WorldWideScience

Sample records for depression scale epds

  1. The Simplified Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS for Antenatal Depression: Is It a Valid Measure for Pre-Screening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sea Kyung Choi, Jung Jin Kim, Yong Gyu Park, Hyun Sun Ko, In Yang Park, Jong Chul Shin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of antenatal depression is critical but poorly conducted. The aim of this study was to construct a simplified depression survey scale and to verify its efficacy as a pre-screening for antenatal depression. A total of 494 pregnant women in the third trimester of gestation who had received antenatal care at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital from July 2009 to June 2010 were included. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS questionnaire was completed by them. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups: 250 of training set and 244 of validation set. We designed a simplified questionnaire comprising two items of EPDS using the training set. We then validated its efficacy with the training set and reaffirmed the results with the validation set. The sum of item 5 (scare or panic and item 8 (sadness or misery explained 75.5% of the total score of the EPDS (AUC = 0.947. Using a score of 3 as a cut-off value of the simplified scale, sensitivity was 92.4% and specificity was 86.3%. The positive and negative predictive values were 56.2% and 98.4%, retrospectively. This study suggests that the simplified EPDS can be an efficient instrument to rule out depression during pregnancy.

  2. Concordance of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to assess increased risk of depression among postpartum women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Pace, Wilson; Wollan, Peter C; Bertram, Susan; Kurland, Margary; Graham, Deborah; Dietrich, Allen

    2009-01-01

    To compare the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) as screening tools for postpartum depression. This study population included the first 500 women to enroll and return their packets during an ongoing study of postpartum depression. The primary outcome of this study was to find rates of concordance and discordance in the EPDS and PHQ-9 categories of "normal" and "increased risk for major depressive disorder." Overall, 97% of eligible women enrolled and 70% returned the packets that included the EPDS and PHQ-9. Four hundred eighty-one of the first 500 packets had complete data, with elevated EPDS or PHQ-9 scores in 138 and 132 women, respectively. Concordance of the EPDS and PHQ-9 were present in 399 women (83%): 326 (67.8%) had "normal" score on both, and 73 (15.2%) had elevated scores for both. Discordant scores in 82 women included 17 with elevated PHQ-9 scores but normal EPDS scores and 65 with elevated EPDS scores and PHQ-9 scores 30 and low education level were predictive of discordant scores, using EPDS and PHQ-9 scores of > or =10 as elevated (odds ratio, 1.9 and P = .02; and odds ratio, 2.3 and P = .01, respectively). PHQ-9 scores of 5 to 9 have been referred to as consistent with "mild depressive symptoms" and appropriate for "watchful waiting" and repeat PHQ-9 at follow-up. Using this follow-up approach would require re-evaluation of 120 (25%) of the women screened. Postpartum depression screening is feasible in primary care practices, and for most women the EPDS and PHQ-9 scores were concordant. Further work is required to identify reasons for the 17% discordant scores as well as to provide definitive recommendations for PHQ-9 scores of 5 to 9.

  3. First validation of a Spanish-translated version of the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS) for use in pregnant women. A Chilean study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Rubén; Jadresic, Enrique; Guajardo, Viviana; Rojas, Graciela

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to detect depression during pregnancy in Chile. The EPDS was applied to a sample of 111 pregnant women, who were attending an antenatal appointment in primary care centers. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-I) was used to assess the convergent validity, and the Depressive Episode module of the MINI was used to identify cases. The factor analysis showed that there was a good fit, with a factor model that explains 57.6 % of the total variance. There was a high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.914) and good convergent validity with the BDI-I (rho = 0.850, p < 0.001). The EPDS was capable of differentiating cases of depression from non-cases. The best cutoff point was between 12 and 13, corresponding to an overall accuracy of 87.4 %. The questionnaire has good psychometric properties and can be useful for detecting cases of depression during pregnancy.

  4. Using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to assess suicidal ideation among pregnant women in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Gelaye, Bizu; Rondon, Marta B; Sánchez, Sixto E; Simon, Gregory E; Henderson, David C; Barrios, Yasmin V; Sánchez, Pedro Mascaro; Williams, Michelle A

    2015-12-01

    We sought to examine the concordance of two suicidal ideation items from the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), to evaluate the prevalence of suicidal ideation among pregnant women, and to assess the co-occurrence of suicidal ideation with antepartum depressive symptoms. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,517 pregnant women attending prenatal care clinics in Lima, Peru. Item 9 of the PHQ-9 assesses suicidal ideation over the last 14 days while item 10 of the EPDS assesses suicidal ideation in the past 7 days. The two suicidal ideation items have a high concordance rate (84.2 %) but a moderate agreement (the Cohen's kappa = 0.42). Based on the PHQ-9 and the EPDS, 15.8 and 8.8 % of participants screened positive for suicidal ideation, respectively. Assessed by the PHQ-9, 51 % of participants with suicidal ideation had probable depression. In prenatal care clinics, screening for suicidal ideation is needed for women with and without depressive symptoms. Future studies are needed to identify additional predictors of antepartum suicidality, determine the appropriate duration of reporting period for suicidal ideation screening, and assess the percentage of individuals with positive responses to the two suicidal ideation items at high risk of planning and attempting suicide.

  5. Validation of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS in a sample of mothers from the 2004 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study Validação da Escala de Depressão Pós-natal de Edinburgo (EPDS em uma amostra de mães da Coorte de Nascimento de Pelotas, 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iná S. Santos

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS for screening and diagnosis of postpartum depression. Three months after delivery, EPDS was administered to 378 mothers from the 2004 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Up to 15 days later, mothers were re-interviewed by mental health care professionals using a semi-structured interview based on ICD-10 (gold standard. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of each cutoff point, and values were plotted as a receiver operator characteristic curve. The best cutoff point for screening postpartum depression was > 10, with 82.6% (75.3-89.9% sensitivity and 65.4% (59.8-71.1% specificity. For screening moderate and severe cases, the best cutoff point was > 11, with 83.8% (73.4-91.3% sensitivity and 74.7% (69.4-79.5% specificity. For diagnosis, EPDS was valid only for prevalence of postpartum depression in the 20-25% range, with 60% PPV for the > 13 cutoff point (59.5% sensitivity; 88.4% specificity. The specificities and PPVs for all cutoff points were below those reported by other authors. Small numbers and the calculation of PPV in samples with overrepresentation of cases in the majority of studies appear to account for these differences.Avaliar a validade da Escala de Depressão Pós-natal de Edimburgo (EPDS para rastreamento e diagnóstico de depressão pós-parto. Três meses pós-parto, a EPDS foi aplicada a 378 mães da Coorte de Nascimentos de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, em 2004. Até 15 dias após, as mães foram reentrevistadas por profissionais de saúde mental utilizando-se questionário semi-estruturado baseado na CID-10 (padrão-ouro. Calculamos sensibilidade e especificidade de cada ponto de corte e construiu-se curva ROC. Melhor ponto de corte para rastreamento foi > 10 (sensibilidade 82,6%, 75,3%-89,9%; especificidade 65,4%, 59,8%-71,1%. Para rastrear casos moderados e graves, melhor ponto de corte foi > 11, com

  6. Detecting depression in pregnancy: validation of EPDS in British Pakistani mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Nusrat; Rahman, Atif; Husain, Meher; Khan, Sarah Marium; Vyas, Avni; Tomenson, Barbara; Cruickshank, Kennedy J

    2014-12-01

    Recent reports suggest that antenatal depression is as prevalent as postnatal depression. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is the most widely used tool to detect postnatal depression, which can also detect depression during the antenatal period. Mothers of Pakistani origin have the highest birth rate in the UK. The validity of EPDS has not been assessed in this group. A prospective cohort of 714 women in their third trimester of pregnancy completed the EPDS while waiting for their antenatal visit. Women scoring 12 or more on the EPDS, and a random sample of low scores were assessed with the Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry to establish psychiatric diagnosis. A cut-off point of 8 showed the best discrimination with sensitivity = 89.6% and specificity 54.7%. Positive predictive value was 29.4 and negative predictive value was 96.2. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.72 (0.66-0.78). When language is taken into account the area under the ROC curve for subjects who preferred the Urdu or Punjabi language is slightly higher at 0.79 than those who preferred English (0.61). We have not been able to find a single clear cut-off is a result of the AUCs not being particularly large, and confirms that the EPDS should only be used as a screen and not for diagnostic purposes. The larger AUC for the Urdu/Punjabi speakers than for the English speakers suggests that the EPDS is as good a screen for this group as for the indigenous English population.

  7. Effects of endorphin massage on B-endorphin level and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS score in women with postpartum blues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayati Hidayati

    2014-06-01

    Results: Endorphin massage treatment significantly increase the B-endorphin level compared to before treatment (P 0.05. The level of EPDS significantly decrease after treatment than that before treatment (P 0.05. There is significantly negative correlation between B-endorphin level and EPDS score (r = -0,517; P 0.05. Conclusion: Endorphin massage is good alternative treatment to increase B-endorphin level and decresae EPDS score among mother with postpartum blues. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 512-516

  8. The EPDS-Lifetime : assessment of lifetime prevalence and risk factors for perinatal depression in a large cohort of depressed women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Boschloo, Lynn; Jones, Ian; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Penninx, Brenda W.

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal depression (PND) is a common complication of pregnancy and postpartum associated with significant morbidity. We had three goals: (1) to explore the performance of a new lifetime version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS-Lifetime) to assess lifetime prevalence of PND; (2) to

  9. The EPDS-Lifetime : assessment of lifetime prevalence and risk factors for perinatal depression in a large cohort of depressed women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Boschloo, Lynn; Jones, Ian; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Penninx, Brenda W.

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal depression (PND) is a common complication of pregnancy and postpartum associated with significant morbidity. We had three goals: (1) to explore the performance of a new lifetime version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS-Lifetime) to assess lifetime prevalence of PND; (2) to

  10. Development of the Perinatal Depression Inventory (PDI)-14 using item response theory: a comparison of the BDI-II, EPDS, PDI, and PHQ-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodey, Benjamin B; Goodman, Sherryl H; Baldasaro, Ruth E; Brooks-DeWeese, Amy; Wilson, Melanie Elliott; Brodey, Inger S B; Doyle, Nora M

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a simple, brief, self-report perinatal depression inventory that accurately measures severity in a number of populations. Our team developed 159 Likert-scale perinatal depression items using simple sentences with a fifth-grade reading level. Based on iterative cognitive interviewing (CI), an expert panel improved and winnowed the item pool based on pre-determined criteria. The resulting 67 items were administered to a sample of 628 pregnant and 251 postpartum women with different levels of depression at private and public sector obstetrics clinics, together with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Edinburg Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), as well as Module A of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Diagnoses (SCID). Responses were evaluated using Item Response Theory (IRT). The Perinatal Depression Inventory (PDI)-14 items are highly informative regarding depression severity and function similarly and informatively across pregnant/postpartum, white/non-white, and private-clinic/public-clinic populations. PDI-14 scores correlate well with the PHQ-9, EPDS, and BDI-II, but the PDI-14 provides a more precise measure of severity using far fewer words. The PDI-14 is a brief depression assessment that excels at accurately measuring depression severity across a wide range of severity and perinatal populations.

  11. Predictive accuracy of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale assessment during pregnancy for the risk of developing postpartum depressive symptoms : a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J. L.; Beijers, C.; van Pampus, M. G.; Verbeek, T.; Stolk, R. P.; Milgrom, J.; Bockting, C. L. H.; Burger, H.

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate whether the 10-item Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) administered antenatally is accurate in predicting postpartum depressive symptoms, and whether a two-item EPDS has similar predictive accuracy. DesignProspective cohort study. SettingObstetric care in the Netherl

  12. Generating an efficient version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in an urban obstetrical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Luther, James F; Eng, Heather F; Dills, John Louis; Sit, Dorothy; Ciolino, Jody D; Wisner, Katherine L

    2017-01-15

    Postpartum depression incurs significant burden and suffering. We investigated the latent structure of the most commonly used screening measure, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in women (N=15,172) and tested its predictive validity for the diagnosis of depression as determined with a structured clinical interview. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, Receiver Operating Characteristic curves, and logistic regression analyses were conducted. A seven-item one factor scale (items 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10) emerged with a Goodness of Index Fit Index (GFI) =.96, relative to the ten-item two factor version of the EPDS (GFI =.94). The seven-item EPDS achieved good sensitivity and specificity in predicting the 10-item EPDS, with a cut point score of 4 on the seven item EPDS to predict a 10-item EPDS score of 10 or more (sensitivity =95%, specificity =91%). The seven and 10-item EPDS showed a similar ability to predict a diagnoses of depression (area under the ROC curve=.795 for the 10-item, .770 for the seven-item EPDS). Logistic regression analyses showed similar predictive ability between the seven- and 10-item scales in predicting scores higher than 18 on the clinical interview LIMITATIONS: The sample represents women from one Midwest medical center and the EPDS was measured via phone. The seven-item one factor version of the EPDS is an efficient and effective measure of depression severity on par with the two factor 10-item version of the EPDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Factor structure of the Japanese version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in the postpartum period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Kubota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is a widely used screening tool for postpartum depression (PPD. Although the reliability and validity of EPDS in Japanese has been confirmed and the prevalence of PPD is found to be about the same as Western countries, the factor structure of the Japanese version of EPDS has not been elucidated yet. METHODS: 690 Japanese mothers completed all items of the EPDS at 1 month postpartum. We divided them randomly into two sample sets. The first sample set (n = 345 was used for exploratory factor analysis, and the second sample set was used (n = 345 for confirmatory factor analysis. RESULTS: The result of exploratory factor analysis indicated a three-factor model consisting of anxiety, depression and anhedonia. The results of confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the anxiety and anhedonia factors existed for EPDS in a sample of Japanese women at 1 month postpartum. The depression factor varies by the models of acceptable fit. CONCLUSIONS: We examined EPDS scores. As a result, "anxiety" and "anhedonia" exist for EPDS among postpartum women in Japan as already reported in Western countries. Cross-cultural research is needed for future research.

  14. Evaluation of the Edinburgh Post Natal Depression Scale using Rasch analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tennant Alan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is a 10 item self-rating post-natal depression scale which has seen widespread use in epidemiological and clinical studies. Concern has been raised over the validity of the EPDS as a single summed scale, with suggestions that it measures two separate aspects, one of depressive feelings, the other of anxiety. Methods As part of a larger cross-sectional study conducted in Melbourne, Australia, a community sample (324 women, ranging in age from 18 to 44 years: mean = 32 yrs, SD = 4.6, was obtained by inviting primiparous women to participate voluntarily in this study. Data from the EPDS were fitted to the Rasch measurement model and tested for appropriate category ordering, for item bias through Differential Item Functioning (DIF analysis, and for unidimensionality through tests of the assumption of local independence. Results Rasch analysis of the data from the ten item scale initially demonstrated a lack of fit to the model with a significant Item-Trait Interaction total chi-square (chi Square = 82.8, df = 40; p Conclusion The results of this study suggest that EPDS, in its original 10 item form, is not a viable scale for the unidimensional measurement of depression. Rasch analysis suggests that a revised eight item version (EPDS-8 would provide a more psychometrically robust scale. The revised cut points of 7/8 and 9/10 for the EPDS-8 show high levels of agreement with the original case identification for the EPDS-10.

  15. Links Among High EPDS Scores, State of Mind Regarding Attachment, and Symptoms of Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne; Steele, Howard; Mehlhase, Heike; Cordes, Katharina; Steele, Miriam; Harder, Susanne; Væver, Mette Skovgaard

    2015-12-01

    Underlying persistent psychological difficulties have been found to moderate potential adverse effects of maternal postpartum depression (PPD) on parenting and infant development. The authors examined whether mothers presenting postpartum depressive symptoms showed higher levels of personality pathology and more insecure state of mind regarding attachment compared to nondepressed mothers. Participants (N = 85) were assessed with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), the Present State Examination, the Adult Attachment Interview, and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II. Mothers with high EPDS scores were more likely to have a preoccupied insecure state of mind and to have personality disorder compared with mothers scoring below clinical cutoff. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis showed that personality disorder and AAI classification were independently related to EPDS score, and that these two factors together accounted for 48% of the variance in EPDS score. Findings are discussed in terms of heterogeneity in PPD populations and underline the importance of examining potential coexisting psychological difficulties when studying PPD.

  16. The use of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale to identify postnatal depression symptoms at well child visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvestri Maria

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives 1 to evaluate the role of the pediatrician in detecting postnatal depression (PD symptoms by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; 2 to detect factors increasing the risk of PD and, 3 to assess the importance of scores gained from fathers' questionnaire. Methods we surveyed 1122 mothers and 499 fathers who were assessed using the EPDS during the first well-child visit. After 5 weeks, high scoring parents, completed a second EPDS. High scoring parents were examined by a psychiatrist who had to confirm the PD diagnosis. Results 26.6% of mothers and 12.6% of fathers at the first visit, 19.0% of mothers and 9.1% of fathers at the second visit, gained scores signaling the risk of PD. Four mothers and two fathers had confirmed PD diagnosis. Younger maternal age, non-Italian nationality and low socio-economic condition were related to higher EPDS scores. Conclusion PD is common in the average population. Using a simple and standardized instrument, pediatricians are able to detect parents with higher risk of suffering from PD.

  17. Psychometric Properties and Diagnostic Accuracy of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in a Sample of Iranian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Kheirabadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS has been used as a reliable screening tool for postpartum depression in many countries. This study aimed to assess the psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy of the EPDS in a sample of Iranian women.Methods: Using stratified sampling 262 postpartum women (2 weeks-3 months after delivery were selected from urban and rural health center in the city of Isfahan. They were interviewed using EPDS and Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS. Data were assessed using factor analysis, diagnosis analysis of receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation coefficient.Results: The age of then participants ranged 18-45 years (26.6±5.1. Based on a cut-off point of >13 for HDRS, 18.3% of the participants. The overall reliability (Cronbach's alpha of EPDS was 0.79. There was a significant correlation (r2=0.60, P value<0.01 between EPDS and HDRS. Two factor analysis showed that anhedonia and depression were two explanatory factors. At a cut-off point12 the sensitivity of the questionnaire was 78% (95% CI: 73%-83% and its specificity was 75% (95% CI: 72%-78%. Conclusion: The Persian version of the EPDS showed appropriate psychometric properties diagnostic accuracy index. It can be used by health system professionals for detection, assessment and treatment for mothers with post partum depression.

  18. Detection of Mental Disorders Other Than Depression with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in a Sample of Pregnant Women in Northern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sifuentes-Alvarez, Antonio; Salas-Martinez, Carlos

    2016-05-18

    We sought to evaluate the capacity of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in discriminating mental disorders other than depression in pregnant women in northern Mexico. Three hundred pregnant women attending prenatal consultations in a public hospital in Durango City, Mexico submitted a validated EPDS and were examined for mental disorders other than depression using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - 4(th) Ed. (DSM-IV) criteria. Sensitivity and specificity of cut-off points of the EPDS, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Of the 300 pregnant women studied, 21 had mental disorders other than depression by the DSM-IV criteria. The best EPDS score for screening mental disorders other than depression was 8/9. This threshold showed a sensitivity of 52.4%, a specificity of 67.0%, a positive predictive value of 11.5%, a negative predictive value of 95.4%, and an area under the curve of 0.643 (95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.76). The EPDS can be considered for screening mental disorders other than depression in Mexican pregnant women whenever a cut-off score of 8/9 is used. However, the tool showed small power to separate pregnant women with and without mental disorders other than depression.

  19. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: translation and validation for a Greek sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogevinas Manolis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is an important screening instrument that is used routinely with mothers during the postpartum period for early identification of postnatal depression. The purpose of this study was to validate the Greek version of EPDS along with sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Methods 120 mothers within 12 weeks postpartum were recruited from the perinatal care registers of the Maternity Departments of 4 Hospitals of Heraklion municipality, Greece. EPDS and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II surveys were administered in random order to the mothers. Each mother was diagnosed with depression according to the validated Greek version of BDI-II. The psychometric measurements that were performed included: two independent samples t-tests, One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, reliability coefficients, Explanatory factor analysis using a Varimax rotation and Principal Components Method. Confirmatory analysis -known as structural equation modelling- of principal components was conducted by LISREL (Linear Structural Relations. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. Results 8 (6.7% of the mothers were diagnosed with major postnatal depression, 14 (11.7% with moderate and 38 (31.7% with mild depression on the basis of BDI-II scores. The internal consistency of the EPDS Greek version -using Chronbach's alpha coefficient- was found 0.804 and that of Guttman split-half coefficient 0.742. Our findings confirm the multidimensionality of EPDS, demonstrating a two-factor structure which contained subscales reflecting depressive symptoms and anxiety. The Confirmatory Factor analysis demonstrated that the two factor model offered a very good fit to our data. The area under ROC curve AUC was found 0.7470 and the logistic estimate for the threshold score of 8/9 fitted the model sensitivity at 76.7% and model specificity at 68

  20. Factor structure and psychometric properties of english and spanish versions of the edinburgh postnatal depression scale among Hispanic women in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Chelsey M; Barroso, Nicole; Rey, Yasmin; Pettit, Jeremy W; Bagner, Daniel M

    2014-12-01

    Although a number of studies have examined the factor structure of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in predominately White or African American samples, no published research has reported on the factor structure among Hispanic women who reside in the United States. The current study examined the factor structure of the EPDS among Hispanic mothers in the United States. Among 220 Hispanic women, drawn from a pediatric primary care setting, with an infant aged 0 to 10 months, 6 structural models guided by the empirical literature were evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. Results supported a 2-factor model of depression and anxiety as the best fitting model. Multigroup models supported the factorial invariance across women who completed the EDPS in English and Spanish. These findings provide initial support for the 2-factor structure of the EPDS among Hispanic women in the United States. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The prevalence of suicidal ideation identified by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in postpartum women in primary care: findings from the RESPOND trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharp Debbie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available 1 Abstract 1.1 Background Suicide is a leading cause of perinatal maternal deaths in industrialised countries but there has been little research to investigate prevalence or correlates of postpartum suicidality. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale is widely used in primary and maternity services to screen for perinatal depressive disorders, and includes a question on suicidal ideation (question 10. We aimed to investigate the prevalence, persistence and correlates of suicidal thoughts in postpartum women in the context of a randomised controlled trial of treatments for postnatal depression. 1.2 Methods Women in primary care were sent postal questionnaires at 6 weeks postpartum to screen for postnatal depression before recruitment into an RCT. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS was used to screen for postnatal depression and in those with high levels of symptoms, a home visit with a standardised psychiatric interview was carried out using the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised version (CIS-R. Other socio-demographic and clinical variables were measured, including functioning (SF12 and quality of the marital relationship (GRIMS. Women who entered the trial were followed up for 18 weeks. 1.3 Results 9% of 4,150 women who completed the EPDS question relating to suicidal ideation reported some suicidal ideation (including hardly ever; 4% reported that the thought of harming themselves had occurred to them sometimes or quite often. In women who entered the randomised trial and completed the EPDS question relating to suicidal ideation (n = 253, suicidal ideation was associated with younger age, higher parity and higher levels of depressive symptoms in the multivariate analysis. Endorsement of 'yes, quite often' to question 10 on the EPDS was associated with affirming at least two CIS-R items on suicidality. We found no association between suicidal ideation and SF-12 physical or mental health or the EPDS total score at 18 weeks. 1

  2. The impact of education, country, race and ethnicity on the self-report of postpartum depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Florio, A.; Putnam, K.; Altemus, M.; Apter, G.; Bergink, V.; Bilszta, J.; Brock, R.; Buist, A.; Deligiannidis, K. M.; Devouche, E.; Epperson, C. N.; Guille, C.; Kim, D.; Lichtenstein, P.; Magnusson, P. K. E.; Martinez, P.; Munk-Olsen, T.; Newport, J.; Payne, J.; Penninx, B. W.; O’Hara, M.; Robertson-Blackmore, E.; Roza, S. J.; Sharkey, K. M.; Stuart, S.; Tiemeier, H.; Viktorin, A.; Schmidt, P. J.; Sullivan, P. F.; Stowe, Z. N.; Wisner, K. L.; Jones, I.; Rubinow, D. R.; Meltzer-Brody, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Universal screening for postpartum depression is recommended in many countries. Knowledge of whether the disclosure of depressive symptoms in the postpartum period differs across cultures could improve detection and provide new insights into the pathogenesis. Moreover, it is a necessary step to evaluate the universal use of screening instruments in research and clinical practice. In the current study we sought to assess whether the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), the most widely used screening tool for postpartum depression, measures the same underlying construct across cultural groups in a large international dataset. Method Ordinal regression and measurement invariance were used to explore the association between culture, operationalized as education, ethnicity/race and continent, and endorsement of depressive symptoms using the EPDS on 8209 new mothers from Europe and the USA. Results Education, but not ethnicity/race, influenced the reporting of postpartum depression [difference between robust comparative fit indexes (Δ*CFI) 0.01), but not between European countries (Δ*CFI depression that women of different educational backgrounds may manifest. The increasing cultural heterogeneity of societies together with the tendency towards globalization requires a culturally sensitive approach to patients, research and policies, that takes into account, beyond rhetoric, the context of a person’s experiences and the context in which the research is conducted. PMID:27866476

  3. Routine screening for postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulos, A M; Bryan, T L; Wollan, P; Yawn, B P

    2001-02-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common and often overlooked condition. Validated screening tools for PPD exist but are not commonly used. We present the 1-year outcome of a project to implement universal PPD screening at the 6-week postpartum visit. Universal screening with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was implemented in all community postnatal care sites. One-year outcome assessments (diagnosis and treatment of PPD) were completed for a sample of the women screened using medical record review of all care they received during the first year postpartum. Sixty-eight (20%) of the 342 women whose medical records were reviewed had been given a documented diagnosis of postpartum depression, resulting in an estimated population rate of 10.7%. Depression was diagnosed in 35% of the women with elevated EPDS scores (> or =10) compared with 5% of the women with low EPDS scores (<10) in the first year postpartum. Treatment was provided for all women diagnosed with depression, including drug therapy for 49% and counseling for 78%. Four women were hospitalized for depression. Some degree of suicidal ideation was noted on the EPDS by 48 women but acknowledged in the chart of only 10 women, including 1 with an immediate hospitalization. The rate of diagnosis of postpartum depression in this community increased from 3.7% before the routine use of EPDS screening to 10.7% following screening. A high EPDS score was predictive of a diagnosis of postpartum depression, and the implementation of routine EPDS screening at 6 weeks postpartum was associated with an increase in the rate of diagnosed postpartum depression in this community.

  4. Impact of antenatal depression on perinatal outcomes and postpartum depression in Korean women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Kyung Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maternal prenatal mental health has been shown to be associated with adverse consequences for the mother and the child. However, studies considering the effect of prenatal depressive symptoms are lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of antenatal depressive symptoms on obstetric outcomes and to determine associations between antenatal and postpartum depressions. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study. The Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS questionnaire was completed by pregnant women receiving obstetrical care at Seoul St. Mary′s hospital in the third trimester of gestation. The electronic medical records were reviewed after delivery and perinatal outcomes were evaluated. The association between antenatal and postpartum depression was analyzed using the EPDS questionnaire, which was completed by the same women within 2 months of delivery. Results: Of the 467 participants, 26.34% (n = 123 had antenatal depressive symptoms, with EPDS scores of ≥10. There were no significant perinatal outcomes associated with antenatal depressive symptoms. During the postpartum period, 192 of the women in the initial study cohort were given the EPDS again as a follow-up. Of the 192 participants, 56 (29.17% scored >10. Spearman correlation coefficient between the antenatal and postpartum EPDS scores was 0.604, which was statistically significant (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Antenatal depression does not lead to unfavorable perinatal outcomes. However, screening for antenatal depression may be helpful to identify women at risk of postpartum depression.

  5. A survey of the clinical acceptability of screening for postnatal depression in depressed and non-depressed women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericksen Jennifer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on clinical acceptability is needed when making cost-utility decisions about health screening implementation. Despite being in use for two decades, most data on the clinical acceptability of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS come from qualitative reports, or include relatively small samples of depressed women. This study aimed to measure acceptability in a survey of a relatively large, community sample with a high representation of clinically depressed women. Methods Using mail, telephone and face-to-face interview, 920 postnatal women were approached to take part in a survey on the acceptability of the EPDS, including 601 women who had screened positive for depression and 245 who had received DSM-IV diagnoses of depression. Acceptability was measured on a 5-point Likert scale of comfort ranging from "Not Comfortable", through "Comfortable" to "Very Comfortable". Results The response rate was just over half for postal surveys (52% and was 100% for telephone and face-to-face surveys (432, 21 and 26 respondents for postal, telephone and face-to-face surveys respectively making 479 respondents in total. Of these, 81.2% indicated that screening with the EPDS had been in the range of "Comfortable" to "Very Comfortable". The other 18.8 % rated screening below the "Comfortable" point, including a small fraction (4.3% who rated answering questions on the EPDS as "Not Comfortable" at the extreme end of the scale. Comfort was inversely related to EPDS score, but the absolute size of this effect was small. Almost all respondents (97% felt that screening was desirable. Conclusion The EPDS had good acceptability in this study for depressed and non-depressed women. Women's views on the desirability of postnatal depression screening appear to be largely independent of personal level of comfort with screening. These results should be useful to policy-makers and are broadly supportive of the Edinburgh Postnatal

  6. Validity and Acceptability of Kimberley Mum’s Mood Scale to Screen for Perinatal Anxiety and Depression in Remote Aboriginal Health Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Jayne; Engelke, Catherine; Williams, Melissa; Stephen, Donna; Coutinho, Sudha; Trust, Stephanie K.

