WorldWideScience

Sample records for depression screening scale

  1. Depression Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Diseases + Condition Centers Mental Health Medical Library Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  2. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) as a screening instrument in tinnitus evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöger, Sigyn; Svedlund, Jan; Holgers, Kajsa-Mia

    2004-09-01

    The identification of anxiety and depressive disorders in tinnitus patients is important from a therapeutic point of view. We have addressed this question by investigating the screening performance of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) in a consecutive series of tinnitus patients (n = 82) without severe socially disabling hearing loss referred to an audiological clinic. The structured clinical interview for DSM-III criteria was used as the gold standard. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the screening abilities of the HAD subscales for anxiety and depression and the total HAD Scale. The ROC analysis showed that the HAD Scale was better at detecting depression than anxiety disorders in tinnitus patients. The optimal cut-off score for the subscales was > or = 5 when we were screening for any anxiety or depressive disorder as well as for major depression. The performance of the HAD depression subscale was superior, especially when we were screening for major depression only (sensitivity 1.00; specificity 0.75). The findings of the study suggest that the HAD Scale is more useful for screening for depression than for anxiety disorders in tinnitus patients

  3. THE VALIDITY OF THE HAMILTON DEPRESSION RATING SCALE AS A SCREENING AND DIAGNOSTIC INSTRUMENT FOR DEPRESSION IN PATIENTS WITH EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koraliya S. Todorova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the concurrent validity of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17 against ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder and its performance as a screening and diagnostic tool for depression in patients with epilepsy (PWE.Subjects and Methods: One hundred and six PWE underwent clinical psychiatric examination followed by evaluation on HAMD-17. ICD-10 criteria for comorbid depressive disorder were applied. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach’s α. A “receiver operating characteristics” (ROC curve was obtained and the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV were calculated for different cut-off points of the HAMD-17.Results: Internal consistency measured by Cronbach’s α was 0.74. Maximal discrimination between depressed and non depressed was obtained at a cut-off score of 8/9 (sensitivity 0.93, specificity 0.98. High sensitivity and NPV at the same cut-off score (sensitivity 0.93, NPV 1.0 show the screening properties, and high specificity and PPV at cut-offs 9/10, the diagnostic properties of the instrument. The area under the ROC curve (AUC=0.746 indicates the concurrent validity of the HAMD-17 score with the ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder.Conclusion: The validity of the HAMD-17 against ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder in PWE in our study is fair. The concurrent administration of diagnostic criteria can ascertain the presence of core symptoms of depression.

  4. Development and Validation of a Screening Scale for Depression in Korea: The Lee and Rhee Depression Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Seon Hee; Rhee, Min Kyu; Kang, Rhee Hun; Lee, Hwa Young; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Young Sun; Lee, Min Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop a culturally sensitive instrument that addressed how individuals express and experience depression to detect this disorder in Koreans. We also assessed the validity, reliability, and diagnostic utility of this scale (Lee and Rhee Depression Scale; LRDS). Methods The sample consisted of 3,697 normal adults selected from 12 administrative districts (Do) and 448 Korean patients diagnosed with depression using the Structured Clinical Interview for DS...

  5. Is the geriatric depression scale a reliable screening tool for depressive symptoms in elderly patients with cognitive impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debruyne, Hans; Van Buggenhout, Michael; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Aries, Marcel; Audenaert, Kurt; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2009-06-01

    To determine the reliability of the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-30) for the screening of depressive symptoms in dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) as the 'gold standard'. Diagnosed according to strictly applied clinical diagnostic criteria, patients with MCI (n = 156) and probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 247) were included. GDS-30, CSDD, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Global Deterioration Scale were assessed in all patients at inclusion. The AD group was divided in three subgroups: mild AD (MMSE>or=18) (n = 117), moderate AD (MMSEor=10) (n = 89) and severe AD (MMSEdepressive symptoms in MCI but not in AD patients. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The Simplified Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS for Antenatal Depression: Is It a Valid Measure for Pre-Screening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sea Kyung Choi, Jung Jin Kim, Yong Gyu Park, Hyun Sun Ko, In Yang Park, Jong Chul Shin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of antenatal depression is critical but poorly conducted. The aim of this study was to construct a simplified depression survey scale and to verify its efficacy as a pre-screening for antenatal depression. A total of 494 pregnant women in the third trimester of gestation who had received antenatal care at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital from July 2009 to June 2010 were included. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS questionnaire was completed by them. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups: 250 of training set and 244 of validation set. We designed a simplified questionnaire comprising two items of EPDS using the training set. We then validated its efficacy with the training set and reaffirmed the results with the validation set. The sum of item 5 (scare or panic and item 8 (sadness or misery explained 75.5% of the total score of the EPDS (AUC = 0.947. Using a score of 3 as a cut-off value of the simplified scale, sensitivity was 92.4% and specificity was 86.3%. The positive and negative predictive values were 56.2% and 98.4%, retrospectively. This study suggests that the simplified EPDS can be an efficient instrument to rule out depression during pregnancy.

  7. Screening for depression among community-dwelling elders: Usefulness of the center for epidemiologic studies depression scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Though common, depressive disorders often remain undetected in late life. Aim: To examine the usefulness of Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D for identifying depression among older people. Settings and Design: Community resident older people (aged 65 years or more, were evaluated by clinicians trained in psychiatry, as part of a cross-sectional study of late-life depression. Assessments were done in the community. Methods and Material: The participants were assigned ICD-10 diagnoses and assessed using Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS and CES-D. A short version of CES-D with 10 items, translated to the local language Malayalam, was used. Statistical Analysis: The sensitivity and specificity of CES-D was evaluated against ICD-10 clinical diagnosis of depression. The correlation of CES-D and MADRS was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: 220 consenting adults from 3 wards of the Panchayath were assessed. On analysis of the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve of CES-D scores in relation to clinical diagnosis, the large Area Under Curve (AUC showed efficient screening and a cut off score of 4 in CES-D had a sensitivity of 97.7% and a specificity of 79.1% for depression. There was also good correlation between the MADRS and CES-D scores (0.838. Conclusion: CES-D is a short simple scale which can be used by health care professionals for detecting depression in older people in primary care settings.

  8. Validation of the Rasch-based Depression Screening in a large scale German general population sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norra Christine

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study aimed at presenting normative data for both parallel forms of the "Rasch-based Depression Screening (DESC", to examine its Rasch model conformity and convergent and divergent validity based on a representative sample of the German general population. Methods The sample was selected with the assistance of a demographic consulting company applying a face to face interview (N = 2509; mean age = 49.4, SD = 18.2; 55.8% women. Adherence to Rasch model assumptions was determined with analysis of Rasch model fit (infit and outfit, unidimensionality, local independence (principal component factor analysis of the residuals, PCFAR and differential item functioning (DIF with regard to participants' age and gender. Norm values were calculated. Convergent and divergent validity was determined through intercorrelations with the depression and anxiety subscales of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D and HADS-A. Results Fit statistics were below critical values (rDESC-I = .61 and rDESC-II = .60, whereas correlations with HADS-A were rDESC-I = .62 and rDESC-II = .60. Conclusions This study provided further support for the psychometric quality of the DESC. Both forms of the DESC adhered to Rasch model assumptions and showed intercorrelations with HADS subscales that are in line with the literature. The presented normative data offer important advancements for the interpretation of the questionnaire scores and enhance its usefulness for clinical and research applications.

  9. Screening for depressive symptoms in adolescents at school: New validity evidences on the short form of the Reynolds Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aritio-Solana, Rebeca; Inchausti, Félix; Chocarro de Luis, Edurne; Lucas Molina, Beatriz; Pérez de Albéniz, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to assess the depressive symptomatology and to gather new validity evidences of the Reynolds Depression Scale-Short form (RADS-SF) in a representative sample of youths. The sample consisted of 2914 adolescents with a mean age of 15.85 years (SD = 1.68). We calculated the descriptive statistics and internal consistency of the RADS-SF scores. Also, confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) at the item level and successive multigroup CFAs to test measurement invariance, were conducted. Latent mean differences across gender and educational level groups were estimated, and finally, we studied the sources of validity evidences with other external variables. The level of internal consistency of the RADS-SF Total score by means of Ordinal alpha was .89. Results from CFAs showed that the one-dimensional model displayed appropriate goodness of-fit indices with CFI value over .95, and RMSEA value under .08. In addition, the results support the strong measurement invariance of the RADS-SF scores across gender and age. When latent means were compared, statistically significant differences were found by gender and age. Females scored 0.347 over than males in Depression latent variable, whereas older adolescents scored 0.111 higher than the younger group. In addition, the RADS-SF score was associated with the RADS scores. The results suggest that the RADS-SF could be used as an efficient screening test to assess self-reported depressive symptoms in adolescents from the general population. PMID:28222193

  10. Screening for Depression after Cardiac Events Using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Geriatric Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gail D.; Hubley, Anita M.

    2007-01-01

    Despite findings that depression is a risk factor for heart disease and for death following cardiac events and that depressed cardiac patients experience significantly reduced quality of life and are less likely to follow treatment regimens, depression is neither adequately identified nor treated in cardiac patients. Recent calls in the literature…

  11. Validation of the Arab Youth Mental Health scale as a screening tool for depression/anxiety in Lebanese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakkash Rima

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection of common mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety, among children and adolescents requires the use of validated, culturally sensitive, and developmentally appropriate screening instruments. The Arab region has a high proportion of youth, yet Arabic-language screening instruments for mental disorders among this age group are virtually absent. Methods We carried out construct and clinical validation on the recently-developed Arab Youth Mental Health (AYMH scale as a screening tool for depression/anxiety. The scale was administered with 10-14 year old children attending a social service center in Beirut, Lebanon (N = 153. The clinical assessment was conducted by a child and adolescent clinical psychiatrist employing the DSM IV criteria. We tested the scale's sensitivity, specificity, and internal consistency. Results Scale scores were generally significantly associated with how participants responded to standard questions on health, mental health, and happiness, indicating good construct validity. The results revealed that the scale exhibited good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86 and specificity (79%. However, it exhibited moderate sensitivity for girls (71% and poor sensitivity for boys (50%. Conclusions The AYMH scale is useful as a screening tool for general mental health states and a valid screening instrument for common mental disorders among girls. It is not a valid instrument for detecting depression and anxiety among boys in an Arab culture.

  12. Validation of the depression anxiety stress scales (DASS) 21 as a screening instrument for depression and anxiety in a rural community-based cohort of northern Vietnamese women

    OpenAIRE

    Tran Thach Duc; Tran Tuan; Fisher Jane

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Depression and anxiety are recognised increasingly as serious public health problems among women in low- and lower-middle income countries. The aim of this study was to validate the 21-item Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS21) for use in screening for these common mental disorders among rural women with young children in the North of Vietnam. Methods The DASS-21 was translated from English to Vietnamese, culturally verified, back-translated and administered to wome...

  13. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale is an adequate screening instrument for depression and anxiety disorder in adults with congential heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ju Ryoung; Huh, June; Song, Jinyoung; Kang, I-Seok; Park, Seung Woo; Chang, Sung-A; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook

    2017-09-05

    The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) is an instrument that is commonly used to screen for depression in patients with chronic disease, but the characteristics of the CES-D in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) have not yet been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the criterion validities and the predictive powers of the CES-D for depression and anxiety disorders in adults with CHD. Two hundred patients were screened with the CES-D and secondarily interviewed with a diagnostic instrument, i.e., the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Instrument. The sensitivity and specificity values of the CES-D were calculated by cross-tabulation at different cutoff scores. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess the optimal cutoff point for each disorder and to assess the predictive power of the instrument. The CES-D exhibited satisfactory criterion validities for depression and for all combinations of depression and/or anxiety. With a desired sensitivity of at least 80%, the optimal cutoff scores were 18. The predictive power of the CES-D in the patients was best for major depression and dysthymia (area under the ROC curve: 0.92) followed by the score for any combination of depression and/or anxiety (0.88). The use of CES-D to simultaneously screen for both depression and anxiety disorders may be useful in adults with CHD. CESDEP 212. Registered 2 March 2014 (retrospectively registered).

  14. Routine screening for postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulos, A M; Bryan, T L; Wollan, P; Yawn, B P

    2001-02-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common and often overlooked condition. Validated screening tools for PPD exist but are not commonly used. We present the 1-year outcome of a project to implement universal PPD screening at the 6-week postpartum visit. Universal screening with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was implemented in all community postnatal care sites. One-year outcome assessments (diagnosis and treatment of PPD) were completed for a sample of the women screened using medical record review of all care they received during the first year postpartum. Sixty-eight (20%) of the 342 women whose medical records were reviewed had been given a documented diagnosis of postpartum depression, resulting in an estimated population rate of 10.7%. Depression was diagnosed in 35% of the women with elevated EPDS scores (> or =10) compared with 5% of the women with low EPDS scores (<10) in the first year postpartum. Treatment was provided for all women diagnosed with depression, including drug therapy for 49% and counseling for 78%. Four women were hospitalized for depression. Some degree of suicidal ideation was noted on the EPDS by 48 women but acknowledged in the chart of only 10 women, including 1 with an immediate hospitalization. The rate of diagnosis of postpartum depression in this community increased from 3.7% before the routine use of EPDS screening to 10.7% following screening. A high EPDS score was predictive of a diagnosis of postpartum depression, and the implementation of routine EPDS screening at 6 weeks postpartum was associated with an increase in the rate of diagnosed postpartum depression in this community.

  15. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) as screening instruments for depression in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Tim J; Friedrich, Michael; Johansen, Christoffer; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Faller, Herman; Koch, Uwe; Brähler, Elmar; Härter, Martin; Keller, Monika; Schulz, Holger; Wegscheider, Karl; Weis, Joachim; Mehnert, Anja

    2017-06-27

    Depression screening in patients with cancer is recommended by major clinical guidelines, although the evidence on individual screening tools is limited for this population. Here, the authors assess and compare the diagnostic accuracy of 2 established screening instruments: the depression modules of the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D), in a representative sample of patients with cancer. This multicenter study was conducted with a proportional, stratified, random sample of 2141 patients with cancer across all major tumor sites and treatment settings. The PHQ-9 and HADS-D were assessed and compared in terms of diagnostic accuracy and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition diagnosis of major depressive disorder using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview for Oncology as the criterion standard. The diagnostic accuracy of the PHQ-9 and HADS-D was fair for diagnosing major depressive disorder, with areas under the ROC curves of 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.79) and 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.77), respectively. The 2 questionnaires did not differ significantly in their areas under the ROC curves (P = .15). The PHQ-9 with a cutoff score ≥7 had the best screening performance, with a sensitivity of 83% (95% confidence interval, 78%-89%) and a specificity of 61% (95% confidence interval, 59%-63%). The American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline screening algorithm had a sensitivity of 44% (95% confidence interval, 36%-51%) and a specificity of 84% (95% confidence interval, 83%-85%). In patients with cancer, the screening performance of both the PHQ-9 and the HADS-D was limited compared with a standardized diagnostic interview. Costs and benefits of routinely screening all patients with cancer should be weighed carefully. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  16. Beside the Geriatric Depression Scale: the WHO-Five Well-being Index as a valid screening tool for depression in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Kramer, Dietmar; Saravo, Barbara; Mergl, Roland; Fejtkova, Sabina; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare criterion validities of the WHO-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5) and the Geriatric Depression Scale 15-item version (GDS-15) and 4-item version (GDS-4) as screening instruments for depression in nursing home residents. Data from 92 residents aged 65-97 years without severe cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Examination ≥15) were analysed. Criterion validities of the WHO-5, the GDS-15 and the GDS-4 were assessed against diagnoses of major and minor depression provided by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Subanalyses were performed for major and minor depression. Areas under the receiver operating curve (AUCs) as well as sensitivities and specificities at optimal cut-off points were computed. Prevalence of depressive disorder was 28.3%. The AUC value of the WHO-5 (0.90) was similar to that of the GDS-15 (0.82). Sensitivity of the WHO-5 (0.92) at its optimal cut-off of ≤12 was significantly higher than that of the GDS-15 (0.69) at its optimal cut-off of ≥7. The WHO-5 was equally sensitive for the subgroups of major and minor depression (0.92), whereas the GDS-15 was sensitive only for major depression (0.85), but not for minor depression (0.54). For specificity, there was no significant difference between WHO-5 (0.79) and GDS-15 (0.88), but both instruments outperformed the GDS-4 (0.53). The WHO-5 demonstrated high sensitivity for major and minor depression. Being shorter than the GDS-15 and superior to the GDS-4, the WHO-5 is a promising screening tool that could help physicians improve low recognition rates of depression in nursing home residents. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Impact of terrorism on health and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale screening in medical students, Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasim, Sara; Khan, Mahjabeen; Aziz, Sina

    2014-03-01

    To determine the association of terrorism with psychiatric morbidity by Hospital Anxiety Depression scale among medical students in Karachi, Pakistan. The questionnaire based cross-sectional survey was conducted from February to March 2011 and comprised students of the Institute of Physical and Medical Rehabilitation and the Dow Medical College, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi. The study tool was a validated Hospital Anxiety Depression scale questionnaire. The data was analysed on SPSS 16. Factor analysis was performed to check which factors had the most influence. Overall there were 1036 respondents. The impact of terrorism on physical, social and mental health was 40 (3.9%), 178 (17.2%) and 818 (79%) respectively. There was an association of terrorism in 980 (84.6%) respondents with psychiatric morbidity. There was an association of terrorism with psychiatric morbidity in majority of respondents. The significant risk factors were age, gender, physical, mental and social health and the desire to live in Pakistan.

  18. Screening for adolescents' internalizing symptoms in primary care: item response theory analysis of the behavior health screen depression, anxiety, and suicidal risk scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, Katherine B; Diamond, Guy; Levy, Suzanne

    2012-05-01

    To apply a modern psychometric approach to validate the Behavioral Health Screen (BHS) Depression, Anxiety, and Suicidal Risk Scales among adolescents in primary care. Psychometric analyses were conducted using data collected from 426 adolescents aged 12 to 21 years (mean = 15.8, SD = 2.2). Rasch-Masters partial credit models were fit to the data to determine whether items supported the comprehensive measurement of internalizing symptoms with minimal gaps and redundancies. Scales were reduced to ensure that they measured singular dimensions of generalized anxiety, depressed affect, and suicidal risk both comprehensively and efficiently. Although gender bias was observed for some depression and anxiety items, differential item functioning did not impact overall subscale scores. Future revisions to the BHS should include additional items that assess low-level internalizing symptoms. The BHS is an accurate and efficient tool for identifying adolescents with internalizing symptoms in primary care settings. Access to psychometrically sound and cost-effective behavioral health screening tools is essential for meeting the increasing demands for adolescent behavioral health screening in primary/ambulatory care.

  19. Validation of the depression anxiety stress scales (DASS 21 as a screening instrument for depression and anxiety in a rural community-based cohort of northern Vietnamese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thach Duc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression and anxiety are recognised increasingly as serious public health problems among women in low- and lower-middle income countries. The aim of this study was to validate the 21-item Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS21 for use in screening for these common mental disorders among rural women with young children in the North of Vietnam. Methods The DASS-21 was translated from English to Vietnamese, culturally verified, back-translated and administered to women who also completed, separately, a psychiatrist-administered Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV Axis 1 diagnoses of depressive and anxiety disorders. The sample was a community-based representative cohort of adult women with young children living in Ha Nam Province in northern Viet Nam. Cronbach’s alpha, Exploratory Factor Analyses (EFA and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC analyses were performed to identify the psychometric properties of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress subscales and the overall scale. Results Complete data were available for 221 women. The internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha of each sub-scale and the overall scale were high, ranging from 0.70 for the Stress subscale to 0.88 for the overall scale, but EFA indicated that the 21 items all loaded on one factor. Scores on each of the three sub-scales, and the combinations of two or three of them were able to detect the common mental disorders of depression and anxiety in women with a sensitivity of 79.1% and a specificity of 77.0% at the optimal cut off of >33. However, they did not distinguish between those experiencing only depression or only anxiety. Conclusions The total score of the 21 items of the DASS21-Vietnamese validation appears to be comprehensible and sensitive to detecting common mental disorders in women with young children in primary health care in rural northern Vietnam and therefore might also be useful to screen for these conditions in other resource

  20. Screening for depression and anxiety among older Chinese immigrants living in Western countries: The use of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoping; Haralambous, Betty; Pachana, Nancy A; Bryant, Christina; LoGiudice, Dina; Goh, Anita; Dow, Briony

    2016-03-01

    Depression and anxiety are two common mental health problems among older people. There is evidence that using well-validated screening tools can improve detection of depression and anxiety among this group. The review explored the use of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI) for screening depression and anxiety among older Chinese immigrants, one of the largest and fastest growing groups of older immigrants in Western society. It focused on the GDS and GAI because both are designed specifically for older people. Online literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. A narrative approach was used to review included papers. A total of 21 articles were included. There were limited data on anxiety among older Chinese immigrants, with only one unpublished report identified. There were 13 studies (20 articles) using the GDS with this group. Results of these studies indicated that the GDS is a reliable tool in this population; however, there was limited validity data. Two versions of the GDS-15 have been used with older Chinese immigrants, including the standard GDS-15 and Mui's GDS-15. Prevalence of depression ranged between 20% and 30% in most reviewed studies. Results of this review have practical implications for clinicians in their use of these tools with older Chinese immigrants in Western countries, such as the different GDS versions. It also suggests a number of directions for future research, such as the inclusion of clinical samples and consideration of the diversity within this group. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Internet administration of the Edinburgh Depression Scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, V.; Nyklicek, I.; Cuijpers, P.; Pop, V.

    2008-01-01

    Background Internet-based screening for depression is becoming increasingly important. The aim of this study is to validate the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) for internet administration. Methods In 407 participants (64% women; 36% men) with subthreshold depression (mean age = 55 years; S.D. = 4.9

  2. 产后抑郁筛查量表中文版在产后抑郁筛查中的应用%Application of the Chinese version of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale in the screening of postpartum depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高明; 王智慧; 傅晓红; 陆丽艳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the value of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS)and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS)in the screening of postpartum depression.Methods A total of 378women within 42 days postpartum completed PDSS,the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS)and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders-Patient Edition (SCID-I/P).The SCID-I/P was regarded the standard for postpartum depression diagnosis.Results The cut-of score for PDSS and EPDS was 76 and 13,respectively.Sensitivity of PDSS was 92.00%,and specificity was 95.25%,with positive predictive value of 77.02% and negative predictive value of 99.01%.Sensitivity of EPDS was 82.30%,and specificity was 81.33%,with positive predictive value of 44.73% and negative predictive value of 97.30%.The sensitivity,specificity and positive predictive value showed significantly difference between PDSS and EPDS (P<0.05),and negative predictive value had no statistical significant differece.Conclusion PDSS scale is more suitable for screening postpartum depression than EPDS scale.%目的 比较产后抑郁筛查量表(PDSS)和爱丁堡产后抑郁量表(EPDS)在产后抑郁筛查中的应用价值.方法 分别采用PDSS、爱丁堡产后抑郁量表(EPDS)及美国精神障碍诊断与统计手册第4版轴Ⅰ障碍定式临床检查患者版(SCID-I/P)对378例产后42 d的妇女进行评定,以SCID-I/P作为产后抑郁诊断标准.结果 将两种量表的临界值分别界定为76分和13分.PDSS的敏感性为92.00%,特异性为95.25%,阳性预测值为77.02%,阴性预测值为99.01%;EPDS的敏感性为82.26%,特异性为81.33%,阳性预测值为44.73%,阴性预测值为97.30%.两种量表特异性和敏感性差异比较有统计学意义(P<0.05).PDSS与EPDS阳性预测值比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),阴性预测值比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 与EPDS比较,PDSS更适合产后抑郁的筛查.

  3. Validity and Acceptability of Kimberley Mum’s Mood Scale to Screen for Perinatal Anxiety and Depression in Remote Aboriginal Health Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Jayne; Engelke, Catherine; Williams, Melissa; Stephen, Donna; Coutinho, Sudha; Trust, Stephanie K.

    2017-01-01

    Background The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is widely recommended for perinatal anxiety and depression screening. However, many Aboriginal women find EPDS language complex and confusing, and providers find using it with Aboriginal women challenging. The two part Kimberley Mum’s Mood Scale (KMMS) was developed to improve screening: Part 1 is a Kimberley version of EPDS; Part 2 is a psychosocial tool that enables contextualisation of Part 1 scores. We aimed to determine if KMMS is a valid and acceptable method of identifying Kimberley Aboriginal perinatal women at risk of anxiety or depressive disorders compared to a semi-structured clinical interview. Methods Across 15 sites in the Kimberley, Western Australia, 97 Aboriginal women aged 16 years and older who intended to continue with their pregnancy or had a baby within the previous 12 months were administered the KMMS by trained healthcare providers who provided an overall assessment of no, low, moderate or high risk; 91 participants were then independently assessed by a blinded clinical expert using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria. A qualitative approach was used to determine KMMS’ acceptability. Results Part 1 had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha, 0.89), and overall KMMS risk equivalence for screening for anxiety or depressive disorders was moderate (sensitivity, 83%; specificity, 87%; positive predictive value, 68%). Participants found the process easy and useful, and healthcare providers found KMMS more useful than EPDS. Part 2 allowed healthcare providers to ask questions that gave participants an opportunity to express themselves, resulting in a deeper understanding between them. Conclusion KMMS is an effective tool for identifying Kimberley Aboriginal perinatal women at risk of anxiety and depressive disorders. Adoption of KMMS with culturally safe training and support is likely to improve screening processes, and with further

  4. Validity and Acceptability of Kimberley Mum's Mood Scale to Screen for Perinatal Anxiety and Depression in Remote Aboriginal Health Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Julia V; Kotz, Jayne; Engelke, Catherine; Williams, Melissa; Stephen, Donna; Coutinho, Sudha; Trust, Stephanie K

    2017-01-01

    The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is widely recommended for perinatal anxiety and depression screening. However, many Aboriginal women find EPDS language complex and confusing, and providers find using it with Aboriginal women challenging. The two part Kimberley Mum's Mood Scale (KMMS) was developed to improve screening: Part 1 is a Kimberley version of EPDS; Part 2 is a psychosocial tool that enables contextualisation of Part 1 scores. We aimed to determine if KMMS is a valid and acceptable method of identifying Kimberley Aboriginal perinatal women at risk of anxiety or depressive disorders compared to a semi-structured clinical interview. Across 15 sites in the Kimberley, Western Australia, 97 Aboriginal women aged 16 years and older who intended to continue with their pregnancy or had a baby within the previous 12 months were administered the KMMS by trained healthcare providers who provided an overall assessment of no, low, moderate or high risk; 91 participants were then independently assessed by a blinded clinical expert using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria. A qualitative approach was used to determine KMMS' acceptability. Part 1 had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha, 0.89), and overall KMMS risk equivalence for screening for anxiety or depressive disorders was moderate (sensitivity, 83%; specificity, 87%; positive predictive value, 68%). Participants found the process easy and useful, and healthcare providers found KMMS more useful than EPDS. Part 2 allowed healthcare providers to ask questions that gave participants an opportunity to express themselves, resulting in a deeper understanding between them. KMMS is an effective tool for identifying Kimberley Aboriginal perinatal women at risk of anxiety and depressive disorders. Adoption of KMMS with culturally safe training and support is likely to improve screening processes, and with further validation may have broader applicability across

  5. Validation of the Edinburgh Depression Scale during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Veerle; Kooistra, Libbe; Lambregtse-van den Berg, Mijke P.; Wijnen, Henny; Bunevicius, Robertas; van Baar, Anneloes; Pop, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Background: Untreated depression during pregnancy may have adverse outcomes for the mother and her child. Screening for depression in the general pregnant population is thus recommended. The Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) is widely used for postpartum depression screening. There is no consensus on

  6. Screening for depression in terminally ill cancer patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Tatsuo; Okuyama, Toru; Sugawara, Yuriko; Shima, Yasuo; Furukawa, Toshiaki A; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2006-01-01

    This study attempted to assess the performance of several screening instruments for adjustment disorders (ADs) and major depression (MD) among terminally ill Japanese cancer patients. Two hundred and nine consecutive patients were assessed for ADs and MD using a structured clinical interview at the time of their registration with a palliative care unit, and two single-item interviews ("Are you depressed?" and "Have you lost interest?") and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were administered. Screening performance was investigated by calculating sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value, negative predictive value, likelihood ratio, and stratum-specific likelihood ratios. When the screening target included both an AD and MD, the HADS is a more useful screening method than the single-item interviews. Regarding screening for MD, both single-item interviews and the HADS possess useful screening performance. Different screening instruments may be recommended depending on the depressive disorders and specific populations.

  7. Adequate Screening of Youngsters for Depressive Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Theuwis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to set up an effective early-detection of depressive symptoms in youngsters, the current study aims to investigate whether two measure moments of the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI improve screening and whether a multi-informant procedure is superior compared to a single-informant procedure thereby controlling for comorbid symptoms. Method.Youngsters (10-15 years filled in the CDI and an Anxiety Scale at Time 1 and the CDI and Youth Self Report one week later. Next, a structured clinical interview was administered. The Child Behaviour CheckList was filled in by the parents. Results. Two measure moments of the CDI are not more accurate in capturing disordered mood changes. Furthermore, parent reports were no significant contributor to the variance over and above the CDI. Discussion. A second moment does not increase screening accuracy. Further research on setting up an effective multistage screening procedure for depressive symptoms for youngsters is however necessary.

  8. Screening Adults for Depression in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Sarah; Pignone, Michael P

    2017-07-01

    The burden of depression in the United States is substantial. Evidence supports the benefits of screening for depression in all adults, including older patients and pregnant and postpartum women, when coupled with appropriate resources for management of disease. Developing, implementing, and sustaining a high-fidelity screening process is an important first step for improving the care of patients with depression in primary care. Initial treatment for depression should include psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of both. Collaborative care models are evidence-based approaches to depression treatment and follow-up that can be feasibly initiated in the primary care setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A survey of the clinical acceptability of screening for postnatal depression in depressed and non-depressed women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericksen Jennifer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on clinical acceptability is needed when making cost-utility decisions about health screening implementation. Despite being in use for two decades, most data on the clinical acceptability of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS come from qualitative reports, or include relatively small samples of depressed women. This study aimed to measure acceptability in a survey of a relatively large, community sample with a high representation of clinically depressed women. Methods Using mail, telephone and face-to-face interview, 920 postnatal women were approached to take part in a survey on the acceptability of the EPDS, including 601 women who had screened positive for depression and 245 who had received DSM-IV diagnoses of depression. Acceptability was measured on a 5-point Likert scale of comfort ranging from "Not Comfortable", through "Comfortable" to "Very Comfortable". Results The response rate was just over half for postal surveys (52% and was 100% for telephone and face-to-face surveys (432, 21 and 26 respondents for postal, telephone and face-to-face surveys respectively making 479 respondents in total. Of these, 81.2% indicated that screening with the EPDS had been in the range of "Comfortable" to "Very Comfortable". The other 18.8 % rated screening below the "Comfortable" point, including a small fraction (4.3% who rated answering questions on the EPDS as "Not Comfortable" at the extreme end of the scale. Comfort was inversely related to EPDS score, but the absolute size of this effect was small. Almost all respondents (97% felt that screening was desirable. Conclusion The EPDS had good acceptability in this study for depressed and non-depressed women. Women's views on the desirability of postnatal depression screening appear to be largely independent of personal level of comfort with screening. These results should be useful to policy-makers and are broadly supportive of the Edinburgh Postnatal

  10. 两种筛查量表早期发现产后抑郁的效果对比%Comparison of two screening scales in screening postpartum depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘梅; 廖少玲; 文若兰

    2012-01-01

    目的 比较产后抑郁筛查量表(PDSS)和爱丁堡产后抑郁量表(EPDS)在产后抑郁筛查中的应用价值.方法 采用PDSS、EPDS及美国精神障碍诊断与统计手册第4版轴Ⅰ障碍定式临床检查患者版(SCID-I/P)同时对445名产后6周的妇女进行评定,以SCID-I/P作为产后抑郁诊断金标准.结果 两种量表的临界值分别为74分和10分.PDSS的灵敏度(93.33%)和特异度(94.75%)的组合较好.PDSS与EPDS的ROC曲线下面积分别为0.978和0.872,差异均有统计学意义(P均<0.05).结论 与EPDS相比,PDSS具有较好的筛检价值,是早期发现产后抑郁患者的简单、快速、准确的筛查工具.%Objective To compare the value of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS)and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale(EPDS) in the screening of postpartum depression.Methods A total of 445 women within 6 weeks postpartum completed PDSS,EPDS and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders-Patient Edition (SCID-I/P).The SCID-I/P was regarded as the gold standard for postpartum depression diagnosis.Results The cut-off score for PDSS and EPDS was 74 and 10,respectively.PDSS achieved the higher combination of sensitivity ( 93.33% ) and specifity ( 94.75% ).The area under the curve for PDSS and EPDS was 0.978 and 0.872,respectively ( P < 0.05 ).Conclusions Compared with EPDS,PDSS has a higher screening value.It is a simple,fast and accurate screening tool for postpartum depression.

  11. 'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayalon, Liat; Goldfracht, Margalit; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    to existing depression screening tools. METHODS: A cross sectional sample of 153 older primary care patients. Participants completed several depression-screening measures (e.g. a single depression screen, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Major Depression Inventory, Visual Analogue Scale). Measures were...

  12. Erectile dysfunction and depression: screening and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, Michael A

    2011-05-01

    The comorbid conditions erectile dysfunction (ED) and depression are highly prevalent in men. Multiple regression analysis to control for all other predictors of ED indicate that men with high depression scores are nearly twice as likely to report ED than nondepressed men. Depression continues to be among the most common comorbid problems in men with ED, both in the community and in clinical samples. This article reviews the current knowledge about the relationship between ED and depression, the effect of treatments for depression on ED, ways to improve screening for depression, and treatment of ED in patients with this comorbidity.

  13. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kathryn Betts; Matto, Holly C.; Sanders, Sara

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) is widely used in clinical and research settings to screen older adults for depressive symptoms. Although several exploratory factor analytic structures have been proposed for the scale, no independent confirmation has been made available that would enable investigators to confidently identify scores…

  14. Screening for depression while patients dialyse: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcot, Joseph; Wellsted, David; Farrington, Ken

    2008-08-01

    The lack of routine depression screening among the haemodialysis (HD) population may contribute to depression being under-recognised. While screening patients could be beneficial, the optimum screening procedure remains unclear. One method would be to screen HD patients while they receive their treatment. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI) could be administered while patients dialysed. Forty HD patients completed the BDI while dialysing and again at a time when off-dialysis. Level of agreement analysis (Bland and Altman) was undertaken to determine if the assessment condition influenced BDI scoring. The off-dialysis assessment also involved a short clinical interview that was compared with the BDI assessment. There was a high level of agreement between the on- and off-dialysis assessments, but differences in response to the somatic items on the BDI scale were apparent between the conditions. The clinical interview revealed that 22% of the sample met the DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder. The optimal cut-off value for the BDI as determined by receiver operating characteristic curves was >or=16, with 88.9% sensitivity and 87.1% specificity. The results indicate that the procedure of on-dialysis assessment using the BDI is a viable screening procedure. The practicality of employing this screening procedure may facilitate improved detection of depression in the dialysis population.

  15. The prevalence and screening methods of postpartum depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Erdem

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum Depression is the most common complicationof the delivery and affects approximately 10%-15% ofwomen who had just gave birth. During a period in whichwomen believe that they should be happy, the depressivemood experienced by most women leads to feelings ofguilt, hiding the symptoms, and postpartum depressionto be overlooked. Although the incidence of serious psychiatricdisorders during pregnancy is low, it is reportedthat the incidence shows a dramatic increase during thepostpartum period and this risky period may continue upto six months, one year or even two years.As the onset of postpartum depression is insidious it caneasily be overlooked if the patient’s seeking help is notsupported, especially when the severity of postpartum depressionis mild or moderate. In these cases, postpartumdepression may persist for a long time and at last it can beso severe that hospitalization would be needed. Therefore,early diagnose is very important and primary carephysicians and other health care workers should be alert.Postpartum Depression should be diagnosed using reliabledescriptive methods in puerperant women. Thescales such as Postnatal Depression Screening Scale,Beck Depression Inventory, Edinburgh Postnatal DepressionScale and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, all of whichwere tested for validity and reliability in our country can beused during follow-up of pregnant and puerperal women.Key words: Postpartum depression, screening methods,primary health care professionals

  16. Screening for Depression In Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Reza ESMAEELI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract How to Cite This Article: Esmaeeli M, Erfani Sayar R, Saghebi A, Elmi Saghi, Rahmani Sh, Elmi S, Rabbani Javadi A. Screening for Depression in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:47-51. Objective In chronically ill children who are hospitalized, many mood changes occur. For example, in children with cancer or renal failure, prolonged hospitalization and chemotherapy can lead to depression. With the improved survival of childhood malignancies, the effect of treatment on child’s psychosocial well-being becomes increasingly relevant. In this study, we examined the prevalence of depression in hospitalized children with chronic and acute conditions in Dr Sheikh Pediatrics Hospital in Mashhad. Materials & Methods After receiving the approval from the Ethics Committee of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, we did this cross-sectional descriptive study, from April to June 2012 in Dr Sheikh Pediatric Hospital in Mashhad. Ninety children, aged between 8 to 16 years, were screened for depression. The sampling method was census. Children with a history of depressive or other mental disorders were excluded. Three groups of children (children with chronic renal disease, malignancy, and acute disease were evaluated for depression using standard Children Depression Inventory Questionnaire (CDI. Two specifically trained nurses with the supervision of a psychiatrist filled out the questionnaires at patients’ bedside. Depression scores were then analyzed by SPSS software. Results Of 90 children, 43(47.7% were male and 47(52.2% were female. The Children’s mean age was 11±2.3 years, and the mean length of hospitalization was 8±5.3 days. Depression was detected in various degrees in 63% of patients (N=57, and 36.6% of children (N=32 had no symptoms of depression. Severe depression was not seen in any of the patients with acute illness. More than half of patients with cancer and chronic kidney disease had

  17. Exploratory Study of the Diagnostic Abilities of the Baptista Depression Scale Adult Version (EBADEP-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makilim Nunes Baptista

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study’s objective was to analyze the diagnostic capabilities of a depression screening scale. For that, this scale was administered along with two diagnostic instruments, namely, the structured clinical interview from the DSM-IV (SCID-CV and the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D, which are considered to be the gold standard for diagnosing depressive disorders. Participants were 22 subjects diagnosed by psychiatrists with Major Depressive Disorder. The EBADEP-A correctly identified cases of depression, showing a high correlation with the HAM-D, which indicates the scale correctly captures most depressive symptoms, even though it was initially used as a depression-screening tool.

  18. Screening for cognitive dysfunction in unipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Caroline Vintergaard; Bjertrup, Anne Juul; Jensen, Johan Høy

    2016-01-01

    Impairment in Psychiatry (SCIP-D) and Cognitive Complaints in Bipolar Disorder Rating Assessment (COBRA) and with established neuropsychological and self-assessment measures. Depression symptoms and socio-occupational function were rated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Functional Assessment...

  19. Screening for depressed mood in an adolescent psychiatric context by brief self-assessment scales -- testing psychometric validity of WHO-5 and BDI-6 indices by latent trait analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Eva Henje; Bech, Per; Högberg, Göran

    2012-01-01

    but they are time-consuming and often not fully implemented in clinical practice. Screening for depressive symptoms in the child psychiatric context using brief, user-friendly and easily managed self-assessment scales may be of clinical value and utility. The aim of the study is to test the psychometric validity.......52 and for the BDI-6 of 0.46. Rasch analysis also accepted unidimensionality when testing males versus females (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The WHO-5 is psychometrically valid in an adolescent psychiatric context including both genders to assess the wellness dimension and applicable as a first step in screening for MDD...

  20. Depression Screening and Patient Outcomes in Cancer : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Anna; Roseman, Michelle; Milette, Katherine; Coyne, James C.; Stefanek, Michael E.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Arthurs, Erin; Leavens, Allison; Palmer, Steven C.; Stewart, Donna E.; de Jonge, Peter; Thombs, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several practice guidelines recommend screening for depression in cancer care, but no systematic reviews have examined whether there is evidence that depression screening benefits cancer patients. The objective was to evaluate the potential benefits of depression screening in cancer pati

  1. The Sensitivity and Specificity of Depression Screening Tools among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailey, Sarah H.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the validity and the sensitivity and specificity of depression screening tools among adults with intellectual and disabilities (ID). Subjects (N = 75) were interviewed with the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and the Glasgow Depression Scale for People with a Learning Disability (GDS-LD) and also completed a clinical…

  2. The Validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Mondolo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the concurrent validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS against the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Ham-D in patients with Parkinson’ disease (PD. Forty-six non-demented PD patients were assessed by a neurologist on the Ham-D. Patients also completed four mood rating scales: the HADS, the GDS, the VAS and the Face Scale. For the HADS and the GDS, Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC curves were obtained and the positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV were calculated for different cut-off scores. Maximum discrimination between depressed and non-depressed PD patients was reached at a cut-off score of 10/11 for both the HADS and the GDS. At the same cut-off score of 10/11 for both the HADS and the GDS, the high sensitivity and NPV make these scales appropriate screening instruments for depression in PD. A high specificity and PPV, which is necessary for a diagnostic test, was reached at a cut-off score of 12/13 for the GDS and at a cut-off score of 11/12 for the HADS. The results indicate the validity of using the HADS and the GDS to screen for depressive symptoms and to diagnose depressive illness in PD.

  3. Screening for Depression in Latino Immigrants: A Systematic Review of Depression Screening Instruments Translated into Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Francisco J; Lamson, Angela L; Hodgson, Jennifer; Bowler, Mark; Saeed, Sy

    2016-08-01

    The research on the diagnostic accuracy of Spanish language depression-screening instruments continues to be scarce in the US. Under-detection of depression by Primary Care Providers is approximately 50 % in the general population and this rate may be even higher for Latino immigrants for whom the depression rate tends to be higher than for non-Hispanic Whites. This systematic review shows that there is still limited evidence that guides primary care-based depression screening for Spanish speakers. The economic, social, and human costs of depression are high and complex; yet improvements in the effectiveness of treatment cannot be made available to sufferers of the disorder if they go undetected.

  4. Older adults' attitudes toward depression screening in primary care settings and exploring a brief educational pamphlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Avani; Scogin, Forrest; Pierpaoli, Christina M; Shah, Amit

    2017-04-21

    This study aimed to assess older adults' (OAs') attitudes toward depression screening in primary care settings with a survey and explore the impact of an educational pamphlet on these attitudes. Older adults above age 55 (N = 140) were randomly stratified by sex to an intervention or control group. The study included a baseline assessment, posttest, the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, a two-page pamphlet on health and mood, and a 10-question quiz. On the basis of survey responses, most participants (93.6%) were willing to complete a depression screen at their doctor's office, and 92.1% perceived depression screening as valuable to their health care. Participants rated the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form positively. The survey also provided information on how screening could be conducted in primary care settings to maximize OAs' comfort. Participants preferred screening in the waiting room or examination room instead of the nurse's station. Those receiving the pamphlet became significantly more willing to be screened for depression than those who did not, F(1, 134) = 4.47, p = 0.04. Most OAs appear receptive to completing a depression screen in primary care settings. Educating OAs about the value of depression screening and tailoring recognition systems to account for preferences may be an initial step in improving recognition rates. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Screening for Depression In Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Reza ESMAEELI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Esmaeeli M, Erfani Sayar R, Saghebi A, Elmi Saghi, Rahmani Sh, Elmi S, Rabbani Javadi A. Screening for Depression in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:47-51. ObjectiveIn chronically ill children who are hospitalized, many mood changes occur. For example, in children with cancer or renal failure, prolonged hospitalization and chemotherapy can lead to depression. With the improved survival of childhoodmalignancies, the effect of treatment on child’s psychosocial well-being becomes increasingly relevant. In this study, we examined the prevalence of depression in hospitalized children with chronic and acute conditions in Dr Sheikh Pediatrics Hospital in Mashhad.Materials & MethodsAfter receiving the approval from the Ethics Committee of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, we did this cross-sectional descriptive study, from April to June 2012 in Dr Sheikh Pediatric Hospital in Mashhad. Ninety children, aged between 8 to 16 years, were screened for depression. The sampling method was census. Children with a history of depressive or other mental disorders were excluded.Three groups of children (children with chronic renal disease, malignancy, and acute disease were evaluated for depression using standard Children Depression Inventory Questionnaire (CDI. Two specifically trained nurses with the supervisionof a psychiatrist filled out the questionnaires at patients’ bedside. Depression scores were then analyzed by SPSS software.ResultsOf 90 children, 43(47.7% were male and 47(52.2% were female. The Children’s mean age was 11±2.3 years, and the mean length of hospitalization was 8±5.3 days.Depression was detected in various degrees in 63% of patients (N=57, and 36.6% of children (N=32 had no symptoms of depression. Severe depression was not seenin any of the patients with acute illness. More than half of patients with cancer and chronic kidney disease had moderate

  6. Assessing Latina/o Undergraduates' Depressive Symptomatology: Comparisons of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and the Self-Report Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Rico, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of depression scales as screening tools at university and college centers is increasing and thus, the question of whether scales are culturally valid for different student groups is increasingly more relevant with increased severity of depression for students and changing student demographics. As such, this study examined the reliability…

  7. Dimensionality and scale properties of the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Cock, Evi S A; Emons, Wilco H M; Nefs, Giesje

    2011-01-01

    Scale (EDS) is a widely used method for screening depression. However, there is still debate about the dimensionality of the test. Furthermore, the EDS was originally developed to screen for depression in postpartum women. Empirical evidence that the EDS has comparable measurement properties in both......BACKGROUND: Depression is a common complication in type 2 diabetes (DM2), affecting 10-30% of patients. Since depression is underrecognized and undertreated, it is important that reliable and validated depression screening tools are available for use in patients with DM2. The Edinburgh Depression...... to laugh or enjoy) and sleeping problems were the most informative indicators for being able to differentiate between the diagnostic groups of mild and severe depression. CONCLUSIONS: The EDS constitutes a sound scale for measuring an attribute of general depression. Persons can be reliably measured using...

  8. A literature review of the application of the Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist to community nursing cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui; Annells, Merilyn

    2009-04-01

    To explore through literature review the appropriateness of three common tools for use by community nurses to screen war veteran and war widow(er) clients for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. War veterans and, to a lesser extent, war widow(er)s, are prone to mental health challenges, especially depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. Community nurses do not accurately identify such people with depression and related disorders although they are well positioned to do so. The use of valid and reliable self-report tools is one method of improving nurses' identification of people with actual or potential mental health difficulties for referral to a general practitioner or mental health practitioner for diagnostic assessment and treatment. The Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist are frequently recommended for mental health screening but the appropriateness of using the tools for screening war veteran and war widow(er) community nursing clients who are often aged and have functional impairment, is unknown. Systematic review. Current literature informs that the Geriatric Depression Scale accurately predicts a diagnosis of depression in community nursing cohorts. The three Depression Anxiety Stress Scales subscales of depression, anxiety and stress are valid; however, no studies were identified that compared the performance of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales in predicting diagnoses of depression or anxiety. The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist predicts post-traumatic stress disorder in community cohorts although no studies meeting the selection criteria included male participants. This review provides recommendations for the use of the Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist based on examination of the published evidence for the application of these screening tools in samples

  9. Construction, reliability and validity test of depression screening scale for community elder%社区老年人抑郁筛查量表的初步编制及信度效度检验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷兰英; 何晓燕; 曹日芳; 赵国秋; 汪永光; 王维丹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a depression screening scale for community elder. Methods An item pool consisted of 60 items was constructed through review, panel discussion and expert consultation. Item analysis was performed in a sample of 93 community-dwelling older people and 59 geriatric depression patients. Then the reliability and validity test of official screening scale was performed in 200 community elder people and 68 geriatric depression patients. Results The screening scale was consisted of 30 items and the incidence rate of each item in patients was higher than the community elder. The Cronbach’sαcoefficient was 0.98, and test-retest reliability after one week interval was 0.68(P<0.05). The to-tal score of this screening scale was positively correlated with SDS standard scores (r=0.71, P<0.05). Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the scale was unidimensional. When the total score of scale was 14, the sensitivity was 91.20%and the specificity was 93.00%. Conclusion The depression screening scale for community-dwelling elder shows good relia-bility and validity.%目的编制社区老年人抑郁筛查量表。方法经文献复习、小组讨论和专家咨询确定了60个条目组成的条目池,在93名社区老年人和59名老年抑郁症患者中测试,并进行项目分析形成正式量表。然后在200名社区老年人和68名老年抑郁症患者中检验量表的信度和效度。结果量表最终纳入30个条目,所有条目在病例组的发生率明显高于社区组,内部一致性Cronbach蒺sα系数为0.98,一周后重测信度为0.68(P<0.05),与抑郁自评量表(SDS)标准分的相关系数为0.71(P<0.05),探索性因素分析揭示了量表单维的因素结构。在量表分数取临界值14时,灵敏度为91.20%,特异度为93.00%。结论本次研究编制的社区老年人抑郁筛查量表具有较好的信度和效度。

  10. Screening for depression in patients with myocardial infarction by general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjær; Vestergaard, Mogens; Christensen, Bo;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depression in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) is highly prevalent and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Routine screening for post-MI depression is recommended. We studied general practitioners’ practice of screening for post-MI depression and analysed whether...... the screening rate varied among subgroups of MI patients with a particular high risk of depression. Design: Population-based cohort study in the Central Denmark Region. Methods: All patients with a first-time MI in 2009 received a questionnaire 3 months after discharge from hospital. The questionnaire included...... information on anxiety and depression according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), severity of the disease, and smoking habits. The responders’ general practitioners received a questionnaire 1 year after the patient had been discharged from hospital. This questionnaire provided information...

  11. Screening for depression in patients with myocardial infarction by general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, K. K.; Vestergaard, M.; Sondergaard, J.;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depression in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) is highly prevalent and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Routine screening for post-MI depression is recommended. We studied general practitioners' practice of screening for post-MI depression and analysed whether...... the screening rate varied among subgroups of MI patients with a particular high risk of depression. Design: Population-based cohort study in the Central Denmark Region. Methods: All patients with a first-time MI in 2009 received a questionnaire 3 months after discharge from hospital. The questionnaire included...... information on anxiety and depression according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), severity of the disease, and smoking habits. The responders' general practitioners received a questionnaire 1 year after the patient had been discharged from hospital. This questionnaire provided information...

  12. Early depression screening is feasible in hospitalized stroke patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul R Karamchandani

    Full Text Available Post-stroke depression (PSD is common but is not routinely assessed for in hospitalized patients. As a Comprehensive Stroke Center, we screen all stroke inpatients for depression, though the feasibility of early screening has not been established. We assessed the hypothesis that early depression screening in stroke patients is feasible. We also explored patient level factors associated with being screened for PSD and the presence of early PSD.The medical records of all patients admitted with ischemic stroke (IS or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH between 01/02/13 and 15/04/13 were reviewed. A depression screen, modified from the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, was administered (maximum score 27, higher scores indicating worse depression. Patients were eligible if they did not have a medical condition precluding screening. Feasibility was defined as screening 75% of all eligible patients.Of 303 IS and ICH inpatients, 70% (211 were eligible for screening, and 75% (158 of all eligible patients were screened. More than one-third of all patients screened positive for depression (score > 4. Women (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.06-4.01 and younger patients (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.96-0.99 were more likely to screen positive. Screening positive was not associated with poor discharge/day 7 outcome (mRS > 3; OR 1.45, 95% CI 0.74-2.83.Screening stroke inpatients for depression is feasible and early depression after stroke is common. Women and younger patients are more likely to experience early PSD. Our results provide preliminary evidence supporting continued screening for depression in hospitalized stroke patients.

  13. Rating scales in general practice depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Paykel, Eugene; Sireling, Lester

    2015-01-01

    within major depressive disorder. The CID was compared to the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17). METHODS: 146 patients from a previous study in general practice with the CID were investigated. The item response theory model established by Rasch was used to investigate the scalability (a scale......׳s psychometric adequacy) of the subscales, and principal component analysis was used to identify subsyndromes with the symptoms of major depression according to DSM-5 or ICD-10. RESULTS: Whereas the HAM-D17 was found not to have an acceptable scalability, the three brief CID subscales for depression (six items......), anxiety (five items), and apathy (five items) all had an acceptable scalability. Within the major depressive symptoms, principal component analysis identified the CID items of hypersomnia, increased appetite or weight gain as defining the subsyndrome of atypical depression. In total 29 patients...

  14. Screening for Depression among a Well Elderly Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Rachelle A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a geriatric wellness program in which social work practitioners played a major role. Compared results of a telephone screening test to detect depression with the clinical judgment of social workers. The screening instrument proved effective in assessing a population with a high rate of major depression. (RJM)

  15. Screening for Depression among a Well Elderly Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Rachelle A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a geriatric wellness program in which social work practitioners played a major role. Compared results of a telephone screening test to detect depression with the clinical judgment of social workers. The screening instrument proved effective in assessing a population with a high rate of major depression. (RJM)

  16. A prospective study to compare three depression screening tools in patients who are terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Dennis, Mick; Taylor, Fiona

    2004-01-01

    Depression is a significant symptom for approximately one in four palliative care patients. This study investigates the performance of three screening tools. Patients were asked to verbally rate their mood on a scale of 0-10; to respond "yes" or "no" to the question "Are you depressed?," and to complete the Edinburgh depression scale. They were also interviewed using a semi-structured clinical interview according to DSM-IV criteria. Complete data was available for 74 patients. For the single question, a "yes" answer had a sensitivity of 55% and specificity 74%. The Edinburgh depression scale at a cut-off point of > or =13 had a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 80%. The verbal mood item with a cut-off point of > or =3 had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 43%. The Edinburgh depression scale proved to be the most reliable instrument for detecting clinical depression in palliative care patients.

  17. Prevalence and predictors of positive screening for postpartum depression in minority parturients in the South Bronx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Samfee; LoBue, Stephen; Hamaoui, Abraham; Rezai, Shadi; Henderson, Cassandra E; Mercado, Ray

    2017-04-01

    It is reported that the rates of perinatal depressive disorders are high in ethnic minority groups from non-English speaking countries. However, very few studies have compared the prevalence of positive screening for postpartum depression (PPD) in minority communities living in an inner city. The goal of this study is to determine the prevalence and the predictors of positive screening for postpartum depression in minority parturients in the South Bronx. The study is a chart review of 314 minority parturients, Black or Hispanic, screened for postpartum depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) tool. The overall prevalence of a positive EPDS screen among Black and Hispanic women was similar, 24.04 and 18.75%, respectively. The Black immigrant cohort had comparable positive screens with 23.81 as African Americans. Hispanic women born in the USA had the least prevalence of positive screens, 7.14%, and those who moved from the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico had a prevalence of 17.24% of positive screens. The women who immigrated from Mexico, Central America, or South America had the highest prevalence of positive screens for PPD, 32.26%. As to the socioeconomic status (SES), there was a significant increase of 27.04 vs. 13.95% (P < 0.019) in positive screens for PPD for the unemployed mothers. Overall, Black and Hispanic parturients had similar rates of positive screens for PPD. Among the Hispanic women, immigrants had higher rates of positive screens, with those from Mexico, Central, and South America as the highest. The hospital experience did not affect the rates of positive screens. Neither did the SES with one exception; those unemployed had the higher rates of positive screens.

  18. Should Screening for Depression among Children and Adolescents Be Demedicalized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Allan V.; Wakefield, Jerome C.

    2009-01-01

    The criteria for diagnosing depressive disorders fails to place the symptoms of intense sadness in the context of major losses in life, and separating normal sadness from depressive disorder among adolescents is especially difficult. Suggested modifications to the screening of suicidal ideation among adolescents are also presented.

  19. Screening for depression in medical research: ethical challenges and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheehan Aisling M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the important role of depression in major illnesses, screening measures for depression are commonly used in medical research. The protocol for managing participants with positive screens is unclear and raises ethical concerns. The aim of this article is to identify and critically discuss the ethical issues that arise when a positive screen for depression is detected, and offer some guidance on managing these issues. Discussion Deciding on whether to report positive screens to healthcare practitioners is both an ethical and a pragmatic dilemma. Evidence suggests that reporting positive depression screens should only be considered in the context of collaborative care. Possible adverse effects, such as the impact of false-positive results, potentially inappropriate labelling, and potentially inappropriate treatment also need to be considered. If possible, the psychometric properties of the selected screening measure should be determined in the target population, and a threshold for depression that minimises the rate of false-positive results should be chosen. It should be clearly communicated to practitioners that screening scores are not diagnostic for depression, and they should be informed about the diagnostic accuracy of the measure. Research participants need to be made aware of the consequences of the detection of high scores on screening measures, and to be fully informed about the implications of the research protocol. Summary Further research is needed and the experiences of researchers, participants, and practitioners need to be collated before the value of reporting positive screens for depression can be ascertained. In developing research protocols, the ethical challenges highlighted should be considered. Participants must be agreeable to the agreed protocol and efforts should be made to minimise potentially adverse effects.

  20. Depression screening optimization in an academic rural setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Sohaib; Torrey, William C; Duncan, Mathew S; Hort, Shoshana J; Mecchella, John N

    2015-01-01

    Primary care plays a critical role in screening and management of depression. The purpose of this paper is to focus on leveraging the electronic health record (EHR) as well as work flow redesign to improve the efficiency and reliability of the process of depression screening in two adult primary care clinics of a rural academic institution in USA. The authors utilized various process improvement tools from lean six sigma methodology including project charter, swim lane process maps, critical to quality tree, process control charts, fishbone diagrams, frequency impact matrix, mistake proofing and monitoring plan in Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control format. Interventions included change in depression screening tool, optimization of data entry in EHR. EHR data entry optimization; follow up of positive screen, staff training and EHR redesign. Depression screening rate for office-based primary care visits improved from 17.0 percent at baseline to 75.9 percent in the post-intervention control phase (p<0.001). Follow up of positive depression screen with Patient History Questionnaire-9 data collection remained above 90 percent. Duplication of depression screening increased from 0.6 percent initially to 11.7 percent and then decreased to 4.7 percent after optimization of data entry by patients and flow staff. Impact of interventions on clinical outcomes could not be evaluated. Successful implementation, sustainability and revision of a process improvement initiative to facilitate screening, follow up and management of depression in primary care requires accounting for voice of the process (performance metrics), system limitations and voice of the customer (staff and patients) to overcome various system, customer and human resource constraints.

