank model structure and parameters on predicting WWTP performance - A global sensitivity analysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Sin, Gürkan; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2011-01-01

    Uncertainty derived from one of the process models – such as one-dimensional secondary settling tank (SST) models – can impact the output of the other process models, e.g., biokinetic (ASM1), as well as the integrated wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) models. The model structure and parameter...... uncertainty of settler models can therefore propagate, and add to the uncertainties in prediction of any plant performance criteria. Here we present an assessment of the relative significance of secondary settling model performance in WWTP simulations. We perform a global sensitivity analysis (GSA) based....... The outcome of this study contributes to a better understanding of uncertainty in WWTPs, and explicitly demonstrates the significance of secondary settling processes that are crucial elements of model prediction under dry and wet-weather loading conditions....

  5. Data on clinical significance of second trimester inflammatory biomarkers in the amniotic fluid in predicting preterm delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaad Kesrouani

    2016-12-01

    Data includes ROC curves for glucose (Fig. 1, IL-6 (Fig. 2 and MMP-9 (Fig. 3, aiming to search for sensitivity and specificity in the prediction of premature delivery. Statistical analyses are performed with SPSS v20.0 software. Statistical significance is determined using the Mann–Whitney and one way ANOVA test. The association with preterm delivery is performed using a two proportions test. Correlations are measured using the Pearson׳’s coefficient. A p value<0.05 is considered statistically significant. The data is presented in the figures provided. Data relied on a previous publication “Prediction of preterm delivery by second trimester inflammatory biomarkers in the amniotic fluid” (A. Kesrouani, E. Chalhoub, E. El Rassy, M. Germanos, A. Khazzaka, J. Rizkallah, E. Attieh, N. Aouad, 2016 [1].

  6. Resting-State Cortico-Thalamic-Striatal Connectivity Predicts Response to Dorsomedial Prefrontal rTMS in Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Tim V; Dunlop, Katharine; Kennedy, Sidney H; Flint, Alastair; Geraci, Joseph; Giacobbe, Peter; Downar, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Despite its high toll on society, there has been little recent improvement in treatment efficacy for major depressive disorder (MDD). The identification of biological markers of successful treatment response may allow for more personalized and effective treatment. Here we investigate whether resting-state functional connectivity predicted response to treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). Twenty-five individuals with treatment-refractory MDD underwent a 4-week course of dmPFC-rTMS. Before and after treatment, subjects received resting-state functional MRI scans and assessments of depressive symptoms using the Hamilton Depresssion Rating Scale (HAMD17). We found that higher baseline cortico-cortical connectivity (dmPFC-subgenual cingulate and subgenual cingulate to dorsolateral PFC) and lower cortico-thalamic, cortico-striatal, and cortico-limbic connectivity were associated with better treatment outcomes. We also investigated how changes in connectivity over the course of treatment related to improvements in HAMD17 scores. We found that successful treatment was associated with increased dmPFC-thalamic connectivity and decreased subgenual cingulate cortex-caudate connectivity, Our findings provide insight into which individuals might respond to rTMS treatment and the mechanisms through which these treatments work. PMID:24150516

  7. Surface tensions of multi-component mixed inorganic/organic aqueous systems of atmospheric significance: measurements, model predictions and importance for cloud activation predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the physical properties of aerosol particles, it is necessary to adequately capture the behaviour of the ubiquitous complex organic components. One of the key properties which may affect this behaviour is the contribution of the organic components to the surface tension of aqueous particles in the moist atmosphere. Whilst the qualitative effect of organic compounds on solution surface tensions has been widely reported, our quantitative understanding on mixed organic and mixed inorganic/organic systems is limited. Furthermore, it is unclear whether models that exist in the literature can reproduce the surface tension variability for binary and higher order multi-component organic and mixed inorganic/organic systems of atmospheric significance. The current study aims to resolve both issues to some extent. Surface tensions of single and multiple solute aqueous solutions were measured and compared with predictions from a number of model treatments. On comparison with binary organic systems, two predictive models found in the literature provided a range of values resulting from sensitivity to calculations of pure component surface tensions. Results indicate that a fitted model can capture the variability of the measured data very well, producing the lowest average percentage deviation for all compounds studied. The performance of the other models varies with compound and choice of model parameters. The behaviour of ternary mixed inorganic/organic systems was unreliably captured by using a predictive scheme and this was dependent on the composition of the solutes present. For more atmospherically representative higher order systems, entirely predictive schemes performed poorly. It was found that use of the binary data in a relatively simple mixing rule, or modification of an existing thermodynamic model with parameters derived from binary data, was able to accurately capture the surface tension variation with concentration. Thus

  8. Depression-related difficulties disengaging from negative faces are associated with sustained attention to negative feedback during social evaluation and predict stress recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Nuria; De Raedt, Rudi

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify: 1) the presence of depression-related attention bias related to a social stressor, 2) its association with depression-related attention biases as measured under standard conditions, and 3) their association with impaired stress recovery in depression. A sample of 39 participants reporting a broad range of depression levels completed a standard eye-tracking paradigm in which they had to engage/disengage their gaze with/from emotional faces. Participants then underwent a stress induction (i.e., giving a speech), in which their eye movements to false emotional feedback were measured, and stress reactivity and recovery were assessed. Depression level was associated with longer times to engage/disengage attention with/from negative faces under standard conditions and with sustained attention to negative feedback during the speech. These depression-related biases were associated and mediated the association between depression level and self-reported stress recovery, predicting lower recovery from stress after giving the speech. PMID:28362826

  9. Non-invasive prediction of hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenoses by contrast density difference in coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, Michaela M., E-mail: michaela.hell@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen (Germany); Dey, Damini [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Taper Building, Room A238, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan; Schmid, Jasmin; Schuhbaeck, Annika [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Overestimation of coronary lesions by coronary computed tomography angiography and subsequent unnecessary invasive coronary angiography and revascularization is a concern. • Differences in plaque characteristics and contrast density difference between hemodynamically significant and non-significant stenoses, as defined by invasive fractional flow reserve, were assessed. • At a threshold of ≥24%, contrast density difference predicted hemodynamically significant lesions with a specificity of 75%, sensitivity of 33%, PPV of 35% and NPV of 73%. • The determination of contrast density difference required less time than transluminal attenuation gradient measurement. - Abstract: Objectives: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) allows the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease. However, its ability to predict the hemodynamic significance of stenoses is limited. We assessed differences in plaque characteristics and contrast density difference between hemodynamically significant and non-significant stenoses, as defined by invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). Methods: Lesion characteristics of 59 consecutive patients (72 lesions) in whom invasive FFR was performed in at least one coronary artery with moderate to high-grade stenoses in coronary CTA were evaluated by two experienced readers. Coronary CTA data sets were acquired on a second-generation dual-source CT scanner using retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition or prospectively ECG-triggered axial acquisition mode. Plaque volume and composition (non-calcified, calcified), remodeling index as well as contrast density difference (defined as the percentage decline in luminal CT attenuation/cross-sectional area over the lesion) were assessed using a semi-automatic software tool (Autoplaq). Additionally, the transluminal attenuation gradient (defined as the linear regression coefficient between intraluminal CT attenuation and length from the ostium) was determined

  10. Significance of exercise-induced ST segment depression in patients with myocardial infarction involving the left circumflex artery. Evaluation by exercise thallium-201 myocardial single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koitabashi, Norimichi; Toyama, Takuji; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi [Gunma Prefectural Cardiovascular Center, Maebashi (Japan)] [and others

    2000-04-01

    The significance of exercise-induced ST segment depression in patients with left circumflex artery involvement was investigated by comparing exercise electrocardiography with exercise thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (Tl-SPECT) and the wall motion estimated by left ventriculography. Tl-SPECT and exercise electrocardiography were simultaneously performed in 51 patients with left circumflex artery involvement (angina pectoris 30, myocardial infarction 21). In patients with myocardial infarction, exercise-induced ST depression was frequently found in the V{sub 2}, V{sub 3} and V{sub 4} leads. In patients with angina pectoris, ST depression was frequently found in the II, III, aV{sub F}, V{sub 5} and V{sub 6} leads. There was no obvious difference in the leads of ST depression in patients with myocardial infarction with ischemia and without ischemia on Tl-SPECT images. In patients with myocardial infarction, the lateral wall motion of the infarcted area evaluated by left ventriculography was more significantly impaired in the patients with ST depression than without ST depression (p<0.01). Exercise-induced ST depression in the precordial leads possibly reflects wall motion abnormality rather than ischemia in the lateral infarcted myocardium. (author)

  11. Pre-treatment attachment anxiety predicts change in depressive symptoms in women who complete day hospital treatment for anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Leah; Tasca, Giorgio A; Bissada, Hany

    2015-03-01

    Individuals with eating disorders are prone to depressive symptoms. This study examines whether depressive symptoms can change in women who complete intensive day treatment for anorexia and bulimia nervosa (BN), and whether these changes are associated with pre-treatment attachment insecurity. Participants were 141 women with anorexia nervosa restricting type (n = 24), anorexia nervosa binge purge type (n = 30), and BN (n = 87) who completed a day hospital treatment programme for eating disorders. They completed a pre-treatment self-report measure of attachment, and a pre-treatment and post-treatment self-report measure of depressive symptoms. Participants experienced significant reductions in depressive symptoms at post-treatment. Eating disorder diagnosis was not related to these improvements. However, participants lower in attachment anxiety experienced significantly greater improvement in depressive symptoms than those who were higher in attachment anxiety. These results suggest that clinicians may tailor eating disorders treatments to patients' attachment patterns and focus on their pre-occupation with relationships and affect regulation to improve depressive symptoms. That depressive symptoms can decrease in women who complete day hospital treatment for anorexia and BN. That improvements in depressive symptoms do not vary according to eating disorder diagnosis in these women. That patients who complete treatment and who have higher attachment anxiety experience less improvements in depressive symptoms compared to those lower in attachment anxiety. That clinicians may attend to aspects of attachment anxiety, such as need for approval and up-regulation of emotions, to improve depressive symptoms in female patients with eating disorders. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Observation of intervention effects of predictive nursing model on depressive emotions of depression patients using methadone for maintenance therapy%预见性护理模式对美沙酮维持治疗患者抑郁情绪的干预效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张家秀; 辛迪

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate intervention effects of predictive nursing model on depressive emotions of depression pa-tients using methadone for maintenance therapy. Methods:In adherence to the treatment of opioid addicts, 109 subjects with depres-sion were screened and randomly assigned into experimental group and control group. The predictive nursing model was performed in experimental group, while conventional nursing was performed in control group. SDS score was observed after the treatment. Results:The SDS score of experimental group was lower than that of control group. Conclusions: The predictive nursing model can significantly reduce the depressive emotions of the depression patients using methadone for maintenance therapy.%目的:探讨预见性护理模式对美沙酮维持治疗患者抑郁情绪的干预效果。方法:在坚持治疗的阿片类物质成瘾者中,筛选出有抑郁情绪的患者109例,随机分为实验组和对照组。实验组患者采取预见性护理模式,对照组患者采取常规护理模式,观察两组患者治疗后的抑郁评分情况。结果:预见性护理实验组患者的 SDS 评分低于常规护理对照组。结论:预见性护理模式能有效缓解美沙酮维持治疗患者的抑郁情绪。

  13. Spatially unassociated galaxies contribute significantly to the blended submillimetre galaxy population: predictions for follow-up observations of ALMA sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hayward, Christopher C; Somerville, Rachel S; Primack, Joel R; Moreno, Jorge; Wechsler, Risa H

    2013-01-01

    There is anecdotal evidence that spatially and physically unassociated galaxies blended into a single submillimetre (submm) source contribute to the submm galaxy (SMG) population. However, the significance of this subpopulation has neither been observationally constrained nor theoretically predicted. This work is the first to theoretically predict the contribution of spatially unassociated components to the SMG population. We generate mock SMG catalogues using lightcones derived from the Bolshoi cosmological simulation; to assign submm flux densities to the mock galaxies, we use a fitting function previously derived from the results of dust radiative transfer performed on hydrodynamical simulations of isolated disc and merging galaxies. We then calculate submm number counts for different beam sizes and without blending. Our model suggests that there are a sufficient number of blended SMGs to account for the observed number counts of submm sources with 850-{\\mu}m flux density S_850 >~12 mJy. Furthermore, we pr...