    2017-01-01

    Background The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is widely recommended for perinatal anxiety and depression screening. However, many Aboriginal women find EPDS language complex and confusing, and providers find using it with Aboriginal women challenging. The two part Kimberley Mum’s Mood Scale (KMMS) was developed to improve screening: Part 1 is a Kimberley version of EPDS; Part 2 is a psychosocial tool that enables contextualisation of Part 1 scores. We aimed to determine if KMMS is a valid and acceptable method of identifying Kimberley Aboriginal perinatal women at risk of anxiety or depressive disorders compared to a semi-structured clinical interview. Methods Across 15 sites in the Kimberley, Western Australia, 97 Aboriginal women aged 16 years and older who intended to continue with their pregnancy or had a baby within the previous 12 months were administered the KMMS by trained healthcare providers who provided an overall assessment of no, low, moderate or high risk; 91 participants were then independently assessed by a blinded clinical expert using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria. A qualitative approach was used to determine KMMS’ acceptability. Results Part 1 had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha, 0.89), and overall KMMS risk equivalence for screening for anxiety or depressive disorders was moderate (sensitivity, 83%; specificity, 87%; positive predictive value, 68%). Participants found the process easy and useful, and healthcare providers found KMMS more useful than EPDS. Part 2 allowed healthcare providers to ask questions that gave participants an opportunity to express themselves, resulting in a deeper understanding between them. Conclusion KMMS is an effective tool for identifying Kimberley Aboriginal perinatal women at risk of anxiety and depressive disorders. Adoption of KMMS with culturally safe training and support is likely to improve screening processes, and with further

  7. Validity and Acceptability of Kimberley Mum's Mood Scale to Screen for Perinatal Anxiety and Depression in Remote Aboriginal Health Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Julia V; Kotz, Jayne; Engelke, Catherine; Williams, Melissa; Stephen, Donna; Coutinho, Sudha; Trust, Stephanie K

    2017-01-01

    The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is widely recommended for perinatal anxiety and depression screening. However, many Aboriginal women find EPDS language complex and confusing, and providers find using it with Aboriginal women challenging. The two part Kimberley Mum's Mood Scale (KMMS) was developed to improve screening: Part 1 is a Kimberley version of EPDS; Part 2 is a psychosocial tool that enables contextualisation of Part 1 scores. We aimed to determine if KMMS is a valid and acceptable method of identifying Kimberley Aboriginal perinatal women at risk of anxiety or depressive disorders compared to a semi-structured clinical interview. Across 15 sites in the Kimberley, Western Australia, 97 Aboriginal women aged 16 years and older who intended to continue with their pregnancy or had a baby within the previous 12 months were administered the KMMS by trained healthcare providers who provided an overall assessment of no, low, moderate or high risk; 91 participants were then independently assessed by a blinded clinical expert using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria. A qualitative approach was used to determine KMMS' acceptability. Part 1 had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha, 0.89), and overall KMMS risk equivalence for screening for anxiety or depressive disorders was moderate (sensitivity, 83%; specificity, 87%; positive predictive value, 68%). Participants found the process easy and useful, and healthcare providers found KMMS more useful than EPDS. Part 2 allowed healthcare providers to ask questions that gave participants an opportunity to express themselves, resulting in a deeper understanding between them. KMMS is an effective tool for identifying Kimberley Aboriginal perinatal women at risk of anxiety and depressive disorders. Adoption of KMMS with culturally safe training and support is likely to improve screening processes, and with further validation may have broader applicability across

  8. Internet administration of the Edinburgh Depression Scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, V.; Nyklicek, I.; Cuijpers, P.; Pop, V.

    2008-01-01

    Background Internet-based screening for depression is becoming increasingly important. The aim of this study is to validate the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) for internet administration. Methods In 407 participants (64% women; 36% men) with subthreshold depression (mean age = 55 years; S.D. = 4.9

  9. 产后抑郁筛查量表中文版在产后抑郁筛查中的应用%Application of the Chinese version of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale in the screening of postpartum depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高明; 王智慧; 傅晓红; 陆丽艳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the value of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS)and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS)in the screening of postpartum depression.Methods A total of 378women within 42 days postpartum completed PDSS,the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS)and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders-Patient Edition (SCID-I/P).The SCID-I/P was regarded the standard for postpartum depression diagnosis.Results The cut-of score for PDSS and EPDS was 76 and 13,respectively.Sensitivity of PDSS was 92.00%,and specificity was 95.25%,with positive predictive value of 77.02% and negative predictive value of 99.01%.Sensitivity of EPDS was 82.30%,and specificity was 81.33%,with positive predictive value of 44.73% and negative predictive value of 97.30%.The sensitivity,specificity and positive predictive value showed significantly difference between PDSS and EPDS (P<0.05),and negative predictive value had no statistical significant differece.Conclusion PDSS scale is more suitable for screening postpartum depression than EPDS scale.%目的 比较产后抑郁筛查量表(PDSS)和爱丁堡产后抑郁量表(EPDS)在产后抑郁筛查中的应用价值.方法 分别采用PDSS、爱丁堡产后抑郁量表(EPDS)及美国精神障碍诊断与统计手册第4版轴Ⅰ障碍定式临床检查患者版(SCID-I/P)对378例产后42 d的妇女进行评定,以SCID-I/P作为产后抑郁诊断标准.结果 将两种量表的临界值分别界定为76分和13分.PDSS的敏感性为92.00%,特异性为95.25%,阳性预测值为77.02%,阴性预测值为99.01%;EPDS的敏感性为82.26%,特异性为81.33%,阳性预测值为44.73%,阴性预测值为97.30%.两种量表特异性和敏感性差异比较有统计学意义(P<0.05).PDSS与EPDS阳性预测值比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),阴性预测值比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 与EPDS比较,PDSS更适合产后抑郁的筛查.

  10. Rating scales in general practice depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Paykel, Eugene; Sireling, Lester

    2015-01-01

    within major depressive disorder. The CID was compared to the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17). METHODS: 146 patients from a previous study in general practice with the CID were investigated. The item response theory model established by Rasch was used to investigate the scalability (a scale......׳s psychometric adequacy) of the subscales, and principal component analysis was used to identify subsyndromes with the symptoms of major depression according to DSM-5 or ICD-10. RESULTS: Whereas the HAM-D17 was found not to have an acceptable scalability, the three brief CID subscales for depression (six items......), anxiety (five items), and apathy (five items) all had an acceptable scalability. Within the major depressive symptoms, principal component analysis identified the CID items of hypersomnia, increased appetite or weight gain as defining the subsyndrome of atypical depression. In total 29 patients...

  11. Couple comorbidity and correlates of postnatal depressive symptoms in mothers and fathers in the first two weeks following delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anding, Jana Eos; Röhrle, Bernd; Grieshop, Melita; Schücking, Beate; Christiansen, Hanna

    2016-01-15

    Postnatal depression affects a significant number of parents; however, its co-occurrence in mothers and fathers has not been studied extensively. Identifying predictors and correlates of postnatal depressive symptoms can help develop effective interventions. Questionnaires on several socio-demographic and psychosocial factors were administered to 276 couples within two weeks after birth. Depressive symptoms in mothers and fathers were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). After calculating the correlation coefficient between mothers and fathers' EPDS scores, univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to identify significant correlates of postnatal depressive symptoms in mothers and fathers. Prevalence of maternal and paternal postnatal depressive symptoms was 15.9% (EPDS>12) and 5.4% (EPDS>10), respectively. There was a moderate positive correlation between mothers and fathers' EPDS scores (r=.30, pparental stress was the strongest predictor for maternal and paternal postnatal depressive symptoms. Pregnancy- and birth-related distress and partners' EPDS scores were also associated with depressive symptoms in both parents. Relationship satisfaction was only inversely related with fathers' EPDS scores, while mothers' EPDS scores were additionally associated with critical life events, history of childhood violence, and birth-related physiological complaints. Since information about participation rates (those who declined) is unavailable, we cannot rule out sampling bias. Further, some psychosocial factors were assessed using single items. Since co-occurrence of depressive symptoms in mothers and fathers is high, developing and evaluating postnatal depression interventions for couples may be beneficial. Interventions to reduce parenting stress may help prevent parental postnatal depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 两种筛查量表早期发现产后抑郁的效果对比%Comparison of two screening scales in screening postpartum depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘梅; 廖少玲; 文若兰

    2012-01-01

    目的 比较产后抑郁筛查量表(PDSS)和爱丁堡产后抑郁量表(EPDS)在产后抑郁筛查中的应用价值.方法 采用PDSS、EPDS及美国精神障碍诊断与统计手册第4版轴Ⅰ障碍定式临床检查患者版(SCID-I/P)同时对445名产后6周的妇女进行评定,以SCID-I/P作为产后抑郁诊断金标准.结果 两种量表的临界值分别为74分和10分.PDSS的灵敏度(93.33%)和特异度(94.75%)的组合较好.PDSS与EPDS的ROC曲线下面积分别为0.978和0.872,差异均有统计学意义(P均<0.05).结论 与EPDS相比,PDSS具有较好的筛检价值,是早期发现产后抑郁患者的简单、快速、准确的筛查工具.%Objective To compare the value of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS)and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale(EPDS) in the screening of postpartum depression.Methods A total of 445 women within 6 weeks postpartum completed PDSS,EPDS and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders-Patient Edition (SCID-I/P).The SCID-I/P was regarded as the gold standard for postpartum depression diagnosis.Results The cut-off score for PDSS and EPDS was 74 and 10,respectively.PDSS achieved the higher combination of sensitivity ( 93.33% ) and specifity ( 94.75% ).The area under the curve for PDSS and EPDS was 0.978 and 0.872,respectively ( P < 0.05 ).Conclusions Compared with EPDS,PDSS has a higher screening value.It is a simple,fast and accurate screening tool for postpartum depression.

  13. Internet administration of the Edinburgh Depression Scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, V.; Nyklicek, I.; Cuijpers, P.; Pop, V.

    2008-01-01

    .001). A major limitation is that the study was conducted without a control group of healthy subjects. Conclusion The psychometric properties of the internet-administered EDS are comparable to those of the paper and pencil EDS. Keywords: Edinburgh Depression Scale; Psychometric properties; Internet

  14. Concurrent Validity of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory Depression Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joel O.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Compared two new measures of depression (Millon Multiaxial Inventory Dysthymia and Major Depression subscales) with two established instruments: Beck Depression Inventory, a self-report measure which emphasizes the cognitive-affective aspects of depression, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, an interview measure that emphasizes somatic…

  15. Development of an Interview-Based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Christine; Scogin, Forrest

    1992-01-01

    Developed interview-based Geriatric Depression Rating Scale (GDRS) and administered 35-item GDRS to 68 older adults with range of affective disturbance. Found scale to have internal consistency and split-half reliability comparable to those of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Geriatric Depression Scale. Concurrent validity, construct…

  16. Relationship between social support during pregnancy and postpartum depressive state: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Mako; Okada, Takashi; Ando, Masahiko; Aleksic, Branko; Kunimoto, Shohko; Nakamura, Yukako; Kubota, Chika; Uno, Yota; Tamaji, Ai; Hayakawa, Norika; Furumura, Kaori; Shiino, Tomoko; Morita, Tokiko; Ishikawa, Naoko; Ohoka, Harue; Usui, Hinako; Banno, Naomi; Murase, Satomi; Goto, Setsuko; Kanai, Atsuko; Masuda, Tomoko; Ozaki, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Although the association between social support and postpartum depression has been previously investigated, its causal relationship remains unclear. Therefore, we examined prospectively whether social support during pregnancy affected postpartum depression. Social support and depressive symptoms were assessed by Japanese version of Social Support Questionnaire (J-SSQ) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), among 877 pregnant women in early pregnancy and at one month postpartum. First, J-SSQ was standardized among peripartum women. The J-SSQ was found to have a two-factor structure, with Number and Satisfaction subscales, by exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Analysis of covariance was performed to examine how EPDS and J-SSQ scores during pregnancy affected the EPDS score at postpartum. Significant associations were found between postpartum EPDS score and both EPDS and total scores on the Number subscales during pregnancy (β = 0.488 and -0.054, ps supportive persons during pregnancy helps protect against postpartum depression, and that this effect is greater in depressive than non-depressive pregnant women. This finding is expected to be vitally important in preventive interventions.

  17. Validation of the Edinburgh Depression Scale during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Veerle; Kooistra, Libbe; Lambregtse-van den Berg, Mijke P.; Wijnen, Henny; Bunevicius, Robertas; van Baar, Anneloes; Pop, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Background: Untreated depression during pregnancy may have adverse outcomes for the mother and her child. Screening for depression in the general pregnant population is thus recommended. The Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) is widely used for postpartum depression screening. There is no consensus on

  18. Clinical and psychometric validation of the psychotic depression assessment scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Pedersen, Christina H; Uggerby, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have indicated that the 11-item Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS), consisting of the 6-item melancholia subscale (HAM-D6) of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and 5 psychosis items from the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), is a valid measure for the ...

  19. Impact of a high Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score on obstetric and perinatal outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaratne, Pathmila; Foo, Xin Y; Kumar, Sailesh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to characterise intrapartum and neonatal outcomes in women with an antenatally recorded Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Score (EPDS) ≤ 9 compared with women with a score of ≥12 at a major Australian tertiary maternity hospital. Women with scores ≥12 are at particularly high risk of major depressive symptomatology. There were 20512 (78.6%) women with a score ≤ 9 and 2708 (10.4%) had a score ≥ 12. Category 1 caesarean sections where there was immediate threat to life (maternal or fetal) were more common in women with EPDS scores ≥12 (5.2% vs. 4.3%, OR 1.24 95% CI 1.03–1.49, p = 0.024). Pre-term birth (birth weights birth (34.4% vs. 30.6%, p < 0.001) and neonatal death (0.48% vs. 0.13%, OR 2.52 95% CI 1.2–5.0, p < 0.001) were higher in babies of these women. These results suggest poorer intrapartum and neonatal outcomes for women with high EPDS scores. PMID:27658526

  20. Measuring depression in women around menopausal age. Towards a validation of the Edinburgh Depression Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becht, M.C.; van Erp, C.F.; Teeuwisse, T.M.; van Heck, G.L.; van Son, M.J.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Background: The relationship between menopause and depression is still rather unclear. Studies using different methodology especially those lacking a clear definition of depression are hardly comparable. Since the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) is not influenced by (menopause-related) somatic symp

  1. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kathryn Betts; Matto, Holly C.; Sanders, Sara

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) is widely used in clinical and research settings to screen older adults for depressive symptoms. Although several exploratory factor analytic structures have been proposed for the scale, no independent confirmation has been made available that would enable investigators to confidently identify scores…

  2. Aspectos epidemiológicos da depressão pós-parto em amostra brasileira Postpartum depression epidemiology in a Brazilian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Enrico Cabral Ruschi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Sintomas psiquiátricos são freqüentes após o parto, momento marcado por alterações hormonais e mudanças no caráter social, na organização familiar e na identidade feminina. A Escala de Depressão Pós-Parto de Edimburgo (EPDS é instrumento de auto-avaliação para rastrear depressão após a gestação, nem sempre adequadamente reconhecida pelos profissionais de saúde. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar prevalência de depressão pós-parto em mulheres atendidas em unidades básicas de saúde. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com aplicação da EPDS em 292 mulheres que se encontravam entre 31 e 180 dias após o parto. Adotamos o ponto de corte INTRODUCTION: Psychiatric symptoms are frequent in the postpartum period, a moment marked by hormonal alterations and changes in social character, family organization and women's identity. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is a self-reporting instrument to track depression after pregnancy, unfortunately not always properly supported by health care professionals. This study aimed at verifying the prevalence of postpartum depression in women receiving care at basic health units. METHODS: Cross-sectional study including 292 women in the postpartum period (from day 31 to 180 who answered the EPDS questionnaire. Cut-off point < 12 for EPDS depression was used. RESULTS: A total of 115 women (39.4% had scores < 12 in EPDS, classified as depressive; 177 (60.6% had scores < 12 and were not considered depressive. Women with lower education, higher number of pregnancies, higher parity, higher number of live children and shortest relationship time had more depression. CONCLUSION: High frequency of postpartum depression is associated with social factors, which shows the importance of health care professionals in early detection of depression, with the aid of instruments such as EPDS, due to its efficacy and practicability.

  3. Development and Validation of a Screening Scale for Depression in Korea: The Lee and Rhee Depression Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Seon Hee; Rhee, Min Kyu; Kang, Rhee Hun; Lee, Hwa Young; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Young Sun; Lee, Min Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop a culturally sensitive instrument that addressed how individuals express and experience depression to detect this disorder in Koreans. We also assessed the validity, reliability, and diagnostic utility of this scale (Lee and Rhee Depression Scale; LRDS). Methods The sample consisted of 3,697 normal adults selected from 12 administrative districts (Do) and 448 Korean patients diagnosed with depression using the Structured Clinical Interview for DS...

  4. Depression in France and Brazil: factorial structure of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale in inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida; Chaves, Márcia Lorena Fagundes; Poirier-Littré, Marie France; Bourdel, Marie Chantal; Loo, Henri; Guelfi, Julien Daniel

    2004-02-01

    Among various research strategies for depression, the cross-cultural approach is a useful tool to investigate depressive disorders. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was applied to 130 depressed inpatients in France and Brazil. Items were factorized by principal component analysis with Varimax rotation using the Kaiser or simulation method for factor sorting. Three factors were obtained in France, and four in Brazil. The first factor includes the core symptoms of depression in both samples. Qualitative and quantitative differences appeared in the anxiety factor between Brazilian and French samples. Insomnia items appeared as another factor for both groups. A limitation of this study is that it was conducted with small inpatient samples. Principal component analysis of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression for depressive inpatients in these two countries showed a similar structure. Differences observed were in the way anxiety items were distributed.

  5. Delusional experience awareness gap between patients and treating doctors - Self-reported EPDS questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemoto, Kousuke; Tsuda, Hisamitsu; Goji, Hiroko; Tadokoro, Yukari; Oshima, Tomohiro; Tachimori, Hisateru; DeToffol, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    Although early and rapid recognition of a psychotic trend in patients with epilepsy certainly pay dividends, there is no handy assessment instrument for screening because of multiple intrinsic difficulties such as lack of a standard screener as well as a reliability gap for screeners between help-seeking and general populations. On the other hand, the predominance of positive symptoms at the initial stage of psychosis is a promising aspect of this specific group. The following specific questions were examined. Is there a measurable difference between the assessment of the treating doctor and the real feelings of the patient? How well does the attained score correspond to the clinical diagnosis? The self-reported Emotions with Persecutory Delusions Scale (EPDS) questionnaire, previously validated in a general population, was used as the assessment tool for psychotic trend in 79 outpatients with epilepsy. Independent from scoring by the patients, the treating doctors also expressed their impressions about the same patients using the same scoring tool. Stepwise multiple regression analysis of the EPDS scores of both doctors and patients revealed that a clinical diagnosis of psychosis was the only independent variable significantly related to EPDS score. Also, there was a significant difference between the EPDS scores of the patients and those of the doctors, in favor of the former. Clinical diagnosis of psychosis proved to be the most powerful determinant of EPDS score independent from other clinical factors. The awareness gap between doctors and patients based on EPDS score revealed that treating doctors often clearly underestimate the psychotic trend of their patients. Our findings suggest that such simple tests as EPDS, with a narrow focus on attenuated delusional symptoms, may help screen for an early psychotic episode in patients with epilepsy that may otherwise not be diagnosed by their physicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Poor sleep maintenance and subjective sleep quality are associated with postpartum maternal depression symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eliza M; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Stickgold, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Women are at increased risk of developing mood disorders during the postpartum period, and poor postpartum sleep may be a modifiable risk factor for the development of depression. This longitudinal study investigated the relationship between sleep variables and postpartum depression symptoms using wrist actigraphy and self-report surveys. Twenty-five healthy primiparous women were recruited from their outpatient obstetricians' offices from July 2009 through March 2010. Subjects wore wrist actigraphs for 1 week during the third trimester of pregnancy and again during the 2nd, 6th, 10th, and 14th weeks postpartum while completing sleep logs and sleep surveys. Subjective assessments of mood were collected at the end of each actigraph week. Subjective sleep assessments were strongly predictive of depression severity scores as measured by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) across all weeks (p measures of sleep maintenance, such as sleep fragmentation, sleep efficiency, and wake time after sleep onset, were also significantly correlated with EPDS scores postpartum. However, there was no relationship between nocturnal sleep duration and EPDS scores. This study provides additional evidence that poor sleep maintenance as measured by wrist actigraphy, rather than lesser amounts of sleep, is associated with EPDS scores during the postpartum period and that subjective assessments of sleep may be more accurate predictors of postpartum depression symptoms than wrist actigraphy. It also supports the hypothesis that disrupted sleep may contribute to the development and extent of postpartum depression symptoms.

  7. Prepregnancy body mass index, gestational weight gain, and elevated depressive symptoms in a Hispanic cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertel, Karen A; Silveira, Marushka L; Pekow, Penelope S; Dole, Nancy; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    Our objective was to assess the associations among prepregnancy Body Mass Index (BMI), gestational weight gain (GWG), and elevated depressive symptoms across pregnancy. We evaluated these associations among 1,090 participants in Proyecto Buena Salud, a prospective cohort study of Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) women in Western Massachusetts. BMI and GWG were self-reported; GWG was classified according to the 2009 Institute of Medicine guidelines. Depressive symptoms were assessed in early, mid-, and late pregnancy using the 10-item Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). We defined elevated depressive symptoms as EPDS scores ≥13 and ≥15. In multivariable, longitudinal modeling, overweight (25.0 to <30 kg/m2) women had an odds ratio of 0.53 (95% CI [0.31, 0.90]) for EPDS scores ≥13 and 0.51 (95% CI [0.28, 0.91]) for EPDS scores ≥15 compared to normal weight women. We did not observe an association between GWG or an interaction between BMI and GWG, in predicting elevated depressive symptoms. Our findings provide preliminary support for an association of prepregnancy overweight status and lower depressive symptoms across pregnancy in Hispanic women. Future research should focus on potential social and cultural differences in perceptions of weight and weight gain in the perinatal period and how these influence psychological health. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Correlation Between the Great East Japan Earthquake and Postpartum Depression: A Study in Miyako, Iwate, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigori, Hidekazu; Sasaki, Michiho; Obara, Taku; Nishigori, Toshie; Ishikuro, Mami; Metoki, Hirohito; Sugawara, Junichi; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Hosoyachi, Akira; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshizumi, Noboru

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the correlation between the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and postpartum depression among perinatal subjects in the Miyako region of Iwate, an area damaged by earthquakes and tsunamis. We retrospectively compared the percentages of women with scores ≥9 on the Japanese version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) among 3 groups of women who gave birth prior to the disaster (before-disaster group: n=141), within 3 months after the disaster (within-3-months group: n=70), and 4-6 months after the disaster (4-6-months group: n=89) at the Iwate Prefectural Miyako Hospital. The risk factors for EPDS scores ≥9 were estimated with multivariate logistic regression analyses. Compared with the before-disaster group, a significantly greater number of women in the within-3-months group had EPDS scores ≥9 at hospital discharge (31.4% versus 9.9%, PJapan Earthquake among perinatal women.

  9. The role of pterins and related factors in the biology of early postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Saleh, M T; Ghubash, R; Karim, L; Krymski, M; Anderson, D N

    1999-06-01

    Plasma tryptophan and other putative amino acids, cortisol, folate and vitamin B12 and urinary biopterin (B) and neopterins (N) were measured in three groups of women: 62 women in the early postpartum period, 23 pregnant and 38 non-gravid controls. Sixty-two postpartum women were screened for depression by the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS) on day 7 after delivery. Postpartum women had significantly lower tryptophan, vitamin B12 and significantly greater levels of cortisol, folate, neopterins and biopterins than controls. Comparisons between women who were classified on the EPDS as cases and non-cases revealed only a statistically significant difference for lower N:B (Plow tryptophan to increased EPDS which also showed significant correlations with low methionine, low tyrosine, low N:B ratio and high vitamin B12.

  10. Accounting for discovery bias in genomic EPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomics has contributed substantially to genetic improvement of beef cattle. The implementation is through computation of genomically enhanced expected progeny differences (GE-EPD), which are predictions of genetic merit of individual animals based on genomic information, pedigree, and data on the ...

  11. Rating scales measuring the severity of psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, S D; Rothschild, A J; Flint, A J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Unipolar psychotic depression (PD) is a severe and debilitating syndrome, which requires intensive monitoring. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of the rating scales used to assess illness severity in PD. METHOD: Selective review of publications reporting results...... into the following categories: (i) rating scales predominantly covering depressive symptoms, (ii) rating scales predominantly covering psychotic symptoms, (iii) rating scales covering delusions, and (iv) rating scales covering PD. For the vast majority of the scales, the clinical and psychometric validity had...... not been tested empirically. The only exception from this general tendency was the 11-item Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS), which was developed specifically to assess the severity of PD. CONCLUSION: In PD, the PDAS represents the only empirically derived rating scale for the measurement...

  12. The Validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Mondolo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the concurrent validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS against the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Ham-D in patients with Parkinson’ disease (PD. Forty-six non-demented PD patients were assessed by a neurologist on the Ham-D. Patients also completed four mood rating scales: the HADS, the GDS, the VAS and the Face Scale. For the HADS and the GDS, Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC curves were obtained and the positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV were calculated for different cut-off scores. Maximum discrimination between depressed and non-depressed PD patients was reached at a cut-off score of 10/11 for both the HADS and the GDS. At the same cut-off score of 10/11 for both the HADS and the GDS, the high sensitivity and NPV make these scales appropriate screening instruments for depression in PD. A high specificity and PPV, which is necessary for a diagnostic test, was reached at a cut-off score of 12/13 for the GDS and at a cut-off score of 11/12 for the HADS. The results indicate the validity of using the HADS and the GDS to screen for depressive symptoms and to diagnose depressive illness in PD.

  13. Perinatal Depression and Patterns of Attachment: A Critical Risk Factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Meuti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aims to verify if the presence and severity of perinatal depression are related to any particular pattern of attachment. Methods. The study started with a screening of a sample of 453 women in their third trimester of pregnancy, who were administered a survey data form, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS and the Experience in Close Relationship (ECR. A clinical group of subjects with perinatal depression (PND, 89 subjects was selected and compared with a control group (C, regarding psychopathological variables and attachment patterns. Results. The ECR showed a prevalence of “Fearful-Avoidant” attachment style in PND group (29.2% versus 1.1%, p<0.001; additionally, the EPDS average score increases with the increasing of ECR dimensions (Avoidance and Anxiety. Conclusion. The severity of depression increases proportionally to attachment disorganization; therefore, we consider attachment as both an important risk factor as well as a focus for early psychotherapeutic intervention.

  14. Measurement invariance of the depressive symptoms scale during adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M.; Chaiton, Michael; Low, Nancy CP; Contreras, Gisèle; Barnett, Tracie A.,; O’Loughlin, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Background This study examined (1) the factor structure of a depressive symptoms scale (DSS), (2) the sex and longitudinal invariance of the DSS, and (3) the predictive validity of the DSS scale during adolescence in terms of predicting depression and anxiety symptoms in early adulthood. Methods Data were drawn from the Nicotine Dependence in Teens (NDIT) study, an ongoing prospective cohort study of 1,293 adolescents. Results The analytical sample included 527 participants who provided compl...