  1. Depression screening and patient outcomes in pregnancy or postpartum : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Arthurs, Erin; Coronado-Montoya, Stephanie; Roseman, Michelle; Delisle, Vanessa C.; Leavens, Allison; Levis, Brooke; Azoulay, Laurent; Smith, Cheri; Ciofani, Luisa; Coyne, James C.; Feeley, Nancy; Gilbody, Simon; Schinazi, Joy; Stewart, Donna E.; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Clinical practice guidelines disagree on whether health care professionals should screen women for depression during pregnancy or postpartum. The objective of this systematic review was to determine whether depression screening improves depression outcomes among women during pregnancy or

  2. Depression screening and patient outcomes in pregnancy or postpartum : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Arthurs, Erin; Coronado-Montoya, Stephanie; Roseman, Michelle; Delisle, Vanessa C.; Leavens, Allison; Levis, Brooke; Azoulay, Laurent; Smith, Cheri; Ciofani, Luisa; Coyne, James C.; Feeley, Nancy; Gilbody, Simon; Schinazi, Joy; Stewart, Donna E.; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Clinical practice guidelines disagree on whether health care professionals should screen women for depression during pregnancy or postpartum. The objective of this systematic review was to determine whether depression screening improves depression outcomes among women during pregnancy or

  3. Depression screening and patient outcomes in pregnancy or postpartum : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Arthurs, Erin; Coronado-Montoya, Stephanie; Roseman, Michelle; Delisle, Vanessa C.; Leavens, Allison; Levis, Brooke; Azoulay, Laurent; Smith, Cheri; Ciofani, Luisa; Coyne, James C.; Feeley, Nancy; Gilbody, Simon; Schinazi, Joy; Stewart, Donna E.; Zelkowitz, Phyllis

    Objective: Clinical practice guidelines disagree on whether health care professionals should screen women for depression during pregnancy or postpartum. The objective of this systematic review was to determine whether depression screening improves depression outcomes among women during pregnancy or

  4. Internet administration of the Edinburgh Depression Scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, V.; Nyklicek, I.; Cuijpers, P.; Pop, V.

    2008-01-01

    .001). A major limitation is that the study was conducted without a control group of healthy subjects. Conclusion The psychometric properties of the internet-administered EDS are comparable to those of the paper and pencil EDS. Keywords: Edinburgh Depression Scale; Psychometric properties; Internet

  5. Psychometric comparison of single-item, short, and comprehensive depression screening measures in Korean young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Ju; Abraham, Ivo

    2016-04-01

    Integrating long depression-screening instruments into routine clinical practice and research studies is often impractical, necessitating short-item if not single-item measures with comparable psychometric properties. To examine whether single-item or short depression-screening measures are comparable to a comprehensive screening measure in reliability (i.e., internal consistency and test-retest reliability) and validity (i.e., convergent, concurrent, and predictive validity) in Korean young adults within a Classical Testing Theory framework. A total of 458 students from six nursing colleges in South Korea completed three depression measures: the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression screening instrument (CES-D; comprehensive measure); the five-item Profile of Mood States-Brief depression subscale (POMS-B depression subscale; short measure); a single-item Likert measure; and a single-item numeric rating scale. Internal consistency reliability was tested by Cronbach's alpha and item-total correlations; test-retest reliability by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC); convergent validity by correlation with the CES-D; concurrent validity by the correlation with perceived stress level and sleep quality; and predictive validity by receiver operating characteristic curve to predict the two groups with different depression levels. The POMS-B depression subscale was comparable to the comprehensive CES-D scale in internal consistency reliability (alpha=.85); test-retest reliability (ICC=.76); and convergent (r=.81 with CES-D), concurrent (r=.64 with perceived stress level, r=.34 with sleep quality), and predictive validity (area under the curve=.88). The two single-item options were not comparable to the comprehensive CES-D. The short POMS-B depression subscale shows an acceptable balance between practical clinical and research needs and psychometric quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Validation of the Patient Health Questionnaire for Depression Screening Among the Elderly Patients in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Peng Chen

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The Chinese versions of the PHQ-9 and its two subscales (PHQ-2 and PHQ-1 are valid and reliable to screen MDD in primary care elderly patients in Taiwan and could be proper alternatives to Geriatric Depression Scale 15-item version.

  7. Concurrent Validity of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory Depression Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joel O.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Compared two new measures of depression (Millon Multiaxial Inventory Dysthymia and Major Depression subscales) with two established instruments: Beck Depression Inventory, a self-report measure which emphasizes the cognitive-affective aspects of depression, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, an interview measure that emphasizes somatic…

  8. Development of an Interview-Based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Christine; Scogin, Forrest

    1992-01-01

    Developed interview-based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale (GDRS) and administered 35-item GDRS to 68 older adults with range of affective disturbance. Found scale to have internal consistency and split-half reliability comparable to those of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Geriatric Depression Scale. Concurrent validity, construct…

  9. Screening for postpartum depression and associated factors among women in China: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinli Chi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAbstractObjectives: This study examined what percentage of Chinese mothers during a three-year postpartum period were screened for postpartum depression and explored the correlation between postpartum depression and various socio-demographic, psychological, and cultural factors. Study design: Cross-sectional survey.Methods: A total of 506 mothers 23 years of age and older who were within three years postpartum completed the online survey. The survey collected information such as family economic status, a history of depression, preparation for pregnancy, relationships with husbands and family members, adult attachment types (Adult Attachment Scale, AAS, and depression (The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, CESD.Results: Approximately 30% of mothers 1–3 years postpartum reported symptoms above the CESD cut-off score (≥16 scores associated with the risk for depression (28.0% in the first year, 30.8% in the second year, and 31.8% in the third year. Factors significantly associated with depression in participants in the correlation analysis were education level; family income; preparation for pregnancy; a history of depression; amount of time spent with their husbands; relationships with husbands, parents, and parents-in-law; and a close, dependent, and/or anxious attachment style. Multiple regression analyses revealed that a history of depression; less preparation for pregnancy; poorer relationships with husbands, parents, and parents-in-law; and a more anxious attachment style were strongly related to a higher risk of postpartum depression. Conclusions: The overall percentage of mothers after delivery who were vulnerable to depression in China remains high. Various factors were significant predictors of postpartum depression. The research findings have several valuable implications for intervention practices. For example, attachment styles and depression history in the assessments of perinatal depression could improve

  10. Escalas de rastreamento para depressão pós-parto: uma revisão sistemática Escalas de rastreo para depresión postparto: una revisión sistemática Postpartum depression screening scales: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Machado Schardosim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar uma revisão sistemática sobre as escalas de rastreamento de Depressão Pós-Parto (DPP aplicadas até 16 semanas após o parto em puérperas acima de 15 anos. Buscaram-se artigos em quatro bases de dados. Os artigos deveriam indicar a definição e a validação precisa dos instrumentos utilizados. Dos 424 resumos, 62 foram acessados na íntegra e, de acordo com os critérios estabelecidos, foram incluídos 18 artigos nesta revisão. O período de rastreamento de DPP variou de 2 a 10 dias pós-parto e o reteste entre 8 e 16 semanas pós-parto. A DPP foi diagnosticada entre 8,8 a 40% da amostra dos estudos. A escala mais utilizada foi a Edinburg Depression Postpartum Scale (EDPS. Concluiu-se que as escalas são comumente utilizadas em pesquisas, mas podem ser uma ferramenta facilitadora para identificação de DPP na assistência às gestantes e às puérperas.El estudio objetivó realizar una revisión sistemática sobre las escalas de rastreo de Depresión Postparto (DPP aplicado hasta 16 semanas postparto en puérperas con más de 15 años. Se buscaron artículos en 4 bases de datos. Los artículos deberían indicar la definición y la validación exacta de los instrumentos utilizados. De los 424 resúmenes, se accedió a 62 íntegramente y de acuerdo con los criterios establecidos, se incluyeron 18 artículos en esta revisión. El período de rastreo varió de 2 a 10 días postparto y la nueva prueba entre 8 y 16 semanas postparto. La DPP fue diagnosticada entre 8,8 y 40% de la muestra de los estudios. Edinburgh Depression Postpartum Scale (EDPS fue la escala más utilizada. Se concluyó que las escalas se usan generalmente en investigaciones pero pueden resultar una herramienta facilitadora para identificar la DPP en la atención a las gestantes y puérperas.This study aimed at conducting a systematic review of postpartum depression (PPD screening scales in puerperal applied until 16 weeks after

  11. Postpartum Depression: Screening, Diagnosis, and Management Programs 2000 through 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara P. Yawn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The value and appropriateness of universal postpartum depression (PPD screening remains controversial in the United States. To date, several PPD screening programs have been introduced and a few have been evaluated. Among those programs that have been evaluated, most report screening rates, diagnosis rates, or treatment initiation rates. Only four studies included patient outcomes such as the level of depressive symptoms at 6 to 12 months postpartum, and only two reported success in improving outcomes. Program characteristics that appear to result in low rates of diagnosis and followup after PPD screening include requirements for a formal psychiatric evaluation, the need to refer women to another site for therapy, and failure to integrate the PPD screening into the care provided at the woman’s or her child’s medical home. The two programs that reported improved outcomes were both self-contained within primary care and included specific followup, management, and therapy procedures. Both resulted in the need for outside referrals in less than 10% of women diagnosed with postpartum depression. Future studies should be based on the successful programs and their identified facilitators while avoiding identified barriers. To affect policies, the future program must report maternal outcomes going beyond the often reported process outcomes of screening, referral, and therapy initiation rates.

  12. Postpartum Depression: Screening, Diagnosis, and Management Programs 2000 through 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Olson, Ardis L; Bertram, Susan; Pace, Wilson; Wollan, Peter; Dietrich, Allen J

    2012-01-01

    The value and appropriateness of universal postpartum depression (PPD) screening remains controversial in the United States. To date, several PPD screening programs have been introduced and a few have been evaluated. Among those programs that have been evaluated, most report screening rates, diagnosis rates, or treatment initiation rates. Only four studies included patient outcomes such as the level of depressive symptoms at 6 to 12 months postpartum, and only two reported success in improving outcomes. Program characteristics that appear to result in low rates of diagnosis and followup after PPD screening include requirements for a formal psychiatric evaluation, the need to refer women to another site for therapy, and failure to integrate the PPD screening into the care provided at the woman's or her child's medical home. The two programs that reported improved outcomes were both self-contained within primary care and included specific followup, management, and therapy procedures. Both resulted in the need for outside referrals in less than 10% of women diagnosed with postpartum depression. Future studies should be based on the successful programs and their identified facilitators while avoiding identified barriers. To affect policies, the future program must report maternal outcomes going beyond the often reported process outcomes of screening, referral, and therapy initiation rates.

  13. Depression Subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale applied preoperatively in spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of the Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D in spine surgery, comparing it to Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, the HADS-D and the BDI were applied to patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar (n=139 or cervical spondylosis (n=17. Spearman correlation tests for HADS-D and BDI were applied. The internal consistency of HADS-D was estimated by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. RESULTS: According to the BDI, the prevalence of depression was of 28.8% (n=45. The Spearman r coefficient between HADS-D and BDI was 0.714 (p10, there was a sensitivity of 71.1%, specificity of 95.4%, and positive likelihood-ratio of 15.78. CONCLUSIONS: HADS-D showed a strong correlation with BDI and good reliability. HADS-D is a good alternative for screening depression and assessing its severity.

  14. Screening for depression in clinical practice: reliability and validity of a five-item subset of the CES-Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Richard W; Maljanian, Rose; Goethe, John

    2003-12-01

    Individuals with chronic disease are not screened routinely for depression. Availability of an abbreviated test with demonstrated reliability and validity might encourage screening so we explored the reliability and validity of a 5-item subset of the 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale among inner-city outpatients with chronic asthma or diabetes. Most patients were female (73.1%) and Hispanic (61.8%). Acceptable reliability was shown by Cronbach alpha (.76) for the subset of 5 items. Validity was supported by the high correlation of .91 between patients' scores on the 5-item subset and the full 20 items. The 5 items reflected a single factor (eigenvalue = 2.66). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified cut-points for the 5 items that were sensitive (> .84) and specific (> or = .80) in identifying patients classified as depressed by full 20 items. The reduced patient and clinician burden of the subset of 5 items, as well as its desirable psychometric properties, support broader application of this subset as a screening tool for depression.

  15. National Depression Screening Day: An Undergraduate Practicum Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Theresa S.; Rangel, Dianna K.

    2009-01-01

    Several authors have described the many benefits of undergraduate practica, how to organize an undergraduate practicum experience, and different undergraduate practicum activities. This article provides a description of the process of organizing and implementing National Depression Screening Day at a university campus as an undergraduate practicum…

  16. Escala de Depressão Pós-natal de Edimburgo para triagem no sistema público de saúde Escala de Depresión Post-natal de Edimburgo para tamizage en el sistema público de salud Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale for screening in the public health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Figueira

    2009-08-01

    ón-oro para diagnóstico de depresión. Fueron calculadas sensibilidad y especificidad de la escala y se utilizó la curva ROC para encontrar el mejor punto de corte. Fue utilizada la prueba t de Stuident para comparación de las variables numéricas y el chi-cuadrado para las variables categóricas. La confiabilidad fue confirmada por el cociente de consistencia interna a de Cronbach. RESULTADOS: Fueron diagnosticadas 66 mujeres con el cuadro depresivo post-parto (26,9% de las muestras. No hubo diferencia entre las mujeres con y sin depresión post-parto con relación a la edad, escolaridad, número de partos anteriores y estado civil. Utilizándose el punto de corte de 10, la sensibilidad de la escala fue 86,4, la especificidad 91,1 y el valor predictivo positivo 0,78. CONCLUSIONES: Las propiedades psicométricas de la Escala la caracterizan como un buen instrumento de tamizage de la depresión post-parto y su uso diseminado en el Sistema Único de Salud podría repercutir positivamente con el aumento significativo en la tasa de reconocimiento, diagnóstico y tratamiento de la depresión post-parto.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the utilization of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale as a screening tool in the public health system. METHODS: The Scale was administered between the 40th and 90th day after delivery to 245 mothers whose delivery occurred at a private maternity hospital located in the municipality of Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil, from 2005 to 2006. All participants were submitted to a structured psychiatric interview (Mini-Plus 5.0, used as gold standard for postpartum depression diagnosis. The scale's sensitivity and specificity were calculated, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to find the best cut-off point. Student's t test was employed to compare numeric variables and chi-square was used for the categorical variables. Reliability was calculated by Cronbach's coefficient á of internal consistency. RESULTS: Postpartum depression

  17. Development of a brief validated geriatric depression screening tool: the SLU "AM SAD".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakkamparambil, Binu; Chibnall, John T; Graypel, Ernest A; Manepalli, Jothika N; Bhutto, Asif; Grossberg, George T

    2015-08-01

    Combining five commonly observed symptoms of late-life depression to develop a short depression screening tool with similar sensitivity and specificity as the conventional, more time-consuming tools. We developed the St. Louis University AM SAD (Appetite, Mood, Sleep, Activity, and thoughts of Death) questionnaire. The frequency of each symptom in the prior 2 weeks is quantified as 0, 1, or 2. Patients 65 years or older from our clinics were administered the AM SAD, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), and the St. Louis University Mental Status Exam (SLUMS). 100 patients were selected. AM SAD correlation with GDS was 0.72 and MADRS 0.80. AM SAD yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 79% and 62% against diagnosis of depression; of 88% and 62% with GDS-15; and 92% and 71% with MADRS. The AM SAD can be reliably used as a short depression screening tool in patients with a SLUMS score of 20 or higher. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Repeated depression screening during the first postpartum year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Bertram, Susan; Kurland, Marge; Wollan, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) screening at 4 to 12 weeks' postpartum can improve outcomes for women when linked to in-practice management programs. The benefit of repeated PPD screening during the first year postpartum remains unclear. We report a substudy of a large pragmatic trial of early PPD screening and practice management, the Translating Research into Practice for Postpartum Depression (TRIPPD) study. Outcome analyses were based on demographic information and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) screening scores from questionnaires mailed to all enrolled women at baseline (4 to 12 weeks' postpartum) and again at 6 and at 12 months' postpartum. The main outcomes of this substudy were the 6- and 12-month rates of PHQ-9 scores that were 10 or greater for women whose baseline PHQ-9 scores were less than 10. Women whose scores were 10 or greater would be considered at high risk of PPD and appropriate for further evaluation. At 6 months, 134 (10.9%) of the 1,235 women who did not have PHQ-9 scores greater than 10 at baseline had elevated scores appropriate for further evaluation. At 12 months, 59 (6.1%) of the 969 women who did not have PHQ-9 scores greater than 10 at baseline or at 6 months had elevated scores. Together the 6- and 12-month repeated screenings identified 193 women at high risk of depression. This finding represents 13.5% of the 1,432 women whose screening results were negative for PPD at baseline. Repeated PPD screening at 6 and 12 months' postpartum increases the percentage of women identified as being at high risk of PPD. Further work will be required to understand the impact of this repeated screening on patient outcomes. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  19. Dimensionality and scale properties of the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the DiaDDzoB study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Victor JM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a common complication in type 2 diabetes (DM2, affecting 10-30% of patients. Since depression is underrecognized and undertreated, it is important that reliable and validated depression screening tools are available for use in patients with DM2. The Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS is a widely used method for screening depression. However, there is still debate about the dimensionality of the test. Furthermore, the EDS was originally developed to screen for depression in postpartum women. Empirical evidence that the EDS has comparable measurement properties in both males and females suffering from diabetes is lacking however. Methods In a large sample (N = 1,656 of diabetes patients, we examined: (1 dimensionality; (2 gender-related item bias; and (3 the screening properties of the EDS using factor analysis and item response theory. Results We found evidence that the ten EDS items constitute a scale that is essentially one dimensional and has adequate measurement properties. Three items showed differential item functioning (DIF, two of them showed substantial DIF. However, at the scale level, DIF had no practical impact. Anhedonia (the inability to be able to laugh or enjoy and sleeping problems were the most informative indicators for being able to differentiate between the diagnostic groups of mild and severe depression. Conclusions The EDS constitutes a sound scale for measuring an attribute of general depression. Persons can be reliably measured using the sum score. Screening rules for mild and severe depression are applicable to both males and females.

  20. Clinical and psychometric validation of the psychotic depression assessment scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Pedersen, Christina H; Uggerby, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have indicated that the 11-item Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS), consisting of the 6-item melancholia subscale (HAM-D6) of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and 5 psychosis items from the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), is a valid measure for the ...

  1. Improving validated depression screen among adolescent population in primary care practice using electronic health records (EHR).

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent depression, has been identified as one of the important risk factors for adolescent safety. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends screening the adolescent population for depression with a validated screening tool at least once a year. Given the time constraints in primary care, many physicians tend to rely more on clinical questioning to screen depression.This has the potential to miss many adolescents who may have mild to moderate depression which may prove detriment...

  2. Depression screening tools in persons with epilepsy: A systematic review of validated tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Stephanie J; Lukmanji, Sara; Fiest, Kirsten M; Patten, Scott B; Wiebe, Samuel; Jetté, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    Depression affects approximately 25% of epilepsy patients. However, the optimal tool to screen for depression in epilepsy has not been definitively established. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature on the validity of depression-screening tools in epilepsy. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched until April 4, 2016 with no restriction on dates. Abstract, full-text review and data abstraction were conducted in duplicate. We included studies that evaluated the validity of depression-screening tools and reported measures of diagnostic accuracy (e.g., sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values) in epilepsy. Study quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies Version 2. Medians and ranges for estimates of diagnostic accuracy were calculated when appropriate. A total of 16,070 abstracts were screened, and 38 articles met eligibility criteria. Sixteen screening tools were validated in 13 languages. The most commonly validated screening tool was the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) (n = 26). The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) (n = 19) was the most common reference standard used. At the most common cutpoint of >15 (n = 12 studies), the NDDI-E had a median sensitivity of 80.5% (range 64.0-100.0) and specificity of 86.2 (range 81.0-95.6). Meta-analyses were not possible due to variability in cutpoints assessed, reference standards used, and lack of confidence intervals reported. A number of studies validated depression screening tools; however, estimates of diagnostic accuracy were inconsistently reported. The validity of scales in practice may have been overestimated, as cutpoints were often selected post hoc based on the study sample. The NDDI-E, which performed well, was the most commonly validated screening tool, is free to the public, and is validated in multiple languages and is easy to administer, although

  3. Brief screening questions for depression in chiropractic patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Aambakk, Benedicte; Bossen, Sanne;

    2014-01-01

    Depression is an important prognostic factor in low back pain (LBP) that appears to be infrequent in chiropractic populations. Identification of depression in few patients would consequently implicate screening of many. It is therefore desirable to have brief screening tools for depression...

  4. Measuring depression in women around menopausal age. Towards a validation of the Edinburgh Depression Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becht, M.C.; van Erp, C.F.; Teeuwisse, T.M.; van Heck, G.L.; van Son, M.J.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Background: The relationship between menopause and depression is still rather unclear. Studies using different methodology especially those lacking a clear definition of depression are hardly comparable. Since the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) is not influenced by (menopause-related) somatic symp

  5. Problems in Cross-Cultural Use of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: "No Butterflies in the Desert"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maters, G.A.; Sanderman, R.; Kim, A.Y.; Coyne, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to screen for anxiety and depression. A large literature is citable in support of its validity, but difficulties are increasingly being identified, such as inexplicably discrepant optimal cutpoints and inconsistent factor-stru

  6. Problems in Cross-Cultural Use of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale : "No Butterflies in the Desert"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maters, Gemma A.; Sanderman, Robbert; Kim, Aimee Y.; Coyne, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to screen for anxiety and depression. A large literature is citable in support of its validity, but difficulties are increasingly being identified, such as inexplicably discrepant optimal cutpoints and inconsistent factor-str

  7. Problems in Cross-Cultural Use of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: "No Butterflies in the Desert"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maters, G.A.; Sanderman, Robbert; Kim, A.Y.; Coyne, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to screen for anxiety and depression. A large literature is citable in support of its validity, but difficulties are increasingly being identified, such as inexplicably discrepant optimal cutpoints and inconsistent factor-stru

  8. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apóstolo, João Luís Alves; Tanner, Barry Allen; Arfken, Cynthia Lee

    2012-01-01

    To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years) comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The correlated 3-factor model fit the data best. The scale demonstrated good internal consistency, with alpha scores of the subscales ranging from 0.836 to 0.897. Correlation with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was positive and moderate with the negative affect scale; it was negative and limited with the positive affect. These findings support the correlated 3-factor structure. The test demonstrated adequate reliability and construct validity, which supports its use for screening in primary care settings with Portuguese speakers.

  9. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in Dutch advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmenhoven, Franca; van Rijswijk, Eric; Engels, Yvonne; Kan, Cornelis; Prins, Judith; van Weel, Chris; Vissers, Kris

    2012-02-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in advanced cancer patients, but the diagnosis of depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer is difficult. Screening instruments could facilitate diagnosing depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the validity of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. Patients with advanced metastatic disease, visiting the outpatient palliative care department, were asked to fill out a self-questionnaire containing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question "Are you feeling depressed?" The mood section of the PRIME-MD was used as a gold standard. Sixty-one patients with advanced metastatic disease were eligible to be included in the study. Complete data were obtained from 46 patients. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristics analysis of the BDI-II was 0.82. The optimal cut-off point of the BDI-II was 16 with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 69%. The single screening question showed a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 94%. The BDI-II seems an adequate screening tool for a depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. The sensitivity of a single screening question is poor.

  10. Missed opportunity to screen and diagnose PTSD and depression among deploying shipboard US military personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Braden R.; Michael, Nelson L.; Scott, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are significant risks for suicide and other adverse events among US military personnel, but prevalence data among ship-assigned personnel at the onset of deployment are unknown. Aims To determine the prevalence of shipboard personnel who screen positive for PTSD and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) at the onset of deployment, and also those who reported these diagnoses made by a physician or healthcare professional in the year prior to deployment. Method Active-duty ship-assigned personnel (N = 2078) completed anonymous assessments at the beginning of deployment. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D; score of ≥22), and PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Checklist–Civilian Version (PCL-C; both score and symptom criteria were used). Results In total, 7.3% (n = 151 of 2076) screened positive for PTSD and 22% (n = 461 of 2078) for MDD at deployment onset. Only 6% and 15% of those who screened positive for PTSD or MDD, respectively, had been diagnosed by a healthcare professional in the past year. Conclusions Missed opportunities for mental healthcare among screen-positive shipboard personnel reduce the benefits associated with early identification and linkage to care. Improved methods of mental health screening that promote early recognition and referral to care may mitigate psychiatric events in theatre. Declaration of interest This work was performed as part of the official duties of the authors as military service members or employees of the US Government. Copyright and usage This work was prepared by military service members or employees of the US Government as part of their official duties. As such, copyright protection is not available for this work (Title 17, USC, §105). PMID:27713833

  11. Screening and early psychological intervention for depression in schools: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Straten, van A.; Smits, N.; Smit, H.F.E.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Depression in children and adolescents is considerably undertreated, and the school may be a good setting for identifying and treating depression. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies in which students were screened for depression, and those with depressive symptoms were treated with a p

  12. Validity of Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D scale in a sample of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R Quiñones

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Optimal depression screening necessitates measurement tools that are valid across varied populations and in the presence of comorbidities. Methods: This study assessed the test properties of two versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale against psychiatric diagnoses established by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview among a clinical sample of US Veterans deployed during Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn. Participants (N = 359 recruited from two Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals completed a clinical interview, structured diagnostic interview, and self-reported measures. Results: Based on diagnostic interview and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition criteria, 29.5% of the sample met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder and 26.5% met diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. Both Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-20 and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-10 scales performed well and almost identically against the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview-major depressive disorder in identifying Veterans with major depressive disorder (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-20 area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve 91%; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-10 area under the ROC curve 90%. Overall, higher cut points for the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scales performed better in correctly identifying true positives and true negatives for major depressive disorder (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-20 cut point 18+ sensitivity 92% specificity 72%; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-10 cut point 10+ sensitivity 92% specificity 69%. Conclusions: The specificity of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scales was poor among Veterans with co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (13% and 16%. Veterans with post

  13. Depression screening and patient outcomes in cardiovascular care : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; de Jonge, Peter; Coyne, James C.; Whooley, Mary A.; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Mitchell, Alex J.; Zuidersma, Marij; Eze-Nliam, Chete; Lima, Bruno B.; Smith, Cheri G.; Soderlund, Karl; Ziegelstein, Roy C.

    2008-01-01

    Context Several practice guidelines recommend that depression be evaluated and treated in patients with cardiovascular disease, but the potential benefits of this are unclear. Objective To evaluate the potential benefits of depression screening in patients with cardiovascular disease by assessing (

  14. Depression in France and Brazil: factorial structure of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale in inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida; Chaves, Márcia Lorena Fagundes; Poirier-Littré, Marie France; Bourdel, Marie Chantal; Loo, Henri; Guelfi, Julien Daniel

    2004-02-01

    Among various research strategies for depression, the cross-cultural approach is a useful tool to investigate depressive disorders. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was applied to 130 depressed inpatients in France and Brazil. Items were factorized by principal component analysis with Varimax rotation using the Kaiser or simulation method for factor sorting. Three factors were obtained in France, and four in Brazil. The first factor includes the core symptoms of depression in both samples. Qualitative and quantitative differences appeared in the anxiety factor between Brazilian and French samples. Insomnia items appeared as another factor for both groups. A limitation of this study is that it was conducted with small inpatient samples. Principal component analysis of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression for depressive inpatients in these two countries showed a similar structure. Differences observed were in the way anxiety items were distributed.

  15. Associations of physical activity, screen time with depression, anxiety and sleep quality among Chinese college freshmen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Feng

    Full Text Available To investigate the independent and interactive associations of physical activity (PA and screen time (ST with depression, anxiety and sleep quality among Chinese college students.A cross-sectional study was conducted in Wuhan University, China from November to December 2011. The students reported their PA, ST and socio-economic characteristics using self-administered questionnaires. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Depression and anxiety were assessed using the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS and Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs of the independent and interactive relationships of PA and ST with depression, anxiety and sleep quality.A total of 1106 freshmen (471 females and 635 males aged 18.9±0.9 years were included in the study. After adjustment for potential confounders, high PA and low ST were independently associated with significantly lower risks for poor sleep quality (OR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.30-0.78 and depression (OR: 0.67, 95%CI: 0.44-0.89, respectively. An interactive inverse association was observed for combined effects of PA and low ST on depression (OR: 0.62, 95%CI: 0.40-0.92 and sleep quality (OR: 0.51, 95%CI: 0.27-0.91. No statistically significant associations were found between PA, ST and anxiety among the participants.These findings suggest an independent and interactive relationship of high PA and low ST with significantly reduced prevalence of depressive problems and favorable sleep quality among Chinese college freshmen.

  16. Use of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M J; Kim, K H

    1998-05-01

    We translated the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale into Korean, paying careful attention to culturally different modes of expression of depressive feelings and thoughts. The final translated version (CES-D-K) was administered to 164 psychiatric patients and 464 normal subjects residing in the community. Reliability, validity, and the optimal cutoff point of this scale were estimated, including ROC analysis. The CES-D-K was reliable and valid for the Korean population. Two optimal cutoff points were suggested: 24/25, the point which best corresponded to the clinical diagnosis of depression, and 20/21, which most effectively detects and covers depressive symptoms during screening. The higher cutoff points than those in Western countries may be due to different ways of expression affect, especially the suppression of positive affect, in cultures based on Confucian ethics.

  17. Challenges and implications of routine depression screening for depression in chronic disease and multimorbidity: a cross sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhautesh Dinesh Jani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression screening in chronic disease is advocated but its impact on routine practice is uncertain. We examine the effects of a programme of incentivised depression screening in chronic disease within a UK primary care setting. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cross sectional analysis of anonymised, routinely collected data (2008-9 from family practices in Scotland serving a population of circa 1.8 million. Primary care registered patients with at least one of three chronic diseases, coronary heart disease, diabetes and stroke, underwent incentivised depression screening using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS. 125143 patients were identified with at least one chronic disease. 10670 (8.5% were under treatment for depression and exempt from screening. Of remaining, HADS were recorded for 35537 (31.1% patients. 7080 (19.9% of screened had raised HADS (≥8; majority had indications of mild depression with HADS between 8 and 10. Over 6 months, 572 (8% of those with raised HADS (≥8 were initiated on antidepressants, while 696 (2.4% patients with normal HADS (<8 were also initiated on antidepressants (relative risk of antidepressant initiation with raised HADS 3.3 (CI 2.97-3.67, p value <0.0001. Of those with multimorbidity who were screened, 24.3% had raised HADS (≥8. A raised HADS was more likely in females, socioeconomically deprived, multimorbid or younger (18-44 individuals. Females and 45-64 years old were more likely to receive antidepressants. LIMITATIONS: retrospective study of routinely collected data. CONCLUSIONS: Despite incentivisation, only a minority of patients underwent depression screening, suggesting that systematic depression screening in chronic disease can be difficult to achieve in routine practice. Targeting those at greatest risk such as the multimorbid or using simpler screening methods may be more effective. Raised HADS was associated with higher number of new antidepressant prescriptions which has

  18. Psychometric properties of the Vulnerability to Abuse Screening Scale for screening abuse of older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Batista Dantas

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE Adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Vulnerability to Abuse Screening Scale to identify risk of domestic violence against older adults in Brazil. METHODS The instrument was adapted and validated in a sample of 151 older adults from a geriatric reference center in the municipality of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, in 2014. We collected sociodemographic, clinical, and abuse-related information, and verified reliability by reproducibility in a sample of 55 older people, who underwent re-testing of the instrument seven days after the first application. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed for all variables, with a significance level of 5%. The construct validity was analyzed by the principal components method with a tetrachoric correlation matrix, the reliability of the scale by the weighted Kappa (Kp statistic, and the internal consistency by the Kuder-Richardson estimator formula 20 (KR-20. RESULTS The average age of the participants was 72.1 years (DP = 6.96; 95%CI 70.94–73.17, with a maximum of 92 years, and they were predominantly female (76.2%; 95%CI 69.82–83.03. When analyzing the relationship between the scores of the Vulnerability to Abuse Screening Scale, categorized by presence (score > 3 or absence (score < 3 of vulnerability to abuse, with clinical and health conditions, we found statistically significant differences for self-perception of health (p = 0.002, depressive symptoms (p = 0.000, and presence of rheumatism (p = 0.003. There were no statistically significant differences between sexes. The Vulnerability to Abuse Screening Scale acceptably evaluated validity in the transcultural adaptation process, demonstrating dimensionality coherent with the original proposal (four factors. In the internal consistency analysis, the instrument presented good results (KR-20 = 0.69 and the reliability via reproducibility was considered excellent for the global scale (Kp = 0

  19. Psychometric properties of the Vulnerability to Abuse Screening Scale for screening abuse of older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Raquel Batista; Oliveira, Graziella Lage; Silveira, Andréa Maria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE Adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Vulnerability to Abuse Screening Scale to identify risk of domestic violence against older adults in Brazil. METHODS The instrument was adapted and validated in a sample of 151 older adults from a geriatric reference center in the municipality of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, in 2014. We collected sociodemographic, clinical, and abuse-related information, and verified reliability by reproducibility in a sample of 55 older people, who underwent re-testing of the instrument seven days after the first application. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed for all variables, with a significance level of 5%. The construct validity was analyzed by the principal components method with a tetrachoric correlation matrix, the reliability of the scale by the weighted Kappa (Kp) statistic, and the internal consistency by the Kuder-Richardson estimator formula 20 (KR-20). RESULTS The average age of the participants was 72.1 years (DP = 6.96; 95%CI 70.94–73.17), with a maximum of 92 years, and they were predominantly female (76.2%; 95%CI 69.82–83.03). When analyzing the relationship between the scores of the Vulnerability to Abuse Screening Scale, categorized by presence (score > 3) or absence (score < 3) of vulnerability to abuse, with clinical and health conditions, we found statistically significant differences for self-perception of health (p = 0.002), depressive symptoms (p = 0.000), and presence of rheumatism (p = 0.003). There were no statistically significant differences between sexes. The Vulnerability to Abuse Screening Scale acceptably evaluated validity in the transcultural adaptation process, demonstrating dimensionality coherent with the original proposal (four factors). In the internal consistency analysis, the instrument presented good results (KR-20 = 0.69) and the reliability via reproducibility was considered excellent for the global scale (Kp = 0.92). CONCLUSIONS

  20. Measurement-based Treatment of Residual Symptoms Using Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale: Korean Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Won; Han, Changsu; Ko, Young-Hoon; Yoon, Seo Young; Pae, Chi-Un; Choi, Joonho; Park, Yong Chon; Kim, Jong-Woo; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Ko, Seung-Duk; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Zimmerman, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was aimed at evaluating the diagnostic validity of the Korean version of the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS) with varying follow-up in a typical clinical setting in multiple centers. Methods In total, 891 psychiatric outpatients were enrolled at the time of their intake appointment. Current diagnostic characteristics were examined using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (41% major depressive disorder). The CUDOS was measured and compared with three clinician rating scales and four self-report scales. Results The CUDOS showed excellent results for internal consistency (Cronbach’s α, 0.91), test-retest reliability (patients at intake, r=0.81; depressed patients in ongoing treatment, r=0.89), and convergent and discriminant validity (measures of depression, r=0.80; measures of anxiety and somatization, r=0.42). The CUDOS had a high ability to discriminate between different levels of depression severity based on the rating of Clinical Global Impression for depression severity and the diagnostic classification of major depression, minor depression, and non-depression. The ability of the CUDOS to identify patients with major depression was high (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve=0.867). A score of 20 as the optimal cutoff point was suggested when screening for major depression using the CUDOS (sensitivity=89.9%, specificity=69.5%). The CUDOS was sensitive to change after antidepressant treatment: patients with greater improvement showed a greater decrease in CUDOS scores (pKorean version of the CUDOS is a very useful measurement for research and for clinical practice. PMID:28138107

  1. Rating scales measuring the severity of psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, S D; Rothschild, A J; Flint, A J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Unipolar psychotic depression (PD) is a severe and debilitating syndrome, which requires intensive monitoring. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of the rating scales used to assess illness severity in PD. METHOD: Selective review of publications reporting results...... into the following categories: (i) rating scales predominantly covering depressive symptoms, (ii) rating scales predominantly covering psychotic symptoms, (iii) rating scales covering delusions, and (iv) rating scales covering PD. For the vast majority of the scales, the clinical and psychometric validity had...... not been tested empirically. The only exception from this general tendency was the 11-item Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS), which was developed specifically to assess the severity of PD. CONCLUSION: In PD, the PDAS represents the only empirically derived rating scale for the measurement...

  2. Using clinical decision support as a means of implementing a universal postpartum depression screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Holly; Nentin, Farida; Silverman, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    A major barrier to the diagnosis of postpartum depression (PPD) includes symptom detection. The lack of awareness and understanding of PPD among new mothers, the variability in clinical presentation, and the various diagnostic strategies can increase this further. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of adding clinical decision support (CDS) to the electronic health record (EHR) as a means of implementing a universal standardized PPD screening program within a large, at high risk, population. All women returning to the Mount Sinai Hospital OB/GYN Ambulatory Practice for postpartum care between 2010 and 2013 were presented with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in response to a CDS "hard stop" built into the EHR. Of the 2102 women who presented for postpartum care, 2092 women (99.5 %) were screened for PPD in response to a CDS hard stop module. Screens were missing on ten records (0.5 %) secondary to refusal, language barrier, or lack of clarity in the EHR. Technology is becoming increasingly important in addressing the challenges faced by health care providers. While the identification of PPD has become the recent focus of public health concerns secondary to the significant social burden, numerous barriers to screening still exist within the clinical setting. The utility of adding CDS in the form of a hard stop, requiring clinicians to enter a standardized PPD mood assessment score to the patient EHR, offers a sufficient way to address a primary barrier to PPD symptom identification at the practitioner level.

  3. Disseminating perinatal depression screening as a public health initiative: a train-the-trainer approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Lisa S; Brock, Rebecca L; O'Hara, Michael W; Gorman, Laura L; Engeldinger, Jane

    2011-08-01

    This case report describes the development and implementation of the Train-the-Trainer: Maternal Depression Screening Program (TTT), a novel approach to disseminating perinatal depression screening. We trained screeners according to a standard pyramid scheme of train-the-trainer programs: three experts trained representatives from health care agencies (the TTT trainers), who in turn trained their staff and implemented depression screening at their home agencies. The TTT trainers had little or no prior mental health experience so "enhanced" components were added to ensure thorough instruction. Although TTT was implemented primarily as a services project, we evaluated both the statewide dissemination and the screening rates achieved by TTT programs. Thirty-two social service or health agencies implemented maternal depression screening in 20 counties throughout Iowa; this reached 58.2% of the Iowa population. For the 16 agencies that provided screening data, the average screening rate (number of women screened/number eligible to be screened) for the first 3 months of screening was 73.2%, 80.5% and 79.0%. We compared screening rates of our TTT programs with those of Healthy Start, a program in which screening was established via an intensive consultation model. We found the screening rates in 62.5% of TTT agencies were comparable to those in Healthy Start. Our "enhanced" train-the-trainer method is a promising approach for broadly implementing depression-screening programs in agencies serving pregnant and postpartum women.

  4. Large-scale screens of metagenomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vinh D; Palden, Tsultrim; DeLong, Edward F

    2007-01-01

    Metagenomic libraries archive large fragments of contiguous genomic sequences from microorganisms without requiring prior cultivation. Generating a streamlined procedure for creating and screening metagenomic libraries is therefore useful for efficient high-throughput investigations into the genetic and metabolic properties of uncultured microbial assemblages. Here, key protocols are presented on video, which we propose is the most useful format for accurately describing a long process that alternately depends on robotic instrumentation and (human) manual interventions. First, we employed robotics to spot library clones onto high-density macroarray membranes, each of which can contain duplicate colonies from twenty-four 384-well library plates. Automation is essential for this procedure not only for accuracy and speed, but also due to the miniaturization of scale required to fit the large number of library clones into highly dense spatial arrangements. Once generated, we next demonstrated how the macroarray membranes can be screened for genes of interest using modified versions of standard protocols for probe labeling, membrane hybridization, and signal detection. We complemented the visual demonstration of these procedures with detailed written descriptions of the steps involved and the materials required, all of which are available online alongside the video.

  5. Screening for neurocognitive impairment, depression, and anxiety in HIV-infected patients in Western Europe and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kevin; Bayon, Carmen; Molina, Jean-Michel; McNamara, Patricia; Resch, Christiane; Muñoz-Moreno, Jose A; Kulasegaram, Ranjababu; Schewe, Knud; Burgos-Ramirez, Angel; De Alvaro, Cristina; Cabrero, Esther; Guion, Matthew; Norton, Michael; van Wyk, Jean

    2014-01-01

    CRANIum, a cross-sectional epidemiology study in Western Europe and Canada, was conducted to describe and compare the prevalence of a positive screen for neurocognitive impairment (NCI), depressive symptoms, and anxiety in an HIV-positive population either receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) or who were naive to antiretroviral therapy (ART). HIV-positive patients ≥18 years of age attending a routine medical follow-up visit and able to complete the designated screening tools were eligible for study inclusion. The Brief Neurocognitive Screen was used to assess NCI; depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The evaluable patient population (N = 2863) included 1766 men (61.7%) and 1096 (38.3%) women. A total of 1969 patients were cART-experienced (68.8%), and 894 were ART-naive (31.2%). A positive screen for NCI was found in 41.5% of patients (cART-experienced, 42.5%; ART-naive, 39.4%; p = 0.12). A positive screen for depressive symptoms was found in 15.7% of patients (cART-experienced, 16.8%; ART-naive, 13.3%; p = 0.01), whereas 33.3% of patients screened positive for anxiety (cART-experienced, 33.5%; ART-naive, 32.8%; p = 0.71). A greater percentage of women compared with men screened positive for NCI (51.78% vs. 35.1%; p < 0.0001) and depressive symptoms (17.9% vs. 14.3%; p = 0.01). These data suggest that neurocognitive and mood disorders remain highly prevalent in HIV-infected patients. Regular mental health screening in this population is warranted.

  6. The cost-utility of screening for depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenstein, M; Vijan, S; Zeber, J E; Boehm, K; Buttar, A

    2001-03-06

    Depressive disorders are common in primary care and cause substantial disability, but they often remain undiagnosed. Screening is a frequently proposed strategy for increasing detection of depression. To examine the cost-utility of screening for depression compared with no screening. Nonstationary Markov model. The published literature. Hypothetical cohort of 40-year-old primary care patients. Lifetime. Health care payer and societal. Self-administered questionnaire followed by provider assessment. Costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Compared with no screening, the cost to society of annual screening for depression in primary care patients is $192 444/QALY. Screening every 5 years and one-time screening cost $50 988/QALY and $32 053/QALY, respectively, compared with no screening. From the payer perspective, the cost of annual screening is $225 467. Cost-utility ratios are most sensitive to the prevalence of major depression, the costs of screening, rates of treatment initiation, and remission rates with treatment. In Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses, the cost-utility of annual screening is less than $50 000/QALY only 2.2% of the time. In multiway analyses, four model variables must be changed to extreme values for the cost-utility of annual screening to fall below $50 000/QALY, but a change in only one variable increases the cost-utility of one-time screening to more than $50 000/QALY. One-time screening is more robustly cost-effective if screening costs are low and effective treatments are being given. Annual and periodic screening for depression cost more than $50 000/QALY, but one-time screening is cost-effective. The cost-effectiveness of screening is likely to improve if treatment becomes more effective.

  7. Self-Rated Mental Health: Screening for Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Women Exposed to Perinatal Intimate Partner Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastello, Jennifer C; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Gaffney, Kathleen F; Kodadek, Marie P; Bullock, Linda C; Sharps, Phyllis W

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the validity of a single-item, self-rated mental health (SRMH) measure in the identification of women at risk for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Baseline data of 239 low-income women participating in an intimate partner violence (IPV) intervention study were analyzed. PTSD was measured with the Davidson Trauma Scale. Risk for depression was determined using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. SRMH was assessed with a single item asking participants to rate their mental health at the time of the baseline interview. Single-item measures can be an efficient way to increase the proportion of patients screened for mental health disorders. Although SRMH is not a strong indicator of PTSD, it may be useful in identifying pregnant women who are at increased risk for depression and need further comprehensive assessment in the clinical setting. Future research examining the use of SRMH among high-risk populations is needed.

  8. Measurement invariance of the depressive symptoms scale during adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M.; Chaiton, Michael; Low, Nancy CP; Contreras, Gisèle; Barnett, Tracie A.,; O’Loughlin, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Background This study examined (1) the factor structure of a depressive symptoms scale (DSS), (2) the sex and longitudinal invariance of the DSS, and (3) the predictive validity of the DSS scale during adolescence in terms of predicting depression and anxiety symptoms in early adulthood. Methods Data were drawn from the Nicotine Dependence in Teens (NDIT) study, an ongoing prospective cohort study of 1,293 adolescents. Results The analytical sample included 527 participants who provided compl...

  9. Implementation of depression screening in antenatal clinics through tablet computers: results of a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano-Belisario, José S; Gupta, Ajay K; O'Donoghue, John; Ramchandani, Paul; Morrison, Cecily; Car, Josip

    2017-05-10

    Mobile devices may facilitate depression screening in the waiting area of antenatal clinics. This can present implementation challenges, of which we focused on survey layout and technology deployment. We assessed the feasibility of using tablet computers to administer a socio-demographic survey, the Whooley questions and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to 530 pregnant women attending National Health Service (NHS) antenatal clinics across England. We randomised participants to one of two layout versions of these surveys: (i) a scrolling layout where each survey was presented on a single screen; or (ii) a paging layout where only one question appeared on the screen at any given time. Overall, 85.10% of eligible pregnant women agreed to take part. Of these, 90.95% completed the study procedures. Approximately 23% of participants answered Yes to at least one Whooley question, and approximately 13% of them scored 10 points of more on the EPDS. We observed no association between survey layout and the responses given to the Whooley questions, the median EPDS scores, the number of participants at increased risk of self-harm, and the number of participants asking for technical assistance. However, we observed a difference in the number of participants at each EPDS scoring interval (p = 0.008), which provide an indication of a woman's risk of depression. A scrolling layout resulted in faster completion times (median = 4 min 46 s) than a paging layout (median = 5 min 33 s) (p = 0.024). However, the clinical significance of this difference (47.5 s) is yet to be determined. Tablet computers can be used for depression screening in the waiting area of antenatal clinics. This requires the careful consideration of clinical workflows, and technology-related issues such as connectivity and security. An association between survey layout and EPDS scoring intervals needs to be explored further to determine if it corresponds to a survey layout effect

  10. Implementing Universal Maternal Depression Screening in Home Visiting Programs: A Pragmatic Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Lisa S.; Taylor, Darby

    2014-01-01

    Maternal depression, although prevalent in low-income women, is not an inevitable consequence of poverty. Nevertheless, depression is a double burden for impoverished women: compromising infant development and diminishing mothers' ability to benefit from or effectively use home visiting services. Without universal screening, depression is often…

  11. [Mokken scaling of the Cognitive Screening Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesfeldt, H F A

    2009-10-01

    The Cognitive Screening Test (CST) is a twenty-item orientation questionnaire in Dutch, that is commonly used to evaluate cognitive impairment. This study applied Mokken Scale Analysis, a non-parametric set of techniques derived from item response theory (IRT), to CST-data of 466 consecutive participants in psychogeriatric day care. The full item set and the standard short version of fourteen items both met the assumptions of the monotone homogeneity model, with scalability coefficient H = 0.39, which is considered weak. In order to select items that would fulfil the assumption of invariant item ordering or the double monotonicity model, the subjects were randomly partitioned into a training set (50% of the sample) and a test set (the remaining half). By means of an automated item selection eleven items were found to measure one latent trait, with H = 0.67 and item H coefficients larger than 0.51. Cross-validation of the item analysis in the remaining half of the subjects gave comparable values (H = 0.66; item H coefficients larger than 0.56). The selected items involve year, place of residence, birth date, the monarch's and prime minister's names, and their predecessors. Applying optimal discriminant analysis (ODA) it was found that the full set of twenty CST items performed best in distinguishing two predefined groups of patients of lower or higher cognitive ability, as established by an independent criterion derived from the Amsterdam Dementia Screening Test. The chance corrected predictive value or prognostic utility was 47.5% for the full item set, 45.2% for the fourteen items of the standard short version of the CST, and 46.1% for the homogeneous, unidimensional set of selected eleven items. The results of the item analysis support the application of the CST in cognitive assessment, and revealed a more reliable 'short' version of the CST than the standard short version (CST14).

  12. Characteristics of depression in Parkinson's disease: evaluating with Zung's Self-Rating Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Fumio; Oishi, Kenichi; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kuga, Atsushi; Kobessho, Hiroshi; Shirafuji, Toshihiko; Higuchi, Masatsugu; Ishihara, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to elucidate characteristics of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fifty-eight PD patients were evaluated with Zung's Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Scores for "suicidal ideation" on the SDS correlated with posture and gait disturbances on the UPDRS. Twenty-six patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) were also evaluated with the SDS. SDS scores for "indecisiveness" and "constipation" were significantly higher in PD patients than SCD patients. Our results suggest that depression is common in disabled persons but PD patients might have a characteristic clinical presentation.

  13. The impact of education, country, race and ethnicity on the self-report of postpartum depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Florio, A.; Putnam, K.; Altemus, M.; Apter, G.; Bergink, V.; Bilszta, J.; Brock, R.; Buist, A.; Deligiannidis, K. M.; Devouche, E.; Epperson, C. N.; Guille, C.; Kim, D.; Lichtenstein, P.; Magnusson, P. K. E.; Martinez, P.; Munk-Olsen, T.; Newport, J.; Payne, J.; Penninx, B. W.; O’Hara, M.; Robertson-Blackmore, E.; Roza, S. J.; Sharkey, K. M.; Stuart, S.; Tiemeier, H.; Viktorin, A.; Schmidt, P. J.; Sullivan, P. F.; Stowe, Z. N.; Wisner, K. L.; Jones, I.; Rubinow, D. R.; Meltzer-Brody, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Universal screening for postpartum depression is recommended in many countries. Knowledge of whether the disclosure of depressive symptoms in the postpartum period differs across cultures could improve detection and provide new insights into the pathogenesis. Moreover, it is a necessary step to evaluate the universal use of screening instruments in research and clinical practice. In the current study we sought to assess whether the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), the most widely used screening tool for postpartum depression, measures the same underlying construct across cultural groups in a large international dataset. Method Ordinal regression and measurement invariance were used to explore the association between culture, operationalized as education, ethnicity/race and continent, and endorsement of depressive symptoms using the EPDS on 8209 new mothers from Europe and the USA. Results Education, but not ethnicity/race, influenced the reporting of postpartum depression [difference between robust comparative fit indexes (Δ*CFI) 0.01), but not between European countries (Δ*CFI depression that women of different educational backgrounds may manifest. The increasing cultural heterogeneity of societies together with the tendency towards globalization requires a culturally sensitive approach to patients, research and policies, that takes into account, beyond rhetoric, the context of a person’s experiences and the context in which the research is conducted. PMID:27866476

  14. Rasch model analysis of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS)

    OpenAIRE

    Tennant Alan; Shea Tracey L; Pallant Julie F

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background There is a growing awareness of the need for easily administered, psychometrically sound screening tools to identify individuals with elevated levels of psychological distress. Although support has been found for the psychometric properties of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS) using classical test theory approaches it has not been subjected to Rasch analysis. The aim of this study was to use Rasch analysis to assess the psychometric properties of the DASS-21...

  15. Validation of Six Short and Ultra-short Screening Instruments for Depression for People Living with HIV in Ontario: Results from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Stephanie KY; Boyle, Eleanor; Burchell, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objective Major depression affects up to half of people living with HIV. However, among HIV-positive patients, depression goes unrecognized 60–70% of the time in non-psychiatric settings. We sought to evaluate three screening instruments and their short forms to facilitate the recognition...... of current depression in HIV-positive patients attending HIV specialty care clinics in Ontario. Methods A multi-centre validation study was conducted in Ontario to examine the validity and accuracy of three instruments (the Center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale [CESD20], the Kessler Psychological...... Distress Scale [K10], and the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale [PHQ9]) and their short forms (CESD10, K6, and PHQ2) in diagnosing current major depression among 190 HIV-positive patients in Ontario. Results from the three instruments and their short forms were compared to results from the gold...

  16. The Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale: Psychometric Properties in Depressed Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Gregory M.; Park, Jong-Hyo; Essex, Marilyn J.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Silva, Susan G.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Curry, John F.; Feeny, Norah C.; Kennard, Betsy; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Pathak, Sanjeev; Reinecke, Mark A.; Rosenberg, David R.; Weller, Elizabeth B.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties and factor structure of the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale were examined in a sample of 422 male and female adolescents (ages 12-17) with current major depressive disorder. The scale demonstrated high internal consistency ([alpha] = 0.93) and correlated significantly with self-report and interview-based measures of…

  17. Rasch Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale--Short Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Karl S.; Green, Kathy E.; Cox, Enid O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine scale dimensionality, reliability, invariance, targeting, continuity, cutoff scores, and diagnostic use of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF) over time with a sample of 177 English-speaking U.S. elders. Design and Methods: An item response theory, Rasch analysis, was conducted with…

  18. Rasch Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale--Short Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Karl S.; Green, Kathy E.; Cox, Enid O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine scale dimensionality, reliability, invariance, targeting, continuity, cutoff scores, and diagnostic use of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF) over time with a sample of 177 English-speaking U.S. elders. Design and Methods: An item response theory, Rasch analysis, was conducted with…

  19. Assessment of Anxiety and Depression by Three Psychological Screening Scales in Functional Dyspepsia Patients%三种不同心理测评量表对功能性消化不良患者焦虑、抑郁状态的评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳宜; 朱丽明; 方秀才; 常敏; 陈卫; 王智凤; 史丽丽; 徐涛

    2012-01-01

    功能性消化不良(FD)与精神心理因素密切相关,客观评估FD患者的心理状态对理解消化不良症状产生的机制、指导选择综合治疗方案、客观评估疗效均具有重要意义.目的:比较汉密尔顿焦虑/抑郁量表(HAMA/HAMD)、Zung焦虑/抑郁自评量表(SAS/SDS)和罗马Ⅲ心理社会警报问卷(RPAQ)对FD患者焦虑、抑郁状态的检出一致性.方法:纳入2008年11月~2010年4月北京协和医院符合罗马Ⅲ诊断标准的FD患者,同时接受HAMA、HAMD他评以及SAS、SDS和RPAQ自评.结果:共纳入134例FD患者.HAMA对FD患者焦虑检出率为72.4%,明显高于SAS(24.6%)和RPAQ(31.3%) (P<0.05);HAMD对FD患者抑郁检出率为47.0%,与SDS无明显差异(44.O%,P>0.05),但明显高于RPAQ(20.9%,P<0.05).SDS与HAMD检出结果的总符合率为73.1%.HAMA/HAMD较SAS/SDS、RPAQ更易检出重度FD患者合并的焦虑和抑郁;SAS和RPAQ漏检约半数FD患者合并的中重度焦虑.结论:HAMA/HAMD较SAS/SDS、RPAQ更易发现FD患者合并的焦虑、抑郁状态,其检出率差异可能与量表不同的构成有关.%Psychological disorders are common in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). It is important to assess the abnormal psychological status in patients with FD for understanding the mechanism of dyspepsia symptoms, guidance of therapy and assessment of efficacy. Aims: To compare the consistency of Hamilton anxiety/depression scale (HAMA/HAMD), self-rating anxiety/depression scale (SAS/SDS) and Rome III psychosocial alarm questionnaire (RPAQ) as screening tools for detection of anxiety/depression in FD patients. Methods: Patients met Rome III diagnostic criteria of FD from Nov. 2008 to Apr. 2010 at Peking Union Medical College Hospital were enrolled. HAMA and HAMD were assessed by a well trained physician, SAS, SDS and RPAQ were completed by patients themselves following the instruction. Results: A total of 134 patients with FD were enrolled in this study. The

  20. Penile Dysmorphic Disorder: Development of a Screening Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Read, Julie; Troglia, Andrea; Carmona, Lina; Fiorito, Chiara; Wells, Hannah; Wylie, Kevan; Muir, Gordon

    2015-11-01

    Penile dysmorphic disorder (PDD) is shorthand for men diagnosed with body dysmorphic disorder, in whom the size or shape of the penis is their main, if not their exclusive, preoccupation causing significant shame or handicap. There are no specific measures for identifying men with PDD compared to men who are anxious about the size of their penis but do not have PDD. Such a measure might be helpful for treatment planning, reducing unrealistic expectations, and measuring outcome after any psychological or physical intervention. Our aim was, therefore, to validate a specific measure, termed the Cosmetic Procedure Screening Scale for PDD (COPS-P). Eighty-one male participants were divided into three groups: a PDD group (n = 21), a small penis anxiety group (n = 37), and a control group (n = 23). All participants completed the COPS-P as well as standardized measures of depression, anxiety, social phobia, body image, quality of life, and erectile function. Penis size was also measured. The final COPS-P was based on nine items. The scale had good internal reliability and significant convergent validity with measures of related constructs. It discriminated between the PDD group, the small penis anxiety group, and the control group. This is the first study to develop a scale able to discriminate between those with PDD and men anxious about their size who did not have PDD. Clinicians and researchers may use the scale as part of an assessment for men presenting with anxiety about penis size and as an audit or outcome measure after any intervention for this population.

  1. Attitude scale and general health questionnaire subscales predict depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Afshar, Hamid; Doost, Hamid Taher Neshat; Mousavi, Seyed Ghafur; Moolavi, Hoseyn

    2012-01-01

    According to Beck theory, dysfunctional attitude has a central role in emergence of depression. The aim of this study was to determine contributions of dysfunctional attitude and general health index to depression. In this case-control study, two groups of subjects participated. The first group consisted of 65 patients with major depression and dysthymic disorder, who were recruited from Noor and Navab Safavi Psychiatry Clinics in Isfahan. The control group was consisted of 65 non-patient individuals who were accompanied or relatives of the patients and was matched with them based on age, sex and education. Both groups completed 26-item Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS-26) and 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Logistic regression and correlation methods were applied for statistical analysis. Logistic regression analysis showed that by an increase of one level in categorized DAS-26 scores and one score in the physical symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and depression subscales of GHQ-28 the risk of depression increase by 6.8, 1.6, 1.9, 3.7, 4.78 times, respectively. Capability of dysfunctional attitude and general health subscales to predict depression supports the Beck's cognitive diathesis stress theory of depression that dysfunctional attitude may be a predisposing risk factor for depression.