  14. The significance of Bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT after yttrium-90 radioembolization treatment in the prediction of extrahepatic side effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Muckle, Marianne; Sabet, Amir; Biermann, Kim; Haslerud, Torjan; Biersack, Hans-Juergen; Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Wilhelm, Kai [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Kuhl, Christiane [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Radiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Unwanted deposition of {sup 90}Y microspheres in organs other than the liver during radioembolization of liver tumours may cause severe side effects such as duodenal ulcer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of posttherapy bremsstrahlung (BS) SPECT/CT images of the liver in comparison to planar and SPECT images in the prediction of radioembolization-induced extrahepatic side effects. A total of 188 radioembolization procedures were performed in 123 patients (50 women, 73 men) over a 2-year period. Planar, whole-body and BS SPECT/CT imaging were performed 24 h after treatment as a part of therapy work-up. Any focally increased extrahepatic accumulation was evaluated as suspicious. Clinical follow-up and gastroduodenoscopy served as reference standards. The studies were reviewed to evaluate whether BS SPECT/CT imaging was of benefit. In the light of anatomic data obtained from SPECT/CT, apparent extrahepatic BS in 43% of planar and in 52% of SPECT images proved to be in the liver and hence false-positive. The results of planar scintigraphy could not be analysed further since 12 images were not assessable due to high scatter artefacts. On the basis of the gastrointestinal (GI) complications and the results of gastroduodenoscopy, true-positive, true-negative, false-positive and false-negative results of BS SPECT and SPECT/CT imaging in the prediction of GI ulcers were determined. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and the accuracy of SPECT and SPECT/CT in the prediction of GI ulcers were 13%, 88%, 8%, 92% and 82%, and 87%, 100%, 100%, 99% and 99%, respectively. Despite the low quality of BS images, BS SPECT/CT can be used as a reliable method to confirm the safe distribution of {sup 90}Y microspheres and in the prediction of GI side effects. (orig.)

  15. The clinical significance of MiR-148a as a predictive biomarker in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanobu Takahashi

    Full Text Available AIM: Development of robust prognostic and/or predictive biomarkers in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC is imperative for advancing treatment strategies for this disease. We aimed to determine whether expression status of certain miRNAs might have prognostic/predictive value in CRC patients treated with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapies. METHODS: We studied a cohort of 273 CRC specimens from stage II/III patients treated with 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy and stage IV patients subjected to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. In a screening set (n = 44, 13 of 21 candidate miRNAs were successfully quantified by multiplex quantitative RT-PCR. In the validation set comprising of the entire patient cohort, miR-148a expression status was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR, and its promoter methylation was quantified by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Lastly, we analyzed the associations between miR-148a expression and patient survival. RESULTS: Among the candidate miRNAs studied, miR-148a expression was most significantly down-regulated in advanced CRC tissues. In stage III and IV CRC, low miR-148a expression was associated with significantly shorter disease free-survival (DFS, a worse therapeutic response, and poor overall survival (OS. Furthermore, miR-148a methylation status correlated inversely with its expression, and was associated with worse survival in stage IV CRC. In multivariate analysis, miR-148a expression was an independent prognostic/predictive biomarker for advanced CRC patients (DFS in stage III, low vs. high expression, HR 2.11; OS in stage IV, HR 1.93. DISCUSSION: MiR-148a status has a prognostic/predictive value in advanced CRC patients treated with conventional chemotherapy, which has important clinical implications in improving therapeutic strategies and personalized management of this malignancy.

  16. The Clarification of Depression and Social Support’s Contribution to the Prediction of Antiretroviral Medication Adherence and the Rate of CD4 in People with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Goodarzi, Mohammad Ali; Joulaei, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    With the development of the antiretroviral therapy, the number of the people with HIV is increasing; therefore, identifying the factors affecting HIV is of great importance. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the antiretroviral medication adherence and the rate of CD4 with depression and social support in the people with HIV. The research method was a descriptive study kind of correlation. The statistical population included all patients with HIV in Shiraz, of whom, 220 people who had referred to the Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center were selected using the available sampling method. Philips et al.’s Social Support Questionnaire, Beck’s Depression Questionnaire II, and ACTG Medication Adherence Questionnaire were used as the research tools. Results were analyzed using the stepwise regression and stepwise hierarchical multiple regression. Regression analysis showed that social support and depression variables could predict totally 47% (Pdepression could predict only 2% (P<0.01) of rate variance of CD4. PMID:27157183

  17. QEEG Theta Cordance in the Prediction of Treatment Outcome to Prefrontal Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation or Venlafaxine ER in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, Martin; Brunovsky, Martin; Novak, Tomas; Kopecek, Miloslav; Stopkova, Pavla; Sos, Peter; Höschl, Cyril

    2015-04-01

    The aims of this double-blind study were to assess and compare the efficacy of quantitative electroencephalographic (QEEG) prefrontal theta band cordance in the prediction of response to 4-week, right, prefrontal, 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or venlafaxine ER in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Prefrontal QEEG cordance values of 50 inpatients (25 subjects in each group) completing 4 weeks of the study were obtained at baseline and after 1 week of treatment. Depressive symptoms were assessed using Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at baseline and at week 1 and 4. Treatment response was defined as a ≥50% reduction in baseline MADRS total score. All responders (n = 9) and 6 of 16 nonresponders in the rTMS group had reduced cordance at week 1 (P treatment, with comparable predictive efficacy for both therapeutic interventions. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  18. Type D personality and diabetes predict the onset of depressive symptoms in patients after percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Ong, Andrew T L; Sonnenschein, Karel

    2006-01-01

    Depression is common in cardiac patients and has been associated with adverse clinical outcome. However, little is known about predictors of the onset of depressive symptoms. We examined predictors of the onset of depressive symptoms at 12 months post-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI...

  19. Do Cognitive Models Help in Predicting the Severity of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Phobia, and Depression after Motor Vehicle Accidents? A Prospective Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehring, Thomas; Ehlers, Anke; Glucksman, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated the power of theoretically derived cognitive variables to predict posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), travel phobia, and depression following injury in a motor vehicle accident (MVA). MVA survivors (N = 147) were assessed at the emergency department on the day of their accident and 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months…

  20. Improvement of mindfulness skills during Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy predicts long-term reductions of neuroticism in persons with recurrent depression in remission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, Philip; Huijbers, Marloes J.; Ormel, Johan; Speckens, Anne E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study examined whether changes in mindfulness skills following Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) are predictive of long-term changes in personality traits. Methods: Using data from the MOMENT study, we included 278 participants with recurrent depression in remission allocat

  1. Improvement of mindfulness skills during Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy predicts long-term reductions of neuroticism in persons with recurrent depression in remission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, Philip; Huijbers, Marloes J.; Ormel, Johan; Speckens, Anne E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study examined whether changes in mindfulness skills following Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) are predictive of long-term changes in personality traits. Methods: Using data from the MOMENT study, we included 278 participants with recurrent depression in remission

  2. Serotonin Transporter-Linked Polymorphic Region (5-HTTLPR) Genotype and Stressful Life Events Interact to Predict Preschool-Onset Depression: A Replication and Developmental Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Ryan; Agrawal, Arpana; Gaffrey, Michael S.; Tillman, Rebecca; Luby, Joan L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Scientific enthusiasm about gene × environment interactions, spurred by the 5-HTTLPR (serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region) × SLEs (stressful life events) interaction predicting depression, have recently been tempered by sober realizations of small effects and meta-analyses reaching opposing conclusions. These mixed findings…

  3. A prospective cohort study of deficient maternal nurturing attitudes predicting adulthood work stress independent of adulthood hostility and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintsanen, M; Kivimäki, M; Hintsa, T; Theorell, T; Elovainio, M; Raitakari, O T; Viikari, J S A; Keltikangas-Järvinen, L

    2010-09-01

    Stressful childhood environments arising from deficient nurturing attitudes are hypothesized to contribute to later stress vulnerability. We examined whether deficient nurturing attitudes predict adulthood work stress. Participants were 443 women and 380 men from the prospective Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Work stress was assessed as job strain and effort-reward imbalance in 2001 when the participants were from 24 to 39 years old. Deficient maternal nurturance (intolerance and low emotional warmth) was assessed based on mothers' reports when the participants were at the age of 3-18 years and again at the age of 6-21 years. Linear regressions showed that deficient emotional warmth in childhood predicted lower adulthood job control and higher job strain. These associations were not explained by age, gender, socioeconomic circumstances, maternal mental problems or participant hostility, and depressive symptoms. Deficient nurturing attitudes in childhood might affect sensitivity to work stress and selection into stressful work conditions in adulthood. More attention should be paid to pre-employment factors in work stress research.

  4. Consistent CMT solutions from Harvard University before great earthquakes in Kurile Islands and its significance for earthquake prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun-guo; DIAO Gui-ling

    2005-01-01

    In the paper, we use the Central Moment Tensor (CMT) solution acquired by Harvard University for the earthquakes occurred in Kurile Islands to analyze the consistent focal mechanism in the area and propose the idea of making earthquake prediction based on the consistent parameter a of focal mechanism and stress field. The results from the study indicate that before MW≥7.5 earthquakes, the consistent parameter a decreases, which starts about 10~110 days and ends about 30~2 days before the great earthquakes. Although the phenomenon is not totally the same for individual earthquake, the difference is not large. Certainly, the phenomenon should be tested by time for its reliability. However, it should not be random that the focal mechanism of MW≥5.3 earthquakes are consistent successively with the stress field in an area of several hundreds kilometers in length. It should be a phenomenon of predictive significance. When the accumulated earthquake examples are sufficient, uniform judgment criteria and prediction principles can be stipulated then.

  5. Physiologically-based, predictive analytics using the heart-rate-to-Systolic-Ratio significantly improves the timeliness and accuracy of sepsis prediction compared to SIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Omar K; Hendren, Sandra; Santiago, Ethel; Nye, Brittany; Abraham, Prasad

    2017-04-01

    Enhancing the efficiency of diagnosis and treatment of severe sepsis by using physiologically-based, predictive analytical strategies has not been fully explored. We hypothesize assessment of heart-rate-to-systolic-ratio significantly increases the timeliness and accuracy of sepsis prediction after emergency department (ED) presentation. We evaluated the records of 53,313 ED patients from a large, urban teaching hospital between January and June 2015. The HR-to-systolic ratio was compared to SIRS criteria for sepsis prediction. There were 884 patients with discharge diagnoses of sepsis, severe sepsis, and/or septic shock. Variations in three presenting variables, heart rate, systolic BP and temperature were determined to be primary early predictors of sepsis with a 74% (654/884) accuracy compared to 34% (304/884) using SIRS criteria (p sepsis identification via detection of variations in HR-to-systolic ratio. This approach may lead to earlier sepsis workup and life-saving interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Weygandt's On the Mixed States of Manic-Depressive Insanity: a translation and commentary on its significance in the evolution of the concept of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Paola; Baldessarini, Ross J; Centorrino, Franca; Egli, Samy; Albert, Matthew; Gerhard, Angela; Maggini, Carlo

    2002-01-01

    Wilhelm Weygandt's Uber die Mischzustände des manisch-depressiven Irreseins (On the Mixed States of Manic-Depressive Insanity) describes and conceptualizes mixed states of mood, behavior, and thinking commonly found in manic-depressive disorders. These ideas emerged from Weygandt's service in the 1890s at the Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Heidelberg, directed by Emil Kraepelin. In the sixth (1899) edition of Kraepelin's influential textbook, the concept of manic-depressive illnesses underwent a fundamental shift from a complex group of syndromal subtypes to a single integrated disorder, widely known from the 1921 English translation of the eighth (1920) edition. In the 1899 edition, Kraepelin acknowledged Weygandt for a new section on mixed manic-depressive states within the new integrated view of manic-depressive disorder. We provide biographical notes on Weygandt, a little-known but historically important figure, as well as the first English translation of his monograph and interpretive summaries of his findings. We also consider whether Weygandt's important insight that the same person could be both manic and depressed not only at different times but even at the same time served as an important stimulus to Kraepelin's unified manic-depressive disorder concept, which survives as bipolar disorder a century later.

  7. Late onset depression: A recent update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Mahapatra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Late onset depression has recently emerged as a serious mental health issue in the geriatric population with significant public health implications. It is often challenging to diagnose and treat this entity. Various theories have been postulated to elucidate the etiology of late onset depression, but a unifying hypothesis is lacking. Although the vascular hypothesis is most researched; a complex interaction of multiple vulnerability factors is the current focus of attention. Numerous psychosocial variables have been implicated to play a significant role in predicting the onset and severity of late-life depression. Phenomenological differences have been delineated from depression occurring at a younger age, but the findings are equivocal. A better understanding of the natural trajectory of depression in the elderly is required for early diagnosis and effective treatment. This review attempts to summarize the current status of evidence regarding epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, and treatment options available for late-onset depression.