  15. Barriers to access to treatment for mothers with postpartum depression in primary health care centers: a predictive model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective to develop a predictive model to evaluate the factors that modify the access to treatment for Postpartum Depression (PPD. Methods prospective study with mothers who participated in the monitoring of child health in primary care centers. For the initial assessment and during 3 months, it was considered: sociodemographic data, gyneco-obstetric data, data on the services provided, depressive symptoms according to the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS and quality of life according to the Short Form-36 Health Status Questionnaire (SF-36. The diagnosis of depression was made based on MINI. Mothers diagnosed with PPD in the initial evaluation, were followed-up. Results a statistical model was constructed to determine the factors that prevented access to treatment, which consisted of: item 2 of EPDS (OR 0.43, 95%CI: 0.20-0.93 and item 5 (OR 0.48, 95%CI: 0.21-1.09, and previous history of depression treatment (OR 0.26, 95%CI: 0.61-1.06. Area under the ROC curve for the model=0.79; p-value for the Hosmer-Lemershow=0.73. Conclusion it was elaborated a simple, well standardized and accurate profile, which advises that nurses should pay attention to those mothers diagnosed with PPD, presenting low/no anhedonia (item 2 of EPDS, scarce/no panic/fear (item 5 of EPDS, and no history of depression, as it is likely that these women do not initiate treatment.

  16. Characteristics of depression in Parkinson's disease: evaluating with Zung's Self-Rating Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Fumio; Oishi, Kenichi; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kuga, Atsushi; Kobessho, Hiroshi; Shirafuji, Toshihiko; Higuchi, Masatsugu; Ishihara, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to elucidate characteristics of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fifty-eight PD patients were evaluated with Zung's Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Scores for "suicidal ideation" on the SDS correlated with posture and gait disturbances on the UPDRS. Twenty-six patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) were also evaluated with the SDS. SDS scores for "indecisiveness" and "constipation" were significantly higher in PD patients than SCD patients. Our results suggest that depression is common in disabled persons but PD patients might have a characteristic clinical presentation.

  17. The Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale: Psychometric Properties in Depressed Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Gregory M.; Park, Jong-Hyo; Essex, Marilyn J.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Silva, Susan G.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Curry, John F.; Feeny, Norah C.; Kennard, Betsy; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Pathak, Sanjeev; Reinecke, Mark A.; Rosenberg, David R.; Weller, Elizabeth B.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties and factor structure of the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale were examined in a sample of 422 male and female adolescents (ages 12-17) with current major depressive disorder. The scale demonstrated high internal consistency ([alpha] = 0.93) and correlated significantly with self-report and interview-based measures of…

  18. Rasch Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale--Short Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Karl S.; Green, Kathy E.; Cox, Enid O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine scale dimensionality, reliability, invariance, targeting, continuity, cutoff scores, and diagnostic use of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF) over time with a sample of 177 English-speaking U.S. elders. Design and Methods: An item response theory, Rasch analysis, was conducted with…

  19. Rasch Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale--Short Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Karl S.; Green, Kathy E.; Cox, Enid O.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine scale dimensionality, reliability, invariance, targeting, continuity, cutoff scores, and diagnostic use of the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-SF) over time with a sample of 177 English-speaking U.S. elders. Design and Methods: An item response theory, Rasch analysis, was conducted with…

  20. Postpartum depression among women who have experienced intimate partner violence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogathi, Jane J; Manongi, Rachael; Mushi, Declare

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Post-partum depression (PPD) in many low-income countries, including Tanzania, is not well recognized, and the underlying predictors and causes of PPD remain unclear. Results from previous studies suggest that PPD is associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) experienced during...... Depression Scale (EPDS) and self-reported IPV experiences were assessed using structured questions adopted from the WHO's Multi-country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence; 3) Assessment for postpartum depression using EPDS was repeated at 40 days post-partum. Data were analyzed using bivariate.......10; 95% CI: 2.04-4.40) as compared to those women who were not exposed to IPV during their pregnancy. Stratified analyses showed that this risk of PPD was highest among younger women (aged 18-24 years) who were exposed to physical violence (AOR=3.75; 95% CI: 1.21-11.67). Among women exposed to emotional...

  1. [Evidence-based management of perinatal depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Yueh; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2008-04-01

    Perinatal depression, which may occur from pregnancy to one year after childbirth, is recognized by the World Health Organization as a significant health issue affecting women. Depression during the perinatal period can have enormous consequences, not only affecting the health of the woman herself but also influencing her interaction with her children and other family members. This article introduces several depression screening tools and evidence-based nonpharmacological managements of perinatal depression. There are some fairly valid and feasible screening methods, among which routinely screening perinatal women with EPDS (Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale) or BDI (Beck Depression Inventory) in the primary care setting is practicable. A survey of the limited literature available reveals that interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive behavior therapy and listening to music provide quantifiable depression amelioration effects for perinatal women. More scientific research moderated by women's life experiences and preferences should be conducted, however, and applied to improve women's health.

  2. Attitude scale and general health questionnaire subscales predict depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Afshar, Hamid; Doost, Hamid Taher Neshat; Mousavi, Seyed Ghafur; Moolavi, Hoseyn

    2012-01-01

    According to Beck theory, dysfunctional attitude has a central role in emergence of depression. The aim of this study was to determine contributions of dysfunctional attitude and general health index to depression. In this case-control study, two groups of subjects participated. The first group consisted of 65 patients with major depression and dysthymic disorder, who were recruited from Noor and Navab Safavi Psychiatry Clinics in Isfahan. The control group was consisted of 65 non-patient individuals who were accompanied or relatives of the patients and was matched with them based on age, sex and education. Both groups completed 26-item Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS-26) and 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Logistic regression and correlation methods were applied for statistical analysis. Logistic regression analysis showed that by an increase of one level in categorized DAS-26 scores and one score in the physical symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and depression subscales of GHQ-28 the risk of depression increase by 6.8, 1.6, 1.9, 3.7, 4.78 times, respectively. Capability of dysfunctional attitude and general health subscales to predict depression supports the Beck's cognitive diathesis stress theory of depression that dysfunctional attitude may be a predisposing risk factor for depression.

  3. Inpatients with major depressive disorder: Psychometric properties of the new Multidimensional Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darharaj, Mohammad; Habibi, Mojtaba; Power, Michael J; Farzadian, Farzaneh; Rahimi, Maesoumeh; Kholghi, Habibeh; Kazemitabar, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    The New Multi-dimensional Depression Scale (NMDS) is one of the most comprehensive scales that measures depression symptoms in four domains, including emotional, cognitive, somatic, and interpersonal. This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the NMDS in a group of Iranian inpatients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). At first, the scale was translated into Persian and used as part of a battery consisting of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). The battery was administered to 271 inpatients with MDD (90 men and 181 women) aged from 18 to 60 who had been referred to psychiatric hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Persian version of the NMDS upheld its original four-factor structure. Moreover, the results showed its good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient ranging from 0.70 for the emotional subscale to 0.83 for the interpersonal subscale). In addition, the NMDS scores were correlated with other constructs in empirically and theoretically expected ways, which provides evidence for the convergent (positive significant relationships with anxiety and cognitive and somatic-affective symptoms of depression) and divergent (negative significant relationships with happiness and mental health and physical health) validity of the scale. These findings supported the Persian version of the NMDS as a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of depression symptoms in patients with MDD.

  4. Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS: A Tool for Assessment of Depression in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana A. Kakrani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is in the process of rapid demographic progression of increased life expectancy and aging with geriatric population of 7.2 percent which is estimated to rise to 20 percent in 2050. With increasing geriatric population elderly with dementia and associated depressive illness are expected to rise in number to almost an epidemic. Among the morbidity encountered in elderly, depressive disorders are common. Aim & Objectives: The present study was conducted with the objective to assess the extent and degree of depression in elderly, and study some correlates associated with depression in them. Material & Methods: The study was carried out at geriatric clinic of Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Pune under the guidance of department of community medicine. Methodology:The randomly selected elderly above the age of 60 years attending the clinic and willing to participate in study were administered the questionnaire of Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, scores were given, based on which the subjects were categorized as mild, moderate and severe. Those with score >5 were considered as suggestive of depression and some factors studied were analysed to find out their association with depression. Results: It was revealed that the proportion of elderly having depression was 52.4% with 84.6% of depressed in age group of 76-80 years. Moderate to severe type was more commonly seen in illiterate; however some degree of depression was present in all elderly irrespective of literacy status. Moderate to severe type was seen more commonly in elderly living in nuclear families (23.8%, and living alone (33.3%. Thus more than half of elderly studied were having depression, and it was observed that as the age advanced the degree of depression significantly increased. Some of the factors studied like low education status, poor economic status, nuclear family status, single status, loneliness, were associated with depression. The GDS Scale can be considered as

  5. Postpartum depression: identifying associations with bipolarity and personality traits. Preliminary results from a cross-sectional study in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Dominika; Jaeschke, Rafał; Siwek, Marcin; Mączka, Grzegorz; Topór-Mądry, Roman; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2014-01-30

    The goals of this study have been to determine the prevalence of the bipolar spectrum features in the population of women with postpartum depression (PPD) symptoms, as well as to analyze the personality differences between putative 'unipolar' and 'bipolar' PPD subjects. The sample enrolled into the cross-sectional study consisted of 344 women at 6-12 weeks postpartum. The authors used the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; cut-off score: 13 pts.) for the assessment of the PPD symptoms, the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ; cut-off scores: 7 or 8 pts.) for diagnosing the bipolar features, and the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) for the assessment of personality traits. The EPDS-positive subjects were more likely to score positively on the MDQ, as compared to the EPDS-negative ones. The EPDS-positive subjects who also scored ≥8 pts. on the MDQ were characterized by higher index of neuroticism, as compared to those who scored positively on the EPDS only. The results suggest that the presence of PPD symptoms is related to significantly higher scores of bipolarity and neuroticism. The more robust trait of neuroticism might be a marker of the 'bipolar' PPD, as compared to the 'unipolar' form of the disorder.

  6. Discriminant possibilities of the Hamilton depression scale: ROC analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novović Zdenka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare discrimination power of original and reconstructed version of Hamilton’s depression scale in separation of depressive vs. anxious patients and to suggest some possibilities which offer ROC analysis. The subjects of the study were 119 patients of Psychiatric clinic in Novi Sad. 67 of them were diagnosed with some of the forms of affective disorders and 52 with an anxious-phobic diagnosis. Results of ROC analysis suggest that both instruments can be used in distinguishing depressive from anxious patients, but reconstructed version shows greater sensitivity and specificity with optimal cut-off score. It also has more significant AUC, which refers to probability of prediction on the basis of the whole spectrum of the results. These data is commented in relation with current debates, between unitaristic and pluralistic oriented authors, about the nature of the anxious-depression relationship.

  7. The Hamilton depression scale. Evaluation of objectivity using logistic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, P; Allerup, P; Gram, L F; Reisby, N; Rosenberg, R; Jacobsen, O; Nagy, A

    1981-03-01

    The consistency of the Hamilton Depression Scale (HDS) as a measure of the severity of depressive states has been examined when the scale was used weekly during a trial when imipramine. By use of logistic models (Rasch) the consistency of the HDS has been considered across patient-variables as age, sex, plasma levels of imipramine, and diagnosis. The results showed that the original 17-item HDS was without adequate consistency, i.e. the total score of the sample of items was no one-dimensional measure of depressive states. However, a melancholia subscale of the HDS contained items the total of which can be used to compare patients quantitatively, although in some part of the analysis one of these items showed ceiling effect. It was concluded that the melancholia subscale (containing the items depressed mood, guilt, work and interests, retardation, psychic anxiety, and general somatic symptoms) can form the basis for further improvements in the field of quantitative rating scales for depressive states.

  8. Mokken scaling analysis of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in individuals with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosco, Theodore D; Doyle, Frank; Watson, Roger; Ward, Mark; McGee, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a prolifically used scale of anxiety and depression. The original bidimensional anxiety-depression latent structure of the HADS has come under significant scrutiny, with previous studies revealing one-, two-, three- and four-dimensional structures. The current study examines the latent structure of the HADS using a non-parametric item response theory method. Using data conglomerated from four independent studies of cardiovascular disease employing the HADS (n=893), Mokken scaling procedure was conducted to assess the latent structure of the HADS. A single scale consisting of 12 of 14 HADS items was revealed, indicating a unidimensional latent HADS structure. The HADS was initially intended to measure mutually exclusive levels of anxiety and depression; however, the current study indicates that a single dimension of general psychological distress is captured. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Reliability Generalization Study of the Geriatric Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Kevin M.; Reese, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a reliability generalization study of the Geriatric Depression Scale (T. Brink and others, 1982). Results from this investigation of 338 studies shows that the average score reliability across studies was 0.8482 and identifies the most important predictors of score reliability. (SLD)

  10. Exploratory Study of the Diagnostic Abilities of the Baptista Depression Scale Adult Version (EBADEP-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makilim Nunes Baptista

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study’s objective was to analyze the diagnostic capabilities of a depression screening scale. For that, this scale was administered along with two diagnostic instruments, namely, the structured clinical interview from the DSM-IV (SCID-CV and the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D, which are considered to be the gold standard for diagnosing depressive disorders. Participants were 22 subjects diagnosed by psychiatrists with Major Depressive Disorder. The EBADEP-A correctly identified cases of depression, showing a high correlation with the HAM-D, which indicates the scale correctly captures most depressive symptoms, even though it was initially used as a depression-screening tool.

  11. Depression, Social Support, and Coping Styles among Pregnant Women after the Lushan Earthquake in Ya'an, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Ren

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess the depression of pregnant women in the aftermath of an earthquake, and to identify the social support that they obtained, their coping styles and socio-demographic factors associated with depression.A total of 128 pregnant women from three hospitals in the epicenter area were recruited immediately after the Ya'an earthquake. Their depression was investigated using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS with a cutoff score of 14; the social support that they obtained was measured using the Social Support Questionnaire; and their coping styles were assessed using the Coping Styles Questionnaire.Immediately after the earthquake, the incidence rate of depression in pregnant women was 35.2%, higher than that of the general pregnant population (7%-14%. The EPDS scores were significantly correlated with gestation age at the time of the earthquake, objective support, subjective support, use of support, negative coping style, and positive coping style. The regression analysis indicated that risk factors of prenatal depression include the number of children, relatives wounded, subjective support, and coping styles. A further analysis of the interaction between social support and two types of coping styles with depression showed that there was interaction effect between subjective social support and positive coping styles in relation to EPDS scores. There was an inverse relationship between low EPDS scores and positive coping styles and high social support, and vice versa.The timing of the occurrence of the earthquake may not necessarily affect the progress of the illness and recovery from depression, and psychological intervention could be conducted in the immediate aftermath after the earthquake. The impact of coping styles on prenatal depression appeared to be linked with social support. Helping pregnant women to adopt positive coping styles with good social support after a recent major earthquake, which is a

  12. The impact of education, country, race and ethnicity on the self-report of postpartum depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Florio, A; Putnam, K; Altemus, M;

    2016-01-01

    cultural groups in a large international dataset. METHOD: Ordinal regression and measurement invariance were used to explore the association between culture, operationalized as education, ethnicity/race and continent, and endorsement of depressive symptoms using the EPDS on 8209 new mothers from Europe...... and the USA. RESULTS: Education, but not ethnicity/race, influenced the reporting of postpartum depression [difference between robust comparative fit indexes (∆*CFI) 0.01), but not between European countries (∆*CFI ... in expression of phenotype of postpartum depression that women of different educational backgrounds may manifest. The increasing cultural heterogeneity of societies together with the tendency towards globalization requires a culturally sensitive approach to patients, research and policies, that takes...

  13. Assessing depression related severity and functional impairment: the Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Ito

    Full Text Available The Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS is a brief, five-item measure for assessing the frequency and intensity of depressive symptoms, as well as functional impairments in pleasurable activities, work or school, and interpersonal relationships due to depression. Although this scale is expected to be useful in various psychiatric and mental health settings, the reliability, validity, and interpretability have not yet been fully examined. This study was designed to examine the reliability, factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity of a Japanese version of the ODSIS, as well as its ability to distinguish between individuals with and without a major depressive disorder diagnosis.From a pool of registrants at an internet survey company, 2830 non-clinical and clinical participants were selected randomly (619 with major depressive disorder, 619 with panic disorder, 576 with social anxiety disorder, 645 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 371 non-clinical panelists. Participants were asked to respond to the ODSIS and conventional measures of depression, functional impairment, anxiety, neuroticism, satisfaction with life, and emotion regulation.Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of three split subsamples indicated the unidimensional factor structure of ODSIS. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis showed invariance of factor loadings between non-clinical and clinical subsamples. The ODSIS also showed excellent internal consistency and test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients. Convergence and discriminance of the ODSIS with various measures were in line with our expectations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that the ODSIS was able to detect a major depressive syndrome accurately.This study supports the reliability and validity of ODSIS in a non-western population, which can be interpreted as demonstrating cross-cultural validity.

  14. The Relationship Between Postpartum Depression and Intimate Partner Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheyla Dogan Bulut

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It has been suggested that intimate partner violence (IPV triggers depression. We aim to examine the effect of exposure to IPV on women who experience postpartum depression as compared with postpartum women without depression. Material and Method: The study sample included 128 women whose week 4 postpartum check was done in Family Practice. A psychiatric evaluation was completed for 128 postpartum women with no history of mental illness or drug use. We administered the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS and a sociodemographic form. A statistical analysis of the women%u2019s exposure to IPV was assessed in relation to their levels of depression as measured by the EPDS along with their sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Postpartum depression was detected in 56.3% (n=72 of the women. The average age and length of marriage of the women showing depression were found to be statistically significantly higher than for those that did not score as depressed (respectively p=0.035 and p=0.003. Rates of exposure to emotional and physical abuse were statistically significantly higher for depressed women (respectively p

  15. Cognitive behavioral therapy in combination with systemic family therapy improves mild to moderate postpartum depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmei Hou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in combination with systemic family therapy (SFT on mild to moderate postpartum depression and sleep quality. Methods: 249 primiparous women with mild to moderate postpartum depression were recruited and randomly assigned to a control group (n=128, which received conventional postpartum care, or to a psychological intervention group (n=121, which received conventional postpartum care combined with psychological intervention. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI were employed to evaluate depression and sleep quality, respectively. Results: 104 patients in the intervention group and 109 in the control group completed the study. After intervention, the EPDS score, PSQI score, sleep quality score, sleep latency score, sleep duration score, habitual sleep efficiency score, sleep disturbance score, and daytime dysfunction score were significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group. The EPDS and PSQI scores of each group at different time points after intervention were markedly decreased compared with those before intervention, and the reduction in the intervention group was more evident than that in the control group. Conclusion: CBT in combination with SFT can improve depression and sleep quality in patients with mild to moderate postpartum depression.

  16. Postpartum depression: bipolar or unipolar? Analysis of 434 Polish postpartum women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał R. Jaeschke

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence of soft bipolar features in a sample of women with postpartum depressive symptoms, as well as to compare the sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics of subjects with bipolar or unipolar postpartum depressive symptomatology. Methods: Four hundred and thirty-four participants were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Postpartum depression (PPD symptoms were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS, while the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ was used to screen for bipolarity features. Results: Of the 434 participants, 66 (15.2% scored ≥ 13 points on the EPDS, thus fulfilling the screening criteria, and 103 scored ≥ 7 points on the MDQ. In comparison with non-depressed subjects, the women who scored positively on the EPDS were significantly more likely to exhibit symptoms of bipolar spectrum disorders (38 vs. 21%; chi-square test, p = 0.015. Women with bipolar PPD symptomatology were significantly younger than those exhibiting unipolar PPD symptoms (31.0±4.8 years vs. 28.5±4.1 years; t-test, p = 0.03. The groups did not differ in terms of obstetric characteristics. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that patients with PPD symptomatology may be more likely to exhibit soft bipolarity features as compared with non-depressed women.

  17. Measuring Depression Over Time . . . or not? : Lack of Unidimensionality and Longitudinal Measurement Invariance in Four Common Rating Scales of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fried, Eiko I.; van Borkulo, Claudia D.; Epskamp, Sacha; Schoevers, Robert A.; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Borsboom, Denny

    2016-01-01

    In depression research, symptoms are routinely assessed via rating scales and added to construct sum-scores. These scores are used as a proxy for depression severity in cross-sectional research, and differences in sum-scores over time are taken to reflect changes in an underlying depression construc

  18. Measuring depression over time . . . Or not? : Lack of unidimensionality and longitudinal measurement invariance in four common rating scales of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fried, E.I.; van Borkulo, C.D.; Epskamp, S.; Schoevers, R.A.; Tuerlinckx, F.; Borsboom, D.

    2016-01-01

    In depression research, symptoms are routinely assessed via rating scales and added to construct sum-scores. These scores are used as a proxy for depression severity in cross-sectional research, and differences in sum-scores over time are taken to reflect changes in an underlying depression construc

  19. Measuring Depression Over Time ... or not? Lack of Unidimensionality and Longitudinal Measurement Invariance in Four Common Rating Scales of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fried, Eiko I.; van Borkulo, Claudia D.; Epskamp, Sacha; Schoevers, Robert A.; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Borsboom, Denny

    2016-01-01

    In depression research, symptoms are routinely assessed via rating scales and added to construct sum-scores. These scores are used as a proxy for depression severity in cross-sectional research, and differences in sum-scores over time are taken to reflect changes in an underlying depression construc

  20. Construct validity of the Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale: evaluation by Mokken scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ya-Hsin; Lee, Chin-Pang; Liu, Chia-Yih; Hung, Ching-I

    2017-01-01

    Objective Previous studies of the Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale (DSSS), a free scale, have been based on the classical test theory, and the construct validity and dimensionality of the DSSS are as yet uncertain. The aim of this study was to use Mokken scale analysis (MSA) to assess the dimensionality of the DSSS. Methods A sample of 214 psychiatric outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders were enrolled at a medical center in Taiwan (age: mean [SD] =38.3 [10.5] years; 63.1% female) and asked to complete the DSSS. MSA was used to assess the dimensionality of the DSSS. Results All 22 items of the DSSS formed a moderate unidimensional scale (Hs=0.403), supporting its construct validity. The DSSS was divided into 4 subscales (Hs ranged from 0.35 to 0.67), including a general somatic scale (GSS), melancholic scale (MS), muscular pain scale (MPS), and chest symptom scale (CSS). The GSS is a weak reliable Mokken scale; the other 3 scales are strong reliable Mokken scales. Conclusion The DSSS is a psychometrically sound measure of depression and somatic symptoms in adult psychiatric outpatients with depression or anxiety. The summed score of the DSSS and its 4 subscales are valid statistics. Further research is required for replication of the 4 subscales of the DSSS. PMID:28182138

  1. Assessing Latina/o Undergraduates' Depressive Symptomatology: Comparisons of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and the Self-Report Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Rico, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of depression scales as screening tools at university and college centers is increasing and thus, the question of whether scales are culturally valid for different student groups is increasingly more relevant with increased severity of depression for students and changing student demographics. As such, this study examined the reliability…

  2. Depression Subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale applied preoperatively in spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of the Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D in spine surgery, comparing it to Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, the HADS-D and the BDI were applied to patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar (n=139 or cervical spondylosis (n=17. Spearman correlation tests for HADS-D and BDI were applied. The internal consistency of HADS-D was estimated by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. RESULTS: According to the BDI, the prevalence of depression was of 28.8% (n=45. The Spearman r coefficient between HADS-D and BDI was 0.714 (p10, there was a sensitivity of 71.1%, specificity of 95.4%, and positive likelihood-ratio of 15.78. CONCLUSIONS: HADS-D showed a strong correlation with BDI and good reliability. HADS-D is a good alternative for screening depression and assessing its severity.

  3. Construct validity of the Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale: evaluation by Mokken scale analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou YH

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ya-Hsin Chou,1 Chin-Pang Lee,1,2 Chia-Yih Liu,1,2 Ching-I Hung1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, 2School of Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan Objective: Previous studies of the Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale (DSSS, a free scale, have been based on the classical test theory, and the construct validity and dimensionality of the DSSS are as yet uncertain. The aim of this study was to use Mokken scale analysis (MSA to assess the dimensionality of the DSSS.Methods: A sample of 214 psychiatric outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders were enrolled at a medical center in Taiwan (age: mean [SD] =38.3 [10.5] years; 63.1% female and asked to complete the DSSS. MSA was used to assess the dimensionality of the DSSS.Results: All 22 items of the DSSS formed a moderate unidimensional scale (Hs=0.403, supporting its construct validity. The DSSS was divided into 4 subscales (Hs ranged from 0.35 to 0.67, including a general somatic scale (GSS, melancholic scale (MS, muscular pain scale (MPS, and chest symptom scale (CSS. The GSS is a weak reliable Mokken scale; the other 3 scales are strong reliable Mokken scales.Conclusion: The DSSS is a psychometrically sound measure of depression and somatic symptoms in adult psychiatric outpatients with depression or anxiety. The summed score of the DSSS and its 4 subscales are valid statistics. Further research is required for replication of the 4 subscales of the DSSS. Keywords: depression, somatization, Mokken scale analysis, item response theory, construct validity

  4. Calibration of the EPD sensors on Solar Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Mason, Glenn; Ho, George; Boettcher, Stephan; Martin, Cesar; Kulkarni, Shrinivasrao; Sanchez Prieto, Sebastian; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Javier; Prieto, Manuel; Panitzsch, Lauri

    2016-07-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) on Solar Orbiter will measure ions from a few keV/nuc up to hundred(s) of MeV/nuc (ion specific) and electrons from few keV to ~20 MeV to understand how solar eruptions produce energetic particle radiation that fills the heliosphere. This important question is one of the main scientific objectives of Solar Orbiter. The EPD sensors have undergone substantial calibration efforts which we will report in this presentation.

  5. Vegetarian diets and depressive symptoms among men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbeln, Joseph R; Northstone, Kate; Evans, Jonathan; Golding, Jean

    2018-01-01

    Vegetarian diets are associate with cardiovascular and other health benefits, but little is known about mental health benefits or risks. To determine whether self-identification of vegetarian dietary habits is associated with significant depressive symptoms in men. Self-report data from 9668 adult male partners of pregnant women in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) included identification as vegetarian or vegan, dietary frequency data and the Edinburgh Post Natal Depression Scale (EPDS). Continuous and binary outcomes were assessed using multiple linear and logistic regression taking account of potential confounding variables including: age, marital status, employment status, housing tenure, number of children in the household, religion, family history of depression previous childhood psychiatric contact, cigarette and alcohol consumption. Vegetarians [n = 350 (3.6% of sample)], had higher depression scores on average than non-vegetarians (mean difference 0.96 points [95%CI + 0.53, + 1.40]) and a greater risk for EPDS scores above 10 (adjusted OR = 1.67 [95% CI: 1.14,2.44]) than non-vegetarians after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Vegetarian men have more depressive symptoms after adjustment for socio-demographic factors. Nutritional deficiencies (e.g. in cobalamin or iron) are a possible explanation for these findings, however reverse causation cannot be ruled out. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. A literature review of the application of the Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist to community nursing cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui; Annells, Merilyn

    2009-04-01

    To explore through literature review the appropriateness of three common tools for use by community nurses to screen war veteran and war widow(er) clients for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. War veterans and, to a lesser extent, war widow(er)s, are prone to mental health challenges, especially depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. Community nurses do not accurately identify such people with depression and related disorders although they are well positioned to do so. The use of valid and reliable self-report tools is one method of improving nurses' identification of people with actual or potential mental health difficulties for referral to a general practitioner or mental health practitioner for diagnostic assessment and treatment. The Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist are frequently recommended for mental health screening but the appropriateness of using the tools for screening war veteran and war widow(er) community nursing clients who are often aged and have functional impairment, is unknown. Systematic review. Current literature informs that the Geriatric Depression Scale accurately predicts a diagnosis of depression in community nursing cohorts. The three Depression Anxiety Stress Scales subscales of depression, anxiety and stress are valid; however, no studies were identified that compared the performance of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales in predicting diagnoses of depression or anxiety. The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist predicts post-traumatic stress disorder in community cohorts although no studies meeting the selection criteria included male participants. This review provides recommendations for the use of the Geriatric Depression Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist based on examination of the published evidence for the application of these screening tools in samples

  7. Thurstone's Scaling Model Applied to the Assessment of Self-Reported Depressive Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Joan

    1994-01-01

    Thurstone's scaling based on judgments of 527 students and 37 clinical faculty members was applied to the Beck Depression Inventory, the Zung Depression Scale, and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and fitted the observed data well. A psychological continuum was derived for severity of depression. (SLD)

  8. [Postpartum depression, neonatal hospitalization, and educational intervention]. [Article in Italian] • Depressione post partum, ospedalizzazione neonatale ed intervento educativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania Picciau

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum depression (PPD is a non-psychotic depressive disease with varying severity, from moderate to severe, which originates after the 4th week from giving birth. At our hospital, a clinical approach to help mothers in a delicate period of their life was performed in 2 phases, in the first week of life during hospitalization of the newborn and after the 4th-6th week after delivery. The main instrument in use for the screening of PPD and used also in our study was the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS. Results are presented concerning in particular the correlations between EPDS and variables such as maternal characteristics and lenght of neonatal hospitalization. Articoli Selezionati del Congresso “Medicina Narrativa e Comunicazione nella Pratica Clinica” · Cagliari · 14 Aprile 2014 Guest Editors: Massimiliano Zonza, Vassilios Fanos, Gian Paolo Donzelli

  9. Family dynamics and postnatal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammentie, T; Tarkka, M-T; Astedt-Kurki, P; Paavilainen, E; Laippala, P

    2004-04-01

    Research has shown that postnatal depression (PND) affects 10-15% of mothers in Western societies. PND is not easily identified and therefore it often remains undetected. Untreated depression has a detrimental effect on the mother and child and the entire family. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the state of family dynamics after delivery and whether the mother's PND was associated with family dynamics. The study used a survey covering the catchment area of one Finnish university hospital. Both primi- and multiparas took part and data were collected using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for mothers and the Family Dynamics Measure II (FDM II) for both mothers and fathers. The data were analysed using SPSS statistical programme and frequency and percentage distributions, means and standard deviations were examined. Correlations were analysed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The significance of any differences between mothers' and fathers' scores was determined with a paired t-test. Of the families participating in the study (373 mothers and 314 partners), 13% of the mothers suffered from PND symptoms (EPDS score of 13 or more). As a whole, family dynamics in the families participating in the study were reported to be rather good. However, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics compared with other families. With the exception of individuation, mothers having depressive symptoms reported more negative family dynamics than their partners. With the exception of role reciprocity, non-depressed mothers reported more positive family dynamics than their partners. Knowledge of the association of mothers' PND with family dynamics could help to develop nursing care at maternity and child welfare clinics and maternity hospitals. Depressed mothers and their families need support to be able to make family dynamics as good as possible.