  2. Inpatients with major depressive disorder: Psychometric properties of the new Multidimensional Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darharaj, Mohammad; Habibi, Mojtaba; Power, Michael J; Farzadian, Farzaneh; Rahimi, Maesoumeh; Kholghi, Habibeh; Kazemitabar, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    The New Multi-dimensional Depression Scale (NMDS) is one of the most comprehensive scales that measures depression symptoms in four domains, including emotional, cognitive, somatic, and interpersonal. This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the NMDS in a group of Iranian inpatients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). At first, the scale was translated into Persian and used as part of a battery consisting of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). The battery was administered to 271 inpatients with MDD (90 men and 181 women) aged from 18 to 60 who had been referred to psychiatric hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Persian version of the NMDS upheld its original four-factor structure. Moreover, the results showed its good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient ranging from 0.70 for the emotional subscale to 0.83 for the interpersonal subscale). In addition, the NMDS scores were correlated with other constructs in empirically and theoretically expected ways, which provides evidence for the convergent (positive significant relationships with anxiety and cognitive and somatic-affective symptoms of depression) and divergent (negative significant relationships with happiness and mental health and physical health) validity of the scale. These findings supported the Persian version of the NMDS as a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of depression symptoms in patients with MDD.

  3. Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS: A Tool for Assessment of Depression in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana A. Kakrani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is in the process of rapid demographic progression of increased life expectancy and aging with geriatric population of 7.2 percent which is estimated to rise to 20 percent in 2050. With increasing geriatric population elderly with dementia and associated depressive illness are expected to rise in number to almost an epidemic. Among the morbidity encountered in elderly, depressive disorders are common. Aim & Objectives: The present study was conducted with the objective to assess the extent and degree of depression in elderly, and study some correlates associated with depression in them. Material & Methods: The study was carried out at geriatric clinic of Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Pune under the guidance of department of community medicine. Methodology:The randomly selected elderly above the age of 60 years attending the clinic and willing to participate in study were administered the questionnaire of Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, scores were given, based on which the subjects were categorized as mild, moderate and severe. Those with score >5 were considered as suggestive of depression and some factors studied were analysed to find out their association with depression. Results: It was revealed that the proportion of elderly having depression was 52.4% with 84.6% of depressed in age group of 76-80 years. Moderate to severe type was more commonly seen in illiterate; however some degree of depression was present in all elderly irrespective of literacy status. Moderate to severe type was seen more commonly in elderly living in nuclear families (23.8%, and living alone (33.3%. Thus more than half of elderly studied were having depression, and it was observed that as the age advanced the degree of depression significantly increased. Some of the factors studied like low education status, poor economic status, nuclear family status, single status, loneliness, were associated with depression. The GDS Scale can be considered as

  4. The predictive power of depression screening procedures for veterans with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankman SA

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Stewart A Shankman1*, Jeffrey Nadelson2*, Sarah Kate McGowan1, Ali A Sovari2, Mladen I Vidovich21Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Illinois, 2Department of Cardiology, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Depression leads to a worse outcome for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Thus, accurately identifying depression in CAD patients is imperative. In many veterans affairs (VA hospitals, patients are screened for depression once a year using the patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9. Although the PHQ-9 is generally considered a specific and sensitive measure of depression, there is reason to believe that these screening procedures may miss a large number of cases of depression within CAD patients and cardiology patients more generally. The goal of this study was to provide data as to the predictive power of this depression screening procedure by (a comparing the prevalence rate of depression identified by the PHQ-9 to known prevalence rates and (b examining whether patients identified as “depressed” also had conditions that consistently co-occur with depression (eg, post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], other medical issues. Participants were 813 consecutive patients who received an angiogram in the cardiac catheterization laboratory at a large VA Medical Center. Prevalence of depression was 6.9% in the overall sample and less than 6% when the sample was restricted to CAD patients with significant stenosis. Depression was significantly associated with PTSD, smoking, and alcohol problems. However, depression was not associated with other medical problems such as diabetes, renal failure, peripheral vascular disease, or anemia. In conclusion, the low prevalence rate of depression and lack of associations with comorbid medical problems may suggest that the VA’s depression screening procedures have low sensitivity for identifying depression in CAD

  5. TRIPPD: a practice-based network effectiveness study of postpartum depression screening and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Dietrich, Allen J; Wollan, Peter; Bertram, Susan; Graham, Debbie; Huff, Jessica; Kurland, Margary; Madison, Suzanne; Pace, Wilson D

    2012-01-01

    Postpartum depression is common but inadequately recognized and undertreated. Continuing depressive symptoms are associated with adverse outcomes for the woman, her infant, and family. We wanted to determine the effect of a practice-based training program for screening, diagnosis, and management of depression in postpartum mothers. In this practice-based effectiveness study, 28 practices were randomized to usual care (n = 14) or intervention (n = 14), and 2,343 women were enrolled between 5 and 12 weeks' postpartum. The intervention sites received education and tools for postpartum depression screening, diagnosis, initiation of therapy, and follow-up within their practices. Usual-care practices received a 30-minute presentation about postpartum depression. Screening information for the usual care was obtained from baseline surveys sent directly to the central site but was not available for patient care. Outcomes were based on patient-reported outcomes (level of depressive symptoms) from surveys at 6 and 12 months, plus medical record review (diagnosis and therapy initiation). Among the 2,343 women enrolled, 1,897 (80.1%) provided outcome information, and were included in the analysis. Overall, 654 (34.5% of 1,897) women had elevated screening scores indicative of depression, with comparable rates in the intervention and usual-care groups. Among the 654 women with elevated postpartum depression screening scores, those in the intervention practices were more likely to receive a diagnosis (P = .0006) and therapy for postpartum depression (P = .002). They also had lower depressive symptom levels at 6 (P = .07) and 12 months' (P=.001) postpartum. Primary care-based screening, diagnosis, and management improved mother's depression outcomes at 12 months. This practical approach could be implemented widely with modest resources.

  6. Simple and practical screening approach to identify HIV-infected individuals with depression or at risk of developing depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjaer, L; Gabel, C; Laursen, T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies have shown that depression and other mental illnesses are under-diagnosed among HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of mental health history and questionnaire-based screening instruments to identify HIV-infected individuals at risk...... of depression. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that the mental health of HIV-infected individuals should be reviewed and a "risk-flag" three-step approach should be used (1) to screen routinely with the two verbal questions suggested by the EACS, (2) to identify whether there is a risk of depression and then screen...... with the BDI-II, and (3) to identify whether there is still a risk and then perform a full evaluation and obtain an accurate psychiatric diagnosis by a psychiatrist....

  7. Screening of Patients with Chronic Medical Disorders in the Outpatient Department for Depression Using Handheld Computers as Interface and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 as a Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Ijya; Singh, Akash Ranjan; Pakhare, Abhijit; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    Depression, especially in concurrence with chronic medical disorders, is highly prevalent worldwide. An average between 9.3% and 23% of patients with one or more chronic disease have co-morbid depression. This comorbid depression has the worst health scores of all the disease states. Despite this, patients with chronic medical disorders are not commonly screened for depression. Lack of objective screening by health-care providers as well as lack of infrastructure (time/space/personnel) probably contributes to gross underdiagnosis of depression. This issue can be addressed using short objective depression screening score (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9]) (validated in native languages, e.g., Hindi) and paperless self-administered interface on handheld computer (tablet), which is the objective of the study. One hundred consecutive patients with chronic medical disorders visiting our medicine outpatient department were screened for depression using tablets with PHQ-9 Hindi on a self-administered interface. The overall prevalence of depression was found to be 25% (95% confidence interval 16.6-34.8). Nearly half of the patients with depression had moderate depression (PHQ-9 score 10-14) while rest had moderately severe or very severe depression (PHQ-9 score >14). Association of depression was not found to be statistically significant with age, duration of disease, gender, the type of disease, or the number of disease. Majority of patients rated ease of the use of tablet interface (on a visual analog scale) as very easy (approx 95%). All the patients were able to complete the tablet screener without assistance, answering all of the questions. The median time of completion with interquartile range was 4 (3-5) min. Majority of the patients (63%) completed the questionnaire within 5 min while rest completed it in 5-10 min. It is feasible to use tablets with PHQ-9 questionnaire in native language for screening depression in chronic medical disorders. With high

  8. A prospective study of screen time in adolescence and depression symptoms in young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Anders; Singhammer, John; Froberg, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between screen time in adolescence and depressive symptoms in young adulthood in a population-based cohort study of Danish adolescents. METHODS: Data were from a cohort of adolescents who were followed-up in young adulthood...... for a period of up to 12years (1997-2010, mean 8.8years, n=435). Information on television viewing, computer use, total screen time and other determinants of depression were obtained in adolescence. Depressive symptoms were obtained in young adulthood using the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and classified...... as mild, moderate or severe depression. Mixed regression models were used to examine the associations, with adjustment for major confounders. RESULTS: In multivariable adjusted analyses, each additional hour/day spent watching television or screen viewing in adolescence was associated with 1.36 (95% CI 0...

  9. Discriminant possibilities of the Hamilton depression scale: ROC analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novović Zdenka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare discrimination power of original and reconstructed version of Hamilton’s depression scale in separation of depressive vs. anxious patients and to suggest some possibilities which offer ROC analysis. The subjects of the study were 119 patients of Psychiatric clinic in Novi Sad. 67 of them were diagnosed with some of the forms of affective disorders and 52 with an anxious-phobic diagnosis. Results of ROC analysis suggest that both instruments can be used in distinguishing depressive from anxious patients, but reconstructed version shows greater sensitivity and specificity with optimal cut-off score. It also has more significant AUC, which refers to probability of prediction on the basis of the whole spectrum of the results. These data is commented in relation with current debates, between unitaristic and pluralistic oriented authors, about the nature of the anxious-depression relationship.

  10. Screening value of the patient health questionnaire depression scale in outpatients from traditional Chinese internal department%患者健康问卷抑郁量表在中医内科门诊对抑郁障碍的筛查价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾庆枝; 刘寒; 缪菊明; 陈建新; 王静夷; 徐海楠; 何燕玲

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨患者健康问卷抑郁量表(PHQ-9)在中医内科门诊对抑郁障碍的筛查价值. 方法:采用连续门诊调查方式,对2009例中医内科门诊18 ~ 65岁患者进行PHQ-9自评,并采用简明神经精神访谈工具(MINI)对患者进行精神检查. 结果:以MINI结果为金标准,本组PHQ-9评分的ROC曲线下面积为0.903(95% CI:0.869 ~0.937);以8分为临界值时中医内科门诊患者的抑郁障碍筛查的敏感性和特异性分别为0.856和0.802.有抑郁障碍、焦虑障碍、慢性躯体疾病患者的PHQ-9评分显著高于无相应疾病的患者(P =0.036 ~0.000).抑郁症状越严重,患者的门诊次数越多、因躯体或心理疾病缺勤的时间越长,抑郁症状引起困难的比率越高(P均=0.000). 结论:以8分为临界值,PHQ-9对中医内科门诊患者的抑郁障碍筛查具有较高的信度和效度.%Objective:To evaluate the screening value of the patient health questionnaire depression scale (PHQ-9) in outpatients from traditional Chinese internal department.Method:By continuous clinic investigation,2009 outpatients from internal department of traditional Chinese medicine were self-evaluated with PHQ-9; and also received psychiatric interview by mini international neuropsychiatric interview(MINI).Results:The MINI results as the gold standard,the area under the receiver operator charactristic analysis (ROC) of PHQ-9 was 0.903 (95% CI:0.869-0.937).With 8 into the critical value for depression screening in outpatients from internal department of traditional Chinese medicine,the sensitivity was 0.856 and specificity was 0.802,respectively.The score of PHQ-9 in the patients with depressive disorder,anxiety disorder or chronic somatic diseases were significantly higher than patients without corresponding diseases (P =0.036-0.000).The heavier the depression symptoms in patient,the more times to clinic and longer absences from work due to physical or mental sickness,and the higher the ratio of

  11. The Hamilton depression scale. Evaluation of objectivity using logistic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, P; Allerup, P; Gram, L F; Reisby, N; Rosenberg, R; Jacobsen, O; Nagy, A

    1981-03-01

    The consistency of the Hamilton Depression Scale (HDS) as a measure of the severity of depressive states has been examined when the scale was used weekly during a trial when imipramine. By use of logistic models (Rasch) the consistency of the HDS has been considered across patient-variables as age, sex, plasma levels of imipramine, and diagnosis. The results showed that the original 17-item HDS was without adequate consistency, i.e. the total score of the sample of items was no one-dimensional measure of depressive states. However, a melancholia subscale of the HDS contained items the total of which can be used to compare patients quantitatively, although in some part of the analysis one of these items showed ceiling effect. It was concluded that the melancholia subscale (containing the items depressed mood, guilt, work and interests, retardation, psychic anxiety, and general somatic symptoms) can form the basis for further improvements in the field of quantitative rating scales for depressive states.

  12. Detection of Mental Disorders Other Than Depression with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in a Sample of Pregnant Women in Northern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sifuentes-Alvarez, Antonio; Salas-Martinez, Carlos

    2016-05-18

    We sought to evaluate the capacity of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in discriminating mental disorders other than depression in pregnant women in northern Mexico. Three hundred pregnant women attending prenatal consultations in a public hospital in Durango City, Mexico submitted a validated EPDS and were examined for mental disorders other than depression using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - 4(th) Ed. (DSM-IV) criteria. Sensitivity and specificity of cut-off points of the EPDS, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Of the 300 pregnant women studied, 21 had mental disorders other than depression by the DSM-IV criteria. The best EPDS score for screening mental disorders other than depression was 8/9. This threshold showed a sensitivity of 52.4%, a specificity of 67.0%, a positive predictive value of 11.5%, a negative predictive value of 95.4%, and an area under the curve of 0.643 (95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.76). The EPDS can be considered for screening mental disorders other than depression in Mexican pregnant women whenever a cut-off score of 8/9 is used. However, the tool showed small power to separate pregnant women with and without mental disorders other than depression.

  13. The Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale: reliability and validity of a brief screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Cecilie S; Griffiths, Mark D; Pallesen, Ståle; Bilder, Robert M; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Aboujaoude, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Although excessive and compulsive shopping has been increasingly placed within the behavioral addiction paradigm in recent years, items in existing screens arguably do not assess the core criteria and components of addiction. To date, assessment screens for shopping disorders have primarily been rooted within the impulse-control or obsessive-compulsive disorder paradigms. Furthermore, existing screens use the terms 'shopping,' 'buying,' and 'spending' interchangeably, and do not necessarily reflect contemporary shopping habits. Consequently, a new screening tool for assessing shopping addiction was developed. Initially, 28 items, four for each of seven addiction criteria (salience, mood modification, conflict, tolerance, withdrawal, relapse, and problems), were constructed. These items and validated scales (i.e., Compulsive Buying Measurement Scale, Mini-International Personality Item Pool, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale) were then administered to 23,537 participants (M age = 35.8 years, SD age = 13.3). The highest loading item from each set of four pooled items reflecting the seven addiction criteria were retained in the final scale, The Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale (BSAS). The factor structure of the BSAS was good (RMSEA = 0.064, CFI = 0.983, TLI = 0.973) and coefficient alpha was 0.87. The scores on the BSAS converged with scores on the Compulsive Buying Measurement Scale (CBMS; 0.80), and were positively correlated with extroversion and neuroticism, and negatively with conscientiousness, agreeableness, and intellect/imagination. The scores of the BSAS were positively associated with anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and inversely related to age. Females scored higher than males on the BSAS. The BSAS is the first scale to fully embed shopping addiction within an addiction paradigm. A recommended cutoff score for the new scale and future research directions are discussed.

  14. The Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale: reliability and validity of a brief screening test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Cecilie S.; Griffiths, Mark D.; Pallesen, Ståle; Bilder, Robert M.; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Aboujaoude, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Although excessive and compulsive shopping has been increasingly placed within the behavioral addiction paradigm in recent years, items in existing screens arguably do not assess the core criteria and components of addiction. To date, assessment screens for shopping disorders have primarily been rooted within the impulse-control or obsessive-compulsive disorder paradigms. Furthermore, existing screens use the terms ‘shopping,’ ‘buying,’ and ‘spending’ interchangeably, and do not necessarily reflect contemporary shopping habits. Consequently, a new screening tool for assessing shopping addiction was developed. Initially, 28 items, four for each of seven addiction criteria (salience, mood modification, conflict, tolerance, withdrawal, relapse, and problems), were constructed. These items and validated scales (i.e., Compulsive Buying Measurement Scale, Mini-International Personality Item Pool, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale) were then administered to 23,537 participants (Mage = 35.8 years, SDage = 13.3). The highest loading item from each set of four pooled items reflecting the seven addiction criteria were retained in the final scale, The Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale (BSAS). The factor structure of the BSAS was good (RMSEA = 0.064, CFI = 0.983, TLI = 0.973) and coefficient alpha was 0.87. The scores on the BSAS converged with scores on the Compulsive Buying Measurement Scale (CBMS; 0.80), and were positively correlated with extroversion and neuroticism, and negatively with conscientiousness, agreeableness, and intellect/imagination. The scores of the BSAS were positively associated with anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and inversely related to age. Females scored higher than males on the BSAS. The BSAS is the first scale to fully embed shopping addiction within an addiction paradigm. A recommended cutoff score for the new scale and future research directions are discussed. PMID:26441749

  15. The Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale: Reliability and validity of a brief screening test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilie Schou Andreassen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although excessive and compulsive shopping has been increasingly placed within the behavioral addiction paradigm in recent years, items in existing screens arguably do not assess the core criteria and components of addiction. To date, assessment screens for shopping disorders have primarily been rooted within the impulse-control or obsessive-compulsive disorder paradigms. Furthermore, existing screens use the terms ‘shopping’, ‘buying’, and ‘spending’ interchangeably, and do not necessarily reflect contemporary shopping habits. Consequently, a new screening tool for assessing shopping addiction was developed. Initially, 28 items, four for each of seven addiction criteria (salience, mood modification, conflict, tolerance, withdrawal, relapse, and problems, were constructed. These items and validated scales (i.e., Compulsive Buying Measurement Scale, Mini-International Personality Item Pool, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale were then administered to 23,537 participants (Mage=35.8 years, SDage=13.3. The highest loading item from each set of four pooled items reflecting the seven addiction criteria were retained in the final scale, The Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale (BSAS. The factor structure of the BSAS was good (RMSEA=.064, CFI=.983, TLI=.973 and coefficient alpha was .87. The scores on the BSAS converged with scores on the Compulsive Buying Measurement Scale (.80, and were positively correlated with extroversion and neuroticism, and negatively with conscientiousness, agreeableness, and intellect/imagination. The scores of the BSAS were positively associated with anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and inversely related to age. Females scored higher than males on the BSAS. The BSAS is the first scale to fully embed shopping addiction within an addiction paradigm. A recommended cutoff score for the new scale and future research directions are discussed.

  16. Web-Based Depression Screening and Psychiatric Consultation for College Students: A Feasibility and Acceptability Study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background. A steady rise in the prevalence of depression among college students has negatively affected student quality of life. This study investigates the feasibility and acceptability of a Web-based model, including Skype, to screen and provide psychiatric consultation to depressed college students. Methods. Students completed the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) online; those who screened positive (PHQ-9 ≥ 10) or endorsed any level of suicidal ideation were offered Web-based p...

  17. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  18. Limited effect of screening for depression with written feedback in outpatients with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Tack, C J; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P H L M

    2011-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a screening procedure for depression (SCR) vs care as usual (CAU) in outpatients with diabetes. The primary outcome measured was depression score and the secondary outcomes were mental healthcare consumption, diabetes-distres...

  19. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  20. Mokken scaling analysis of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in individuals with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosco, Theodore D; Doyle, Frank; Watson, Roger; Ward, Mark; McGee, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a prolifically used scale of anxiety and depression. The original bidimensional anxiety-depression latent structure of the HADS has come under significant scrutiny, with previous studies revealing one-, two-, three- and four-dimensional structures. The current study examines the latent structure of the HADS using a non-parametric item response theory method. Using data conglomerated from four independent studies of cardiovascular disease employing the HADS (n=893), Mokken scaling procedure was conducted to assess the latent structure of the HADS. A single scale consisting of 12 of 14 HADS items was revealed, indicating a unidimensional latent HADS structure. The HADS was initially intended to measure mutually exclusive levels of anxiety and depression; however, the current study indicates that a single dimension of general psychological distress is captured. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Reliability Generalization Study of the Geriatric Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Kevin M.; Reese, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a reliability generalization study of the Geriatric Depression Scale (T. Brink and others, 1982). Results from this investigation of 338 studies shows that the average score reliability across studies was 0.8482 and identifies the most important predictors of score reliability. (SLD)

  2. The Reach of Depression Screening Preceding Treatment: Are There Patterns of Patients' Self-Selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajduković, Dea; Pibernik-Okanović, Mirjana; Šekerija, Mario; Hermanns, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the reach of depression screening followed by treatment programs for subsyndromal depression and explored demographic and clinical characteristics of patients who were reached versus those who were not. A two-item Patient Health Questionnaire-Depression was sent to 4196 type 2 diabetic patients. Positively screened patients were interviewed to assess the severity of depression, and those with subclinical symptoms were invited to treatment groups. The reach of screening procedure was evaluated by the total response rate, proportion of positive depression screenings, and proportion of eligible patients entering treatment programs. Predictors of responsiveness to screening and of participation in treatment were determined using logistic regression. Of the 34% of patients who returned the questionnaire (n = 1442), 40% reported depressive symptoms and a need for professional help (n = 581). Age (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.05–1.08), BMI (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.00–1.04), HbA1C (OR = .92, 95% CI = .86–.99), and LDL-cholesterol (OR = .90, 95% CI = .81–1.00) correlated with response to screening. Willingness to accept treatment was predicted by professional status (OR = 3.24, 95% CI = 1.53–6.87), education (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.05–1.38), and BMI (OR = .91, 95% CI = .85–.98). Older patients with better diabetes control were more likely to be reached by postal screening for depressive symptoms. Professionally inactive, better-educated persons and those with lower BMI were more likely to participate in the intervention for subsyndromal depression. PMID:23209461

  3. The Reach of Depression Screening Preceding Treatment: Are There Patterns of Patients' Self-Selection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dea Ajduković

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the reach of depression screening followed by treatment programs for subsyndromal depression and explored demographic and clinical characteristics of patients who were reached versus those who were not. A two-item Patient Health Questionnaire-Depression was sent to 4196 type 2 diabetic patients. Positively screened patients were interviewed to assess the severity of depression, and those with subclinical symptoms were invited to treatment groups. The reach of screening procedure was evaluated by the total response rate, proportion of positive depression screenings, and proportion of eligible patients entering treatment programs. Predictors of responsiveness to screening and of participation in treatment were determined using logistic regression. Of the 34% of patients who returned the questionnaire (n=1442, 40% reported depressive symptoms and a need for professional help (n=581. Age (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.05–1.08, BMI (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.00–1.04, HbA1C (OR = .92, 95% CI = .86–.99, and LDL-cholesterol (OR = .90, 95% CI = .81–1.00 correlated with response to screening. Willingness to accept treatment was predicted by professional status (OR = 3.24, 95% CI = 1.53–6.87, education (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.05–1.38, and BMI (OR = .91, 95% CI = .85–.98. Older patients with better diabetes control were more likely to be reached by postal screening for depressive symptoms. Professionally inactive, better-educated persons and those with lower BMI were more likely to participate in the intervention for subsyndromal depression.

  4. Screening and Predicting Posttraumatic Stress and Depression in Children Following Single-Incident Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Reginald D. V.; Ellis, Alicia A.; Nehmy, Thomas J.; Ball, Shelley-Anne

    2010-01-01

    Three screening methods to predict posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms in children following single-incident trauma were tested. Children and adolescents (N = 90; aged 7-17 years) were assessed within 4 weeks of an injury that led to hospital treatment and followed up 3 and 6 months later. Screening methods were adapted…

  5. Screening instruments for a population of older adults: The 10-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria; Chudzinski, Veronica; Gontijo-Guerra, Samantha; Préville, Michel

    2015-07-30

    Screening tools that appropriately detect older adults' mental disorders are of great public health importance. The present study aimed to establish cutoff scores for the 10-item Kessler Psychological Distress (K10) and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scales when screening for depression and anxiety. We used data from participants (n = 1811) in the Enquête sur la Santé des Aînés-Service study. Depression and anxiety were measured using DSM-V and DSM-IV criteria. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis provided an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.767 and 0.833 for minor and for major depression when using K10. A cutoff of 19 was found to balance sensitivity (0.794) and specificity (0.664) for minor depression, whereas a cutoff of 23 was found to balance sensitivity (0.692) and specificity (0.811) for major depression. When screening for an anxiety with GAD-7, ROC analysis yielded an AUC of 0.695; a cutoff of 5 was found to balance sensitivity (0.709) and specificity (0.568). No significant differences were found between subgroups of age and gender. Both K10 and GAD-7 were able to discriminate between cases and non-cases when screening for depression and anxiety in an older adult population of primary care service users. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing depression related severity and functional impairment: the Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Ito

    Full Text Available The Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS is a brief, five-item measure for assessing the frequency and intensity of depressive symptoms, as well as functional impairments in pleasurable activities, work or school, and interpersonal relationships due to depression. Although this scale is expected to be useful in various psychiatric and mental health settings, the reliability, validity, and interpretability have not yet been fully examined. This study was designed to examine the reliability, factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity of a Japanese version of the ODSIS, as well as its ability to distinguish between individuals with and without a major depressive disorder diagnosis.From a pool of registrants at an internet survey company, 2830 non-clinical and clinical participants were selected randomly (619 with major depressive disorder, 619 with panic disorder, 576 with social anxiety disorder, 645 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 371 non-clinical panelists. Participants were asked to respond to the ODSIS and conventional measures of depression, functional impairment, anxiety, neuroticism, satisfaction with life, and emotion regulation.Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of three split subsamples indicated the unidimensional factor structure of ODSIS. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis showed invariance of factor loadings between non-clinical and clinical subsamples. The ODSIS also showed excellent internal consistency and test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients. Convergence and discriminance of the ODSIS with various measures were in line with our expectations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that the ODSIS was able to detect a major depressive syndrome accurately.This study supports the reliability and validity of ODSIS in a non-western population, which can be interpreted as demonstrating cross-cultural validity.

  7. Does Evidence Support the American Heart Association's Recommendation to Screen Patients for Depression in Cardiovascular Care? An Updated Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Roseman, Michelle; Coyne, James C.; de Jonge, Peter; Delisle, Vanessa C.; Arthurs, Erin; Levis, Brooke; Ziegelstein, Roy C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically review evidence on depression screening in coronary heart disease (CHD) by assessing the (1) accuracy of screening tools; (2) effectiveness of treatment; and (3) effect of screening on depression outcomes. Background: A 2008 American Heart Association (AHA) Science Advi

  8. Measuring Depression Over Time . . . or not? : Lack of Unidimensionality and Longitudinal Measurement Invariance in Four Common Rating Scales of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fried, Eiko I.; van Borkulo, Claudia D.; Epskamp, Sacha; Schoevers, Robert A.; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Borsboom, Denny

    2016-01-01

    In depression research, symptoms are routinely assessed via rating scales and added to construct sum-scores. These scores are used as a proxy for depression severity in cross-sectional research, and differences in sum-scores over time are taken to reflect changes in an underlying depression construc

  9. Measuring depression over time . . . Or not? : Lack of unidimensionality and longitudinal measurement invariance in four common rating scales of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fried, E.I.; van Borkulo, C.D.; Epskamp, S.; Schoevers, R.A.; Tuerlinckx, F.; Borsboom, D.

    2016-01-01

    In depression research, symptoms are routinely assessed via rating scales and added to construct sum-scores. These scores are used as a proxy for depression severity in cross-sectional research, and differences in sum-scores over time are taken to reflect changes in an underlying depression construc

  10. Measuring Depression Over Time ... or not? Lack of Unidimensionality and Longitudinal Measurement Invariance in Four Common Rating Scales of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fried, Eiko I.; van Borkulo, Claudia D.; Epskamp, Sacha; Schoevers, Robert A.; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Borsboom, Denny

    2016-01-01

    In depression research, symptoms are routinely assessed via rating scales and added to construct sum-scores. These scores are used as a proxy for depression severity in cross-sectional research, and differences in sum-scores over time are taken to reflect changes in an underlying depression construc

  11. Construct validity of the Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale: evaluation by Mokken scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ya-Hsin; Lee, Chin-Pang; Liu, Chia-Yih; Hung, Ching-I

    2017-01-01

    Objective Previous studies of the Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale (DSSS), a free scale, have been based on the classical test theory, and the construct validity and dimensionality of the DSSS are as yet uncertain. The aim of this study was to use Mokken scale analysis (MSA) to assess the dimensionality of the DSSS. Methods A sample of 214 psychiatric outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders were enrolled at a medical center in Taiwan (age: mean [SD] =38.3 [10.5] years; 63.1% female) and asked to complete the DSSS. MSA was used to assess the dimensionality of the DSSS. Results All 22 items of the DSSS formed a moderate unidimensional scale (Hs=0.403), supporting its construct validity. The DSSS was divided into 4 subscales (Hs ranged from 0.35 to 0.67), including a general somatic scale (GSS), melancholic scale (MS), muscular pain scale (MPS), and chest symptom scale (CSS). The GSS is a weak reliable Mokken scale; the other 3 scales are strong reliable Mokken scales. Conclusion The DSSS is a psychometrically sound measure of depression and somatic symptoms in adult psychiatric outpatients with depression or anxiety. The summed score of the DSSS and its 4 subscales are valid statistics. Further research is required for replication of the 4 subscales of the DSSS. PMID:28182138

  12. Web-Based Depression Screening and Psychiatric Consultation for College Students: A Feasibility and Acceptability Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A steady rise in the prevalence of depression among college students has negatively affected student quality of life. This study investigates the feasibility and acceptability of a Web-based model, including Skype, to screen and provide psychiatric consultation to depressed college students. Methods. Students completed the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 online; those who screened positive (PHQ-9 ≥ 10 or endorsed any level of suicidal ideation were offered Web-based psychiatric consultation using Skype. After the consultation, students filled out a 7-item satisfaction questionnaire to report on the acceptability of this Web-based method. Results. A total of 972 students consented to the online depression screening and 285 screened positive. Of those, 69 students consented and 17 students successfully completed the psychiatric consultation via Skype. Thirteen (76.4% students found the interview useful in helping them understand their depression. Fifteen (88.2% students thought that psychologists and psychiatrists could successfully see patients via videoconferencing. Conclusions. Current online technologies can provide depression screening and psychiatric consultation to college students; those who participated reported a positive experience. Future studies will need to address the low levels of participation among college students and attract students who are underserved, as well as use a videoconferencing platform that adequately protects data confidentiality.

  13. The accuracy of diagnosis of major depression in patients with Parkinson's disease: a comparative study among the UPDRS, the geriatric depression scale and the Beck depression inventory A precisão do diagnóstico de depressão na doença de Parkinson: um estudo comparativo entre a UPDRS, a escala geriátrica de depressão e o inventário de depressão de Beck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Tumas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the accuracy of diagnosis of major depression in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD using the UPDRS, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15 and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. METHOD: 50 consecutive patients with PD were evaluated. The diagnosis of major depression was made according to the DSM-IV criteria. RESULTS: We found a 24% prevalence of major depression. All depression scales were highly correlated but UPDRS depression item had the lowest diagnostic value. The GDS15 had the more appropriate "receiver operating characteristics" curve. The best cut-off scores for screening depression were 17/18 for BDI and 8/9 for GDS15. We did not find any correlation between the level of depression and intensity of motor symptoms, functional capacity and duration of the disease. CONCLUSION: GDS15 is better than the BDI and the UPDRS for screening depression in PD and depression is not related to the degree of parkinsonian symptoms.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a precisão do diagnóstico de depressão em pacientes com doença de Parkinson avaliados pela UPDRS, pela Escala Geriátrica de Depressão com 15 itens (EGD15 e pelo Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB. MÉTODO: 50 pacientes com DP foram avaliados. O diagnóstico de depressão maior foi feito segundo os critérios do DSM-IV. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de depressão foi 24%. As escalas de depressão tiveram elevada correlação entre si. A UPDRS apresentou a menor sensibilidade para o diagnóstico. A EGD15 mostrou uma curva ROC mais apropriada que o IDB. Os melhores escores-de-corte para diagnóstico de depressão foram 17/18 para o IDB e 8/9 para a EGD15. Não houve correlação entre os níveis de depressão e a intensidade do parkinsonismo, a capacidade funcional ou a duração da doença. CONCLUSÃO: A EGD15 é melhor que o IDB para diagnosticar depressão na DP. A depressão não está relacionada à gravidade dos sintomas parkinsonianos.

  14. Development of the Adolescent Preoccupation with Screens Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Simon C; Houghton, Stephen; Zadow, Corinne; Rosenberg, Michael; Wood, Lisa; Shilton, Trevor; Lawrence, David

    2017-08-11

    Although public health concerns have been raised regarding the detrimental health effects of increasing rates of electronic screen use among adolescents, such effects have been small. Instruments currently available tend to be lengthy, have a clinical research focus, and assess young people's screen use on specific screen-based activities (e.g., TV, computer, or internet). None appear to address screen use across a broad range of screens, including mobile devices and screen-based activities. The objective was to develop a new and short self-report scale for investigating adolescents' screen use across all screens and screen-based activities in non-clinical settings. The Adolescent Preoccupation with Screens Scale (APSS) was developed over a three stage process. First, a review of the current literature and existing instruments was undertaken and suitable items identified. Second, the draft APSS was piloted with adolescents and item affectivity and discrimination indices were calculated. Third, a cross sectional school based online survey of 1967 Australian adolescents in grades 5 (10 years old), 7 (13 years) and 9 (15 years) from 25 randomly selected schools was conducted. Factor Analysis on a sub-sample of the data (n = 782) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis on the remaining sub-sample (n = 1185), supported a two-factor model. The first factor reflects adolescents' mood management with screen use, and the second reflects a behavioural preoccupation. The measure demonstrated strong invariance across sex and across Grades 5, 7, and 9. Both factors displayed good internal consistency (α = .91 and .87, respectively). Sex and grade differences on both scales were investigated and boys in Grade 5 reported higher levels of both mood management and behavioural preoccupation with screens. There were no sex differences on mood management in Grades 7 and 9, but girls reported higher behavioural preoccupation in both these later grades. The APSS provides researchers

  15. Adult depression screening in Saudi primary care: prevalence, instrument and cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background By the year 2020 depression would be the second major cause of disability adjusted life years lost, as reported by the World Health Organization. Depression is a mental illness which causes persistent low mood, a sense of despair, and has multiple risk factors. Its prevalence in primary care varies between 15.3-22%, with global prevalence up to 13% and between 17-46% in Saudi Arabia. Despite several studies that have shown benefit of early diagnosis and cost-savings of up to 80%, physicians in primary care setting continue to miss out on 30-50% of depressed patients in their practices. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted at three large primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia aiming at estimating point prevalence of depression and screening cost among primary care adult patients, and comparing Patient Health Questionnaires PHQ-2 with PHQ-9. Adult individuals were screened using Arabic version of PHQ-2 and PHQ-9. PHQ-2 scores were correlated with PHQ-9 scores using linear regression. A limited cost-analysis and cost saving estimates of depression screening was done using the Human Capital approach. Results Patients included in the survey analysis were 477, of whom 66.2% were females, 77.4% were married, and nearly 20% were illiterate. Patients exhibiting depressive symptoms on the basis of PHQ9 were 49.9%, of which 31% were mild, 13.4% moderate, 4.4% moderate-severe and 1.0% severe cases. Depression scores were significantly associated with female gender (p-value 0.049), and higher educational level (p-value 0.002). Regression analysis showed that PHQ-2 & PHQ-9 were strongly correlated R = 0.79, and R2 = 0.62. The cost-analysis showed savings of up to 500 SAR ($133) per adult patient screened once a year. Conclusion The point prevalence of screened depression is high in primary care visitors in Saudi Arabia. Gender and higher level of education were found to be significantly associated with screened depression. Majority of cases were mild to

  16. Benefits of Strategic Small-Scale Targeted Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R

    2016-08-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is a key technology platform for the discovery of chemical probes and identification of potential drug leads. Once mainly found in industry, HTS is now an integral component of a significant number of academic basic and translational research enterprises. Although the allure of large-scale diversity set-based HTS is substantive, the inherent costs associated with this type of screening strategy are steep and often yield suboptimal return on investment. Perhaps more appealing, and potentially more rewarding, are smaller scale screening strategies using targeted libraries coupled with assays with high-physiological relevance. These "high-physiocontextual"-targeted library screening paradigms, in turn, may have significant impact on the quality of chemical probes and ensuing drug discovery efforts.

  17. Screening Internet forum participants for depression symptoms by assembling and enhancing multiple NLP methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmen, Christian; Hsiung, Robert C; Wetter, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Depression is a disease that can dramatically lower quality of life. Symptoms of depression can range from temporary sadness to suicide. Embarrassment, shyness, and the stigma of depression are some of the factors preventing people from getting help for their problems. Contemporary social media technologies like Internet forums or micro-blogs give people the opportunity to talk about their feelings in a confidential anonymous environment. However, many participants in such networks may not recognize the severity of their depression and their need for professional help. Our approach is to develop a method that detects symptoms of depression in free text, such as posts in Internet forums, chat rooms and the like. This could help people appreciate the significance of their depression and realize they need to seek help. In this work Natural Language Processing methods are used to break the textual information into its grammatical units. Further analysis involves detection of depression symptoms and their frequency with the help of words known as indicators of depression and their synonyms. Finally, similar to common paper-based depression scales, e.g., the CES-D, that information is incorporated into a single depression score. In this evaluation study, our depressive mood detection system, DepreSD (Depression Symptom Detection), had an average precision of 0.84 (range 0.72-1.0 depending on the specific measure) and an average F measure of 0.79 (range 0.72-0.9).

  18. Generating an efficient version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in an urban obstetrical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Luther, James F; Eng, Heather F; Dills, John Louis; Sit, Dorothy; Ciolino, Jody D; Wisner, Katherine L

    2017-01-15

    Postpartum depression incurs significant burden and suffering. We investigated the latent structure of the most commonly used screening measure, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in women (N=15,172) and tested its predictive validity for the diagnosis of depression as determined with a structured clinical interview. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, Receiver Operating Characteristic curves, and logistic regression analyses were conducted. A seven-item one factor scale (items 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10) emerged with a Goodness of Index Fit Index (GFI) =.96, relative to the ten-item two factor version of the EPDS (GFI =.94). The seven-item EPDS achieved good sensitivity and specificity in predicting the 10-item EPDS, with a cut point score of 4 on the seven item EPDS to predict a 10-item EPDS score of 10 or more (sensitivity =95%, specificity =91%). The seven and 10-item EPDS showed a similar ability to predict a diagnoses of depression (area under the ROC curve=.795 for the 10-item, .770 for the seven-item EPDS). Logistic regression analyses showed similar predictive ability between the seven- and 10-item scales in predicting scores higher than 18 on the clinical interview LIMITATIONS: The sample represents women from one Midwest medical center and the EPDS was measured via phone. The seven-item one factor version of the EPDS is an efficient and effective measure of depression severity on par with the two factor 10-item version of the EPDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Construct validity of the Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale: evaluation by Mokken scale analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou YH

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ya-Hsin Chou,1 Chin-Pang Lee,1,2 Chia-Yih Liu,1,2 Ching-I Hung1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, 2School of Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan Objective: Previous studies of the Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale (DSSS, a free scale, have been based on the classical test theory, and the construct validity and dimensionality of the DSSS are as yet uncertain. The aim of this study was to use Mokken scale analysis (MSA to assess the dimensionality of the DSSS.Methods: A sample of 214 psychiatric outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders were enrolled at a medical center in Taiwan (age: mean [SD] =38.3 [10.5] years; 63.1% female and asked to complete the DSSS. MSA was used to assess the dimensionality of the DSSS.Results: All 22 items of the DSSS formed a moderate unidimensional scale (Hs=0.403, supporting its construct validity. The DSSS was divided into 4 subscales (Hs ranged from 0.35 to 0.67, including a general somatic scale (GSS, melancholic scale (MS, muscular pain scale (MPS, and chest symptom scale (CSS. The GSS is a weak reliable Mokken scale; the other 3 scales are strong reliable Mokken scales.Conclusion: The DSSS is a psychometrically sound measure of depression and somatic symptoms in adult psychiatric outpatients with depression or anxiety. The summed score of the DSSS and its 4 subscales are valid statistics. Further research is required for replication of the 4 subscales of the DSSS. Keywords: depression, somatization, Mokken scale analysis, item response theory, construct validity

  20. Psychometric properties of responses by clinicians and older adults to a 6-item Hebrew version of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D6)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachner, Yaacov G; O'Rourke, Norm; Goldfracht, Margalit

    2013-01-01

    The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) is commonly used as a screening instrument, as a continuous measure of change in depressive symptoms over time, and as a means to compare the relative efficacy of treatments. Among several abridged versions, the 6-item HAM-D6 is used most widely in lar...... degree because of its good psychometric properties. The current study compares both self-report and clinician-rated versions of the Hebrew version of this scale....

  1. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: translation and validation for a Greek sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogevinas Manolis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is an important screening instrument that is used routinely with mothers during the postpartum period for early identification of postnatal depression. The purpose of this study was to validate the Greek version of EPDS along with sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Methods 120 mothers within 12 weeks postpartum were recruited from the perinatal care registers of the Maternity Departments of 4 Hospitals of Heraklion municipality, Greece. EPDS and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II surveys were administered in random order to the mothers. Each mother was diagnosed with depression according to the validated Greek version of BDI-II. The psychometric measurements that were performed included: two independent samples t-tests, One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, reliability coefficients, Explanatory factor analysis using a Varimax rotation and Principal Components Method. Confirmatory analysis -known as structural equation modelling- of principal components was conducted by LISREL (Linear Structural Relations. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. Results 8 (6.7% of the mothers were diagnosed with major postnatal depression, 14 (11.7% with moderate and 38 (31.7% with mild depression on the basis of BDI-II scores. The internal consistency of the EPDS Greek version -using Chronbach's alpha coefficient- was found 0.804 and that of Guttman split-half coefficient 0.742. Our findings confirm the multidimensionality of EPDS, demonstrating a two-factor structure which contained subscales reflecting depressive symptoms and anxiety. The Confirmatory Factor analysis demonstrated that the two factor model offered a very good fit to our data. The area under ROC curve AUC was found 0.7470 and the logistic estimate for the threshold score of 8/9 fitted the model sensitivity at 76.7% and model specificity at 68

  2. Postpartum depression screening in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: program development, implementation, and lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherry AS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Amanda S Cherry,1 Ryan T Blucker,1 Timothy S Thornberry,2 Carla Hetherington,3 Mary Anne McCaffree,3 Stephen R Gillaspy1 1Department of Pediatrics, Section of General and Community Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, 2Department of Psychology, Morehead State University, Morehead, KY, 3Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK, USA Objective: The aims of this project were to describe the development of a postpartum depression screening program for mothers of infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and assess the implementation of the screening program. Methods: Screening began at 14 days postpartum and was implemented as part of routine medical care. A nurse coordinator facilitated communication with mothers for increasing screen completion, review of critical self-harm items, and making mental health referrals. During the 18-month study period, 385 out of 793 eligible mothers completed the screen. Results: Approximately 36% of mothers had a positive screen that resulted in a mental health referral and an additional 30% of mothers had screening results indicating significant symptoms. Conclusion: Several barriers were identified, leading to adjustments in the screening process, and ultimately recommendations for future screening programs and research. Development of a postpartum depression screening process in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit involves support, training, implementation, and coordination from administrators, medical staff, new mothers, and mental health specialists. Several predictable challenges to program development require ongoing assessment and response to these challenges. Relevance: This study highlights the expanding role of the psychologist and behavioral health providers in health care to intervene as early as possible in the life of a child and family with medical complications through multidisciplinary program development and

  3. Screening for depressive disorders in outpatients with mild to moderate psoriasis: A study from North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubh Mohan Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis and depressive disorders commonly occur together. Depressive disorders have an impact on the quality of life and the outcome of psoriasis. Aims: The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of using a modification of the Hindi translation of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9 as a verbal, clinician administered, short screening questionnaire for detecting depressive disorders. Materials and Methods: One hundred and four out-patients with psoriasis were recruited in the study. In the first stage of the study, socio-demographic data, Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI score, and Dermatological Quality of Life (DLQI score were recorded. The modified questionnaire was administered by the dermatologist. In the second stage, psychiatric diagnoses were confirmed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Results: The prevalence of depressive disorders was 39.4%. Receiver operating curve (ROC analysis showed that the questionnaire had a good discriminant ability in detecting depressive disorders (area under curve: 0.81, SE = 0.04, 95% confidence interval = 0.72-0.89. Limitations: The sample size is small and more studies are needed with the screening questions in different languages to validate the findings of the study. Conclusion: The questionnaire can be a useful screening instrument for detecting depressive disorders in patients with psoriasis.

  4. [PHQ-2 as First Screening Instrument of Prenatal Depression in Primary Health Care, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María de la Fe; Castelao Legazpi, Pilar Carolina; Olivares Crespo, María Eugenia; Soto Balbuena, Cristina; Izquierdo Méndez, Nuria; Ferrer Barrientos, Francisco Javier; Huynh-Nhu, Le

    2017-01-30

    Prenatal depression is a major public health problem that is barely treated. Based on existing literature, depression during this period is associated with negative consequences for the mother and the baby. Therefore it is important to make an adequate screening in this population. The aim of this study was to determine the discriminant validity and cut-off of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) as a screening tool to identify the depression in pregnant women living in Spain. The sample included 1,019 female participants, aged between 19 and 45 years, who participated voluntarily, and received prenatal care during the first trimester. Participants completed a sociodemographic questionnaire, PHQ-2 andPHQ-9. The research has been developed within the Obstetrics and Gynecology department at two public hospitals in two different Spanish Regions. The research was conducted between 2014 and 2016 performing a ROC curve analysis to determine the discriminative capacity and cut-off for PHQ-2. 11,1 % out of 1019 participants were diagnosed with depression. The area under the curve of PHQ-2 was 0,84 p smaller than 0,001. With the cutoff 2 the sensitivity and specificity of 85,4 % and 79,5% respectively. A score Equal or greater than 2 is an appropriate cut-off in PHQ-2 to detect depression during pregnancy. The use of PHQ-2 could precede PHQ-9 as a brief screening tool for antenatal depression in obstetric settings.

  5. The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale: A systematic review and reliability generalization meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueras, Jose A; Martín-Vivar, María; Sandin, Bonifacio; San Luis, Concepción; Pineda, David

    2017-08-15

    Anxiety and depression are among the most common mental disorders during childhood and adolescence. Among the instruments for the brief screening assessment of symptoms of anxiety and depression, the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) is one of the more widely used. Previous studies have demonstrated the reliability of the RCADS for different assessment settings and different versions. The aims of this study were to examine the mean reliability of the RCADS and the influence of the moderators on the RCADS reliability. We searched in EBSCO, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and NCBI databases and other articles manually from lists of references of extracted articles. A total of 146 studies were included in our meta-analysis. The RCADS showed robust internal consistency reliability in different assessment settings, countries, and languages. We only found that reliability of the RCADS was significantly moderated by the version of RCADS. However, these differences in reliability between different versions of the RCADS were slight and can be due to the number of items. We did not examine factor structure, factorial invariance across gender, age, or country, and test-retest reliability of the RCADS. The RCADS is a reliable instrument for cross-cultural use, with the advantage of providing more information with a low number of items in the assessment of both anxiety and depression symptoms in children and adolescents. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Factor structure of the Japanese version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in the postpartum period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Kubota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is a widely used screening tool for postpartum depression (PPD. Although the reliability and validity of EPDS in Japanese has been confirmed and the prevalence of PPD is found to be about the same as Western countries, the factor structure of the Japanese version of EPDS has not been elucidated yet. METHODS: 690 Japanese mothers completed all items of the EPDS at 1 month postpartum. We divided them randomly into two sample sets. The first sample set (n = 345 was used for exploratory factor analysis, and the second sample set was used (n = 345 for confirmatory factor analysis. RESULTS: The result of exploratory factor analysis indicated a three-factor model consisting of anxiety, depression and anhedonia. The results of confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the anxiety and anhedonia factors existed for EPDS in a sample of Japanese women at 1 month postpartum. The depression factor varies by the models of acceptable fit. CONCLUSIONS: We examined EPDS scores. As a result, "anxiety" and "anhedonia" exist for EPDS among postpartum women in Japan as already reported in Western countries. Cross-cultural research is needed for future research.

  7. Perinatal depression screening in healthy start: an evaluation of the acceptability of technical assistance consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Lisa S; O'Hara, Michael W; Fisher, Sheehan D

    2013-08-01

    In 2001, Healthy Start was required to screen for maternal depression. To support this mandate, technical assistance (TA) consultations were provided to eleven programs. Participant evaluations assessed TA recipients' views, a foundational level of program evaluation. Staff evaluated TA presentations immediately; and directors assessed its helpfulness in a 6-month and a 5-year follow-up. Staff believed their knowledge increased significantly; the majority rated TA presentations as "useful" to "very useful." Most directors rated TA as "useful" or "very useful" in achieving TA goals, reported having "few" or "no" obstacles in screening, and rated staff as "willing" or "very willing" to screen. A range of educational programs have been developed to assist the implementation of maternal depression screening. The current evaluation indicates that diverse types of programs held positive views of TA consultation and believed it was effective. The success of the method argues for further development.

  8. Concordance of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to assess increased risk of depression among postpartum women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Pace, Wilson; Wollan, Peter C; Bertram, Susan; Kurland, Margary; Graham, Deborah; Dietrich, Allen

    2009-01-01

    To compare the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) as screening tools for postpartum depression. This study population included the first 500 women to enroll and return their packets during an ongoing study of postpartum depression. The primary outcome of this study was to find rates of concordance and discordance in the EPDS and PHQ-9 categories of "normal" and "increased risk for major depressive disorder." Overall, 97% of eligible women enrolled and 70% returned the packets that included the EPDS and PHQ-9. Four hundred eighty-one of the first 500 packets had complete data, with elevated EPDS or PHQ-9 scores in 138 and 132 women, respectively. Concordance of the EPDS and PHQ-9 were present in 399 women (83%): 326 (67.8%) had "normal" score on both, and 73 (15.2%) had elevated scores for both. Discordant scores in 82 women included 17 with elevated PHQ-9 scores but normal EPDS scores and 65 with elevated EPDS scores and PHQ-9 scores 30 and low education level were predictive of discordant scores, using EPDS and PHQ-9 scores of > or =10 as elevated (odds ratio, 1.9 and P = .02; and odds ratio, 2.3 and P = .01, respectively). PHQ-9 scores of 5 to 9 have been referred to as consistent with "mild depressive symptoms" and appropriate for "watchful waiting" and repeat PHQ-9 at follow-up. Using this follow-up approach would require re-evaluation of 120 (25%) of the women screened. Postpartum depression screening is feasible in primary care practices, and for most women the EPDS and PHQ-9 scores were concordant. Further work is required to identify reasons for the 17% discordant scores as well as to provide definitive recommendations for PHQ-9 scores of 5 to 9.

  9. Screening for depressive symptoms in older adults in the Family Health Strategy, Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Eduardo Lopes; Rubin, Leonardo Librelotto; Giacobbo, Sara de Souza; Gomes, Irenio; Cataldo, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the prevalence of depression in older adults and associated factors. METHODS Cross-sectional study using a stratified random sample of 621 individuals aged ≥ 60 from 27 family health teams in Porto Alegre, RS, Southern Brazil, between 2010 and 2012. Community health agents measured depression using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. Scores of ≥ 6 were considered as depression and between 11 and 15 as severe depression. Poisson regression was used to search for independent associations of sociodemographic and self-perceived health with both depression and its severity. RESULTS The prevalence of depression was 30.6% and was significantly higher in women (35.9% women versus 20.9% men, p < 0.001). The variables independently associated with depression were: female gender (PR = 1.4, 95%CI 1.1;1.8); low education, especially illiteracy (PR = 1.8, 95%CI 1.2;2 6); regular self-rated health (OR = 2.2, 95%CI 1.6;3.0); and poor/very poor self-rated health (PR = 4.0, 95%CI 2.9;5.5). Except for education, the strength of association of these factors increases significantly in severe depression. CONCLUSIONS A high prevalence of depression was observed in the evaluations conducted by community health agents, professionals who are not highly specialized. The findings identified using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale in this way are similar to those in the literature, with depression more associated with low education, female gender and worse self-rated health. From a primary health care strategic point of view, the findings become still more relevant, indicating that community health agents could play an important role in identifying depression in older adults. PMID:25119932

  10. Screening for depressive symptoms in older adults in the Family Health Strategy, Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Lopes Nogueira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the prevalence of depression in older adults and associated factors. METHODS Cross-sectional study using a stratified random sample of 621 individuals aged ≥ 60 from 27 family health teams in Porto Alegre, RS, Southern Brazil, between 2010 and 2012. Community health agents measured depression using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. Scores of ≥ 6 were considered as depression and between 11 and 15 as severe depression. Poisson regression was used to search for independent associations of sociodemographic and self-perceived health with both depression and its severity. RESULTS The prevalence of depression was 30.6% and was significantly higher in women (35.9% women versus 20.9% men, p < 0.001. The variables independently associated with depression were: female gender (PR = 1.4, 95%CI 1.1;1.8; low education, especially illiteracy (PR = 1.8, 95%CI 1.2;2 6; regular self-rated health (OR = 2.2, 95%CI 1.6;3.0; and poor/very poor self-rated health (PR = 4.0, 95%CI 2.9;5.5. Except for education, the strength of association of these factors increases significantly in severe depression. CONCLUSIONS A high prevalence of depression was observed in the evaluations conducted by community health agents, professionals who are not highly specialized. The findings identified using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale in this way are similar to those in the literature, with depression more associated with low education, female gender and worse self-rated health. From a primary health care strategic point of view, the findings become still more relevant, indicating that community health agents could play an important role in identifying depression in older adults.

  11. Thurstone's Scaling Model Applied to the Assessment of Self-Reported Depressive Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Joan

    1994-01-01

    Thurstone's scaling based on judgments of 527 students and 37 clinical faculty members was applied to the Beck Depression Inventory, the Zung Depression Scale, and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and fitted the observed data well. A psychological continuum was derived for severity of depression. (SLD)

  12. The impact of patient and provider factors on depression screening of american Indian and alaska native people in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, Denise A; Muller, Clemma J; Smith, Julia J; Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y; Manson, Spero M

    2012-04-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends routine depression screening in primary care, yet regular screening does not occur in most health systems serving Alaska Native and American Indian people. The authors examined factors associated with administration of depression screening among Alaska Native and American Indian people in a large urban clinic. Medical records of 18 625 Alaska Native and American Indian adults were examined 1 year after implementation of a depression screening initiative. Multilevel logistic regression models examined associations between patient and provider factors and administration of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Forty-seven percent of patients were screened. Women were more likely than men to be screened (50% vs 43%, P substance abuse disorders or prior antidepressant dispensation. Women previously diagnosed with depression had higher odds of screening (P = .002). Men seen by male providers had higher odds of screening than did men seen by female providers (P = .040). Screening rates peaked among providers with 2 to 5 years of employment with the clinic. Cross-sectional analysis of medical record data was of unknown reliability; there were limited sociodemographic data. Even with significant organizational support for annual depression screening, primary care providers systematically missed men and patients with infrequent primary care visits. Outreach to male patients and additional supports for primary care providers, especially in the first years of practice, may improve screening and treatment for depression among Alaska Native and American Indian people.

  13. The Kimberley assessment of depression of older Indigenous Australians: prevalence of depressive disorders, risk factors and validation of the KICA-dep scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo P Almeida

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to develop a culturally acceptable and valid scale to assess depressive symptoms in older Indigenous Australians, to determine the prevalence of depressive disorders in the older Kimberley community, and to investigate the sociodemographic, lifestyle and clinical factors associated with depression in this population. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey of adults aged 45 years or over from six remote Indigenous communities in the Kimberley and 30% of those living in Derby, Western Australia. The 11 linguistic and culturally sensitive items of the Kimberley Indigenous Cognitive Assessment of Depression (KICA-dep scale were derived from the signs and symptoms required to establish the diagnosis of a depressive episode according to the DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10 criteria, and their frequency was rated on a 4-point scale ranging from 'never' to 'all the time' (range of scores: 0 to 33. The diagnosis of depressive disorder was established after a face-to-face assessment with a consultant psychiatrist. Other measures included sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, and clinical history. RESULTS: The study included 250 participants aged 46 to 89 years (mean±SD = 60.9±10.7, of whom 143 (57.2% were women. The internal reliability of the KICA-dep was 0.88 and the cut-point 7/8 (non-case/case was associated with 78% sensitivity and 82% specificity for the diagnosis of a depressive disorder. The point-prevalence of a depressive disorder in this population was 7.7%; 4.0% for men and 10.4% for women. Heart problems were associated with increased odds of depression (odds ratio = 3.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.2,8.8. CONCLUSIONS: The KICA-dep has robust psychometric properties and can be used with confidence as a screening tool for depression among older Indigenous Australians. Depressive disorders are common in this population, possibly because of increased stressors and health morbidities.

  14. Passive versus Active Parental Permission: Implications for the Ability of School-Based Depression Screening to Reach Youth at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Maggie; Stoep, Ann Vander; McCauley, Elizabeth; Herting, Jerald R.; Tracy, Melissa; Lymp, James

    2008-01-01

    Background: Depression is prevalent among children and adolescents and often goes untreated with adverse effects on academic success and healthy development. Depression screening can facilitate early identification and timely referral to prevention and treatment programs. Conducting school-based emotional health screening, however, raises the…

  15. Quality of Life in Depression Scale (QLDS – development of the scale and Polish adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majkowicz, Mikołaj

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to adapt the Quality of Life in Depression Scale to Polish conditions. The scale determines the quality of life, defined in terms of the concept of needs, and focuses on patients with depressive disorders. Since its basic version has been developed, the tool was adapted in many countries, also outside Europe.Method. The adaptation procedure included the translation of the original version into Polish, followed by the English retranslation, and was performed by four independent, qualified translators. The final Polish version was verified during a pilot study.Results. This pilot study confirmed high reliability of the Polish version of Quality of Life in Depression Scale.Conclusion. The Quality of Life in Depression Scale (QLDS can be considered an interesting tool in view of its broad theoretical background, and a simple procedure to complete during a clinical evaluation. The use of a specialist translation procedure, and the results of our pilot study suggest that the QLDS can be used in further research, both when evaluating a clinical population and when dealing with individual patients.