  8. Predicting Meaningful Outcomes to Medication and Self-Help Treatments for Binge Eating Disorder in Primary Care: The Significance of Early Rapid Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M.; White, Marney A.; Masheb, Robin M.; Gueorguieva, Ralitza

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined rapid response among obese patients with binge-eating disorder (BED) in a randomized clinical trial testing anti-obesity medication and self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy (shCBT), alone and in combination, in primary-care settings. Method 104 obese patients with BED were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: sibutramine, placebo, shCBT+sibutramine, or shCBT+placebo. Treatments were delivered by generalist primary-care physicians and the medications were given double-blind. Independent assessments were performed by trained and monitored doctoral research-clinicians monthly throughout treatment, post-treatment (4 months), and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups (i.e., 16 months after randomization). Rapid response, defined as ≥65% reduction in binge-eating by the fourth treatment week, was used to predict outcomes. Results Rapid response characterized 47% of patients. Rapid response was unrelated to demographic and baseline clinical characteristics. Rapid response was significantly associated prospectively with remission from binge eating at post-treatment (51% versus 9% for non-rapid responders), 6-month (53% vs 23.6%), and 12-month (46.9% vs 23.6%) follow-ups. Mixed effects model analyses revealed rapid response was significantly associated with greater decreases in binge-eating, eating-disorder psychopathology, depression, and percent weight loss. Discussion Our findings, based on a diverse obese patient group receiving medication and self-help CBT treatments for BED in primary care settings, indicate that patients who have a rapid response achieve good clinical outcomes through 12-month follow-ups after ending treatments. Rapid response represents a strong prognostic indicator of clinically meaningful outcomes even in low intensity medication and self-help interventions. Rapid response has important clinical implications for stepped-care treatment models for BED. Clinical Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00537810 PMID

  9. Predicting meaningful outcomes to medication and self-help treatments for binge-eating disorder in primary care: The significance of early rapid response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M; White, Marney A; Masheb, Robin M; Gueorguieva, Ralitza

    2015-04-01

    We examined rapid response among obese patients with binge-eating disorder (BED) in a randomized clinical trial testing antiobesity medication and self-help cognitive-behavioral therapy (shCBT), alone and in combination, in primary-care settings. One hundred four obese patients with BED were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments: sibutramine, placebo, shCBT + sibutramine, or shCBT + placebo. Treatments were delivered by generalist primary-care physicians and the medications were given double-blind. Independent assessments were performed by trained and monitored doctoral research clinicians monthly throughout treatment, posttreatment (4 months), and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups (i.e., 16 months after randomization). Rapid response, defined as ≥65% reduction in binge eating by the fourth treatment week, was used to predict outcomes. Rapid response characterized 47% of patients, was unrelated to demographic and baseline clinical characteristics, and was significantly associated, prospectively, with remission from binge eating at posttreatment (51% vs. 9% for nonrapid responders), 6-month (53% vs. 23.6%), and 12-month (46.9% vs. 23.6%) follow-ups. Mixed-effects model analyses revealed that rapid response was significantly associated with greater decreases in binge-eating or eating-disorder psychopathology, depression, and percent weight loss. Our findings, based on a diverse obese patient group receiving medication and shCBT for BED in primary-care settings, indicate that patients who have a rapid response achieve good clinical outcomes through 12-month follow-ups after ending treatment. Rapid response represents a strong prognostic indicator of clinically meaningful outcomes, even in low-intensity medication and self-help interventions. Rapid response has important clinical implications for stepped-care treatment models for BED. clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00537810 (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Study of prognostic significance of antenatal ultrasonography and renin angiotensin system activation in predicting disease severity in posterior urethral valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Bhadoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Study on prognostic significance of antenatal ultrasonography and renin angiotensin system activation in predicting disease severity in posterior urethral valves. Materials and Methods: Antenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis patients were included. Postnatally, they were divided into two groups, posterior urethral valve (PUV and non-PUV. The studied parameters were: Gestational age at detection, surgical intervention, ultrasound findings, cord blood and follow up plasma renin activity (PRA values, vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR, renal scars, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Results: A total of 25 patients were included, 10 PUV and 15 non-PUV. All infants with PUV underwent primary valve incision. GFR was less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 body surface area in 4 patients at last follow-up. Keyhole sign, oligoamnios, absent bladder cycling, and cortical cysts were not consistent findings on antenatal ultrasound in PUV. Cord blood PRA was significantly higher (P < 0.0001 in PUV compared to non-PUV patients. Gestational age at detection of hydronephrosis, cortical cysts, bladder wall thickness, and amniotic fluid index were not significantly correlated with GFR while PRA could differentiate between poor and better prognosis cases with PUV. Conclusions: Ultrasound was neither uniformly useful in diagnosing PUV antenatally, nor differentiating it from cases with non-PUV hydronephrosis. In congenital hydronephrosis, cord blood PRA was significantly higher in cases with PUV compared to non-PUV cases and fell significantly after valve ablation. Cord blood PRA could distinguish between poor and better prognosis cases with PUV.

  11. Is (18)F-FDG-PET suitable to predict clinical response to the treatment of geriatric depression? A systematic review of PET studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Crescenzo, Franco; Ciliberto, Mario; Menghini, Deny; Treglia, Giorgio; Ebmeier, Klaus P; Janiri, Luigi

    2017-09-01

    Geriatric depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in later life. It differs from earlier depression in its presentation, etiology, risk factors, protective factors and outcome. Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to detect changes in neural circuitry in neuropsychiatric disorders, and several authors have assessed its role in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with geriatric depression. We reviewed the current evidence on the use of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) in geriatric depressed patients to find predictors of treatment response. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and the PsycINFO databases to find relevant peer-reviewed articles on PET in geriatric depression using the search terms ('PET' or 'positron emission tomography') and ('mood' or 'affective disorder' or 'affective disorders' or 'depression' or 'dysthymia' or 'seasonal affective disorder'). Eleven articles comprising 128 patients were included. We extracted data on glucose uptake of depressed patients and controls at baseline and after different types of intervention (total sleep deprivation followed by a recovery sleep and treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). (18)F-FDG-PET showed significant alterations of glucose uptake in several brain areas, in particular the anterior cingulate cortex, which showed reduced metabolism after treatment, and was a predictor of treatment response.

  12. The effects of gender and depression severity on the association between alpha asymmetry and depression across four brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesulola, Emmanuel; Sharpley, Christopher F; Agnew, Linda L

    2017-03-15

    Data describing the association between EEG asymmetry and depression status have been equivocal. Effects from brain regions involved, depression severity, and the generalisability of findings across genders, have been inconsistently examined and/or verified. This study investigated these issues within a community sample to potentially expand the asymmetry hypothesis to non-severe depression participants. The singular effects of brain region and electrode site, gender, and depression severity, plus the interaction between gender and depression severity across brain regions were investigated in a study of alpha asymmetry among 46 males and 54 females (M age=32.5 yr, SD=14.13 yr) using the Self-rating Depression Scale (Zung, 1973). There was no significant difference across genders or age for depression severity. Dichotomous classification of depressed state produced similar but slightly different results from analysis of the whole range of depression status, although the frontal region was the only area where depression was consistently significantly associated with EEG asymmetry, and then only for females. However, the direction of those differences for females was opposite of that predicted by the EEG asymmetry-depression hypothesis. Several methodological issues that may have contributed to these findings are discussed, with suggestions made for future research that focusses upon individual depression symptom profiles rather than dichotomous or total depression scores in order to assist in developing a clinically-relevant model of EEG asymmetry in depressed persons.

  13. Comorbid Mild Cognitive Impairment and Depressive Symptoms Predict Future Dementia in Community Older Adults: A 24-Month Follow-Up Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Makino, Keitaro; Suzuki, Takao

    2016-10-18

    Older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are non-demented, but demonstrate cognitive dysfunction, and have significantly higher risk of progressing to dementia. A better understanding of more sensitive risk factors, such as combination of cognitive and psychological status, for progression of MCI to dementia may be crucial for prevention of development of dementia. To examine MCI, depressive symptoms, and comorbid MCI and depressive symptoms as risk factors for development of dementia. A total of 3,663 community-dwelling older people were included in this prospective longitudinal study. MCI was determined by age- and education-adjusted objective cognitive impairment using computerized comprehensive cognitive measures including memory, attention/executive function, and processing speed. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and defined by a GDS score of 6 or more. During the 24-month follow-up period, 72 participants (2.0%) developed dementia. Baseline MCI was significantly associated with an increased risk of incident dementia (hazard ratio [HR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-5.5) but depressive symptoms were not (2.0; 1.0-4.2) after adjusting for age, sex, education, prescribed medications, and walking speed. Participants with comorbid MCI and depressive symptoms at baseline had a higher risk of developing dementia (HR, 4.8; 2.3-10.5). Although MCI and depressive symptoms may be associated with increased risk for incident dementia independently, comorbid MCI and depressive symptoms have a significantly greater impact on dementia development among community-dwelling older adults.

  14. In Silico Prediction of the Anti-Depression Mechanism of a Herbal Formula (Tiansi Liquid Containing Morinda officinalis and Cuscuta chinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Cheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Depression is a sickening psychiatric condition that is prevalent worldwide. To manage depression, the underlying modes of antidepressant effect of herbals are important to be explored for the development of natural drugs. Tiansi Liquid is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM that is prescribed for the management of depression, however its underlying mechanism of action is still uncertain. The purpose of this study was to systematically investigate the pharmacological mode of action of a herbal formula used in TCM for the treatment of depression. Methods: Based on literature search, an ingredients-targets database was developed for Tiansi Liquid, followed by the identification of targets related to depression. The interaction between these targets was evaluated on the basis of protein-protein interaction network constructed by STITCH and gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis using ClueGO plugin. Results: As a result of literature search, 57 components in Tiansi Liquid formula and 106 potential targets of these ingredients were retrieved. A careful screening of these targets led to the identification of 42 potential targets associated with depression. Ultimately, 327 GO terms were found by analysis of gene functional annotation clusters and abundance value of these targets. Most of these terms were found to be closely related to depression. A significant number of protein targets such as IL10, MAPK1, PTGS2, AKT1, APOE, PPARA, MAPK1, MIF, NOS3 and TNF-α were found to be involved in the functioning of Tiansi Liquid against depression. Conclusions: The findings elaborate that Tiansi Liquid can be utilized to manage depression, however, multiple molecular mechanisms of action could be proposed for this effect. The observed core mechanisms could be the sensory perception of pain, regulation of lipid transport and lipopolysaccharide-mediated signaling pathway.

  15. Successful application of adaptive emotion regulation skills predicts the subsequent reduction of depressive symptom severity but neither the reduction of anxiety nor the reduction of general distress during the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin M Wirtz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Deficits in general emotion regulation (ER skills have been linked to symptoms of depression and are thus considered a promising target in the treatment of Major depressive disorder (MDD. However, at this point, the extent to which such skills are relevant for coping with depression and whether they should instead be considered a transdiagnostic factor remain unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether successful ER skills application is associated with changes in depressive symptom severity (DSS, anxiety symptom severity (ASS, and general distress severity (GDS over the course of treatment for MDD. METHODS: Successful ER skills application, DSS, ASS, and GDS were assessed four times during the first three weeks of treatment in 175 inpatients who met the criteria for MDD. We computed Pearson correlations to test whether successful ER skills application and the three indicators of psychopathology are cross-sectionally associated. We then performed latent growth curve modelling to test whether changes in successful ER skills application are negatively associated with a reduction of DSS, ASS, or GDS. Finally, we utilized latent change score models to examine whether successful ER skills application predicts subsequent reduction of DSS, ASS, or GDS. RESULTS: Successful ER skills application was cross-sectionally associated with lower levels of DSS, ASS, and GDS at all points of assessment. An increase in successful skills application during treatment was associated with a decrease in DSS and GDS but not ASS. Finally, successful ER skills application predicted changes in subsequent DSS but neither changes in ASS nor changes in GDS. CONCLUSIONS: Although general ER skills might be relevant for a broad range of psychopathological symptoms, they might be particularly important for the maintenance and treatment of depressive symptoms.

  16. Association between obesity and depressive disorder in adolescents at high risk for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerton, G; Thapar, A; Thapar, A K

    2014-04-01

    To examine the relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI) and depressive disorder in adolescents at high risk for depression. Prospective longitudinal 3-wave study of offspring of parents with recurrent depression. Replication in population-based cohort study. Three hundred and thirty-seven families where offspring were aged 9-17 years at baseline and 10-19 years at the final data point. Replication sample of adolescents from population-based cohort study aged 11-13 years at first assessment and 14-17 years at follow-up. High risk sample used BMI, skin-fold thickness, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV)-defined major depressive disorder and depression symptoms using the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment (CAPA). Replication sample used BMI, DSM-IV depressive disorder and depression symptoms using the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA). Two hundred and eighty-nine adolescents were included in the primary analyses. The mean BMI for each age group in this sample were significantly higher than population norms. There was no significant longitudinal association between categories of weight (or BMI) and new onset depressive disorder or depression symptoms. Similar results were found for skin-fold thickness. The association was also tested in a replication population-based sample and found to be non-significant in the subsample of offspring with mothers who had experienced recurrent depression in the past. BMI at age 12 years was, however, a significant predictor of depression symptoms but not of depressive disorder at age 15 years for the total unselected population. BMI does not significantly predict the development of depression in the offspring of parents with recurrent depression.

  17. Depression (Major Depressive Disorder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... generally miserable or unhappy without really knowing why. Depression symptoms in children and teens Common signs and ... in normal activities, and avoidance of social interaction. Depression symptoms in older adults Depression is not a ...