  10. Quality of Life in Depression Scale (QLDS – development of the scale and Polish adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majkowicz, Mikołaj

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to adapt the Quality of Life in Depression Scale to Polish conditions. The scale determines the quality of life, defined in terms of the concept of needs, and focuses on patients with depressive disorders. Since its basic version has been developed, the tool was adapted in many countries, also outside Europe.Method. The adaptation procedure included the translation of the original version into Polish, followed by the English retranslation, and was performed by four independent, qualified translators. The final Polish version was verified during a pilot study.Results. This pilot study confirmed high reliability of the Polish version of Quality of Life in Depression Scale.Conclusion. The Quality of Life in Depression Scale (QLDS can be considered an interesting tool in view of its broad theoretical background, and a simple procedure to complete during a clinical evaluation. The use of a specialist translation procedure, and the results of our pilot study suggest that the QLDS can be used in further research, both when evaluating a clinical population and when dealing with individual patients.

  11. The Techniques for Overcoming Depression Questionnaire: Mokken Scale Analysis, Reliability, and Concurrent Validity in Depressed Cardiac Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Lemos, Mariantonia; Doyle, Frank; Steinmeyer, Brian C; Csik, Iris; Carney, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    The Techniques for Overcoming Depression (TOD) questionnaire assesses the frequency with which patients being treated for depression use cognitive-behavioral techniques in daily life. This study examined its latent structure, reliability and concurrent validity in depressed cardiac patients. The TOD was administered at the initial and final treatment sessions in three trials of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) (n = 260) for depression in cardiac patients. Mokken scaling was used to determine its dimensionality. The TOD is unidimensional in depressed cardiac patients, both at the initial evaluation (H = .46) and the end of treatment (H = .47). It is sensitive to change and the total score correlates with therapist ratings of the patient's socialization to CBT (r=.40, povercoming depression in cardiac patients. Studies of the TOD in other depressed patient populations are needed.

  12. Dimensionality and scale properties of the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Cock, Evi S A; Emons, Wilco H M; Nefs, Giesje

    2011-01-01

    Scale (EDS) is a widely used method for screening depression. However, there is still debate about the dimensionality of the test. Furthermore, the EDS was originally developed to screen for depression in postpartum women. Empirical evidence that the EDS has comparable measurement properties in both......BACKGROUND: Depression is a common complication in type 2 diabetes (DM2), affecting 10-30% of patients. Since depression is underrecognized and undertreated, it is important that reliable and validated depression screening tools are available for use in patients with DM2. The Edinburgh Depression...... to laugh or enjoy) and sleeping problems were the most informative indicators for being able to differentiate between the diagnostic groups of mild and severe depression. CONCLUSIONS: The EDS constitutes a sound scale for measuring an attribute of general depression. Persons can be reliably measured using...

  13. Validity of the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale for youth with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Lindsey; Renno, Patricia; Storch, Eric A; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Lewin, Adam B; Arnold, Elysse; Lin, Enjey; Wood, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    High rates of anxiety and depression are reported among youth with autism spectrum disorders. These conditions are generally assessed using measures validated for typically developing youth. Few studies have investigated their validity for autism spectrum disorders, which is crucial for accurate assessment and the provision of proper treatment. The Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale was evaluated with 67 youth with autism spectrum disorders to examine its utility in measuring anxiety and depression in this population. Parents and children (aged 11-15 years) referred to a multisite intervention study completed the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule, Child Behavior Checklist, and Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results suggest acceptable internal consistency of the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale. Modest convergent validity was found among the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale and other standardized measures of anxiety and depression. There were stronger correlations between Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale Total scores and subscales of measures expected to correlate significantly than those not expected to correlate. One exception was a significant association between the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale and Child Behavior Checklist Attention subscale, calling into question the divergent validity in separating anxiety from attention problems. Overall, results suggest preliminary support for the Revised Children's Anxiety and Depression Scale in youth with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders.

  14. Confirmatory factor analysis of the portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21

    OpenAIRE

    Apóstolo,João Luís Alves; Tanner,Barry Allen; Arfken,Cynthia Lee

    2012-01-01

    To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years) comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The co...

  15. Development of a Geriatric Scale of Hopelessness: Implications for Counseling and Intervention with the Depressed Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated hopelessness, depression, and self-esteem among depressed elderly people (N=78) and developed a Geriatric Hopelessness Scale (GHS). As predicted, elderly subjects who scored high on the GHS showed significantly higher depression and lower self-esteem scores. (JAC)

  16. Development of a Geriatric Scale of Hopelessness: Implications for Counseling and Intervention with the Depressed Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated hopelessness, depression, and self-esteem among depressed elderly people (N=78) and developed a Geriatric Hopelessness Scale (GHS). As predicted, elderly subjects who scored high on the GHS showed significantly higher depression and lower self-esteem scores. (JAC)

  17. File list: ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 All antigens Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX079858,...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  18. File list: Unc.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes mm9 Unclassified Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX352044 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 All antigens Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX079858,...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  20. File list: Unc.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes mm9 Unclassified Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX352044 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes mm9 TFs and others Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX352043... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes mm9 TFs and others Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX352043... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 All antigens Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX079858,...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: Unc.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes mm9 Unclassified Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX352044 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 All antigens Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX079858,...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes mm9 Unclassified Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX352044 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes mm9 TFs and others Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX352043... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Epd.50.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.50.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts mm9 Unclassified Epidermis Dermal fibroblasts h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Epd.50.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Epd.20.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.20.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts mm9 Unclassified Epidermis Dermal fibroblasts h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Epd.20.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.Epd.10.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.10.Unclassified.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Unclassified Epidermis SRX352044 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Epd.10.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.Epd.20.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.20.Unclassified.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Unclassified Epidermis SRX352044 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Epd.20.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Unc.Epd.05.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.05.Unclassified.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Unclassified Epidermis SRX352044 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Epd.05.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Epd.50.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.50.Unclassified.AllCell mm9 Unclassified Unclassified Epidermis SRX352044 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Epd.50.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  14. Can insomnia in pregnancy predict postpartum depression? A longitudinal, population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe K Dørheim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insomnia and depression are strongly interrelated. This study aimed to describe changes in sleep across childbirth, and to evaluate whether insomnia in pregnancy is a predictor of postpartum depression. METHODS: A longitudinal, population-based study was conducted among perinatal women giving birth at Akershus University Hospital, Norway. Women received questionnaires in weeks 17 and 32 of pregnancy and eight weeks postpartum. This paper presents data from 2,088 of 4,662 women with complete data for insomnia and depression in week 32 of pregnancy and eight weeks postpartum. Sleep times, wake-up times and average sleep durations were self-reported. The Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS was used to measure insomnia. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS was used to measure depressive symptoms. RESULTS: After delivery, sleep duration was reduced by 49 minutes (to 6.5 hours, and mean sleep efficiency was reduced from 84% to 75%. However, self-reported insomnia scores (BIS improved from 17.2 to 15.4, and the reported prevalence of insomnia decreased from 61.6% to 53.8%. High EPDS scores and anxiety in pregnancy, fear of delivery, previous depression, primiparity, and higher educational level were risk factors for both postpartum insomnia and depression. Insomnia did not predict postpartum depression in women with no prior history of depression, whereas women who recovered from depression had residual insomnia. LIMITATIONS: Depression and insomnia were not verified by clinical interviews. Women with depressive symptoms were less likely to remain in the study. CONCLUSIONS: Although women slept fewer hours at night after delivery compared to during late pregnancy, and reported more nights with nighttime awakenings, their self-reported insomnia scores improved, and the prevalence of insomnia according to the DSM-IV criteria decreased. Insomnia in pregnancy may be a marker for postpartum recurrence of depression among women with previous

  15. Association between gestational diabetes and perinatal depressive symptoms: evidence from a Greek cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Pinelopi; Spyropoulou, Areti C; Kalogerakis, Zacharias; Vousoura, Eleni; Moraitou, Martha; Zervas, Iannis M

    2017-09-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to assess the association of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) with prenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms in a sample of pregnant women in Greece. Earlier research supports a relationship between depression and diabetes, but only a few studies have examined the relationship between GDM and perinatal depressive symptomatology. A total of 117 women in their third trimester of pregnancy participated in the study. Demographic and obstetric history data were recorded during women's third trimester of pregnancy. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the validated Greek version of the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at two time points: on the third trimester of pregnancy and on the first week postpartum. Findings Prevalence of GDM was 14.5%. Probable diagnosis of depression occurred for 12% of the sample during the antenatal assessment and 15.1% in the postpartum assessment. In the first week postpartum, women with GDM had significantly higher postpartum (but no antenatal) EPDS scores compared with the non-GDM cohort. In conclusion, GDM appears to be associated with depressive symptoms in the first week postpartum. Clinical implications and recommendations for future research are discussed, emphasizing the importance of closely monitoring women with GDM who seem more vulnerable to developing depressive symptomatology during the postnatal period.

  16. In Systemic Sclerosis, Anxiety and Depression Assessed by Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale Are Independently Associated with Disability and Psychological Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anxious and depressive symptoms are frequent in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc. Our objective is to assess their prevalence and association with district and global disability and psychological variables. Methods. 119 SSc patients were assessed by Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS. Clinical depression and anxiety were defined for HADS score cutoff ≥8. Patients were assessed for psychological symptoms (RSES, COPE-NIV, hand (HAMIS, CHFDS, fist closure, and hand opening and face disability (MHISS, mouth opening, global disability, and fatigue (HAQ, FACIT. Results. Both depression and anxiety in SSc are 36%. Depressive patients with comorbid anxiety have higher HADS-D score than patients with depression only (. HADS-A and -D are positively correlated with global disability, hands and mouth disability, fatigue, self-esteem and avoidance coping strategy, and, only HADS-A, also with social support (. By multiple regression, HADS-D is independently associated with FACIT-F (, RSES (, and MHISS total score (, together explaining 50% of variance. HADS-A is independently associated with RSES (, COPE-NIV SA (, COPE-NIV SS (, FACIT-F (, and MHISS mouth opening (, explaining 41% of variance. Conclusions. In SSc depression and anxiety correlate to local and global disabilities and psychological characteristics. Depressive patients with comorbid anxiety have higher level of depressive symptoms.

  17. THE VALIDITY OF THE HAMILTON DEPRESSION RATING SCALE AS A SCREENING AND DIAGNOSTIC INSTRUMENT FOR DEPRESSION IN PATIENTS WITH EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koraliya S. Todorova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the concurrent validity of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17 against ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder and its performance as a screening and diagnostic tool for depression in patients with epilepsy (PWE.Subjects and Methods: One hundred and six PWE underwent clinical psychiatric examination followed by evaluation on HAMD-17. ICD-10 criteria for comorbid depressive disorder were applied. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach’s α. A “receiver operating characteristics” (ROC curve was obtained and the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV were calculated for different cut-off points of the HAMD-17.Results: Internal consistency measured by Cronbach’s α was 0.74. Maximal discrimination between depressed and non depressed was obtained at a cut-off score of 8/9 (sensitivity 0.93, specificity 0.98. High sensitivity and NPV at the same cut-off score (sensitivity 0.93, NPV 1.0 show the screening properties, and high specificity and PPV at cut-offs 9/10, the diagnostic properties of the instrument. The area under the ROC curve (AUC=0.746 indicates the concurrent validity of the HAMD-17 score with the ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder.Conclusion: The validity of the HAMD-17 against ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder in PWE in our study is fair. The concurrent administration of diagnostic criteria can ascertain the presence of core symptoms of depression.

  18. Dimensionality of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) in cardiac patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emons, Wilco H M; Sijtsma, Klaas; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) measures anxiety and depressive symptoms and is widely used in clinical and nonclinical populations. However, there is some debate about the number of dimensions represented by the HADS. In a sample of 534 Dutch cardiac patients, this study examined...... items each were found to be structurally sound and reliable. These scales covered the two key attributes of anxiety and (anhedonic) depression. The findings suggest that the HADS may be reduced to a 10-item questionnaire comprising two 5-item scales measuring anxiety and depressive symptoms....

  19. Antenatal depressive symptoms and subjective birth experience in association with postpartum depressive symptoms and acute stress reaction in mothers and fathers: A longitudinal path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürber, Susanne; Baumeler, Luzia; Grob, Alexander; Surbek, Daniel; Stadlmayr, Werner

    2017-08-01

    Postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS) and acute stress reactions (ASR) after childbirth are frequently documented in mothers, but research is scarce in fathers. In a longitudinal path analysis, the interplay of depressive symptoms in pregnancy and the subjective childbirth experience of mothers and fathers are examined with regard to the development of PDS and ASR postpartum. One hundred eighty nine expectant couples were recruited between August 2006 and September 2009. They completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in the last trimester of pregnancy. In the first week postpartum, they answered the Salmon's Item List (subjective birth experience), and four weeks after birth the EPDS and the Impact of Event Scale - revised (IES-r). The data were evaluated in a longitudinal path analysis. Compared with fathers, mothers reported more depressive symptoms (pregnancy: pexperience' (p0.10), but moderately correlated four weeks after birth (r=0.387, pexperience were independently predictive of PDS and ASR after childbirth in mothers and fathers controlling for age, mode of delivery, parity, epidural anaesthesia, infant gender and birth weight. Antenatal depressive symptoms were related to subjective childbirth experience only in fathers. Parental prenatal depressive symptoms and subjective birth experience are important predictors of postnatal psychological adjustment in mothers and fathers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Reliability and preliminary evidence of validity of a Farsi version of the depression anxiety stress scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayani, Ali Asghar

    2010-08-01

    The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of the Farsi version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales were examined, with a sample of 306 undergraduate students (123 men, 183 women) ranging from 18 to 51 years of age (M age = 25.4, SD = 6.1). Participants completed the Satisfaction with Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales. The findings confirmed the preliminary reliabilities and preliminary construct validity of the Farsi translation of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales.

  1. A diagnostic component for the EPD-CAR project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, WA; van der Velde, W; Dassen, WRM; van der Putten, N; Spruijt, HJ; Baljon, MH

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a diagnostic module which is a part of the EPD-CAR (Electronic Patient Dossier for Cardiology) project of the Interuniversity Cordiology Institute of the Netherlands. It consists of 13 coding trees, each containing between 3 and 20 subitems. The scheme evolved from daily

  2. Verbeter uw verslaglegging, gebruik de EPD-scan-h.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jabaaij, L.; Njoo, K.; Visscher, S.; Hoogen, H. van den; Tiersma, W.; Levelink, H.; Verheij, R.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic patient records (EPRs, or elektronisch patiëntendossier, EPD) will fulfil their function only if general practices record patient data in a structured and uniform manner. To facilitate this, the Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG) has developed the guideline ‘Adequate record keep

  3. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Depressants KidsHealth > For Teens > Depressants A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Depressants What Are Depressants? Depressants are drugs that calm nerves and relax ...

  4. VALIDITY OF THE GHQ AND SCL ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION SCALES - A COMPARATIVE-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOETER, MWJ

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a comparison between the validity of the SCL anxiety, phobic anxiety and depression scales and the GHQ-28 anxiety-/insomnia and severe depression scales in a psychiatric outpatient population. Validity was studied at a categorical level with DSM-III diagnosis, an

  5. Excellent reliability of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-21) in Indonesia after training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Istriana, E.; Kurnia, A.; Weijers, A.; Hidayat, T.; Pinxten, W.J.L.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Schellekens, A.F.A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) is the most widely used depression rating scale worldwide. Reliability of HDRS has been reported mainly from Western countries. The current study tested the reliability of HDRS ratings among psychiatric residents in Indonesia, before and afte

  6. Screening for Depression after Cardiac Events Using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Geriatric Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gail D.; Hubley, Anita M.

    2007-01-01

    Despite findings that depression is a risk factor for heart disease and for death following cardiac events and that depressed cardiac patients experience significantly reduced quality of life and are less likely to follow treatment regimens, depression is neither adequately identified nor treated in cardiac patients. Recent calls in the literature…

  7. The structure of the Montgomery-Åsberg depression rating scale over the course of treatment for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Lena C; Robinson, Jennifer J; Rolland, Jean-Pierre; Fruyt, Filip De; Rouillon, Frédéric; Bagby, R Michael

    2013-09-01

    The Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) is a widely used clinician-rated measure of depressive severity. Empirical support for the factor structure of the MADRS is mixed; further, the comparison of MADRS scores within and between patients requires the demonstration of consistent instrument properties. The objective of the current investigation was to evaluate MADRS factor structure as well as MADRS factorial invariance across time and gender. The MADRS was administered to 821 depressed outpatients participating in a large-scale effectiveness study of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy for depression. Treatment outcome did not differ across treatment groups. Factor structure and invariance was evaluated via confirmatory factor analysis. A four-factor model consisting of Sadness, Negative Thoughts, Detachment and Neurovegetative symptoms demonstrated a good fit to the data. This four-factor structure was invariant across time and gender. A hierarchical model, in which these four factors served as indicators of a general depression factor, was also supported. A limitation of the current study is the lack of comprehensive characterization of patient clinical features; results need to be replicated in more severely depressed or treatment refractory patients. Overall, evidence supported the use of the MADRS total score as well as subscales focused on affective, cognitive, social and somatic aspects of depression in male and female outpatients. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Depressive Symptoms on the Geriatric Depression Scale and Suicide Deaths in Older Middle-aged Men: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sang-Wook

    2016-05-01

    Prospective evaluations of the associations between depressive symptoms and suicide deaths have been mainly performed in high-risk populations, such as individuals with psychiatric disorders or histories of self-harm. The purpose of this study was to prospectively examine whether more severe depressive symptoms assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were associated with a greater risk of death from suicide in a general-risk population. A total of 113 478 men from the Korean Veterans Health Study (mean age, 58.9 years) who participated in a postal survey in 2004 were followed up for suicide mortality until 2010. Over 6.4 years of follow-up, 400 men died by suicide (56.7 deaths per 100 000 person-years). More severe depressive symptoms were associated with greater risk of suicide death (p for trend depression were 2.18 for mild depression, 2.13 for moderate depression, 3.33 for severe depression, and 3.67 for extreme depression. After adjusting for potential confounders, men with a potential depressive disorder had an approximate 90% higher mortality from suicide (adjusted HR, 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38 to 2.68; pdepression. Each five-point increase in the GDS score was associated with a higher risk of death by suicide (adjusted HR, 1.22; pDepressive symptoms assessed using the GDS were found to be a strong independent predictor of future suicide. However, the estimate of relative risk was weaker than would be expected based on retrospective psychological autopsy studies.

  9. Postpartum Depression Among Asian Indian Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Deepika; Park, Van Ta; McNiesh, Susan

    2015-01-01

    To explore Asian Indian mothers' perspectives of postpartum depression (PPD) and mental health help-seeking behavior. Qualitative exploratory design. Using convenience sampling, postpartum mothers were recruited through flyers posted in public places and on social media sites. Postpartum depression risk was assessed with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) prior to qualitative interviews. Content analysis methods were used to extract themes from participant narratives. Twelve self-identified, married, Asian Indian mothers, aged between 29 and 40 years, living in Northern California, who gave birth to a healthy infant within the last 12 months, took part in this study. Scores on the EPDS indicated two participants were at an increased risk for developing PPD. Content analysis revealed two emerging themes: (1) Culture-specific postpartum practices and ceremonies and their role in maternal-infant postpartum recovery; and (2) Maternal mental health help-seeking behavior. Nurses taking care of women during the extended prenatal and postpartum period have the unique opportunity to build rapport with their patients which can offer a window of opportunity to educate and help dispel myths about PPD symptoms and treatment. To promote successful maternal-infant outcomes, PPD education should be initiated at the first prenatal appointment, continue during the pregnancy, and be incorporated into well-baby visits through the first postpartum year. Education should include signs and symptoms of PPD as well as importance of timely mental-health help-seeking.

  10. Prevalence, continuation, and identification of postpartum depressive symptomatology among refugee, asylum-seeking, non-refugee immigrant, and Canadian-born women: results from a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Merry, Lisa; Stewart, Donna; Gagnon, Anita J

    2016-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence, continuation, and identification of maternal depressive symptomatology over the first 16 weeks postpartum among refugee, asylum-seeking, non-refugee immigrant, and Canadian-born women. A sample of 1125 women (143 refugees, 369 asylum-seekers, 303 non-refugee immigrant, and 310 Canadian-born) completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 1 and 16 weeks postpartum. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive power of the 1-week EPDS to identify women with elevated EPDS scores at 16 weeks were determined. The total number of women with EPDS scores >9 for each group at 1 and 16 weeks, respectively, was 26.6 and 18.2 % for refugees; 25.2 and 24.1 % for asylum-seekers; 22.4 and 14.2 % for non-refugee immigrants, and 14.8 and 7.4 % for Canadian-born. Using the cut-off score of 9/10, the 1-week EPDS accurately classified 77.6 % refugee, 73.4 % asylum-seeking, 76.6 % non-refugee immigrant, and 85.5 % Canadian-born women at 16 weeks with or without postpartum depressive symptomatology. The 1-week EPDS was significantly correlated to the 16-week EPDS (r = 0.46, p 9 at 1 week postpartum: refugees (OR = 6.9, 95 % CI = 2.8-17.3), asylum-seekers (OR = 4.0, 95 % CI = 2.4-6.7), non-refugee immigrants (OR = 3.8, 95 % CI = 2.0-7.6), and Canadian-born women (OR = 8.0, 95 % CI = 3.3-19.8). Our findings suggest that refugee, asylum-seeking, non-refugee immigrant, and Canadian-born women at risk of postpartum depression may be identified early in the postpartum period such that secondary preventive interventions may be implemented.

  11. Attitude scale and general health questionnaire subscales predict depression?

    OpenAIRE

    Amrollah Ebrahimi; Hamid Afshar; Hamid Taher Neshat Doost; Seyed Ghafur Mousavi; Hoseyn Moolavi

    2012-01-01

    Background: According to Beck theory, dysfunctional attitude has a central role in emergence of depression. The aim of this study was to determine contributions of dysfunctional attitude and general health index to depression. Methods: In this case-control study, two groups of subjects participated. The first group consisted of 65 patients with major depression and dysthymic disorder, who were recruited from Noor and Navab Safavi Psychiatry Clinics in Isfa-han. The control group was consi...

  12. Personality, depressive symptoms during pregnancy and their influence on postnatal depression in Spanish pregnant Spanish women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Marín-Morales

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of personality factors and antenatal depressive symptomatology in postnatal depression. A prospective ex post facto design was carried out. The sample consisted of 116 women, recruited in their first trimester of pregnancy and followed up until four months postpartum. The measurement instruments used were the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS to assess postpartum depression, the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI to analyse personality traits and the depression subscale of the Symptoms Check List 90 (SCL-90-R to assess depressive symptomatology in the first half of pregnancy. Socio-demographic variables (age, parity, educational level, employment status, and planned pregnancy and clinical variables (neonatal Apgar score and mode of delivery were also taken into account. A positive correlation was found between postpartum depression and depressive symptomatology in the first trimester; however after the regression analysis neuroticism was the only factor that predicted postpartum depressive symptoms, explaining 24.8% of the variance. Neuroticism significantly influences psychological health during life events such as motherhood. Due to its stable condition, personality could be assessed from the beginning of pregnancy, contributing to the care of pregnant women with high scores in neuroticism, to prevent, detect and treat early postnatal depression.

  13. Is the geriatric depression scale a reliable screening tool for depressive symptoms in elderly patients with cognitive impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debruyne, Hans; Van Buggenhout, Michael; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Aries, Marcel; Audenaert, Kurt; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2009-06-01

    To determine the reliability of the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-30) for the screening of depressive symptoms in dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) as the 'gold standard'. Diagnosed according to strictly applied clinical diagnostic criteria, patients with MCI (n = 156) and probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 247) were included. GDS-30, CSDD, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Global Deterioration Scale were assessed in all patients at inclusion. The AD group was divided in three subgroups: mild AD (MMSE>or=18) (n = 117), moderate AD (MMSEor=10) (n = 89) and severe AD (MMSEdepressive symptoms in MCI but not in AD patients. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Dietary patterns and depressive symptoms in a UK cohort of men and women: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northstone, Kate; Joinson, Carol; Emmett, Pauline

    2017-09-18

    There is evidence to suggest that individual components of dietary intake are associated with depressive symptoms. Studying the whole diet, through dietary patterns, has become popular as a way of overcoming intercorrelations between individual dietary components; however, there are conflicting results regarding associations between dietary patterns and depressive symptoms. We examined the associations between dietary patterns extracted using principal component analysis and depressive symptoms, taking account of potential temporal relationships. Depressive symptoms in parents were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) when the study child was 3 and 5 years of age. Scores >12 were considered indicative of the presence of clinical depressive symptoms. Diet was assessed via FFQ when the study child was 4 years of age. Longitudinal population-based birth cohort. Mothers and fathers taking part in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children when their study child was 3-5 years old. Unadjusted results suggested that increased scores on the 'processed' and 'vegetarian' patterns in women and the 'semi-vegetarian' pattern in men were associated with having EPDS scores ≥13. However, after adjustment for confounders all results were attenuated. This was the case for all those with available data and when considering a sub-sample who were 'disease free' at baseline. We found no association between dietary patterns and depressive symptoms after taking account of potential confounding factors and the potential temporal relationship between them. This suggests that previous studies reporting positive associations may have suffered from reverse causality and/or residual confounding.

  15. The development and initial validation of the Terminally Ill Grief or Depression Scale (TIGDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyakoil, Vyjeyanthi S; Kraemer, Helena C; Noda, Art; Moos, Rudolf; Hallenbeck, James; Webster, Maria; Yesavage, Jerome A

    2005-01-01

    Patients often experience 'preparatory-grief' as they cope with the dying process. Some may be depressed. The Terminally Ill Grief or Depression Scale (TIGDS), comprising grief and depression sub-scales, is a new self-report measure designed to differentiate between preparatory-grief and depression in adult inpatients. The initial 100-item inventory was assembled based on literature review, interviews with clinicians and dying patients and then shortened to 42 items based on consensus expert opinion. Validity and reliability were tested in a sample of 55 terminally ill adults. The consensus clinical opinion was used as the gold standard to differentiate between preparatory grief and depression. The intra-class correlation coefficient was high (it was calculated to estimate the test-retest reliability for the 47 patients who had completed the TIGDS twice--retest was administered 2 to 7 days after the initial test), ranging from 0.86 (grief) to 0.97 (depression). The validity of TIGDS was assessed using a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, comparing the first test with the clinical criterion. The first and only variable and cut-point was the depression score (chi-square = 18.4, p depression = 3 cutoff score. The construct validity of the TIGDS was tested by comparing with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The TIGDS depression subscale showed strong convergent validity and the TIGDS grief subscale showed strong discriminant validity with the HADS total score.