  16. Screening for Postpartum Depression in Well-Baby Care Settings : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee-van den Berg, Angarath I.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M.; IJzerman, Maarten J; Haasnoot-Smallegange, Riet M. E.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Postpartum depression (PPD) is a mental health problem frequently experienced by mothers in the first year postpartum. Early detection and treatment can help to reduce its negative effect on the development of the newborn child. Well-baby care (WBC) is a promising screening setting for

  17. A Culturally Relevant and Responsive Approach to Screening for Perinatal Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sarah Kye; Handrick, Sandii Leland

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of a culturally relevant and responsive approach to screening for perinatal depression in low-income, predominantly African American women. Method: The study details the development of the community-informed instrument and subsequent evaluation of its psychometric…

  18. Outcomes of Community-Based Screening for Depression and Suicide Prevention among Japanese Elders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Fujita, Motoi; Goto, Masahiro; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Tomoe

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study we evaluate outcomes of a community-based program to prevent suicide among elderly individuals aged 65 and older. Design and Methods: We used a quasi-experimental design with intervention and referent municipalities. The program included a 7-year implementation of depression screening with follow-up by general practitioners…

  19. The Techniques for Overcoming Depression Questionnaire: Mokken Scale Analysis, Reliability, and Concurrent Validity in Depressed Cardiac Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Lemos, Mariantonia; Doyle, Frank; Steinmeyer, Brian C; Csik, Iris; Carney, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    The Techniques for Overcoming Depression (TOD) questionnaire assesses the frequency with which patients being treated for depression use cognitive-behavioral techniques in daily life. This study examined its latent structure, reliability and concurrent validity in depressed cardiac patients. The TOD was administered at the initial and final treatment sessions in three trials of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) (n = 260) for depression in cardiac patients. Mokken scaling was used to determine its dimensionality. The TOD is unidimensional in depressed cardiac patients, both at the initial evaluation (H = .46) and the end of treatment (H = .47). It is sensitive to change and the total score correlates with therapist ratings of the patient's socialization to CBT (r=.40, povercoming depression in cardiac patients. Studies of the TOD in other depressed patient populations are needed.

  20. Use of a smartphone application to screen for depression and suicide in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seung-Ho; Woo, Young Sup; Hong, Jeong-Wan; Yoon, Bo-Hyun; Hwang, Tae-Yeon; Kim, Moon-Doo; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2017-05-01

    This is a cross-sectional study using a free depression and suicide screening smartphone application, which contains the data from the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) and a Suicide Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R). The free application was downloaded worldwide from Apple's App Store and Android Market, and the participants who downloaded the application were actively measured. The subjects totaled 208,683 men and women. 72.6% of the subjects were females, and 81.4% of the subjects were aged between 10 and 29years. In total, 25.7% of the participants were recorded CES-D positive, and there were differences among the groups based on sex (χ2=1065.82, psmartphone application may be a useful tool for screening depression and suicide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of sample size in genome-scale RNAi screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas; Heyse, Joseph F

    2009-04-01

    For genome-scale RNAi research, it is critical to investigate sample size required for the achievement of reasonably low false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate. The analysis in this article reveals that current design of sample size contributes to the occurrence of low signal-to-noise ratio in genome-scale RNAi projects. The analysis suggests that (i) an arrangement of 16 wells per plate is acceptable and an arrangement of 20-24 wells per plate is preferable for a negative control to be used for hit selection in a primary screen without replicates; (ii) in a confirmatory screen or a primary screen with replicates, a sample size of 3 is not large enough, and there is a large reduction in FNRs when sample size increases from 3 to 4. To search a tradeoff between benefit and cost, any sample size between 4 and 11 is a reasonable choice. If the main focus is the selection of siRNAs with strong effects, a sample size of 4 or 5 is a good choice. If we want to have enough power to detect siRNAs with moderate effects, sample size needs to be 8, 9, 10 or 11. These discoveries about sample size bring insight to the design of a genome-scale RNAi screen experiment.

  2. Validity of the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale for youth with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Lindsey; Renno, Patricia; Storch, Eric A; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Lewin, Adam B; Arnold, Elysse; Lin, Enjey; Wood, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    High rates of anxiety and depression are reported among youth with autism spectrum disorders. These conditions are generally assessed using measures validated for typically developing youth. Few studies have investigated their validity for autism spectrum disorders, which is crucial for accurate assessment and the provision of proper treatment. The Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale was evaluated with 67 youth with autism spectrum disorders to examine its utility in measuring anxiety and depression in this population. Parents and children (aged 11-15 years) referred to a multisite intervention study completed the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule, Child Behavior Checklist, and Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results suggest acceptable internal consistency of the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale. Modest convergent validity was found among the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale and other standardized measures of anxiety and depression. There were stronger correlations between Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale Total scores and subscales of measures expected to correlate significantly than those not expected to correlate. One exception was a significant association between the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale and Child Behavior Checklist Attention subscale, calling into question the divergent validity in separating anxiety from attention problems. Overall, results suggest preliminary support for the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale in youth with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders.

  3. Nanoliter-scale protein crystallization and screening with a microfluidic droplet robot

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Li-Na; Guo, Rui; Cui, Heng-Jun; Ye, Sheng; Fang, Qun

    2014-01-01

    .... Here we describe a fully-automated droplet robot for nanoliter-scale crystallization screening that combines the advantages of both automated robotics technique for protein crystallization screening...

  4. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  5. Contacts to general practice and antidepressant treatment initiation after screening for anxiety and depression in patients with heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjær; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Schougaard, Liv Marit Valen;

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anxiety and depression are found in 20-30% of all persons with heart disease, and depression is known to impact mortality. This paper aimed to describe the effect of systematic screening of this population in terms of use of general practice, psychological therapy and antidepressant...... symptoms had more general practitioner (GP) contact rates than patients without anxiety or depressive symptoms both before and after the screening. Furthermore, patients with depressive symptoms increased their GP contact rate significantly in the first month after the screening, while...... this was not the case for patients with anxiety symptoms. Finally, patients with heart disease and anxiety or depressive symptoms more frequently initiated treatment with antidepressants than patients with heart disease without anxiety or depressive symptoms, whereas therapy sessions with a psychologist were rarely...

  6. Healthcare Technician Delivered Screening of Adults with Diabetes to Improve Primary Care Provider Recognition of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Scollan-Koliopoulos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to implement a continuous quality improvement project aimed at improving primary care provider recognition of depression. Materials and Methods: A randomized, blinded, pre- and post-test design was implemented with 92 adults attending an academic internal medicine clinic. Subjects were assigned to an intervention where healthcare technicians (HCT trained in the fundamentals of diabetes education delivered brief probing questions about self-care behavior and tailored talking points to encourage patients to talk to their primary care physician about their emotional health. The control group received a sham intervention that included only information on standards of diabetes care. Measures included both a paper-and-pencil screening of depression and the Primary Healthcare Questionnaire-8 (PHQ-8. Outcomes were evaluated for antidepressant and/or counseling treatment modalities once the possibility of depression was identified. Results: Both the control and intervention groups improved from pre-test to 3-month post-test scores on the PHQ-8 in clinically significant ways, but continued to have moderate to severe depression symptoms. There was a significant likelihood of receiving antidepressant therapy and/or counseling in those who scored high on the PHQ-8. Conclusion: HCT can be trained to talk to patients about emotional health issues during routine primary care visits. Depression screening measures can be administered as part of the triage routine at the start of a primary care visit, along with tasks such as vital signs. Answering a screening measure can help create awareness of symptoms and feelings that can prompt discussion during the patient-provider encounter that can result in the diagnosis and treatment of depression.

  7. Confirmatory factor analysis of the portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21

    OpenAIRE

    Apóstolo,João Luís Alves; Tanner,Barry Allen; Arfken,Cynthia Lee

    2012-01-01

    To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years) comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The co...

  8. Development of a Geriatric Scale of Hopelessness: Implications for Counseling and Intervention with the Depressed Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated hopelessness, depression, and self-esteem among depressed elderly people (N=78) and developed a Geriatric Hopelessness Scale (GHS). As predicted, elderly subjects who scored high on the GHS showed significantly higher depression and lower self-esteem scores. (JAC)

  9. Development of a Geriatric Scale of Hopelessness: Implications for Counseling and Intervention with the Depressed Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated hopelessness, depression, and self-esteem among depressed elderly people (N=78) and developed a Geriatric Hopelessness Scale (GHS). As predicted, elderly subjects who scored high on the GHS showed significantly higher depression and lower self-esteem scores. (JAC)

  10. Developing a brief depression screen and identifying associations with comorbid physical and psychological illness in Australian Gulf War veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Dean P; Sim, Malcolm R; Clarke, David M; Forbes, Andrew B; Ikin, Jillian F; Kelsall, Helen L

    2015-12-01

    Major depression occurs frequently in veterans, and is associated with comorbid psychological and physical disorders and poorer quality of life. Depression can be difficult to detect in primary care, while lengthy assessment instruments can deter use. Our study aimed to develop a brief depression screen that could be used by veterans and caregivers, and then to compare the association between the brief screen and comorbidities and quality of life with that of a longer instrument. Our dataset comprised 1204 male Royal Australian Navy veterans of the 1990/91 Gulf War. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), health-related quality of life by the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12), major depression and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses such as posttraumatic disorder (PTSD) using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) criteria. Comorbid physical illnesses including musculoskeletal disorders, chronic fatigue and diabetes were examined. A brief depression screen of three key self-reported symptoms was identified. Veterans with major depression present according to the screen were over four times more likely to have multisymptom illness or PTSD, and almost twice as likely to have musculoskeletal disorders. Having depression according to the brief screen and having at least one other physical or psychological condition was associated with poorer quality of life. Similar results were obtained for a longer screen based on all GHQ-12 items. A 3 item depression screen performed as well as a 12 item one in identifying major depression, comorbid physical and psychological illness and poorer quality of life in veterans. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The validity of screening instruments for posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and other anxiety symptoms in Tajikistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Anna-Clara; Ekblad, Solvig; Mukhamadiev, Davron; Muminova, Reykhan

    2007-11-01

    Armed conflicts and violations of human rights have a large and long-lasting impact on the mental health of affected individuals. In Tajikistan's civil war, 1992-1997, out of a total population of 6.5 million, about 60,000 were killed and 700,000 became refugees. Little has been done to explore the mental health consequences of this war. The purpose of the present pilot study was to validate 1 screening instrument for PTSD and 1 for depression and anxiety symptoms in a Tajik outpatient population. The sample for the study totaled 75. The appropriate cutoff values were determined empirically. The validity of the instruments was high. In conclusion, the use of validated screening instruments was a feasible way to explore the prevalence of PTSD, depression, and other anxiety symptoms in a Tajikistan context.

  12. The use of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale to identify postnatal depression symptoms at well child visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvestri Maria

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives 1 to evaluate the role of the pediatrician in detecting postnatal depression (PD symptoms by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; 2 to detect factors increasing the risk of PD and, 3 to assess the importance of scores gained from fathers' questionnaire. Methods we surveyed 1122 mothers and 499 fathers who were assessed using the EPDS during the first well-child visit. After 5 weeks, high scoring parents, completed a second EPDS. High scoring parents were examined by a psychiatrist who had to confirm the PD diagnosis. Results 26.6% of mothers and 12.6% of fathers at the first visit, 19.0% of mothers and 9.1% of fathers at the second visit, gained scores signaling the risk of PD. Four mothers and two fathers had confirmed PD diagnosis. Younger maternal age, non-Italian nationality and low socio-economic condition were related to higher EPDS scores. Conclusion PD is common in the average population. Using a simple and standardized instrument, pediatricians are able to detect parents with higher risk of suffering from PD.

  13. SCREENING OF DEPRESSION AMONG POST GRADUATE MEDICAL STUDENTS OF A TEACHING INSTITUTE IN MAHARASHTRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil R.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : According to World Health Organization, depressive disorders are the fourth leading health problem in the world. Medical school is recognized as a stressful environment that often exerts a negative effect on the academic performance, physical health and p sychological well - being of the student One - fourth to one - third of the post graduate medical trainees and residents develop clinical depression at some point in their training period. As minimal literature is there documenting prevalence of depression among post graduate medical students, this study was undertaken with the objective of screening of depression among post graduate medical students of a teaching institute of Maharashtra. SETTING AND DESIGN : Cross - sectional study conducted in a tertiary care hos pital of a teaching institute in a district of Maharashtra from July 2013 till September 2013 targeting all post graduates students of the institute. METHODS AND MATERIALS : A pre - tested structured questionnaire with details regarding socio demographic cha racteristics and factors influencing mental health status was used to collect the information from post graduate medical students. Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ - 9, based on PRIME MD Today (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders, was used to prov isionally diagnose depression. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS : Statistical software Open Epi Version 2.3 for proportions and chi square test. RESULTS : Out of 81 respondents, 40 had depressive symptoms based on the PHQ - 9 scores of 5 or more than 5, giving a prevalenc e of 49.4% among postgraduate students in this study. Prevalence of mild, moderate, moderately severe and severe depression was 25(30.9%, 9(11.1%, 4(4.9% and 2(2.5% respectively. CONCLUSION : Depression among post - graduate medical students is common. It is unrecognized, under - estimated and not properly addressed. This issue should be properly addressed because of its possible impact on quality of health

  14. Escala de Depressão Pós-natal de Edimburgo para triagem no sistema público de saúde Escala de Depresión Post-natal de Edimburgo para tamizage en el sistema público de salud Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale for screening in the public health system

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Figueira; Humberto Corrêa; Leandro Malloy-Diniz; Marco Aurélio Romano-Silva

    2009-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Avaliar a utilização da Escala de Depressão Pós-natal de Edimburgo como instrumento de triagem no sistema público de saúde. MÉTODOS: A Escala foi administrada entre o 40º e 90º dia do pós-parto, a 245 mulheres que tiveram parto em uma maternidade privada no município de Belo Horizonte (MG), entre 2005 e 2006. As participantes foram submetidas a uma entrevista psiquiátrica estruturada (Mini-Plus 5.0) utilizada como padrão-ouro para diagnóstico de depressão. Foram calculadas sensibili...

  15. In Systemic Sclerosis, Anxiety and Depression Assessed by Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale Are Independently Associated with Disability and Psychological Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anxious and depressive symptoms are frequent in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc. Our objective is to assess their prevalence and association with district and global disability and psychological variables. Methods. 119 SSc patients were assessed by Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS. Clinical depression and anxiety were defined for HADS score cutoff ≥8. Patients were assessed for psychological symptoms (RSES, COPE-NIV, hand (HAMIS, CHFDS, fist closure, and hand opening and face disability (MHISS, mouth opening, global disability, and fatigue (HAQ, FACIT. Results. Both depression and anxiety in SSc are 36%. Depressive patients with comorbid anxiety have higher HADS-D score than patients with depression only (. HADS-A and -D are positively correlated with global disability, hands and mouth disability, fatigue, self-esteem and avoidance coping strategy, and, only HADS-A, also with social support (. By multiple regression, HADS-D is independently associated with FACIT-F (, RSES (, and MHISS total score (, together explaining 50% of variance. HADS-A is independently associated with RSES (, COPE-NIV SA (, COPE-NIV SS (, FACIT-F (, and MHISS mouth opening (, explaining 41% of variance. Conclusions. In SSc depression and anxiety correlate to local and global disabilities and psychological characteristics. Depressive patients with comorbid anxiety have higher level of depressive symptoms.

  16. Psychometric Properties and Diagnostic Accuracy of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in a Sample of Iranian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Kheirabadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS has been used as a reliable screening tool for postpartum depression in many countries. This study aimed to assess the psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy of the EPDS in a sample of Iranian women.Methods: Using stratified sampling 262 postpartum women (2 weeks-3 months after delivery were selected from urban and rural health center in the city of Isfahan. They were interviewed using EPDS and Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS. Data were assessed using factor analysis, diagnosis analysis of receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation coefficient.Results: The age of then participants ranged 18-45 years (26.6±5.1. Based on a cut-off point of >13 for HDRS, 18.3% of the participants. The overall reliability (Cronbach's alpha of EPDS was 0.79. There was a significant correlation (r2=0.60, P value<0.01 between EPDS and HDRS. Two factor analysis showed that anhedonia and depression were two explanatory factors. At a cut-off point12 the sensitivity of the questionnaire was 78% (95% CI: 73%-83% and its specificity was 75% (95% CI: 72%-78%. Conclusion: The Persian version of the EPDS showed appropriate psychometric properties diagnostic accuracy index. It can be used by health system professionals for detection, assessment and treatment for mothers with post partum depression.

  17. Depressive symptoms and access to mental health care in women screened for postpartum depression who lose health insurance coverage after delivery: findings from the Translating Research into Practice for Postpartum Depression (TRIPPD) effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, William V; Wollan, Peter; Lewis, Greg; Bertram, Susan; Kurland, Margary J; Vore, Kimberle; Yawn, Barbara P

    2014-09-01

    To determine the impact of losing health insurance coverage on perceived need for and access to mental health care in women screened for postpartum depression (PPD) in primary care settings. The study sample included 2343 women enrolled in a 12-month, multisite, randomized trial that compared clinical outcomes of a comprehensive PPD screening and management program with usual care (March 1, 2006, through August 31, 2010). Screening for PPD occurred at the first postpartum visit (5-12 weeks) using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale followed by the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Insurance status during the prenatal period, at delivery, and during the first postpartum year and perceived need for and access to mental health care during the first postpartum year were assessed via questionnaires completed by individual patients and participating practices. Rates of uninsured increased from 3.8% during pregnancy and delivery (n=87 of 2317) to 10.8% at the first postpartum visit (n=253 of 2343) and 13.7% at any subsequent visit to the practice after 2 months post partum (n=226 of 1646) (P<.001, both comparisons vs baseline). For patients with data on insurance type during follow-up, insurance loss occurred primarily in Medicaid beneficiaries. Nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire scores and self-reported need for mental health care did not differ significantly between patients who remained insured and those who lost insurance during the first postpartum year. However, of patients who reported the need for mental health care, 61.1% of the uninsured (n=66 of 108) vs 27.1% of the insured (n=49 of 181) reported an inability to obtain mental health care (P<.001). Loss of insurance during the first postpartum year did not significantly affect depressive symptoms or perceived need for mental health care but did adversely affect self-reported ability to obtain mental health care. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by

  18. Dimensionality of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) in cardiac patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emons, Wilco H M; Sijtsma, Klaas; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) measures anxiety and depressive symptoms and is widely used in clinical and nonclinical populations. However, there is some debate about the number of dimensions represented by the HADS. In a sample of 534 Dutch cardiac patients, this study examined...... items each were found to be structurally sound and reliable. These scales covered the two key attributes of anxiety and (anhedonic) depression. The findings suggest that the HADS may be reduced to a 10-item questionnaire comprising two 5-item scales measuring anxiety and depressive symptoms....

  19. Large Scale Bacterial Colony Screening of Diversified FRET Biosensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Litzlbauer

    Full Text Available Biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET between fluorescent protein mutants have started to revolutionize physiology and biochemistry. However, many types of FRET biosensors show relatively small FRET changes, making measurements with these probes challenging when used under sub-optimal experimental conditions. Thus, a major effort in the field currently lies in designing new optimization strategies for these types of sensors. Here we describe procedures for optimizing FRET changes by large scale screening of mutant biosensor libraries in bacterial colonies. We describe optimization of biosensor expression, permeabilization of bacteria, software tools for analysis, and screening conditions. The procedures reported here may help in improving FRET changes in multiple suitable classes of biosensors.

  20. Reliability and preliminary evidence of validity of a Farsi version of the depression anxiety stress scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayani, Ali Asghar

    2010-08-01

    The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of the Farsi version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales were examined, with a sample of 306 undergraduate students (123 men, 183 women) ranging from 18 to 51 years of age (M age = 25.4, SD = 6.1). Participants completed the Satisfaction with Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales. The findings confirmed the preliminary reliabilities and preliminary construct validity of the Farsi translation of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales.

  1. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Depressants KidsHealth > For Teens > Depressants A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Depressants What Are Depressants? Depressants are drugs that calm nerves and relax ...

  2. VALIDITY OF THE GHQ AND SCL ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION SCALES - A COMPARATIVE-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOETER, MWJ

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a comparison between the validity of the SCL anxiety, phobic anxiety and depression scales and the GHQ-28 anxiety-/insomnia and severe depression scales in a psychiatric outpatient population. Validity was studied at a categorical level with DSM-III diagnosis, an

  3. Excellent reliability of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-21) in Indonesia after training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Istriana, E.; Kurnia, A.; Weijers, A.; Hidayat, T.; Pinxten, W.J.L.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Schellekens, A.F.A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) is the most widely used depression rating scale worldwide. Reliability of HDRS has been reported mainly from Western countries. The current study tested the reliability of HDRS ratings among psychiatric residents in Indonesia, before and afte

  4. The structure of the Montgomery-Åsberg depression rating scale over the course of treatment for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Lena C; Robinson, Jennifer J; Rolland, Jean-Pierre; Fruyt, Filip De; Rouillon, Frédéric; Bagby, R Michael

    2013-09-01

    The Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) is a widely used clinician-rated measure of depressive severity. Empirical support for the factor structure of the MADRS is mixed; further, the comparison of MADRS scores within and between patients requires the demonstration of consistent instrument properties. The objective of the current investigation was to evaluate MADRS factor structure as well as MADRS factorial invariance across time and gender. The MADRS was administered to 821 depressed outpatients participating in a large-scale effectiveness study of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy for depression. Treatment outcome did not differ across treatment groups. Factor structure and invariance was evaluated via confirmatory factor analysis. A four-factor model consisting of Sadness, Negative Thoughts, Detachment and Neurovegetative symptoms demonstrated a good fit to the data. This four-factor structure was invariant across time and gender. A hierarchical model, in which these four factors served as indicators of a general depression factor, was also supported. A limitation of the current study is the lack of comprehensive characterization of patient clinical features; results need to be replicated in more severely depressed or treatment refractory patients. Overall, evidence supported the use of the MADRS total score as well as subscales focused on affective, cognitive, social and somatic aspects of depression in male and female outpatients. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Norms and Screening Utility of the Dutch Version of the Children's Depression Inventory in Clinical and Nonclinical Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Jeffrey; Braet, Caroline; Rood, Lea; Timbremont, Benedikte; van Vlierberghe, Leen; Goossens, Lien; van Breukelen, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to (a) assess relationships between the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and "DSM"-oriented depression and anxiety scales of the Youth Self Report, (b) develop reliable norms for the CDI, and (c) determine CDI cutoff scores for selecting youngsters at risk for depression and anxiety. A total of 3,073 nonclinical and…

  6. Depressive Symptoms on the Geriatric Depression Scale and Suicide Deaths in Older Middle-aged Men: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sang-Wook

    2016-05-01

    Prospective evaluations of the associations between depressive symptoms and suicide deaths have been mainly performed in high-risk populations, such as individuals with psychiatric disorders or histories of self-harm. The purpose of this study was to prospectively examine whether more severe depressive symptoms assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were associated with a greater risk of death from suicide in a general-risk population. A total of 113 478 men from the Korean Veterans Health Study (mean age, 58.9 years) who participated in a postal survey in 2004 were followed up for suicide mortality until 2010. Over 6.4 years of follow-up, 400 men died by suicide (56.7 deaths per 100 000 person-years). More severe depressive symptoms were associated with greater risk of suicide death (p for trend depression were 2.18 for mild depression, 2.13 for moderate depression, 3.33 for severe depression, and 3.67 for extreme depression. After adjusting for potential confounders, men with a potential depressive disorder had an approximate 90% higher mortality from suicide (adjusted HR, 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38 to 2.68; pdepression. Each five-point increase in the GDS score was associated with a higher risk of death by suicide (adjusted HR, 1.22; pDepressive symptoms assessed using the GDS were found to be a strong independent predictor of future suicide. However, the estimate of relative risk was weaker than would be expected based on retrospective psychological autopsy studies.

  7. Limited effect of screening for depression with written feedback in outpatients with diabetes mellitus: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwer, F.; Tack, C.J.J.; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P.H.; Bazelmans, E.; Beekman, A.T.; Heine, R.J.; Snoek, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a screening procedure for depression (SCR) vs care as usual (CAU) in outpatients with diabetes. The primary outcome measured was depression score and the secondary outcomes were mental healthcare consumption, diabetes-distress a

  8. Predictor Variables and Screening Protocol for Depressive and Anxiety Disorders in Cancer Outpatients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Polidoro Lima

    Full Text Available Cancer patients are at increased risk of persistent depressive and anxiety symptoms and disorders compared to the general population. However, these issues are not always identified, which may worsen the prognosis and increase morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to identify predictor variables (demographic and clinical for the development of mood and anxiety disorders in cancer outpatients and to propose a probabilistic screening protocol considering these variables and certain standardized screening instruments.A total of 1,385 adults, of both genders, receiving outpatient cancer care were evaluated using a questionnaire and screening instruments. Thereafter, 400 of these subjects responded to the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (SCID-IV by telephone to confirm or rule out the presence of a Current Major Depressive Episode (CMDE or Anxiety Disorder (AD.Of the patients surveyed, 64% met the criteria for CMDE and 41% for AD. Female gender was found to be a risk factor for both disorders, and the presence of previous psychiatric history and marital status (divorced and widowed were risk factors for anxiety disorders. When scoring above the recommended cutoff score, the screening instruments also indicated a risk of the studied disorders. Based on these findings, a screening protocol and nomograms were created for the quantification, combination and probabilistic estimate of risk, with accuracy indicators >0.68.The prevalence rates for the disorders under study are extremely high in cancer patients. The use of the proposed protocol and nomogram can facilitate rapid and wide screening, thus refining triage and supporting the establishment of criteria for referral to mental health professionals, so that patients can be properly diagnosed and treated.

  9. Attitude scale and general health questionnaire subscales predict depression?

    OpenAIRE

    Amrollah Ebrahimi; Hamid Afshar; Hamid Taher Neshat Doost; Seyed Ghafur Mousavi; Hoseyn Moolavi

    2012-01-01

    Background: According to Beck theory, dysfunctional attitude has a central role in emergence of depression. The aim of this study was to determine contributions of dysfunctional attitude and general health index to depression. Methods: In this case-control study, two groups of subjects participated. The first group consisted of 65 patients with major depression and dysthymic disorder, who were recruited from Noor and Navab Safavi Psychiatry Clinics in Isfa-han. The control group was consi...

  10. The development and initial validation of the Terminally Ill Grief or Depression Scale (TIGDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyakoil, Vyjeyanthi S; Kraemer, Helena C; Noda, Art; Moos, Rudolf; Hallenbeck, James; Webster, Maria; Yesavage, Jerome A

    2005-01-01

    Patients often experience 'preparatory-grief' as they cope with the dying process. Some may be depressed. The Terminally Ill Grief or Depression Scale (TIGDS), comprising grief and depression sub-scales, is a new self-report measure designed to differentiate between preparatory-grief and depression in adult inpatients. The initial 100-item inventory was assembled based on literature review, interviews with clinicians and dying patients and then shortened to 42 items based on consensus expert opinion. Validity and reliability were tested in a sample of 55 terminally ill adults. The consensus clinical opinion was used as the gold standard to differentiate between preparatory grief and depression. The intra-class correlation coefficient was high (it was calculated to estimate the test-retest reliability for the 47 patients who had completed the TIGDS twice--retest was administered 2 to 7 days after the initial test), ranging from 0.86 (grief) to 0.97 (depression). The validity of TIGDS was assessed using a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, comparing the first test with the clinical criterion. The first and only variable and cut-point was the depression score (chi-square = 18.4, p depression = 3 cutoff score. The construct validity of the TIGDS was tested by comparing with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The TIGDS depression subscale showed strong convergent validity and the TIGDS grief subscale showed strong discriminant validity with the HADS total score.

  11. Screening for depression among indigenous Mexican migrant farmworkers using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlan, William; Lee, Junghee

    2010-04-01

    U.S. farmworkers include growing numbers of individuals from indigenous, pre-Columbian communities in southern Mexico with distinctive languages and cultures. Given the high stress these farmworkers experience in their challenging work environments, they are very susceptible to depression and other mental and emotional health disorders. The present study explores the Spanish version of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) as a screen for the presence and severity of depression among 123 indigenous Mexican-origin, migrant farmworkers in Oregon. Factor structure and inter-item correlations of the PHQ-9 are examined, along with associations between depression and culture-bound syndromes, self-esteem, self-efficacy, acculturation stress, and other sample psychosocial characteristics. The PHQ-9 exhibited strong factor loadings and internal consistency, and its severity score significantly correlated with other indicators of health status that were observed in previous studies to be significantly associated with depression. The PHQ-9 appears to be culturally relevant for use with Mexicans coming from a variety of indigenous cultures and having very low education and literacy.

  12. Rasch model analysis of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tennant Alan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing awareness of the need for easily administered, psychometrically sound screening tools to identify individuals with elevated levels of psychological distress. Although support has been found for the psychometric properties of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS using classical test theory approaches it has not been subjected to Rasch analysis. The aim of this study was to use Rasch analysis to assess the psychometric properties of the DASS-21 scales, using two different administration modes. Methods The DASS-21 was administered to 420 participants with half the sample responding to a web-based version and the other half completing a traditional pencil-and-paper version. Conformity of DASS-21 scales to a Rasch partial credit model was assessed using the RUMM2020 software. Results To achieve adequate model fit it was necessary to remove one item from each of the DASS-21 subscales. The reduced scales showed adequate internal consistency reliability, unidimensionality and freedom from differential item functioning for sex, age and mode of administration. Analysis of all DASS-21 items combined did not support its use as a measure of general psychological distress. A scale combining the anxiety and stress items showed satisfactory fit to the Rasch model after removal of three items. Conclusion The results provide support for the measurement properties, internal consistency reliability, and unidimensionality of three slightly modified DASS-21 scales, across two different administration methods. The further use of Rasch analysis on the DASS-21 in larger and broader samples is recommended to confirm the findings of the current study.

  13. Validation of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) section I as a screening and diagnostic instrument for apathy in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kenn Freddy; Larsen, Jan Petter; Aarsland, Dag

    2008-01-01

    We examined the validity of the motivation/initiative item of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) section I as a screening and diagnostic measure for apathy in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fifty-eight patients with PD were evaluated with the UPDRS, the 14-item Apathy Scale (AS), and standardized rating scales of depression and cognitive impairment. Apathy was diagnosed using specific items of the AS together with proposed criteria for apathy. A score of 2 or more on the motivation/initiative item was adequate to screen for apathy, whereas a score of 4 had high diagnostic accuracy at the cost of unacceptable low sensitivity.

  14. Effect of Depression on Risky Drinking and Response to a Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Annika C; Brodine, Stephanie K; Alcaraz, John E; Clapp, John D; Allison, Matthew A; Calac, Dan J; Hull, Andrew D; Gorman, Jessica R; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; Chambers, Christina D

    2015-08-01

    We assessed alcohol consumption and depression in 234 American Indian/Alaska Native women (aged 18-45 years) in Southern California. Women were randomized to intervention or assessment alone and followed for 6 months (2011-2013). Depression was associated with risk factors for alcohol-exposed pregnancy (AEP). Both treatment groups reduced drinking (P < .001). Depressed, but not nondepressed, women reduced drinking in response to SBIRT above the reduction in response to assessment alone. Screening for depression may assist in allocating women to specific AEP prevention interventions.

  15. Evaluation of the Cardiac Depression Visual Analogue Scale in a medical and non-medical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Mirella; Sheehan, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Comorbid depression and medical illness is associated with a number of adverse health outcomes such as lower medication adherence and higher rates of subsequent mortality. Reliable and valid psychological measures capable of detecting a range of depressive symptoms found in medical settings are needed. The Cardiac Depression Visual Analogue Scale (CDVAS) is a recently developed, brief six-item measure originally designed to assess the range and severity of depressive symptoms within a cardiac population. The current study aimed to further investigate the psychometric properties of the CDVAS in a general and medical sample. The sample consisted of 117 participants, whose mean age was 40.0 years (SD = 19.0, range 18-84). Participants completed the CDVAS, the Cardiac Depression Scale (CDS), the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) and a demographic and health questionnaire. The CDVAS was found to have adequate internal reliability (α = .76), strong concurrent validity with the CDS (r = .89) and the depression sub-scale of the DASS (r = .70), strong discriminant validity and strong predictive validity. The principal components analysis revealed that the CDVAS measured only one component, providing further support for the construct validity of the scale. Results of the current study indicate that the CDVAS is a short, simple, valid and reliable measure of depressive symptoms suitable for use in a general and medical sample.

  16. Depression and anxiety in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: prevalence rates based on a comparison of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS and the hospital, Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Covic Tanya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While it is recognised that depression is prevalent in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, recent studies have also highlighted significant levels of anxiety in RA patients. This study compared two commonly used scales, the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, in relation to their measurement range and cut points to consider the relative prevalence of both constructs, and if prevalence rates may be due to scale-specific case definition. Methods Patients meeting the criteria for RA were recruited in Leeds, UK and Sydney, Australia and asked to complete a survey that included both scales. The data was analysed using the Rasch measurement model. Results A total of 169 RA patients were assessed, with a repeat subsample, resulting in 323 cases for analysis. Both scales met Rasch model expectations. Using the 'possible+probable' cut point from the HADS, 58.3% had neither anxiety nor depression; 13.5% had anxiety only; 6.4% depression only and 21.8% had both 'possible+probable' anxiety and depression. Cut points for depression were comparable across the two scales while a lower cut point for anxiety in the DASS was required to equate prevalence. Conclusions This study provides further support for high prevalence of depression and anxiety in RA. It also shows that while these two scales provide a good indication of possible depression and anxiety, the estimates of prevalence so derived could vary, particularly for anxiety. These findings are discussed in terms of comparisons across studies and selection of scales for clinical use.

  17. Screening for personality disorder with the Standardised Assessment of Personality: Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS: further evidence of concurrent validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Paul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assessment of personality disorders (PD is costly and time-consuming. There is a need for a brief screen for personality disorders that can be used in routine clinical settings and epidemiological surveys. Aims: To test the validity of the Standardised Assessment of Personality: Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS as a screen for PD in a clinical sample of substance abusers. Methods Convergent validity of the SAPAS with both categorical and dimensional representations of personality disorders was estimated. Results In this sample, the SAPAS correlated well with dimensional representations of cluster A and C personality disorders, even after controlling for ADHD symptoms, anxiety/depression symptoms and recent substance use. The SAPAS was also significantly associated with total number of PD criteria, although correlation with categorical measures of PD was weak. Conclusions The SAPAS is an valid brief screen for PD as assessed dimensionally.

  18. The Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) and the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale (MADRS). A psychometric re-analysis of the European Genome-Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression Study using Rasch analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Allerup, Peter; Larsen, Erik Roj

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this re-analysis of the European Genome-Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression Study (GENDEP) was to psychometrically test the unidimensionality of the full Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS10) and the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17) versus their respective...... 2030 had to be supplemented with the Friedman two-way analysis of variance by ranks. The HAM-D6 but not the MADRS5 was accepted. It was therefore concluded that the HAM-D6 is a psychometrically valid outcome scale to measure change in clinical trials of antidepressants....

  19. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY - CONSTRUCTION OF A PROTOTYPICAL ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION SCALE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOETER, MWJ; VANDENBRINK, W

    1992-01-01

    The question of the relationship between anxiety and depression remains to be solved. The fact that clinical pictures show substantial overlap makes it difficult, using conventional instruments, to distinguish between the co-occurrence of anxiety and depression and overlap in definitions and measure

  20. Depressive Symptoms, Depletion, or Developmental Change? Withdrawal, Apathy, and Lack of Vigor in the Geriatric Depressive Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kathryn Betts

    2001-01-01

    This study has dual goals of confirming the existence of a "Withdrawal/Apathy/[Lack of] Vigor" (WAV) dimension of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and determining if it is descriptive of either depletion or disengagement-related change in older adults. High endorsement rates suggest WAV may be congruent with disengagement or depletion and may…

  1. Use of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in a North American population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A; Gang, P; Cole, K; Rutsky, M; Reese, L; Weisbord, J A

    1993-05-01

    1. The authors mailed the Edinburgh Post-natal Depression Scale to 308 women at six weeks postpartum. 2. It was completed and return by 185 women (60.0%). 3. Thirty-two of them (17.4%) scored 12 and above, the threshold reported to identify most women with postpartum depressive disorder.

  2. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale-Short Form: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Rachel C.; Kanter, Jonathan W.; Luo, Wen

    2011-01-01

    Following a landmark component analysis of cognitive therapy by Jacobson and colleagues (1996), there has been renewed interest in behavioral activation (BA) treatments for depression. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) was developed to measure when and how clients become activated over the course of BA treatment. Multiple…

  3. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale-Short Form: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Rachel C.; Kanter, Jonathan W.; Luo, Wen

    2011-01-01

    Following a landmark component analysis of cognitive therapy by Jacobson and colleagues (1996), there has been renewed interest in behavioral activation (BA) treatments for depression. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) was developed to measure when and how clients become activated over the course of BA treatment. Multiple…

  4. A suicide risk screening scale for HIV- infected persons in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To construct a brief suicide risk screening scale (SRSS) as a self-administered instrument to screen for .... be inadequate for measuring suicidality in ... describes your attitude for the past week, including now, write 'T' in the block provided.

  5. Psychometric evaluation of the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) as depression severity scale using the LEAD (Longitudinal Expert Assessment of All Data) as index of validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Timmerby, N; Martiny, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Major Depression Inventory (MDI) was developed to cover the universe of depressive symptoms in DSM-IV major depression as well as in ICD-10 mild, moderate, and severe depression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the standardization of the MDI as a depression severity......-IV major depression. The conventional VAS scores for no, mild, moderate, and severe depression were used for the standardization of the MDI. RESULTS: The inter-correlation for the MDI with the clinician ratings (VAS, MES, HAM-D17 and HAM-D6) increased over the rating weeks in terms of Pearson coefficients....... After nine weeks of therapy the coefficient ranged from 0.74 to 0.83. Using the clinician-rated VAS depression severity scale, the conventional MDI cut-off scores for no or doubtful depression, and for mild, moderate and severe depression were confirmed. CONCLUSIONS: Using the VAS as index of external...

  6. Sensitivity and specificity of a two-question screening tool for depression in a specialist palliative care unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Payne, Ann

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: The primary objective in this study is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of a two-item screening interview for depression versus the formal psychiatric interview, in the setting of a specialist palliative in-patient unit so that we may identify those individuals suffering from depressive disorder and therefore optimise their management in this often-complex population. METHODS: A prospective sample of consecutive admissions (n = 167) consented to partake in the study, and the screening interview was asked separately to the formal psychiatric interview. RESULTS: The two-item questionnaire, achieved a sensitivity of 90.7% (95% CI 76.9-97.0) but a lower specificity of 67.7% (95% CI 58.7-75.7). The false positive rate was 32.3% (95% CI 24.3-41.3), but the false negative rate was found to be a low 9.3% (95% CI 3.0-23.1). A subgroup analysis of individuals with a past experience of depressive illness, (n = 95), revealed that a significant number screened positive for depression by the screening test, 55.2% (16\\/29) compared to those with no background history of depression, 33.3% (22\\/66) (P = 0.045). CONCLUSION: The high sensitivity and low false negative rate of the two-question screening tool will aid health professionals in identifying depression in the in-patient specialist palliative care unit. Individuals, who admit to a previous experience of depressive illness, are more likely to respond positively to the two-item questionnaire than those who report no prior history of depressive illness (P = 0.045).

  7. Validation of a cutoff for the Depression Scale of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies, Brief Version (CESD-7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarón Salinas-Rodríguez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the Depression Scale of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies, Brief Version (CESD-7 psychometric properties in Mexican adult population, and validate a cutoff for classifying subjects according to the presence / absence of clinically significant depressive symptoms (CSDS. Materials and methods. Screening cross-sectional study with a subsample of 301 adult residents of the Morelos state in Mexico, originally interviewed for the National Survey of Health and Nutrition 2012. Sensitivity and specificity of the selected cutoff were estimated using as reference the diagnostic criteria of ICD-10 and DSM-IV. Results. The cutoff point estimated was CESD-7=9. Using the ICD-10 the sensitivity and specificity were 90.2 and 86%, and ROC was 88%. Using DSM-IV, the values were 80.4, 89.6, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions. The short version of the CESD-7 has good psychometric properties and can be used as a screening test to identify probable cases of subjects with clinically significant depressive symptoms.

  8. Efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder: a subgroup analysis and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression item analyses of the Aripiprazole Depression Multicenter Efficacy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Norio; Otsubo, Tempei; Kato, Masaki; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Ono, Hiroaki; Kamijima, Kunitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Results from this randomized, placebo-controlled study of aripiprazole augmentation to antidepressant therapy (ADT) in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) (the Aripiprazole Depression Multicenter Efficacy [ADMIRE] study) revealed that aripiprazole augmentation was superior to ADT alone and was well tolerated. In subgroup analyses, we investigated the influence of demographic- and disease-related factors on the observed responses. We also examined how individual symptom improvement was related to overall improvement in MDD. Data from the ADMIRE study were analyzed. Subgroup analyses were performed on the primary outcome measures: the mean change in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score from the end of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)/serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) treatment to the end of the randomized treatment. Changes in the MADRS total scores were consistently greater with aripiprazole than placebo in each of the subgroups. Efficacy was not related to sex, age, number of adequate ADT trials in the current episode, MDD diagnosis, number of depressive episodes, duration of the current episode, age at first depressive episode, time since the first depressive episode, type of SSRI/SNRI, or severity at the end of SSRI/SNRI treatment phase. Compared to placebo, aripiprazole resulted in significant and rapid improvement on seven of the 10 MADRS items, including sadness. These post-hoc analyses indicated that aripiprazole was effective for a variety of Japanese patients with MDD who had exhibited inadequate responses to ADT. Additionally, we suggest that aripiprazole significantly and rapidly improved the core depressive symptoms. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  9. Adaptation to Portuguese of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS)

    OpenAIRE

    Apóstolo,João Luís Alves; Mendes,Aida Cruz; Azeredo,Zaida Aguiar

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to adapt to Portuguese, of Portugal, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales, a 21-item short scale (DASS 21), designed to measure depression, anxiety and stress. Method: After translation and back-translation with the help of experts, the DASS 21 was administered to patients in external psychiatry consults (N=101), and its internal consistency, construct validity and concurrent validity were measured. Results: The DASS 21 properties certify its quality to measure emotional state...

  10. Testing a German Adaption of the Entrapment Scale and Assessing the Relation to Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Trachsel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The construct of entrapment is used in evolutionary theory to explain the etiology of depression. The perception of entrapment can emerge when defeated individuals want to escape but are incapable. Studies have shown relationships of entrapment to depression, and suicidal tendencies. The aim of this study was a psychometric evaluation and validation of the Entrapment Scale in German (ES-D. 540 normal subjects completed the ES-D along with other measures of depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and distress. Good reliability and validity of the ES-D was demonstrated. Further, whereas entrapment originally has been regarded as a two-dimensional construct, our analyses supported a single-factor model. Entrapment explained variance in depressive symptoms beyond that explained by stress and hopelessness supporting the relevance of the construct for depression research. These findings are discussed with regard to their theoretical implications as well as to the future use of the entrapment scale in clinical research and practice.

  11. The Symptom Checklist-core depression (SCL-CD6) scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Westerlund, Hugo; Leineweber, Constanze

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Major depressive disorders are common, with substantial impact on individuals/society. Brief scales for depression severity, based on a small number of characteristics all of which are necessary for diagnosis, have been recommended in self-reported versions for clinical work or research when...... aiming to quickly and accurately measure depression. We have examined psychometric properties of a brief 6-item version of the Symptom Checklist (SCL), the Symptom Checklist core depression scale (SCL-CD6) and aimed to identify a cut-point for epidemiological research. METHODS: The psychometric...... evaluation of the SCL-CD6 was mainly performed by a Mokken analysis of unidimensionality in a random sample of 1476 residents in the Stockholm County, aged 18-64 years. The standardization of SCL-CD6 was based on ROC analysis, using the Major Depression Inventory as index of validity. Predictive validity...

  12. Using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) on patients with epilepsy: Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Ying; Pakpour, Amir H

    2017-02-01

    The problems of mood disorders are critical in people with epilepsy. Therefore, there is a need to validate a useful tool for the population. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) has been used on the population, and showed that it is a satisfactory screening tool. However, more evidence on its construct validity is needed. A total of 1041 people with epilepsy were recruited in this study, and each completed the HADS. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch analysis were used to understand the construct validity of the HADS. In addition, internal consistency was tested using Cronbachs' α, person separation reliability, and item separation reliability. Ordering of the response descriptors and the differential item functioning (DIF) were examined using the Rasch models. The HADS showed that 55.3% of our participants had anxiety; 56.0% had depression based on its cutoffs. CFA and Rasch analyses both showed the satisfactory construct validity of the HADS; the internal consistency was also acceptable (α=0.82 in anxiety and 0.79 in depression; person separation reliability=0.82 in anxiety and 0.73 in depression; item separation reliability=0.98 in anxiety and 0.91 in depression). The difficulties of the four-point Likert scale used in the HADS were monotonically increased, which indicates no disordering response categories. No DIF items across male and female patients and across types of epilepsy were displayed in the HADS. The HADS has promising psychometric properties on construct validity in people with epilepsy. Moreover, the additive item score is supported for calculating the cutoff. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Concurrent Validity of Brief Screening Questions for Anxiety, Depression, Social Isolation, Catastrophization and Fear of Movement in People with Low Back Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Mirkhil, Saeida; Keating, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    (i) to test the concurrent validity of brief screening questions for five psychosocial constructs (anxiety, depression, social isolation, catastrophization and fear of movement), and (ii) to translate into Danish and validate those screening questions.......(i) to test the concurrent validity of brief screening questions for five psychosocial constructs (anxiety, depression, social isolation, catastrophization and fear of movement), and (ii) to translate into Danish and validate those screening questions....

  14. Detecting depressive and anxiety disorders in distressed patients in primary care; comparative diagnostic accuracy of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhaak Peter FM

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive and anxiety disorders often go unrecognized in distressed primary care patients, despite the overtly psychosocial nature of their demand for help. This is especially problematic in more severe disorders needing specific treatment (e.g. antidepressant pharmacotherapy or specialized cognitive behavioural therapy. The use of a screening tool to detect (more severe depressive and anxiety disorders may be useful not to overlook such disorders. We examined the accuracy with which the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS are able to detect (more severe depressive and anxiety disorders in distressed patients, and which cut-off points should be used. Methods Seventy general practitioners (GPs included 295 patients on sick leave due to psychological problems. They excluded patients with recognized depressive or anxiety disorders. Patients completed the 4DSQ and HADS. Standardized diagnoses of DSM-IV defined depressive and anxiety disorders were established with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC analyses were performed to obtain sensitivity and specificity values for a range of scores, and area under the curve (AUC values as a measure of diagnostic accuracy. Results With respect to the detection of any depressive or anxiety disorder (180 patients, 61%, the 4DSQ and HADS scales yielded comparable results with AUC values between 0.745 and 0.815. Also with respect to the detection of moderate or severe depressive disorder, the 4DSQ and HADS depression scales performed comparably (AUC 0.780 and 0.739, p 0.165. With respect to the detection of panic disorder, agoraphobia and social phobia, the 4DSQ anxiety scale performed significantly better than the HADS anxiety scale (AUC 0.852 versus 0.757, p 0.001. The recommended cut-off points of both HADS scales appeared to be too low while those of the 4DSQ anxiety

  15. A study of remitted and treatment-resistant depression using MMPI and including pessimism and optimism scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Suzuki

    Full Text Available The psychological aspects of treatment-resistant and remitted depression are not well documented.We administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI to patients with treatment-resistant depression (n = 34, remitted depression (n = 25, acute depression (n = 21, and healthy controls (n = 64. Pessimism and optimism were also evaluated by MMPI.ANOVA and post-hoc tests demonstrated that patients with treatment-resistant and acute depression showed similarly high scores for frequent scale (F, hypochondriasis, depression, conversion hysteria, psychopathic device, paranoia, psychasthenia and schizophrenia on the MMPI compared with normal controls. Patients with treatment-resistant depression, but not acute depression registered high on the scale for cannot say answer. Using Student's t-test, patients with remitted depression registered higher on depression and social introversion scales, compared with normal controls. For pessimism and optimism, patients with treatment-resistant depression demonstrated similar changes to acutely depressed patients. Remitted depression patients showed lower optimism than normal controls by Student's t-test, even though these patients were deemed recovered from depression using HAM-D.The patients with remitted depression and treatment-resistant depression showed subtle alterations on the MMPI, which may explain the hidden psychological features in these cohorts.

  16. A study of remitted and treatment-resistant depression using MMPI and including pessimism and optimism scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Michio; Muneoka, Katsumasa; Sato, Koichi; Hashimoto, Kenji; Shirayama, Yukihiko

    2014-01-01

    The psychological aspects of treatment-resistant and remitted depression are not well documented. We administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) to patients with treatment-resistant depression (n = 34), remitted depression (n = 25), acute depression (n = 21), and healthy controls (n = 64). Pessimism and optimism were also evaluated by MMPI. ANOVA and post-hoc tests demonstrated that patients with treatment-resistant and acute depression showed similarly high scores for frequent scale (F), hypochondriasis, depression, conversion hysteria, psychopathic device, paranoia, psychasthenia and schizophrenia on the MMPI compared with normal controls. Patients with treatment-resistant depression, but not acute depression registered high on the scale for cannot say answer. Using Student's t-test, patients with remitted depression registered higher on depression and social introversion scales, compared with normal controls. For pessimism and optimism, patients with treatment-resistant depression demonstrated similar changes to acutely depressed patients. Remitted depression patients showed lower optimism than normal controls by Student's t-test, even though these patients were deemed recovered from depression using HAM-D. The patients with remitted depression and treatment-resistant depression showed subtle alterations on the MMPI, which may explain the hidden psychological features in these cohorts.

  17. The Major Depressive Disorder Hierarchy: Rasch Analysis of 6 items of the Hamilton Depression Scale Covering the Continuum of Depressive Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Melancholic features of depression (MFD) seem to be a unidimensional group of signs and symptoms. However, little importance has been given to the evaluation of what features are related to a more severe disorder. That is, what are the MFD that appear only in the most depressed patients. We aim to demonstrate how each MFD is related to the severity of the major depressive disorder. Methods We evaluated both the Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS-17) and its 6-item melancholic subscale (HAM-D6) in 291 depressed inpatients using Rasch analysis, which computes the severity of each MFD. Overall measures of model fit were mean (±SD) of items and persons residual = 0 (±1); low χ2 value; p>0.01. Results For the HDRS-17 model fit, mean (±SD) of item residuals = 0.35 (±1.4); mean (±SD) of person residuals = -0.15 (±1.09); χ2 = 309.74; p<0.00001. For the HAM-D6 model fit, mean (±SD) of item residuals = 0.5 (±0.86); mean (±SD) of person residuals = 0.15 (±0.91); χ2 = 56.13; p = 0.196. MFD ordered by crescent severity were depressed mood, work and activities, somatic symptoms, psychic anxiety, guilt feelings, and psychomotor retardation. Conclusions Depressed mood is less severe, while guilt feelings and psychomotor retardation are more severe MFD in a psychiatric hospitalization. Understanding depression as a continuum of symptoms can improve the understanding of the disorder and may improve its perspective of treatment. PMID:28114341

  18. Psychometric properties of the Vulnerability to Abuse Screening Scale for screening abuse of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Raquel Batista; Oliveira, Graziella Lage; Silveira, Andréa Maria

    2017-04-10

    Adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Vulnerability to Abuse Screening Scale to identify risk of domestic violence against older adults in Brazil. The instrument was adapted and validated in a sample of 151 older adults from a geriatric reference center in the municipality of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, in 2014. We collected sociodemographic, clinical, and abuse-related information, and verified reliability by reproducibility in a sample of 55 older people, who underwent re-testing of the instrument seven days after the first application. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed for all variables, with a significance level of 5%. The construct validity was analyzed by the principal components method with a tetrachoric correlation matrix, the reliability of the scale by the weighted Kappa (Kp) statistic, and the internal consistency by the Kuder-Richardson estimator formula 20 (KR-20). The average age of the participants was 72.1 years (DP = 6.96; 95%CI 70.94-73.17), with a maximum of 92 years, and they were predominantly female (76.2%; 95%CI 69.82-83.03). When analyzing the relationship between the scores of the Vulnerability to Abuse Screening Scale, categorized by presence (score > 3) or absence (score sexo foi predominantemente feminino (76,2%; IC95% 69,82-83,03). Ao analisar a relação entre os escores da Escala Triagem de Vulnerabilidade ao Abuso, categorizados em presença (índice > 3) ou ausência (índice sexo, não houve diferença estatisticamente significante. A Escala Triagem de Vulnerabilidade ao Abuso comportou-se de forma aceitável na avaliação da validade no processo de adaptação transcultural, demonstrando dimensionalidade coerente com a proposta original (quatro fatores). Na análise da consistência interna, o instrumento apresentou bons resultados (KR-20 = 0,69) e a confiabilidade via reprodutibilidade foi considerara excelente para a escala global (Kp = 0,92). A Escala Triagem de Vulnerabilidade ao

  19. Screening and Referral for Postpartum Depression among Low-Income Women: A Qualitative Perspective from Community Health Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonda C. Boyd

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum depression is a serious and common psychiatric illness. Mothers living in poverty are more likely to be depressed and have greater barriers to accessing treatment than the general population. Mental health utilization is particularly limited for women with postpartum depression and low-income, minority women. As part of an academic-community partnership, focus groups were utilized to examine staff practices, barriers, and facilitators in mental health referrals for women with depression within a community nonprofit agency serving low-income pregnant and postpartum women. The focus groups were analyzed through content analyses and NVIVO-8. Three focus groups with 16 community health workers were conducted. Six themes were identified: (1 screening and referral, (2 facilitators to referral, (3 barriers to referral, (4 culture and language, (5 life events, and (6 support. The study identified several barriers and facilitators for referring postpartum women with depression to mental health services.

  20. A violência doméstica como indicador de risco no rastreamento da depressão pós-parto Domestic violence as a risk factor in the screening of for post-partum depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiane Mattar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: apurar a freqüência de risco para depressão pós-parto (DP em puérperas de hospital de São Paulo, região Sudeste do Brasil, e determinar fatores associados - entre eles a violência doméstica (VD. MÉTODOS: estudo descritivo, tipo corte transversal. Participaram 133 mulheres, que tiveram partos com idade gestacional de 20 semanas ou mais, no período de agosto a setembro de 2005, em maternidade terciária em São Paulo (Brasil. Foram entrevistadas empregando-se a versão em português do Abuse Assessment Screen para o diagnóstico de violência e responderam questionário de auto-avaliação do risco de DP (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. As variáveis foram representadas por freqüências absoluta e relativa. A associação entre as variáveis de interesse e DP foi avaliada pelo teste do chi2 ou exato de Fisher. Adotou-se o nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: o risco de DP foi identificado em 24 puérperas (18%. Das mulheres entrevistadas, 38,3% referiram história de abusos. Observou-se associação entre a ocorrência de VD após os 15 anos de idade e o risco de depressão (p=0,03. A ocorrência de abusos no grupo de mulheres com probabilidade de apresentar DP foi de 58,3%, proporção significativamente maior do que a observada no grupo controle com 33,9%. CONCLUSÕES: a probabilidade de apresentar depressão foi alta entre as puérperas assistidas em maternidade terciária da região Sudeste do Brasil. A VD sofrida após os 15 anos de idade esteve estatisticamente associada ao risco de DP.PURPOSE: to assess the prevalence of the risk of post-partum depression in women in the post-natal ward of a hospital in São Paulo city, in the southeastern region of Brazil, and analyze the associated factors, including domestic violence (DV. METHODS: this was a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The participants were 133 women with at least 20 weeks of gestation age, who delivered their babies from August to September

  1. Screening for neurocognitive impairment, depression, and anxiety in HIV-infected patients in Western Europe and Canada

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    CRANIum, a cross-sectional epidemiology study in Western Europe and Canada, was conducted to describe and compare the prevalence of a positive screen for neurocognitive impairment (NCI), depressive symptoms, and anxiety in an HIV-positive population either receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) or who were naive to antiretroviral therapy (ART). HIV-positive patients ≥18 years of age attending a routine medical follow-up visit and able to complete the designated screening tools we...

  2. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003213.htm Depression - overview To use the sharing features on this ... older adults Major depression Persistent depressive disorder Postpartum depression Premenstrual ... Review Date 1/4/2016 Updated by: Timothy Rogge, ...

  3. Local community intervention through depression screening and group activity for elderly suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Ono, Yutaka; Watanabe, Naoki; Tanaka, Eriko; Kudoh, Seijiro; Sakashita, Tomoe; Sakamoto, Shinji; Neichi, Keiko; Satoh, Kyoko; Nakamura, Kenji; Yoshimura, Kimio

    2006-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate outcomes of a community-based program to prevent suicide among the elderly (>or=65 years old) using a quasi-experimental design with two neighboring references. During 1999-2004, the program including depression screening and group activity was conducted by the public health nurses in the Minami district (population 1685) of Nagawa town, rural Japan. Pre-post changes in the risk of completing suicide were estimated by the incidence rate ratios (IRR). The risk for Minami's elderly females was reduced by 74% (age-adjusted IRR, 0.26; 90% CI, 0.07-0.98) more than the historical trend, while there was no change in the risk of Minami's males and nor in the male or female references. The local intervention using public health nursing would be effective against suicide for elderly females without diffusing to the surroundings.

  4. Validating the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire against the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen; Sharples, Phil; Murray, Aja L.

    2015-01-01

    The Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ), a brief screening tool for intellectual disability, was originally validated against the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition (WAIS-III), which was superseded by the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) in the United Kingdom in 2010. This study examines the…

  5. Validating the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire against the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen; Sharples, Phil; Murray, Aja L.

    2015-01-01

    The Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ), a brief screening tool for intellectual disability, was originally validated against the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition (WAIS-III), which was superseded by the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) in the United Kingdom in 2010. This study examines the…

  6. Nanoliter-Scale Protein Crystallization and Screening with a Microfluidic Droplet Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Zhu; Li-Na Zhu; Rui Guo; Heng-Jun Cui; Sheng Ye; Qun Fang

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale screening of hundreds or even thousands of crystallization conditions while with low sample consumption is in urgent need, in current structural biology research. Here we describe a fully-automated droplet robot for nanoliter-scale crystallization screening that combines the advantages of both automated robotics technique for protein crystallization screening and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. A semi-contact dispensing method was developed to achieve flexible, programma...