  18. Predictive significance of standardized uptake value parameters of FDG-PET in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, X-Y.; Wang, W.; Li, M.; Li, Y.; Guo, Y-M. [PET-CT Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an, Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2015-02-03

    {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is widely used to diagnose and stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the predictive ability of different FDG standardized uptake values (SUVs) in 74 patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed and different SUV parameters (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub avg}, SUV{sub T/L}, and SUV{sub T/A}) obtained, and their relationship with clinical characteristics were investigated. Meanwhile, correlation and multiple stepwise regression analyses were performed to determine the primary predictor of SUVs for NSCLC. Age, gender, and tumor size significantly affected SUV parameters. The mean SUVs of squamous cell carcinoma were higher than those of adenocarcinoma. Poorly differentiated tumors exhibited higher SUVs than well-differentiated ones. Further analyses based on the pathologic type revealed that the SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub avg}, and SUV{sub T/L} of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma tumors were higher than those of moderately or well-differentiated tumors. Among these four SUV parameters, SUV{sub T/L} was the primary predictor for tumor differentiation. However, in adenocarcinoma, SUV{sub max} was the determining factor for tumor differentiation. Our results showed that these four SUV parameters had predictive significance related to NSCLC tumor differentiation; SUV{sub T/L} appeared to be most useful overall, but SUV{sub max} was the best index for adenocarcinoma tumor differentiation.

  19. Stability of self-referent encoding task performance and associations with change in depressive symptoms from early to middle childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Brandon L; Hayden, Elizabeth P; Klein, Daniel N

    2015-01-01

    Depressed individuals exhibit memory biases on the self-referent encoding task (SRET), such that those with depression exhibit poorer recall of positive, and enhanced recall of negative, trait adjectives (referred to as positive and negative processing biases). However, it is unclear when SRET biases emerge, whether they are stable, and if biases predict, or are predicted by, depressive symptoms. To address this, a community sample of 434 children completed the SRET and a depressive symptoms measure at ages 6 and 9. Negative and positive processing exhibited low, but significant, stability. At ages 6 and 9, depressive symptoms correlated with higher negative, and lower positive, SRET processing. Importantly, lower positive processing at age 6 predicted increased symptoms at age 9. However, negative processing at age 6 did not predict depressive symptoms at age 9, and depressive symptoms at age 6 did not predict SRET processing scores at age 9. This suggests that less positive processing may reflect vulnerability for future depressive symptoms.

  20. Trajectories of preschool disorders to full DSM depression at school age and early adolescence: continuity of preschool depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luby, Joan L; Gaffrey, Michael S; Tillman, Rebecca; April, Laura M; Belden, Andy C

    2014-07-01

    Preschool-onset depression, a developmentally adapted form of depression arising between ages 3 and 6, has demonstrated numerous validated features, including characteristic alterations in stress reactivity and brain function. This syndrome is characterized by subthreshold DSM criteria for major depressive disorder, raising questions about its clinical significance. To clarify the utility and public health significance of the preschool-onset depression construct, the authors investigated diagnostic outcomes of preschool children at school age and in adolescence. In a longitudinal prospective study of preschool children, the authors assessed the likelihood of meeting full criteria for major depressive disorder at age 6 or later as a function of preschool depression, other preschool axis I disorders, maternal history of depression, nonsupportive parenting, and traumatic life events. Preschool-onset depression emerged as a robust predictor of major depressive disorder in later childhood even after accounting for the effect of maternal history of depression and other risk factors. Preschool-onset conduct disorder also predicted major depression in later childhood, but this association was partially mediated by nonsupportive parenting, reducing by 21% the effect of preschool conduct disorder in predicting major depression. Study findings provide evidence that this preschool depressive syndrome is a robust risk factor for developing full criteria for major depression in later childhood, over and above other established risk factors. The results suggest that attention to preschool depression and conduct disorder in addition to maternal history of depression and exposure to trauma may be important in identifying young children at highest risk for later major depression and applying early interventions.

  1. Additional Value of Transluminal Attenuation Gradient in CT Angiography to Predict Hemodynamic Significance of Coronary Artery Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuijfzand, Wynand J.; Danad, Ibrahim; Raijmakers, Pieter G.; Marcu, C. Bogdan; Heymans, Martijn W.; van Kuijk, Cornelis C.; van Rossum, Albert C.; Nieman, Koen; Min, James K.; Leipsic, Jonathon; van Royen, Niels; Knaapen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The current study evaluates the incremental value of transluminal attenuation gradient (TAG), TAG with corrected contrast opacification (CCO), and TAG with exclusion of calcified coronary segments (ExC) over coronary computed tomography angiogram (CTA) alone using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as the gold standard. BACKGROUND TAG is defined as the contrast opacification gradient along the length of a coronary artery on a coronary CTA. Preliminary data suggest that TAG provides additional functional information. Interpretation of TAG is hampered by multiple heartbeat acquisition algorithms and coronary calcifications. Two correction models have been proposed based on either dephasing of contrast delivery by relating coronary density to corresponding descending aortic opacification (TAG-CCO) or excluding calcified coronary segments (TAG-ExC). METHODS Eighty-five patients with intermediate probability of coronary artery disease were prospectively included. All patients underwent step-and-shoot 256-slice coronary CTA. TAG, TAG-CCO, and TAG-ExC analyses were performed followed by invasive coronary angiography in conjunction with FFR measurements of all major coronary branches. RESULTS Thirty-four patients (40%) were diagnosed with hemodynamically-significant coronary artery disease (i.e., FFR ≤0.80). On a per-vessel basis (n = 253), 59 lesions (23%) were graded as hemodynamically significant, and the diagnostic accuracy of coronary CTA (diameter stenosis ≥50%) was 95%, 75%, 98%, and 54% for sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value, respectively. TAG and TAG-ExC did not discriminate between vessels with or without hemodynamically significant lesions (−13.5 ± 17.1 HU [Hounsfield units] × 10 mm−1 vs. −11.6 ± 13.3 HU × 10 mm−1, p = 0.36; and 13.1 ± 15.9 HU × 10 mm−1 vs. −11.4 ± 11.7 HU × 10 mm−1, p = 0.77, respectively). TAG-CCO was lower in vessels with a hemodynamically-significant lesion (−0

  2. Sense of identity and depression in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Başaran; Kaynak-Demir, Hadiye; Sönmez, Emel Irmak

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sense of identity and depression in a group of adolescents. Thirty-one depressed adolescents and 31 control subjects were included in the study. They were evaluated using the Sense of Identity Assessment Form (SIAF), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Depressed adolescents were reevaluated during the eighth week of antidepressant treatment. Higher baseline SIAF scores were detected in depressed adolescents as compared with non-depressed subjects. After antidepressant treatment, there was a significant decrease in SIAF scores in the depression group. Correlation analysis indicated that there are significant, positive relationships between SIAF, depression, and anxiety scores. The regression analysis results suggested that the change in SIAF scores can accurately predict 91.6% of the remitters and 42.8% of the non-remitters. Collectively, these findings indicate that there is a close association between depression symptoms and identity confusion-related distress in adolescents.

  3. CNR1 gene is associated with high neuroticism and low agreeableness and interacts with recent negative life events to predict current depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Gabriella; Chase, Diana; Pegg, Emma; Downey, Darragh; Toth, Zoltan G; Stones, Kathryn; Platt, Hazel; Mekli, Krisztina; Payton, Antony; Elliott, Rebecca; Anderson, Ian M; Deakin, J F William

    2009-07-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) gene (CNR1) knockout mice are prone to develop anhedonic and helpless behavior after chronic mild stress. In humans, the CB1 antagonist rimonabant increases the risk of depressed mood disorders and anxiety. These studies suggest the hypothesis that genetic variation in CB1 receptor function influences the risk of depression in humans in response to stressful life events. In a population sample (n=1269), we obtained questionnaire measures of personality (Big Five Inventory), depression and anxiety (Brief Symptom Inventory), and life events. The CNR1 gene was covered by 10 SNPs located throughout the gene to determine haplotypic association. Variations in the CNR1 gene were significantly associated with a high neuroticism and low agreeableness phenotype (explained variance 1.5 and 2.5%, respectively). Epistasis analysis of the SNPs showed that the previously reported functional 5' end of the CNR1 gene significantly interacts with the 3' end in these phenotypes. Furthermore, current depression scores significantly associated with CNR1 haplotypes but this effect diminished after covariation for recent life events, suggesting a gene x environment interaction. Indeed, rs7766029 showed highly significant interaction between recent negative life events and depression scores. The results represent the first evidence in humans that the CNR1 gene is a risk factor for depression--and probably also for co-morbid psychiatric conditions such as substance use disorders--through a high neuroticism and low agreeableness phenotype. This study also suggests that the CNR1 gene influences vulnerability to recent psychosocial adversity to produce current symptoms of depression.

  4. Discovery and its geological significance of the mantle-derived helium in the inclusions of the Ordovician oil-bearing reservoir rocks in the Huanghua depression, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaobao; XU Yongchang; SUN Mingliang; CHENG Keming; LIU Wenhui; LI Xiufen; MA Liyuan

    2004-01-01

    The values of the helium isotopes in the inclusions of the Ordovician reservoir rocks in the Kongxi buried hill belt in the Huanghua depression were first measured and the source of helium and its geological significance were investigated in comparison with those of the helium isotopes in the conclusions in the Ordovician rocks in the Ordos basin and the Tarim basin. The input of the mantle-derived helium into the inclusions in the carbonate reservoir rocks was found from the Konggu 3 well, the Konggu 4 well, and the Konggu 7 well in the Kongxi buried hill belt. The 3He/4He and R/Ra in the conclusions in the Ordovician oil-bearing reservoir rocks in the Konggu 7 well average 2.54×10-6(3) (sample quantity, the same below) and 1.82(3), respectively. The percent of the mantle-derived helium in the inclusions of the reservoir rocks in the Konggu 7 well reaches up to an average of 23.0%(3). The age of the contribution of the mantle-derived helium to the inclusions in the Kongxi buried hill belt is in the Late Triassic or the Early Tertiary. The finding of the mantle-derived helium shows that the interaction of the deep crust with mantle and the activity of deep faults occurred, the terrestrial heat flow value was high, and mantle-derived inorganic gas pools might be formed in the Kongxi buried hill belt. The finding of the mantle-derived helium in the inclusions of oil-bearing reservoir rocks also provides a new way for researching the activity of mantle-derived matter and its associated geological problems.

  5. A Prospective Test of Cognitive Vulnerability Models of Depression with Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Cara; Stice, Eric; Burton, Emily; Fudell, Molly; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to provide a more rigorous prospective test of two cognitive vulnerability models of depression with longitudinal data from 496 adolescent girls. Results supported the cognitive vulnerability model in that stressors predicted future increases in depressive symptoms and onset of clinically significant major depression for…

  6. Development of a Geriatric Scale of Hopelessness: Implications for Counseling and Intervention with the Depressed Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated hopelessness, depression, and self-esteem among depressed elderly people (N=78) and developed a Geriatric Hopelessness Scale (GHS). As predicted, elderly subjects who scored high on the GHS showed significantly higher depression and lower self-esteem scores. (JAC)

  7. Development of a Geriatric Scale of Hopelessness: Implications for Counseling and Intervention with the Depressed Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated hopelessness, depression, and self-esteem among depressed elderly people (N=78) and developed a Geriatric Hopelessness Scale (GHS). As predicted, elderly subjects who scored high on the GHS showed significantly higher depression and lower self-esteem scores. (JAC)

  8. Markers of Oxidative Stress and Neuroprogression in Depression Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaváková, Magdaléna; Ďuračková, Zdeňka; Trebatická, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is multifactorial disorder with high prevalence and alarming prognostic in the nearest 15 years. Several mechanisms of depression are known. Neurotransmitters imbalance and imbalance between neuroprogressive and neuroprotective factors are observed in major depression. Depression is accompanied by inflammatory responses of the organism and consequent elevation of proinflammatory cytokines and increased lipid peroxidation are described in literature. Neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression are also associated with telomerase shortening, oxidative changes in nucleotides, and polymorphisms in several genes connected to metabolism of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrion dysfunction is directly associated with increasing levels of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress plays significant role in pathophysiology of major depression via actions of free radicals, nonradical molecules, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Products of oxidative stress represent important parameters for measuring and predicting of depression status as well as for determining effectiveness of administrated antidepressants. Positive effect of micronutrients, vitamins, and antioxidants in depression treatment is also reviewed.

  9. Markers of Oxidative Stress and Neuroprogression in Depression Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdaléna Vaváková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depression is multifactorial disorder with high prevalence and alarming prognostic in the nearest 15 years. Several mechanisms of depression are known. Neurotransmitters imbalance and imbalance between neuroprogressive and neuroprotective factors are observed in major depression. Depression is accompanied by inflammatory responses of the organism and consequent elevation of proinflammatory cytokines and increased lipid peroxidation are described in literature. Neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression are also associated with telomerase shortening, oxidative changes in nucleotides, and polymorphisms in several genes connected to metabolism of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrion dysfunction is directly associated with increasing levels of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress plays significant role in pathophysiology of major depression via actions of free radicals, nonradical molecules, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Products of oxidative stress represent important parameters for measuring and predicting of depression status as well as for determining effectiveness of administrated antidepressants. Positive effect of micronutrients, vitamins, and antioxidants in depression treatment is also reviewed.