  16. Factores psicosociales asociados a un alto, medio y bajo riesgo de síntomas depresivos en el posparto inmediato Psychosocial factors associated to low, medium and high risk of depressive symptoms in the immediate postpartum period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Inés Paolini

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: evaluar factores psicosociales asociados a síntomas depresivos en el posparto inmediato. MÉTODOS: 45 mujeres puérperas de un hospital público de Buenos Aires, Argentina, fueron entrevistadas entre el 1er y el 3er día posparto, de marzo-diciembre 2010. La Escala de Depresión Posnatal de Edimburgo (EPDS fue administrada para evaluar síntomas depresivos. La entrevista psicológica perinatal (EPP fue administrada para detectar variables psicosociales. A partir de los resultados obtenidos en la EPDS, se separó la muestra en tres grupos con diferentes grados de riesgo de sintomatología depresiva: "negativas o de bajo riesgo", "positivas de riesgo medio" y "positivas de alto riesgo". Los puntajes de corte utilizados fueron 9 y 19. RESULTADOS: se encontraron diferencias significativas entre los tres grupos con violencia familiar, migración, historia previa de depresión, presencia de síntomas depresivos durante el embarazo y mayor cantidad de estresores. CONCLUSIONES: el establecimiento de los dos puntajes de corte en la EPDS permite una detección temprana de las mujeres que presentan síntomas depresivos. Se sugiere la utilidad del puntaje de corte de 19 para la detección temprana de mujeres con mayor riesgo de desarrollar depresión posparto.OBJECTIVES: evaluate psychosocial factors associated to depressive symptoms during the immediate postpartum period. METHODS: a total of 45 argentine puerperal women hospitalized in a public maternal hospital of Buenos Aires, Argentina, were interviewed on the 1st and 3rd day postpartum from March to December 2010. Aiming to assess the presence of depressive symptoms, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS was administrated. The Perinatal Psychological Interview was administrated to explore psychosocial variables. Based on the scores obtained in the EPDS, the sample was separated in three different groups with increasing risk of depressive symptomatology: "negative or low risk

  17. The correlation between breastfeeding self-efficacy and maternal postpartum depression in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubaran, Carlos; Foresti, Katia

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between breastfeeding self-efficacy and postpartum depression symptoms in a sample of Portuguese-speaking mothers in southern Brazil. There remains equivocal evidence regarding a putative association between breastfeeding self-efficacy and postpartum depression. This is a cross-sectional study in which eligible research participants completed screening questionnaires and other assessment tools. Mothers were interviewed once only in their homes between the 2nd and 12th week of the postpartum period. Research participants completed the Portuguese version of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Breastfeeding self-efficacy was evaluated through the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES-SF). A total number of 89 mothers completed the investigation: 69 (77%) were exclusively breastfeeding, whereas 20 mothers (22.7%) were partially breastfeeding at the time of the interview. Mothers who combined breastfeeding and bottle-feeding presented higher PDSS and EPDS scores. The breastfeeding self-efficacy scores were higher in mothers who exclusively breastfed and were negatively associated (pconfidence in their ability to breastfeed. This association may be particularly relevant for the purpose of screening procedures for depression and unsatisfactory breastfeeding during the postpartum period. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) as a screening instrument in tinnitus evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöger, Sigyn; Svedlund, Jan; Holgers, Kajsa-Mia

    2004-09-01

    The identification of anxiety and depressive disorders in tinnitus patients is important from a therapeutic point of view. We have addressed this question by investigating the screening performance of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) in a consecutive series of tinnitus patients (n = 82) without severe socially disabling hearing loss referred to an audiological clinic. The structured clinical interview for DSM-III criteria was used as the gold standard. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the screening abilities of the HAD subscales for anxiety and depression and the total HAD Scale. The ROC analysis showed that the HAD Scale was better at detecting depression than anxiety disorders in tinnitus patients. The optimal cut-off score for the subscales was > or = 5 when we were screening for any anxiety or depressive disorder as well as for major depression. The performance of the HAD depression subscale was superior, especially when we were screening for major depression only (sensitivity 1.00; specificity 0.75). The findings of the study suggest that the HAD Scale is more useful for screening for depression than for anxiety disorders in tinnitus patients

  19. Prenatal stress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms as predictors of intention to breastfeed among Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insaf, Tabassum Z; Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Pekow, Penelope; Dole, Nancy; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2011-08-01

    Studies on the relationship between prenatal psychosocial risk factors and breastfeeding are sparse, particularly in Hispanic women. We evaluated this association among 424 participants in Proyecto Buena Salud, an ongoing prospective cohort of pregnant Hispanic women in Western Massachusetts. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) were administered by bilingual interviewers in early pregnancy (mean 13.6 weeks gestation) and midpregnancy (mean 25.7 weeks gestation). Information on sociodemographic, behavioral, and acculturation factors was also collected. Breastfeeding intention was abstracted from medical records. Poisson regression was used to calculate prevalence risk ratios (PRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 274 (64.6%) women reported a positive intention to breastfeed. In multivariate analyses, women in the highest quartile of perceived stress (PRR 0.76, 95% CI 0.62-0.94) in early pregnancy and highest quartile of anxiety in early pregnancy (PRR 0.66, 95% CI 0.54-0.81) and midpregnancy (PRR 0.80, 95% CI 0.64-1.00) were less likely to intend to breastfeed compared to women in the lowest quartile. Women who had at least probable minor depression (EPDS score ≥13) (PRR 0.79, 95% CI 0.65-0.95) or probable major depression (EPDS score ≥15) (PRR 0.77, 95% CI 0.62-0.96) during midpregnancy were less likely to intend to breastfeed compared to women without depressive symptoms. Similarly, women with persistent depressive symptoms over pregnancy were 24%-33% less likely to intend to breastfeed compared to women without depressive symptoms. Psychosocial risk factors during pregnancy are important predictors of breastfeeding intention among Hispanic women.

  20. The effect of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate on postnatal depression: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singata-Madliki, Mandisa; Hofmeyr, G Justus; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2016-07-01

    Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is the most commonly used hormonal contraceptive method in South Africa. It is frequently administered in the immediate postnatal period, yet it is unclear whether it affects the risk of postnatal depression (PND). To determine whether DMPA increases the risk of PND compared with the copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) when administered after delivery. A single-blind randomised controlled trial conducted at two teaching hospitals in East London, South Africa. Eligible, consenting women (N=242) requiring postnatal contraception were randomised to receive DMPA or an IUD within 48 hours of childbirth and interviewed at 1 and 3 months postpartum. Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Resumption of sexual intercourse, menstrual symptoms and breastfeeding rates were also assessed. One-month EPDS depression scores were statistically significantly higher in the DMPA arm compared with IUD arm (p=0.04). Three-month BDI-II scores were significantly higher in the DMPA arm than in the IUD arm (p=0.002) and, according to the BDI-II but not the EPDS, more women in the DMPA arm had major depression at this time-point (8 vs 2; p=0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in other outcome measures except that fewer women had resumed sexual activity by 1 month postpartum in the DMPA arm (13% vs 26%; p=0.02). The possibility that immediate postnatal DMPA use is associated with depression cannot be excluded. These findings justify further research with longer follow-up. PACTR201209000419241. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Evaluation of the Cardiac Depression Visual Analogue Scale in a medical and non-medical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, Mirella; Sheehan, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Comorbid depression and medical illness is associated with a number of adverse health outcomes such as lower medication adherence and higher rates of subsequent mortality. Reliable and valid psychological measures capable of detecting a range of depressive symptoms found in medical settings are needed. The Cardiac Depression Visual Analogue Scale (CDVAS) is a recently developed, brief six-item measure originally designed to assess the range and severity of depressive symptoms within a cardiac population. The current study aimed to further investigate the psychometric properties of the CDVAS in a general and medical sample. The sample consisted of 117 participants, whose mean age was 40.0 years (SD = 19.0, range 18-84). Participants completed the CDVAS, the Cardiac Depression Scale (CDS), the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) and a demographic and health questionnaire. The CDVAS was found to have adequate internal reliability (α = .76), strong concurrent validity with the CDS (r = .89) and the depression sub-scale of the DASS (r = .70), strong discriminant validity and strong predictive validity. The principal components analysis revealed that the CDVAS measured only one component, providing further support for the construct validity of the scale. Results of the current study indicate that the CDVAS is a short, simple, valid and reliable measure of depressive symptoms suitable for use in a general and medical sample.

  2. Screening for depression among community-dwelling elders: Usefulness of the center for epidemiologic studies depression scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Though common, depressive disorders often remain undetected in late life. Aim: To examine the usefulness of Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D for identifying depression among older people. Settings and Design: Community resident older people (aged 65 years or more, were evaluated by clinicians trained in psychiatry, as part of a cross-sectional study of late-life depression. Assessments were done in the community. Methods and Material: The participants were assigned ICD-10 diagnoses and assessed using Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS and CES-D. A short version of CES-D with 10 items, translated to the local language Malayalam, was used. Statistical Analysis: The sensitivity and specificity of CES-D was evaluated against ICD-10 clinical diagnosis of depression. The correlation of CES-D and MADRS was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: 220 consenting adults from 3 wards of the Panchayath were assessed. On analysis of the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve of CES-D scores in relation to clinical diagnosis, the large Area Under Curve (AUC showed efficient screening and a cut off score of 4 in CES-D had a sensitivity of 97.7% and a specificity of 79.1% for depression. There was also good correlation between the MADRS and CES-D scores (0.838. Conclusion: CES-D is a short simple scale which can be used by health care professionals for detecting depression in older people in primary care settings.

  3. Depression and anxiety in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: prevalence rates based on a comparison of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS and the hospital, Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Covic Tanya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While it is recognised that depression is prevalent in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, recent studies have also highlighted significant levels of anxiety in RA patients. This study compared two commonly used scales, the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, in relation to their measurement range and cut points to consider the relative prevalence of both constructs, and if prevalence rates may be due to scale-specific case definition. Methods Patients meeting the criteria for RA were recruited in Leeds, UK and Sydney, Australia and asked to complete a survey that included both scales. The data was analysed using the Rasch measurement model. Results A total of 169 RA patients were assessed, with a repeat subsample, resulting in 323 cases for analysis. Both scales met Rasch model expectations. Using the 'possible+probable' cut point from the HADS, 58.3% had neither anxiety nor depression; 13.5% had anxiety only; 6.4% depression only and 21.8% had both 'possible+probable' anxiety and depression. Cut points for depression were comparable across the two scales while a lower cut point for anxiety in the DASS was required to equate prevalence. Conclusions This study provides further support for high prevalence of depression and anxiety in RA. It also shows that while these two scales provide a good indication of possible depression and anxiety, the estimates of prevalence so derived could vary, particularly for anxiety. These findings are discussed in terms of comparisons across studies and selection of scales for clinical use.

  4. EPD-deposited ZnO thin films: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verde, M.

    2014-07-01

    ZnO-based materials and specifically ZnO films with tailored morphology have been subjected to extensive research in the past few years due to their high potential for multiple prospective applications, mainly in electronics. Electrophoretic Deposition (EPD) constitutes an economical, eco friendly, low energy consuming and easily scalable alternative to the high energy consuming evaporative techniques which are commonly used for the obtaining of these ZnO films. For its application, however, the use of stable, well dispersed suspensions is a necessary requirement, and thus a thorough study of their colloidal chemistry is essential. In this work the main contributions to the study of colloidal chemistry of ZnO nanoparticle suspensions and their shaping into ZnO films by EPD are summarized. (Author)

  5. Tetragonal and cubic zirconia multilayered ceramic constructs created by EPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochales, Carolina; Frank, Stefan; Zehbe, Rolf; Traykova, Tania; Fleckenstein, Christine; Maerten, Anke; Fleck, Claudia; Mueller, Wolf-Dieter

    2013-02-14

    The interest in electrophoretic deposition (EPD) for nanomaterials and ceramics production has widely increased due to the versatility of this technique to effectively combine different materials in unique shapes and structures. We successfully established an EPD layering process with submicrometer sized powders of Y-TZP with different mol percentages of yttrium oxide (3 and 8%) and produced multilayers of alternating tetragonal and cubic phases with a clearly defined interface. The rationale behind the design of these multilayer constructs was to optimize the properties of the final ceramic by combining the high mechanical toughness of the tetragonal phase of zirconia together with the high ionic conductivity of its cubic phase. In this work, a preliminary study of the mechanical properties of these constructs proved the good mechanical integrity of the multilayered constructs obtained as well as crack deflection in the interface between tetragonal and cubic zirconia layers.

  6. The Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) and the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale (MADRS). A psychometric re-analysis of the European Genome-Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression Study using Rasch analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Allerup, Peter; Larsen, Erik Roj

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this re-analysis of the European Genome-Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression Study (GENDEP) was to psychometrically test the unidimensionality of the full Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS10) and the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17) versus their respective...... 2030 had to be supplemented with the Friedman two-way analysis of variance by ranks. The HAM-D6 but not the MADRS5 was accepted. It was therefore concluded that the HAM-D6 is a psychometrically valid outcome scale to measure change in clinical trials of antidepressants....

  7. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY - CONSTRUCTION OF A PROTOTYPICAL ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION SCALE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOETER, MWJ; VANDENBRINK, W

    1992-01-01

    The question of the relationship between anxiety and depression remains to be solved. The fact that clinical pictures show substantial overlap makes it difficult, using conventional instruments, to distinguish between the co-occurrence of anxiety and depression and overlap in definitions and measure

  8. Characteristics of Postpartum Depression in Anand District, Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Himadri L; Ganjiwale, Jaishree D; Nimbalkar, Archana S; Vani, Shashi N; Vasa, Rohitkumar; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M

    2015-10-01

    Characteristics of postpartum depression (PPD) in Anand District, Gujarat, India. PPD affects 1 in 10 women in the developed world. It has been implicated as an independent factor with adverse effect on child health, and health care-seeking behavior of mothers. We sought to find the prevalence of PPD in our hospital by including mothers who registered and delivered live babies at our hospital. Basic demographic information related to pregnancy was acquired from mothers and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), pre-translated and validated in Gujarati language, was administered. Current study observed prevalence of PPD as 48.5% using cutoff score of 10.5 for classifying depression in Gujarati women. Factors associated with depression after multivariable logistic regression were: age of mother, modified Kuppuswami category (MKC) score, family type, violence from husband, gravida, para and sex of infant. PPD has higher prevalence in our study vis-a-vis Western countries. This may be because of early administration of EPDS. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Prenatal and postnatal depression among low income Brazilian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Da-Silva

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal depression is a significant problem affecting 10-15% of mothers in many countries and has been the subject of an increasing number of publications. Prenatal depression has been studied less. The aims of the present investigation were: 1 to obtain information on the prevalence of prenatal and postnatal depression in low income Brazilian women by using an instrument already employed in several countries, i.e., the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; 2 to evaluate the risk factors involved in prenatal and postnatal depression in Brazil. The study groups included 33 pregnant women interviewed at home during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, and once a month during the first six months after delivery. Questions on life events and the mother's relationship with the baby were posed during each visit. Depressed pregnant women received less support from their partners than non-depressed pregnant women (36.4 vs 72.2%, P<0.05; Fisher exact test. Black women predominated among pre- and postnatally depressed subjects. Postnatal depression was associated with lower parity (0.4 ± 0.5 vs 1.1 ± 1.0, P<0.05; Student t-test. Thus, the period of pregnancy may be susceptible to socio-environmental factors that induce depression, such as the lack of affective support from the partner. The prevalence rate of 12% observed for depression in the third month postpartum is comparable to that of studies from other countries.

  10. Depressive Symptoms, Depletion, or Developmental Change? Withdrawal, Apathy, and Lack of Vigor in the Geriatric Depressive Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kathryn Betts

    2001-01-01

    This study has dual goals of confirming the existence of a "Withdrawal/Apathy/[Lack of] Vigor" (WAV) dimension of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and determining if it is descriptive of either depletion or disengagement-related change in older adults. High endorsement rates suggest WAV may be congruent with disengagement or depletion and may…

  11. Use of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in a North American population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A; Gang, P; Cole, K; Rutsky, M; Reese, L; Weisbord, J A

    1993-05-01

    1. The authors mailed the Edinburgh Post-natal Depression Scale to 308 women at six weeks postpartum. 2. It was completed and return by 185 women (60.0%). 3. Thirty-two of them (17.4%) scored 12 and above, the threshold reported to identify most women with postpartum depressive disorder.

  12. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale-Short Form: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Rachel C.; Kanter, Jonathan W.; Luo, Wen

    2011-01-01

    Following a landmark component analysis of cognitive therapy by Jacobson and colleagues (1996), there has been renewed interest in behavioral activation (BA) treatments for depression. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) was developed to measure when and how clients become activated over the course of BA treatment. Multiple…

  13. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale-Short Form: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Rachel C.; Kanter, Jonathan W.; Luo, Wen

    2011-01-01

    Following a landmark component analysis of cognitive therapy by Jacobson and colleagues (1996), there has been renewed interest in behavioral activation (BA) treatments for depression. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) was developed to measure when and how clients become activated over the course of BA treatment. Multiple…

  14. Psychometric evaluation of the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) as depression severity scale using the LEAD (Longitudinal Expert Assessment of All Data) as index of validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Timmerby, N; Martiny, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Major Depression Inventory (MDI) was developed to cover the universe of depressive symptoms in DSM-IV major depression as well as in ICD-10 mild, moderate, and severe depression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the standardization of the MDI as a depression severity......-IV major depression. The conventional VAS scores for no, mild, moderate, and severe depression were used for the standardization of the MDI. RESULTS: The inter-correlation for the MDI with the clinician ratings (VAS, MES, HAM-D17 and HAM-D6) increased over the rating weeks in terms of Pearson coefficients....... After nine weeks of therapy the coefficient ranged from 0.74 to 0.83. Using the clinician-rated VAS depression severity scale, the conventional MDI cut-off scores for no or doubtful depression, and for mild, moderate and severe depression were confirmed. CONCLUSIONS: Using the VAS as index of external...

  15. Factors associated with early postpartum maternity blues and depression tendency among Japanese mothers with full-term healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuki; Tamakoshi, Koji

    2014-02-01

    Maternity blues and postpartum depression are common mental health problems during the early postpartum period. However, few studies have examined the factors associated with maternity blues and postpartum depression in healthy mothers with spontaneous births of healthy full-term infants. This study aimed to determine the demographic and obstetric factors, various feelings during pregnancy, and psychological factors by using the Maternity Blues Scale (MBS) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) among healthy Japanese mothers. We distributed the MBS and EPDS self-administered questionnaires to 100 Japanese mothers during their 4-5 day hospitalization and at a health check-up 1-month after delivery, respectively. Multiple regression analyses were performed including the above-mentioned variables as independent variables and the maximum MBS or EPDS scores as dependent variables. The answers "Having a friend I can talk to about maternity life or child rearing" [beta (95% confidence interval) = -1.53 (-2.68 - -0.378)] and "Satogaeri bunben", a Japanese traditional support system wherein a postnatal woman lives with her husband/parents [-2.82 (-4.73 - -0.898)] were significantly associated with MBS scores. The answer "Having a friend I can talk to about maternity life or child rearing" [-2.83 (-4.76 - -0.903)] was also significantly associated with EPDS scores, although the association between the partner's age and these scores was marginally significant [-0.106 (-0.008 - 0.221)]. This study shows that it is important to provide support for healthy women without delivery complications, both at home and in the community.

  16. Prenatal listening to songs composed for pregnancy and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwebube, Chineze; Glover, Vivette; Stewart, Lauren

    2017-05-08

    Prenatal anxiety and depression are distressing for the expectant mother and can have adverse effects on her fetus and subsequently, her child. This study aimed to determine whether listening to specially composed songs would be an effective intervention for reducing symptoms of prenatal anxiety and depression. Pregnant women were recruited online and randomly assigned to one of two groups: the music group (daily listening to specially composed songs) or control group (daily relaxation) for 12 weeks each. Self-report questionnaires were used to assess symptoms of State and Trait anxiety (Spielberger) and depression (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS)). Trait anxiety was measured as the primary outcome, while State anxiety and depression were the secondary outcomes. 111 participants were randomised to each group. 20 participants in the intervention group and 16 participants in the active control group completed the study. The music group demonstrated lower Trait Anxiety (p = .0001) (effect size 0.80), State Anxiety (p = .02) (effect size 0.64), and EPDS (p = .002) (effect size 0.92) scores at week 12 compared to baseline, by paired t test. There were no such changes in the control group. Though this pilot study had high levels of attrition, the results do suggest that regular listening to relaxing music should be explored further as an effective non-pharmacological means for reducing prenatal anxiety and depression. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02776293 LV-001. Registered 17 May 2016. Retrospectively registered.

  17. Efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder: a subgroup analysis and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression item analyses of the Aripiprazole Depression Multicenter Efficacy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Norio; Otsubo, Tempei; Kato, Masaki; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Ono, Hiroaki; Kamijima, Kunitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Results from this randomized, placebo-controlled study of aripiprazole augmentation to antidepressant therapy (ADT) in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) (the Aripiprazole Depression Multicenter Efficacy [ADMIRE] study) revealed that aripiprazole augmentation was superior to ADT alone and was well tolerated. In subgroup analyses, we investigated the influence of demographic- and disease-related factors on the observed responses. We also examined how individual symptom improvement was related to overall improvement in MDD. Data from the ADMIRE study were analyzed. Subgroup analyses were performed on the primary outcome measures: the mean change in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score from the end of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)/serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) treatment to the end of the randomized treatment. Changes in the MADRS total scores were consistently greater with aripiprazole than placebo in each of the subgroups. Efficacy was not related to sex, age, number of adequate ADT trials in the current episode, MDD diagnosis, number of depressive episodes, duration of the current episode, age at first depressive episode, time since the first depressive episode, type of SSRI/SNRI, or severity at the end of SSRI/SNRI treatment phase. Compared to placebo, aripiprazole resulted in significant and rapid improvement on seven of the 10 MADRS items, including sadness. These post-hoc analyses indicated that aripiprazole was effective for a variety of Japanese patients with MDD who had exhibited inadequate responses to ADT. Additionally, we suggest that aripiprazole significantly and rapidly improved the core depressive symptoms. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  18. Adaptation to Portuguese of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS)

    OpenAIRE

    Apóstolo,João Luís Alves; Mendes,Aida Cruz; Azeredo,Zaida Aguiar

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to adapt to Portuguese, of Portugal, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales, a 21-item short scale (DASS 21), designed to measure depression, anxiety and stress. Method: After translation and back-translation with the help of experts, the DASS 21 was administered to patients in external psychiatry consults (N=101), and its internal consistency, construct validity and concurrent validity were measured. Results: The DASS 21 properties certify its quality to measure emotional state...

  19. Implementation of depression screening in antenatal clinics through tablet computers: results of a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano-Belisario, José S; Gupta, Ajay K; O'Donoghue, John; Ramchandani, Paul; Morrison, Cecily; Car, Josip

    2017-05-10

    Mobile devices may facilitate depression screening in the waiting area of antenatal clinics. This can present implementation challenges, of which we focused on survey layout and technology deployment. We assessed the feasibility of using tablet computers to administer a socio-demographic survey, the Whooley questions and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to 530 pregnant women attending National Health Service (NHS) antenatal clinics across England. We randomised participants to one of two layout versions of these surveys: (i) a scrolling layout where each survey was presented on a single screen; or (ii) a paging layout where only one question appeared on the screen at any given time. Overall, 85.10% of eligible pregnant women agreed to take part. Of these, 90.95% completed the study procedures. Approximately 23% of participants answered Yes to at least one Whooley question, and approximately 13% of them scored 10 points of more on the EPDS. We observed no association between survey layout and the responses given to the Whooley questions, the median EPDS scores, the number of participants at increased risk of self-harm, and the number of participants asking for technical assistance. However, we observed a difference in the number of participants at each EPDS scoring interval (p = 0.008), which provide an indication of a woman's risk of depression. A scrolling layout resulted in faster completion times (median = 4 min 46 s) than a paging layout (median = 5 min 33 s) (p = 0.024). However, the clinical significance of this difference (47.5 s) is yet to be determined. Tablet computers can be used for depression screening in the waiting area of antenatal clinics. This requires the careful consideration of clinical workflows, and technology-related issues such as connectivity and security. An association between survey layout and EPDS scoring intervals needs to be explored further to determine if it corresponds to a survey layout effect

  20. Prevalência e preditores de sintomatologia depressiva após o parto Prevalence and predictors of depressive symptoms after childbirth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Costa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A depressão pós-parto é uma patologia que ocorre nas primeiras semanas após o parto com conseqüências negativas não só para a mãe, como também para o bebê e para a família. OBJETIVO: Examinar a prevalência de depressão após o parto, bem como as circunstâncias suscetíveis de predizer a sintomatologia depressiva 1 semana e 3 meses após o parto. MÉTODOS: 197 grávidas preencheram o Questionário de Antecipação do Parto (QAP (Costa et al., 2005a no segundo trimestre de gestação. Na primeira semana após o parto, responderam ao Questionário de Experiência e Satisfação com o Parto (QESP (Costa et al., 2005b e à Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS (Augusto et al., 1996, esta última aplicada novamente no terceiro mês do puerpério. RESULTADOS: Uma percentagem significativa de mulheres encontra-se clinicamente deprimida (EPDS 13 na primeira semana e 3 meses após o parto (12,4% e 13,7%, respectivamente. Das que têm EPDS > 13 na primeira semana, 25% estão ainda deprimidas 3 meses após o parto. Circunstâncias relativas à saúde física, à experiência emocional de parto e ao primeiro contato com o bebê predizem a sintomatologia depressiva na primeira semana do puerpério. A sintomatologia depressiva na primeira semana após o parto e a experiência emocional negativa de parto predizem a sintomatologia depressiva 3 meses após o parto. CONCLUSÕES: Constata-se a importância da experiência emocional de parto e do primeiro contato com o bebê, enfatizando a necessidade de atender às necessidades psicológicas da mulher.BACKGROUND: Postnatal depression is a pathology occurring in the first weeks after childbirth with negative consequence not only for mothers, but also for theirs babies and families. OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of postnatal depression and factors that might predict depressive symptoms one week and three months after childbirth. METHODS: 197 pregnant women filled out the

  1. Testing a German Adaption of the Entrapment Scale and Assessing the Relation to Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Trachsel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The construct of entrapment is used in evolutionary theory to explain the etiology of depression. The perception of entrapment can emerge when defeated individuals want to escape but are incapable. Studies have shown relationships of entrapment to depression, and suicidal tendencies. The aim of this study was a psychometric evaluation and validation of the Entrapment Scale in German (ES-D. 540 normal subjects completed the ES-D along with other measures of depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and distress. Good reliability and validity of the ES-D was demonstrated. Further, whereas entrapment originally has been regarded as a two-dimensional construct, our analyses supported a single-factor model. Entrapment explained variance in depressive symptoms beyond that explained by stress and hopelessness supporting the relevance of the construct for depression research. These findings are discussed with regard to their theoretical implications as well as to the future use of the entrapment scale in clinical research and practice.

  2. The Symptom Checklist-core depression (SCL-CD6) scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Westerlund, Hugo; Leineweber, Constanze

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Major depressive disorders are common, with substantial impact on individuals/society. Brief scales for depression severity, based on a small number of characteristics all of which are necessary for diagnosis, have been recommended in self-reported versions for clinical work or research when...... aiming to quickly and accurately measure depression. We have examined psychometric properties of a brief 6-item version of the Symptom Checklist (SCL), the Symptom Checklist core depression scale (SCL-CD6) and aimed to identify a cut-point for epidemiological research. METHODS: The psychometric...... evaluation of the SCL-CD6 was mainly performed by a Mokken analysis of unidimensionality in a random sample of 1476 residents in the Stockholm County, aged 18-64 years. The standardization of SCL-CD6 was based on ROC analysis, using the Major Depression Inventory as index of validity. Predictive validity...

  3. Measurement-based Treatment of Residual Symptoms Using Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale: Korean Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Won; Han, Changsu; Ko, Young-Hoon; Yoon, Seo Young; Pae, Chi-Un; Choi, Joonho; Park, Yong Chon; Kim, Jong-Woo; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Ko, Seung-Duk; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Zimmerman, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was aimed at evaluating the diagnostic validity of the Korean version of the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS) with varying follow-up in a typical clinical setting in multiple centers. Methods In total, 891 psychiatric outpatients were enrolled at the time of their intake appointment. Current diagnostic characteristics were examined using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (41% major depressive disorder). The CUDOS was measured and compared with three clinician rating scales and four self-report scales. Results The CUDOS showed excellent results for internal consistency (Cronbach’s α, 0.91), test-retest reliability (patients at intake, r=0.81; depressed patients in ongoing treatment, r=0.89), and convergent and discriminant validity (measures of depression, r=0.80; measures of anxiety and somatization, r=0.42). The CUDOS had a high ability to discriminate between different levels of depression severity based on the rating of Clinical Global Impression for depression severity and the diagnostic classification of major depression, minor depression, and non-depression. The ability of the CUDOS to identify patients with major depression was high (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve=0.867). A score of 20 as the optimal cutoff point was suggested when screening for major depression using the CUDOS (sensitivity=89.9%, specificity=69.5%). The CUDOS was sensitive to change after antidepressant treatment: patients with greater improvement showed a greater decrease in CUDOS scores (pKorean version of the CUDOS is a very useful measurement for research and for clinical practice. PMID:28138107

  4. A study of remitted and treatment-resistant depression using MMPI and including pessimism and optimism scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Suzuki

    Full Text Available The psychological aspects of treatment-resistant and remitted depression are not well documented.We administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI to patients with treatment-resistant depression (n = 34, remitted depression (n = 25, acute depression (n = 21, and healthy controls (n = 64. Pessimism and optimism were also evaluated by MMPI.ANOVA and post-hoc tests demonstrated that patients with treatment-resistant and acute depression showed similarly high scores for frequent scale (F, hypochondriasis, depression, conversion hysteria, psychopathic device, paranoia, psychasthenia and schizophrenia on the MMPI compared with normal controls. Patients with treatment-resistant depression, but not acute depression registered high on the scale for cannot say answer. Using Student's t-test, patients with remitted depression registered higher on depression and social introversion scales, compared with normal controls. For pessimism and optimism, patients with treatment-resistant depression demonstrated similar changes to acutely depressed patients. Remitted depression patients showed lower optimism than normal controls by Student's t-test, even though these patients were deemed recovered from depression using HAM-D.The patients with remitted depression and treatment-resistant depression showed subtle alterations on the MMPI, which may explain the hidden psychological features in these cohorts.