  7. Factor analysis of the hospital anxiety and depression scale among a Huntington's disease population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Maria; Maltby, John; Martucci, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Depression and anxiety are common in Huntington's disease, a genetic neurodegenerative disorder. There is a need for measurement tools of mood to be validated within a Huntington's disease population. The current study aimed to analyze the factor structure of the Hospital Anxiety......, with two group factors, comprising four depression and four anxiety items, provided the best fit of the data. The salience of loadings on the bifactor model suggested that loadings were high on the general factor (accounting for 64% of the variance) and low on the group factors (21% for anxiety and 15......% for depression). CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that eight items from the scale perform well among the sample. Consistent with recent developments in modeling the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, a bifactor interpretation for an eight-item version outperformed other extant models. Our findings provide...

  8. Validation of Six Short and Ultra-short Screening Instruments for Depression for People Living with HIV in Ontario: Results from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie K Y Choi

    Full Text Available Major depression affects up to half of people living with HIV. However, among HIV-positive patients, depression goes unrecognized 60-70% of the time in non-psychiatric settings. We sought to evaluate three screening instruments and their short forms to facilitate the recognition of current depression in HIV-positive patients attending HIV specialty care clinics in Ontario.A multi-centre validation study was conducted in Ontario to examine the validity and accuracy of three instruments (the Center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale [CESD20], the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale [K10], and the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale [PHQ9] and their short forms (CESD10, K6, and PHQ2 in diagnosing current major depression among 190 HIV-positive patients in Ontario. Results from the three instruments and their short forms were compared to results from the gold standard measured by Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (the "M.I.N.I.".Overall, the three instruments identified depression with excellent accuracy and validity (area under the curve [AUC]>0.9 and good reliability (Kappa statistics: 0.71-0.79; Cronbach's alpha: 0.87-0.93. We did not find that the AUCs differed in instrument pairs (p-value>0.09, or between the instruments and their short forms (p-value>0.3. Except for the PHQ2, the instruments showed good-to-excellent sensitivity (0.86-1.0 and specificity (0.81-0.87, excellent negative predictive value (>0.90, and moderate positive predictive value (0.49-0.58 at their optimal cut-points.Among people in HIV care in Ontario, Canada, the three instruments and their short forms performed equally well and accurately. When further in-depth assessments become available, shorter instruments might find greater clinical acceptance. This could lead to clinical benefits in fast-paced speciality HIV care settings and better management of depression in HIV-positive patients.

  9. A study on construction, validation and determination of normalization of adolescents depression scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Babakhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to construct, to validate and to determine normalization factors associated with adolescents depression scale. The study is performed among 750 randomly selected guided and high school students, 364 male and 386 female, who live in city of Zanjan, Iran. Validity of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Validity of Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS and divergence validity of the Coopersmith self- esteem coefficients are 0.72, 0.37 and -0.71, respectively. Result suggests that adolescents’ depression test is a reliable and valid tool for assessing depression, with utility in both research and clinical settings, counseling centers. In addition, the results of correlation test indicate there are some meaningful differences between depression levels of female and male students. In fact, our survey indicates that female students have more depression than male students do (F-value = 33.06, Sig. = 0.000. In addition, there are some meaningful differences between depression levels in various educational levels (F-value = 8.59, Sig. = 0.000. However, the study does not find sufficient evidence to believe there is any meaningful correlation between educational backgrounds and gender.

  10. Depression and Anxiety Screens as Simultaneous Predictors of 10-Year Incidence of Diabetes Mellitus in Older Adults in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambaty, Tasneem; Callahan, Christopher M; Perkins, Anthony J; Stewart, Jesse C

    2017-02-01

    To examine depression and anxiety screens and their individual items as simultaneous predictors of incident diabetes mellitus. Ten-year follow-up study of individuals screened for the Improving Mood-Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment (IMPACT) trial. Two large urban primary care clinics in Indianapolis, Indiana. Diverse sample (53% African American, 80% of lower socioeconomic status) of 2,156 older adults initially free of diabetes mellitus. Depression and anxiety screens were completed during routine primary care visits between 1999 and 2001. Incident diabetes mellitus data were obtained from an electronic medical record system and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services analytical files though 2009. Over the 10-year period, 558 (25.9%) participants had diabetes mellitus onset. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for demographic and diabetes mellitus risk factors revealed that a positive screen for anxiety, but not for depression, predicted incident diabetes mellitus when entered into separate models (anxiety: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.15-1.61, P anxiety: HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.12-1.61, P anxiety is a risk factor for diabetes mellitus in older adults independent of depression and traditional diabetes mellitus risk factors. Anxiety requires greater consideration and awareness in the context of diabetes mellitus risk assessment and primary prevention. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Validation of the turkish version of the centre for epidemiologic studies depression scale (ces-d in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karşıdağ Kubilay

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a common co-morbid health problem in patients with diabetes that is underrecognised. Current international guidelines recommend screening for depression in patients with diabetes. Yet, few depression screening instruments have been validated for use in this particular group of patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods A sample of 151 Turkish outpatients with type 2 diabetes completed the CES-D, the World Health Organization-Five Well-Being Index (WHO-5, and the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale (PAID. Explanatory factor analyses, various correlations and Cronbach's alpha were investigated to test the validity and reliability of the CES-D in Turkish diabetes outpatients. Results The original four-factor structure proposed by Radloff was not confirmed. Explanatory factor analyses revealed a two-factor structure representing two subscales: (1 depressed mood combined with somatic symptoms of depression and (2 positive affect. However, one item showed insufficient factor loadings. Cronbach's alpha of the total score was high (0.88, as were split-half coefficients (0.77-0.90. The correlation of the CES-D with the WHO-5 was the strongest (r = -0.70, and supported concurrent validity. Conclusion The CES-D appears to be a valid measure for the assessment of depression in Turkish diabetes patients. Future studies should investigate its sensitivity and specificity as well as test-retest reliability.

  12. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  13. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    , that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression......The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued...

  14. Validação da escala de depressão geriátrica em um ambulatório geral Validation of geriatric depression scale in a general outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emylucy Martins Paiva Paradela

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A Escala de Depressão Geriátrica, utilizada para o rastreamento de sintomas depressivos em idosos, ainda não teve suas características de medida avaliadas em ambulatórios gerais no Brasil. O objetivo foi estudar a validade da Escala, com 15 itens (EDG-15, na identificação de episódio de Depressão Maior ou Distimia em idosos atendidos em ambulatório geral. MÉTODOS: A Escala foi aplicada em 302 indivíduos com 65 anos ou mais, que em seguida foram examinados, de maneira independente, por um geriatra que não tinha conhecimento dos resultados da Escala. Os diagnósticos de Depressão Maior ou Distimia foram feitos utilizando-se os critérios do Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV. A sensibilidade e a especificidade nos vários pontos de corte foram expressas pela curva Receiver Operating Characteristic. RESULTADOS: O ponto de corte de melhor equilíbrio foi 5/6, obteve sensibilidade de 81% e especificidade de 71%; e o valor da área sob a curva Receiver Operating Characteristic foi de 0,85 (IC 95%: 0,79-0,91. CONCLUSÕES: A Escala de Depressão Geriátrica pode ser utilizada para o rastreamento de sintomas depressivos na população geriátrica ambulatorial brasileira. O ponto de corte 5/6, sugerido inicialmente por outros autores, mostrou-se adequado.OBJECTIVE: The Geriatric Depression Scale for screening depressive symptoms in the elderly has not been assessed in elderly outpatients who seek primary health care in Brazil. The objective was to determine the validity of the Short Scale for Major Depressive Episode or Dysthymia (GDS-15 in elderly outpatients. METHODS: The scale was applied in 302 subjects with 65 years and older and then examined by an independent geriatrician, blinded to the results. Major depression and dysthymia were diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated at several cutoff values and a Receiver

  15. Personality disorders in heart failure patients requiring psychiatric management: comorbidity detections from a routine depression and anxiety screening protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Selkow, Terina

    2014-12-30

    Several international guidelines recommend routine depression screening in cardiac disease populations. No previous study has determined the prevalence and comorbidities of personality disorders in patients presenting for psychiatric treatment after these screening initiatives. In the first stage 404 heart failure (HF) patients were routinely screened and 73 underwent structured interview when either of the following criteria were met: (a) Patient Health Questionnaire ≥10; (b) Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire ≥7); (c) Response to one item panic-screener. Or (d) Suicidality. Patients with personality disorders were compared to the positive-screen patients on psychiatric comorbidities. The most common personality disorders were avoidant (8.2%), borderline (6.8%) and obsessive compulsive (4.1%), other personality disorders were prevalent in less than Personality disorder patients had significantly greater risk of major depression (risk ratio (RR) 1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-13.3), generalized anxiety disorder (RR 3.2; 95% CI 1.0-10.0), social phobia (RR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-11.5) and alcohol abuse/dependence (RR 3.2; 95% 1.0-9.5). The findings that HF patients with personality disorders presented with complex psychiatric comorbidity suggest that pathways facilitating the integration of psychiatric services into cardiology settings are warranted when routine depression screening is in place.

  16. Clinic staff attitudes towards the use of mHealth technology to conduct perinatal depression screenings: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineros-Leano, Maria; Tabb, Karen M; Sears, Heather; Meline, Brandon; Huang, Hsiang

    2015-04-01

    The use of mHealth technology is an innovative approach for screening low-income mothers for depression. Past studies show that the use of technology removes barriers such as literacy issues, language challenges, concerns about privacy and lack of transportation and can also increase reliability. However, little is known about staff attitudes and perceptions towards using mHealth technology for screening low-income women for depression in clinics. Four focus groups were conducted with staff members in a supplemental nutrition program for women, infants and children located in a public health clinic. A semi-structured focus group interview guide was used to examine staff perceptions related to depression screening with tablet technology. All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to analyse all focus group data. Three major benefits and two major barriers were found. The benefits of using technology for perinatal depression screenings were reduction of literacy and language barriers, reduction of redundancy and errors and increased privacy for clients. The barriers were increased network issues and responsibility for technology, which included fear of the devices being lost, stolen or broken. Before implementing mHealth tablet technology for depression screening in a public health clinic, it is important to address the concerns of staff members to make the transition more effective. This study provides timely information on staff-perceived benefits and barriers when implementing mHealth technology in a public health setting. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to assess suicidal ideation among pregnant women in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Gelaye, Bizu; Rondon, Marta B; Sánchez, Sixto E; Simon, Gregory E; Henderson, David C; Barrios, Yasmin V; Sánchez, Pedro Mascaro; Williams, Michelle A

    2015-12-01

    We sought to examine the concordance of two suicidal ideation items from the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), to evaluate the prevalence of suicidal ideation among pregnant women, and to assess the co-occurrence of suicidal ideation with antepartum depressive symptoms. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,517 pregnant women attending prenatal care clinics in Lima, Peru. Item 9 of the PHQ-9 assesses suicidal ideation over the last 14 days while item 10 of the EPDS assesses suicidal ideation in the past 7 days. The two suicidal ideation items have a high concordance rate (84.2 %) but a moderate agreement (the Cohen's kappa = 0.42). Based on the PHQ-9 and the EPDS, 15.8 and 8.8 % of participants screened positive for suicidal ideation, respectively. Assessed by the PHQ-9, 51 % of participants with suicidal ideation had probable depression. In prenatal care clinics, screening for suicidal ideation is needed for women with and without depressive symptoms. Future studies are needed to identify additional predictors of antepartum suicidality, determine the appropriate duration of reporting period for suicidal ideation screening, and assess the percentage of individuals with positive responses to the two suicidal ideation items at high risk of planning and attempting suicide.

  18. Correlation between dietary zinc intakes and its serum levels with depression scales in young female students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani, Reza; Saeidi, Somaye; Nazari, Zahra; Nematpour, Sorour

    2010-11-01

    It has been suggested that mood disorders and depressive status may be accompanied by lowered zinc status in the body, and adequate consumption of zinc increases a general perceived well-being. The main objective of this study was to assess the correlation between serum zinc concentrations and dietary zinc intakes with depression scores in university female students. In the first phase, Beck's depression questionnaire was applied in a random sampling of 308 selected 20-25-year-old female students (one third of total students in Ahvaz Jondi-Shapour University of Medical Sciences Golestan dormitories) to assess the major depressive disorder (MDD) scales. Then, in the second phase, 23 students who identified as having moderate and severe depression were selected as the case group, and 23 healthy age matched were chosen as the controls. Each of them completed a 12-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire containing the main food sources of zinc in the usual dietary patterns and also a 24-h food recall questionnaire to assure the daily zinc intakes. Daily zinc intakes were obtained by multiplying each portion size by its zinc content using food tables. A 5-ml blood sample was taken for further serum zinc status using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry technique. Pearson's r was used to show the correlation between quantitative variables. Both daily zinc intake and serum zinc concentrations of MDD group were about two thirds of healthy index (p Depressed individuals used to eat lower servings of red meats and chicken as the main food sources of zinc in students' usual diets (p students (r = 0.55; p students(r = -0.65; p depressed female students, dietary zinc intake is correlated to its serum concentrations; however, the serum zinc levels are inversely correlated to depression scales. Consumption of the main dietary sources of zinc such as red meats and chicken should be encouraged in young depressed girls.

  19. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  20. Multi-scale motility amplitude associated with suicidal thoughts in major depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premananda Indic

    Full Text Available Major depression occurs at high prevalence in the general population, often starts in juvenile years, recurs over a lifetime, and is strongly associated with disability and suicide. Searches for biological markers in depression may have been hindered by assuming that depression is a unitary and relatively homogeneous disorder, mainly of mood, rather than addressing particular, clinically crucial features or diagnostic subtypes. Many studies have implicated quantitative alterations of motility rhythms in depressed human subjects. Since a candidate feature of great public-health significance is the unusually high risk of suicidal behavior in depressive disorders, we studied correlations between a measure (vulnerability index [VI] derived from multi-scale characteristics of daily-motility rhythms in depressed subjects (n = 36 monitored with noninvasive, wrist-worn, electronic actigraphs and their self-assessed level of suicidal thinking operationalized as a wish to die. Patient-subjects had a stable clinical diagnosis of bipolar-I, bipolar-II, or unipolar major depression (n = 12 of each type. VI was associated inversely with suicidal thinking (r = -0.61 with all subjects and r = -0.73 with bipolar disorder subjects; both p<0.0001 and distinguished patients with bipolar versus unipolar major depression with a sensitivity of 91.7% and a specificity of 79.2%. VI may be a useful biomarker of characteristic features of major depression, contribute to differentiating bipolar and unipolar depression, and help to detect risk of suicide. An objective biomarker of suicide-risk could be advantageous when patients are unwilling or unable to share suicidal thinking with clinicians.

  1. A reliability generalization meta-analysis of coefficient alpha for the Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassar, Matt; Bradley, Greg

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a meta-analytic method known as reliability generalization to investigate the score reliability for a popular depression measure: The Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale. We used the technique to provide an aggregate estimate of coefficient alpha across empirical studies that have employed the measure over time and across populations. Furthermore, we identified sample and demographic characteristics associated with variance in coefficient alpha. We discuss conditions associated with variability in coefficient alpha and alert researchers and practitioners to appropriate uses of the scale based on common reliability benchmarks.

  2. Striatal dopaminergic activity (FDOPA-PET) associated with cognitive items of a depression scale (MADRS) in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerts, Janneke; Leenders, Klaus L.; Koning, Marthe; Portman, Axel T.; van Beilen, Marije

    2007-01-01

    Motor symptoms form the hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD), although other features such as depression are often present. Currently-used depression rating scales measure affective and somatic symptoms. These somatic symptoms of depression can also be core PD symptoms, suggesting an overlap of symp

  3. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS: validation in a Greek general hospital sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patapis Paulos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS has been used in several languages to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients with good results. Methods The HADS was administered to 521 participants (275 controls and 246 inpatients and outpatients of the Internal Medicine and Surgical Departments in 'Attikon' General Hospital in Athens. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were used as 'gold standards' for depression and anxiety respectively. Results The HADS presented high internal consistency; Cronbach's α cofficient was 0.884 (0.829 for anxiety and 0.840 for depression and stability (test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient 0.944. Factor analysis showed a two-factor structure. The HADS showed high concurrent validity; the correlations of the scale and its subscales with the BDI and the STAI were high (0.722 – 0.749. Conclusion The Greek version of HADS showed good psychometric properties and could serve as a useful tool for clinicians to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients.

  4. Confirmatory factor analysis of the portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 Análisis factorial confirmatoria de la versión portuguesa de la Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 Análise fatorial confirmatória da versão portuguesa da Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21

    OpenAIRE

    João Luís Alves Apóstolo; Barry Allen Tanner; Cynthia Lee Arfken

    2012-01-01

    To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years) comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The co...

  5. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  6. Screening for lung cancer: time for large-scale screening by chest computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlomi, Dekel; Ben-Avi, Ronny; Balmor, Gingy Ronen; Onn, Amir; Peled, Nir

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Age and smoking are the primary risk factors for lung cancer. Treatment based on surgical removal in the early stages of the disease results in better survival. Screening programmes for early detection that used chest radiography and sputum cytology failed to attain reduction of lung cancer mortality. Screening by low-dose computed tomography (CT) demonstrated high rates of early-stage lung cancer detection in a high-risk population. Nevertheless, no mortality advantage was manifested in small randomised control trials. A large randomised control trial in the U.S.A., the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), showed a significant relative reduction of 20% in lung cancer mortality and 6.7% reduction in total mortality, yet no reduction was evidenced in the late-stage prevalence. Screening for lung cancer by low-dose CT reveals a high level of false-positive lesions, which necessitates further noninvasive and invasive evaluations. Based primarily on the NLST eligible criteria, new guidelines have recently been developed by major relevant organisations. The overall recommendation coming out of this collective work calls for lung cancer screening by low-dose CT to be performed in medical centres manned by specialised multidisciplinary teams, as well as for a mandatory, pre-screening, comprehensive discussion with the patient about the risks and advantages involved in the process. Lung cancer screening is on the threshold of a new era, with ever more questions still left open to challenge future studies.

  7. Validation of the PHQ-9 as a screening instrument for depression in diabetes patients in specialized outpatient clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Steenbergen-Weijenburg Kirsten M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the treatment of depression in diabetes patients, it is important that depression is recognized at an early stage. A screening method for depression is the patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9. The aim of this study is to validate the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 as a screening instrument for depression in diabetes patients in outpatient clinics. Methods 197 diabetes patients from outpatient clinics in the Netherlands filled in the PHQ-9. Within 2 weeks they were approached for an interview with the Mini Neuropsychiatric Interview. DSM-IV diagnoses of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD were the criterion for which the sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative predictive values and Receiver Operator Curves (ROC for the PHQ-9 were calculated. Results The cut-off point of a summed score of 12 on the PHQ-9 resulted in a sensitivity of 75.7% and a specificity of 80.0%. Predictive values for negative and positive test results were respectively 93.4% and 46.7%. The ROC showed an area under the curve of 0.77. Conclusions The PHQ-9 proved to be an efficient and well-received screening instrument for MDD in this sample of diabetes patients in a specialized outpatient clinic. The higher cut-off point of 12 that was needed and somewhat lower sensitivity than had been reported elsewhere may be due to the fact that the patients from a specialized diabetes clinic have more severe pathology and more complications, which could be recognized by the PHQ-9 as depression symptoms, while instead being diabetes symptoms.

  8. Psychometric properties of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 in older primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloster, Andrew T; Rhoades, Howard M; Novy, Diane; Klotsche, Jens; Senior, Ashley; Kunik, Mark; Wilson, Nancy; Stanley, Melinda A

    2008-10-01

    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) was designed to efficiently measure the core symptoms of anxiety and depression and has demonstrated positive psychometric properties in adult samples of anxiety and depression patients and student samples. Despite these findings, the psychometric properties of the DASS remain untested in older adults, for whom the identification of efficient measures of these constructs is especially important. To determine the psychometric properties of the DASS 21-item version in older adults, we analyzed data from 222 medical patients seeking treatment to manage worry. Consistent with younger samples, a three-factor structure best fit the data. Results also indicated good internal consistency, excellent convergent validity, and good discriminative validity, especially for the Depression scale. Receiver operating curve analyses indicated that the DASS-21 predicted the diagnostic presence of generalized anxiety disorder and depression as well as other commonly used measures. These data suggest that the DASS may be used with older adults in lieu of multiple scales designed to measure similar constructs, thereby reducing participant burden and facilitating assessment in settings with limited assessment resources.

  9. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale in patients with tinnitus and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Mohammed Abdel Motaal; Elmagd, Manal Hassan Abo; Elbadry, Mohammed Mohammed; Kader, Rafeek Mohammed Abdel

    2014-08-01

    The study was proposed to evaluate co-morbid depression, anxiety and stress associated with tinnitus patients. The study was done on 196 subjects: 100 patients suffering from subjective tinnitus associated with hearing loss (tinnitus group), 45 patients suffering from hearing loss only (hearing loss group) and 50 healthy subjects not suffering from tinnitus or hearing loss (control group); the age ranges from 20 to 60 years old. The studied sample was subjected to full ear, nose and throat examinations and audiological evaluation. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) was developed by Levibond H and Levibond F to assess three self-report scales designed to measure the negative emotional status of depression, anxiety and stress. All patients and control group were evaluated by DASS. (1) Depression: males were affected more than females. All patients over 60 years were affected by depression. The duration of tinnitus seems correlating with the severity of depression. Only 2 patients (4.3 %) of the hearing loss group suffer from depression. (2) Anxiety: 90 % of males suffer from anxiety as compared to 83.3 % females. The age group 20-29 years old suffers more than other age groups. Only 4 patients (8.7 %) of hearing loss group suffer from anxiety. (3) Stress: females seem to be affected by the stress (76.7 %) more than males (67.5). Patients in age group 30-39 suffer the most from the disease. There is a direct correlation between duration of tinnitus and severity of stress. No one of the hearing loss group suffers from stress. In conclusion, depression, anxiety and stress should be taken into consideration in the treatment of patients suffering from tinnitus.

  10. Utilization of Professional Mental Health Services Related to Population-Level Screening for Anxiety, Depression, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Among Public High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, John D; Le, Vi Donna; Baillargeon, Jacques; Temple, Jeff R

    2016-08-01

    This study examines results from three mental health screening measures in a cohort of adolescent public school students in seven public schools in Southeast Texas affiliated with the Dating it Safe study. We estimated the odds of receiving professional mental health treatment in the previous year given results from different mental health screening batteries: the CES-D 10 battery for depression screening, the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders, and the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder screen. Overall, students with higher scores on screening instruments for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and combinations of screening instruments were more likely to have sought past-year professional mental health treatment than non-symptomatic youth. However, the proportion of students screening positive and receiving professional treatment was low, ranging from 11 to 16 %. This study emphasizes the need for broader evaluation of population-based mental health screening among adolescents.

  11. Predictive accuracy of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale assessment during pregnancy for the risk of developing postpartum depressive symptoms : a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J. L.; Beijers, C.; van Pampus, M. G.; Verbeek, T.; Stolk, R. P.; Milgrom, J.; Bockting, C. L. H.; Burger, H.

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate whether the 10-item Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) administered antenatally is accurate in predicting postpartum depressive symptoms, and whether a two-item EPDS has similar predictive accuracy. DesignProspective cohort study. SettingObstetric care in the Netherl

  12. INECO frontal screening: um instrumento para avaliar as funções executivas na depressão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Nunes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available O comprometimento das funções executivas constitui um dos défices mais robustos na perturbação depressiva. Contudo, poucos instrumentos têm sido concebidos para avaliar de forma breve e específica as funções executivas na depressão. Este estudo objetiva avaliar as funções executivas em doentes com depressão, analisar a relação existente entre a gravidade da depressão e o desempenho do funcionamento executivo, e verificar a sensibilidade e especificidade do INECO Frontal Screening (IFS comparativamente com a Behavioural Assessment of Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS na avaliação das funções executivas em doentes com depressão. 50 participantes com depressão (Média idades = 43.46, DP = 10.71 e 35 participantes pertencentes ao grupo de controlo (Média idades = 40.91, DP = 10.46, de ambos os géneros, foram avaliados através do IFS e da BADS. Os participantes com depressão apresentaram um funcionamento executivo deficitário comparativamente ao grupo de controlo tanto no IFS como na BADS e o aumento da gravidade da depressão fez-se acompanhar por um maior comprometimento do funcionamento executivo. O IFS demonstrou-se tão sensível e específico quanto a BADS na deteção da disfunção executiva em doentes com depressão. Este estudo sugere que o IFS é um instrumento breve, sensível e específico para avaliar as funções executivas na depressão.

  13. Task force report: Scales for screening and evaluating tremor: Critique and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elble, R.; Bain, P.; Forjaz, M. Joao; Haubenberger, D.; Testa, C.; Goetz, C.G.; Leentjens, A.F.; Martinez-Martin, P.; Traon, A. Pavy-Le; Post, B.; Sampaio, C.; Stebbins, G.T.; Weintraub, D.; Schrag, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Movement Disorder Society established a task force to review rating scales for the assessment of tremor. Screening instruments used in identifying patients with tremor were also reviewed. Seven tremor severity scales, six activities of daily living (ADL)/disability scales, four quality-of-life

  14. Task force report: Scales for screening and evaluating tremor: Critique and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elble, R.; Bain, P.; Forjaz, M. Joao; Haubenberger, D.; Testa, C.; Goetz, C.G.; Leentjens, A.F.; Martinez-Martin, P.; Traon, A. Pavy-Le; Post, B.; Sampaio, C.; Stebbins, G.T.; Weintraub, D.; Schrag, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Movement Disorder Society established a task force to review rating scales for the assessment of tremor. Screening instruments used in identifying patients with tremor were also reviewed. Seven tremor severity scales, six activities of daily living (ADL)/disability scales, four quality-of-life s

  15. Screening for symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients admitted to a university hospital with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghetti, Carolina Casanova; Guidolin, Bruno Luiz; Zimmermann, Paulo Roberto; Sfoggia, Ana

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome to a university hospital and to examine associations with use of psychotropic drugs. Ninety-one patients who had had an acute coronary event were enrolled on this cross-sectional prevalence study. Characteristics of the study population and the prevalence rates of depression and anxiety in the sample were assessed using the Hospital São Lucas da Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS) psychiatric consultation protocol, which includes clinical and sociodemographic data, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The prevalence of symptoms of anxiety was 48.4% (44 patients) and the prevalence of depressive symptoms was 26.4% (24 patients). Of these, 19 patients (20.9% of the whole sample) had scores indicative of both types of symptoms concomitantly. Considering the whole sample, just 17 patients (18.7%) were receiving treatment for anxiety or depression with benzodiazepines and/or antidepressants. Anxiety and depression are disorders that are more prevalent among patients with acute coronary syndrome than in the general population, but they are generally under-diagnosed and under-treated. Patients with anxiety and depression simultaneously had higher scores on the HADS for anxiety and depression and therefore require more intensive care.

  16. The use of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale to assist in the case management of patients living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Deborah; Mizuno, Lori T; Thornberry, Anya

    2010-01-01

    Depression is a common comorbidity in people with HIV/AIDS, frequently impacting disease status by direct effects on immune fuinction and adherence to antiretroviral treatment. For case managers, who are often the main contacts for patients, quick and simple identification of patients at high risk for depression can be both a challenge and a priority. These patients should be screened at the primary point of care and then referred to mental health providers for further evaluation or diagnosis. Here we report the experiences in three diverse case management settings using the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale for patient self-reporting of depression symptoms. The three clinics--Broward House in Wilton Manors, Florida; BIENESTAR Human Services in Los Angeles, California, and the West Midtown Medical Group in New York City--serve diverse racial and ethnic populations with substantial HIV infection rates in urban and rural communities. Benefits of using this validated tool include increased patient self-awareness and acceptance by mental health providers, thereby facilitating a final diagnosis that leads to improved implementation of treatment for depression. Case management settings provide a unique point of contact to unite clients with mental health care, especially in disease settings where depression or other mental health conditions are prevalent.

  17. Rasch analysis of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (hads for use in motor neurone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Pamela J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS is commonly used to assess symptoms of anxiety and depression in motor neurone disease (MND. The measure has never been specifically validated for use within this population, despite questions raised about the scale's validity. This study seeks to analyse the construct validity of the HADS in MND by fitting its data to the Rasch model. Methods The scale was administered to 298 patients with MND. Scale assessment included model fit, differential item functioning (DIF, unidimensionality, local dependency and category threshold analysis. Results Rasch analyses were carried out on the HADS total score as well as depression and anxiety subscales (HADS-T, D and A respectively. After removing one item from both of the seven item scales, it was possible to produce modified HADS-A and HADS-D scales which fit the Rasch model. An 11-item higher-order HADS-T total scale was found to fit the Rasch model following the removal of one further item. Conclusion Our results suggest that a modified HADS-A and HADS-D are unidimensional, free of DIF and have good fit to the Rasch model in this population. As such they are suitable for use in MND clinics or research. The use of the modified HADS-T as a higher-order measure of psychological distress was supported by our data. Revised cut-off points are given for the modified HADS-A and HADS-D subscales.

  18. Changes in depression in a cohort of Danish HIV-positive individuals: time for routine screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjaer, Lotte; Laursen, Tinne; Christensen, Nils B

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to follow a cohort of HIV-positive individuals for 3 years in order to assess changes in depression, adherence, unsafe sex and emotional strains from living with HIV. Methods: Participants were assessed for depression, adherence, emotional strain and unsafe sex...... via a questionnaire. The Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI) was used to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI score of 20 or above (moderate to major depression) were offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Results: In 2005, 205 HIV......-positive individuals participated in the study. Symptoms of depression (BDI >14) were observed in 77 (38%) and major depression (BDI ≥20) in 53 (26%) individuals. In 2008, 148 participants were retested (72% of original sample). Depression (BDI >14) was observed in 38 (26%) and symptoms of major depression (BDI ≥20...

  19. Measurement invariance of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 across medical student genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Peyman; Nozari, Farnoosh; Ahrari, Forooghosadat; Bagheri, Zahra

    2017-03-30

    This study aimed to assess whether male and female Iranian medical students perceived the meaning of the items in the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 consistently. A convenience sample of 783 preclinical medical students from the first to sixth semester was invited to this cross-sectional study. Of the 477 respondents, 238 were male and 239 were female. All participants completed the Persian version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21. The graded response model was used to assess measurement invariance of the instrument across the gender groups. Categorical confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the construct validity of the measure. Moreover, internal consistency was assessed via Cronbach's Alpha. Statistically significant differential item functioning was flagged for just item 6 in the depression subscales (c(2)=6.5, df=1, p=0.011). However, removing or retaining the item 6 in the stress subscale did not change our findings significantly, when we compared stress scores across two genders. The results of categorical confirmatory factor analysis supported the fit of the three-factor model of Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21. Moreover, Cronbach's alpha was greater than 0.7 in depression, anxiety and stress subscales. This study revealed that Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 is an invariant measure across male and female medical students. Hence, this reliable and valid instrument can be used for meaningful comparison of distress scores between medical student genders. Gender comparisons of medical students' psychological profiles provide a better insight into gender influences on the outcome of medical education and medical practice.

  20. Factorial and Discriminant Validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, John G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the factorial and discriminant validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale for 116 parents participating in family support programs. Factorial validity was adequate, and results indicated a moderate correlation between the CES-D and self-esteem and state anxiety. However, a high correlation was obtained…

  1. Psychometric Properties of an Arabic Version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Miriam Taouk; Lovibond, Peter; Laube, Roy; Megahead, Hamido A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To translate and evaluate the psychometric properties of an Arabic-language version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS). Method: The items were translated, back translated, refined, and tested in an Australian immigrant sample (N = 220). Results: Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the Arabic DASS discriminates between…

  2. Measurement Invariance of the Reynolds Depression Adolescent Scale across Gender and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Wells, Craig; Paino, Mercedes; Lemos-Giraldez, Serafin; Villazon-Garcia, Ursula; Sierra, Susana; Garcia-Portilla Gonzalez, Ma Paz; Bobes, Julio; Muniz, Jose

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to examine measurement invariance of the Reynolds Depression Adolescent Scale (RADS) (Reynolds, 1987) across gender and age in a representative sample of nonclinical adolescents. The sample was composed of 1,659 participants, 801 males (48.3%), with a mean age of 15.9 years (SD = 1.2). Confirmatory…

  3. Validation of Geriatric Depression Scale--5 Scores among Sedentary Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, David X.; McAuley, Edward; Motl, Robert W.; Elavsky, Steriani; Konopack, James F.; Jerome, Gerald J.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the validity of Geriatric Depression Scale--5 (GDS-5) scores among older sedentary adults based on its structural properties and relationship with external criteria. Participants from two samples (Ns = 185 and 93; M ages = 66 and 67 years) completed baseline assessments as part of randomized controlled exercise trials.…

  4. A Brief Version of the Geriatric Depression Scale for the Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheung-Tak; Chan, Alfred C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Elderly persons (N=310) attending outpatient psychiatric clinics were given an interview on the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (T. L. Brink et al., 1982; J. A. Yesavage et al., 1983) and received an independent psychiatric evaluation. A 3-step binary logistic regression showed that 2 items measuring positive affect and 2 others measuring…

  5. Depression in geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Asghar-Ali, A; Braun, U K

    2009-02-01

    While the most serious of depressive illnesses in the elderly is major depressive disorder, patients' quality of life can be significantly impacted by dysthmic disorder, sub-threshold depression (minor depression), or a depressive disorder due to a general medical condition, all of which have been shown to be more prevalent than major depression in the community dwelling population of older adults. Older adults are also more likely to develop grief reaction and frequently deal with issues of bereavement. This review will discuss the diagnoses of all relevant depressive diagnoses that primary care physicians are likely to encounter. Among the many different assessment tools that screen for depression the briefest instruments are a two-question screening tool recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and, specifically developed for older adults, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is available in a short 15- Yes/No-question version. Many medical illnesses are associated with depressive symptoms. The focus in this review is on dementing illnesses/cerebrovascular disease, dementia of the Alzheimer's type, and Parkinson disease. First-line pharmacological therapy of depression includes selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs), and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Side effects of particular drugs can often be geared towards achieving additional benefits, e.g. weight gain associated with the use of some SSRISs may be helpful for patients with dementia.

  6. Nanoliter-scale protein crystallization and screening with a microfluidic droplet robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Zhu, Li-Na; Guo, Rui; Cui, Heng-Jun; Ye, Sheng; Fang, Qun

    2014-05-23

    Large-scale screening of hundreds or even thousands of crystallization conditions while with low sample consumption is in urgent need, in current structural biology research. Here we describe a fully-automated droplet robot for nanoliter-scale crystallization screening that combines the advantages of both automated robotics technique for protein crystallization screening and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. A semi-contact dispensing method was developed to achieve flexible, programmable and reliable liquid-handling operations for nanoliter-scale protein crystallization experiments. We applied the droplet robot in large-scale screening of crystallization conditions of five soluble proteins and one membrane protein with 35-96 different crystallization conditions, study of volume effects on protein crystallization, and determination of phase diagrams of two proteins. The volume for each droplet reactor is only ca. 4-8 nL. The protein consumption significantly reduces 50-500 fold compared with current crystallization stations.

  7. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that depression is000  a common comorbid health issue in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Reviews have also concluded that depression in diabetes is associated with higher HbA1c levels, less optimal self-care behaviours, lower quality of life, incident vascular...... complications and higher mortality rates. However, longitudinal studies into the course of depression in people with type 1 diabetes remain scarce. In this issue of Diabetologia, Kampling and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4123-0 ) report the 5 year trajectories of depression in adults with newly diagnosed...... type 1 diabetes (mean age, 28 years). Their baseline results showed that shortly after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes a major depressive episode was diagnosed in approximately 6% of participants, while 8% suffered from an anxiety disorder. The longitudinal depression data showed that, in a 5 year...

  8. The prevalence of suicidal ideation identified by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in postpartum women in primary care: findings from the RESPOND trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharp Debbie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available 1 Abstract 1.1 Background Suicide is a leading cause of perinatal maternal deaths in industrialised countries but there has been little research to investigate prevalence or correlates of postpartum suicidality. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale is widely used in primary and maternity services to screen for perinatal depressive disorders, and includes a question on suicidal ideation (question 10. We aimed to investigate the prevalence, persistence and correlates of suicidal thoughts in postpartum women in the context of a randomised controlled trial of treatments for postnatal depression. 1.2 Methods Women in primary care were sent postal questionnaires at 6 weeks postpartum to screen for postnatal depression before recruitment into an RCT. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS was used to screen for postnatal depression and in those with high levels of symptoms, a home visit with a standardised psychiatric interview was carried out using the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised version (CIS-R. Other socio-demographic and clinical variables were measured, including functioning (SF12 and quality of the marital relationship (GRIMS. Women who entered the trial were followed up for 18 weeks. 1.3 Results 9% of 4,150 women who completed the EPDS question relating to suicidal ideation reported some suicidal ideation (including hardly ever; 4% reported that the thought of harming themselves had occurred to them sometimes or quite often. In women who entered the randomised trial and completed the EPDS question relating to suicidal ideation (n = 253, suicidal ideation was associated with younger age, higher parity and higher levels of depressive symptoms in the multivariate analysis. Endorsement of 'yes, quite often' to question 10 on the EPDS was associated with affirming at least two CIS-R items on suicidality. We found no association between suicidal ideation and SF-12 physical or mental health or the EPDS total score at 18 weeks. 1

  9. [The ICD-10 Symptom Rating (ISR): validation of the depression scale in a clinical sample].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Wolfram Alexis; Loew, Thomas; von Heymann, Friedrich; Stadtmüller, Godehard; Georgi, Alexander; Tischinger, Michael; Strom, Frederik; Mutschler, Friederike; Tritt, Karin

    2015-06-01

    The ICD-10 Symptom Rating (ISR) 1 measures the severity of psychiatric disorders with 29 items on 5 subscales as comprehensively as possible. The following syndromes are measured: Depressive syndrome, anxiety syndrome, obsessive-compulsive syndrome, Somatoform syndrome, eating disorder syndrome as well as additional items that cover various mental syndromes, and an overall score. The study reports findings on the validity and sensitivity to change of the depression subscale (ISR-D). In a clinical sample of N=949 inpatients with depression spectrum disorders the convergent validity was determined by correlation with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) 3 and the subscale "depression" of the Symptom-Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) 4. The high correlation between the different instruments confirms the validity of the ISR-Depression Scale. The sensitivity to change of the ISR seems higher than that of the BDI and the SCL-90. Because of its economy and the good psychometric properties the ISR is recommended for use in clinical samples.

  10. A Psychometric Analysis of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scales--Parent Version in a School Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebesutani, Chad; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K.; Nakamura, Brad J.; Regan, Jennifer; Lynch, Roxanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale--Parent Version (RCADS-P) is a parent-report questionnaire of youth anxiety and depression with scales corresponding to the "DSM" diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and major depressive…

  11. A Psychometric Analysis of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scales--Parent Version in a School Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebesutani, Chad; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K.; Nakamura, Brad J.; Regan, Jennifer; Lynch, Roxanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale--Parent Version (RCADS-P) is a parent-report questionnaire of youth anxiety and depression with scales corresponding to the "DSM" diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and major depressive…

  12. Validation of Standardized Questionnaires Evaluating Symptoms of Depression in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Approaches to Screening for a Frequent Yet Underrated Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englbrecht, Matthias; Alten, Rieke; Aringer, Martin; Baerwald, Christoph G; Burkhardt, Harald; Eby, Nancy; Fliedner, Gerhard; Gauger, Bettina; Henkemeier, Ulf; Hofmann, Michael W; Kleinert, Stefan; Kneitz, Christian; Krueger, Klaus; Pohl, Christoph; Roske, Anne-Eve; Schett, Georg; Schmalzing, Marc; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Peter Tony, Hans; Wendler, Joerg

    2017-01-01

    To validate standard self-report questionnaires for depression screening in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and compare these measures to one another and to the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), a standardized structured interview. In 9 clinical centers across Germany, depressive symptomatology was assessed in 262 adult RA patients at baseline (T0) and at 12 ± 2 weeks followup (T1) using the World Health Organization 5-Item Well-Being Index (WHO-5), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). The construct validity of these depression questionnaires (using convergent and discriminant validity) was evaluated using Spearman's correlations at both time points. The test-retest reliability of the questionnaires was evaluated in RA patients who had not undergone a psychotherapeutic intervention or received antidepressants between T0 and T1. The sensitivity and the specificity of the questionnaires were calculated using the results of the MADRS, a structured interview, as the gold standard. According to Spearman's correlation coefficients, all questionnaires met convergent validity criteria (ρ > |0.50|), with the BDI-II performing best, while correlations with age and disease activity for all questionnaires met the criteria for discriminant validity (ρ questionnaire to meet the predefined retest reliability criterion (ρ ≥ 0.70) was the BDI-II (rs  = 0.77), which also achieved the best results for both sensitivity and specificity (>80%) when using the MADRS as the gold standard. The BDI-II best met the predefined criteria, and the PHQ-9 met most of the validity criteria, with lower sensitivity and specificity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Screening and Treatment for Depression, Dementia, and Psychosis with Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AND TREATMENT FOR DEPRESSION, DEMENTIA, AND PSYCHOSIS WITH PARKINSON DISEASE Depression, dementia, and psychosis are common in people with Parkinson disease. These conditions can affect how people with Parkinson ...

  14. Standardized clinical outcome rating scale for depression for use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Posternak, Michael A; Chelminski, Iwona; Friedman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The integration of research into clinical practice to conduct effectiveness studies faces multiple obstacles. One obstacle is the burden of completing research measures of outcome. A simple, reliable, and valid measure that could be rated at every visit, incorporated into a clinician's progress note, and reflect the DSM-IV definition of a major depressive episode (including partial and full remission from the episode) would enhance the ability to conduct effectiveness research. The goal of the present study was to examine the reliability and validity of such a measure. Three hundred and three psychiatric outpatients who were being treated for a DSM-IV major depressive episode were rated on the Standardized Clinical Outcome Rating for Depression (SCOR-D), 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, and the Global Assessment of Functioning. We examined the correlation between the SCOR-D and the other measures, and conducted an analyses of variance to compare mean values on these measures for each rating point on the SCOR-D. The inter-rater reliability of the SCOR-D dimensional ratings and categorical determination of remission were high. The SCOR-D was highly correlated with the other scales, and there were significant differences on the other measures of depression severity between each adjacent rating level of the SCOR-D. The SCOR-D is a brief standardized outcome measure linked to the DSM-IV approach toward defining remission that can be incorporated into routine clinical practice without adding undue burden to the treating clinician with some evidence of reliability and validity. This measure could make it more feasible to conduct effectiveness studies in clinical practice.

  15. The validity of self-rating depression scales in patients with chronic widespread pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Omerovic, Emina; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of depression in chronic pain patients by self-rating questionnaires developed and validated for use in normal and/or psychiatric populations is common. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) in a sample...... of females with chronic widespread pain (CWP). METHOD: A total of 263 females diagnosed with CWP and referred for rehabilitation completed the MDI as part of the baseline evaluation. Rasch analysis was applied to this dataset. Rasch measurement models allow detailed analyses of an instrument's rating scale...

  16. Children's Depression Screener (ChilD-S): Development and Validation of a Depression Screening Instrument for Children in Pediatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruhe, Barbara; Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Pietsch, Kathrin; Baethmann, Martina; Peters, Jochen; Kellnar, Stephan; Heep, Axel; Burdach, Stefan; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Schulte-Korne, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and validate the Children's Depression Screener (ChilD-S) for use in pediatric care. In two pediatric samples, children aged 9-12 (NI = 200; NII = 246) completed an explorative item pool (subsample I) and a revised item pool (subsample II). Diagnostic accuracy of each of the 22 items from the revised…

  17. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  18. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  19. Task force report: scales for screening and evaluating tremor: critique and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elble, Rodger; Bain, Peter; Forjaz, Maria João; Haubenberger, Dietrich; Testa, Claudia; Goetz, Christopher G; Leentjens, Albert F G; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Post, Bart; Sampaio, Cristina; Stebbins, Glenn T; Weintraub, Daniel; Schrag, Anette

    2013-11-01

    The Movement Disorder Society established a task force to review rating scales for the assessment of tremor. Screening instruments used in identifying patients with tremor were also reviewed. Seven tremor severity scales, six activities of daily living (ADL)/disability scales, four quality-of-life scales, and five screening instruments were identified by searching PubMed.gov. The availability, use, acceptability, reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change were reviewed for each scale; and each scale was classified as recommended, suggested or listed based on whether 3, 2, or 1 of the following criteria were met: (1) used in the assessment of tremor (yes/no), (2) used in published studies by people other than the developers (yes/no), and (3) successful clinimetric testing (yes/no). Five tremor severity scales (the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale, the Bain and Findley Clinical Tremor Rating Scale, the Bain and Findley Spirography Scale, the Washington Heights-Inwood Genetic Study of Essential Tremor Rating Scale, and the Tremor Research Group Essential Tremor Rating Assessment Scale), one ADL/disability scale (the Bain and Findley Tremor ADL Scale), one quality-of-life scale (the Quality of Life in Essential Tremor Questionnaire), and one screening instrument (the Washington Heights-Inwood Genetic Study of Essential Tremor Rating Scale, version 1) are recommended using these criteria. However, all scales need a more comprehensive analysis of sensitivity to change in order to judge their utility in clinical trials and individual patient assessments. The task force recommends that further work with existing recommended scales be performed as opposed to the development of new tremor scales.

  20. Evaluation of the Edinburgh Post Natal Depression Scale using Rasch analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tennant Alan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is a 10 item self-rating post-natal depression scale which has seen widespread use in epidemiological and clinical studies. Concern has been raised over the validity of the EPDS as a single summed scale, with suggestions that it measures two separate aspects, one of depressive feelings, the other of anxiety. Methods As part of a larger cross-sectional study conducted in Melbourne, Australia, a community sample (324 women, ranging in age from 18 to 44 years: mean = 32 yrs, SD = 4.6, was obtained by inviting primiparous women to participate voluntarily in this study. Data from the EPDS were fitted to the Rasch measurement model and tested for appropriate category ordering, for item bias through Differential Item Functioning (DIF analysis, and for unidimensionality through tests of the assumption of local independence. Results Rasch analysis of the data from the ten item scale initially demonstrated a lack of fit to the model with a significant Item-Trait Interaction total chi-square (chi Square = 82.8, df = 40; p Conclusion The results of this study suggest that EPDS, in its original 10 item form, is not a viable scale for the unidimensional measurement of depression. Rasch analysis suggests that a revised eight item version (EPDS-8 would provide a more psychometrically robust scale. The revised cut points of 7/8 and 9/10 for the EPDS-8 show high levels of agreement with the original case identification for the EPDS-10.

  1. Agreement for depression diagnosis between DSM-IV-TR criteria, three validated scales, oncologist assessment, and psychiatric clinical interview in elderly patients with advanced ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhondali W

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety Depression Scale, the distress thermometer, the mood thermometer, and OA. The interview guide for PCI was constructed from three validated scales: the GDS, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, revised (DSM criteria for depression were used as a gold standard.Results: Out of 109 patients enrolled at 21 centers, 99 (91% completed all the assessments. Patient characteristics were: mean age 78, performance status ≥2: 47 (47%. Thirty six patients (36% were identified as depressed by the PCI versus 15 (15% identified by DSM. We found moderate agreement for depression identification between DSM and GDS (κ=0.508 and PCI (κ=0.431 and high agreement with MADRS (κ=0.663. We found low or no agreement between DSM with the other assessment strategies, including OA (κ=-0.043. Identification according to OA (yes/no resulted in a false-negative rate of 87%. As a screening tool, GDS had the best sensitivity and specificity (94% and 80%, respectively.Conclusion: The use of validated tools, such as GDS, and collaboration between psychologists and oncologists are warranted to better identify emotional disorders in elderly women with AOC. Keywords: depression, elderly, cancer, screening, geriatric assessment

  2. The Problematic and Risky Internet Use Screening Scale (PRIUSS) for Adolescents and Young Adults: Scale Development and Refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenchick, Lauren A; Eickhoff, Jens; Christakis, Dimitri A; Brown, Richard L; Zhang, Chong; Benson, Meghan; Moreno, Megan A

    2014-06-01

    Problematic Internet use (PIU) is a growing health concern among adolescents and young adults. The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to develop and refine a theoretically-grounded and psychometrically-validated assessment instrument for PIU specifically tailored to adolescents and young adults. An item pool was developed using concept mapping and a review of the literature, and administered to 714 students from two universities between 18 and 25 years of age. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used in a development subsample (n=500) to construct the scale. A cross-validation sample (n=214) was used to confirm the scale's reliability. The Problematic and Risky Internet Use Screening Scale (PRIUSS) is an 18-item scale with three subscales: Social Impairment, Emotional Impairment, and Risky/Impulsive Internet Use. Based on its strong theoretical foundation and promising psychometric performance, the PRIUSS may be a valuable tool for screening and prevention efforts in this population.

  3. Factor analysis of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale from a large cancer population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam B; Selby, Peter J; Velikova, Galina; Stark, Dan; Wright, E Penny; Gould, Ann; Cull, Ann

    2002-06-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used as a tool for assessing psychological distress in patients and non-clinical groups. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results regarding the factor structure of the questionnaire for different groups of patients, and the general population. This study investigated the factor structure of the HADS in a large heterogeneous cancer population of 1474 patients. It also sought to investigate emerging evidence that the HADS conforms to the tripartite model of anxiety and depression (Clark & Watson, 1993), and to test the proposal that detection rates for clinical cases of anxiety and depression could be enhanced by partialling out the effects of higher order factors from the HADS (Dunbar et al., 2000). The results demonstrated a two-factor structure corresponding to the Anxiety and Depression subscales of the questionnaire. The factor structure remained stable for different subgroups of the sample, for males and females, as well as for different age groups, and a subgroup of metastatic cancer patients. The two factors were highly correlated (r =.52) and subsequent secondary factor analyses demonstrated a single higher order factor corresponding to psychological distress or negative affectivity. We concluded that the HADS comprises two factors corresponding to anhedonia and autonomic anxiety, which share a common variance with a primary factor namely psychological distress, and that the subscales of the HADS, rather than the residual scores (e.g. Dunbar et al., 2000) were more effective at detecting clinical cases of anxiety and depression.

  4. How do you feel? Detection of recurrent Major Depressive Disorder using a single-item screening tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rijsbergen, G. D.; Burger, H.; Hollon, S. D.; Elgersma, H. J.; Kok, G. D.; Dekker, J.; de Jong, P. J.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.

    2014-01-01

    Mood is a key element of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), and is perceived as a highly dynamic construct. The aim of the current study was to examine whether a single-item mood scale can be used for mood monitoring. One hundred thirty remitted out-patients were assessed using the Structured Clinical

  5. An Objective Screening Method for Major Depressive Disorder Using Logistic Regression Analysis of Heart Rate Variability Data Obtained in a Mental Task Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghao Sun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Heart rate variability (HRV has been intensively studied as a promising biological marker of major depressive disorder (MDD. Our previous study confirmed that autonomic activity and reactivity in depression revealed by HRV during rest and mental task (MT conditions can be used as diagnostic measures and in clinical evaluation. In this study, logistic regression analysis (LRA was utilized for the classification and prediction of MDD based on HRV data obtained in an MT paradigm.Methods: Power spectral analysis of HRV on R-R intervals before, during, and after an MT (random number generation was performed in 44 drug-naïve patients with MDD and 47 healthy control subjects at Department of Psychiatry in Shizuoka Saiseikai General Hospital. Logit scores of LRA determined by HRV indices and heart rates discriminated patients with MDD from healthy subjects. The high frequency (HF component of HRV and the ratio of the low frequency (LF component to the HF component (LF/HF correspond to parasympathetic and sympathovagal balance, respectively.Results: The LRA achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 80.0% and 79.0%, respectively, at an optimum cutoff logit score (0.28. Misclassifications occurred only when the logit score was close to the cutoff score. Logit scores also correlated significantly with subjective self-rating depression scale scores (p < 0.05.Conclusion: HRV indices recorded during a mental task may be an objective tool for screening patients with MDD in psychiatric practice. The proposed method appears promising for not only objective and rapid MDD screening, but also evaluation of its severity.

  6. Reliability and validity of Anxiety and Depression Hospital Scales (HADS: Iranian patients with anxiety and depression disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviani H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Iranian researchers and scientists in the fields of psychiatry and psychology undoubtedly need to spend more time and make considerable efforts to prepare and validate Persian versions of measurements. The present study was designed to validate HADS in Iranian clinically anxious and depressed patients compared to normal population."n"n Methods: 261 anxious and depressed patients referred to the inpatient clinic of Rouzbeh Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, and 261 healthy volunteers (matched for their sex were tested using HADS, and two additional clinical tools, ie., BDI & BAI. Then the patients were interviewed by a psychiatrist or a psychologist (using DSM IV checklist and rated for their anxiety and depression severity levels based on a 10-point scale from 1 to 10. BDI and BAI were regarded as objective device providing other external criteria to examine validity further. Moreover, to assess reliability 10% of the patients (n= 27 were randomly selected and re-tested after three days."n"n Results: Findings showed that all measures and their subscales proved to be valid and reliable with good internal consistencies in Iranian depressed and anxious patients. This study provides clinicians and researchers with

  7. Confirmatory factor analysis of the portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 Análisis factorial confirmatoria de la versión portuguesa de la Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 Análise fatorial confirmatória da versão portuguesa da Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luís Alves Apóstolo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The correlated 3-factor model fit the data best. The scale demonstrated good internal consistency, with alpha scores of the subscales ranging from 0.836 to 0.897. Correlation with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was positive and moderate with the negative affect scale; it was negative and limited with the positive affect. These findings support the correlated 3-factor structure. The test demonstrated adequate reliability and construct validity, which supports its use for screening in primary care settings with Portuguese speakers.El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar cual de los tres modelos publicados mejor caracteriza la estructura factorial de la versión portuguesa de la Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21 y evaluar su validez y confiabilidad. Se compararon los tres modelos a través de análisis factorial confirmatoria de la DASS-21, aplicada el 1.297 pacientes adultos, del servicio de atención básica (66,7% mujeres; edad Media=48,57 años. La relación entre la DASS-21 y la Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS también fue analizada. El modelo de tres factores correlacionados se ajusta mejor a los datos. La escala presentó buena consistencia interna con valores alfa observados en las subescalas, variando de 0,836 a 0,897. La correlación con la PANAS fue positiva y comedida con la escala de afecto negativa, y negativa y limitada con la escala de afecto positivo. Esos resultados corroboran la estructura de tres factores. La

  8. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Different people have different symptoms. Some symptoms of depression include: Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness ...

  9. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty may trigger depression in some people. Medical illness – ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary ...

  10. Problems in cross-cultural use of the hospital anxiety and depression scale: "no butterflies in the desert".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma A Maters

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS is widely used to screen for anxiety and depression. A large literature is citable in support of its validity, but difficulties are increasingly being identified, such as inexplicably discrepant optimal cutpoints and inconsistent factor-structures. This article examines whether these problems could be due to the construction of the HADS that poses difficulties for translation and cross-cultural use. METHODS: Authors' awareness of difficulties translating the HADS were identified by examining 20% of studies using the HADS, obtained by a systematic literature search in Pubmed and PsycINFO in May 2012. Reports of use of translations and validation studies were recorded for papers from non-English speaking countries. Narrative and systematic reviews were examined for how authors dealt with different translations. RESULTS: Of 417 papers from non-English speaking countries, only 45% indicated whether a translation was used. Studies validating translations were cited in 54%. Seventeen reviews, incorporating data from diverse translated versions, were examined. Only seven mentioned issues of language and culture, and none indicated insurmountable problems in integrating results from different translations. CONCLUSION: Initial decisions concerning item content and response options likely leave the HADS difficult to translate, but we failed to find an acknowledgment of problems in articles involving its translation and cross-cultural use. Investigators' lack of awareness of these issues can lead to anomalous results and difficulties in interpretation and integration of these results. Reviews tend to overlook these issues and most reviews indiscriminately integrate results from studies performed in different countries. Cross-culturally valid, but literally translated versions of the HADS may not be attainable, and specific cutpoints may not be valid across cultures and language. Claims about rates

  11. Psychometric Properties of the Parent Version of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale in a Clinical Sample of Turkish Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormez, Vahdet; Kilincaslan, Ayse; Ebesutani, Chad; Orengul, A Cahid; Kaya, Ilyas; Ceri, Veysi; Nasiroglu, Serhat; Filiz, Mekiya; Chorpita, Bruce F

    2017-03-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale-Parent version (RCADS-P) is a self-report questionnaire that assesses dimensions of DSM-based anxiety and depressive disorders in children and adolescents. The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Turkish version in a clinical sample of 483 children and adolescents. The child and parent versions of the RCADS, parent versions of the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-Depression Scale were administered. Current psychiatric diagnoses were assessed via the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present Version. The RCADS-P demonstrated high internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and good convergent, divergent, and discriminant validity. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the DSM-related six-factor structure. With its demonstrated favorable psychometric properties, the Turkish RCADS-P is currently the only validated parent-report instrument that assesses DSM-based anxiety and depressive disorders in children and adolescents in Turkey.

  12. Measurement equivalence of the CES-D 8 depression-scale among the ageing population in eleven European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missinne, Sarah; Vandeviver, Christophe; Van de Velde, Sarah; Bracke, Piet

    2014-07-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent mental disorders in later life. However, despite considerable research attention, great confusion remains regarding the association between ageing and depression. There is doubt as to whether a depression scale performs identically for different age groups and countries. Although measurement equivalence is a crucial prerequisite for valid comparisons across age groups and countries, it has not been established for the eight-item version of the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D8). Using multi-group confirmatory factor analysis, we assess configural, metric, and scalar measurement equivalence across two age groups (50-64 years of age and 65 or older) in eleven European countries, employing data from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement (SHARE). Results indicate that the construct of depression is comparable across age and country groups, allowing the substantive interpretation of correlates and mean levels of depressive symptoms.

  13. Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS-21): psychometric analysis across four racial groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Peter J

    2007-09-01

    Growing cross-cultural awareness has led researchers to examine frequently used research instruments and assessment tools in racially diverse populations. The present study was conducted to assess the psychometric characteristics of the 21-item version of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales (DASS-21) among different racial groups. The DASS-21 was chosen because it appears to be a reliable and easy to administer measure, ideal for both clinical and research purposes. Results suggest that the internal consistency, and convergent and divergent validity of the DASS-21 are similar across racial groups. Multigroup CFA, however, indicated that item loadings were invariant, while scale covariances were not invariant. This suggests that, although the items may load similarly on the depression, anxiety and stress constructs, these constructs may be differentially inter-related across groups. Implications for application in clinical practice are discussed.