  10. Integrated analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression: Adding biological significance to microRNA target predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Iterson (Mat); S. Bervoets (Sander); E.J. de Meijer (Emile); H.P. Buermans (Henk); P.A.C. 't Hoen (Peter); R.X. Menezes (Renée); J.M. Boer (Judith)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCurrent microRNA target predictions are based on sequence information and empirically derived rules but do not make use of the expression of microRNAs and their targets. This study aimed to improve microRNA target predictions in a given biological context, using in silico predictions, mi

  11. Incorporating significant amino acid pairs and protein domains to predict RNA splicing-related proteins with functional roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Huang, Kai-Yao; Weng, Tzu-Ya; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Machinery of pre-mRNA splicing is carried out through the interaction of RNA sequence elements and a variety of RNA splicing-related proteins (SRPs) (e.g. spliceosome and splicing factors). Alternative splicing, which is an important post-transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, gives rise to multiple mature mRNA isoforms, which encodes proteins with functional diversities. However, the regulation of RNA splicing is not yet fully elucidated, partly because SRPs have not yet been exhaustively identified and the experimental identification is labor-intensive. Therefore, we are motivated to design a new method for identifying SRPs with their functional roles in the regulation of RNA splicing. The experimentally verified SRPs were manually curated from research articles. According to the functional annotation of Splicing Related Gene Database, the collected SRPs were further categorized into four functional groups including small nuclear Ribonucleoprotein, Splicing Factor, Splicing Regulation Factor and Novel Spliceosome Protein. The composition of amino acid pairs indicates that there are remarkable differences among four functional groups of SRPs. Then, support vector machines (SVMs) were utilized to learn the predictive models for identifying SRPs as well as their functional roles. The cross-validation evaluation presents that the SVM models trained with significant amino acid pairs and functional domains could provide a better predictive performance. In addition, the independent testing demonstrates that the proposed method could accurately identify SRPs in mammals/plants as well as effectively distinguish between SRPs and RNA-binding proteins. This investigation provides a practical means to identifying potential SRPs and a perspective for exploring the regulation of RNA splicing.

  12. Incorporating significant amino acid pairs and protein domains to predict RNA splicing-related proteins with functional roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Huang, Kai-Yao; Weng, Tzu-Ya; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Machinery of pre-mRNA splicing is carried out through the interaction of RNA sequence elements and a variety of RNA splicing-related proteins (SRPs) (e.g. spliceosome and splicing factors). Alternative splicing, which is an important post-transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, gives rise to multiple mature mRNA isoforms, which encodes proteins with functional diversities. However, the regulation of RNA splicing is not yet fully elucidated, partly because SRPs have not yet been exhaustively identified and the experimental identification is labor-intensive. Therefore, we are motivated to design a new method for identifying SRPs with their functional roles in the regulation of RNA splicing. The experimentally verified SRPs were manually curated from research articles. According to the functional annotation of Splicing Related Gene Database, the collected SRPs were further categorized into four functional groups including small nuclear Ribonucleoprotein, Splicing Factor, Splicing Regulation Factor and Novel Spliceosome Protein. The composition of amino acid pairs indicates that there are remarkable differences among four functional groups of SRPs. Then, support vector machines (SVMs) were utilized to learn the predictive models for identifying SRPs as well as their functional roles. The cross-validation evaluation presents that the SVM models trained with significant amino acid pairs and functional domains could provide a better predictive performance. In addition, the independent testing demonstrates that the proposed method could accurately identify SRPs in mammals/plants as well as effectively distinguish between SRPs and RNA-binding proteins. This investigation provides a practical means to identifying potential SRPs and a perspective for exploring the regulation of RNA splicing.

  13. Insecure Attachment, Dysfunctional Attitudes, and Low Self-Esteem Predicting Prospective Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Adabel; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2009-01-01

    This study extends the existing adult literature on insecure attachment as a predictor of depression and anxiety by examining these pathways in a sample of adolescents. In addition, dysfunctional attitudes and low self-esteem were tested as mediators of the association between insecure attachment and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Youth (N =…

  14. Slow identification of facial happiness in early adolescence predicts onset of depression during 8 years of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijen, Charlotte; Hartman, Catharina A.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent onset depression places a high burden on those who suffer from it, and is difficult to treat. An improved understanding of mechanisms underlying susceptibility to adolescent depression may be useful in early detection and as target in treatment. Facial emotion identification bias has been

  15. Insecure Attachment, Dysfunctional Attitudes, and Low Self-Esteem Predicting Prospective Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Adabel; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2009-01-01

    This study extends the existing adult literature on insecure attachment as a predictor of depression and anxiety by examining these pathways in a sample of adolescents. In addition, dysfunctional attitudes and low self-esteem were tested as mediators of the association between insecure attachment and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Youth (N =…

  16. Interpersonal Sensitivity, Romantic Stress, and the Prediction of Depression: A Study of Inner-City, Minority Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Christie J.; Daley, Shannon E.; Gunderson, Brent H.

    2006-01-01

    The role of interpersonal sensitivity in the relation between romantic stress and depression was examined in 55 adolescent girls from an inner-city high school. Depression, interpersonal sensitivity, and chronic and episodic romantic stress were measured at two time points, 6 months apart. Interpersonal sensitivity was found to moderate the…

  17. Sleep quality predicts positive and negative affect but not vice versa. An electronic diary study in depressed and healthy individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmans, Mara E J; Bos, Elisabeth H; Hoenders, H J Rogier; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; de Jonge, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: The exact nature of the complex relationship between sleep and affect has remained unclear. This study investigated the temporal order of change in sleep and affect in participants with and without depression. Methods: 27 depressed patients and 27 pair-matched healthy controls assessed t

  18. Guilt Trips and Love Withdrawal: Does Mothers' Use of Psychological Control Predict Depressive Symptoms among African American Adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandara, Jelani; Pikes, Crysta L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of maternal psychological control on the depressive symptoms of 152 lower socioeconomic status African American adolescents. After controlling for the effects of other parenting practices, psychological control had a strong positive relationship with girls' depressive symptoms, but none for boys, even though the 2…

  19. Rumination and Loneliness Independently Predict Six-Month Later Depression Symptoms among Chinese Elderly in Nursing Homes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Gan

    Full Text Available Previous studies conducted in Western countries independently demonstrated that loneliness and rumination are remarkable risk factors of depression among the elderly in both community and nursing homes. However, knowledge on the relationship between these three constructs among the elderly in Eastern countries is scarce. The current study aims to determine the relationship between loneliness, rumination, and depression among Chinese elderly in nursing homes.A total of 71 elderly participants with an average age of 82.49 years completed this six-month longitudinal study. Physical reports indicated that none of the participants were clinically depressed before the study. At Time 1, their loneliness and rumination were measured using UCLA-8 Loneliness Scale and Ruminative Responses Scale. Six months later, the participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale to assess depressive symptoms (Time 2.Multiple regression analysis revealed that both loneliness and rumination at Time 1 were the predictors of depression symptoms at Time 2 among the Chinese elderly in nursing homes. However, in the mediation analysis using PROCESS, the indirect effect between loneliness at Time 1 and depression symptoms at Time 2 was insignificant.Results suggest that previous loneliness and rumination thinking are predictors of future depression symptoms among the Chinese elderly in nursing homes. However, the insignificant mediation further suggests that the differences between loneliness and rumination should be explored in future studies. Findings have important implications for mental health professionals in nursing homes in China.

  20. Multi-level prediction of short-term outcome of depression : non-verbal interpersonal processes, cognitions and personality traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, E; Bouhuys, N

    1998-01-01

    It was hypothesized that personality factors determine the short-term outcome of depression, and that they may do this via non-verbal interpersonal interactions and via cognitive interpretations of non-verbal behaviour. Twenty-six hospitalized depressed patients entered the study. Personality factor

  1. Preoperative Metabolic Syndrome Is Predictive of Significant Gastric Cancer Mortality after Gastrectomy: The Fujian Prospective Investigation of Cancer (FIESTA) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dan; Peng, Feng; Lin, Xiandong; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Hejun; Liang, Binying; Ji, Kaida; Lin, Jinxiu; Chen, Lin-Feng; Zheng, Xiongwei; Niu, Wenquan

    2017-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. However, the impact of MetS on gastric cancer mortality remains largely unknown. Here, we prospectively examined the prediction of preoperative MetS for gastric cancer mortality by analyzing a subset of data from the ongoing Fujian prospective investigation of cancer (FIESTA) study. This study was conducted among 3012 patients with gastric cancer who received radical gastrectomy between 2000 and 2010. The latest follow-up was completed in 2015. Blood/tissue specimens, demographic and clinicopathologic characteristics were collected at baseline. During 15-year follow-up, 1331 of 3012 patients died of gastric cancer. The median survival time (MST) of patients with MetS was 31.3months, which was significantly shorter than that of MetS-free patients (157.1months). The coexistence of MetS before surgery was associated with a 2.3-fold increased risk for gastric cancer mortality (P<0.001). The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were increased with invasion depth T1/T2 (HR=2.78, P<0.001), regional lymph node metastasis N0 (HR=2.65, P<0.001), positive distant metastasis (HR=2.53, P<0.001), TNM stage I/II (HR=3.00, P<0.001), intestinal type (HR=2.96, P<0.001), negative tumor embolus (HR=2.34, P<0.001), and tumor size ≤4.5cm (HR=2.49, P<0.001). Further survival tree analysis confirmed the top splitting role of TNM stage, followed by MetS or hyperglycemia with remarkable discrimination ability. In this large cohort study, preoperative MetS, especially hyperglycemia, was predictive of significant gastric cancer mortality in patients with radical gastrectomy, especially for early stage of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The use of predictive lithostratigraphy to significantly improve the ability to forecast reservoir and source rocks? Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, R. D.; Moore, T. L.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-29

    The purpose of this CRADA, which ended in 2003, was to make reservoir and source rock distribution significantly more predictable by quantifying the fundamental controls on stratigraphic heterogeneity. To do this, the relationships among insolation, climate, sediment supply, glacioeustasy, and reservoir and source rock occurrence were investigated in detail. Work current at the inception of the CRADA had uncovered previously unrecognized associations among these processes and properties that produce a phenomenon that, when properly analyzed, will make lithostratigraphic variability (including texture, porosity, and permeability) substantially more understandable. Computer climate simulations of selected time periods, compared with the global distribution of paleoclimatic indicators, documented spatial and temporal climate changes as a function of insolation and provided quantitative changes in runoff, lake level, and glacioeustasy. The effect of elevation and climate on sediment yield was assessed numerically by analyzing digital terrain and climate data. The phase relationships of climate, yield, and glacioeustatic cycles from the Gulf of Mexico and/or other sedimentary basins were assessed by using lacunarity, a statistical technique.

  3. Data on clinical significance of second trimester inflammatory biomarkers in the amniotic fluid in predicting preterm delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesrouani, Assaad; Chalhoub, Elie; El Rassy, Elie; Germanos, Mirna; Khazzaka, Aline; Rizkallah, Jamale; Attieh, Elie; Aouad, Norma

    2016-12-01

    In this article second trimester amniotic fluid biomarkers are measured for correlation with preterm delivery. One additional milliliter of amniotic fluid is collected during amniocentesis for dosages of IL-6, MMP-9, CRP and glucose levels, along with maternal serum CRP and glucose. MMP-9 and Il-6 levels were measured with the corresponding Human Quantikine(R) ELISA Kit (R&D systems) according to the instructions provided by the manufacturer. Cut-off values for AF MMP-9 and IL-6 were fixed by the kit sensitivity thresholds. Data includes ROC curves for glucose (Fig. 1), IL-6 (Fig. 2) and MMP-9 (Fig. 3), aiming to search for sensitivity and specificity in the prediction of premature delivery. Statistical analyses are performed with SPSS v20.0 software. Statistical significance is determined using the Mann-Whitney and one way ANOVA test. The association with preterm delivery is performed using a two proportions test. Correlations are measured using the Pearson׳'s coefficient. A p valueamniotic fluid" (A. Kesrouani, E. Chalhoub, E. El Rassy, M. Germanos, A. Khazzaka, J. Rizkallah, E. Attieh, N. Aouad, 2016) [1].