  5. A study of remitted and treatment-resistant depression using MMPI and including pessimism and optimism scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Michio; Muneoka, Katsumasa; Sato, Koichi; Hashimoto, Kenji; Shirayama, Yukihiko

    2014-01-01

    The psychological aspects of treatment-resistant and remitted depression are not well documented. We administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) to patients with treatment-resistant depression (n = 34), remitted depression (n = 25), acute depression (n = 21), and healthy controls (n = 64). Pessimism and optimism were also evaluated by MMPI. ANOVA and post-hoc tests demonstrated that patients with treatment-resistant and acute depression showed similarly high scores for frequent scale (F), hypochondriasis, depression, conversion hysteria, psychopathic device, paranoia, psychasthenia and schizophrenia on the MMPI compared with normal controls. Patients with treatment-resistant depression, but not acute depression registered high on the scale for cannot say answer. Using Student's t-test, patients with remitted depression registered higher on depression and social introversion scales, compared with normal controls. For pessimism and optimism, patients with treatment-resistant depression demonstrated similar changes to acutely depressed patients. Remitted depression patients showed lower optimism than normal controls by Student's t-test, even though these patients were deemed recovered from depression using HAM-D. The patients with remitted depression and treatment-resistant depression showed subtle alterations on the MMPI, which may explain the hidden psychological features in these cohorts.

  6. The Major Depressive Disorder Hierarchy: Rasch Analysis of 6 items of the Hamilton Depression Scale Covering the Continuum of Depressive Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Melancholic features of depression (MFD) seem to be a unidimensional group of signs and symptoms. However, little importance has been given to the evaluation of what features are related to a more severe disorder. That is, what are the MFD that appear only in the most depressed patients. We aim to demonstrate how each MFD is related to the severity of the major depressive disorder. Methods We evaluated both the Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS-17) and its 6-item melancholic subscale (HAM-D6) in 291 depressed inpatients using Rasch analysis, which computes the severity of each MFD. Overall measures of model fit were mean (±SD) of items and persons residual = 0 (±1); low χ2 value; p>0.01. Results For the HDRS-17 model fit, mean (±SD) of item residuals = 0.35 (±1.4); mean (±SD) of person residuals = -0.15 (±1.09); χ2 = 309.74; p<0.00001. For the HAM-D6 model fit, mean (±SD) of item residuals = 0.5 (±0.86); mean (±SD) of person residuals = 0.15 (±0.91); χ2 = 56.13; p = 0.196. MFD ordered by crescent severity were depressed mood, work and activities, somatic symptoms, psychic anxiety, guilt feelings, and psychomotor retardation. Conclusions Depressed mood is less severe, while guilt feelings and psychomotor retardation are more severe MFD in a psychiatric hospitalization. Understanding depression as a continuum of symptoms can improve the understanding of the disorder and may improve its perspective of treatment. PMID:28114341

  7. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apóstolo, João Luís Alves; Tanner, Barry Allen; Arfken, Cynthia Lee

    2012-01-01

    To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years) comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The correlated 3-factor model fit the data best. The scale demonstrated good internal consistency, with alpha scores of the subscales ranging from 0.836 to 0.897. Correlation with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was positive and moderate with the negative affect scale; it was negative and limited with the positive affect. These findings support the correlated 3-factor structure. The test demonstrated adequate reliability and construct validity, which supports its use for screening in primary care settings with Portuguese speakers.

  8. Impact of a Manualized Multifocal Perinatal Home-Visiting Program Using Psychologists on Postnatal Depression: The CAPEDP Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugravier, Romain; Tubach, Florence; Saias, Thomas; Guedeney, Nicole; Pasquet, Blandine; Purper-Ouakil, Diane; Tereno, Susana; Welniarz, Bertrand; Matos, Joana

    2013-01-01

    Context Postnatal maternal depression (PND) is a significant risk factor for infant mental health. Although often targeted alongside other factors in perinatal home-visiting programs with vulnerable families, little impact on PND has been observed. Objective This study evaluates the impact on PND symptomatology of a multifocal perinatal home-visiting intervention using psychologists in a sample of women presenting risk factors associated with infant mental health difficulties. Methods 440 primiparous women were recruited at their seventh month of pregnancy. All were future first-time mothers, under 26, with at least one of three additional psychosocial risk factors: low educational level, low income, or planning to raise the child without the father. The intervention consisted of intensive multifocal home visits through to the child’s second birthday. The control group received care as usual. PND symptomatology was assessed at baseline and three months after birth using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Results At three months postpartum, mean (SD) EPDS scores were 9.4 (5.4) for the control group and 8.6 (5.4) for the intervention group (p = 0.18). The difference between the mean EPDS scores was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.35; 1.34). The intervention group had significantly lower EPDS scores than controls in certain subgroups: women with few depressive symptoms at inclusion (EPDS <8): difference = 1.66 (95%CI: 0.17; 3.15), p = 0.05, adjusted for baseline EPDS score), women who were planning to raise the child with the child’s father: difference = 1.45 (95%CI: 0.27; 2.62), p = 0.04 (adjusted); women with a higher educational level: difference = 1.59 (95%CI: 0.50; 2.68) p = 0.05 (adjusted). Conclusion CAPEDP failed to demonstrate an overall impact on PND. However, post-hoc analysis reveals the intervention was effective in terms of primary prevention and in subgroups of women without certain risk factors. Effective overall reduction

  9. Impact of a manualized multifocal perinatal home-visiting program using psychologists on postnatal depression: the CAPEDP randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Dugravier

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Postnatal maternal depression (PND is a significant risk factor for infant mental health. Although often targeted alongside other factors in perinatal home-visiting programs with vulnerable families, little impact on PND has been observed. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the impact on PND symptomatology of a multifocal perinatal home-visiting intervention using psychologists in a sample of women presenting risk factors associated with infant mental health difficulties. METHODS: 440 primiparous women were recruited at their seventh month of pregnancy. All were future first-time mothers, under 26, with at least one of three additional psychosocial risk factors: low educational level, low income, or planning to raise the child without the father. The intervention consisted of intensive multifocal home visits through to the child's second birthday. The control group received care as usual. PND symptomatology was assessed at baseline and three months after birth using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS. RESULTS: At three months postpartum, mean (SD EPDS scores were 9.4 (5.4 for the control group and 8.6 (5.4 for the intervention group (p = 0.18. The difference between the mean EPDS scores was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.35; 1.34. The intervention group had significantly lower EPDS scores than controls in certain subgroups: women with few depressive symptoms at inclusion (EPDS <8: difference = 1.66 (95%CI: 0.17; 3.15, p = 0.05, adjusted for baseline EPDS score, women who were planning to raise the child with the child's father: difference = 1.45 (95%CI: 0.27; 2.62, p = 0.04 (adjusted; women with a higher educational level: difference = 1.59 (95%CI: 0.50; 2.68 p = 0.05 (adjusted. CONCLUSION: CAPEDP failed to demonstrate an overall impact on PND. However, post-hoc analysis reveals the intervention was effective in terms of primary prevention and in subgroups of women without certain risk factors. Effective overall reduction of PND

  10. Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2012-11-26

    This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

  11. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003213.htm Depression - overview To use the sharing features on this ... older adults Major depression Persistent depressive disorder Postpartum depression Premenstrual ... Review Date 1/4/2016 Updated by: Timothy Rogge, ...

  12. Suicidal Ideation in Depressed Postpartum Women: Associations with Childhood Trauma, Sleep Disturbance and Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Dorothy; Luther, James; Buysse, Daniel; Dills, John L.; Eng, Heather; Okun, Michele; Wisniewski, Stephen; Wisner, Katherine L

    2015-01-01

    Background Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in postpartum women. Identifying modifiable factors related to suicide risk in mothers after delivery is a public health priority. Our study aim was to examine associations between suicidal ideation (SI) and plausible risk factors (experience of abuse in childhood or as an adult, sleep disturbance, and anxiety symptoms) in depressed postpartum women. Methods This secondary analysis included 628 depressed mothers at 4–6 weeks postpartum. Diagnosis was confirmed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. We examined SI from responses to the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale-EPDS item 10; depression levels on the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Atypical Depression Symptoms (SIGH-ADS); plus sleep disturbance and anxiety levels with subscales from the EPDS and SIGH-ADS items on sleep and anxiety symptoms.. Results Of the depressed mothers, 496 (79%) ‘never’ had thoughts of self-harm; 98 (15.6%) ‘hardly ever’; and 34 (5.4%) ‘sometimes’ or ‘quite often’. Logistic regression models indicated that having frequent thoughts of self-harm was related to childhood physical abuse (odds ratio-OR=1.68, 95% CI=1.00, 2.81); in mothers without childhood physical abuse, having frequent self-harm thoughts was related to sleep disturbance (OR=1.15, 95%CI=1.02, 1.29) and anxiety symptoms (OR=1.11, 95%CI=1.01, 1.23). Discussion Because women with postpartum depression can present with frequent thoughts of self-harm and a high level of clinical complexity, conducting a detailed safety assessment, that includes evaluation of childhood abuse history and current symptoms of sleep disturbance and anxiety, is a key component in the management of depressed mothers. PMID:26001587

  13. Use of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M J; Kim, K H

    1998-05-01

    We translated the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale into Korean, paying careful attention to culturally different modes of expression of depressive feelings and thoughts. The final translated version (CES-D-K) was administered to 164 psychiatric patients and 464 normal subjects residing in the community. Reliability, validity, and the optimal cutoff point of this scale were estimated, including ROC analysis. The CES-D-K was reliable and valid for the Korean population. Two optimal cutoff points were suggested: 24/25, the point which best corresponded to the clinical diagnosis of depression, and 20/21, which most effectively detects and covers depressive symptoms during screening. The higher cutoff points than those in Western countries may be due to different ways of expression affect, especially the suppression of positive affect, in cultures based on Confucian ethics.

  14. Factor analysis of the hospital anxiety and depression scale among a Huntington's disease population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Maria; Maltby, John; Martucci, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Depression and anxiety are common in Huntington's disease, a genetic neurodegenerative disorder. There is a need for measurement tools of mood to be validated within a Huntington's disease population. The current study aimed to analyze the factor structure of the Hospital Anxiety......, with two group factors, comprising four depression and four anxiety items, provided the best fit of the data. The salience of loadings on the bifactor model suggested that loadings were high on the general factor (accounting for 64% of the variance) and low on the group factors (21% for anxiety and 15......% for depression). CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that eight items from the scale perform well among the sample. Consistent with recent developments in modeling the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, a bifactor interpretation for an eight-item version outperformed other extant models. Our findings provide...

  15. A study on construction, validation and determination of normalization of adolescents depression scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Babakhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to construct, to validate and to determine normalization factors associated with adolescents depression scale. The study is performed among 750 randomly selected guided and high school students, 364 male and 386 female, who live in city of Zanjan, Iran. Validity of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Validity of Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS and divergence validity of the Coopersmith self- esteem coefficients are 0.72, 0.37 and -0.71, respectively. Result suggests that adolescents’ depression test is a reliable and valid tool for assessing depression, with utility in both research and clinical settings, counseling centers. In addition, the results of correlation test indicate there are some meaningful differences between depression levels of female and male students. In fact, our survey indicates that female students have more depression than male students do (F-value = 33.06, Sig. = 0.000. In addition, there are some meaningful differences between depression levels in various educational levels (F-value = 8.59, Sig. = 0.000. However, the study does not find sufficient evidence to believe there is any meaningful correlation between educational backgrounds and gender.

  16. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  17. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    , that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression......The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued...

  18. File list: His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation E...pidermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 Input control Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX753311...18,SRX514836,SRX476929,SRX663240,SRX105185 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  1. File list: DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX100993,SRX...100991,SRX201837,SRX100992,SRX100990 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  2. File list: DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX100993,SRX...100992,SRX100990,SRX100991,SRX201837 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes mm9 All antigens Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX352044,S...RX352043 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 Input control Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX099052...36,SRX476929,SRX244150,SRX105185,SRX663240 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Epd.10.AllAg.NHDF [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.AllAg.NHDF hg19 Histone Epidermis NHDF SRX186682,SRX067460,SRX186701,SRX...067413,SRX067401,SRX186750,SRX186722,SRX190034,SRX186749,SRX067504,SRX067484,SRX067496 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.10.AllAg.NHDF.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.NHDF [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.NHDF hg19 All antigens Epidermis NHDF SRX186682,SRX067413,SRX06740...X186750,SRX080385,SRX190033 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.NHDF.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.Epd.05.AllAg.NHDF [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.05.AllAg.NHDF hg19 Input control Epidermis NHDF SRX067501,SRX080385,SRX1900...33,SRX1091831 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.05.AllAg.NHDF.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.NHEK [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.NHEK hg19 TFs and others Epidermis NHEK SRX186685,SRX080161,SRX038...644,SRX080410,SRX067387,SRX080370,SRX031248,SRX102973,SRX038645,SRX204107,SRX204109 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.NHEK.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.NHDF [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.NHDF hg19 TFs and others Epidermis NHDF SRX186746,SRX067495,SRX199...904,SRX1091830,SRX199903 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.NHDF.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Epd.50.GFP.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.GFP.AllCell hg19 TFs and others GFP Epidermis SRX573186,SRX573180,SRX573...177,SRX573183,SRX718424 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.GFP.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Hs_68 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Hs_68 hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Hs 68 SRX396584,SRX396581,SRX3...96579,SRX396580,SRX396583,SRX396590,SRX396589 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Hs_68.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Epd.05.AllAg.NHDF [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.AllAg.NHDF hg19 Histone Epidermis NHDF SRX186682,SRX186750,SRX186701,SRX...067460,SRX067413,SRX067401,SRX067504,SRX186722,SRX190034,SRX186749,SRX067484,SRX067496 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.05.AllAg.NHDF.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Epd.20.MYC.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.MYC.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MYC Epidermis SRX130063,SRX185776,SRX080...161,SRX864094,SRX864095 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.MYC.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.NHDF [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.NHDF hg19 All antigens Epidermis NHDF SRX186682,SRX186746,SRX06746...X199904,SRX069113,SRX199903 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.NHDF.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.CS1AN [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.CS1AN hg19 TFs and others Epidermis CS1AN SRX573186,SRX573180,SRX5...73183,SRX573177 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.CS1AN.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Epd.05.GFP.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.GFP.AllCell hg19 TFs and others GFP Epidermis SRX573186,SRX573180,SRX573...183,SRX718424,SRX573177 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.GFP.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.Epd.10.AllAg.NHDF [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.10.AllAg.NHDF hg19 Input control Epidermis NHDF SRX067501,SRX1091831,SRX190...033,SRX080385 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.10.AllAg.NHDF.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Epd.05.AllAg.NHEK [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.AllAg.NHEK hg19 Histone Epidermis NHEK SRX038660,SRX067425,SRX038647,SRX...,SRX038649,SRX189957,SRX038651,SRX067477,SRX038650,SRX038648 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.05.AllAg.NHEK.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.BJ [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.BJ hg19 All antigens Epidermis BJ SRX490262,SRX017557,SRX490261,SR...1,SRX190018,SRX080433,SRX189990,SRX189987 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.BJ.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblast hg19 Input control Epidermis Dermal fibroblast S...,SRX447386,SRX666594,SRX447389,SRX200051,SRX864096,SRX200053 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblast.bed ...

  1. File list: NoD.Epd.05.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Epd.05.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts mm9 No description Epidermis Dermal fibroblasts... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Epd.05.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Epd.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.10.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Epidermis SRX2000...54,SRX189959,SRX080365,SRX573182,SRX573176 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: InP.Epd.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.10.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Epidermis SRX70095...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Epd.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: InP.Epd.05.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.05.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Epidermis SRX68894...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Epd.05.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.Epd.50.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.50.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Epidermis SRX7005...65,SRX189959,SRX080381,SRX189950,SRX099054 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.50.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: InP.Epd.20.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.20.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Epidermis SRX7005...65,SRX573179,SRX189950,SRX573185,SRX483584 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.20.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.Epd.50.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.50.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Epidermis SRX14260...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Epd.50.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: InP.Epd.05.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.05.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Epidermis SRX2000...94,SRX130096,SRX573176,SRX573179,SRX038662 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.05.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epide...rmis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Epd.50.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200046,...SRX200052,SRX200048,SRX200050 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 All antigens Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200048,SR...X200036,SRX200052,SRX200038,SRX200044,SRX200042,SRX200050,SRX200046 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200046,...SRX200052,SRX200048,SRX200050 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 Histone Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200036,SRX2000...38,SRX200044,SRX200042 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Epd.10.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 Histone Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200044,SRX2000...38,SRX200036,SRX200042 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.10.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 All antigens Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200046,SR...X200052,SRX200048,SRX200042,SRX200044,SRX200036,SRX200038,SRX200050 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Epd.50.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.50.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 Histone Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200042,SRX2000...44,SRX200036,SRX200038 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.50.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 All antigens Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200046,SR...X200052,SRX200048,SRX200044,SRX200038,SRX200036,SRX200042,SRX200050 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200046,...SRX200052,SRX200048,SRX200050 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200048,...SRX200052,SRX200050,SRX200046 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 Histone Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200044,SRX2000...42,SRX200038,SRX200036 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 All antigens Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200046,SR...X200052,SRX200048,SRX200044,SRX200042,SRX200038,SRX200036,SRX200050 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX100993,SRX...100991,SRX201837,SRX100992,SRX100990 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX97158...7,SRX971588,SRX663246,SRX663245,SRX663248,SRX663247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Melanocytes SRX382354,SR...X382353,SRX346921,SRX346922 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  6. File list: InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 Input control Epidermis Melanocytes SRX382355,SRX...382356 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 Input control Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX323568...36,SRX971581,SRX753311,SRX105185,SRX099054 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX97158...7,SRX971588,SRX663248,SRX663245,SRX663246,SRX663247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes mm9 All antigens Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX352044,S...RX352043 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Epd.20.TCP1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.TCP1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others TCP1 Epidermis SRX019786,SRX663250,SRX6...X514838,SRX099053,SRX099055,SRX514844 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.TCP1.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Epd.10.TCP1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.TCP1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others TCP1 Epidermis SRX663251,SRX019786,SRX5...X105186,SRX514839,SRX514838,SRX099053 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.TCP1.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Epd.50.TCP1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.TCP1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others TCP1 Epidermis SRX663250,SRX663252,SRX6...X514838,SRX099053,SRX099055,SRX514844 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.TCP1.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Epd.05.TCP1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.TCP1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others TCP1 Epidermis SRX663251,SRX663249,SRX6...X514838,SRX018991,SRX105187,SRX099055 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.TCP1.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Epd.20.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.20.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Epidermis SRX70095...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Epd.20.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: DNS.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis Melanocytes SRX089283,SRX0892...82,SRX201198,SRX201794,SRX201799,SRX100889 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Melanocytes SRX346921,SR...X382354,SRX382353,SRX346922 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 Histone Epidermis Melanocytes SRX109440,SRX109442...,SRX109445,SRX109443,SRX109441,SRX109444 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 All antigens Epidermis Melanocytes SRX382354,SRX1...X109443,SRX100889,SRX382355,SRX382356,SRX109441,SRX109444 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis Melanocytes SRX089283,SRX0892...82,SRX201198,SRX201794,SRX201799,SRX100889 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 Input control Epidermis Melanocytes SRX382355,SRX...382356 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.LOX-IMVI [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.LOX-IMVI hg19 All antigens Epidermis LOX-IMVI SRX109449,SRX109450,...SRX109451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.LOX-IMVI.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.LOX-IMVI [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.LOX-IMVI hg19 All antigens Epidermis LOX-IMVI SRX109449,SRX109450,...SRX109451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.LOX-IMVI.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Epd.20.AllAg.LOX-IMVI [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.AllAg.LOX-IMVI hg19 Histone Epidermis LOX-IMVI SRX109449,SRX109450,SRX10...9451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.20.AllAg.LOX-IMVI.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Epd.50.AllAg.LOX-IMVI [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.50.AllAg.LOX-IMVI hg19 Histone Epidermis LOX-IMVI SRX109449,SRX109450,SRX10...9451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.50.AllAg.LOX-IMVI.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.LOX-IMVI [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.LOX-IMVI hg19 All antigens Epidermis LOX-IMVI SRX109449,SRX109450,...SRX109451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.LOX-IMVI.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Epd.05.AllAg.LOX-IMVI [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.AllAg.LOX-IMVI hg19 Histone Epidermis LOX-IMVI SRX109449,SRX109450,SRX10...9451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.05.AllAg.LOX-IMVI.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.LOX-IMVI [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.LOX-IMVI hg19 All antigens Epidermis LOX-IMVI SRX109449,SRX109450,...SRX109451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.LOX-IMVI.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Epd.10.AllAg.LOX-IMVI [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.AllAg.LOX-IMVI hg19 Histone Epidermis LOX-IMVI SRX109449,SRX109450,SRX10...9451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.10.AllAg.LOX-IMVI.bed ...

  9. File list: InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Hair_Follicle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Hair_Follicle mm9 Input control Epidermis Hair Follicle SRX700956,...SRX700958,SRX209796,SRX699296,SRX688940,SRX450827,SRX450825,SRX323582,SRX209794 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Hair_Follicle.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Hair_Follicle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Hair_Follicle mm9 All antigens Epidermis Hair Follicle SRX376930,S...,SRX688940,SRX700958,SRX209795,SRX209796,SRX323582,SRX699296,SRX450825,SRX450827,SRX209794 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Hair_Follicle.bed ...

  11. File list: InP.Epd.20.AllAg.Hair_Follicle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.20.AllAg.Hair_Follicle mm9 Input control Epidermis Hair Follicle SRX700956,...SRX700958,SRX209796,SRX699296,SRX688940,SRX450827,SRX209794,SRX450825,SRX323582 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Epd.20.AllAg.Hair_Follicle.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Hair_Follicle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Hair_Follicle mm9 Input control Epidermis Hair Follicle SRX700956,...SRX688940,SRX700958,SRX209796,SRX323582,SRX699296,SRX450825,SRX450827,SRX209794 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Epd.10.AllAg.Hair_Follicle.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Hair_Follicle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Hair_Follicle mm9 All antigens Epidermis Hair Follicle SRX323585,S...,SRX700958,SRX209796,SRX699296,SRX688940,SRX450827,SRX209794,SRX209795,SRX450825,SRX323582 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Hair_Follicle.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Epd.05.AllAg.Hair_Follicle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.05.AllAg.Hair_Follicle mm9 Input control Epidermis Hair Follicle SRX688940,...SRX700956,SRX699296,SRX323582,SRX700958,SRX450827,SRX209794,SRX450825,SRX209796 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Epd.05.AllAg.Hair_Follicle.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Hair_Follicle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Hair_Follicle mm9 All antigens Epidermis Hair Follicle SRX323585,S...,SRX209796,SRX699296,SRX688940,SRX450827,SRX450826,SRX209795,SRX450825,SRX323582,SRX209794 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Hair_Follicle.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Hair_Follicle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Hair_Follicle mm9 All antigens Epidermis Hair Follicle SRX323585,S...,SRX450826,SRX450828,SRX323582,SRX700958,SRX700957,SRX450827,SRX209794,SRX450825,SRX209796 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Hair_Follicle.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 hg19 All antigens Epidermis Fibrobl GM03348 SRX189...394,SRX189398,SRX189393 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Epd.05.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.05.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 hg19 RNA polymerase Epidermis Fibrobl GM03348 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.05.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.FibroP [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.FibroP hg19 All antigens Epidermis FibroP SRX189392,SRX189405,SRX1...89391 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.FibroP.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Fibrobl GM03348 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 hg19 All antigens Epidermis Fibrobl GM03348 SRX189...394,SRX189398,SRX189393 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.FibroP [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.FibroP hg19 All antigens Epidermis FibroP SRX189392,SRX189405,SRX1...89391 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.FibroP.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epide...rmis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: DNS.Epd.20.AllAg.RPMI-7951 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.20.AllAg.RPMI-7951 hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis RPMI-7951 SRX193607,SRX201303,S...RX201289 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.20.AllAg.RPMI-7951.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.RPMI-7951 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.RPMI-7951 hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis RPMI-7951 SRX193607,SRX201303,S...RX201289 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.RPMI-7951.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.RPMI-7951 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.RPMI-7951 hg19 All antigens Epidermis RPMI-7951 SRX193607,SRX20130...3,SRX201289 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.RPMI-7951.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.RPMI-7951 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.RPMI-7951 hg19 All antigens Epidermis RPMI-7951 SRX193607,SRX20130...3,SRX201289 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.RPMI-7951.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Epd.10.AllAg.RPMI-7951 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.10.AllAg.RPMI-7951 hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis RPMI-7951 SRX193607,SRX201303,S...RX201289 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.10.AllAg.RPMI-7951.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.RPMI-7951 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.RPMI-7951 hg19 All antigens Epidermis RPMI-7951 SRX193607,SRX20130...3,SRX201289 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.RPMI-7951.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.RPMI-7951 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.RPMI-7951 hg19 All antigens Epidermis RPMI-7951 SRX193607,SRX20130...3,SRX201289 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.RPMI-7951.bed ...

  13. File list: DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.RPMI-7951 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.RPMI-7951 hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis RPMI-7951 SRX193607,SRX201303,S...RX201289 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.RPMI-7951.bed ...

  14. File list: NoD.Epd.50.AllAg.Hs_68 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Epd.50.AllAg.Hs_68 hg19 No description Epidermis Hs 68 SRX007038,SRX007037,SRX0...07036,SRX007035 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Epd.50.AllAg.Hs_68.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Epd.20.SMARCA4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.SMARCA4.AllCell hg19 TFs and others SMARCA4 Epidermis SRX718423,SRX97158...2,SRX971584,SRX718422,SRX971583,SRX719732 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.SMARCA4.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Epd.05.SMARCA4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.SMARCA4.AllCell hg19 TFs and others SMARCA4 Epidermis SRX718422,SRX71842...3,SRX971582,SRX971584,SRX719732,SRX971583 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.SMARCA4.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Epd.50.SMARCA4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.SMARCA4.AllCell hg19 TFs and others SMARCA4 Epidermis SRX718423,SRX97158...2,SRX971584,SRX971583,SRX719732,SRX718422 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.SMARCA4.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Epd.10.SMARCA4.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.SMARCA4.AllCell hg19 TFs and others SMARCA4 Epidermis SRX718423,SRX71842...2,SRX971582,SRX971584,SRX719732,SRX971583 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.SMARCA4.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Epiderm...is http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Epd.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Epiderm...is http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Epd.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Epd.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Epiderm...is http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Epd.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 All antigens Epidermis Melanocytes SRX346921,SRX3...X382356,SRX109441,SRX109445,SRX109443,SRX100889,SRX109444 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis Melanocytes SRX089283,SRX2011...98,SRX089282,SRX201799,SRX201794 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: NoD.Epd.20.NA.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Epd.20.NA.AllCell hg19 No description NA Epidermis SRX796596,SRX796595,SRX79659...6589,SRX796590,SRX796586,SRX007035,SRX1003359 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Epd.20.NA.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.Epd.50.NA.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Epd.50.NA.AllCell hg19 No description NA Epidermis SRX796596,SRX796595,SRX79659...6586,SRX007036,SRX444062,SRX1003359,SRX007035 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Epd.50.NA.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.Epd.10.AllAg.Hs_68 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Epd.10.AllAg.Hs_68 hg19 No description Epidermis Hs 68 SRX007036,SRX007035,SRX0...07038,SRX007037 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Epd.10.AllAg.Hs_68.bed ...