  14. Large-scale screening of hypothetical metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmer, Christopher E.; Leaf, Michael; Lee, Chang Yeon; Farha, Omar K.; Hauser, Brad G.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Snurr, Randall Q.

    2012-02-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials constructed from modular molecular building blocks, typically metal clusters and organic linkers. These can, in principle, be assembled to form an almost unlimited number of MOFs, yet materials reported to date represent only a tiny fraction of the possible combinations. Here, we demonstrate a computational approach to generate all conceivable MOFs from a given chemical library of building blocks (based on the structures of known MOFs) and rapidly screen them to find the best candidates for a specific application. From a library of 102 building blocks we generated 137,953 hypothetical MOFs and for each one calculated the pore-size distribution, surface area and methane-storage capacity. We identified over 300 MOFs with a predicted methane-storage capacity better than that of any known material, and this approach also revealed structure-property relationships. Methyl-functionalized MOFs were frequently top performers, so we selected one such promising MOF and experimentally confirmed its predicted capacity.

  15. Large-scale screening of hypothetical metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmer, Christopher E; Leaf, Michael; Lee, Chang Yeon; Farha, Omar K; Hauser, Brad G; Hupp, Joseph T; Snurr, Randall Q

    2011-11-06

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials constructed from modular molecular building blocks, typically metal clusters and organic linkers. These can, in principle, be assembled to form an almost unlimited number of MOFs, yet materials reported to date represent only a tiny fraction of the possible combinations. Here, we demonstrate a computational approach to generate all conceivable MOFs from a given chemical library of building blocks (based on the structures of known MOFs) and rapidly screen them to find the best candidates for a specific application. From a library of 102 building blocks we generated 137,953 hypothetical MOFs and for each one calculated the pore-size distribution, surface area and methane-storage capacity. We identified over 300 MOFs with a predicted methane-storage capacity better than that of any known material, and this approach also revealed structure-property relationships. Methyl-functionalized MOFs were frequently top performers, so we selected one such promising MOF and experimentally confirmed its predicted capacity.

  16. [Evidence-based management of perinatal depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Yueh; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2008-04-01

    Perinatal depression, which may occur from pregnancy to one year after childbirth, is recognized by the World Health Organization as a significant health issue affecting women. Depression during the perinatal period can have enormous consequences, not only affecting the health of the woman herself but also influencing her interaction with her children and other family members. This article introduces several depression screening tools and evidence-based nonpharmacological managements of perinatal depression. There are some fairly valid and feasible screening methods, among which routinely screening perinatal women with EPDS (Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale) or BDI (Beck Depression Inventory) in the primary care setting is practicable. A survey of the limited literature available reveals that interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive behavior therapy and listening to music provide quantifiable depression amelioration effects for perinatal women. More scientific research moderated by women's life experiences and preferences should be conducted, however, and applied to improve women's health.

  17. The improved Clinical Global Impression Scale (iCGI: development and validation in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadouri Alane

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI is frequently used in medical care and clinical research because of its face validity and practicability. This study proposes to improve the reliability of the Clinical Global Impression (CGI scale in depressive disorders by the use of a semi-standardized interview, a new response format, and a Delphi procedure. Methods Thirty patients hospitalised for a major depressive episode were filmed at T1 (first week in hospital and at T2 (2 weeks later during a 5' specific interview. The Hamilton Depressive Rating Scale and the Symptom Check List were also rated. Eleven psychiatrists rated these videos using either the usual CGI response format or an improved response format, with or without a Delphi procedure. Results The new response format slightly improved (but not significantly the interrater agreement, the Delphi procedure did not. The best results were obtained when ratings by 4 independent raters were averaged. In this situation, intraclass correlation coefficients were about 0.9. Conclusion The Clinical Global Impression is a useful approach in psychiatry since it apprehends patients in their entirety. This study shows that it is possible to quantify such impressions with a high level of interrater agreement.

  18. The Effects of Donepezil on 15-Item Geriatric Depression Scale Structure in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngsoon Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In Alzheimer disease (AD, depression is among the most common accompanying neuropsychiatric symptoms and has different clinical manifestations when compared with early-life depression. In patients with drug-naïve AD, we tried to explore the structure of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15 and the effect of donepezil on these substructures. Methods: GDS15, cognitive function, and activities of daily living function tests were administered to 412 patients with probable AD who had not been medicated before visiting the hospital. Using principal component analysis, three factors were identified. The patients with AD who received only donepezil were retrospectively analyzed and we compared the change of cognition and GDS15 subgroup after donepezil medication. Results: Our study identified three factors and revealed that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale. The Barthel index was significantly correlated with factor 1 (positively and factor 2 (negatively. The Korean version of the MMSE (K-MMSE was significantly correlated with factor 2 and factor 3. Compared to the baseline state, K-MMSE and GDS15 showed significant improvement after taking donepezil. Among GDS15 subgroups, factor 2 and factor 3 showed significant improvement after donepezil treatment. Conclusions: These results suggest that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale and donepezil differentially affects the GDS15 subgroup in AD.

  19. The Effects of Donepezil on 15-Item Geriatric Depression Scale Structure in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youngsoon; Kwak, Yong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In Alzheimer disease (AD), depression is among the most common accompanying neuropsychiatric symptoms and has different clinical manifestations when compared with early-life depression. In patients with drug-naïve AD, we tried to explore the structure of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15) and the effect of donepezil on these substructures. Methods GDS15, cognitive function, and activities of daily living function tests were administered to 412 patients with probable AD who had not been medicated before visiting the hospital. Using principal component analysis, three factors were identified. The patients with AD who received only donepezil were retrospectively analyzed and we compared the change of cognition and GDS15 subgroup after donepezil medication. Results Our study identified three factors and revealed that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale. The Barthel index was significantly correlated with factor 1 (positively) and factor 2 (negatively). The Korean version of the MMSE (K-MMSE) was significantly correlated with factor 2 and factor 3. Compared to the baseline state, K-MMSE and GDS15 showed significant improvement after taking donepezil. Among GDS15 subgroups, factor 2 and factor 3 showed significant improvement after donepezil treatment. Conclusions These results suggest that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale and donepezil differentially affects the GDS15 subgroup in AD.

  20. The Validity of the Different Versions of the Hamilton Depression Scale in Separating Remission Rates of Placebo and Antidepressants in Clinical Trials of Major Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyle, Phillip Raphael; Lemming, Ole; Timmerby, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Our objectivewas to validate the different versions of the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) both psychometrically (scalability) and clinically in discriminating antidepressants from placebo in terms of remission rates in an 8-week clinical trial in the acute treatment of major depression...... in the longer HAM-D versions indicated smaller discriminating validity over placebo. The HAM-D6 indicated a dose effect on remission for vortioxetine in both moderate and severe major depression. The brief HAM-D6 was thus found superior to HAM-D17, HAM-D21, and HAM-D24 both in terms of scalability...

  1. Scale model investigations into the insertion loss of screens under the influence of wind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten bo; Arranz, Marta galindo

    1996-01-01

    in the frequency domain. The meteorological data representing the wind conditions have been determined by means of hot-wire anemometry in positions on both sides of the screen as well as directly over the screen. The measured data are compared with calculated results from PE calculations and from an alternative......A hard screen on an absorbing ground is investigated experimentally under the influence of wind. The experimental data are the result of model experiments in a 1:25 scale model within a wind tunnel. The sound propagation is measured using a triggered spark source and averaging on a power basis...

  2. Dimensional approach to symptom factors of major depressive disorder in Koreans, using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Jang, Eun Young; Kim, Daeho; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Jung-Bum; Jo, Sun-Jin; Park, Yong Chon

    2015-01-01

    Although major depressive disorder (MDD) has a variety of symptoms beyond the affective dimensions, the factor structure and contents of comprehensive psychiatric symptoms of this disorder have rarely been explored using the 18-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). We aimed to identify the factor structure of the 18-item BPRS in Korean MDD patients. A total of 258 MDD patients were recruited from a multicenter sample of the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS), depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), global severity (Clinical Global Impression of Severity Scale), suicidal ideation (Scale for Suicide Ideation), functioning (Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale), and quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-abbreviated version). Common factor analysis with oblique rotation was used to yield factor structure. A four-factor structure was designed and interpreted by the symptom dimensions to reflect mood disturbance, positive symptoms/apathy, bipolarity, and thought distortion/mannerism. These individual factors were also significantly correlated with clinical variables. The findings of this study support the view that the BPRS may be a promising measuring tool for the initial assessment of MDD patients. In addition, the four-factor structure of the BPRS may be useful in understanding the mood and psychotic characteristics of these patients.

  3. Dimensional approach to symptom factors of major depressive disorder in Koreans, using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: The Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Cheol Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although major depressive disorder (MDD has a variety of symptoms beyond the affective dimensions, the factor structure and contents of comprehensive psychiatric symptoms of this disorder have rarely been explored using the 18-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS. We aimed to identify the factor structure of the 18-item BPRS in Korean MDD patients. A total of 258 MDD patients were recruited from a multicenter sample of the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS, depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, global severity (Clinical Global Impression of Severity Scale, suicidal ideation (Scale for Suicide Ideation, functioning (Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale, and quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-abbreviated version. Common factor analysis with oblique rotation was used to yield factor structure. A four-factor structure was designed and interpreted by the symptom dimensions to reflect mood disturbance, positive symptoms/apathy, bipolarity, and thought distortion/mannerism. These individual factors were also significantly correlated with clinical variables. The findings of this study support the view that the BPRS may be a promising measuring tool for the initial assessment of MDD patients. In addition, the four-factor structure of the BPRS may be useful in understanding the mood and psychotic characteristics of these patients.

  4. High-throughput screening and scale-up of cocrystals using resonant acoustic mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagapudi, Karthik; Umanzor, Evelyn Yanez; Masui, Colin

    2017-04-15

    This paper explores the effectiveness of resonant acoustic mixing RAM for screening and scale up of cocrystals. 16 cocrystal systems were selected as test cases based on previous literature precedent. A 96 well plate set up in conjunction with zirconia beads was used for cocrystal screening using RAM. A success rate of 80% was obtained in the screen for plates containing solvent or solvent plus Zirconia beads. A proof of concept production of hydrated and anhydrous cocrystals of 1:1 Theophylline Citric acid system at a 400mg scale was demonstrated using solvent and bead assisted RAM. Finally the parameters affecting the scale up of 2:1 Theophylline Oxalic acid cocrystals was explored in a systematic fashion using a Design of Experiments DOE approach. The RAM parameters of acceleration and mixing time were optimized using the DOE approach. A quantitative XRPD method was developed to determine the extent of conversion to the cocrystal when using RAM Mixing time of 2h and an acceleration of 60G were determined to be optimal. The optimized parameters were used to demonstrate scale up of 2:1 Theophylline Oxalic acid cocrystals at an 80 gram scale with a net yield of 94%. RAM is thus established as an environmentally friendly mechanochemical technique for both high throughput screening and scaled up production of cocrystals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The acute social defeat stress and nest-building test paradigm: A potential new method to screen drugs for depressive-like symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabi, Hikari; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Okayama, Tsuyoshi; Kohari, Daisuke; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2017-02-01

    Psychosocial stress can cause mental conditions such as depression in humans. To develop drug therapies for the treatment of depression, it is necessary to use animal models of depression to screen drug candidates that exhibit anti-depressive effects. Unfortunately, the present methods of drug screening for antidepressants, the forced-swim test and tail-suspension test, are limiting factors in drug discovery because they are not based on the constructive validity of objective phenotypes in depression. Previously, we discovered that the onset of nest building is severely delayed in mice exposed to subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS). Therefore, a novel paradigm combining acute social defeat stress (ASDS) and the nest-building test (SNB) were established for the efficient screening of drugs for depressive-like symptoms. Since ASDS severely delayed the nest-building process as shown in chronically social defeated mice, we sought to rescue the delayed nest-building behavior in ASDS mice. Injecting a specific serotonin 2a receptor antagonist (SR-46349B), the nest-building deficit exhibited by ASDS mice was partially rescued. On the other hand, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine) did not rescue the nest-building deficit in ASDS mice. Therefore, we conclude that the SNB paradigm is an another potential behavioral method for screening drugs for depressive-like symptoms including attention deficit, anxiety, low locomotion, and decreased motivation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A validation study of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in different groups of Dutch subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, P; Ormel, J; Sloekers, PPA; Kempen, GIJM; Speckens, AEM; VanHemert, AM; van Hemert, A.M.

    Background. Research on the dimensional structure and reliability of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and its relationship with age is scarce. Moreover, its efficacy in determining the presence of depression in different patient groups has been questioned. Methods. Psychometric

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of the original 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale in nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Gerritsen, DL; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) in diagnosing depression in older nursing home patients. Method Three hundred and thirty-three older nursing home patients participated in a prospective cross-sectional study

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of the original 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale in nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Gerritsen, DL; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) in diagnosing depression in older nursing home patients. Method Three hundred and thirty-three older nursing home patients participated in a prospective cross-sectional study

  9. Validity of the definite and semidefinite questionnaire version of the Hamilton Depression Scale, the Hamilton subscale and the Melancholia Scale. Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Bent; Bech, Per

    2011-01-01

    -reporting versions (definitely and semidefinitely anchored) corresponding to the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Hamilton Subscale (HAM6), and the Bech-Rafaelsen Melancholia Scale (MES) were compared to each other and the clinician-rated version. The unidimensional property of the sum score in each scale...

  10. Performance of the Visual Analogue Scale of Happiness and of the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia in the Tremembé Epidemiological Study, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina G. César

    Full Text Available Depression is a major growing public health problem. Many population studies have found a significant relationship between depression and the presence of cognitive disorders. OBJECTIVE: To establish the correlation between the Visual Analogue Scale of Happiness and the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia in the population aged 60 years or over in the city of Tremembé, state of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An epidemiological survey involving home visits was carried out in the city of Tremembé. The sample was randomly selected by drawing 20% of the population aged 60 years or older from each of the city's census sectors. In this single-phase study, the assessment included clinical history, physical and neurological examination, cognitive evaluation, and application of both the Cornell Scale and the Analogue Scale of Happiness for psychiatric symptoms. The presence of depressive symptoms was defined as scores greater than or equal to 8 points on the Cornell Scale. RESULTS: A total of 623 subjects were evaluated and of these 251 (40.3% had clinically significant depressive symptoms on the Cornell Scale, with a significant association with female gender (p<0.001 and with lower education (p=0.012. One hundred and thirty-six participants (21.8% chose the unhappiness faces, with a significant association with age (p<0.001, female gender (p=0.020 and low socioeconomic status (p=0.012. Although there was a statistically significant association on the correlation test, the correlation was not high (rho=0.47. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of depressive symptoms was high in this sample and the Visual Analogue Scale of Happiness and Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia should not be used as similar alternatives for evaluating the presence of depressive symptoms, at least in populations with low educational level.

  11. Sensitivity to changes during antidepressant treatment: a comparison of unidimensional subscales of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) in patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Isabella; Wagner, Stefanie; Mergl, Roland; Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Hautzinger, Martin; Henkel, Verena; Hegerl, Ulrich; Tadić, André

    2012-06-01

    In the efficacy evaluation of antidepressant treatments, the total score of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) is still regarded as the 'gold standard'. We previously had shown that the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) was more sensitive to detect depressive symptom changes than the HAMD17 (Helmreich et al. 2011). Furthermore, studies suggest that the unidimensional subscales of the HAMD, which capture the core depressive symptoms, outperform the full HAMD regarding the detection of antidepressant treatment effects. The aim of the present study was to compare several unidimensional subscales of the HAMD and the IDS regarding their sensitivity to changes in depression symptoms in a sample of patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression (MIND). Biweekly IDS-C28 and HAMD17 data from 287 patients of a 10-week randomised, placebo-controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of sertraline and cognitive-behavioural group therapy in patients with MIND were converted to subscale scores and analysed during the antidepressant treatment course. We investigated sensitivity to depressive change for all scales from assessment-to-assessment, in relation to depression severity level and placebo-verum differences. The subscales performed similarly during the treatment course, with slight advantages for some subscales in detecting treatment effects depending on the treatment modality and on the items included. Most changes in depressive symptomatology were detected by the IDS short scale, but regarding the effect sizes, it performed worse than most subscales. Unidimensional subscales are a time- and cost-saving option in judging drug therapy outcomes, especially in antidepressant treatment efficacy studies. However, subscales do not cover all facets of depression (e.g. atypical symptoms, sleep disturbances), which might be important for comprehensively understanding the nature of the disease depression. Therefore, the cost-to-benefit ratio must be

  12. Validation of a cutoff point for the short version of the Depression Scale of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies in older Mexican adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarón Salinas-Rodríguez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify a valid cutoff point associated with Center for Epidemiologic Studies, Depression Scale (CES-D of seven items, which allows the classification of older adults according to presence/absence of clinically significant depressive symptoms. Materials and methods. Screening study with 229 older adults residing in two states of Mexico (Morelos and Tlaxcala, which were part of the sample from the National Survey of Health and Nutrition, 2012. We estimated the sensitivity and specificity associated with the selected cutoff points using the diagnostic criteria of ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision and DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition. Results. The cutoff point estimated was CES-D=5. According to the ICD-10 sensitivity and specificity were 83.3 and 90.2%, and ROC was 87%. Using DSM-IV, the values were 85, 83.2, and 84%, respectively. Conclusions. The short version of the CES-D can be used as a screening test to identify probable cases of older adults with clinically significant depressive symptoms.

  13. [Validation of a cutoff point for the short version of the Depression Scale of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies in older Mexican adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Rodríguez, Aarón; Manrique-Espinoza, Betty; Acosta-Castillo, Gilberto Isaac; Franco-Núñez, Aurora; Rosas-Carrasco, Oscar; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel; Sosa-Ortiz, Ana Luisa

    2014-01-01

    To identify a valid cutoff point associated with Center for Epidemiologic Studies, Depression Scale (CES-D) of seven items, which allows the classification of older adults according to presence/absence of clinically significant depressive symptoms. Screening study with 229 older adults residing in two states of Mexico (Morelos and Tlaxcala), which were part of the sample from the National Survey of Health and Nutrition, 2012. We estimated the sensitivity and specificity associated with the selected cutoff points using the diagnostic criteria of ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision) and DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition). The cutoff point estimated was CES-D=5. According to the ICD-10 sensitivity and specificity were 83.3 and 90.2%, and ROC was 87%. Using DSM-IV, the values were 85, 83.2, and 84%, respectively. The short version of the CES-D can be used as a screening test to identify probable cases of older adults with clinically significant depressive symptoms.

  14. Unrevealed Depression Involves Dysfunctional Coping Strategies in Crohn’s Disease Patients in Clinical Remission

    OpenAIRE

    Caterina Viganò; Roberta Calzolari; Paola Marianna Marinaccio; Cristina Bezzio; Federica Furfaro; Gabriella Ba; Giovanni Maconi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. This study investigated the proportion of CD patients in clinical remission with clinical depression, and coping strategies in those with severe depressive disorders. Materials and Methods. One hundred consecutive CD patients in clinical remission were screened for anxiety and depression by using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and patients with depressive symptoms were further investigated by means of Cognitive Behavioural Assessment 2.0 and Beck Depression Invento...

  15. Validation of an Arabic translation of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Russel; Al Saif, Abdulaziz; el-din Mohamed, Gamal

    2005-01-01

    Depression is a common condition in primary care medicine in all population groups. We wanted to validate an Arabic translation Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale for Arabic speakers as it has been validated in a number of other languages. The hospital translation service translated the English version into Arabic, which was verified by back translation. This version was tested in a pilot study with 40 bilingual Arabic-English clinicians and Arabic linguistic experts. Revised questions were subjected to another translation-back translation and the final version tested in a clinical trial with 240 consenting bilingual English-Arabic speakers. The subjects were randomly assigned to answer either the English or Arabic version of the Zung questionnaire first, ensuring that subjects had no access to previous answers when answering the questionnaire in the other language. The scores obtained were tested for agreement using the kappa statistic. We found substantial agreement between the scores obtained from the two questionnaires. The kappa measurement of agreement was 0.652 (95% confidence interval, 0.571-0.732) We believe the Arabic translation of the English Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale is valid and reliable, and will be useful to practitioners who would like to use this tool in Arabic-speaking patients.

  16. Normalization Procedure for the Baptista Depression Scale - Adult Version (EBADEP-A: Transferring of Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Oliveira Gomes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the standardization of psychological instruments, that is, the construction of referential interpretations of a test, we can find different procedures performed both by Classical Test Theory and the Theory of Item Response. Especially in this case (IRT, we can admit a test as a norm, in order to use its standardization and transfer the cut-off point to another instrument. Based on this information, the present study aimed to provide a cutoff score for the Baptista Depression Scale - Adult Version (EBADEP-A through procedures of norms-transfer based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies – Depression Scale (CES-D. The EBADEP-A presented good distribution and ability to discriminate depressive symptoms, and the sample, consisting of Brazilian College students, received a cutoff score of 32 points. It is emphasized that this is an exploratory and preliminary study, and it we suggest further analyzes to be performed with clinical samples for which results can be corroborated or confronted.

  17. The time has come to stop rotations for the identification of structures in the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Csillag, Claudio; Hellström, Lone;

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To use principal component analysis (PCA) to test the hypothesis that the items of the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17) have been selected to reflect depression disability, whereas some of the items are specific for sub-typing depression into typical vs. atypical depression. Method:...

  18. Cross-cultural validation of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Shi, Hai-Song; Geng, Fu-Lei; Zou, Lai-Quan; Tan, Shu-Ping; Wang, Yi; Neumann, David L; Shum, David H K; Chan, Raymond C K

    2016-05-01

    The gap between the demand and delivery of mental health services in mainland China can be reduced by validating freely available and psychometrically sound psychological instruments. The present research examined the Chinese version of the 21-item Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21). Study 1 administered the DASS-21 to 1,815 Chinese college students and found internal consistency indices (Cronbach's alpha) of .83, .80, and .82 for the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress subscales, respectively, and .92 for the total DASS total. Test-retest reliability over a 6-month interval was .39 to .46 for each of the 3 subscales and .46 for the total DASS. Moderate convergent validity of the Depression and Anxiety subscales was demonstrated via significant correlations with the Chinese Beck Depression Inventory (r = .51 at Time 1 and r = .64 at Time 2) and the Chinese State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (r = .41), respectively. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the original 3-factor model with 1 minor change (nonnormed fit index [NNFI] = .964, comparative fit index [CFI] = .968, and root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA] = .079). Study 2 examined the clinical utility of the Chinese DASS-21 in 166 patients with schizophrenia and 90 matched healthy controls. Patients had higher Depression and Anxiety but not Stress subscale scores than healthy controls. A discriminant function composed of the linear combination of 3 subscale scores correctly discriminated 69.92% of participants, which again supported the potential clinical utility of the DASS in mainland China. Taken together, findings in these studies support the cross-cultural validity of the DASS-21 in China. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Experimental cocrystal screening and solution based scale-up cocrystallization methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamatari, Maria; Ross, Steven A; Douroumis, Dennis; Velaga, Sitaram P

    2017-08-12

    Cocrystals are crystalline single phase materials composed of two or more different molecular and/or ionic compounds generally in a stoichiometric ratio which are neither solvates nor simple salts. If one of the components is an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), the term pharmaceutical cocrystal is often used. There is a growing interest among drug development scientists in exploring cocrystals, as means to address physicochemical, biopharmaceutical and mechanical properties and expand solid form diversity of the API. Conventionally, coformers are selected based on crystal engineering principles, and the equimolar mixtures of API and coformers are subjected to solution-based crystallization that are commonly employed in polymorph and salt screening. However, the availability of new knowledge on cocrystal phase behaviour in solid state and solutions has spurred the development and implementation of more rational experimental cocrystal screening as well as scale-up methods. This review aims to provide overview of commonly employed solid form screening techniques in drug development with an emphasis on cocrystal screening methodologies. The latest developments in understanding and the use of cocrystal phase diagrams in both screening and solution based scale-up methods are also presented. Final section is devoted to reviewing the state of the art research covering solution based scale-up cocrystallization process for different cocrystals besides more recent continuous crystallization methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Large-Scale Hypoconnectivity Between Resting-State Functional Networks in Unmedicated Adolescent Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchet, Matthew D; Ho, Tiffany C; Connolly, Colm G; Tymofiyeva, Olga; Lewinn, Kaja Z; Han, Laura Km; Blom, Eva H; Tapert, Susan F; Max, Jeffrey E; Frank, Guido Kw; Paulus, Martin P; Simmons, Alan N; Gotlib, Ian H; Yang, Tony T

    2016-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) often emerges during adolescence, a critical period of brain development. Recent resting-state fMRI studies of adults suggest that MDD is associated with abnormalities within and between resting-state networks (RSNs). Here we tested whether adolescent MDD is characterized by abnormalities in interactions among RSNs. Participants were 55 unmedicated adolescents diagnosed with MDD and 56 matched healthy controls. Functional connectivity was mapped using resting-state fMRI. We used the network-based statistic (NBS) to compare large-scale connectivity between groups and also compared the groups on graph metrics. We further assessed whether group differences identified using nodes defined from functionally defined RSNs were also evident when using anatomically defined nodes. In addition, we examined relations between network abnormalities and depression severity and duration. Finally, we compared intranetwork connectivity between groups and assessed the replication of previously reported MDD-related abnormalities in connectivity. The NBS indicated that, compared with controls, depressed adolescents exhibited reduced connectivity (pdepression was significantly correlated with reduced connectivity in this set of network interactions (p=0.020, corrected), specifically with reduced connectivity between components of the dorsal attention network. The dorsal attention network was also characterized by reduced intranetwork connectivity in the MDD group. Finally, we replicated previously reported abnormal connectivity in individuals with MDD. In summary, adolescents with MDD show hypoconnectivity between large-scale brain networks compared with healthy controls. Given that connectivity among these networks typically increases during adolescent neurodevelopment, these results suggest that adolescent depression is associated with abnormalities in neural systems that are still developing during this critical period.

  1. PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTY OF FATIGUE SEVERITY SCALE AND CORRELATION WITH DEPRESSION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN CIRRHOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danusa ROSSI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common complaint in cirrhotic patients and may be considered a debilitating symptom with negative impact on quality of life. Research on its etiology and treatment has been hampered by the lack of relevant and reproducible measures of fatigue. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS in cirrhotic patients and to correlate with depressive symptomatology and quality of life. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with a convenience sample of 106 cirrhotic patients, aged between 18 and 70 years, both genders, literate, pre and post liver transplantation in outpatient follow-up. Internal consistency, reproducibility, discriminant validity, criterion validity, construct validity, responsiveness criterion, depressive symptomatology and quality of life were evaluated through questionnaires between January and October 2015. RESULTS: The mean age was 54.75±9.9 years, 65.1% male and 32.1% of the sample had cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus. The mean FSS score was 4.74±1.64. Cronbach’s alpha was 0.93, and the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient was 0.905 (95% CI: 0.813-0.952. For discriminant validity, FSS differentiated scores from different groups (P=0.009 and presented a correlation with the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (r=0.606, P=0.002. FSS correlated significantly and positively with depressive symptomatology and correlated negatively with the SF-36 domains for construct validity. For responsiveness, no significant changes were observed in the fatigue scores in the pre and post-liver transplantation periods (P=0.327. CONCLUSION: FSS showed good psychometric performance in the evaluation of fatigue in patients with cirrhosis. Fatigue presented a strong correlation with depressive symptomatology and quality of life.

  2. Demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors identify a high-risk group for depression screening among predominantly Hispanic patients with Type 2 diabetes in safety net care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ell, Kathleen; Katon, Wayne; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Guterman, Jeffrey; Wu, Shinyi

    2015-01-01

    Identify biopsychosocial factors associated with depression for patients with Type 2 diabetes. A quasi-experimental clinical trial of 1293 patients was predominantly Hispanic (91%) female (62%), mean age 53 and average diabetes duration 10 years; 373 (29%) patients were depressed and assessed by Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Demographic, baseline clinical and psychosocial variables were compared between depressed and nondepressed patients. Bivariate analyses found depression significantly associated (pidentified six key risk factors: greater disability, diabetes symptoms and regimen distress, female gender, less diabetes self-care and lack of A1C. In addition, after controlling for identified six factors, the number of psychosocial stressors significantly associated with increased risk of depression (adjusted odds ratio=1.37, 95% confidence intervals: 1.18-1.58, pidentify a high-risk group of patients needing depression screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulation applied to working frequency selection in large-scale vibrating screen's design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Chen-yu; SU Rong-hua

    2011-01-01

    The working frequency selection of the ZK30525 vibrating screen was studied using ANSYS.Integrating the dynamic performance simulation analysis of the vibrating screen structure,the variation laws of beams' vibration displacements changing with different exciting frequencies were researched.These beams include six beams,with one discharging beam and one in-material beam.Results indicate that vibration displacements in the middle of these beams increase with the augmentation of exciting frequency.When exciting frequency exceeds a certain value,there exists a flat change region for vibration displacement.According to vibrator characteristics,the vibrating screen's working frequency should be selected in the flat change region,and be far away from modal frequencies.The study provides theoretical guidance for the reasonable working frequency selection of the large-scale vibrating screen.

  4. A Rapid DNA Mini-prep Method for Large-Scale Rice Mutant Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Fu-lin; WANG He-he; CHEN Jie; ZHUANG Jie-yun; Hei LEUNG; CHENG Shi-hua; Wu Jian-li

    2006-01-01

    A high throughput rice DNA mini-preparation method was developed. The method is suitable for large-scale mutant bank screening as well as large mapping populations with characteristics of maintaining relatively high level of DNA purity and concentration. The extracted DNA was tested and suitable for regular PCR amplification (SSR) and for Targeting Induced Local Lesion in Genome (TILLING) analysis.

  5. Adaptation to Portuguese of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS) Adaptación para la lengua portuguesa de la Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) Adaptação para a língua portuguesa da Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS)

    OpenAIRE

    João Luís Alves Apóstolo; Aida Cruz Mendes; Zaida Aguiar Azeredo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to adapt to Portuguese, of Portugal, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales, a 21-item short scale (DASS 21), designed to measure depression, anxiety and stress. Method: After translation and back-translation with the help of experts, the DASS 21 was administered to patients in external psychiatry consults (N=101), and its internal consistency, construct validity and concurrent validity were measured. Results: The DASS 21 properties certify its quality to measure emotional state...

  6. Factors affecting reproducibility between genome-scale siRNA-based screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Nicholas J.; Le Sommer, Caroline; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Pearson, James L.

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference-based screening is a powerful new genomic technology which addresses gene function en masse. To evaluate factors influencing hit list composition and reproducibility, we performed two identically designed small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based, whole genome screens for host factors supporting yellow fever virus infection. These screens represent two separate experiments completed five months apart and allow the direct assessment of the reproducibility of a given siRNA technology when performed in the same environment. Candidate hit lists generated by sum rank, median absolute deviation, z-score, and strictly standardized mean difference were compared within and between whole genome screens. Application of these analysis methodologies within a single screening dataset using a fixed threshold equivalent to a p-value ≤ 0.001 resulted in hit lists ranging from 82 to 1,140 members and highlighted the tremendous impact analysis methodology has on hit list composition. Intra- and inter-screen reproducibility was significantly influenced by the analysis methodology and ranged from 32% to 99%. This study also highlighted the power of testing at least two independent siRNAs for each gene product in primary screens. To facilitate validation we conclude by suggesting methods to reduce false discovery at the primary screening stage. In this study we present the first comprehensive comparison of multiple analysis strategies, and demonstrate the impact of the analysis methodology on the composition of the “hit list”. Therefore, we propose that the entire dataset derived from functional genome-scale screens, especially if publicly funded, should be made available as is done with data derived from gene expression and genome-wide association studies. PMID:20625183

  7. Creation and validation of the Cognitive and Behavioral Response to Stress Scale in a depression trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Adam S; Schueller, Stephen M; Lattie, Emily G; Mohr, David C

    2015-12-30

    The Cognitive and Behavioral Response to Stress Scale (CB-RSS) is a self-report measure of the use and helpfulness of several cognitive and behavioral skills. Unlike other measures that focus on language specific to terms used in therapy, the CB-RSS was intended to tap the strategies in ways that might be understandable to those who had not undergone therapy. The measure was included in a clinical trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression and completed by 325 participants at baseline and end of treatment (18 weeks). Psychometric properties of the scale were assessed through iterative exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. These analyses identified two subscales, cognitive and behavioral skills, each with high reliability. Validity was addressed by investigating relationships with depression symptoms, positive affect, perceived stress, and coping self-efficacy. End of treatment scores predicted changes in all outcomes, with the largest relationships between baseline CB-RSS scales and coping self-efficacy. These findings suggest that the CB-RSS is a useful tool to measure cognitive and behavioral skills both at baseline (prior to treatment) as well as during the course of treatment.

  8. The self-stigma of depression scale: Translation and validation of the Arabic version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Ahmed Darraj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-stigma may feature strongly and be detrimental for people with depression, but the understanding of its nature and prevalence is limited by the lack of psychometrically validated measures. This study is aimed to validate the Arabic version self-stigma of depression scale (SSDS among adolescents. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study involved 100 adolescents randomly selected. The analyses include face validation, factor analysis, and reliability testing. A test–retest was conducted within a 2-week interval. Results: The mean score for self-stigma of depression among study participants was 68.9 (Standard deviation = 8.76 median equal to 71 and range was 47. Descriptive analysis showed that the percentage of those who scored below the mean score (41.7% is shown less than those who scored above the mean score (58.3%. Preliminary construct validation analysis confirmed that factor analysis was appropriate for the Arabic-translated version of the SSDS. Furthermore, the factor analysis showed similar factor loadings to the original English version. The total internal consistency of the translated version, which was measured by Cronbach's alphas ranged from 0.70 to 0.77 for the four subscales and 0.84 for the total scale. Test–retest reliability was assessed in 65 respondents after 2 weeks. Cronbach's alphas ranged from 0.70 to 0.77 for the four subscales and 0.84 for the total scale. Conclusions: Face validity, construct validity, and reliability analysis were found satisfactory for the Arabic-translated version of the SSDS. The Arabic-translated version of the SSDS was found valid and reliable to be used in future studies, with comparable properties to the original version and to previous studies.

  9. A technique to screen American beech for resistance to the beech scale insect (Cryptococcus fagisuga Lind.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jennifer L; Carey, David W

    2014-01-01

    Beech bark disease (BBD) results in high levels of initial mortality, leaving behind survivor trees that are greatly weakened and deformed. The disease is initiated by feeding activities of the invasive beech scale insect, Cryptococcus fagisuga, which creates entry points for infection by one of the Neonectria species of fungus. Without scale infestation, there is little opportunity for fungal infection. Using scale eggs to artificially infest healthy trees in heavily BBD impacted stands demonstrated that these trees were resistant to the scale insect portion of the disease complex(1). Here we present a protocol that we have developed, based on the artificial infestation technique by Houston(2), which can be used to screen for scale-resistant trees in the field and in smaller potted seedlings and grafts. The identification of scale-resistant trees is an important component of management of BBD through tree improvement programs and silvicultural manipulation.

  10. The evaluation of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale : Depressed and Positive Affect in cancer patients and healthy reference subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroevers, MJ; Sanderman, R; van Sonderen, E; Ranchor, AV

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of a two-factor structure of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale. The study was conducted in a large group of cancer patients (n = 475) and a matched reference group (n = 255). Both groups filled in a questionnaire at two

  11. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Scale for Depression (Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II)--A Study on a Sample of Students in the State of Kuwait Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahem, Ahmed Mohammed Faleh

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) the Arabized version by Gharib (2000); the study sample consisted of 500 male and female students from the Kuwaiti universities by 250 males and 250 females on whom the BDI-II scale was applied twice; the psychometric characteristics such as the…

  12. Large-scale virtual screening on public cloud resources with Apache Spark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuccini, Marco; Ahmed, Laeeq; Schaal, Wesley; Laure, Erwin; Spjuth, Ola

    2017-01-01

    Structure-based virtual screening is an in-silico method to screen a target receptor against a virtual molecular library. Applying docking-based screening to large molecular libraries can be computationally expensive, however it constitutes a trivially parallelizable task. Most of the available parallel implementations are based on message passing interface, relying on low failure rate hardware and fast network connection. Google's MapReduce revolutionized large-scale analysis, enabling the processing of massive datasets on commodity hardware and cloud resources, providing transparent scalability and fault tolerance at the software level. Open source implementations of MapReduce include Apache Hadoop and the more recent Apache Spark. We developed a method to run existing docking-based screening software on distributed cloud resources, utilizing the MapReduce approach. We benchmarked our method, which is implemented in Apache Spark, docking a publicly available target receptor against [Formula: see text]2.2 M compounds. The performance experiments show a good parallel efficiency (87%) when running in a public cloud environment. Our method enables parallel Structure-based virtual screening on public cloud resources or commodity computer clusters. The degree of scalability that we achieve allows for trying out our method on relatively small libraries first and then to scale to larger libraries. Our implementation is named Spark-VS and it is freely available as open source from GitHub (https://github.com/mcapuccini/spark-vs).Graphical abstract.

  13. [Three new observational scales for use in Dutch nursing homes: scales from the Resident Assessment Instrument for Activities of Daily Living, cognition and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, D.; Ooms, M; Steverink, N.; Frijters, D.; Bezemer, D.; Ribbe, M

    2004-01-01

    The reliability and validity of three MDS scales for ADL, cognition and depression are described. The scales consist of items of the Minimum Data Set of the Resident Assessment Instrument and are available just after an MDS assessment. Data collection took place in nine Dutch nursing homes (N = 227)

  14. [Integral Care Guide for Early Detection and Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder in Adults. Integral Attention of Adults with a Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder: Part I: Risk Factors, Screening, Suicide Risk Diagnosis and Assessment in Patients with a Depression Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia Bohórquez; Valencia, Jenny García; Guarín, Maritza Rodríguez; Narváez, Eliana Bravo; Jaramillo, Luis Eduardo; Acosta, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Pedraza, Ricardo Sánchez; Díaz, Sergio Mario Castro

    2012-12-01

    Depression is an important cause of morbidity and disability in the world; however, it is under-diagnosed at all care levels. The purpose here is to present recommendations based on the evidence gathered to answer a series of clinical questions concerning risk factors, screening, suicide risk diagnosis and evaluation in patients undergoing a depressive episode and recurrent depressive disorder. Emphasis has been made upon the approach used at the primary care level so as to grant adult diagnosed patients the health care guidelines based on the best and more updated evidence available thus achieving minimum quality standards. A practical clinical guide was elaborated according to standards of the Methodological Guide of the Ministry of Social Protection. Recommendation from guides NICE90 and CANMAT were adopted and updated so as to answer the questions posed while de novo questions were developed. Recommendations 1-22 corresponding to screening, suicide risk and depression diagnosis were presented. The corresponding degree of recommendation is included. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Search for Screened Interactions Below the Dark Energy Length Scale Using Optically Levitated Microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Rider, Alexander D; Blakemore, Charles P; Louis, Maxime; Lu, Marie; Gratta, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a search for unknown interactions that couple to mass between an optically levitated microsphere and a gold-coated silicon cantilever. The scale and geometry of the apparatus enables a search for new forces that appear at distances below 100 $\\mu$m and which would have evaded previous searches due to screening mechanisms. The data are consistent with electrostatic backgrounds and place upper limits on the strength of new interactions at 5.6 \\times 10^4$ in the region of parameter space where the self-coupling $\\Lambda \\gtrsim 5$ meV and the microspheres are not fully screened.

  16. Screening older adults at risk of falling with the Tinetti balance scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raîche, M; Hébert, R; Prince, F; Corriveau, H

    2000-09-16

    In a prospective study of 225 community dwelling people 75 years and older, we tested the validity of the Tinetti balance scale to predict individuals who will fall at least once during the following year. A score of 36 or less identified 7 of 10 fallers with 70% sensitivity and 52% specificity. With this cut-off score, 53% of the individuals were screened positive and presented a two-fold risk of falling. These characteristics support the use of this test to screen older people at risk of falling in order to include them in a preventive intervention.

  17. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fenglei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  18. Predicting Suicidal Ideation with the Depression Hopelessness and Suicide Screening Form (DHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jeremy F.; Kroner, Daryl G.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examines a series of interactions between a prior history of suicidal behavior and cognitions permissive of suicide, and the variables of depression and hopelessness in the relationship with suicidal ideation in two samples of incarcerated offenders. Results indicate that both a prior history of suicidal behavior and cognitions…

  19. Screening tools used for measuring depression among people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, T; Lloyd, C E; Pouwer, F

    2012-01-01

    of these tools in diabetes populations. Literature searches for the period January 1970 to October 2010 were conducted using MEDLINE, PSYCH-INFO, ASSIA, SCOPUS, ACADEMIC SEARCH COMPLETE, CINAHL and SCIENCE DIRECT. RESULTS: Data are presented for the 234 published studies that were examined. The Beck Depression...

  20. Comparative study of occurrence of depression in the third age in closed and open structures of elderly care according to the Hamilton depression scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Zintrou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a serious mental disorder that is a leading cause of morbidity in the elderly and affects the daily lives of the elderly leading to the marginalization and stigmatization. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression in the elderly, both in the community and in closed structures and identify possible differences between these two groups. Material and Method: The studied population consisted of 200 elderly people. One hundred of them came from closed structure care (nursing home and the remaining 100 by Open Care Centres (KAPI. For data collection, a specially designed questionnaire that included demographic data, information about their health and their daily habits and Depression Scale Hamilton, were used. Results: The majority of the sample (50.5% was men. Depressive symptomatology was showed by 44% (31% mild and 13% moderate. The men of the nursing home had greater depression than men of KAPI and showed a greater percentage of women (27.3 % mild and 12.1 % moderate, with women of the nursing home outweighing the percentages of those in KAPI. Depressive symptomatology exhibited by widowers, people with multiple pathology and those who did not exercise, with rates of 61.5%, 34.6% and 73.1% respectively. Big difference appeared between closed and open structure, where the elderly in nursing home seemed to show greater depression by 53%, versus 35% of those in KAPI. Conclusions: Gender, marital status, presence of pathology, exercise and living in closed structures of care, seem to influence the occurrence of depression in the elderly.

  1. Usefulness of the Spanish version of the mood disorder questionnaire for screening bipolar disorder in routine clinical practice in outpatients with major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montes José

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to some studies, almost 40% of depressive patients – half of them previously undetected – are diagnosed of bipolar II disorder when systematically assessed for hypomania. Thus, instruments for bipolar disorder screening are needed. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ is a self-reported questionnaire validated in Spanish in stable patients with a previously known diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate in the daily clinical practice the usefulness of the Spanish version of the MDQ in depressive patients. Methods Patients (n = 87 meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for a major depressive episode, not previously known as bipolar were included. The affective module of the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID was used as gold standard. Results MDQ screened 24.1% of depressive patients as bipolar, vs. 12.6% according to SCID. For a cut-off point score of 7 positive answers, sensitivity was 72.7% (95% CI = 63.3 – 82.1 and specificity 82.9% (95% CI = 74.9–90.9. Likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests were 4,252 y 0,329 respectively. Limitations The small sample size reduced the power of the study to 62%. Conclusion Sensitivity and specificity of the MDQ were high for screening bipolar disorder in patients with major depression, and similar to the figures obtained in stable patients. This study confirms that MDQ is a useful instrument in the daily clinical assessment of depressive patients.

  2. Assessing the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS in a national sample of Danish youth aged 8-16 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hoff Esbjørn

    Full Text Available Early identification of anxiety among youth is required to prevent them from going unrecognised and untreated by mental health professionals. A precise identification of the young person's primary difficulty is also required to guide treatment programs. Availability of a valid and easily administrable assessment tool is crucial for identifying youth suffering from anxiety disorders. The purpose of the present study was therefore to examine the psychometric properties of the Danish version of the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS. A total of 667 youth from community schools (4(th through 9(th grade across Denmark participated in the study. The psychometric properties of the RCADS-(DAN resembled those reported in US and Europe. Within scale reliability was excellent with Chronbach's alpha of.96. All subscales also showed good to excellent internal reliability. The study provides convincing evidence that the RCADS-(DAN is a valid assessment tool for screening anxiety in Danish youth.

  3. The Diagnostic Apathia Scale predicts a dose-remission relationship of T-PEMF in treatment-resistant depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Lunde, Marianne; Lauritzen, Lise

    2014-01-01

    of fatigue, concentration and memory problems, lack of interests, difficulties in making decisions, and sleep problems. We evaluated 65 patients with therapy-resistant depression. In total, 34 of these patients received placebo T-PEMF in the afternoon and active T-PEMF in the morning, that is, one daily dose....... The remaining 31 patients received active T-PEMF twice daily. Duration of treatment was 8 weeks in both groups. The Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17) and the Bech-Rafaelsen Melancholia Scale (MES) were used to measure remission. We also focused on the Diagnostic Apathia Scale, which is based on a mixture...

  4. Factor structure and reliability of the depression, anxiety and stress scales in a large Portuguese community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos-Raposo, José; Fernandes, Helder Miguel; Teixeira, Carla M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the factor structure and reliability of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS-21) in a large Portuguese community sample. Participants were 1020 adults (585 women and 435 men), with a mean age of 36.74 (SD = 11.90) years. All scales revealed good reliability, with Cronbach's alpha values between .80 (anxiety) and .84 (depression). The internal consistency of the total score was .92. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the best-fitting model (*CFI = .940, *RMSEA = .038) consisted of a latent component of general psychological distress (or negative affectivity) plus orthogonal depression, anxiety and stress factors. The Portuguese version of the DASS-21 showed good psychometric properties (factorial validity and reliability) and thus can be used as a reliable and valid instrument for measuring depression, anxiety and stress symptoms.

  5. 'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayalon, Liat; Goldfracht, Margalit; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    evaluated against a depression diagnosis made by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. RESULTS: Overall, 3.9% of the sample was diagnosed with depression. The most notable finding was that the single-item question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?' had as good or better sensitivity (83......: An easy way to detect depression in older primary care patients would be asking the single question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?'...

  6. Structural Validity of the MACI Psychopathy and Narcissism Scales: Evidence of Multidimensionality and Implications for Use in Research and Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Stephanie R.; Moretti, Marlene M.; Da Silva, Kimberley S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties and predictive validity of three self-report scales (the Psychopathy Content Scale, the Psychopathy-16 scale, and the Egotistic scale) derived from the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) to screen for the presence of psychopathic and narcissistic personality characteristics. Exploratory…

  7. Depression in Homebound Older Adults: Recent Advances in Screening and Psychosocial Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Namkee G; Sirey, Jo Anne; Bruce, Martha L

    2013-03-01

    Homebound older adults are more likely than their ambulatory peers to suffer from depression. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of antidepressant medications alone in such cases is limited. Greater benefits might be realized if patients received both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy to enhance their skills to cope with their multiple chronic medical conditions, isolation, and mobility impairment; however, referrals to specialty mental health services seldom succeed due to inaccessibility, shortage of geriatric mental health providers, and cost. Since a large proportion of homebound older adults receive case management and other services from aging services network agencies, the integration of mental health services into these agencies is likely to be cost-efficient and effective. This review summarizes recent advances in home-based assessment and psychosocial treatment of depression in homebound recipients of aging services.

  8. Validation of a Portuguese version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale for Children (CES-DC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Carvalho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Depression is one of the most common mental disorders in children, and in adolescents, as in adults. Once its occurrence during childhood and adolescence leads to serious consequences in adulthood, its early detection is an important goal. Self-report instruments have a key role on accessing thoughts, feelings and behaviors in an easily, reliably and validly way. The aim of the current study is to assess psychometric properties (reliability and validity of the Portuguese translation of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale for Children (CES-DC. Methods: A school-based sample of 417 adolescents aged 12–18 years (M = 15,20, SD = 1,72 was involved in this study. Translation and Back Translation was made. To study convergent and divergent validity there were used the Portuguese versions of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS 21, of the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI, and of the Students' Life Satisfaction Scale (SLSS which measure, respectively, negative emotional states (depression, anxiety and stress, depressive symptoms and global life satisfaction. Results: Factor analysis revealed three factors (mood, interpersonal relationships and happiness that explain 54% of the variance. The results show that the scale has an excellent internal consistency (α = 0,90, good temporal stability (r = 0,72 as an adequate convergent and divergent validity. Results showed that depressive symptoms varied in function of age and gender. Conclusions: The results of the present study provide initial adequate validity and reliability of the CES-DC. Nevertheless some limitations to this study, the results suggest that CES-DC can be a useful questionnaire in the assessment of depressive symptoms in Portuguese adolescents.

  9. Factorial Validity and Internal Consistency of Malaysian Adapted Depression Anxiety Stress Scale - 21 in an Adolescent Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Hairul Anuar Hashim; Freddy Golok; Rosmatunisah Ali

    2011-01-01

    Background: Psychometrically sound measurement instrument is a fundamental requirement across broad range of research areas. In negative affect research, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) has been identified as a psychometrically sound instrument to measure depression, anxiety and stress, especially the 21-item version. However, its psychometric properties in adolescents have been less consistent. Objectives: Thus, the present study sought to examine the factorial validity and internal c...

  10. Screening and large-scale expression of membrane proteins in mammalian cells for structural studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, April; Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Wang, Kevin H.; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Claxton, Derek P.; Baconguis, Isabelle; Althoff, Thorsten; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K. Christopher; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Structural, biochemical and biophysical studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins are often hampered by difficulties in over-expression of the candidate molecule. Baculovirus transduction of mammalian cells (BacMam), although a powerful method to heterologously express membrane proteins, can be cumbersome for screening and expression of multiple constructs. We therefore developed plasmid Eric Gouaux (pEG) BacMam, a vector optimized for use in screening assays, as well as for efficient production of baculovirus and robust expression of the target protein. In this protocol we show how to use small-scale transient transfection and fluorescence-detection, size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) experiments using a GFP-His8 tagged candidate protein to screen for monodispersity and expression level. Once promising candidates are identified, we describe how to generate baculovirus, transduce HEK293S GnTI− (N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I-negative) cells in suspension culture, and over-express the candidate protein. We have used these methods to prepare pure samples of chicken acid-sensing ion channel 1a (cASIC1) and Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl), for X-ray crystallography, demonstrating how to rapidly and efficiently screen hundreds of constructs and accomplish large-scale expression in 4-6 weeks. PMID:25299155

  11. Evaluating the psychometric properties of the attitudes towards depression and its treatments scale in an Australian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Benedetto M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fadia Isaac1, Kenneth Mark Greenwood2, Mirella Di Benedetto31Cairnmillar Institute School of Psychology Counselling and Psychotherapy, Camberwell, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Psychology and Social Science Faculty of Computing, Health and Science, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia; 3School of Health Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Bundoora, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Individuals’ attitudes towards depression and its treatments may influence their likelihood of seeking professional help and adherence to treatment when depressed. Objective measures, such as the Attitudes Towards Depression and its Treatments scale (ATDT, have been developed to assess such attitudes. The aims of this research were to test the reliability and validity of ATDT on an Australian sample who were not depressed during the study or who had previously been depressed, to explore the attitudes of the Australian public towards depression, and to compare these attitudes to those of a Canadian sample of people with depression.Methods: A sample of 63 males and 140 females (mean age = 32.2 years, SD = 12.9 years from Melbourne, Australia took part in this study. Fourteen of the males and 52 of the female participants (mean age = 35.4 years, SD = 13.2 years stated that they had been previously diagnosed with depression.Results: The attitudes of the Australian sample and the subset of that sample who had previously experienced depression differed from those of the Canadian outpatient sample: they were less ashamed of depression, more likely to take antidepressants and consider psychotherapy, and more likely to seek help from professionals or significant others in their lives. However, those in the Australian sample were more likely to report that antidepressants made them lose control, and they were less willing to consider electric shock as a treatment option for their depression. The internal reliability as

  12. Large-scale plasmonic microarrays for label-free high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tsung-Yao; Huang, Min; Yanik, Ahmet Ali; Tsai, Hsin-Yu; Shi, Peng; Aksu, Serap; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih; Altug, Hatice

    2011-11-07

    Microarrays allowing simultaneous analysis of thousands of parameters can significantly accelerate screening of large libraries of pharmaceutical compounds and biomolecular interactions. For large-scale studies on diverse biomedical samples, reliable, label-free, and high-content microarrays are needed. In this work, using large-area plasmonic nanohole arrays, we demonstrate for the first time a large-scale label-free microarray technology with over one million sensors on a single microscope slide. A dual-color filter imaging method is introduced to dramatically increase the accuracy, reliability, and signal-to-noise ratio of the sensors in a highly multiplexed manner. We used our technology to quantitatively measure protein-protein interactions. Our platform, which is highly compatible with the current microarray scanning systems can enable a powerful screening technology and facilitate diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

  13. Validating the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire Against the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen; Sharples, Phil; Murray, Aja L

    2015-08-01

    The Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ), a brief screening tool for intellectual disability, was originally validated against the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition (WAIS-III), which was superseded by the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) in the United Kingdom in 2010. This study examines the performance of the LDSQ using the WAIS-IV as the diagnostic intellectual assessment. Based on the original optimal cut-off score, the LDSQ sensitivity value was equivalent (91%) to that obtained in the original validation study, and the specificity value was higher at 92%. This suggests that the LDSQ remains valid when using the WAIS-IV as the comparative intellectual assessment.

  14. Item response theory analysis of the Lichtenberg Financial Decision Screening Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresi, Jeanne A; Ocepek-Welikson, Katja; Lichtenberg, Peter A

    2017-06-07

    The focus of these analyses was to examine the psychometric properties of the Lichtenberg Financial Decision Screening Scale (LFDSS). The purpose of the screen was to evaluate the decisional abilities and vulnerability to exploitation of older adults. Adults aged 60 and over were interviewed by social, legal, financial, or health services professionals who underwent in-person training on the administration and scoring of the scale. Professionals provided a rating of the decision-making abilities of the older adult. The analytic sample included 213 individuals with an average age of 76.9 (SD = 10.1). The majority (57%) were female. Data were analyzed using item response theory (IRT) methodology. The results supported the unidimensionality of the item set. Several IRT models were tested. Ten ordinal and binary items evidenced a slightly higher reliability estimate (0.85) than other versions and better coverage in terms of the range of reliable measurement across the continuum of financial incapacity.

  15. Screening methods for linear-scaling short-range hybrid calculations on CPU and GPU architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuerle, Matthias; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-04-01

    We present screening schemes that allow for efficient, linear-scaling short-range exchange calculations employing Gaussian basis sets for both CPU and GPU architectures. They are based on the LinK [C. Ochsenfeld et al., J. Chem. Phys. 109, 1663 (1998)] and PreLinK [J. Kussmann and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134114 (2013)] methods, but account for the decay introduced by the attenuated Coulomb operator in short-range hybrid density functionals. Furthermore, we discuss the implementation of short-range electron repulsion integrals on GPUs. The introduction of our screening methods allows for speedups of up to a factor 7.8 as compared to the underlying linear-scaling algorithm, while retaining full numerical control over the accuracy. With the increasing number of short-range hybrid functionals, our new schemes will allow for significant computational savings on CPU and GPU architectures.

  16. A Korean validation study of the Clinically Useful Anxiety Outcome Scale: Comorbidity and differentiation of anxiety and depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Won; Han, Changsu; Ko, Young-Hoon; Yoon, Seoyoung; Pae, Chi-Un; Choi, Joonho; Kim, Jae-Min; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Hoseon; Patkar, Ashwin A; Zimmerman, Mark

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Clinically Useful Anxiety Outcome Scale (CUXOS) and to examine the current diagnostic comorbidity and differential severity of anxiety symptoms between major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders. In total, 838 psychiatric outpatients were analyzed at their intake appointment. Diagnostic characteristics were examined using the structured clinical interview from the DSM-IV because the DSM5 was not available at the start of the study. The CUXOS score was measured and compared with that of 3 clinician rating scales and 4 self-report scales. The CUXOS showed excellent results for internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.90), test-retest reliability (r = 0.74), and discriminant and convergent validity. The CUXOS significantly discriminated between different levels of anxiety severity, and the measure was sensitive to change after treatment. Approximately 45% of patients with MDD were additionally diagnosed with anxiety disorders while 55% of patients with anxiety disorders additionally reported an MDD. There was a significant difference in CUXOS scores between diagnostic categories (MDD only, anxiety only, both disorders, and no MDD or anxiety disorder). The CUXOS scores differed significantly between all categories of depression (major, minor, and non-depression) except for the comparison between minor depression and non-depression groups. The Korean version of the CUXOS is a reliable and valid measure of the severity of anxiety symptoms. The use of the CUXOS could broaden the understanding of coexisting and differentiating characteristics of anxiety and depression.

  17. Validation of brief screening tools for depressive and alcohol use disorders among TB and HIV patients in primary care in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Vikram

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and determine the optimum cut-off scores for clinical use of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT against a reference psychiatric diagnostic interview, in TB and anti-retroviral therapy (ART patients in primary care in Zambia. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in 16 primary level care clinics. Consecutive sampling was used to select 649 participants who started TB treatment or ART in the preceding month. Participants were first interviewed using the CES-D and AUDIT, and subsequently with a psychiatric diagnostic interview for current major depressive disorder (MDD and alcohol use disorders (AUDs using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. The diagnostic accuracy was calculated using the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (AUROC. The optimum cut-off scores for clinical use were calculated using sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV. Results The CES-D and AUDIT had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.84; 0.98 respectively. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the four-factor CES-D model was not a good fit for the data (Tucker-Lewis Fit Index (TLI = 0.86; standardized root-mean square residual (SRMR = 0.06 while the two-factor AUDIT model fitted the data well (TFI = 0.99; SRMR = 0.04. Both the CES-D and AUDIT demonstrated good discriminatory ability in detecting MINI-defined current MDDs and AUDs (AUROC for CES-D = 0.78; AUDIT = 0.98 for women and 0.75 for men. The optimum CES-D cut-off score in screening for current MDD was 22 (sensitivity 73%, PPV 76% while that of the AUDIT in screening for AUD was 24 for women (sensitivity 60%, PPV 60%, and 20 for men (sensitivity 55%, PPV 50%. Conclusions The CES-D and AUDIT showed high discriminatory ability in measuring MINI-defined current MDD and AUD respectively. They are

  18. Pattern analysis of total item score and item response of the Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress (K6) in a nationally representative sample of US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitaka, Shinichiro; Kawasaki, Yohei; Ide, Kazuki; Akutagawa, Maiko; Yamada, Hiroshi; Yutaka, Ono; Furukawa, Toshiaki A

    2017-01-01

    Several recent studies have shown that total scores on depressive symptom measures in a general population approximate an exponential pattern except for the lower end of the distribution. Furthermore, we confirmed that the exponential pattern is present for the individual item responses on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). To confirm the reproducibility of such findings, we investigated the total score distribution and item responses of the Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress (K6) in a nationally representative study. Data were drawn from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS), which comprises four subsamples: (1) a national random digit dialing (RDD) sample, (2) oversamples from five metropolitan areas, (3) siblings of individuals from the RDD sample, and (4) a national RDD sample of twin pairs. K6 items are scored using a 5-point scale: "none of the time," "a little of the time," "some of the time," "most of the time," and "all of the time." The pattern of total score distribution and item responses were analyzed using graphical analysis and exponential regression model. The total score distributions of the four subsamples exhibited an exponential pattern with similar rate parameters. The item responses of the K6 approximated a linear pattern from "a little of the time" to "all of the time" on log-normal scales, while "none of the time" response was not related to this exponential pattern. The total score distribution and item responses of the K6 showed exponential patterns, consistent with other depressive symptom scales.