  4. Maternal postpartum depressive symptoms predict delay in non-verbal communication in 14-month-old infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Emiko; Takagai, Shu; Takei, Nori; Itoh, Hiroaki; Kanayama, Naohiro; Tsuchiya, Kenji J

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the potential relationship between maternal depressive symptoms during the postpartum period and non-verbal communication skills of infants at 14 months of age in a birth cohort study of 951 infants and assessed what factors may influence this association. Maternal depressive symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, and non-verbal communication skills were measured using the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories, which include Early Gestures and Later Gestures domains. Infants whose mothers had a high level of depressive symptoms (13+ points) during both the first month postpartum and at 10 weeks were approximately 0.5 standard deviations below normal in Early Gestures scores and 0.5-0.7 standard deviations below normal in Later Gestures scores. These associations were independent of potential explanations, such as maternal depression/anxiety prior to birth, breastfeeding practices, and recent depressive symptoms among mothers. These findings indicate that infants whose mothers have postpartum depressive symptoms may be at increased risk of experiencing delay in non-verbal development.

  5. Significance of peak height velocity as a predictive factor for curve progression in patients with idiopathic scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    progression in patients with IS. Conclusions These findings indicate that 31.5 degrees of spinal curvature when patients are at PHV is a significant predictive indicator for progression of the curve to a magnitude requiring surgery. We suggest that the curve-progression risk assessment in patients with IS should include PHV, along with measures of skeletal and non-skeletal maturities. PMID:25815057

  6. Significance of Vestibular Testing on Distinguishing the Nerve of Origin for Vestibular Schwannoma and Predicting the Preservation of Hearing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Bo He; Chun-Jiang Yu; Hong-Ming Ji; Yan-Ming Qu; Ning Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Determining the nerve of origin for vestibular schwannoma (VS),as a method for predicting hearing prognosis,has not been systematically considered.The vestibular test can be used to investigate the function of the superior vestibular nerve (SVN) and the inferior vestibular nerve (IVN).This study aimed to preoperatively distinguish the nerve of origin for VS patients using the vestibular test,and determine if this correlated with hearing preservation.Methods:A total of 106 patients with unilateral VS were enrolled in this study prospectively.Each patient received a caloric test,vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test,and cochlear nerve function test (hearing) before the operation and 1 week,3,and 6 months,postoperatively.All patients underwent surgical removal of the VS using the suboccipital approach.During the operation,the nerve of tumor origin (SVN or IVN) was identified by the surgeon.Tumor size was measured by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging.Results:The nerve of tumor origin could not be unequivocally identified in 38 patients (38/106,35.80%).These patients were not subsequently evaluated.In 26 patients (nine females,seventeen males),tumors arose from the SVN and in 42 patients (18 females,24 males),tumors arose from the IVN.Comparing with the nerve of origins (SVN and IVN) of tumors,the results of the caloric tests and VEMP tests were significantly different in tumors originating from the SVN and the IVN in our study.Hearing was preserved in 16 of 26 patients (61.54%) with SVN-originating tumors,whereas hearing was preserved in only seven of 42 patients (16.67%) with IVN-originating tumors.Conclusions:Our data suggest that caloric and VEMP tests might help to identify whether VS tumors originate from the SVN or IVN.These tests could also be used to evaluate the residual function of the nerves after surgery.Using this information,we might better predict the preservation of hearing for patients.

  7. Interaction of FKBP5 Gene Variants and Adverse Life Events in Predicting Depression Onset: Results From a 10-Year Prospective Community Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Petra; Brückl, Tanja; Nocon, Agnes; Pfister, Hildegard; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Uhr, Manfred; Lieb, Roselind; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom; Holsboer, Florian; Ising, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Objective The binding protein FKBP5 is an important modulator of the function of the glucocorticoid receptor, the main receptor of the stress horm one system. This turns the FKBP5 gene into a key candidate for gene-environment interactions, which are considered critical for pathogenesis of stress-related disorders. The authors explored gene-environment interactions between FKBP5 gene variants and adverse life events in predicting the first occurrence of a major depressive episode. Method The analyses were based on 884 Caucasians in a 10-year prospective community study. At baseline, they were 14–24 years old and did not fulfill criteria for a major depressive episode. The DSM-IV-based Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to assess adverse life events preceding baseline and major depressive episodes during follow-up. On the basis of previous findings, five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the FKBP5 gene were selected for genotyping. Results While the authors did not observe genetic main effects, they found interactions between the five SNPs and traumatic (but not separation) events, with the strongest effect for severe trauma. The effect of trauma on incident major depressive episodes was evident among subjects homozygous for the minor alleles but not subjects with other genotypes. The findings were replicated in the U.K. Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study. Conclusions These hypothesis-driven results suggest that an interaction between FKBP5 genotype and trauma is involved in the onset of depression. Subjects homozygous for the minor alleles of the investigated FKBP5 SNPs seem to be particularly sensitive to effects of trauma exposure in terms of triggering depression onset. PMID:21865530

  8. Predictors of remission in depression to individual and combined treatments (PReDICT: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop Boadie W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited controlled data exist to guide treatment choices for clinicians caring for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD. Although many putative predictors of treatment response have been reported, most were identified through retrospective analyses of existing datasets and very few have been replicated in a manner that can impact clinical practice. One major confound in previous studies examining predictors of treatment response is the patient’s treatment history, which may affect both the predictor of interest and treatment outcomes. Moreover, prior treatment history provides an important source of selection bias, thereby limiting generalizability. Consequently, we initiated a randomized clinical trial designed to identify factors that moderate response to three treatments for MDD among patients never treated previously for the condition. Methods/design Treatment-naïve adults aged 18 to 65 years with moderate-to-severe, non-psychotic MDD are randomized equally to one of three 12-week treatment arms: (1 cognitive behavior therapy (CBT, 16 sessions; (2 duloxetine (30–60 mg/d; or (3 escitalopram (10–20 mg/d. Prior to randomization, patients undergo multiple assessments, including resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, immune markers, DNA and gene expression products, and dexamethasone-corticotropin-releasing hormone (Dex/CRH testing. Prior to or shortly after randomization, patients also complete a comprehensive personality assessment. Repeat assessment of the biological measures (fMRI, immune markers, and gene expression products occurs at an early time-point in treatment, and upon completion of 12-week treatment, when a second Dex/CRH test is also conducted. Patients remitting by the end of this acute treatment phase are then eligible to enter a 21-month follow-up phase, with quarterly visits to monitor for recurrence. Non-remitters are offered augmentation treatment for a second 12

  9. Patient-specific metrics of invasiveness reveal significant prognostic benefit of resection in a predictable subset of gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L Baldock

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are incurable, primary brain neoplasms noted for their potential to extensively invade brain parenchyma. Current methods of clinical imaging do not elucidate the full extent of brain invasion, making it difficult to predict which, if any, patients are likely to benefit from gross total resection. Our goal was to apply a mathematical modeling approach to estimate the overall tumor invasiveness on a patient-by-patient basis and determine whether gross total resection would improve survival in patients with relatively less invasive gliomas.In 243 patients presenting with contrast-enhancing gliomas, estimates of the relative invasiveness of each patient's tumor, in terms of the ratio of net proliferation rate of the glioma cells to their net dispersal rate, were derived by applying a patient-specific mathematical model to routine pretreatment MR imaging. The effect of varying degrees of extent of resection on overall survival was assessed for cohorts of patients grouped by tumor invasiveness.We demonstrate that patients with more diffuse tumors showed no survival benefit (P = 0.532 from gross total resection over subtotal/biopsy, while those with nodular (less diffuse tumors showed a significant benefit (P = 0.00142 with a striking median survival benefit of over eight months compared to sub-totally resected tumors in the same cohort (an 80% improvement in survival time for GTR only seen for nodular tumors.These results suggest that our patient-specific, model-based estimates of tumor invasiveness have clinical utility in surgical decision making. Quantification of relative invasiveness assessed from routinely obtained pre-operative imaging provides a practical predictor of the benefit of gross total resection.

  10. Low self-esteem prospectively predicts depression in the transition to young adulthood: A replication of Orth, Robins, and Roberts (2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Sven; Göllner, Richard; Trautwein, Ulrich; Roberts, Brent W

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a close replication of the work of Orth, Robins, and Roberts (2008). Orth et al. (2008) tested three theoretical models of the relation between self-esteem and depression--the vulnerability model, the scar model, and the common factor model--using longitudinal, cross-lagged panel designs. The authors concluded that depression and self-esteem were not the same construct (contrary to the common-factor model), and furthermore, the results were clearly in line with the vulnerability model and not with the scar model (low self-esteem predicts subsequent levels of depression and not vice versa). In addition, the results held for both men and women. To conduct a very close replication of the work of Orth et al. (2008), we used data from another large longitudinal study (N = 2,512), which is highly similar in study design and that contains the same measures (self-esteem and depression). The present study replicated the results of the Orth et al. (2008) study in a notable manner, in regard to the comparability of the coefficients, and therefore, corroborates the vulnerability model (and not the scar- or the common-factor model).

  11. Fatigue and depression predict physician visits and work disability in women with primary Sjögren's syndrome: results from a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff, Gisela; Dörner, Thomas; Zink, Angela

    2012-02-01

    Patients with primary SS (pSS) are frequently suffering from multiple enduring disorders that raise the risk of work disability and require treatment by various health-care specialists. We aimed at determining predictors of physician visits and work disability in pSS patients. Physician visits within the past 6 months, employment status and sick leave were compared among 176 female pSS patients and 115 age-matched controls. Dryness, pain, fatigue and depression were assessed by rating scales of the EULAR Sjögren's Syndrome Patient Reported Index (ESSPRI), the Profile of Fatigue and Discomfort (PROFAD) and Patient Health Questionnaire depression measurements (PHQ-9). Factors associated with an increased number of physician visits and inability to work were determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Patients and controls were comparable in age and education, but differed significantly in the prevalence of depression (38.1 vs 7.9%, P high ratings for the statement 'I have had difficulties to keep going, was easily worn out or lacking in energy' had a highly increased risk of not being gainfully employed (adjusted OR 4.1; 95% CI 1.5, 11.2; P < 0.001). In pSS, lack of stamina and/or depression cause a higher level of individual and societal burden than dry eyes and mouth. Fatigue and depression deserve more recognition as treatment targets in pSS.

  12. Depression - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  13. Changes in affect during treatment for depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, Ann M; Persons, Jacqueline B; Thomas, Cannon

    2007-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the tripartite model [Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (1991). Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: Psychometric evidence and psychometric implications. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 316-336] can be extended to account for change during treatment for anxiety and depression. Forty-one patients treated naturalistically in private practice with cognitive behavior therapy completed weekly measures of depression, anxiety, negative affect (NA), positive affect (PA), and anxious arousal (AA). Consistent with the model, NA was associated with anxiety and depression during treatment, PA was more strongly related to depression than to anxiety, and AA was more strongly related to anxiety than to depression. As predicted, symptoms of depression and anxiety and NA all decreased during treatment. As predicted, AA also decreased, particularly for patients with panic disorder. PA increased during treatment, but only for patients who showed a significant decline in depression and only over an extended period of treatment. Nearly two-thirds of the variance in anxiety change was accounted for by changes in depression and NA, and just over three-fourths of the variance in depression change was accounted for by changes in anxiety and NA, indicating that much of the change in anxiety and depression across the course of treatment is shared in common.

  14. Testing the Temporal Relationship Between Maternal and Adolescent Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms in a Community Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ruth C.; Clark, Shaunna L.; Dahne, Jennifer; Stratton, Kelcey J.; MacPherson, Laura; Lejuez, C. W.; Amstadter, Ananda B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transactional models have been used to explain the relationship between maternal depression and child behavioral problems; however, few studies have examined transactional models for maternal depression and adolescent depression and anxiety. Method Using an autoregressive cross-lagged analysis, we examined the longitudinal association between maternal and adolescent depression to determine the extent to which maternal depression influences adolescent depression and anxiety, and vice versa, over the course of a four-year period. Participants were a community sample of 277 mother-adolescent dyads with offspring aged 10–14 at the first year used in the analyses (43.7% female; 35% African American, 2.9% Hispanic/Latino). Depressive symptoms were assessed using maternal self-report (Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale [CESD]; Radloff, 1977), and adolescent depression and anxiety were assessed by self-report (Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale [RCADS]; Chorpita, Yim, Moffitt, Umemoto, & Francis, 2000). Results The final model, χ2 (14) = 23.74, p= .05; TLI= .97; CFI= .98; RMSEA= .05, indicated that maternal depression was significantly associated with adolescent depression two years later. Interestingly, adolescent depression did not significantly predict maternal depression, and the association between maternal and adolescent depression was not moderated by gender, age, or ethnicity. The association between maternal depression and adolescent anxiety was weaker than that observed for adolescent depression. Conclusions Results suggest that the transaction model of maternal depression may not extend to adolescent depression and anxiety. Furthermore, maternal depression can have an enduring effect on adolescent depression and continued research and clinical monitoring over extended periods of time is warranted. PMID:24702257

  15. Significance of vapor phase chemical reactions on CVD rates predicted by chemically frozen and local thermochemical equilibrium boundary layer theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the role played by vapor-phase chemical reactions on CVD rates by comparing the results of two extreme theories developed to predict CVD mass transport rates in the absence of interfacial kinetic barrier: one based on chemically frozen boundary layer and the other based on local thermochemical equilibrium. Both theories consider laminar convective-diffusion boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers and include thermal (Soret) diffusion and variable property effects. As an example, Na2SO4 deposition was studied. It was found that gas phase reactions have no important role on Na2SO4 deposition rates and on the predictions of the theories. The implications of the predictions of the two theories to other CVD systems are discussed.