  7. File list: NoD.Epd.20.AllAg.Hs_68 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Epd.20.AllAg.Hs_68 hg19 No description Epidermis Hs 68 SRX007036,SRX007038,SRX0...07037,SRX007035 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Epd.20.AllAg.Hs_68.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.Epd.05.DNase-Seq.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.05.DNase-Seq.AllCell hg19 DNase-seq DNase-Seq Epidermis SRX201290,SRX100993...RX469954,SRX469956 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.05.DNase-Seq.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Epd.10.GFP.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.GFP.AllCell hg19 TFs and others GFP Epidermis SRX573186,SRX573180,SRX573...183,SRX718424,SRX573177 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.GFP.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Epd.20.GFP.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.GFP.AllCell hg19 TFs and others GFP Epidermis SRX573186,SRX573180,SRX573...183,SRX718424,SRX573177 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.GFP.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX97158...7,SRX971588,SRX663246,SRX663245,SRX663248,SRX663247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes mm9 All antigens Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX352044,S...RX352043 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Epd.10.MITF.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.MITF.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MITF Epidermis SRX346921,SRX346922,SRX6...85341,SRX685340 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.MITF.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Epd.05.MITF.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.MITF.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MITF Epidermis SRX346921,SRX346922,SRX6...85340,SRX685341 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.MITF.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Epd.20.MITF.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.MITF.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MITF Epidermis SRX685341,SRX346921,SRX3...46922,SRX685340 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.MITF.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Epd.50.MITF.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.MITF.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MITF Epidermis SRX685341,SRX346921,SRX6...85340,SRX346922 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.MITF.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Melanoma SRX264465,SRX26446...6,SRX685341,SRX685340 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 All antigens Epidermis Melanoma SRX264465,SRX264466,...334 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 Histone Epidermis Melanoma SRX685326,SRX685319,SRX68...685337,SRX685329,SRX685336,SRX685334,SRX685338,SRX685335,SRX685330 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 All antigens Epidermis Melanoma SRX264465,SRX685341,...340 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 All antigens Epidermis Melanoma SRX264465,SRX264466,...340 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Melanoma SRX264465,SRX68534...1,SRX264466,SRX685340 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Melanoma SRX685341,SRX26446...6,SRX264465,SRX685340 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 Histone Epidermis Melanoma SRX685326,SRX685319,SRX68...685332,SRX685338,SRX685336,SRX685335,SRX685333,SRX685334,SRX685330 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 Histone Epidermis Melanoma SRX685326,SRX685335,SRX68...685337,SRX685331,SRX685329,SRX685338,SRX685336,SRX685334,SRX685330 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.10.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 Histone Epidermis Melanoma SRX685322,SRX685318,SRX68...685321,SRX685329,SRX685338,SRX685336,SRX685333,SRX685337,SRX685334 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 All antigens Epidermis Melanoma SRX685341,SRX685326,...340 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanoma hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Melanoma SRX264465,SRX26446...6,SRX685340,SRX685341 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.AllAg.Melanoma.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Epidermis... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Epd.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Epd.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Epidermis SRX71842...0,SRX512368,SRX512366,SRX807621,SRX512367,SRX512372,SRX512373,SRX807620 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Epd.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Epidermis SRX51236...8,SRX512367,SRX718420,SRX512372,SRX512366,SRX512373,SRX807621,SRX807620 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Epd.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Epidermis SRX71842...0,SRX512368,SRX512366,SRX807621,SRX512367,SRX512372,SRX512373,SRX807620 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX100993,SRX...100992,SRX100991,SRX100990,SRX201837 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.10.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  15. File list: InP.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 Input control Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX323568...11,SRX663240,SRX099052,SRX105185,SRX099054 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.20.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes mm9 All antigens Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX352043,S...RX352044 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Epd.50.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 Input control Epidermis Melanocytes SRX382355,SRX...382356 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Epidermis Keratinocytes SRX97158...7,SRX971588,SRX663248,SRX663246,SRX663245,SRX663247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.05.AllAg.Keratinocytes.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanocytes hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis Melanocytes SRX089283,SRX2011...98,SRX089282,SRX201794,SRX201799,SRX100889 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.20.AllAg.Melanocytes.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Epd.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Epd.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Epd.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Epd.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation E...pidermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Epd.10.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.10.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 hg19 RNA polymerase Epidermis Fibrobl GM03348 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.10.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis Fibrobl GM03348 SRX189394...,SRX189398,SRX189393 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.05.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Epd.20.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.20.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 hg19 RNA polymerase Epidermis Fibrobl GM03348 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.20.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Epd.20.Grhl3.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.Grhl3.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Grhl3 Epidermis SRX382124,SRX382120,SRX...382119,SRX382122 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.Grhl3.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Epd.10.Grhl3.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.Grhl3.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Grhl3 Epidermis SRX382119,SRX382124,SRX...382120,SRX382122 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.Grhl3.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts mm9 All antigens Epidermis Dermal fibroblasts S...26,SRX310225,SRX310224,SRX388187 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Epd.20.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblast [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblast hg19 Input control Epidermis Dermal fibroblast S...,SRX200045,SRX864096,SRX200053,SRX200051,SRX447389,SRX447386 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Epd.50.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblast.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts mm9 TFs and others Epidermis Dermal fibroblasts... SRX247302,SRX382120,SRX247301,SRX247303,SRX382119,SRX310229,SRX310227,SRX310225 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Dermal_fibroblasts.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.Epd.10.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.10.Unclassified.AllCell hg19 Unclassified Unclassified Epidermis SRX718425,...SRX472906,SRX472907,SRX080126,SRX1007722,SRX080125,SRX718426,SRX472908 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Epd.10.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.Epd.50.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.50.Unclassified.AllCell hg19 Unclassified Unclassified Epidermis SRX718425,...SRX080126,SRX1007722,SRX718426,SRX472906,SRX472907,SRX080125,SRX472908 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Epd.50.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.Epd.20.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.20.Unclassified.AllCell hg19 Unclassified Unclassified Epidermis SRX718425,...SRX472907,SRX472906,SRX080126,SRX080125,SRX472908,SRX1007722,SRX718426 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Epd.20.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Epd.05.Unclassified.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Epd.05.Unclassified.AllCell hg19 Unclassified Unclassified Epidermis SRX472906,...SRX472907,SRX718425,SRX718426,SRX1007722,SRX080126,SRX472908,SRX080125 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Epd.05.Unclassified.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.HFF [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.HFF hg19 DNase-seq Epidermis HFF SRX193603,SRX069165,SRX069198,SRX...069195,SRX069117 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Epd.50.AllAg.HFF.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Epidermi...247,SRX080162,SRX807622 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Epidermi...246,SRX663247,SRX807622 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Epider...mis SRX016997 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Epider...mis SRX016997 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.10.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Epidermi...245,SRX663247,SRX807622 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Epd.05.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  4. Postnatal depression and socio-cultural practices among postnatal mothers in Kota Bahru, Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azidah, A K; Shaiful, B I; Rusli, N; Jamil, M Y

    2006-03-01

    This is a cross sectional study to determine the relationship of postnatal depression (PND) and socio-cultural practices post-delivery among women in Kota Bharu, Kelantan. Four hundred and twenty one pregnant women were screened for depression between 36 - 42 weeks of pregnancy, 1 week and 4 - 6 weeks postpartum using Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). The women also completed questionnaires on socio-demography, psychosocial support and traditional postnatal care. The prevalence of PND at 4-6 weeks postpartum was 20.7%. Depressive symptoms at the end of pregnancy (p<0.05) and one week postpartum (p<0.05), worry about the baby (p<0.05), use of traditional medication (p<0.05) and traditional massage (p<0.05) were significantly associated with PND.

  5. Correlation between dietary zinc intakes and its serum levels with depression scales in young female students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani, Reza; Saeidi, Somaye; Nazari, Zahra; Nematpour, Sorour

    2010-11-01

    It has been suggested that mood disorders and depressive status may be accompanied by lowered zinc status in the body, and adequate consumption of zinc increases a general perceived well-being. The main objective of this study was to assess the correlation between serum zinc concentrations and dietary zinc intakes with depression scores in university female students. In the first phase, Beck's depression questionnaire was applied in a random sampling of 308 selected 20-25-year-old female students (one third of total students in Ahvaz Jondi-Shapour University of Medical Sciences Golestan dormitories) to assess the major depressive disorder (MDD) scales. Then, in the second phase, 23 students who identified as having moderate and severe depression were selected as the case group, and 23 healthy age matched were chosen as the controls. Each of them completed a 12-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire containing the main food sources of zinc in the usual dietary patterns and also a 24-h food recall questionnaire to assure the daily zinc intakes. Daily zinc intakes were obtained by multiplying each portion size by its zinc content using food tables. A 5-ml blood sample was taken for further serum zinc status using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry technique. Pearson's r was used to show the correlation between quantitative variables. Both daily zinc intake and serum zinc concentrations of MDD group were about two thirds of healthy index (p Depressed individuals used to eat lower servings of red meats and chicken as the main food sources of zinc in students' usual diets (p students (r = 0.55; p students(r = -0.65; p depressed female students, dietary zinc intake is correlated to its serum concentrations; however, the serum zinc levels are inversely correlated to depression scales. Consumption of the main dietary sources of zinc such as red meats and chicken should be encouraged in young depressed girls.

  6. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  7. Multi-scale motility amplitude associated with suicidal thoughts in major depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premananda Indic

    Full Text Available Major depression occurs at high prevalence in the general population, often starts in juvenile years, recurs over a lifetime, and is strongly associated with disability and suicide. Searches for biological markers in depression may have been hindered by assuming that depression is a unitary and relatively homogeneous disorder, mainly of mood, rather than addressing particular, clinically crucial features or diagnostic subtypes. Many studies have implicated quantitative alterations of motility rhythms in depressed human subjects. Since a candidate feature of great public-health significance is the unusually high risk of suicidal behavior in depressive disorders, we studied correlations between a measure (vulnerability index [VI] derived from multi-scale characteristics of daily-motility rhythms in depressed subjects (n = 36 monitored with noninvasive, wrist-worn, electronic actigraphs and their self-assessed level of suicidal thinking operationalized as a wish to die. Patient-subjects had a stable clinical diagnosis of bipolar-I, bipolar-II, or unipolar major depression (n = 12 of each type. VI was associated inversely with suicidal thinking (r = -0.61 with all subjects and r = -0.73 with bipolar disorder subjects; both p<0.0001 and distinguished patients with bipolar versus unipolar major depression with a sensitivity of 91.7% and a specificity of 79.2%. VI may be a useful biomarker of characteristic features of major depression, contribute to differentiating bipolar and unipolar depression, and help to detect risk of suicide. An objective biomarker of suicide-risk could be advantageous when patients are unwilling or unable to share suicidal thinking with clinicians.

  8. Loss of Resources and Hurricane Experience as Predictors of Postpartum Depression Among Women in Southern Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Matthew; Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre; Pridjian, Gabriella; Elkind-Hirsch, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background After a natural disaster, mental disorders often become a long-term public health concern. Previous studies under smaller-scale natural disaster conditions suggest loss of psychosocial resources is associated with psychological distress. Methods We examined the occurrence of depression 6 and 12 months postpartum among 208 women residing in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, who were pregnant during or immediately after Hurricane Katrina's landfall. Based on the Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, we explored the contribution of both tangible/financial and nontangible (psychosocial) loss of resources (LOR) on the outcome of depression, measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). We also investigated the influence on depression of individuals' hurricane experience through a Hurricane Experience Score (HES) that includes such factors as witnessing death, contact with flood waters, and injury to self or family members. Results Both tangible and nontangible LOR were associated with depression cross-sectionally and prospectively. Severe hurricane exposure (high HES) was also associated with depression. Regression analysis showed LOR-associated depression was explained almost entirely by nontangible rather than tangible factors. Consistent with COR theory, however, nontangible LOR explained some of the association between severe hurricane exposure and depression in our models. A similar result was seen prospectively for depression at 12 months, even controlling for depression symptoms at 6 months. Conclusions These results suggest the need for preventive measures aimed at preserving psychosocial resources to reduce the long-term effects of disasters. PMID:20438305

  9. A reliability generalization meta-analysis of coefficient alpha for the Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassar, Matt; Bradley, Greg

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a meta-analytic method known as reliability generalization to investigate the score reliability for a popular depression measure: The Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale. We used the technique to provide an aggregate estimate of coefficient alpha across empirical studies that have employed the measure over time and across populations. Furthermore, we identified sample and demographic characteristics associated with variance in coefficient alpha. We discuss conditions associated with variability in coefficient alpha and alert researchers and practitioners to appropriate uses of the scale based on common reliability benchmarks.

  10. Striatal dopaminergic activity (FDOPA-PET) associated with cognitive items of a depression scale (MADRS) in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerts, Janneke; Leenders, Klaus L.; Koning, Marthe; Portman, Axel T.; van Beilen, Marije

    2007-01-01

    Motor symptoms form the hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD), although other features such as depression are often present. Currently-used depression rating scales measure affective and somatic symptoms. These somatic symptoms of depression can also be core PD symptoms, suggesting an overlap of symp

  11. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS: validation in a Greek general hospital sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patapis Paulos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS has been used in several languages to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients with good results. Methods The HADS was administered to 521 participants (275 controls and 246 inpatients and outpatients of the Internal Medicine and Surgical Departments in 'Attikon' General Hospital in Athens. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were used as 'gold standards' for depression and anxiety respectively. Results The HADS presented high internal consistency; Cronbach's α cofficient was 0.884 (0.829 for anxiety and 0.840 for depression and stability (test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient 0.944. Factor analysis showed a two-factor structure. The HADS showed high concurrent validity; the correlations of the scale and its subscales with the BDI and the STAI were high (0.722 – 0.749. Conclusion The Greek version of HADS showed good psychometric properties and could serve as a useful tool for clinicians to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients.

  12. Confirmatory factor analysis of the portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 Análisis factorial confirmatoria de la versión portuguesa de la Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 Análise fatorial confirmatória da versão portuguesa da Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21

    OpenAIRE

    João Luís Alves Apóstolo; Barry Allen Tanner; Cynthia Lee Arfken

    2012-01-01

    To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years) comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The co...

  13. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  14. Psychometric properties of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 in older primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloster, Andrew T; Rhoades, Howard M; Novy, Diane; Klotsche, Jens; Senior, Ashley; Kunik, Mark; Wilson, Nancy; Stanley, Melinda A

    2008-10-01

    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) was designed to efficiently measure the core symptoms of anxiety and depression and has demonstrated positive psychometric properties in adult samples of anxiety and depression patients and student samples. Despite these findings, the psychometric properties of the DASS remain untested in older adults, for whom the identification of efficient measures of these constructs is especially important. To determine the psychometric properties of the DASS 21-item version in older adults, we analyzed data from 222 medical patients seeking treatment to manage worry. Consistent with younger samples, a three-factor structure best fit the data. Results also indicated good internal consistency, excellent convergent validity, and good discriminative validity, especially for the Depression scale. Receiver operating curve analyses indicated that the DASS-21 predicted the diagnostic presence of generalized anxiety disorder and depression as well as other commonly used measures. These data suggest that the DASS may be used with older adults in lieu of multiple scales designed to measure similar constructs, thereby reducing participant burden and facilitating assessment in settings with limited assessment resources.

  15. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale in patients with tinnitus and hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Mohammed Abdel Motaal; Elmagd, Manal Hassan Abo; Elbadry, Mohammed Mohammed; Kader, Rafeek Mohammed Abdel

    2014-08-01

    The study was proposed to evaluate co-morbid depression, anxiety and stress associated with tinnitus patients. The study was done on 196 subjects: 100 patients suffering from subjective tinnitus associated with hearing loss (tinnitus group), 45 patients suffering from hearing loss only (hearing loss group) and 50 healthy subjects not suffering from tinnitus or hearing loss (control group); the age ranges from 20 to 60 years old. The studied sample was subjected to full ear, nose and throat examinations and audiological evaluation. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) was developed by Levibond H and Levibond F to assess three self-report scales designed to measure the negative emotional status of depression, anxiety and stress. All patients and control group were evaluated by DASS. (1) Depression: males were affected more than females. All patients over 60 years were affected by depression. The duration of tinnitus seems correlating with the severity of depression. Only 2 patients (4.3 %) of the hearing loss group suffer from depression. (2) Anxiety: 90 % of males suffer from anxiety as compared to 83.3 % females. The age group 20-29 years old suffers more than other age groups. Only 4 patients (8.7 %) of hearing loss group suffer from anxiety. (3) Stress: females seem to be affected by the stress (76.7 %) more than males (67.5). Patients in age group 30-39 suffer the most from the disease. There is a direct correlation between duration of tinnitus and severity of stress. No one of the hearing loss group suffers from stress. In conclusion, depression, anxiety and stress should be taken into consideration in the treatment of patients suffering from tinnitus.

  16. Validity of Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D scale in a sample of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R Quiñones

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Optimal depression screening necessitates measurement tools that are valid across varied populations and in the presence of comorbidities. Methods: This study assessed the test properties of two versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale against psychiatric diagnoses established by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview among a clinical sample of US Veterans deployed during Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn. Participants (N = 359 recruited from two Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals completed a clinical interview, structured diagnostic interview, and self-reported measures. Results: Based on diagnostic interview and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition criteria, 29.5% of the sample met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder and 26.5% met diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder. Both Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-20 and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-10 scales performed well and almost identically against the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview-major depressive disorder in identifying Veterans with major depressive disorder (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-20 area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve 91%; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-10 area under the ROC curve 90%. Overall, higher cut points for the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scales performed better in correctly identifying true positives and true negatives for major depressive disorder (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-20 cut point 18+ sensitivity 92% specificity 72%; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression-10 cut point 10+ sensitivity 92% specificity 69%. Conclusions: The specificity of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scales was poor among Veterans with co-occurring post-traumatic stress disorder (13% and 16%. Veterans with post

  17. Decomposition of formaldehyde by EPD photocatalyst filters in HVAC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chien-Chih Chen; Ching-Song Jwo; Tun-Ping Teng

    2011-01-01

    This study used electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to apply titanium oxide (TiO2) coating on stainless steel filters and investigated the effectiveness of photocatalytic oxidation of formaldehyde by TiO2 under various conditions of heating ventilation air conditioning (HVAC).The results showed photocatalytic efficiency could reach 35.59% at 21 ℃ and 36.39% at 26℃ with 7 photocatalyst filters and 5 UVC lamps,the overall efficiency of formaldehyde removal of 52.37% at 21 ℃,and 56.8% at 26℃.By all experimental data can be found that the temperature for the photocatalytic performance is not obvious in the range of this study.

  18. Neighborhood adversity, ethnic diversity, and weak social cohesion and social networks predict high rates of maternal depressive symptoms: a critical realist ecological study in South Western Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, John Graeme; Kemp, Lynn Ann; Jalaludin, Bin Badrudin; Phung, Hai Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study reported here is to explore ecological covariate and latent variable associations with perinatal depressive symptoms in South Western Sydney for the purpose of informing subsequent theory generation of perinatal context, depression, and the developmental origins of health and disease. Mothers (n = 15,389) delivering in 2002 and 2003 were assessed at two to three weeks after delivery for risk factors for depressive symptoms. The binary outcome variables were Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS)> 9 and > 12. Aggregated EPDS > 9 was analyzed for 101 suburbs. Suburb-level variables were drawn from the 2001 Australian Census, New South Wales Crime Statistics, and aggregated individual-level risk factors. Analysis included exploratory factor analysis, univariate and multivariate likelihood, and Bayesian linear regression with conditional autoregressive components. The exploratory factor analysis identified six factors: neighborhood adversity, social cohesion, health behaviors, housing quality, social services, and support networks. Variables associated with neighborhood adversity, social cohesion, social networks, and ethnic diversity were consistently associated with aggregated depressive symptoms. The findings support the theoretical proposition that neighborhood adversity causes maternal psychological distress and depression within the context of social buffers including social networks, social cohesion, and social services.

  19. Rasch analysis of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (hads for use in motor neurone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Pamela J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS is commonly used to assess symptoms of anxiety and depression in motor neurone disease (MND. The measure has never been specifically validated for use within this population, despite questions raised about the scale's validity. This study seeks to analyse the construct validity of the HADS in MND by fitting its data to the Rasch model. Methods The scale was administered to 298 patients with MND. Scale assessment included model fit, differential item functioning (DIF, unidimensionality, local dependency and category threshold analysis. Results Rasch analyses were carried out on the HADS total score as well as depression and anxiety subscales (HADS-T, D and A respectively. After removing one item from both of the seven item scales, it was possible to produce modified HADS-A and HADS-D scales which fit the Rasch model. An 11-item higher-order HADS-T total scale was found to fit the Rasch model following the removal of one further item. Conclusion Our results suggest that a modified HADS-A and HADS-D are unidimensional, free of DIF and have good fit to the Rasch model in this population. As such they are suitable for use in MND clinics or research. The use of the modified HADS-T as a higher-order measure of psychological distress was supported by our data. Revised cut-off points are given for the modified HADS-A and HADS-D subscales.

  20. Screening for depressive symptoms in adolescents at school: New validity evidences on the short form of the Reynolds Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aritio-Solana, Rebeca; Inchausti, Félix; Chocarro de Luis, Edurne; Lucas Molina, Beatriz; Pérez de Albéniz, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to assess the depressive symptomatology and to gather new validity evidences of the Reynolds Depression Scale-Short form (RADS-SF) in a representative sample of youths. The sample consisted of 2914 adolescents with a mean age of 15.85 years (SD = 1.68). We calculated the descriptive statistics and internal consistency of the RADS-SF scores. Also, confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) at the item level and successive multigroup CFAs to test measurement invariance, were conducted. Latent mean differences across gender and educational level groups were estimated, and finally, we studied the sources of validity evidences with other external variables. The level of internal consistency of the RADS-SF Total score by means of Ordinal alpha was .89. Results from CFAs showed that the one-dimensional model displayed appropriate goodness of-fit indices with CFI value over .95, and RMSEA value under .08. In addition, the results support the strong measurement invariance of the RADS-SF scores across gender and age. When latent means were compared, statistically significant differences were found by gender and age. Females scored 0.347 over than males in Depression latent variable, whereas older adolescents scored 0.111 higher than the younger group. In addition, the RADS-SF score was associated with the RADS scores. The results suggest that the RADS-SF could be used as an efficient screening test to assess self-reported depressive symptoms in adolescents from the general population. PMID:28222193

  1. Measurement invariance of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 across medical student genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Peyman; Nozari, Farnoosh; Ahrari, Forooghosadat; Bagheri, Zahra

    2017-03-30

    This study aimed to assess whether male and female Iranian medical students perceived the meaning of the items in the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 consistently. A convenience sample of 783 preclinical medical students from the first to sixth semester was invited to this cross-sectional study. Of the 477 respondents, 238 were male and 239 were female. All participants completed the Persian version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21. The graded response model was used to assess measurement invariance of the instrument across the gender groups. Categorical confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the construct validity of the measure. Moreover, internal consistency was assessed via Cronbach's Alpha. Statistically significant differential item functioning was flagged for just item 6 in the depression subscales (c(2)=6.5, df=1, p=0.011). However, removing or retaining the item 6 in the stress subscale did not change our findings significantly, when we compared stress scores across two genders. The results of categorical confirmatory factor analysis supported the fit of the three-factor model of Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21. Moreover, Cronbach's alpha was greater than 0.7 in depression, anxiety and stress subscales. This study revealed that Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 is an invariant measure across male and female medical students. Hence, this reliable and valid instrument can be used for meaningful comparison of distress scores between medical student genders. Gender comparisons of medical students' psychological profiles provide a better insight into gender influences on the outcome of medical education and medical practice.

  2. Factorial and Discriminant Validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, John G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the factorial and discriminant validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale for 116 parents participating in family support programs. Factorial validity was adequate, and results indicated a moderate correlation between the CES-D and self-esteem and state anxiety. However, a high correlation was obtained…

  3. Psychometric Properties of an Arabic Version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Miriam Taouk; Lovibond, Peter; Laube, Roy; Megahead, Hamido A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To translate and evaluate the psychometric properties of an Arabic-language version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS). Method: The items were translated, back translated, refined, and tested in an Australian immigrant sample (N = 220). Results: Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the Arabic DASS discriminates between…

  4. Measurement Invariance of the Reynolds Depression Adolescent Scale across Gender and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Wells, Craig; Paino, Mercedes; Lemos-Giraldez, Serafin; Villazon-Garcia, Ursula; Sierra, Susana; Garcia-Portilla Gonzalez, Ma Paz; Bobes, Julio; Muniz, Jose

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to examine measurement invariance of the Reynolds Depression Adolescent Scale (RADS) (Reynolds, 1987) across gender and age in a representative sample of nonclinical adolescents. The sample was composed of 1,659 participants, 801 males (48.3%), with a mean age of 15.9 years (SD = 1.2). Confirmatory…

  5. Validation of Geriatric Depression Scale--5 Scores among Sedentary Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, David X.; McAuley, Edward; Motl, Robert W.; Elavsky, Steriani; Konopack, James F.; Jerome, Gerald J.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the validity of Geriatric Depression Scale--5 (GDS-5) scores among older sedentary adults based on its structural properties and relationship with external criteria. Participants from two samples (Ns = 185 and 93; M ages = 66 and 67 years) completed baseline assessments as part of randomized controlled exercise trials.…

  6. A Brief Version of the Geriatric Depression Scale for the Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheung-Tak; Chan, Alfred C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Elderly persons (N=310) attending outpatient psychiatric clinics were given an interview on the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (T. L. Brink et al., 1982; J. A. Yesavage et al., 1983) and received an independent psychiatric evaluation. A 3-step binary logistic regression showed that 2 items measuring positive affect and 2 others measuring…

  7. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that depression is000  a common comorbid health issue in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Reviews have also concluded that depression in diabetes is associated with higher HbA1c levels, less optimal self-care behaviours, lower quality of life, incident vascular...... complications and higher mortality rates. However, longitudinal studies into the course of depression in people with type 1 diabetes remain scarce. In this issue of Diabetologia, Kampling and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4123-0 ) report the 5 year trajectories of depression in adults with newly diagnosed...... type 1 diabetes (mean age, 28 years). Their baseline results showed that shortly after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes a major depressive episode was diagnosed in approximately 6% of participants, while 8% suffered from an anxiety disorder. The longitudinal depression data showed that, in a 5 year...

  8. [The ICD-10 Symptom Rating (ISR): validation of the depression scale in a clinical sample].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Wolfram Alexis; Loew, Thomas; von Heymann, Friedrich; Stadtmüller, Godehard; Georgi, Alexander; Tischinger, Michael; Strom, Frederik; Mutschler, Friederike; Tritt, Karin

    2015-06-01

    The ICD-10 Symptom Rating (ISR) 1 measures the severity of psychiatric disorders with 29 items on 5 subscales as comprehensively as possible. The following syndromes are measured: Depressive syndrome, anxiety syndrome, obsessive-compulsive syndrome, Somatoform syndrome, eating disorder syndrome as well as additional items that cover various mental syndromes, and an overall score. The study reports findings on the validity and sensitivity to change of the depression subscale (ISR-D). In a clinical sample of N=949 inpatients with depression spectrum disorders the convergent validity was determined by correlation with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) 3 and the subscale "depression" of the Symptom-Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) 4. The high correlation between the different instruments confirms the validity of the ISR-Depression Scale. The sensitivity to change of the ISR seems higher than that of the BDI and the SCL-90. Because of its economy and the good psychometric properties the ISR is recommended for use in clinical samples.

  9. A Psychometric Analysis of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scales--Parent Version in a School Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebesutani, Chad; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K.; Nakamura, Brad J.; Regan, Jennifer; Lynch, Roxanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale--Parent Version (RCADS-P) is a parent-report questionnaire of youth anxiety and depression with scales corresponding to the "DSM" diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and major depressive…

  10. A Psychometric Analysis of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scales--Parent Version in a School Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebesutani, Chad; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K.; Nakamura, Brad J.; Regan, Jennifer; Lynch, Roxanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale--Parent Version (RCADS-P) is a parent-report questionnaire of youth anxiety and depression with scales corresponding to the "DSM" diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and major depressive…

  11. Standardized clinical outcome rating scale for depression for use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Posternak, Michael A; Chelminski, Iwona; Friedman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The integration of research into clinical practice to conduct effectiveness studies faces multiple obstacles. One obstacle is the burden of completing research measures of outcome. A simple, reliable, and valid measure that could be rated at every visit, incorporated into a clinician's progress note, and reflect the DSM-IV definition of a major depressive episode (including partial and full remission from the episode) would enhance the ability to conduct effectiveness research. The goal of the present study was to examine the reliability and validity of such a measure. Three hundred and three psychiatric outpatients who were being treated for a DSM-IV major depressive episode were rated on the Standardized Clinical Outcome Rating for Depression (SCOR-D), 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, and the Global Assessment of Functioning. We examined the correlation between the SCOR-D and the other measures, and conducted an analyses of variance to compare mean values on these measures for each rating point on the SCOR-D. The inter-rater reliability of the SCOR-D dimensional ratings and categorical determination of remission were high. The SCOR-D was highly correlated with the other scales, and there were significant differences on the other measures of depression severity between each adjacent rating level of the SCOR-D. The SCOR-D is a brief standardized outcome measure linked to the DSM-IV approach toward defining remission that can be incorporated into routine clinical practice without adding undue burden to the treating clinician with some evidence of reliability and validity. This measure could make it more feasible to conduct effectiveness studies in clinical practice.