  19. Parental separation in childhood as a risk factor for depression in adulthood: a community-based study of adolescents screened for depression and followed up after 15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohman, Hannes; Låftman, Sara Brolin; Päären, Aivar; Jonsson, Ulf

    2017-03-29

    Earlier research has investigated the association between parental separation and long-term health outcomes among offspring, but few studies have assessed the potentially moderating role of mental health status in adolescence. The aim of this study was to analyze whether parental separation in childhood predicts depression in adulthood and whether the pattern differs between individuals with and without earlier depression. A community-based sample of individuals with adolescent depression in 1991-93 and matched non-depressed peers were followed up using a structured diagnostic interview after 15 years. The participation rate was 65% (depressed n = 227; non-depressed controls n = 155). Information on parental separation and conditions in childhood and adolescence was collected at baseline. The outcome was depression between the ages 19-31 years; information on depression was collected at the follow-up diagnostic interview. The statistical method used was binary logistic regression. Our analyses showed that depressed adolescents with separated parents had an excess risk of recurrence of depression in adulthood, compared with depressed adolescents with non-separated parents. In addition, among adolescents with depression, parental separation was associated with an increased risk of a switch to bipolar disorder in adulthood. Among the matched non-depressed peers, no associations between parental separation and adult depression or bipolar disorder were found. Parental separation may have long-lasting health consequences for vulnerable individuals who suffer from mental illness already in adolescence.

  20. DYNAMIC SCALING OF GROWING SURFACES WITH GROWTH INHOMOGENEITIES OF SCREENED COULOMBIC FUNCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG GANG; MA BEN-KUN

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic scaling properties of growing surfaces with growth inhomogeneities are studied by applying a dy namic renormalization-group analysis to the generalized Kardar-Parisi-Zhang(hereafter abbreviated to KPZ) equation, which contains an additional term of growth inhomogeneities. In a practical crystal growth process, these growth inho mogeneities can be induced by surface impurities and defects and are modeled by a screened Coulomb function in this paper. Our results show that the existence of the growth inhomogeneities can significantly change the dynamic scaling properties of a growing surface and can lead to a rougher surface.

  1. The validity of dysthymia to predict clinical depressive symptoms as measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale at the 5-year follow-up of patients with first episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In long-term follow-up studies on depression, the Eysenck Neuroticism Scale (ENS) at the score level of dysthymia has been found to be valid at predicting poor outcome. AIMS: The ENS dysthymia level was compared with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) level to predict the prevalence......, and HAM-D from 2005-2007. At 5-year follow-up from 2011-2013, the participants were re-assessed by HAM-D. The HAM-D was used to measure depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. The Mokken analysis was used to indicate scalability of the BDI and ENS. RESULTS: A total of 185 participants were available...... as measured by the two self-rating scales ENS and BDI can be considered part of a 'double depression' in patients with first episode depression, implying an existence of depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Evaluation of dysthymia or neuroticism is important to perform, even...

  2. The THINC-Integrated Tool (THINC-it) Screening Assessment for Cognitive Dysfunction: Validation in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Roger S; Best, Michael W; Bowie, Christopher R; Carmona, Nicole E; Cha, Danielle S; Lee, Yena; Subramaniapillai, Mehala; Mansur, Rodrigo B; Barry, Harry; Baune, Bernhard T; Culpepper, Larry; Fossati, Philippe; Greer, Tracy L; Harmer, Catherine; Klag, Esther; Lam, Raymond W; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Harrison, John

    2017-07-01

    To validate the THINC-integrated tool (THINC-it)-a freely available, patient-administered, computerized screening tool integrating subjective and objective measures of cognitive function in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD). Subjects aged 18 to 65 years (n = 100) with recurrent MDD experiencing a major depressive episode of at least moderate severity were evaluated and compared to age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (n = 100). Between January and June 2016, subjects completed the THINC-it, which includes variants of the Choice Reaction Time Identification Task (IDN), One-Back Test, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, Trail Making Test-Part B, and the Perceived Deficits Questionnaire for Depression-5-item (PDQ-5-D). The THINC-it required approximately 10 to 15 minutes for administration and was capable of detecting cognitive deficits in adults with MDD. A total of 44.4% of adults with MDD exhibited cognitive performance at ≥ 1.0 SD below that of healthy controls on standardized mean scores of the THINC-it. Concurrent validity of the overall tool, based on a calculated composite score, was acceptable (r = 0.539, P < .001). Concurrent validity of the component tests ranged from -0.083 (IDN) to 0.929 (PDQ-5-D). Qualitative survey results indicated that there was a high level of satisfaction and perceived value in administering the THINC-it regarding its impact on the appropriateness and quality of care being received. The THINC-it is a valid and sensitive tool for detecting cognitive dysfunction in adults with MDD that is free, easy to use, and rapidly administered. The THINC-it should be incorporated into the assessment and measurement of all patients with MDD, particularly among those with enduring functional impairment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02508493.

  3. Insight in bipolar disorder: a comparison between mania, depression and euthymia using the Insight Scale for Affective Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Assis da Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate whether having general insight into bipolar disorder and its symptoms is affected by the mood state of the patient, using the Insight Scale for Affective Disorders, a hetero-application scale for people with mood disorders.Methods: Ninety-five patients with bipolar disorder were evaluated and divided into different groups according to the mood state presented during assessment (i.e., euthymia, mania and depression. Sociodemographic and clinical data (Hamilton Depression Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Clinical Global Impressions Scale were recorded. Insight was evaluated using the Insight Scale for Affective Disorders.Results: Patients with bipolar disorder in mania show less insight about their condition than patients in depression or euthymia, and less insight about their symptoms than patients with depression, with the exception of awareness of weight change.Conclusions: Loss of insight during mania may have important implications for treatment compliance and adherence and needs to be taken into account in the clinical management of people with bipolar disorder.

  4. Relationship between depression anxiety stress scale (DASS) and urinary hydroxyproline and proline concentrations in hospital workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keou Won; Kim, Soo Jeong; Park, Jae Beom; Lee, Kyung Jong

    2011-01-01

    Although increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) is caused by stress accelerates collagen degradation, there was no data on the relationship between stress and urinary hydroxyproline (Hyp) and proline (Pro), a good marker of collagen degradation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between depression, anxiety, and stress (DAS) and concentrations of urinary Hyp and Pro. 97 hospital employees aged 20 to 58 were asked to fill out comprehensive self-administrated questionnaires containing information about their medical history, lifestyle, length of the work year, shift-work and DAS. depression anxiety stress scale (DASS) was applied to evaluate chronic mental disorders. Urine samples were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with double derivatization for the assay of hydroxyproline and proline. The mean value of Hyp and Pro concentration in all subjects was 194.1 ± 113.4 μmol/g and 568.2 ± 310.7 μmol/g. DASS values and urinary Pro concentrations were differentiated by sex (female > male, p others, p stress (Adjusted r2 = 0.051) and anxiety and job (Adjusted r2 = 0.199), respectively. We found that stress and anxiety were correlated with urinary Hyp and Pro concentrations. To identifying a definite correlation, further study in large populations will be needed.

  5. Clinical utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for an outpatient fibromyalgia education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seungree; Tin, Diane; Bain, Lorna; Thorne, J Carter; Ginsburg, Liane

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines the clinical utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in the context of evaluating the Fibromyalgia Outpatient Education Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre (Newmarket, Canada). A pre-test/post-test design was implemented for data analysis. A total of 232 patients' data were obtained through retrospective patient chart review. Complete pre-post data were available for 70 patients and qualitative analysis was done for 12 patients. Main outcome measures included HADS and Arthritis Self-Efficacy (ASE) scores. At the end of the education program, subgroups of patients (high attendance, high exercise habit, low medication) experienced significant improvement on HADS-depression and ASE scores. Linear regression analysis found that HADS pre-program scores explain far more variance in HADS post-test scores than ASE pre-program scores explain in ASE post-program scores; more variance in ASE post-program scores was explained by other variables. In contrast to the quantitative analysis of the Anxiety subscale of HADS, patients in the focus group indicated that their anxiety level decreased through attending the education program. These findings suggest that HADS is an appropriate tool for evaluating fibromyalgia and related patient education programs. Moreover, patient education programs have positive effects on enhancing patients' psychological well-being and self-confidence in controlling fibromyalgia-related symptoms.

  6. Factors associated with risk of depression and relevant predictors of screening for depression in clinical practice: a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected individuals in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, Maria; Sodemann, Morten; Gabel, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors associated with risk of depression. RESULTS: Symptoms of depression (BDI-II score ≥ 14) were observed in 75 patients (35%), and symptoms of moderate to major depression (BDI-II score ≥ 20......OBJECTIVES: Depression and psychiatric disorders are frequent among HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of depression and describe the psychiatric history of HIV-infected individuals in an out-patient clinic in Denmark and to identify factors of clinical...... importance that may be used to identify patients at risk of depression. METHODS: In 2013, 212 HIV-infected patients were included in a questionnaire study. We used the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI-II score ≥ 20 were...

  7. Sadness in the SUN: using computerized screening to analyze correlates of depression and adherence in HIV-infected adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedaldi, Ellen M; van den Berg-Wolf, Mary; Richardson, James; Patel, Pragna; Durham, Marcus; Hammer, John; Henry, Keith; Metzler, Sara; Önen, Nur; Conley, Lois; Wood, Kathy; Brooks, John T; Buchacz, Kate

    2012-12-01

    We used a standardized screening tool to examine frequency of depression and its relation to antiretroviral medication adherence among HIV-infected persons on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the Study to Understand the Natural History of HIV/AIDS in the Era of Effective Therapy (SUN Study). This is a prospective observational cohort of 700 HIV-infected patients enrolled between March 2004 and June 2006 in four U.S. cities, who completed a confidential audio computer-assisted self-interview [ACASI] with behavioral risk and health-related questions at baseline and 6-month follow-up visits, including the nine-question PRIME-MD depression screener and a validated 3-day antiretroviral adherence question. Among 539 eligible participants receiving HAART, 14% had depression at baseline (22% women, 12% men). In multivariable analysis using generalized estimating equations (GEE) to account for repeated measurements through 24 months of follow-up, persons who reported depression on a given ACASI were twice as likely to report nonadherence to antiretrovirals on the same ACASI (Odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% CI: 1.15, 3.57] for mild/moderate depression versus none); such persons were also less likely to have HIV viral load<400 copies/mL. Self-administered computerized standardized screening tools can identify at-risk individuals with depression who may benefit from interventions to improve antiretroviral adherence.

  8. Fifty years with the Hamilton scales for anxiety and depression. A tribute to Max Hamilton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P

    2009-01-01

    From the moment Max Hamilton started his psychiatric education, he considered psychometrics to be a scientific discipline on a par with biochemistry or pharmacology in clinical research. His clinimetric skills were in operation in the 1950s when randomised clinical trials were established...... as the method for the evaluation of the clinical effects of psychotropic drugs. Inspired by Eysenck, Hamilton took the long route around factor analysis in order to qualify his scales for anxiety (HAM-A) and depression (HAM-D) as scientific tools. From the moment when, 50 years ago, Hamilton published his first...... placebo-controlled trial with an experimental anti-anxiety drug, he realized the dialectic problem in using the total score on HAM-A as a sufficient statistic for the measurement of outcome. This dialectic problem has been investigated for more than 50 years with different types of factor analyses without...

  9. Validation of Six Short and Ultra-short Screening Instruments for Depression for People Living with HIV in Ontario: Results from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Stephanie KY; Boyle, Eleanor; Burchell, Ann;

    2015-01-01

    of current depression in HIV-positive patients attending HIV specialty care clinics in Ontario. Methods A multi-centre validation study was conducted in Ontario to examine the validity and accuracy of three instruments (the Center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale [CESD20], the Kessler Psychological...... Distress Scale [K10], and the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale [PHQ9]) and their short forms (CESD10, K6, and PHQ2) in diagnosing current major depression among 190 HIV-positive patients in Ontario. Results from the three instruments and their short forms were compared to results from the gold...... positive predictive value (0.49–0.58) at their optimal cut-points. Conclusion Among people in HIV care in Ontario, Canada, the three instruments and their short forms performed equally well and accurately. When further in-depth assessments become available, shorter instruments might find greater clinical...

  10. A psychometric validation analysis of Eysenck’s Neuroticism and Extraversion Scales in a sample of first time depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Stine Bjerrum; Bech, Per; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2015-01-01

    Eysenck and Eysenck identified the two-factor structure of personality, namely neuroticism and extraversion which has been widely used in clinical psychiatry, and generated much research on the psychometric properties of the scales. Using a classical psychometric approach the neuroticism...... and extraversion scales have shown robust psychometric properties. The present study used both classical psychometric and item response theory (IRT) analyses to evaluate the neuroticism and extraversion scales and improve scalability of the instrument neuroticism and extraversion. A first time depressed sample...... symptoms related to interpersonal sensitivity were identified. For the extraversion scale a shorter and psychometrically more robust version was identified together with a short introversion scale. Clinically discriminant validity was analysed using correlations. The correlation between depression (Ham...

  11. Chilean experimental version of the State-Trait Depression Questionnaire (ST-DEP: Trait sub-scale (T-DEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Vera-Villarroel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This instrumental study presents the first validity and reliability data for the Trait subscale (T-DEP of the Chilean experimental version of the State and Trait Depression Inventory (ST-DEP: Euthymia and Dysthymia. The data were obtained from a sample of 300 university students. The internal consistency values for the TDEP were high (.90. The test-retest values from eight weeks time interval (fifty six days were elevated (.78. A factorial analysis of the principal components revealed a principal factor for all of the constructed items in this experimental version of the TDEP. The last, promax rotation showed two clear main factors similar in size: negative affectivity (Dysthymia and positive affectivity (Euthymia. The convergent validity indexes for the Beck Depression Inventory and the Zung Self Rating Depression Scale, were also high, with indexes ranging from .64 to .71. The correlation between State- Trait Anxiety Inventory and the depression scales used in this study was high (between .63 and .78, once again indicating the usual overlapping between anxiety and depression seen in most depression inventories.

  12. Depressive symptoms in youth with type 1 or type 2 diabetes: Results of the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium screening assessment of depression in diabetes study

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the frequency of depressive symptoms and the diagnosis and management of depression in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) enrolled in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium T1D and T2D registries. The Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) 2 Self-Report (Short) version ...

  13. Scaling up cervical cancer screening in the midst of human papillomavirus vaccination advocacy in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerawattananon Yot

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening tests for cervical cancer are effective in reducing the disease burden. In Thailand, a Pap smear program has been implemented throughout the country for 40 years. In 2008 the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH unexpectedly decided to scale up the coverage of free cervical cancer screening services, to meet an ambitious target. This study analyzes the processes and factors that drove this policy innovation in the area of cervical cancer control in Thailand. Methods In-depth interviews with key policy actors and review of relevant documents were conducted in 2009. Data analysis was guided by a framework, developed on public policy models and existing literature on scaling-up health care interventions. Results Between 2006 and 2008 international organizations and the vaccine industry advocated the introduction of Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccine for the primary prevention of cervical cancer. Meanwhile, a local study suggested that the vaccine was considerably less cost-effective than cervical cancer screening in the Thai context. Then, from August to December 2008, the MoPH carried out a campaign to expand the coverage of its cervical cancer screening program, targeting one million women. The study reveals that several factors were influential in focusing the attention of policymakers on strengthening the screening services. These included the high burden of cervical cancer in Thailand, the launch of the HPV vaccine onto the global and domestic markets, the country’s political instability, and the dissemination of scientific evidence regarding the appropriateness of different options for cervical cancer prevention. Influenced by the country’s political crisis, the MoPH’s campaign was devised in a very short time. In the view of the responsible health officials, the campaign was not successful and indeed, did not achieve its ambitious target. Conclusion The Thai case study suggests that the political crisis was a

  14. Rationale and study protocol for a multi-component Health Information Technology (HIT) screening tool for depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in the primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegler, Kelly; Mollica, Richard; Sim, Susan Elliott; Nicholas, Elisa; Chandler, Maria; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Paigne, Kittya; Paigne, Sompia; Nguyen, Danh V; Sorkin, Dara H

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence rate of depression in primary care is high. Primary care providers serve as the initial point of contact for the majority of patients with depression, yet, approximately 50% of cases remain unrecognized. The under-diagnosis of depression may be further exacerbated in limited English-language proficient (LEP) populations. Language barriers may result in less discussion of patients' mental health needs and fewer referrals to mental health services, particularly given competing priorities of other medical conditions and providers' time pressures. Recent advances in Health Information Technology (HIT) may facilitate novel ways to screen for depression and other mental health disorders in LEP populations. The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale and protocol of a clustered randomized controlled trial that will test the effectiveness of an HIT intervention that provides a multi-component approach to delivering culturally competent, mental health care in the primary care setting. The HIT intervention has four components: 1) web-based provider training, 2) multimedia electronic screening of depression and PTSD in the patients' primary language, 3) Computer generated risk assessment scores delivered directly to the provider, and 4) clinical decision support. The outcomes of the study include assessing the potential of the HIT intervention to improve screening rates, clinical detection, provider initiation of treatment, and patient outcomes for depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among LEP Cambodian refugees who experienced war atrocities and trauma during the Khmer Rouge. This technology has the potential to be adapted to any LEP population in order to facilitate mental health screening and treatment in the primary care setting.

  15. Psychometric Limitations of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale for Assessing Depressive Symptoms among Adults with HIV/AIDS: A Rasch Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl L. Gay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D scale is a widely used measure of depressive symptoms, but its psychometric properties have not been adequately evaluated among adults with HIV/AIDS. This study used an item response theory approach (Rasch analysis to evaluate the CES-D’s validity and reliability in relation to key demographic and clinical variables in adults with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 347 adults with HIV/AIDS (231 males, 93 females, and 23 transgenders; age range 22–77 years completed the CES-D. A Rasch model application was used to analyze the CES-D’s rating scale functioning, internal scale validity, person-response validity, person-separation validity, internal consistency, differential item functioning (DIF, and differential test functioning. CES-D scores were generally high and associated with several demographic and clinical variables. The CES-D distinguished 3 distinct levels of depression and had acceptable internal consistency but lacked unidimensionality, five items demonstrated poor fit to the model, 15% of the respondents demonstrated poor fit, and eight items demonstrated DIF related to gender, race, or AIDS diagnosis. Removal of misfitting items resulted in minimal improvement in the CES-D’s substantive and structural validity. CES-D scores should be interpreted with caution in adults with HIV/AIDS, particularly when comparing scores across gender and racial groups.

  16. A large scale screen for neural stem cell markers in Xenopus retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, Karine; Mazurier, Nicolas; Bronchain, Odile; Borday, Caroline; Cabochette, Pauline; Chesneau, Albert; Colozza, Gabriele; El Yakoubi, Warif; Hamdache, Johanna; Locker, Morgane; Gilchrist, Michael J; Pollet, Nicolas; Perron, Muriel

    2012-04-01

    Neural stem cell research suffers from a lack of molecular markers to specifically assess stem or progenitor cell properties. The organization of the Xenopus ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) in the retina allows the spatial distinction of these two cell types: stem cells are confined to the most peripheral region, while progenitors are more central. Despite this clear advantage, very few genes specifically expressed in retinal stem cells have been discovered so far in this model. To gain insight into the molecular signature of these cells, we performed a large-scale expression screen in the Xenopus CMZ, establishing it as a model system for stem cell gene profiling. Eighteen genes expressed specifically in the CMZ stem cell compartment were retrieved and are discussed here. These encode various types of proteins, including factors associated with proliferation, mitotic spindle organization, DNA/RNA processing, and cell adhesion. In addition, the publication of this work in a special issue on Xenopus prompted us to give a more general illustration of the value of large-scale screens in this model species. Thus, beyond neural stem cell specific genes, we give a broader highlight of our screen outcome, describing in particular other retinal cell markers that we found. Finally, we present how these can all be easily retrieved through a novel module we developed in the web-based annotation tool XenMARK, and illustrate the potential of this powerful searchable database in the context of the retina.

  17. Reliability and validity of the Ethiopian version of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS in HIV infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayalu Aklilu Reda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS is a widely used instrument for evaluating psychological distress from anxiety and depression. HADS has not yet been validated in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Amharic (Ethiopian language version of HADs among HIV infected patients. METHODS: The translated scale was administered to 302 HIV/AIDS patients on follow up for and taking anti-retroviral treatment. Consistency assessment was conducted using Cronbach's alpha, test-retest reliability using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC. Construct validity was examined using principal components analysis (PCA. Parallel analysis, Kaiser's criterion and the scree test were used for factor extraction. RESULTS: The internal consistency was 0.78 for the anxiety, 0.76 for depression subscales and 0.87 for the full scale of HADS. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC was 80%, 86%, and 84% for the anxiety and depression subscales, and total score respectively. PCA revealed a one dimensional scale. CONCLUSION: This preliminary validation study of the Ethiopian version of the HADs indicates that it has promising acceptability, reliability and validity. The adopted scale has a single underlying dimension as indicated by Razavi's model. The HADS can be used to examine psychological distress in HIV infected patients. Findings are discussed and recommendations made.

  18. Estimating the severity of intellectual disability in adults: a Mokken scaling analysis of the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Aja L; McKenzie, Karen

    2013-09-01

    A Mokken scaling analysis of the learning disability screening questionnaire (LDSQ) suggested that, with the exception of 1 item, the scale conforms to the properties of a Mokken scale. This has advantages for estimating the severity of intellectual disability and inferring the difficulties likely to be experienced by an individual for whom there is incomplete information on intellectual and adaptive functioning.

  19. The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale-Short Version: Scale Reduction via Exploratory Bifactor Modeling of the Broad Anxiety Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebesutani, Chad; Reise, Steven P.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Ale, Chelsea; Regan, Jennifer; Young, John; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine; Weisz, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Using a school-based (N = 1,060) and clinic-referred (N = 303) youth sample, the authors developed a 25-item shortened version of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) using Schmid-Leiman exploratory bifactor analysis to reduce client burden and administration time and thus improve the transportability characteristics of this…

  20. Large Scale Nanoparticle Screening for Small Molecule Analysis in Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnik, Gargey B; Hansen, Rebecca L; Korte, Andrew R; Reichert, Malinda D; Vela, Javier; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-09-20

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as efficient matrixes for small molecule profiling and imaging by laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), but so far there has been no systematic study comparing different NPs in the analysis of various classes of small molecules. Here, we present a large scale screening of 13 NPs for the analysis of two dozen small metabolite molecules. Many NPs showed much higher LDI efficiency than organic matrixes in positive mode and some NPs showed comparable efficiencies for selected analytes in negative mode. Our results suggest that a thermally driven desorption process is a key factor for metal oxide NPs, but chemical interactions are also very important, especially for other NPs. The screening results provide a useful guideline for the selection of NPs in the LDI-MS analysis of small molecules.

  1. Large-Scale Forward Genetic Screening Analysis of Development of Hematopoiesis in Zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Wang; Ning Ma; Yiyue Zhang; Wenqing Zhang; Zhibin Huang; Lingfeng Zhao; Wei Liu; Xiaohui Chen; Ping Meng; Qing Lin; Yali Chi; Mengchang Xu

    2012-01-01

    Zebrafish is a powerful model for the investigation of hematopoiesis.In order to isolate novel mutants with hematopoietic defects,large-scale mutagenesis screening of zebrafish was performed.By scoring specific hematopoietic markers,52 mutants were identified and then classified into four types based on specific phenotypic traits.Each mutant represented a putative mutation of a gene regulating the relevant aspect of hematopoiesis,including early macrophage development,early granulopoiesis,embryonic myelopoiesis,and definitive erythropoiesis/lymphopoiesis.Our method should be applicable for other types of genetic screening in zebrafish.In addition,further study of the mutants we identified may help to unveil the molecular basis of hematopoiesis.

  2. Cross-cultural adaptation into Punjabi of the English version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Rod S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We wanted to use a Punjabi version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS to enable non-English speaking patients to participate in a clinical trial. The aim of the study was to translate and validate the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale into Punjabi. Methods The HADS was translated into Punjabi by a multidisciplinary team, verified against the original version, and administered to 73 bilingual patients attending an outpatient clinic. Results One sample t-tests and the Bland-Altman plots demonstrated acceptable linguistic agreement between the two versions of the HADS. Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficients (p Conclusion The Punjabi HADS is an acceptable, reliable and valid measure of anxiety and depression among physically ill Punjabi speaking people in the United Kingdom.

  3. Interpretation of Errors Made by Mandarin-Speaking Children on the Preschool Language Scales--5th Edition Screening Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yonggang; Rattanasone, Nan Xu; Wyver, Shirley; Hinton, Amber; Demuth, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    We investigated typical errors made by Mandarin-speaking children when measured by the Preschool Language Scales-fifth edition, Screening Test (PLS-5 Screening Test). The intention was to provide preliminary data for the development of a guideline for early childhood educators and psychologists who use the test with Mandarin-speaking children.…

  4. Brief depression screening with the PHQ-2 associated with prognosis following percutaneous coronary intervention with paclitaxel-eluting stenting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Denollet, Johan; de Jonge, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    Depression is associated with adverse prognosis in cardiac patients, warranting the availability of brief and valid instruments to identify depressed patients in clinical practice.......Depression is associated with adverse prognosis in cardiac patients, warranting the availability of brief and valid instruments to identify depressed patients in clinical practice....

  5. Dealing with missing data in a multi-question depression scale: a comparison of imputation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Heather

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Missing data present a challenge to many research projects. The problem is often pronounced in studies utilizing self-report scales, and literature addressing different strategies for dealing with missing data in such circumstances is scarce. The objective of this study was to compare six different imputation techniques for dealing with missing data in the Zung Self-reported Depression scale (SDS. Methods 1580 participants from a surgical outcomes study completed the SDS. The SDS is a 20 question scale that respondents complete by circling a value of 1 to 4 for each question. The sum of the responses is calculated and respondents are classified as exhibiting depressive symptoms when their total score is over 40. Missing values were simulated by randomly selecting questions whose values were then deleted (a missing completely at random simulation. Additionally, a missing at random and missing not at random simulation were completed. Six imputation methods were then considered; 1 multiple imputation, 2 single regression, 3 individual mean, 4 overall mean, 5 participant's preceding response, and 6 random selection of a value from 1 to 4. For each method, the imputed mean SDS score and standard deviation were compared to the population statistics. The Spearman correlation coefficient, percent misclassified and the Kappa statistic were also calculated. Results When 10% of values are missing, all the imputation methods except random selection produce Kappa statistics greater than 0.80 indicating 'near perfect' agreement. MI produces the most valid imputed values with a high Kappa statistic (0.89, although both single regression and individual mean imputation also produced favorable results. As the percent of missing information increased to 30%, or when unbalanced missing data were introduced, MI maintained a high Kappa statistic. The individual mean and single regression method produced Kappas in the 'substantial agreement' range

  6. Does the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measure anxiety symptoms consistently across adolescence? The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathyssek, Christina M.; Olino, Thomas M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Van Oort, Floor V. A.

    We assessed if the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measures anxiety symptoms similarly across age groups within adolescence. This is crucial for valid comparison of anxiety levels between different age groups. Anxiety symptoms were assessed biennially in a representative

  7. Does the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measure anxiety symptoms consistently across adolescence? The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathyssek, Christina M.; Olino, Thomas M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Van Oort, Floor V. A.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed if the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measures anxiety symptoms similarly across age groups within adolescence. This is crucial for valid comparison of anxiety levels between different age groups. Anxiety symptoms were assessed biennially in a representative populatio

  8. Does the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measure anxiety symptoms consistently across adolescence? The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Mathyssek (Christina); T.M. Olino (Thomas); C.A. Hartman; J. Ormel (Johan Hans); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); F.V.A. van Oort (Floor)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe assessed if the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measures anxiety symptoms similarly across age groups within adolescence. This is crucial for valid comparison of anxiety levels between different age groups. Anxiety symptoms were assessed biennially in a representati

  9. Can a one-item mood scale do the trick? Predicting relapse over 5.5-years in recurrent depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, Gerard D.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Berking, Matthias; Koeter, Maarten W.J.; Schene, Aart H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine whether a simple Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) is able to predict time to relapse over 5.5-years. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 187 remitted recurrently depressed out-patients were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) a

  10. The Short Version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21): Factor Structure in a Young Adolescent Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the factor structure of the short form of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21; Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995b) in a young adolescent sample. A group of 484 high school students ("Mean" age = 13.62 years, Min = 11.83, Max = 15.67 years, 52 % boys) completed the DASS-21. Several models were tested using Confirmatory Factor…

  11. The Consequences of Perfectionism Scale: Factorial Structure and Relationships with Perfectionism, Performance Perfectionism, Affect, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeber, Joachim; Hoyle, Azina; Last, Freyja

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the Consequences of Perfectionism Scale (COPS) and its relationships with perfectionism, performance perfectionism, affect, and depressive symptoms in 202 university students using confirmatory factor analysis, correlations, and regression analyses. Results suggest that the COPS is a reliable and valid measure of positive…

  12. The Consequences of Perfectionism Scale: Factorial structure and relationships with perfectionism, performance perfectionism, affect, and depressive symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Stoeber, Joachim; Hoyle, Alison J.; Last, Freyja

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the Consequences of Perfectionism Scale (COPS) and its relationships with perfectionism, performance perfectionism, affect, and depressive symptoms in 202 university students using confirmatory factor analysis, correlations, and regression analyses. Results suggest that the COPS is a reliable and valid measure of positive and negative consequences of perfectionism.

  13. A new clinical rating scale for work absence and productivity: validation in patients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatham Lakshmi N

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD is highest in working age people and depression causes significant impairment in occupational functioning. Work productivity and work absence should be incorporated into clinical assessments but currently available scales may not be optimized for clinical use. This study seeks to validate the Lam Employment Absence and Productivity Scale (LEAPS, a 10-item self-report questionnaire that takes 3-5 minutes to complete. Methods The study sample consisted of consecutive patients attending a Mood Disorders outpatient clinic who were in full- or part-time paid work. All patients met DSM-IV criteria for MDD and completed during their intake assessment the LEAPS, the self-rated version of the Quick Inventory for Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-SR, the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS and the Health and Work Performance Questionnaire (HPQ. Standard psychometric analyses for validation were conducted. Results A total of 234 patients with MDD completed the assessments. The LEAPS displayed excellent internal consistency as assessed by Cronbach's alpha of 0.89. External validity was assessed by comparing the LEAPS to the other clinical and work functioning scales. The LEAPS total score was significantly correlated with the SDS work disability score (r = 0.63, p Conclusion The LEAPS displays good internal and external validity in a population of patients with MDD attending an outpatient clinic, which suggests that it may be a clinically useful tool to assess and monitor work functioning and productivity in depressed patients.

  14. Construction and validation of a patient- and user-friendly nursing home version of the Geriatric Depression Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K.; Gerritsen, D. L.; Beekman, A. T. F.; Eisses, A. M. H.; Kluiter, H.; Ribbe, M. W.

    Objective To construct a patient- and user-friendly shortened version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is especially suitable for nursing home patients. Methods The study was carried out on two different data bases including 23 Dutch nursing homes. Data on the GDS (n = 410), the Mini

  15. Construction and validation of a patient- and user-friendly nursing home version of the Geriatric Depression Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K.; Gerritsen, D. L.; Beekman, A. T. F.; Eisses, A. M. H.; Kluiter, H.; Ribbe, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To construct a patient- and user-friendly shortened version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is especially suitable for nursing home patients. Methods The study was carried out on two different data bases including 23 Dutch nursing homes. Data on the GDS (n = 410), the Mini Men

  16. A Reexamination of the Factor Structure of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: Is a One-Factor Model Plausible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael C.; Cheavens, Jennifer S.; Heiy, Jane E.; Cukrowicz, Kelly C.

    2010-01-01

    The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) is one of the most widely used measures of depressive symptoms in research today. The original psychometric work in support of the CES-D (Radloff, 1977) described a 4-factor model underlying the 20 items on the scale. Despite a long history of evidence supporting this structure,…

  17. The Psychometric Properties of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale in Chinese Primary Care Patients: Factor Structure, Construct Validity, Reliability, Sensitivity and Responsiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Yee Chin

    Full Text Available The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D is a commonly used instrument to measure depressive symptomatology. Despite this, the evidence for its psychometric properties remains poorly established in Chinese populations. The aim of this study was to validate the use of the CES-D in Chinese primary care patients by examining factor structure, construct validity, reliability, sensitivity and responsiveness.The psychometric properties were assessed amongst a sample of 3686 Chinese adult primary care patients in Hong Kong. Three competing factor structure models were examined using confirmatory factor analysis. The original CES-D four-structure model had adequate fit, however the data was better fit into a bi-factor model. For the internal construct validity, corrected item-total correlations were 0.4 for most items. The convergent validity was assessed by examining the correlations between the CES-D, the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9 and the Short Form-12 Health Survey (version 2 Mental Component Summary (SF-12 v2 MCS. The CES-D had a strong correlation with the PHQ-9 (coefficient: 0.78 and SF-12 v2 MCS (coefficient: -0.75. Internal consistency was assessed by McDonald's omega hierarchical (ωH. The ωH value for the general depression factor was 0.855. The ωH values for "somatic", "depressed affect", "positive affect" and "interpersonal problems" were 0.434, 0.038, 0.738 and 0.730, respectively. For the two-week test-retest reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.91. The CES-D was sensitive in detecting differences between known groups, with the AUC >0.7. Internal responsiveness of the CES-D to detect positive and negative changes was satisfactory (with p value 0.2. The CES-D was externally responsive, with the AUC>0.7.The CES-D appears to be a valid, reliable, sensitive and responsive instrument for screening and monitoring depressive symptoms in adult Chinese primary care patients. In its original

  18. Large scale generation of micro-droplet array by vapor condensation on mesh screen piece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian; Xu, Jinliang; He, Xiaotian; Liu, Qi

    2017-01-01

    We developed a novel micro-droplet array system, which is based on the distinct three dimensional mesh screen structure and sintering and oxidation induced thermal-fluid performance. Mesh screen was sintered on a copper substrate by bonding the two components. Non-uniform residue stress is generated along weft wires, with larger stress on weft wire top location than elsewhere. Oxidation of the sintered package forms micro pits with few nanograsses on weft wire top location, due to the stress corrosion mechanism. Nanograsses grow elsewhere to show hydrophobic behavior. Thus, surface-energy-gradient weft wires are formed. Cooling the structure in a wet air environment nucleates water droplets on weft wire top location, which is more “hydrophilic” than elsewhere. Droplet size is well controlled by substrate temperature, air humidity and cooling time. Because warp wires do not contact copper substrate and there is a larger conductive thermal resistance between warp wire and weft wire, warp wires contribute less to condensation but function as supporting structure. The surface energy analysis of drops along weft wires explains why droplet array can be generated on the mesh screen piece. Because the commercial material is used, the droplet system is cost effective and can be used for large scale utilization.

  19. SCREENING FOR POSTSTROKE COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT VIA MINI MENTAL STATE EXAMINATION AND MONTREAL COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirena Valkova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study is to examine cognitive performance after mild stroke via Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE and Montreal cognitive assessment scale (MoCA and to compare the results.Material and methods: We examined 54 patients with mild stroke (aged 52 to 72 (mean 63.17, SD 5.96; 34 males and 20 females and 54 controls, adjusted by age, sex and education level. All subjects were tested via MMSE (Bulgarian version and MoCa (Bulgarian version. Data was collected in the single step model at the 90th day after stroke incident for patients and at the day of obtaining informed consent for controls. Results: Patients have poorer performance on both MMSE and MoCa than controls. MoCa has comparatively good discriminative validity and sensitivity.Conclusions: Although MMSE is one of the classical screening tools for cognitive impairment widely used in Bulgaria, other screening tools should not be ignored. On the basis of our results, MoCa is also a good screening instrument, especially for poststroke cognitive impairment.

  20. Prevalence and psychopathological characteristics of depression in consecutive otorhinolaryngologic inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westhofen Martin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High prevalence of depression has been reported in otorhinolaryngologic patients (ORL. However, studies using a semi-structured interview to determine the prevalence of depression in ORL are lacking. Therefore the present study sought to determine the depression prevalence in ORL applying a semi-structured diagnostic interview and to further characterize the pathopsychological and demographic characteristics of depression in these patients. Methods One-hundred inpatients of the otorhinolaryngologic department of a German university hospital participated voluntarily (age M = 38.8 years, SD = 13.9; 38.0% female. Depression was assessed using a clinical interview in which the International Diagnostic Checklist for depression (IDCL was applied. Patients completed the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI which constitutes three composite scores and nine symptom scales and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Multivariate analyses of variance, correlations and effect sizes were conducted. Results A prevalence of depression of 21.0% was determined, 38.0% of the depressed patients were female. Depressed patients showed higher scores on the BSI-scales "interpersonal sensitivity", "depression", "anxiety", "phobic anxiety" and "psychoticism" with medium effect sizes. Conclusions High prevalence of depression was found which is in accordance with results of prior studies. Depressed patients showed higher psychological distress as compared to non-depressed patients. The results call for carrying on in engaging in depression research and routine depression screening in ORL.

  1. The prevalence of depression in white-European and South-Asian people with impaired glucose regulation and screen-detected type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Aujla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is a clear relationship between depression and diabetes. However, the directionality of the relationship remains unclear and very little research has considered a multi-ethnic population. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of depression in a White-European (WE and South-Asian (SA population attending a community diabetes screening programme, and to explore the association of depression with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and impaired glucose regulation (IGR. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants were recruited from general practices in Leicestershire (United Kingdom between August 2004 and December 2007. 4682 WE (40-75 years and 1327 SA participants (25-75 years underwent an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test, detailed history, anthropometric measurements and completed the World Health Organisation-Five (WHO-5 Wellbeing Index. Depression was defined by a WHO-5 wellbeing score < or =13. Unadjusted prevalence of depression for people in the total sample with T2DM and IGR was 21.3% (21.6% in WE, 20.6% in SA, p = 0.75 and 26.0% (25.3% in WE, 28.9% in SA, p = 0.65 respectively. For people with normal glucose tolerance, the prevalence was 25.1% (24.9% in WE, 26.4% in SA, p = 0.86. Age-adjusted prevalences were higher for females than males. Odds ratios adjusted for age, gender, and ethnicity, showed no significant increase in prevalent depression for people with T2DM (OR = 0.95, 95%CI 0.62 to 1.45 or IGR (OR = 1.17, 95%CI 0.96 to 1.42. CONCLUSIONS: Prior to the knowledge of diagnosis, depression was not significantly more prevalent in people with screen detected T2DM or IGR. Differences in prevalent depression between WE and SA people were also not identified. In this multi-ethnic population, female gender was significantly associated with depression.

  2. Large-scale RNA interference screening in mammalian cells identifies novel regulators of mutant huntingtin aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available In polyglutamine (polyQ diseases including Huntington's disease (HD, mutant proteins containing expanded polyQ stretch form aggregates in neurons. Genetic or RNAi screenings in yeast, C. elegans or Drosophila have identified multiple genes modifying polyQ aggregation, a few of which are confirmed effective in mammals. However, the overall molecular mechanism underlying polyQ protein aggregation in mammalian cells still remains obscure. We here perform RNAi screening in mouse neuro2a cells to identify mammalian modifiers for aggregation of mutant huntingtin, a causative protein of HD. By systematic cell transfection and automated cell image analysis, we screen ∼ 12000 shRNA clones and identify 111 shRNAs that either suppress or enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation, without altering its gene expression. Classification of the shRNA-targets suggests that genes with various cellular functions such as gene transcription and protein phosphorylation are involved in modifying the aggregation. Subsequent analysis suggests that, in addition to the aggregation-modifiers sensitive to proteasome inhibition, some of them, such as a transcription factor Tcf20, and kinases Csnk1d and Pik3c2a, are insensitive to it. As for Tcf20, which contains polyQ stretches at N-terminus, its binding to mutant huntingtin aggregates is observed in neuro2a cells and in HD model mouse neurons. Notably, except Pik3c2a, the rest of the modifiers identified here are novel. Thus, our first large-scale RNAi screening in mammalian system identifies previously undescribed genetic players that regulate mutant huntingtin aggregation by several, possibly mammalian-specific mechanisms.

  3. Development of a social skills assessment screening scale for psychiatric rehabilitation settings: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornima Bhola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Deficits in social skills may present in a range of psychiatric disorders, particularly in the more serious and persistent conditions, and have an influence on functioning across various domains. Aims: This pilot study aimed at developing a brief measure, for structured evaluation and screening for social skills deficits, which can be easily integrated into routine clinical practice. Settings and Design: The sample consisted of 380 inpatients and their accompanying caregivers, referred to Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services at a tertiary care government psychiatric hospital. Materials and Methods: The evaluation included an Inpatient intake Proforma and the 20-item Social Skills Assessment Screening Scale (SSASS. Disability was assessed using the Indian Disability Evaluation and Assessment Scale (IDEAS for a subset of 94 inpatients. Statistical Analysis Used: The analysis included means and standard deviations, frequency and percentages, Cronbach's alpha to assess internal consistency, t-tests to assess differences in social skills deficits between select subgroups, and correlation between SSASS and IDEAS scores. Results: The results indicated the profile of social skills deficits assessed among the inpatients with varied psychiatric diagnoses. The “psychosis” group exhibited significantly higher deficits than the “mood disorder” group. Results indicated high internal consistency of the SSASS and adequate criterion validity demonstrated by correlations with select IDEAS domains. Modifications were made to the SSASS following the pilot study. Conclusions: The SSASS has potential value as a measure for screening and individualised intervention plans for social skills training in mental health and rehabilitation settings. The implications for future work on the psychometric properties and clinical applications are discussed.

  4. The iBeetle large-scale RNAi screen reveals gene functions for insect development and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schultheis, Dorothea; Schwirz, Jonas; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Majumdar, Upalparna; Dao, Van Anh; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Tech, Maike; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Theis, Mirko; Schild, Inga; Trauner, Jochen; Koniszewski, Nikolaus D B; Küster, Elke; Kittelmann, Sebastian; Hu, Yonggang; Lehmann, Sabrina; Siemanowski, Janna; Ulrich, Julia; Panfilio, Kristen A; Schröder, Reinhard; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario; Buchhholz, Frank; Frasch, Manfred; Roth, Siegfried; Wimmer, Ernst A; Schoppmeier, Michael; Klingler, Martin; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-07-28

    Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the functional studies predominantly focus on candidate genes previously identified in Drosophila, which is biasing research towards conserved gene functions. RNAi screens in other organisms promise to reduce this bias. Here we present the results of the iBeetle screen, a large-scale, unbiased RNAi screen in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which identifies gene functions in embryonic and postembryonic development, physiology and cell biology. The utility of Tribolium as a screening platform is demonstrated by the identification of genes involved in insect epithelial adhesion. This work transcends the restrictions of the candidate gene approach and opens fields of research not accessible in Drosophila.

  5. Meta-analysis of screening and case finding tools for depression in cancer: Evidence based recommendations for clinical practice on behalf of the Depression in Cancer Care consensus group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, A. J.; Meader, N.; Davies, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To examine the validity of screening and case-finding tools used in the identification of depression as defined by an ICD10/DSM-IV criterion standard. Methods: We identified 63 studies involving 19 tools (in 33 publications) designed to help clinicians identify depression in cancer...... as cases. The main cautions are the reliance on DSM-IV definitions of major depression, the large number of small studies and the paucity of data for many tools in specific settings. Conclusions: Although no single tool could be offered unqualified support, several tools are likely to improve upon...... unassisted clinical recognition. In clinical practice, all tools should form part of an integrated approach involving further follow-up, clinical assessment and evidence based therapy. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Construct validity of the misrepresentation scales of the psychological screening inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon, Richard I; Cunningham, Katie S

    2005-10-01

    This study provides construct validity evidence and reliabilities (consistency and stability) for 5 misrepresentation (response distortion) scales of the Psychological Screening Inventory (PSI; Lanyon, 1970, 1973, 1978) in assessing 3 constructs: exaggeration of psychopathology, exaggeration of personal virtue, and exaggeration of health problems. Using data from forensic cases, the existence and independence of these 3 constructs were confirmed in data from the MMPI-2 (Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) and the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (Paulhus, 1986, 1991). The PSI scales were then shown to load highly on these constructs. The PSI scales also showed the expected patterns when their mean scores were examined for 15 sets of responses from participant groups with varied motivations to misrepresent. We present receiver operating characteristic data to show the success of the scales in distinguishing between simulators and appropriate comparison groups. Using the same data, we also present classification accuracy in terms of positive predictive power and negative predictive power based on a sensitivity level of 90% and misrepresentation base rates of .20 and .10.

  7. In vitro screening for estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds using Mozambique tilapia and sea bass scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Patrícia I S; Estêvão, M Dulce; Santos, Soraia; Andrade, André; Power, Deborah M

    2017-09-01

    A wide range of estrogenic endocrine disruptors (EDCs) are accumulating in the environment and may disrupt the physiology of aquatic organisms. The effects of EDCs on fish have mainly been assessed using reproductive endpoints and in vivo animal experiments. We used a simple non-invasive assay to evaluate the impact of estrogens and EDCs on sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) scales. These were exposed to estradiol (E2), two phytoestrogens and six anthropogenic estrogenic/anti-estrogenic EDCs and activities of enzymes related to mineralized tissue turnover (TRAP, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and ALP, alkaline phosphatase) were measured. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR detected the expression of both membrane and nuclear estrogen receptors in the scales of both species, confirming scales as a target for E2 and EDCs through different mechanisms. Changes in TRAP or ALP activities after 30minute and 24h exposure were detected in sea bass and tilapia scales treated with E2 and three EDCs, although compound-, time- and dose-specific responses were observed for the two species. These results support again that the mineralized tissue turnover of fish is regulated by estrogens and reveals that the scales are a mineralized estrogen-responsive tissue that may be affected by some EDCs. The significance of these effects for whole animal physiology needs to be further explored. The in vitro fish scale bioassay is a promising non-invasive screening tool for E2 and EDCs effects, although the low sensitivity of TRAP/ALP quantification limits their utility and indicates that alternative endpoints are required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Wording effects and the factor structure of the Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale in HIV/AIDS patients on antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Wouters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the immense burden of HIV/AIDS on health systems in sub-Saharan Africa and the intricate link between HIV/AIDS and mental health problems, health care providers need a valid and reliable instrument to assess mental health rapidly. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS may constitute such an instrument. The aims of this study were to: (1 examine the factor structure of the HADS in a population of South African HIV/AIDS patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART; and (2 identify and control the disturbing influence of systematic wording effects in vulnerable respondent groups. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The translated scale was administered to 716 HIV/AIDS patients enrolled in the public sector ART program in South Africa. A combined confirmatory factor analysis and correlated-traits-correlated-methods framework was used to determine the preferred factor structure of the HADS, while controlling for the disturbing influence of systematic wording effects. When assessing the structure without a negative wording factor, all three factor structures displayed an acceptable fit to the data. The three-factor solution best fitted the data. Addition of a method factor significantly improved the fit of all three factor solutions. Using χ(2 difference testing, Razavi's one-factor solution displayed a superior fit compared to the other two factor solutions. CONCLUSIONS: The study outcomes support the use of the HADS as a valid and reliable means to screen for mental health problems in HIV/AIDS patients enrolled in a public-sector ART program in a resource-limited context. The results demonstrate the importance of evaluating and correcting for wording effects when examining the factor structure of the screening instrument in vulnerable patient groups. In light of the inter-relationships between HIV/AIDS and mental health problems and the scarcity of adequate screening tools, additional studies on this topic are required.

  9. A computerised screening instrument for adolescent depression: population-based validation and application to a two-phase case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, G C; Coffey, C; Posterino, M; Carlin, J B; Wolfe, R; Bowes, G

    1999-03-01

    Computer-administered questionnaires have been little explored as a potentially effective and inexpensive alternative to pencil and paper screening tests. A self-administered computerised form of the revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R) was compared with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) in a two-phase study of 2032 Australian high school students (mean age 15.7 years) drawn from a stratified random sample of 44 schools in the state of Victoria, Australia. Prevalence, sensitivity and specificity were estimated using weighting to compensate for the two-phase sampling. Point prevalence estimates of depression using the CIS-R were 1.8% for males and 5.6% for females--an overall prevalence of 3.2%. Prevalence estimates for depression in the past 6 months using the CIDI were 5.2% for males and 16.9% for females--an overall estimate of 12.1%. The CIS-R had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 0.49 and negative predictive value (NPV) of 0.91 for CIDI depression in the past 6 months. Specificity was very high (0.97) but sensitivity low (0.18), indicating that a majority of those with a CIDI-defined depressive episode in the past 6 months were not recognised at a single screening using the CIS-R. Even so, the CIS-R has proved at least as good as any pencil and paper questionnaire in identifying cases for nested case-control studies of adolescent depression. Further exploration of strategies such as serial screening to enhance sensitivity is warranted.

  10. Factorial Validity and Internal Consistency of Malaysian Adapted Depression Anxiety Stress Scale - 21 in an Adolescent Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairul Anuar Hashim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychometrically sound measurement instrument is a fundamental requirement across broad range of research areas. In negative affect research, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS has been identified as a psychometrically sound instrument to measure depression, anxiety and stress, especially the 21-item version. However, its psychometric properties in adolescents have been less consistent. Objectives: Thus, the present study sought to examine the factorial validity and internal consistency of the adapted 21-item version of DASS in Malaysian adolescents. Method: Using cross-sectional study design, DASS-21 was administered to 750 Malaysian adolescents (Mean age = 13.40 ± 0.49. The data were then analyzed using Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, in which the original DASS-21 factor structure (depression-stress-anxiety was compared to 8 other alternative models.Results: CFA results revealed a weak support for DASS-21 as a differentiated measure of depression, anxiety and stress in Malaysian adolescents. Extremely high latent factors intercorrelations were observed in the model reflecting original DASS factor structure. On the other hand, despite the best overall fit of a 4-factor model consisting of depression, anxiety, and stress, as well as a general negative affect factor, individual factor loadings for the specific factors were uninterpretable. Although model fit of 1-factor model was inferior when compared the other competing models, this model (1-factor exhibit reasonable model fit. Conclusion: We concluded that the use of Malaysian adapted DASS-21 as a differentiated measure stress, anxiety, and depression in Malaysian adolescent should proceed with caution and further refinement of the scale is necessary before a concrete conclusion can be made.

  11. Validation of the WHO-5 as a first-step screening instrument for depression in adults with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halliday, Jennifer A; Hendrieckx, Christel; Busija, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    and its suitability for identifying likely depression in Australian adults with diabetes. METHODS: The Diabetes MILES - Australia study dataset provided a sample of N=3249 who completed the WHO-5 (positively-worded 5-item measure of emotional well-being) and the PHQ-9 (9-item measure of depressive.......73, pdetecting likely depression...

  12. The Italian version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21: Factor structure and psychometric properties on community and clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottesi, Gioia; Ghisi, Marta; Altoè, Gianmarco; Conforti, Erica; Melli, Gabriele; Sica, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21) is the short version of a self-report measure that was originally developed to provide maximum differentiation between depressive and anxious symptoms. Despite encouraging evidence, the factor structure and other features of the DASS-21 are yet to be firmly established. A community sample of 417 participants and two clinical groups (32 depressive patients and 25 anxious patients) completed the Italian version of the DASS-21 along with several measures of psychopathology. Confirmatory factor analyses suggested that the DASS-21 is a measure of general distress plus three additional orthogonal dimensions (anxiety, depression, and stress). The internal consistency and temporal stability of the measure were good; each DASS-21 scale correlated more strongly with a measure of a similar construct, demonstrating good convergent and divergent validity. Lastly, the DASS-21 demonstrated good criterion-oriented validity. The validity of the Italian DASS-21 and its utility, both for community and clinical individuals, are supported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Screening of phenylpyruvic acid producers and optimization of culture conditions in bench scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Hasan B; Demirci, Ali; Patterson, Paul H; Elias, Ryan J

    2014-11-01

    Alpha keto acids are deaminated forms of amino acids that have received significant attention as feed and food additives in the agriculture and medical industries. To date, their production has been commonly performed at shake-flask scale with low product concentrations. In this study, production of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), which is the alpha keto acid of phenylalanine was investigated. First, various microorganisms were screened to select the most efficient producer. Thereafter, growth parameters (temperature, pH, and aeration) were optimized in bench scale bioreactors to maximize both PPA and biomass concentration in bench scale bioreactors, using response surface methodology. Among the four different microorganisms evaluated, Proteus vulgaris was the most productive strain for PPA production. Optimum temperature, pH, and aeration conditions were determined as 34.5 °C, 5.12, and 0.5 vvm for PPA production, whereas 36.9 °C, pH 6.87, and 0.96 vvm for the biomass production. Under these optimum conditions, PPA concentration was enhanced to 1,054 mg/L, which was almost three times higher than shake-flask fermentation concentrations. Moreover, P. vulgaris biomass was produced at 3.25 g/L under optimum conditions. Overall, this study demonstrated that optimization of growth parameters improved PPA production in 1-L working volume bench-scale bioreactors compared to previous studies in the literature and was a first step to scale up the production to industrial production.

  14. Label free screening of enzyme inhibitors at femtomole scale using segmented flow electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuwen; Slaney, Thomas R; Kennedy, Robert T

    2012-07-03

    Droplet-based microfluidics is an attractive platform for screening and optimizing chemical reactions. Using this approach, it is possible to reliably manipulate nanoliter volume samples and perform operations such as reagent addition with high precision, automation, and throughput. Most studies using droplet microfluidics have relied on optical techniques to detect the reaction; however, this requires engineering color or fluorescence change into the reaction being studied. In this work, we couple electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to nanoliter scale segmented flow reactions to enable direct (label-free) analysis of reaction products. The system is applied to a screen of inhibitors for cathepsin B. In this approach, solutions of test compounds (including three known inhibitors) are arranged as an array of nanoliter droplets in a tube segmented by perfluorodecalin. The samples are pumped through a series of tees to add enzyme, substrate (peptides), and quenchant. The resulting reaction mixtures are then infused into a metal-coated, fused silica ESI emitter for MS analysis. The system has potential for high-throughput as reagent addition steps are performed at 0.7 s per sample and ESI-MS at up to 1.2 s per sample. Carryover is inconsequential in the ESI emitter and between 2 and 9% per reagent addition depending on the tee utilized. The assay was reliable with a Z-factor of ~0.8. The method required 0.8 pmol of test compound, 1.6 pmol of substrate, and 5 fmol of enzyme per reaction. Segmented flow ESI-MS allows direct, label free screening of reactions at good throughput and ultralow sample consumption.

  15. Chloroplast 2010: a database for large-scale phenotypic screening of Arabidopsis mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Savage, Linda J; Larson, Matthew D; Wilkerson, Curtis G; Last, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    Large-scale phenotypic screening presents challenges and opportunities not encountered in typical forward or reverse genetics projects. We describe a modular database and laboratory information management system that was implemented in support of the Chloroplast 2010 Project, an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) reverse genetics phenotypic screen of more than 5,000 mutants (http://bioinfo.bch.msu.edu/2010_LIMS; www.plastid.msu.edu). The software and laboratory work environment were designed to minimize operator error and detect systematic process errors. The database uses Ruby on Rails and Flash technologies to present complex quantitative and qualitative data and pedigree information in a flexible user interface. Examples are presented where the database was used to find opportunities for process changes that improved data quality. We also describe the use of the data-analysis tools to discover mutants defective in enzymes of leucine catabolism (heteromeric mitochondrial 3-methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase [At1g03090 and At4g34030] and putative hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase [At2g26800]) based upon a syndrome of pleiotropic seed amino acid phenotypes that resembles previously described isovaleryl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (At3g45300) mutants. In vitro assay results support the computational annotation of At2g26800 as hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase.

  16. Shared genetic factors in migraine and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, A H.; de Vries, B; Janssens, A C.J.W.; Vanmolkot, K R.J.; Aulchenko, Y S.; Henneman, P; Oostra, B A.; Frants, R R.; van den Maagdenberg, A M.J.M.; Ferrari, M D.; van Duijn, C M.; Terwindt, G M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the co-occurrence of migraine and depression and assess whether shared genetic factors may underlie both diseases. Methods: Subjects were 2,652 participants of the Erasmus Rucphen Family genetic isolate study. Migraine was diagnosed using a validated 3-stage screening method that included a telephone interview. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale and the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D). The contribution of shared genetic factors in migraine and depression was investigated by comparing heritability estimates for migraine with and without adjustment for symptoms of depression, and by comparing the heritability scores of depression between migraineurs and controls. Results: We identified 360 migraine cases: 209 had migraine without aura (MO) and 151 had migraine with aura (MA). Odds ratios for depression in patients with migraine were 1.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.98–1.70) for MO and 1.70 (95% CI 1.28–2.24) for MA. Heritability estimates were significant for all migraine (0.56), MO (0.77), and MA (0.96), and decreased after adjustment for symptoms of depression or use of antidepressant medication, in particular for MA. Comparison of the heritability scores for depression between patients with migraine and controls showed a genetic correlation between HADS-D score and MA. Conclusions: There is a bidirectional association between depression and migraine, in particular migraine with aura, which can be explained, at least partly, by shared genetic factors. GLOSSARY CES-D = Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; CI = confidence interval; ERF = Erasmus Rucphen Family; HADS-D = Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; IHS = International Headache Society; MA = migraine with aura; MO = migraine without aura; OR = odds ratio. PMID:20071666

  17. Validating a shortened depression scale (10 item CES-D among HIV-positive people in British Columbia, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To establish the reliability and validity of a shortened (10-item depression scale used among HIV-positive patients enrolled in the Drug Treatment Program in British Columbia, Canada. METHODS: The 10-item CES-D (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale was examined among 563 participants who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART between August 1, 1996 and June 30, 2002. Internal consistency of the scale was measured by Cronbach's alpha. Using the original CES-D 20 as primary criteria, comparisons were made using the Kappa statistic. Predictive accuracy of CES-D 10 was assessed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and negative predictive values. Factor analysis was also performed to determine if the CES-D 10 contained the same factors of positive and negative affect found in the original development of the CES-D. RESULTS: The correlation between the original and the shortened scale is very high (Spearman correlation coefficient  =0.97 (P<0.001. Internal consistency reliability coefficients of the CES-D 10 were satisfactory (Cronbach α=0.88. The CES-D 10 showed comparable accuracy to the original CES-D 20 in classifying participants with depressive symptoms (Kappa=0.82, P<0.001. Sensitivity of CES-D 10 was 91%; specificity was 92%; and positive predictive value was 92%. Factor analysis demonstrates that CES-D 10 contains the same underlying factors of positive and negative affect found in the original development of the CES-D 20. CONCLUSION: The 10-item CES-D is a comparable tool to measure depressive symptoms among HIV-positive research participants.