  16. Delayed mood transitions in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, Jakob

    2014-05-01

    The hypothesis defended here is that the process of mood-normalizing transitions fails in a significant proportion of patients suffering from major depressive disorder. Such a failure is largely unrelated to the psychological content. Evidence for the hypothesis is provided by the highly variable and unpredictable time-courses of the depressive episodes. The main supporting observations are: (1) mood transitions within minutes or days have been reported during deep brain stimulation, naps after sleep deprivation and bipolar mood disorders; (2) sleep deprivation, electroconvulsive treatment and experimental drugs (e.g., ketamine) may facilitate mood transitions in major depressive disorder within hours or a few days; (3) epidemiological and clinical studies show that the time-to-recovery from major depressive disorder can be described with decay models implying very short depressive episodes; (4) lack of relationship between the length of depression and recovery episodes in recurrent depression; (5) mood fluctuations predict later therapeutic success in major depressive disorder. We discuss some recent models aimed to describe random mood transitions. The observations together suggest that the mood transitions have a wide variety of apparently unrelated causes. We suggest that the mechanism of mood transition is compromised in major depressive disorder, which has to be recognized in diagnostic systems.

  17. Childhood adversities, adulthood life events and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkeila, Jyrki; Vahtera, Jussi; Nabi, Hermann; Kivimäki, Mika; Korkeila, Katariina; Sumanen, Markku; Koskenvuo, Karoliina; Koskenvuo, Markku

    2010-12-01

    The role of childhood adversities in predicting adulthood depression has been suggested to be complex and in need of additional comprehensive studies. This investigation set out to examine whether increased exposure to life events (LEs) in adulthood mediates the association between childhood adversities and adulthood depression. This study is based on a random health survey sample from the Finnish working-aged population (n=16,877) with a follow-up of up to 7 years. Depression was identified by Beck Depression Inventory, records of antidepressant prescriptions and hospitalization due to depression obtained from national health registers. Childhood adversities were associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing a high number of LEs in adulthood and their perceived burdensomeness. The mean number of new LEs correlated significantly (Pchildhood adversities. Reporting childhood adversities was associated with a 1.28-2.70-fold increase in the odds of depression as indicated by BDI score, a 1.29-1.94-fold increase in the rate of antidepressant prescriptions and a 1.17-4.04-fold increase in the risk of hospitalization due to depression. Adjustment for new LE attenuated these associations by 21-24%, but did not render them insignificant. Increased exposure to adult negative life events proximal to adult depression may partially explain the association between childhood adversities and adult depression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Depression in context of low neuroticism is a risk factor for stroke : a 9-year cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, Radboud M; Wouts, Lonneke; Schoevers, Robert A; Bremmer, Marijke A; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Comijs, Hannie C; Oude Voshaar, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Depression predicts stroke; however, meta-analyses show significant heterogeneity. We hypothesize that the risk of depression on incident stroke is conditional upon the relative contribution of vascular disease and of neuroticism in the underlying pathways to depression in a specific pati

  19. Depression in context of low neuroticism is a risk factor for stroke: a 9-year cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, R.M.; Wouts, L.; Schoevers, R.A.; Bremmer, M.A.; Beekman, A.T.; Comijs, H.C.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Depression predicts stroke; however, meta-analyses show significant heterogeneity. We hypothesize that the risk of depression on incident stroke is conditional upon the relative contribution of vascular disease and of neuroticism in the underlying pathways to depression in a specific pati

  20. Cushing's syndrome masquerading as treatment resistant depression

    OpenAIRE

    Anil Kumar, B. N.; Sandeep Grover

    2016-01-01

    Treatment resistant depression (TRD) is a common clinical occurrence among patients treated for major depressive disorder. A significant proportion of patients remain significantly depressed in spite of aggressive pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches. Management of patient with treatment resistant depression requires thorough evaluation for physical causes. We report a case of recurrent depressive disorder, who presented with severe depressive episode without psychotic symptoms, n...

  1. Prior Delinquency and Depression Differentially Predict Conditional Associations Between Discrete Patterns of Adolescent Religiosity and Adult Alcohol Use Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyland, Meredith A; Rowatt, Wade C; Latendresse, Shawn J

    2017-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated that adolescent delinquency and depression are prospectively related to adult alcohol use and that adolescent religiosity may influence these relationships. However, such associations have not been investigated using person-centered approaches that provide nuanced explorations of these constructs. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we examined whether adolescent delinquency and depression differentiated typologies of adult alcohol users and whether these relationships varied across religiosity profiles. Three typologies of self-identified Christian adolescents and 4 types of adult alcohol users were identified via latent profile analysis. Delinquency and depression were related to increased likelihood of membership in heavy drinking or problematic alcohol use profiles, but this relationship was most evident among those likely to be involved in religious practices. These results demonstrate the importance of person-centered approaches in characterizing the influences of internalizing and externalizing behaviors on subsequent patterns of alcohol use. PMID:28469423

  2. Personality, depressive symptoms during pregnancy and their influence on postnatal depression in Spanish pregnant Spanish women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Marín-Morales

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of personality factors and antenatal depressive symptomatology in postnatal depression. A prospective ex post facto design was carried out. The sample consisted of 116 women, recruited in their first trimester of pregnancy and followed up until four months postpartum. The measurement instruments used were the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS to assess postpartum depression, the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI to analyse personality traits and the depression subscale of the Symptoms Check List 90 (SCL-90-R to assess depressive symptomatology in the first half of pregnancy. Socio-demographic variables (age, parity, educational level, employment status, and planned pregnancy and clinical variables (neonatal Apgar score and mode of delivery were also taken into account. A positive correlation was found between postpartum depression and depressive symptomatology in the first trimester; however after the regression analysis neuroticism was the only factor that predicted postpartum depressive symptoms, explaining 24.8% of the variance. Neuroticism significantly influences psychological health during life events such as motherhood. Due to its stable condition, personality could be assessed from the beginning of pregnancy, contributing to the care of pregnant women with high scores in neuroticism, to prevent, detect and treat early postnatal depression.

  3. Coping Styles, Aggression and Interpersonal Conflicts among Depressed and Non-Depressed People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Nazir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study compared people with depressive symp¬toms and people without depressive symptoms with reference to their coping styles, level of aggression and interpersonal conflicts.Methods: A purposive sample of 128 people (64 depressed and 64 normal controls was selected from four different teaching hospitals of Lahore. Both the groups were matched on four demographic levels i.e. age, gender, education and monthly income. Symptom Checklist-R was used to screen out depressed and non-depressed people. The Brief COPE, the Aggres¬sion Questionnaire and the Bergen Social Relationship Scale were used to assess coping styles, aggression and interpersonal conflicts respectively. The Independent t-test was used to compare the groups. Binary logistic Regression was also carried out to predict the role of research variables in causing depression.Results: The results showed that level of aggression and interpersonal conflict was significantly more in people with depressive symptoms as compared to control group. On the other hand control group was using more adaptive coping styles than people with depressive symptoms but no difference was found in the use of maladaptive coping styles. Conclusion: The present findings revealed that coping styles, aggression and interpersonal conflicts play important role in depression. Therefore, these dimen-sions must be considered while dealing with the depressive patients. Implications for preventive work are also discussed in the light of previous researches.

  4. Detecting reliable non interacting proteins (NIPs) significantly enhancing the computational prediction of protein-protein interactions using machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A; Mazzocco, G; Kel, A; Wyrwicz, L S; Plewczynski, D

    2016-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a vital role in most biological processes. Hence their comprehension can promote a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying living systems. However, besides the cost and the time limitation involved in the detection of experimentally validated PPIs, the noise in the data is still an important issue to overcome. In the last decade several in silico PPI prediction methods using both structural and genomic information were developed for this purpose. Here we introduce a unique validation approach aimed to collect reliable non interacting proteins (NIPs). Thereafter the most relevant protein/protein-pair related features were selected. Finally, the prepared dataset was used for PPI classification, leveraging the prediction capabilities of well-established machine learning methods. Our best classification procedure displayed specificity and sensitivity values of 96.33% and 98.02%, respectively, surpassing the prediction capabilities of other methods, including those trained on gold standard datasets. We showed that the PPI/NIP predictive performances can be considerably improved by focusing on data preparation.

  5. Discovery of Early Tertiary Hydrothermal Activity and Its Significance in Oil/Gas Geology,Dougpu Depression,Henan Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱家祥; 朱家蔚; 等

    1994-01-01

    Data from the super-deep wells(PS10,PS14 and YS1)led to the discovery of widespread met-al-bearing hydrothermal fluids (or hot brines) related to basic magmas in the Lower Tertiary clastic sequence in the Dongpu Depression .In terms of SEM and EDAX analyses, pore-casting thin section examination of sandstone ,the composition and forming temperature of fluid inclusions ,the trace ele-ment composition of mustone and kerogen and organic geochemical analyses, it is demonstrated that the hydrothermal fluids existing in the area studied are ejecting fluids, which have a close bearing on diagenesis and sedimentation, rather than intrusive veins along the tectonic fractures.The main indicators of hydrothermal activity are:(1)abnormal alteration of kerogen;(2) high-temperature altered mineral assemblage;(30abnormal distribution of hydrocarbons;(4) specific assemblages and abnormal contents of heavy metals in mudstone and kerogen;(5) specific composi-tion of complex compounds and assemblages of fluid inclusions in sandstone;(6) periodic basaltic magma activity.Results of geological observations and laboratory simulating experiments demonstrated that the hydrothermal fluids have a close bearing on hydrocarbon generation in the Dongpu Depression. Two aspects of the effect of hydrothermal fluids are noticed:hydrothermal hydrocarbon production and strong metal catalysis in oil and gas generation.

  6. The Diagnostic Apathia Scale predicts a dose-remission relationship of T-PEMF in treatment-resistant depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Lunde, Marianne; Lauritzen, Lise

    2014-01-01

    of fatigue, concentration and memory problems, lack of interests, difficulties in making decisions, and sleep problems. We evaluated 65 patients with therapy-resistant depression. In total, 34 of these patients received placebo T-PEMF in the afternoon and active T-PEMF in the morning, that is, one daily dose....... The remaining 31 patients received active T-PEMF twice daily. Duration of treatment was 8 weeks in both groups. The Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17) and the Bech-Rafaelsen Melancholia Scale (MES) were used to measure remission. We also focused on the Diagnostic Apathia Scale, which is based on a mixture...

  7. A multifractal approach to characterize cumulative rainfall and tillage effects on soil surface micro-topography and to predict depression storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vidal Vázquez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the indices currently employed for assessing soil surface micro-topography, such as random roughness (RR, are merely descriptors of its vertical component. Recently, multifractal analysis provided a new insight for describing the spatial configuration of soil surface roughness. The main objective of this study was to test the ability of multifractal parameters to assess in field conditions the decay of initial surface roughness induced by natural rainfall under different soil tillage systems. In addition, we evaluated the potential of the joint use of multifractal indices plus RR to improve predictions of water storage in depressions of the soil surface (MDS. Field experiments were performed on an Oxisol at Campinas, São Paulo State (Brazil. Six tillage treatments, namely, disc harrow, disc plough, chisel plough, disc harrow + disc level, disc plough + disc level and chisel plough + disc level were tested. In each treatment soil surface micro-topography was measured four times, with increasing amounts of natural rainfall, using a pin meter. The sampling scheme was a square grid with 25 × 25 mm point spacing and the plot size was 1350 × 1350 mm (≈1.8 m2, so that each data set consisted of 3025 individual elevation points. Duplicated measurements were taken per treatment and date, yielding a total of 48 experimental data sets. MDS was estimated from grid elevation data with a depression-filling algorithm. Multifractal analysis was performed for experimental data sets as well as for oriented and random surface conditions obtained from the former by removing slope and slope plus tillage marks, respectively. All the investigated microplots exhibited multifractal behaviour, irrespective of surface condition, but the degree of multifractality showed wide differences between them. Multifractal parameters provided valuable information for characterizing the spatial features of soil micro-topography as they were able to