  18. The Utility of MMPI-2-RF Scale Scores in the Differential Diagnosis of Schizophrenia and Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tayla T C; Graham, John R; Arbisi, Paul A

    2017-04-07

    This study was designed to determine whether scores on selected Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scales could be used to differentiate between individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia (SCZ) and major depressive disorder (MDD). The sample was drawn from 2 psychiatric inpatient hospitals and included data from 199 individuals with SCZ and 808 individuals with MDD. A series of multivariate analyses of variance, analyses of variance, and odds ratios were calculated to determine which MMPI-2-RF scales provide the best differentiation between individuals presenting with these 2 disorders. Results indicated scales assessing internalizing dysfunction, including Emotional/Internalizing Dysfunction (EID), Restructured Clinical Scales Demoralization (RCd), Low Positive Emotions (RC2), Suicidal/Death Ideation (SUI), and Self Doubt (SFD) best discriminated MDD from SCZ. Scales assessing thought dysfunction, incluidng Thought Dysfunction (THD), Restructured Clinical Scales Ideas of Persecution (RC6) and Aberrant Experiences (RC8), and Psychoticism-Revised (PSYC-r) were demonstrated to best identify SCZ. Comparisons of the examined MMPI-2-RF scales to MMPI-2 scales assessing similar constructs suggested scales from the MMPI-2-RF perform similarly to their MMPI-2 counterparts in detecting MDD or SCZ, but might have increased ability to discriminate SCZ from other conditions. Overall, results of this study suggest that scores on the examined MMPI-2-RF scales provide important information about the differential diagnosis of MDD and SCZ to clinicians working in inpatient settings.

  19. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression This screening form was developed from ...

  20. Screening for depression in low-income elderly patients at the primary care level: use of the patient health questionnaire-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Teresa Saraiva Lino

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Depression is one of the most common mental disorders and a leading cause of disability worldwide. It constitutes a serious public health problem, particularly among elderly individuals. Most depressed elderly patients are treated by primary care (PC physicians. The "Patient Health Questionnaire" (PHQ-2 is an instrument used for the detection of depression in PC settings. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the performance of the PHQ-2 in a low-income and uneducated elderly PC population. METHODS: A non-probabilistic population sample of 142 individuals was selected from the healthcare unit's users ≧ 60 years. Criterion validity was assessed by estimating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV of the PHQ-2 in comparison with the structured interview using the DSM-IV. The estimates of sensitivity and specificity were obtained from varying cut-offs of the PHQ-2 score. A Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC curve was constructed and the area under the curve (AUC was calculated. RESULTS: The group was predominantly female (73.9%, with low education level (mean 3 years of schooling. The mean age was 72.5 years old. The prevalence of depression was 26.1%. The best values of sensitivity (0.74, specificity (0.77, PPV (0.50 e NPV (0.90 were obtained with score equal to 1. The AUC was 0.77, indicating a modest performance of the test accuracy. CONCLUSION: The simplicity of the PHQ-2 is an advantage for its use in PC. The high NPV indicated that 90% of those who tested negative would not need additional tests. However, the low PPV indicated that the PHQ-2 is not sufficient to screen for depression. The application of the instrument could be the first step of the screening, that would include a second step to all those with positive tests formerly.

  1. Screening Obese Adolescents for Binge Eating Disorder in Primary Care: The Adolescent Binge Eating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamay-Weber, Catherine; Combescure, Christophe; Lanza, Lydia; Carrard, Isabelle; Haller, Dagmar M

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the performance of a simple and developmentally appropriate 10-item questionnaire (Adolescent Binge Eating Scale) for the prediction of binge eating disorder (BED) diagnosis in adolescents seen for obesity. We evaluated the performance of the questionnaire in comparison with a clinical interview, in a population of adolescents being seen for obesity. The ?(2) or Fisher exact tests were used. There were 94 adolescents aged 12-18 years (59.6% girls) who completed the study. The questionnaire demonstrated a good association with the clinical interview and distinguished different levels of risk for having a BED: participants who responded positively to questions 1 or 2 and had more than 6 positive answers to the 8 additional questions had a high risk of subclinical and clinical BED (83.3%); participants with 3 or fewer positive answers had a low risk of clinical BED (4%). The Adolescent Binge Eating Scale questionnaire is a potential screening tool to identify adolescents with obesity at high risk of BED and guide referral to a specialist to clarify the diagnosis and provide adequate care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rastreamento da depressão pós-parto em mulheres atendidas pelo Programa de Saúde da Família Post-partum depression screening among women attended by the Family Health Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Bezerra da Silva Cruz

    2005-04-01

    , in the city of São Paulo, and to identify risk factors associated with PPD. METHODS:a cross-sectional study with 70 postpartum women from two FHP units (Fazenda da Juta II and Jardim Sinhá, from October 2003 to February 2004. The following instruments were used: questionnaire with socio-demographical-economic data and obstetric and perinatal data; Self-Report Questionnaire 20 (SRQ-20, for screening of MMD, and Edinburgh Post-Natal Depression Scale (EPDS, for evaluation of PPD. To verify association between explanatory variables and PPD, Student's t test, chi2 or linear trend chi2 were utilized when indicated. To evaluate concordance between scales (EPDS and SRQ-20 kappa (kappa coefficient correlation was used. RESULTS:the prevalence of PPD and MMD was 37.1%. Scales presented a good concordance (kappa=0.75. The explanatory variables age, ethnicity, years of education, profession, and marital status, besides partner's profession and years of education, familiar income, number of pregnancies, parity, miscarriage, number of alive children, premature deliveries, gestational age, type of delivery, planning of actual pregnancy, score of Apgar (first and five minutes, newborn sex and weight, and breastfeeding did not show significant statistical association. A greater perception of social support from the partner was associated with lower prevalence of PPD (p=0.03. CONCLUSION: because of its high prevalence and negative impact upon mother and child, it is worthwhile to sensitize health care professionals about the importance of PPD

  3. Validez y confiabilidad del cuestionario del ENASEM para la depresión en adultos mayores Validity and reliability of the screening questionnaire for geriatric depression used in the Mexican Health and Age Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gloria Aguilar-Navarro

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar la validez y confiabilidad de un instrumento para detectar depresión en adultos mayores. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: El estudio se realizó en la consulta externa del Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ, entre mayo de 2005 y marzo de 2006. Se utilizaron el diagnóstico clínico de depresión a través de el Manual Diagnóstico y Estadístico de Trastornos Mentales, en su cuarta versión revisada (DSM-IV-TR, y la Escala de depresión geriátrica (EDG de Yesavage, para establecer las propiedades clinimétricas de un cuestionario dicotómico de nueve reactivos, desprendido del Estudio Nacional sobre Salud y Envejecimiento en México (ENASEM. RESULTADOS: En el proceso de validación participaron 199 individuos de edad media de 79.5 años. El resultado del cuestionario de la ENASEM estuvo significativamente correlacionado con el diagnóstico clínico de depresión (pOBJECTIVE: To assess the validity and reliability of a geriatric depression questionnaire used in the Mexican Health and Age Study (MHAS. METHODS: The study was conducted at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ clinic from May 2005 to March 2006. This depression screening nine-item questionnaire was validated using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR (fourth revised version and Yesavage's 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15 criteria. The instrument belongs to the MHAS, a prospective panel study of health and aging in Mexico. RESULTS: A total of 199 subjects 65 years of age and older participated in the validation process (median age= 79.5 years. MHAS questionnaire result was significantly correlated to the clinical depression diagnosis (p<0.001 and to the GDS-15 score (p<0.001. Internal consistency was adequate (alpha coefficient: 0.74. The cutoff point e" 5/9 points yielded an 80.7% and 68.7% sensitivity and specificity respectively. The fidelity

  4. Validation of the Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS)-Psychometric properties of the long and short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhr, Kristina; Hautzinger, Martin; Krisch, Katharina; Berking, Matthias; Ebert, David Daniel

    2016-04-01

    With the development of the Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) by Kanter, et al. [1], different behavioral aspects of depression like activation, rumination or avoidance, and functional impairment can be measured. The long and the short versions of the BADS, however, show differences in the quality of psychometric properties. We wanted to validate the short and long forms of the BADS. We therefore evaluated the factor structure, the psychometric properties, and the construct validity of the long version and the subscales in a clinically depressed German sample (n=258) in study 1. In study 2, we explored the factor structure and the psychometric properties of the short version of the BADS in a subsyndromal sample with elevated depressive symptoms (n=406). In study 1, our results replicated the four factor solution of the BADS-25 original version and showed good psychometric properties. However, with regard to the BADS-9 only the French factor solution of the short BADS-9 demonstrated acceptable fit with low internal consistency of the subscale Avoidance. Thus, only the total score of the short form can be recommended.

  5. Factor structure and dimensionality of the two depression scales in STAR*D using level 1 datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P; Fava, M; Trivedi, M H

    2011-01-01

    ). METHODS: The first treatment step (Level 1) in the STAR*D study provided a dataset of 4041 outpatients with DSM-IV nonpsychotic major depression. The HAM-D(17) and IDS-C(30) were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) without rotation. Mokken analysis tested the unidimensionality of the IDS-C(6......), which corresponds to the unidimensional HAM-D(6.) RESULTS: For both the HAM-D(17) and IDS-C(30), PCA identified a bi-directional factor contrasting the depressive symptoms versus the neurovegetative symptoms. The HAM-D(6) and the corresponding IDS-C(6) symptoms all emerged in the depression factor. Both...... the HAM-D(6) and IDS-C(6) were found to be unidimensional scales, i.e., their total scores are each a sufficient statistic for the measurement of depressive states. LIMITATIONS: STAR*D used only one medication in Level 1. CONCLUSIONS: The unidimensional HAM-D(6) and IDS-C(6) should be used when evaluating...

  6. The Toronto Hospital Alertness Test scale: relationship to daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and symptoms of depression and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Azmeh Shahid,1–5 Sharon A Chung,1,2,5 Lance Maresky,1 Affan Danish,1 Arina Bingeliene,1,4,5 Jianhua Shen,1 Colin M Shapiro1–5 1Sleep Research Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, University of Toronto, 2Youthdale Treatment Centres, 3Youthdale Child and Adolescent Sleep Centre, 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 5Department of Psychiatry, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: The Toronto Hospital Alertness Test (THAT scale was designed to measure alertness, defined as the capacity of the mind to respond appropriately to external and internal stimuli. The present study’s aim is to determine normative values of alertness on the THAT and to explore the relationship among excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, depressive symptoms, and alertness. Methods: Normative data were collected from 60 healthy males and females. To explore the relationship among alertness, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, depression, and anxiety, data were collected from charts of sleep clinic patients. All study subjects completed measures for fatigue, sleepiness, depressive symptoms, and anxiety. Results: The average score on the THAT was 34.9±7.2 (range 22–50 for the control group. The cutoff score for the THAT, indicative of clinically significant reduced alertness, was determined to be ≤20.5 (mean –2 SD. THAT alertness scores were found to be modestly, significantly, and negatively correlated with fatigue levels (r=–0.39, P<0.001, depressive symptoms (r=–0.53, P<0.001, and anxiety symptoms (r=–0.41, P<0.001. No correlations were found between alertness levels and daytime sleepiness. Regression analyses revealed a significant model (F=19.9, P<0.001, adjusted R2=0.35 with depressive symptoms (P<0.001 and fatigue (P=0.006 emerging as the only significant predictors of scores on the THAT. Conclusion: The findings of this study support that sleepiness is not the same as

  7. Psychometric evaluation of the Signs of Depression Scale with a revised scoring mechanism in stroke patients with communicative impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Mariska J; de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2017-05-01

    To investigate (1) the diagnostic value of the Signs of Depression Scale (SODS) in a Likert scale format and (2) whether the Likert scale improves the diagnostic value compared with the original dichotomous scale. Cross-sectional multicentre study. One general and one university hospital in the Netherlands. A total of 116 consecutive hospitalized stroke patients, of whom 53 were patients with communicative impairment. Depression was diagnosed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) administered to the patients' relatives. The Barthel Index (BI) was used as an external validator. The correlation between the CIDI and the SODS-Likert or the SODS was small ( rb = 0.18), and the correlation between the Barthel Index and the SODS-Likert ( rs = -0.30) or the SODS ( rs = -0.33) was moderate. For both instruments, the discriminatory power for diagnosing depression when compared with the CIDI was best at a cut-off score of ⩾2. The internal consistency of the SODS-Likert was acceptable (α = 0.69) and slightly higher than that of the SODS (α = 0.57). The inter-rater reliability of the SODS-Likert and the SODS was acceptable (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.66 and ICC 0.80, respectively). The clinical utility was rated good. The diagnostic value of the SODS did not improve using a Likert scale format. However, the diagnostic value of the original dichotomous SODS is reasonable for the initial mood assessment of stroke patients with communicative impairment.

  8. Validity and test–retest reliability of the Persian version of the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadpanah M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Ahmadpanah,1 Meisam Sheikhbabaei,1 Mohammad Haghighi,1 Fatemeh Roham,1 Leila Jahangard,1 Amineh Akhondi,2 Dena Sadeghi Bahmani,3 Hafez Bajoghli,4 Edith Holsboer-Trachsler,3 Serge Brand3,5 1Behavioral Disorders and Substances Abuse Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; 2Hamadan Educational Organization, Ministry of Education, Hamadan, Iran; 3Center for Affective, Stress, and Sleep Disorders, Psychiatric Clinics of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 4Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Department of Sport, Exercise and Health Science, Sport Science Section, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background and aims: The Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS is an expert’s rating tool to assess the severity and symptoms of depression. The aim of the present two studies was to validate the Persian version of the MADRS and determine its test–retest reliability in patients diagnosed with major depressive disorders (MDD. Methods: In study 1, the translated MADRS and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS were applied to 210 patients diagnosed with MDD and 100 healthy adults. In study 2,200 patients diagnosed with MDD were assessed with the MADRS in face-to-face interviews. Thereafter, 100 patients were assessed 3–14 days later, again via face-to-face-interviews, while the other 100 patients were assessed 3–14 days later via a telephone interview. Results: Study 1: The MADRS and HDRS scores between patients with MDD and healthy controls differed significantly. Agreement between scoring of the MADRS and HDRS was high (r=0.95. Study 2: The intraclass correlation coefficient (test–retest reliability was r=0.944 for the face-to-face interviews, and r=0.959 for the telephone interviews. Conclusion: The present data suggest that the Persian MADRS has high validity and excellent test–retest reliability over

  9. Validade da escala de depressão do Center for Epidemiological Studies entre idosos brasileiros Validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale among Brazilian elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samila Sather Tavares Batistoni

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Obter validade interna, de construto e de critério para a escala Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression, em idosos. MÉTODOS: O instrumento foi aplicado a 903 idosos residentes em Juiz de Fora, Estado de Minas Gerais, entre os anos de 2002-2003. Os resultados foram comparados com a versão brasileira da Geriatric Depression Scale, aplicado a uma subamostra de 446 respondentes. A consistência interna das duas escalas foi aferida pelo coeficiente alfa de Cronbach, calculado para os itens em sua totalidade e para os itens de cada fator obtido para o instrumento avaliado. Para avaliar a validade de construto, seus 20 itens foram submetidos à análise fatorial exploratória a fim de conhecer o padrão de variação conjunta dos itens e a variância explicada por cada fator. RESULTADOS: O instrumento revelou índices satisfatórios de validade interna (alfa=0,860, sensibilidade (74,6% e especificidade (73,6%, para nota de corte >11. Entretanto, apontou freqüência relativamente alta de falsos positivos em comparação à Geriatric Depression Scale: de 33,8% vs. 15%. A análise fatorial exploratória do instrumento gerou estrutura fatorial com três fatores: afetos negativos, dificuldades de iniciar comportamentos e afetos positivos. CONCLUSÕES: O instrumento mostrou-se psicometricamente adequado para uso entre idosos. Entretanto, estudos adicionais de natureza longitudinal e transversal, desenvolvidos em diferentes contextos, poderão esclarecer os efeitos de variáveis somáticas e situacionais sobre os resultados desse instrumento em pessoas idosas.OBJECTIVE: To obtain internal construct and criteria validity for the Center of Epidemiological Studies - Depression scale in elderly people. METHODS: The instrument was applied to 903 elderly living in a city in southeastern Brazil, between 2002 and 2003. Results were compared with the Brazilian version of the CES-D applied to a sub-sample of 446 participants. Internal consistency

  10. Adaptation to Portuguese of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS Adaptación para la lengua portuguesa de la Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS Adaptação para a língua portuguesa da Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luís Alves Apóstolo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to adapt to Portuguese, of Portugal, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales, a 21-item short scale (DASS 21, designed to measure depression, anxiety and stress. Method: After translation and back-translation with the help of experts, the DASS 21 was administered to patients in external psychiatry consults (N=101, and its internal consistency, construct validity and concurrent validity were measured. Results: The DASS 21 properties certify its quality to measure emotional states. The instrument reveals good internal consistency. Factorial analysis shows that the two-factor structure is more adequate. The first factor groups most of the items that theoretically assess anxiety and stress, and the second groups most of the items that assess depression, explaining, on the whole, 58.54% of total variance. The strong positive correlation between the DASS 21 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD confirms the hypothesis regarding the criterion validity, however, revealing fragilities as to the divergence between theoretically different constructs.Objetivo: adaptar a la lengua portuguesa, de Portugal, la Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, versión corta de 21 ítems, (DASS-21, que permite evaluar depresión, ansiedad y estrés. Método: Después de haber sido traducida y retrovertida, con la ayuda de peritos, la DASS-21 fue administrada a enfermos en consulta externa de psiquiatría (N=101, y fue evaluada la consistencia interna, la validez de constructo y la validez concurrente. Resultados: Las propiedades de la DASS-21 atestiguan su calidad para evaluar estados emocionales. El instrumento reveló buena consistencia interna. El análisis factorial muestra que la estructura de dos factores es la más ajustada. El primer factor agrupa la mayoría de los ítems que teóricamente evalúan ansiedad y estrés, y el segundo agrupa la mayoría de los ítems que evalúan depresión, explicando en su conjunto el 58,54% de la variaci

  11. Screening for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board of Directors Scientific Advisory Board Honorary Advisory Board DBSA Gerald L. Klerman Awards Young Adult Council Staff Employment Opportunities Contact Us For the Media Media Kit Facts about Mood Disorders DBSA News Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements ...

  12. International Committee on Mental Health in Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus statements for screening and treating depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Abbott, Janice; Georgiopoulos, Anna M; Goldbeck, Lutz; Smith, Beth; Hempstead, Sarah E; Marshall, Bruce; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Elborn, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Studies measuring psychological distress in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have found high rates of both depression and anxiety. Psychological symptoms in both individuals with CF and parent caregivers have been associated with decreased lung function, lower body mass index, worse adherence, worse health-related quality of life, more frequent hospitalisations and increased healthcare costs. To identify and treat depression and anxiety in CF, the CF Foundation and the European CF Society invited a panel of experts, including physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, a pharmacist, parents and an individual with CF, to develop consensus recommendations for clinical care. Over 18 months, this 22-member committee was divided into four workgroups: Screening; Psychological Interventions; Pharmacological Treatments and Implementation and Future Research, and used the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome methodology to develop questions for literature search and review. Searches were conducted in PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Psychiatry online and ABDATA by a methodologist at Dartmouth. The committee reviewed 344 articles, drafted statements and set an 80% acceptance for each recommendation statement as a consensus threshold prior to an anonymous voting process. Fifteen guideline recommendation statements for screening and treatment of depression and anxiety in individuals with CF and parent caregivers were finalised by vote. As these recommendations are implemented in CF centres internationally, the process of dissemination, implementation and resource provision should be closely monitored to assess barriers and concerns, validity and use.

  13. [Development of a screening scale for children at risk of baby bottle tooth decay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadra-Eid, J; Baudet, D; Fourny, M; Sellier, E; Brun, C; François, P

    2012-03-01

    Baby bottle tooth decay is a severe form of early childhood caries. This study aims to elaborate a screening tool for at risk children in order to facilitate primary prevention. A case-control study was conducted among children suffering from baby bottle tooth decay and children with no dental caries. Cases were children aged 5 years or less at diagnosis who experienced at least four caries with one or more affecting maxillary incisors. Controls were children matched for age and sex. Parents were interviewed by phone about their child's exposure to potential risk factors. We included 88 children suffering from baby bottle tooth decay and 88 children with no dental caries. In multivariate analysis, low social class (OR 6.39 [95% CI, 1.45-28.11]), prolonged bottle feeding or bedtime feeding (OR 153.2 [95% CI, 11.77-1994.96]), and snacking (OR 5.94 [95% CI, 1.35-26.2]) were significantly associated with baby bottle tooth decay. Regular dental visits were a significant protecting factor (OR 0.13 [95% CI, 0.02-0.77]). A score was developed using these significant risk factors and tested on the survey population. The mean score was 13/20 for cases and 4/20 for controls. These results are in accordance with the literature, except for brushing teeth, which was not significantly associated with baby bottle tooth decay in our study. A screening scale with a score of 20 points was proposed. Future validation is required. Pediatricians and general practitioners should encourage parents to change their habits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Newborn screening for hunter disease: a small-scale feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijter, G J G; Goudriaan, D A; Boer, A M; Van den Bosch, J; Van der Ploeg, A T; Elvers, L H; Weinreich, S S; Reuser, A J

    2014-01-01

    Hunter disease (Mucopolysaccharidosis type II, MPS II) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS). Two main therapies have been reported for MPS II patients: enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Both treatment modalities have been shown to improve some symptoms, but the results with regard to cognitive functioning have been poor. Early initiation of therapy, i.e., before neurological symptoms have manifested, may alter cognitive outcome. The need for early identification makes Hunter disease a candidate for newborn screening (NBS). Our objective was to explore the use of a fluorometric assay that could be applicable for high-throughput analysis of IDS activity in dried blood spots (DBS). The median IDS activity in DBS samples from 1,426 newborns was 377 pmol/punch/17 h (range 78-1111). The IDS activity in one sample was repeatedly under the cutoff value (set at 20% of the median value), which would imply a recall rate of 0.07%. A sample from a clinically diagnosed MPS II individual, included in each 96-well test plate, had IDS activities well below the 20% cutoff value. Coefficients of variation in quality control samples with low, medium, and high IDS activities (190, 304, and 430 pmol/punch/17 h, respectively) were 12% to 16%. This small-scale pilot study shows that newborn screening for Hunter disease using a fluorometric assay in DBS is technically feasible with a fairly low recall rate. NBS may allow for identification of infants with Hunter disease before clinical symptoms become evident enabling early intervention.

  15. Celiac disease markers in patients with liver diseases: A single center large scale screening study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pavel Drastich; Eva Honsová; Alena Lodererová; Marcela Jare(s)ová; Aneta Pekáriková; Iva Hoffmanová; Ludmila Tu(c)ková

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the coincidence of celiac disease,we tested its serological markers in patients with various liver diseases.METHODS:Large-scale screening of serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG),and deamidated gliadin using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and serum antibodies against endomysium using immunohistochemistry,in patients with various liver diseases (n =962) and patients who underwent liver transplantation (OLTx,n =523) was performed.The expression of tTG in liver tissue samples of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and from various liver diseases using immunohistochemistry was carried out.The final diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed by histological analysis of small-intestinal biopsy.RESULTS:We found that 29 of 962 patients (3%) with liver diseases and 5 of 523 patients (0.8%) who underwent OLTx were seropositive for IgA and IgG anti-tTG antibodies.However,celiac disease was biopsy-diagnosed in 16 patients:4 with autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ,3 with Wilson's disease,3 with celiac hepatitis,2 with primary sclerosing cholangitis,1with primary biliary cirrhosis,1 with Budd-Chiari syndrome,1 with toxic hepatitis,and 1 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.Unexpectedly,the highest prevalence of celiac disease was found in patients with Wilson's disease (9.7%),with which it is only rarely associated.On the other hand,no OLTx patients were diagnosed with celiac disease in our study.A pilot study of the expression of tTG in liver tissue using immunohistochemistry documented the overexpression of this molecule in endothelial cells and periportal hepatocytes of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and toxic hepatitis,primary sclerosing cholangitis or autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ.CONCLUSION:We suggest that screening for celiac disease may be beneficial not only in patients with associated liver diseases,but also in patients with Wilson's disease.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of opportunistic screening and minimal contact psychotherapy to prevent depression in primary care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. van den Berg (Merlijn); F. Smit (Filip); T. Vos (Theo); P.H.M. van Baal (Pieter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Depression causes a large burden of disease worldwide. Effective prevention has the potential to reduce that burden considerably. This study aimed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of minimal contact psychotherapy, based on Lewinsohn's 'Coping with depression' course, tar

  17. Brief Depression Screening with the PHQ-2 Associated with Prognosis Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with Paclitaxel-Eluting Stenting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Denollet, Johan; de Jonge, Peter; Simsek, Cihan; Serruys, Patrick W.; van Domburg, Ron T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is associated with adverse prognosis in cardiac patients, warranting the availability of brief and valid instruments to identify depressed patients in clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: We examined whether the two-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) was associated with adver

  18. Depression, desperation, and suicidal ideation in college students: results from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention College Screening Project at Emory University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlow, Steven J; Rosenberg, Jill; Moore, J David; Haas, Ann P; Koestner, Bethany; Hendin, Herbert; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to examine suicidal ideation and depression in undergraduate college students who participated in the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention-sponsored College Screening Project at Emory University. The principal measure of depressive symptoms was the nine-item depression module from the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Additional questions were focused on current suicidal ideation, past suicide attempts, and episodes of deliberate self-harm and on symptoms of anxiety and distress. Seven hundred and twenty-nine students participated over a 3-school-year interval (2002-2005). Most notably, 11.1% of the students endorsed current (past 4 weeks) suicidal ideation and 16.5% had a lifetime suicide attempt or self-injurious episode. Students with current suicidal ideation had significantly higher depression symptom severity than those without suicidal ideation (t = -9.34, df = 706, Pstudents with PHQ-9 scores of 15 or higher reported suicidal ideation compared to 5.7% of those with lower scores (chi(2) = 56.29, df = 1, Pstudents with moderately severe to severe depression (85%) or current suicidal ideation (84%) were not receiving any psychiatric treatment at the time of assessment. These results suggest that there is a strong relationship between severity of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in college students, and that suicidal feelings and actions are relatively common in this group. This underscores the need to provide effective mental health outreach and treatment services to this vulnerable population. As this analysis was based on data collected at a single institution, the results may not be representative of all college students or young adults.

  19. Anhedonia and Pessimism in Hospitalized Depressed Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinoviy Gutkovich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal study investigates whether anhedonia and pessimistic attributional style represent a clinical state or a trait in hospitalized depressed adolescents. 81 consecutive adolescent inpatients were screened with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the clinician-rated Major Depressive Disorder (MDD criteria sheet. 51 patients with BDI score ≥10 and/or ≥4 symptoms on MDD criteria sheet were assessed at Time 1 upon admission, with 39 patients (78% assessed at discharge (Time 2 with the Pleasure Scale for Children and Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire—Revised. Anhedonia and pessimism at admission were associated with BDI scores at admission and discharge as well as number of depressive symptoms and depression severity. MDD diagnosis was associated with anhedonia, but not with pessimism. Pessimism—but not anhedonia—improved significantly by discharge. Results suggest that while some adolescents exhibit enduring anhedonia, pessimistic attributional style appears to be a concomitant feature of an acute depressive state.

  20. Contribution to the validation of the Kutcher Adolescent Depression Scale (KADS-6 in a Portuguese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Quintão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The KADS-6 is a self-report assessment instrument known for its ease application in assessing depression in young people. This study aimed to contribute to the validation of the Portuguese version of this tool and analyze its psychometric characteristics in comparison with other self-report instruments for depression in adolescents, in Portugal. Two samples were collected, a non-clinical group of in school youth (n=773; 52.4% male and a clinical sample (n=134 youth; 44% male. Comparisons also used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI. Results: The factor analysis revealed the unidimensionality of the measure. The KADS-6 demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha in both clinical (.74 and school (.80 samples. Its convergent validity with the BDI-II and CDI was r=.44; r=.61, respectively in the clinical sample and r=.60; r=.57 in the school sample. The KADS-6, a short and time efficient instrument, showed good psychometric characteristics in terms of internal consistency and convergent validity in comparison with the BDI-II and the CDI. Given its ease of use and scoring, the KADS-6 could be considered for use in both school and clinical settings when addressing adolescent depression.

  1. Expanding Cervical Cancer Screening and Treatment in Tanzania: Stakeholders' Perceptions of Structural Influences on Scale-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCree, Renicha; Giattas, Mary Rose; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Jolly, Pauline E; Martin, Michelle Y; Usdan, Stuart Lawrence; Kohler, Connie; Lisovicz, Nedra

    2015-06-01

    Tanzania has the highest burden of cervical cancer in East Africa. This study aims to identify perceived barriers and facilitators that influence scale-up of regional and population-level cervical cancer screening and treatment programs in Tanzania. Convenience sampling was used to select participants for this qualitative study among 35 key informants. Twenty-eight stakeholders from public-sector health facilities, academia, government, and nongovernmental organizations completed in-depth interviews, and a seven-member municipal health management team participated in a focus group discussion. The investigation identified themes related to the infrastructure of health services for cervical cancer prevention, service delivery, political will, and sociocultural influences on screening and treatment. Decentralizing service delivery, improving access to screening and treatment, increasing the number of trained health workers, and garnering political will were perceived as key facilitators for enhancing and initiating screening and treatment services. In conclusion, participants perceived that system-level structural factors should be addressed to expand regional and population-level service delivery of screening and treatment. Tanzanian women have a high burden of cervical cancer. Understanding the perceived structural factors that may influence screening coverage for cervical cancer and availability of treatment may be beneficial for program scale-up. This study showed that multiple factors contribute to the challenge of cervical cancer screening and treatment in Tanzania. In addition, it highlighted systematic developments aimed at expanding services. This study is important because the themes that emerged from the results may help inform programs that plan to improve screening and treatment in Tanzania and potentially in other areas with high burdens of cervical cancer. ©AlphaMed Press.

  2. screening for cognitive impairment in late onset depression in a Brazilian sample using the BBRC-edu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Maria da Silva Novaretti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Depression and dementia are the most prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders in the elderly population. Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia in most countries, being responsible for more than half of all dementia cases. Late-onset depression is a frequent cause of cognitive decline in the elderly. Differentiating between cognitive impairment secondary to depression and incipient dementia poses a challenge in the clinical setting. Objective: To evaluate the performance of elderly depressed patients using the BBRC-Edu. Methods: We studied 25 patients with late onset depression (mean age: 73.6 y (6.6; schooling: 9.1 y (5.7 and 30 patients with mild AD (mean age 76.6 y (5.4; schooling: 7.5 y (7.1, who were compared to a control group of 30 healthy elderly (mean age 73.8 y (5.8; schooling: 9.1 y (5.4 using the CERAD and BBRC-Edu batteries. Results: For the CERAD battery, depressed patients performed better than AD patients on all tasks (p0.05, and performed poorer than controls on verbal fluency (animals and Word List Recall tasks (p0.05, and performed worse than controls on Learning (second presentation and verbal fluency (fruits tasks (p<0.0001. Conclusion: Overall performance on the BBRC-Edu allowed differentiation of controls and depressed patients from AD patients.

  3. Elaboração e validação da Escala de Depressão para Idosos Elaboration and validation of the Depression Scale for the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Giavoni

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi desenvolver e validar a Escala de Depressão para Idosos (EDI. Foi elaborado um modelo teórico explicativo da depressão, composto por três categorias: cognitiva, afetiva e somático-motora. Os itens elaborados foram submetidos à análise semântica e de juizes. O instrumento piloto foi aplicado a 340 sujeitos, sendo 88% do sexo feminino, com ensino fundamental completo (67,9% e idade média de 63,74 (DP = 6,87 anos. A amostra respondeu também ao Inventário de Depressão de Beck (BDI. Para a validação da escala, foram realizadas análises fatoriais e análise da consistência interna dos itens (alfa de Cronbach. Regressões múltiplas avaliaram o poder de predição dos fatores da EDI sobre o escore final do BDI. A validação da escala demonstrou que a EDI é composta por dois fatores: cognitivo-afetivo e somático-motor, que explicam 53% do BDI (validade convergente. Pode-se afirmar, portanto, que a EDI é formada por fatores que avaliam diferentes aspectos do constructo depressão (validade fatorial, os quais apresentam índices de consistência interna dentro dos padrões psicométricos.The objective of this study was to develop and validate the Depression Scale for the Elderly. An explanatory theoretical model was developed for depression, consisting of three categories: cognitive, affective, and somato-motor. The items elaborated thusly were submitted to semantic analysis and judges. The pilot instrument was applied to 340 subjects, 88% of whom were females, mostly with complete primary education (67.9%, and a mean age of 63.74 (SD = 6.87 years. The sample also responded to the Beck Depression Index (BDI. Validation of the scale was based on factor analyses (Principal Axis Factoring and analysis of the items' internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha. Multiple regressions evaluated the predictive power of the factors in the depression scale for the elderly on the final BDI score. Scale validation

  4. Substantial improvements in large-scale redocking and screening using the novel HYDE scoring function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nadine; Hindle, Sally; Lange, Gudrun; Klein, Robert; Albrecht, Jürgen; Briem, Hans; Beyer, Kristin; Claußen, Holger; Gastreich, Marcus; Lemmen, Christian; Rarey, Matthias

    2012-06-01

    The HYDE scoring function consistently describes hydrogen bonding, the hydrophobic effect and desolvation. It relies on HYdration and DEsolvation terms which are calibrated using octanol/water partition coefficients of small molecules. We do not use affinity data for calibration, therefore HYDE is generally applicable to all protein targets. HYDE reflects the Gibbs free energy of binding while only considering the essential interactions of protein-ligand complexes. The greatest benefit of HYDE is that it yields a very intuitive atom-based score, which can be mapped onto the ligand and protein atoms. This allows the direct visualization of the score and consequently facilitates analysis of protein-ligand complexes during the lead optimization process. In this study, we validated our new scoring function by applying it in large-scale docking experiments. We could successfully predict the correct binding mode in 93% of complexes in redocking calculations on the Astex diverse set, while our performance in virtual screening experiments using the DUD dataset showed significant enrichment values with a mean AUC of 0.77 across all protein targets with little or no structural defects. As part of these studies, we also carried out a very detailed analysis of the data that revealed interesting pitfalls, which we highlight here and which should be addressed in future benchmark datasets.

  5. ToxDBScan: Large-Scale Similarity Screening of Toxicological Databases for Drug Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Römer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new tool for hepatocarcinogenicity evaluation of drug candidates in rodents. ToxDBScan is a web tool offering quick and easy similarity screening of new drug candidates against two large-scale public databases, which contain expression profiles for substances with known carcinogenic profiles: TG-GATEs and DrugMatrix. ToxDBScan uses a set similarity score that computes the putative similarity based on similar expression of genes to identify chemicals with similar genotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic potential. We propose using a discretized representation of expression profiles, which use only information on up- or down-regulation of genes as relevant features. Therefore, only the deregulated genes are required as input. ToxDBScan provides an extensive report on similar compounds, which includes additional information on compounds, differential genes and pathway enrichments. We evaluated ToxDBScan with expression data from 15 chemicals with known hepatocarcinogenic potential and observed a sensitivity of 88 Based on the identified chemicals, we achieved perfect classification of the independent test set. ToxDBScan is publicly available from the ZBIT Bioinformatics Toolbox.

  6. Is postpartum depression a homogenous disorder: time of onset, severity, symptoms and hopelessness in relation to the course of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Pirjo; Koistinen, Eeva; Hintikka, Jukka

    2014-12-10

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common illness, but due to the underlying processes and the diversity of symptoms, some variability is exhibited. The risk of postpartum depression is great if the mother has previously suffered from depression, but there is some evidence that a certain subgroup of women only experience depression during the postpartum period. The study group consisted of 104 mothers with postpartum major depression and a control group of 104 postpartum mothers without depression. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) was used for data collection. The severity of depression and other mental symptoms were assessed using several validated rating scales. A history of past depression (82%), including depression during pregnancy (42%) and during the postpartum period (53%), was very common in those with current PPD. Eighteen per cent of mothers with current PPD had previously not had any depressive episodes and four per cent had experienced depression only during the postpartum period. Therefore, pure PPD was rare. The onset of PPD was usually (84%) within six weeks of childbirth. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, depressed mood, diminished pleasure/interest, decreased energy, and psychomotor agitation/retardation were common with all kinds of depression histories. Pure PPD was the most similar to the first depressive episode. Nevertheless, the severity of depression, the level of hopelessness, somatisation, interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, hostility, psychoticism, sleep disturbance, and suicidal ideation were lower, appetite changed less, and concentration was better than in other recurrent depressions. According to this study, PPD is not a homogenous disorder. The time of onset, severity, symptoms, level of hopelessness, and the course of depression vary. Recurrent depression is common. All mothers must be screened during the sixth week postpartum at the latest. Screening alone is not

  7. Validation of the Chinese version of the "Mood Disorder Questionnaire" for screening bipolar disorder among patients with a current depressive episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Zhaoyu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ is a well-recognized screening tool for bipolar disorder, but its Chinese version needs further validation. This study aims to measure the accuracy of the Chinese version of the MDQ as a screening instrument for bipolar disorder (BPD in a group of patients with a current major depressive episode. Methods 142 consecutive patients with an initial DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of a major depressive episode were screened for BPD using the Chinese translation of the MDQ and followed up for one year. The final diagnosis, determined by a special committee consisting of three trained senior psychiatrists, was used as a 'gold standard' and ROC was plotted to evaluate the performance of the MDQ. The optimal cut-off was chosen by maximizing the Younden's index. Results Of the 142 patients, 122 (85.9% finished the one year follow-up. On the basis of a semi-structured clinical interview 48.4% (59/122 received a diagnosis of unipolar depression (UPD, 36.9% (45/122 BPDII and 14.8% (18/122 BPDI. At the end of the one year follow-up,9 moved from UPD to BPD, 2 from BPDII to UPD, 1 from BPDII to BPDI, the overall rate of initial misdiagnosis was 16.4%. MDQ showed a good accuracy for BPD: the optimal cut-off was 4, with a sensitivity of 0.72 and a specificity of 0.73. When BPDII and BPDI were calculated independently, the optimal cut-off for BPDII was 4, with a sensitivity of 0.70 and a specificity of 0.73; while the optimal cut-off for BPDI was 5, with a sensitivity of 0.67 and a specificity of 0.86. Conclusions Our results show that the Chinese version of MDQ is a valid tool for screening BPD in a group of patients with current depressive episode on the Chinese mainland.

  8. Reynolds number dependence of the drag coefficient for laminar flow through fine-scale photoetched screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hern, T. J.; Torczynski, J. R.

    1993-06-01

    The laminar steady flow downstream of fine-mesh screens is studied. Instead of woven-wire screens, high-uniformity screens are fabricated by photoetching holes into 50.8-micron-thick Inconel sheets. The resulting screens have minimum wire widths of 50.8 microns and inter-wire separations of 254 and 318 microns for the two screens examined. A flow facility has been constructed for experiments with these screens. Air is passed through the screens at upstream velocities yielding wire width Reynolds numbers from 2 to 35. To determine the drag coefficient, pressure drops across the screens are measured using pressure transducers and manometers. Three-dimensional flow simulations are also performed. The computational drag coefficients consistently overpredict the experimental values. However, the computational results exhibit sensitivity to the assumed wire cross section, indicating that detailed knowledge of the wire cross section is essential for unambiguous interpretation of experiments using photoetched screens. Standard semiempirical drag correlations for woven-wire screens do not predict the present experimental results with consistent accuracy.

  9. Validity of the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Lindsey; Renno, Patricia; Storch, Eric A.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Lewin, Adam B.; Arnold, Elysse; Lin, Enjey; Wood, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    High rates of anxiety and depression are reported among youth with autism spectrum disorders. These conditions are generally assessed using measures validated for typically developing youth. Few studies have investigated their validity for autism spectrum disorders, which is crucial for accurate assessment and the provision of proper treatment.…

  10. Validity of the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Lindsey; Renno, Patricia; Storch, Eric A.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Lewin, Adam B.; Arnold, Elysse; Lin, Enjey; Wood, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    High rates of anxiety and depression are reported among youth with autism spectrum disorders. These conditions are generally assessed using measures validated for typically developing youth. Few studies have investigated their validity for autism spectrum disorders, which is crucial for accurate assessment and the provision of proper treatment.…

  11. An effective method for controlling false discovery and false nondiscovery rates in genome-scale RNAi screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2010-10-01

    In most genome-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screens, the ultimate goal is to select siRNAs with a large inhibition or activation effect. The selection of hits typically requires statistical control of 2 errors: false positives and false negatives. Traditional methods of controlling false positives and false negatives do not take into account the important feature in RNAi screens: many small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) may have very small but real nonzero average effects on the measured response and thus cannot allow us to effectively control false positives and false negatives. To address for deficiencies in the application of traditional approaches in RNAi screening, the author proposes a new method for controlling false positives and false negatives in RNAi high-throughput screens. The false negatives are statistically controlled through a false-negative rate (FNR) or false nondiscovery rate (FNDR). FNR is the proportion of false negatives among all siRNAs examined, whereas FNDR is the proportion of false negatives among declared nonhits. The author also proposes new concepts, q*-value and p*-value, to control FNR and FNDR, respectively. The proposed method should have broad utility for hit selection in which one needs to control both false discovery and false nondiscovery rates in genome-scale RNAi screens in a robust manner.

  12. The World Health Organization Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Self-Report Screening Scale for DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Berk; Adler, Lenard A; Rudin, Cynthia; Faraone, Stephen V; Spencer, Thomas J; Berglund, Patricia; Gruber, Michael J; Kessler, Ronald C

    2017-05-01

    Recognition that adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is common, seriously impairing, and usually undiagnosed has led to the development of adult ADHD screening scales for use in community, workplace, and primary care settings. However, these scales are all calibrated to DSM-IV criteria, which are narrower than the recently developed DSM-5 criteria. To update for DSM-5 criteria and improve the operating characteristics of the widely used World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) for screening. Probability subsamples of participants in 2 general population surveys (2001-2003 household survey [n = 119] and 2004-2005 managed care subscriber survey [n = 218]) who completed the full 29-question self-report ASRS, with both subsamples over-sampling ASRS-screened positives, were blindly administered a semistructured research diagnostic interview for DSM-5 adult ADHD. In 2016, the Risk-Calibrated Supersparse Linear Integer Model, a novel machine-learning algorithm designed to create screening scales with optimal integer weights and limited numbers of screening questions, was applied to the pooled data to create a DSM-5 version of the ASRS screening scale. The accuracy of the new scale was then confirmed in an independent 2011-2012 clinical sample of patients seeking evaluation at the New York University Langone Medical Center Adult ADHD Program (NYU Langone) and 2015-2016 primary care controls (n = 300). Data analysis was conducted from April 4, 2016, to September 22, 2016. The sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and positive predictive value (PPV) of the revised ASRS. Of the total 637 participants, 44 (37.0%) household survey respondents, 51 (23.4%) managed care respondents, and 173 (57.7%) NYU Langone respondents met DSM-5 criteria for adult ADHD in the semistructured diagnostic interview. Of the respondents who met DSM-5 criteria for adult ADHD, 123 were male (45.9%); mean (SD) age was 33.1 (11.4) years

  13. [Accuracy and diagnostic utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) in a sample of obese Mexican patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Vázquez-Velázquez, Verónica; Arcila-Martínez, Denise; Sierra-Ovando, Angel Ernesto; González-Barranco, Jorge; Salín-Pascual, Rafael J

    2002-01-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) have been used in Mexico in drug abusers, burned patients, older people, with renal insufficiency and high-risk pregnant women. The aim of this study was to determine reproducibility and accuracy of the questionnaire in a sample of obese subjects. A group of 75 obese patients (BMI > 27) without diabetes mellitus were invited to participated in the study. Diagnosis of anxiety or depression was made by an structured interview based on the DSM-IV criteria, and they were requested to complete the HAD. All subjects were randomized for the manoeuvre sequence. Sensibility specificity, positive predictive value and negative value, and unweighted kappa coefficient (for concordance) were calculated for the two procedures. The questionnaire reproducibility was assessed buy test-retest with other 25 independent subjects. Internal validity was estimated by alpha Cronbach, Guttman and intraclass correlation coefficients. Mean age was 39.7 +/- 11.5 years and BMI 39.1 +/- 9.6. The best cut off point for anxiety was 8 points (Kappa 0.68) and for depression 7 points (Kappa 0.73). Mean age for test-retest was 39.2 +/- 14.5 years and BMI 45.3 +/- 14.6. The alpha-Cronbach was 0.84 for the first tes. and 0.86 for the second. Intraclass coefficient correlation was 0.946. The HAD is applicable for obese subjects, it is reproducible and concordant with a structured interview.

  14. Screening for depression and anxiety : Correlates of non-response and cohort attrition in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Veen, Willem Jan; Van Der Meer, Klaas; Penninx, Brenda W.

    2009-01-01

    A major problem in the analysis of attrition of cohorts in Studies on mental health problems is that data on those who do not participate at the outset of a study are largely unavailable. It is not known how underlying psychopathology affects the first stages of screening where non-response and sele

  15. The Factor Structure, Predictors, and Percentile Norms of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D Scale in the Dutch-speaking Adult Population of Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D is a commonly used self-report scale to measure depressive symptoms in the general population. In the present study, the Dutch version of the CES-D was administered to a sample of 837 Dutch-speaking adults of Belgium to examine the factor structure of the scale. Using confirmatory factory analysis (CFA, four first-order models and two second-order models were tested, and the second-order factor model with three pairs of correlated error terms provided the best fit to the data. Second, five socio-demographic variables (age, gender, education level, relation status, and family history of depression were included as covariates to the second-order factor model to explore the associations between background characteristics and the latent factor depression using a multiple indicators and multiple causes (MIMIC approach. Age had a significantly negative effect on depression, but the effect was not substantial. Female gender, lower education level, being single or widowed, and having a family history of depression were found to be significant predictors of higher levels of depression symptomatology. Finally, percentile norms on the CES-D raw scores were provided for subgroups of gender by education level for the general Dutch-speaking adult population of Belgium.

  16. Items of the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale Associated With Response to Paroxetine Treatment in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Tetsu; Sato, Yasushi; Nakagami, Taku; Tsuchimine, Shoko; Kaneda, Ayako; Kaneko, Sunao; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the association between the severity of each symptom evaluated by the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at baseline and responsiveness to treatment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) to identify the items that predict treatment response. The patients received a diagnosis of MDD if they had a score greater than 20 points on the MADRS. Following admission, 120 patients were enrolled in the study, and 89 patients completed the study. For the first week, a 20-mg/d dose of paroxetine was administered; thereafter, the dose was increased to 40 mg/d. The MADRS was applied at baseline and after 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks. We defined responders as patients with improvements in their MADRS scores of more than 50% after 6 weeks of treatment. A multiple regression analysis of MADRS scores at 6 weeks was performed to identify patients who responded to treatment. There was a significant difference between responders and nonresponders in the reported sadness (RS) score for all MADRS items. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, only the RS and concentration difficulties (C) scores showed a significant association with treatment response. Based on the results of χ tests, RS score cutoff values of 2/3 and 3/4 revealed significant differences in the responder rate. None of the cutoff values for the C score revealed significant differences. The RS score was significantly associated with responsiveness to paroxetine treatment for MDD, with higher RS scores predicting poor responses to treatment.

  17. Factor structure of the Athens Insomnia Scale and its associations with demographic characteristics and depression in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; King, Bryan H; Chang, Yu-Ping

    2010-03-01

    The eight-item Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS-8) is an instrument that has been used frequently to assess insomnia problems. Previous research on adults has found that the AIS-8 functioned as a sole component. This study aimed to examine the prevalence rates of insomnia problems on the AIS-8, the factor structure of the AIS-8 in adolescents and its associations with demographic characteristics and depression in adolescents. A total of 8319 adolescent students (4334 girls and 3985 boys, mean age = 14.7 years, standard deviation = 1.7 years) in southern Taiwan were recruited into this study and completed the AIS-8. We performed an exploratory factor analysis to examine the factor structure of the AIS-8, and used the parallel analysis for making decisions regarding factor retention. We also used multiple regression analysis models to determine the associations between insomnia and demographic characteristics and depression. The results found that a high proportion of adolescents had insomnia problems as measured by the AIS-8. The AIS-8 was composed of two different factors when used among a large adolescent population, including insomnia symptoms (factor 1) and subjective sleep and daytime distress (factor 2). While being male, being younger, and having depression were associated positively with the severity of insomnia symptoms (factor 1), being older, living in urban areas, and having depression were associated positively with the severity of subjective sleep and daytime distress (factor 2). Clinicians and researchers should consider the different meanings of the two factors of the AIS-8 when using this tool to assess insomnia problems in adolescents.

  18. Validation of the Swedish version of the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale used in patients 70 years and older undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingehall, Helena Claesson; Smulter, Nina; Engström, Karl Gunnar; Gustafson, Yngve; Olofsson, Birgitta

    2013-10-01

    Validation of the Swedish version of the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale as a screening tool for nurses to use to detect postoperative delirium in patients 70 years and older undergoing cardiac surgery. Delirium is common among old patients after cardiac surgery. Underdiagnosis and poor documentation of postoperative delirium is problematic, and nurses often misread the signs. A prospective observational study. Patients (n = 142) scheduled for cardiac surgery were assessed three times daily by the nursing staff using the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale. Nursing Delirium Screening Scale was compared with the Mini Mental State Examination and the Organic Brains Syndrome Scale, evaluated day one and day four postoperatively. Delirium was diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - DSM-IV-TR criteria. A larger proportion of patients were diagnosed with delirium according to the Mini Mental State Examination and Organic Brains Syndrome Scale compared with the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale, both on day one and day four. The Nursing Delirium Screening Scale protocol identified the majority of hyperactive and mixed delirium patients, whereas several with hypoactive delirium were unrecognised. The Swedish version of the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale was easily incorporated into clinical care and showed high sensitivity in detecting hyperactive symptoms of delirium. However, in the routine use by nurses, the Nursing Delirium Screening Scale had low sensitivity in detecting hypoactive delirium, the most prevalent form of delirium after cardiac surgery. Nursing Delirium Screening Scale probably has to be combined with cognitive testing to detect hypoactive delirium. Nurses play a key role in detecting delirium. The Nursing Delirium Screening Scale was easy incorporated instrument for clinical practice and identified the majority of hyperactive and mixed delirium, but several of the patients with hypoactive delirium were unrecognised

  19. The effects of implementing a point-of-care electronic template to prompt routine anxiety and depression screening in patients consulting for osteoarthritis (the Primary Care Osteoarthritis Trial): A cluster randomised trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallen, Christian D; Nicholl, Barbara I; Lewis, Martyn; Bartlam, Bernadette; Green, Daniel; Jowett, Sue; Kigozi, Jesse; Belcher, John; Clarkson, Kris; Lingard, Zoe; Pope, Christopher; Chew-Graham, Carolyn A; Croft, Peter; Hay, Elaine M; Peat, George

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether prompting general practitioners (GPs) to routinely assess and manage anxiety and depression in patients consulting with osteoarthritis (OA) improves pain outcomes. We conducted a cluster randomised controlled trial involving 45 English general practices. In intervention practices, patients aged ≥45 y consulting with OA received point-of-care anxiety and depression screening by the GP, prompted by an automated electronic template comprising five questions (a two-item Patient Health Questionnaire-2 for depression, a two-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder-2 questionnaire for anxiety, and a question about current pain intensity [0-10 numerical rating scale]). The template signposted GPs to follow National Institute for Health and Care Excellence clinical guidelines for anxiety, depression, and OA and was supported by a brief training package. The template in control practices prompted GPs to ask the pain intensity question only. The primary outcome was patient-reported current pain intensity post-consultation and at 3-, 6-, and 12-mo follow-up. Secondary outcomes included pain-related disability, anxiety, depression, and general health. During the trial period, 7,279 patients aged ≥45 y consulted with a relevant OA-related code, and 4,240 patients were deemed potentially eligible by participating GPs. Templates were completed for 2,042 patients (1,339 [31.6%] in the control arm and 703 [23.1%] in the intervention arm). Of these 2,042 patients, 1,412 returned questionnaires (501 [71.3%] from 20 intervention practices, 911 [68.0%] from 24 control practices). Follow-up rates were similar in both arms, totalling 1,093 (77.4%) at 3 mo, 1,064 (75.4%) at 6 mo, and 1,017 (72.0%) at 12 mo. For the primary endpoint, multilevel modelling yielded significantly higher average pain intensity across follow-up to 12 mo in the intervention group than the control group (adjusted mean difference 0.31; 95% CI 0.04, 0.59). Secondary outcomes were

  20. ROS-activated ATM-dependent phosphorylation of cytoplasmic substrates identified by large scale phosphoproteomics screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    substrates (HMGA1 and UIMCI/RAP80), another five were identified in a whole cell extract phosphoproteomic screens and the remaining four proteins had not been identified previously in DNA damage response screens. We validated the phosphorylation of three of these proteins (OSR1, HDGF and ccdc82) as ATM...

  1. Large-scale screening of a targeted Enterococcus faecalis mutant library identifies envelope fitness factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Rigottier-Gois

    Full Text Available Spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria responsible for nosocomial and community-acquired infections urges for novel therapeutic or prophylactic targets and for innovative pathogen-specific antibacterial compounds. Major challenges are posed by opportunistic pathogens belonging to the low GC% gram-positive bacteria. Among those, Enterococcus faecalis is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections associated with life-threatening issues and increased hospital costs. To better understand the molecular properties of enterococci that may be required for virulence, and that may explain the emergence of these bacteria in nosocomial infections, we performed the first large-scale functional analysis of E. faecalis V583, the first vancomycin-resistant isolate from a human bloodstream infection. E. faecalis V583 is within the high-risk clonal complex 2 group, which comprises mostly isolates derived from hospital infections worldwide. We conducted broad-range screenings of candidate genes likely involved in host adaptation (e.g., colonization and/or virulence. For this purpose, a library was constructed of targeted insertion mutations in 177 genes encoding putative surface or stress-response factors. Individual mutants were subsequently tested for their i resistance to oxidative stress, ii antibiotic resistance, iii resistance to opsonophagocytosis, iv adherence to the human colon carcinoma Caco-2 epithelial cells and v virulence in a surrogate insect model. Our results identified a number of factors that are involved in the interaction between enterococci and their host environments. Their predicted functions highlight the importance of cell envelope glycopolymers in E. faecalis host adaptation. This study provides a valuable genetic database for understanding the steps leading E. faecalis to opportunistic virulence.

  2. The Diagnostic Apathia Scale predicts the ability to return to work following depression or anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Lc; Eplov, Lf; Nordentoft, M

    2014-01-01

    , tiredness/fatigue, insomnia, and reduced ability to work and engage in personal interests. The scale was analysed for psychometric validity (scalability) and for its ability to predict RTW. Finally, the predictive validity of the Diagnostic Apathia Scale regarding RTW was compared with scales measuring...

  3. Validation of a susceptibility, benefits, and barrier scale for mammography screening among Peruvian women: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaman Moises A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perceived beliefs about breast cancer and breast cancer screening are important predictors for mammography utilization. This study adapted and validated the Champion's scale in Peru. This scale measures perceived susceptibility for breast cancer and perceived benefits and barriers for mammography. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among women ages 40 to 65 attending outpatient gynecology services in a public hospital in Peru. A group of experts developed and pre-tested a Spanish version of the Champion's scale to assess its comprehensibility (N = 20. Factor analysis, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability analyses were performed (N = 285. Concurrent validity compared scores from participants who had a mammogram and those who did not have it in the previous 15 months. T-test and multiple regression analysis adjusting for socio-demographic factors, mammography knowledge and other preventive behaviors were performed. Results The construct validity and reliability were optimal. Cronbach-Alpha coefficients were 0.75 (susceptibility, 0.72 (benefits and 0.86 (barriers. Concurrent validity analysis showed an association between barriers and mammography screening use in bivariate (22.3 ± 6.7 vs. 30.2 ± 7.6; p Conclusion Concurrent validity analysis showed that the Champion's scale has important limitations for assessing perceived susceptibility for breast cancer and perceived benefits for mammography among Peruvian women. There is still a need for developing valid and reliable instruments for measuring perceived beliefs about breast cancer and mammography screening among Peruvian women.

  4. [Confirmatory factor analysis of the short French version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies of Depression Scale (CES-D10) in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartierre, N; Coulon, N; Demerval, R

    2011-09-01

    Screening depressivity among adolescents is a key public health priority. In order to measure the severity of depressive symptomatology, a four-dimensional 20 items scale called "Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale" (CES-D) was developed. A shorter 10-item version was developed and validated (Andresen et al.). For this brief version, several authors supported a two-factor structure - Negative and Positive affect - but the relationship between the two reversed-worded items of the Positive affect factor could be better accounted for by correlated errors. The aim of this study is triple: firstly to test a French version of the CES-D10 among adolescents; secondly to test the relevance of a one-dimensional structure by considering error correlation for Positive affect items; finally to examine the extent to which this structural model is invariant across gender. The sample was composed of 269 Fre