  8. A multifractal approach to characterize cumulative rainfall and tillage effects on soil surface micro-topography and to predict depression storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vidal Vázquez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Most of the indices currently employed for assessing soil surface micro-topography, such as random roughness (RR, are merely descriptors of its vertical component. Recently, multifractal analysis provided a new insight for describing the spatial configuration of soil surface roughness. The main objective of this study was to test the ability of multifractal parameters to assess decay of initial surface roughness induced by natural rainfall under different soil tillage systems in field conditions. In addition, we evaluated the potential of the joint use of multifractal indices plus RR to improve predictions of water storage in depressions of the soil surface (MDS. Field experiments were performed on an Oxisol at Campinas, São Paulo State (Brazil. Six tillage treatments, namely, disc harrow, disc plough, chisel plough, disc harrow + disc level, disc plough + disc level and chisel plough + disc level were tested. In each treatment soil surface micro-topography was measured four times, with increasing amounts of natural rainfall, using a pin meter. The sampling scheme was a square grid with 25×25 mm point spacing and the plot size was 1350×1350 mm (≈1.8 m2, so that each data set consisted of 3025 individual elevation points. Duplicated measurements were taken per treatment and date, yielding a total of 48 experimental data sets. MDS was estimated from grid elevation data with a depression-filling algorithm. Multifractal analysis was performed for experimental data sets as well as for oriented and random surface conditions obtained from the former by removing slope and slope plus tillage marks, respectively. All the investigated microplots exhibited multifractal behaviour, irrespective of surface condition, but the degree of multifractality showed wide differences between them. Multifractal parameters provided valuable information for characterizing the spatial features of soil micro-topography as they were able to discriminate data

  9. Natural outcome and risk-prediction model of late-life depression%老年抑郁的自然转归及风险预测模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽婷; 陈树林; 金涛; 李琳; 范海楠; 余湘娥; 方瑜; 马彦; 许百华

    2012-01-01

    目的:了解社区情境中老年抑郁的患病率、自然转归及风险因素预测模型.方法:随机选取一个完整社区作为研究点,采用PHQ-9量表对1275名60岁以上的老年人进行筛查;然后使用SCID,对所有PHQ-9在10分以上、50%的PHQ-9在5~9分之间的和5%的PHQ-9小于5分的老年人进行诊断性访谈,对所有接受诊断性访谈的老年人使用PHQ-9,在1年内每隔3个月随访一次,第12个月时使用SCID进行诊断访谈;把12个月之后的PHQ-9得分作为因变量,对10个可能的危险因素进行Logistic回归分析.结果:初次筛查有141人(11.1%)得分超过10分,298人(23.4%)得分为5~9分,836人(65.5%)得分为0~4分,初次诊断访谈发现符合major depressive disorder(MDD)的老年人有93名,老年抑郁症的时点患病率是7.3%;与1年后PHQ-9得分相比,原先无抑郁症状对象中,17.6%出现抑郁症状;有抑郁症状的对象中,50%抑郁症状减少或程度下降,9%发展为明显的抑郁症状,有41%没有变化;有明显抑郁症状的对象中,12%缓解为没有明显抑郁症状,24%抑郁症状减少或程度下降,64%持续抑郁症状明显;累积疾病、社会支持、文化程度、日常能力及基线抑郁水平是其显著预测因素.结论:老年抑郁症的患病率高,1年的自然转归无明显缓解,识别率和诊断和治疗率都很低,专科-社区卫生合作的管理模型是老年抑郁防治的重要途径之一.%Objective: To investigate the prevalence and natural outcome of late-life depression in the community and to analyze the risk-prediction models. Methods: A community in Hang Zhou was selected as a trial. A total of 1 275 persons aged 60 or more in this community were screened by PHQ-9 questionnaire; SCID was used for interviewer to diagnostic interview the people whose PHQ-9 was more than 10 points,50% of those whose PHQ-9 was from 5 to 9 points and 5% of those whose PHQ-9 was less than 5 points

  10. The Significance of Community Care in the Rehabilitation of Postnatal Depression%社区关怀在产后抑郁症康复中的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马一婷; 戚宇红; 叶雪芬; 雪峰

    2011-01-01

    Objective The incidence of postpartum depression became higher,but not many patients received treatment. The reason was that whether patient,their families or the medical staff did not know the post-natal depression was a mental illness.This subject was represented the solutions for community physicians ,who were going to help the mothers who were unable or unwilling to have psychological treatment: firstly, through postpartum visit to the local social work groups for help;secondly, contact a psychiatrist visits or telephone interview with suicidal mothers. Methods A questionnaire survey of 437 cases maternal by selfrating depression scale on the 7th,the 14th and 28th postpartum was conducted with retrospective analysis. Results There were 77 cases of postpartum depression,the incidence rate was 18.33%. 21 patients were willing to accept hospital treatment of out-patient counseling, accounting for 27.27%. 30 patients were willing to accept the help of social workers, accounting for 38.96%. After a community of common interest, all the patients were recovered. Conclusion Community care can not only solve difficulties and problems faced by patients and improve their quality of life, but also encourage the power of community to prevent and assist in the treatment of postpartum depression.%目的 产后抑郁症的发病率较高,但就诊的患者并不多.本文拟通过对无法,或不愿转诊进行心理治疗的产妇,社康中心产后访视人员通过向当地的社工团体寻求帮助和对有自杀倾向的产妇,社区医生主动联系心理医生家访或电话访视的方式,对惠有产后抑郁的产妇进行帮助和治疗.方法 对437例产妇分别在产后第7天或第14天,以及第28天,发放抑郁自评量表(SDS),进行回顾性分析.结果 调查共发现产后抑郁症77例,发病率为18.33%,21例愿意接受专科医院的门诊心理咨询治疗,占27.27%,30例愿意接受社会工作者的帮助、治疗,占38.96%.经过社会

  11. A Single, One-Off Measure of Depression and Anxiety Predicts Future Symptoms, Higher Healthcare Costs, and Lower Quality of Life in Coronary Heart Disease Patients: Analysis from a Multi-Wave, Primary Care Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Palacios

    Full Text Available To determine whether a one-off, baseline measure of depression and anxiety in a primary care, coronary heart disease (CHD population predicts ongoing symptoms, costs, and quality of life across a 3-year follow-up.Longitudinal cohort study.16 General Practice surgeries across South-East London.803 adults (70% male, mean age 71 years contributing up to 7 follow-up points.Ongoing reporting of symptoms, health care costs, and quality of life.At baseline, 27% of the sample screened positive for symptoms of depression and anxiety, as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. The probability of scoring above the cut-off throughout the follow-up was 71.5% (p<0.001 for those screening positive at baseline, and for those screening negative, the probability of scoring below the cut-off throughout the follow-up was 97.6% (p<0.001. Total health care costs were 39% higher during follow-up for those screening positive (p<0.05. Quality of life as measured by the SF-12 was lower on the mental component during follow-up for those screening positive (-0.75, CI -1.53 to 0.03, p = 0.059, and significantly lower on the physical component (-4.99, CI -6.23 to -.376, p<0.001.A one-off measure for depression and anxiety symptoms in CHD predicts future symptoms, costs, and quality of life over the subsequent three-years. These findings suggest symptoms of depression and anxiety in CHD persist throughout long periods and are detrimental to a patient's quality of life, whilst incurring higher health care costs for primary and secondary care services. Screening for these symptoms at the primary care level is important to identify and manage patients at risk of the negative effects of this comorbidity. Implementation of screening, and possible collaborative care strategies and interventions that help mitigate this risk should be the ongoing focus of researchers and policy-makers.

  12. Concentration Change and Clinical Significance of Plasma Cortisol in Patients with Post - stroke Depression%脑卒中后抑郁症患者血浆皮质醇的含量变化及临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永强; 段晓峰; 尹娟

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the concentration variation and clinical value of plasma cortisol in patients with post -stroke depression. Methods Fifty- nine patients with post - stroke depression admitted to Cerebrovascular Disease Hospital of Baoding from September 2010 to August 2011 were selected as observation group. According to the scores of Hamilton rating scale for depression (HAMD), they were divided into depression group (n = 21) and non- depression group (n = 38), and the concentration change of plasma cortisol of all the patients was determined. 32 cases with normal plasma cortisol levels detected in our hospital were served as control group. The features of concentration change of plasma cortisol of patients with post - stroke depression were analyzed. Results The plasma cortisol concentrations at 8:00 am, 16:00 and 0:00 pm in patients of observation group were significantly higher than those of control group, and the difference was statistically significant between the two groups ( P < 0.05 ). The plasma cortisol concentrations at 8:00 am, 16:00 and 0:00 pm in patients of depression group were significantly higher than those of non - depression group, and the difference was statistically significant between the two groups (P <0.05). Conclusions The concentration change of plasma cortisol of patients with post - stroke depression is more significantly, which should be taken seriously by clinicians. And the corresponding therapeutic measures should be adopted actively.%目的 探讨脑卒中后抑郁症患者血浆皮质醇的含量变化及临床意义. 方法 选择本院2010年9月-2011年8月收治的脑卒中患者59例作为观察组,采用汉密顿抑郁量表(HAMD)测定后分为抑郁组21例和非抑郁组38例,均测定血浆皮质醇的含量变化,以在本院检测血浆皮质醇含量正常的32例作为对照组,分析脑卒中后抑郁症患者血浆皮质醇的含量变化特点. 结果 观察组患者清晨8时、下午4时、夜间12时的

  13. The course of depressive symptoms in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, F; Denollet, J

    2012-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of the study was to examine the course (incidence, recurrence/persistence) of depressive symptoms in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes and to identify significant predictors of these different course patterns. METHODS: A cohort of 2,460 primary care patients...... = 310), while recurrence/persistence in those with baseline depression was found in 66% (n = 212).The presence of any depression was associated with being female, low education, non-cardiovascular chronic diseases, stressful life events and a self-reported history of depression. Incident depression...... was predicted by female sex, low education and depression history, while patients with a history of depression had a 2.5-fold increased odds of recurrent/persistent depression. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Depression is common in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes, with one in seven patients reporting...

  14. Spatially resolved flux measurements of NOX from London suggest significantly higher emissions than predicted by inventories

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Adam R.; Lee, James D; Misztal, Pawel K.; Metzger, Stefan; Shaw, Marvin D.; Alastair C. Lewis; Purvis, Ruth M.; Carslaw, David C.; Allen H. Goldstein; Hewitt, C. Nicholas; Davison, Brian; Beevers, Sean D.; Karl, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    To date, direct validation of city-wide emissions inventories for air pollutants has been difficult or impossible. However, recent technological innovations now allow direct measurement of pollutant fluxes from cities, for comparison with emissions inventories, which are themselves commonly used for prediction of current and future air quality and to help guide abatement strategies. Fluxes of NOx were measured using the eddy-covariance technique from an aircraft flying at low altitude over Lo...

  15. A circle dance in a psychiatric setting : can a circle dance intervention decrease levels of depressed affect among patients with mental health illnesses and, if so, what aspect of this dance is most significant?

    OpenAIRE

    Beard, Ella King

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the circle dance in decreasing depressed affect amongst a group of 45 patients with severe mental health illnesses and highlights the most significant aspect of that dance. Patients participated in one of four conditions: a group performing a regular traditional upbeat Irish circle dance holding hands and with a jump step [jump+hands]; a group performing the same dance holding hands with no jump step [hands]; a group performing the same dance without holdin...

  16. Girls' Tobacco and Alcohol Use during Early Adolescence: Prediction from Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms across Two Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Elam, Kit; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Associations between trajectories of depressive symptoms and subsequent tobacco and alcohol use were examined in two samples of girls assessed at age 11.5 (T1), 12.5 (T2), and 13.5 (T3). Two samples were examined to ascertain if there was generalizability of processes across risk levels and cultures. Study 1 comprised a United States-based sample…

  17. The Theory of Planned Behavior as It Predicts Potential Intention to Seek Mental Health Services for Depression among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Lisa M.; Cotter, Kelly A.; Kravitz, Richard L.; Cello, Philip C.; Fernandez y Garcia, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Between 9.5% and 31.3% of college students suffer from depression ("American college health association national college health assessment II: reference group executive summary spring 2013." "Amer. Coll. Health Assoc." 2013; Eagan K, Stolzenberg EB, Ramirez JJ, Aragon, MC, Suchard, RS, Hurtado S. "The American…

  18. A functional MRI marker may predict the outcome of electroconvulsive therapy in severe and treatment-resistant depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, J.A.; Scholte, H.S.; van Oudheusden, L.J.B.; Verwey, B.; Denys, D.; van Wingen, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is effective even in treatment-resistant patients with major depression. Currently, there are no markers available that can assist in identifying those patients most likely to benefit from ECT. In the present study, we investigated whether resting-state network connec

  19. The Theory of Planned Behavior as It Predicts Potential Intention to Seek Mental Health Services for Depression among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Lisa M.; Cotter, Kelly A.; Kravitz, Richard L.; Cello, Philip C.; Fernandez y Garcia, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Between 9.5% and 31.3% of college students suffer from depression ("American college health association national college health assessment II: reference group executive summary spring 2013." "Amer. Coll. Health Assoc." 2013; Eagan K, Stolzenberg EB, Ramirez JJ, Aragon, MC, Suchard, RS, Hurtado S. "The American…

  20. Successful emotion regulation skills application predicts subsequent reduction of symptom severity during treatment of major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radkovsky, Anna; McArdle, John J; Bockting, Claudi L H; Berking, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Deficits in emotion regulation (ER) skills are considered a putative maintaining factor for major depressive disorder (MDD) and hence a promising target in the treatment of MDD. However, to date, the association between the successful application of arguably adaptive ER skills and changes