  12. The validity of self-rating depression scales in patients with chronic widespread pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Omerovic, Emina; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of depression in chronic pain patients by self-rating questionnaires developed and validated for use in normal and/or psychiatric populations is common. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) in a sample...... of females with chronic widespread pain (CWP). METHOD: A total of 263 females diagnosed with CWP and referred for rehabilitation completed the MDI as part of the baseline evaluation. Rasch analysis was applied to this dataset. Rasch measurement models allow detailed analyses of an instrument's rating scale...

  13. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  14. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  15. Prenatal exposure to maternal depressed mood and the MTHFR C677T variant affect SLC6A4 methylation in infants at birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Devlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prenatal and early postnatal exposure to maternal depression may "program" childhood behavior via epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation. Methylenetetrahydro-folate reductase (MTHFR is an important enzyme in the generation of methyl groups for DNA methylation. The common MTHFR C677T variant is associated with depression in men and non-pregnant women, and with global changes in DNA methylation. This study investigated the effect of maternal MTHFR C677T genotype on antenatal maternal mood, and their impact on the gene-specific methylation in pregnant women and their newborn infants. The methylation status of SLC6A4, which encodes the transmembrane serotonin transporter, and BDNF, which encodes brain derived neurotrophic factor, were assessed because of their potential role in behaviour. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Depressed mood was assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D in women (n = 82, all taking folate during the 2(nd and 3(rd trimesters of pregnancy. The methylation status of SLC6A4 and BDNF were assessed in 3rd trimester maternal peripheral leukocytes and in umbilical cord leukocytes collected from their infants at birth. Women with the MTHFR 677TT genotype had greater 2(nd trimester depressed mood (p<0.05. Increased 2(nd trimester maternal depressed mood (EPDS scores was associated with decreased maternal and infant SLC6A4 promoter methylation (p<0.05, but had no effect on BDNF promoter methylation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings show that the MTHFR C677T variant is associated with greater depressed mood during pregnancy. We further showed that prenatal exposure to maternal depressed mood affects gene-specific DNA methylation patterns. These findings support the concept that alterations in epigenetic processes may contribute to developmental programming of behaviour by maternal depression.

  16. The experience of depression, anxiety, and mania among perinatal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J Jo; Silver, Richard K; Elue, Rita; Adams, Marci G; La Porte, Laura M; Cai, Li; Kim, Jong Bae; Gibbons, Robert D

    2016-10-01

    We assessed differential item functioning (DIF) based on computerized adaptive testing (CAT) to examine how perinatal mood disorders differ from adult psychiatric disorders. The CAT-Mental Health (CAT-MH) was administered to 1614 adult psychiatric outpatients and 419 perinatal women with IRB approval. We examined individual item-level differences using logistic regression and overall score differences by scoring the perinatal data using the original bifactor model calibration based on the psychiatric sample data and a new bifactor model calibration based on the perinatal data and computing their correlation. To examine convergent validity, we computed correlations of the CAT-MH with contemporaneously administered Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scales (EPDS). The rate of major depression in the perinatal sample was 13 %. Rates of anxiety, mania, and suicide risk were 5, 6, and 0.4 %, respectively. One of 66 depression items, one of 69 anxiety items, and 15 of 53 mania items exhibited DIF (i.e., failure to discriminate between high and low levels of the disorder) in the perinatal sample based on the psychiatric sample calibration. Removal of these items resulted in correlations of the original and perinatal calibrations of r = 0.983 for depression, r = 0.986 for anxiety, and r = 0.932 for mania. The 91.3 % of cases were concordantly categorized as either "at-risk" or "low-risk" between the EPDS and the perinatal calibration of the CAT-MH. There was little evidence of DIF for depression and anxiety symptoms in perinatal women. This was not true for mania. Now calibrated for perinatal women, the CAT-MH can be evaluated for longitudinal symptom monitoring.

  17. Dimensionality and scale properties of the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the DiaDDzoB study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Victor JM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a common complication in type 2 diabetes (DM2, affecting 10-30% of patients. Since depression is underrecognized and undertreated, it is important that reliable and validated depression screening tools are available for use in patients with DM2. The Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS is a widely used method for screening depression. However, there is still debate about the dimensionality of the test. Furthermore, the EDS was originally developed to screen for depression in postpartum women. Empirical evidence that the EDS has comparable measurement properties in both males and females suffering from diabetes is lacking however. Methods In a large sample (N = 1,656 of diabetes patients, we examined: (1 dimensionality; (2 gender-related item bias; and (3 the screening properties of the EDS using factor analysis and item response theory. Results We found evidence that the ten EDS items constitute a scale that is essentially one dimensional and has adequate measurement properties. Three items showed differential item functioning (DIF, two of them showed substantial DIF. However, at the scale level, DIF had no practical impact. Anhedonia (the inability to be able to laugh or enjoy and sleeping problems were the most informative indicators for being able to differentiate between the diagnostic groups of mild and severe depression. Conclusions The EDS constitutes a sound scale for measuring an attribute of general depression. Persons can be reliably measured using the sum score. Screening rules for mild and severe depression are applicable to both males and females.

  18. Association between maternal postnatal depressive symptoms and infants' communication skills: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, Lisbeth; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Smith, Lars; Birkeland, Marianne Skogbrott; Slinning, Kari

    2016-11-01

    Postnatal depression (PND) is associated with adverse effects on a broad range of child outcomes, including language problems. The current study aimed to investigate if the time of exposure to maternal PND symptoms measured with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 6 weeks, 4 months and 6 months postpartum were related to the infants' communication skills measured with the Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ) at 12 and 24 months. Secondly, to study to what extent the number of exposures to high level of PND symptoms (i.e., EPDS score≥10) might be associated with level of communication skills later (at 12 and 24 months), and last, to determine to what extent maternal PND symptoms at 6 weeks were related to changes in the developmental course of communication skills from 4 to 24 months. 1555 children and their mothers participate in the study. Regression analyses indicated that PND at 4 months were associated with lower levels of communicative skills at 12 (coefficient -0.37, 95% CI -0.63 to -0.12, p=0.004) and 24 months (coefficient -0.34, CI -0.56 to -0.13, p=0.002). Infants of mothers with an EPDS sum score≥10 obtained at a minimum of two time points, had significantly worse communicative skills at 12 months than infants of mothers with no indication of PND (difference -6.12, CI -11.14 to -1.09, p=0.017). No such significant relations were found at 24 months. However, linear mixed effects analysis showed that mothers' depressive symptoms at 6 weeks were not significantly related to changes in infant communication scores from age 4 to 24 months. These findings suggest that symptoms of maternal PND symptoms should be taken into account for communication development in infancy.

  19. Factor analysis of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale from a large cancer population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam B; Selby, Peter J; Velikova, Galina; Stark, Dan; Wright, E Penny; Gould, Ann; Cull, Ann

    2002-06-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used as a tool for assessing psychological distress in patients and non-clinical groups. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results regarding the factor structure of the questionnaire for different groups of patients, and the general population. This study investigated the factor structure of the HADS in a large heterogeneous cancer population of 1474 patients. It also sought to investigate emerging evidence that the HADS conforms to the tripartite model of anxiety and depression (Clark & Watson, 1993), and to test the proposal that detection rates for clinical cases of anxiety and depression could be enhanced by partialling out the effects of higher order factors from the HADS (Dunbar et al., 2000). The results demonstrated a two-factor structure corresponding to the Anxiety and Depression subscales of the questionnaire. The factor structure remained stable for different subgroups of the sample, for males and females, as well as for different age groups, and a subgroup of metastatic cancer patients. The two factors were highly correlated (r =.52) and subsequent secondary factor analyses demonstrated a single higher order factor corresponding to psychological distress or negative affectivity. We concluded that the HADS comprises two factors corresponding to anhedonia and autonomic anxiety, which share a common variance with a primary factor namely psychological distress, and that the subscales of the HADS, rather than the residual scores (e.g. Dunbar et al., 2000) were more effective at detecting clinical cases of anxiety and depression.

  20. File list: ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.CS1AN [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.CS1AN hg19 All antigens Epidermis CS1AN SRX573184,SRX573187,SRX573...181,SRX573178,SRX573186,SRX573180,SRX573183,SRX573185,SRX573182,SRX573176,SRX573179,SRX573177 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Epd.05.AllAg.CS1AN.bed ...

  1. Reliability and validity of Anxiety and Depression Hospital Scales (HADS: Iranian patients with anxiety and depression disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviani H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Iranian researchers and scientists in the fields of psychiatry and psychology undoubtedly need to spend more time and make considerable efforts to prepare and validate Persian versions of measurements. The present study was designed to validate HADS in Iranian clinically anxious and depressed patients compared to normal population."n"n Methods: 261 anxious and depressed patients referred to the inpatient clinic of Rouzbeh Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, and 261 healthy volunteers (matched for their sex were tested using HADS, and two additional clinical tools, ie., BDI & BAI. Then the patients were interviewed by a psychiatrist or a psychologist (using DSM IV checklist and rated for their anxiety and depression severity levels based on a 10-point scale from 1 to 10. BDI and BAI were regarded as objective device providing other external criteria to examine validity further. Moreover, to assess reliability 10% of the patients (n= 27 were randomly selected and re-tested after three days."n"n Results: Findings showed that all measures and their subscales proved to be valid and reliable with good internal consistencies in Iranian depressed and anxious patients. This study provides clinicians and researchers with

  2. Complex emotions, complex problems: understanding the experiences of perinatal depression among new mothers in urban Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andajani-Sutjahjo, Sari; Manderson, Lenore; Astbury, Jill

    2007-03-01

    In this article, we explore how Javanese women identify and speak of symptoms of depression in late pregnancy and early postpartum and describe their subjective accounts of mood disorders. The study, conducted in the East Java region of Indonesia in 2000, involved in-depth interviews with a subgroup of women (N = 41) who scored above the cutoff score of 12/13 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) during pregnancy, at six weeks postpartum, or on both occasions. This sample was taken from a larger cohort study (N cohort = 488) researching the sociocultural factors that contribute to women's emotional well-being in early motherhood. The women used a variety of Indonesian and Javanese terms to explain their emotional states during pregnancy and in early postpartum, some of which coincided with the feelings described on the EPDS and others of which did not. Women attributed their mood variations to multiple causes including: premarital pregnancy, chronic illness in the family, marital problems, lack of support from partners or family networks, their husband's unemployment, and insufficient family income due to giving up their own paid work. We argue for the importance of understanding the context of childbearing in order to interpret the meaning of depression within complex social, cultural, and economic contexts.

  3. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Different people have different symptoms. Some symptoms of depression include: Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness ...

  4. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty may trigger depression in some people. Medical illness – ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary ...

  5. Predictors of Depression Symptoms Among Low-Income Women Exposed to Perinatal Intimate Partner Violence (IPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastello, Jennifer C; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Gaffney, Kathleen F; Kodadek, Marie P; Sharps, Phyllis W; Bullock, Linda C

    2016-08-01

    Women experiencing perinatal intimate partner violence (IPV) may be at increased risk for depression. Baseline data was analyzed from 239 low-income pregnant women participating in an intervention study designed to reduce exposure to IPV. Depression risk was assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and IPV factors were measured with the Conflict Tactics Scale-Revised (CTS-2). Stepwise regression was conducted to identify predictors of risk for depression. Race (p = 0.028), psychological IPV (p = 0.035) and sexual IPV (p = 0.031) were strongly associated with risk for depression. Regression results indicated that women experiencing severe psychological IPV were more likely to develop depression (OR 3.16, 95 % CI 1.246, 8.013) than those experiencing severe physical or sexual IPV. Experiencing severe psychological IPV during pregnancy is strongly linked to risk for depression. Routine screening for psychological IPV may increase identification and treatment of women at high risk for depression during pregnancy.

  6. Measurement equivalence of the CES-D 8 depression-scale among the ageing population in eleven European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missinne, Sarah; Vandeviver, Christophe; Van de Velde, Sarah; Bracke, Piet

    2014-07-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent mental disorders in later life. However, despite considerable research attention, great confusion remains regarding the association between ageing and depression. There is doubt as to whether a depression scale performs identically for different age groups and countries. Although measurement equivalence is a crucial prerequisite for valid comparisons across age groups and countries, it has not been established for the eight-item version of the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D8). Using multi-group confirmatory factor analysis, we assess configural, metric, and scalar measurement equivalence across two age groups (50-64 years of age and 65 or older) in eleven European countries, employing data from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement (SHARE). Results indicate that the construct of depression is comparable across age and country groups, allowing the substantive interpretation of correlates and mean levels of depressive symptoms.

  7. Impact of terrorism on health and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale screening in medical students, Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasim, Sara; Khan, Mahjabeen; Aziz, Sina

    2014-03-01

    To determine the association of terrorism with psychiatric morbidity by Hospital Anxiety Depression scale among medical students in Karachi, Pakistan. The questionnaire based cross-sectional survey was conducted from February to March 2011 and comprised students of the Institute of Physical and Medical Rehabilitation and the Dow Medical College, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi. The study tool was a validated Hospital Anxiety Depression scale questionnaire. The data was analysed on SPSS 16. Factor analysis was performed to check which factors had the most influence. Overall there were 1036 respondents. The impact of terrorism on physical, social and mental health was 40 (3.9%), 178 (17.2%) and 818 (79%) respectively. There was an association of terrorism in 980 (84.6%) respondents with psychiatric morbidity. There was an association of terrorism with psychiatric morbidity in majority of respondents. The significant risk factors were age, gender, physical, mental and social health and the desire to live in Pakistan.

  8. Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS-21): psychometric analysis across four racial groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Peter J

    2007-09-01

    Growing cross-cultural awareness has led researchers to examine frequently used research instruments and assessment tools in racially diverse populations. The present study was conducted to assess the psychometric characteristics of the 21-item version of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales (DASS-21) among different racial groups. The DASS-21 was chosen because it appears to be a reliable and easy to administer measure, ideal for both clinical and research purposes. Results suggest that the internal consistency, and convergent and divergent validity of the DASS-21 are similar across racial groups. Multigroup CFA, however, indicated that item loadings were invariant, while scale covariances were not invariant. This suggests that, although the items may load similarly on the depression, anxiety and stress constructs, these constructs may be differentially inter-related across groups. Implications for application in clinical practice are discussed.

  9. Rasch model analysis of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS)

    OpenAIRE

    Tennant Alan; Shea Tracey L; Pallant Julie F

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background There is a growing awareness of the need for easily administered, psychometrically sound screening tools to identify individuals with elevated levels of psychological distress. Although support has been found for the psychometric properties of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS) using classical test theory approaches it has not been subjected to Rasch analysis. The aim of this study was to use Rasch analysis to assess the psychometric properties of the DASS-21...

  10. The improved Clinical Global Impression Scale (iCGI: development and validation in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadouri Alane

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI is frequently used in medical care and clinical research because of its face validity and practicability. This study proposes to improve the reliability of the Clinical Global Impression (CGI scale in depressive disorders by the use of a semi-standardized interview, a new response format, and a Delphi procedure. Methods Thirty patients hospitalised for a major depressive episode were filmed at T1 (first week in hospital and at T2 (2 weeks later during a 5' specific interview. The Hamilton Depressive Rating Scale and the Symptom Check List were also rated. Eleven psychiatrists rated these videos using either the usual CGI response format or an improved response format, with or without a Delphi procedure. Results The new response format slightly improved (but not significantly the interrater agreement, the Delphi procedure did not. The best results were obtained when ratings by 4 independent raters were averaged. In this situation, intraclass correlation coefficients were about 0.9. Conclusion The Clinical Global Impression is a useful approach in psychiatry since it apprehends patients in their entirety. This study shows that it is possible to quantify such impressions with a high level of interrater agreement.

  11. The Effects of Donepezil on 15-Item Geriatric Depression Scale Structure in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngsoon Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In Alzheimer disease (AD, depression is among the most common accompanying neuropsychiatric symptoms and has different clinical manifestations when compared with early-life depression. In patients with drug-naïve AD, we tried to explore the structure of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15 and the effect of donepezil on these substructures. Methods: GDS15, cognitive function, and activities of daily living function tests were administered to 412 patients with probable AD who had not been medicated before visiting the hospital. Using principal component analysis, three factors were identified. The patients with AD who received only donepezil were retrospectively analyzed and we compared the change of cognition and GDS15 subgroup after donepezil medication. Results: Our study identified three factors and revealed that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale. The Barthel index was significantly correlated with factor 1 (positively and factor 2 (negatively. The Korean version of the MMSE (K-MMSE was significantly correlated with factor 2 and factor 3. Compared to the baseline state, K-MMSE and GDS15 showed significant improvement after taking donepezil. Among GDS15 subgroups, factor 2 and factor 3 showed significant improvement after donepezil treatment. Conclusions: These results suggest that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale and donepezil differentially affects the GDS15 subgroup in AD.

  12. The Effects of Donepezil on 15-Item Geriatric Depression Scale Structure in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youngsoon; Kwak, Yong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In Alzheimer disease (AD), depression is among the most common accompanying neuropsychiatric symptoms and has different clinical manifestations when compared with early-life depression. In patients with drug-naïve AD, we tried to explore the structure of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15) and the effect of donepezil on these substructures. Methods GDS15, cognitive function, and activities of daily living function tests were administered to 412 patients with probable AD who had not been medicated before visiting the hospital. Using principal component analysis, three factors were identified. The patients with AD who received only donepezil were retrospectively analyzed and we compared the change of cognition and GDS15 subgroup after donepezil medication. Results Our study identified three factors and revealed that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale. The Barthel index was significantly correlated with factor 1 (positively) and factor 2 (negatively). The Korean version of the MMSE (K-MMSE) was significantly correlated with factor 2 and factor 3. Compared to the baseline state, K-MMSE and GDS15 showed significant improvement after taking donepezil. Among GDS15 subgroups, factor 2 and factor 3 showed significant improvement after donepezil treatment. Conclusions These results suggest that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale and donepezil differentially affects the GDS15 subgroup in AD.

  13. Validation of the depression anxiety stress scales (DASS) 21 as a screening instrument for depression and anxiety in a rural community-based cohort of northern Vietnamese women

    OpenAIRE

    Tran Thach Duc; Tran Tuan; Fisher Jane

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Depression and anxiety are recognised increasingly as serious public health problems among women in low- and lower-middle income countries. The aim of this study was to validate the 21-item Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS21) for use in screening for these common mental disorders among rural women with young children in the North of Vietnam. Methods The DASS-21 was translated from English to Vietnamese, culturally verified, back-translated and administered to wome...

  14. The Validity of the Different Versions of the Hamilton Depression Scale in Separating Remission Rates of Placebo and Antidepressants in Clinical Trials of Major Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyle, Phillip Raphael; Lemming, Ole; Timmerby, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Our objectivewas to validate the different versions of the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) both psychometrically (scalability) and clinically in discriminating antidepressants from placebo in terms of remission rates in an 8-week clinical trial in the acute treatment of major depression...... in the longer HAM-D versions indicated smaller discriminating validity over placebo. The HAM-D6 indicated a dose effect on remission for vortioxetine in both moderate and severe major depression. The brief HAM-D6 was thus found superior to HAM-D17, HAM-D21, and HAM-D24 both in terms of scalability...

  15. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale is an adequate screening instrument for depression and anxiety disorder in adults with congential heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ju Ryoung; Huh, June; Song, Jinyoung; Kang, I-Seok; Park, Seung Woo; Chang, Sung-A; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook

    2017-09-05

    The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) is an instrument that is commonly used to screen for depression in patients with chronic disease, but the characteristics of the CES-D in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) have not yet been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the criterion validities and the predictive powers of the CES-D for depression and anxiety disorders in adults with CHD. Two hundred patients were screened with the CES-D and secondarily interviewed with a diagnostic instrument, i.e., the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Instrument. The sensitivity and specificity values of the CES-D were calculated by cross-tabulation at different cutoff scores. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess the optimal cutoff point for each disorder and to assess the predictive power of the instrument. The CES-D exhibited satisfactory criterion validities for depression and for all combinations of depression and/or anxiety. With a desired sensitivity of at least 80%, the optimal cutoff scores were 18. The predictive power of the CES-D in the patients was best for major depression and dysthymia (area under the ROC curve: 0.92) followed by the score for any combination of depression and/or anxiety (0.88). The use of CES-D to simultaneously screen for both depression and anxiety disorders may be useful in adults with CHD. CESDEP 212. Registered 2 March 2014 (retrospectively registered).

  16. Dimensional approach to symptom factors of major depressive disorder in Koreans, using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Jang, Eun Young; Kim, Daeho; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Jung-Bum; Jo, Sun-Jin; Park, Yong Chon

    2015-01-01

    Although major depressive disorder (MDD) has a variety of symptoms beyond the affective dimensions, the factor structure and contents of comprehensive psychiatric symptoms of this disorder have rarely been explored using the 18-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). We aimed to identify the factor structure of the 18-item BPRS in Korean MDD patients. A total of 258 MDD patients were recruited from a multicenter sample of the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS), depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), global severity (Clinical Global Impression of Severity Scale), suicidal ideation (Scale for Suicide Ideation), functioning (Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale), and quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-abbreviated version). Common factor analysis with oblique rotation was used to yield factor structure. A four-factor structure was designed and interpreted by the symptom dimensions to reflect mood disturbance, positive symptoms/apathy, bipolarity, and thought distortion/mannerism. These individual factors were also significantly correlated with clinical variables. The findings of this study support the view that the BPRS may be a promising measuring tool for the initial assessment of MDD patients. In addition, the four-factor structure of the BPRS may be useful in understanding the mood and psychotic characteristics of these patients.

  17. Dimensional approach to symptom factors of major depressive disorder in Koreans, using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: The Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Cheol Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although major depressive disorder (MDD has a variety of symptoms beyond the affective dimensions, the factor structure and contents of comprehensive psychiatric symptoms of this disorder have rarely been explored using the 18-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS. We aimed to identify the factor structure of the 18-item BPRS in Korean MDD patients. A total of 258 MDD patients were recruited from a multicenter sample of the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS, depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, global severity (Clinical Global Impression of Severity Scale, suicidal ideation (Scale for Suicide Ideation, functioning (Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale, and quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-abbreviated version. Common factor analysis with oblique rotation was used to yield factor structure. A four-factor structure was designed and interpreted by the symptom dimensions to reflect mood disturbance, positive symptoms/apathy, bipolarity, and thought distortion/mannerism. These individual factors were also significantly correlated with clinical variables. The findings of this study support the view that the BPRS may be a promising measuring tool for the initial assessment of MDD patients. In addition, the four-factor structure of the BPRS may be useful in understanding the mood and psychotic characteristics of these patients.

  18. Problems in Cross-Cultural Use of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: "No Butterflies in the Desert"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maters, G.A.; Sanderman, R.; Kim, A.Y.; Coyne, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to screen for anxiety and depression. A large literature is citable in support of its validity, but difficulties are increasingly being identified, such as inexplicably discrepant optimal cutpoints and inconsistent factor-stru

  19. Problems in Cross-Cultural Use of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale : "No Butterflies in the Desert"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maters, Gemma A.; Sanderman, Robbert; Kim, Aimee Y.; Coyne, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to screen for anxiety and depression. A large literature is citable in support of its validity, but difficulties are increasingly being identified, such as inexplicably discrepant optimal cutpoints and inconsistent factor-str

  20. Problems in Cross-Cultural Use of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: "No Butterflies in the Desert"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maters, G.A.; Sanderman, Robbert; Kim, A.Y.; Coyne, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to screen for anxiety and depression. A large literature is citable in support of its validity, but difficulties are increasingly being identified, such as inexplicably discrepant optimal cutpoints and inconsistent factor-stru

  1. A validation study of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in different groups of Dutch subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spinhoven, P; Ormel, J; Sloekers, PPA; Kempen, GIJM; Speckens, AEM; VanHemert, AM; van Hemert, A.M.

    Background. Research on the dimensional structure and reliability of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and its relationship with age is scarce. Moreover, its efficacy in determining the presence of depression in different patient groups has been questioned. Methods. Psychometric

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of the original 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale in nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Gerritsen, DL; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) in diagnosing depression in older nursing home patients. Method Three hundred and thirty-three older nursing home patients participated in a prospective cross-sectional study

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of the original 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale in nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Gerritsen, DL; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) in diagnosing depression in older nursing home patients. Method Three hundred and thirty-three older nursing home patients participated in a prospective cross-sectional study

  4. Validity of the definite and semidefinite questionnaire version of the Hamilton Depression Scale, the Hamilton subscale and the Melancholia Scale. Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Bent; Bech, Per

    2011-01-01

    -reporting versions (definitely and semidefinitely anchored) corresponding to the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Hamilton Subscale (HAM6), and the Bech-Rafaelsen Melancholia Scale (MES) were compared to each other and the clinician-rated version. The unidimensional property of the sum score in each scale...

  5. Performance of the Visual Analogue Scale of Happiness and of the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia in the Tremembé Epidemiological Study, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina G. César

    Full Text Available Depression is a major growing public health problem. Many population studies have found a significant relationship between depression and the presence of cognitive disorders. OBJECTIVE: To establish the correlation between the Visual Analogue Scale of Happiness and the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia in the population aged 60 years or over in the city of Tremembé, state of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An epidemiological survey involving home visits was carried out in the city of Tremembé. The sample was randomly selected by drawing 20% of the population aged 60 years or older from each of the city's census sectors. In this single-phase study, the assessment included clinical history, physical and neurological examination, cognitive evaluation, and application of both the Cornell Scale and the Analogue Scale of Happiness for psychiatric symptoms. The presence of depressive symptoms was defined as scores greater than or equal to 8 points on the Cornell Scale. RESULTS: A total of 623 subjects were evaluated and of these 251 (40.3% had clinically significant depressive symptoms on the Cornell Scale, with a significant association with female gender (p<0.001 and with lower education (p=0.012. One hundred and thirty-six participants (21.8% chose the unhappiness faces, with a significant association with age (p<0.001, female gender (p=0.020 and low socioeconomic status (p=0.012. Although there was a statistically significant association on the correlation test, the correlation was not high (rho=0.47. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of depressive symptoms was high in this sample and the Visual Analogue Scale of Happiness and Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia should not be used as similar alternatives for evaluating the presence of depressive symptoms, at least in populations with low educational level.

  6. Methods to identify postnatal depression in primary care: an integrated evidence synthesis and value of information analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, C; Gilbody, S; Brealey, S; Paulden, M; Palmer, S; Mann, R; Green, J; Morrell, J; Barkham, M; Light, K; Richards, D

    2009-07-01

    To provide an overview of methods to identify postnatal depression (PND) in primary care and to assess their validity, acceptability, clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, to model estimates of cost, to assess whether any method meets UK National Screening Committee (NSC) criteria and to identify areas for future research. Searches of 20 electronic databases (including MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CENTRAL, DARE and CDSR), forward citation searching, personal communication with authors and searching of reference lists. A generalised linear mixed model approach to the bivariate meta-analysis was undertaken for the validation review with quality assessment using QUADAS. Within the acceptability review, a textual narrative approach was employed to synthesise qualitative and quantitative research evidence. For the clinical and cost-effectiveness reviews methods outlined by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and the Cochrane Collaboration were followed. Probabilistic models were developed to estimate the costs associated with different identification strategies. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was the most frequently explored instrument across all of the reviews. In terms of test performance, postnatally the EPDS performed reasonably well: sensitivity ranged from 0.60 (specificity 0.97) to 0.96 (specificity 0.45) for major depression only; from 0.31 (specificity 0.99) to 0.91 (specificity 0.67) for major or minor depression; and from 0.38 (specificity 0.99) to 0.86 (specificity 0.87) for any psychiatric disorder. Evidence from the acceptability review indicated that, in the majority of studies, the EPDS was acceptable to women and health-care professionals when women were forewarned of the process, when the EPDS was administered in the home, with due attention to training, with empathetic skills of the health visitor and due consideration to positive responses to question 10 about self-harm. Suggestive evidence from the clinical

  7. The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale: A systematic review and reliability generalization meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueras, Jose A; Martín-Vivar, María; Sandin, Bonifacio; San Luis, Concepción; Pineda, David

    2017-08-15

    Anxiety and depression are among the most common mental disorders during childhood and adolescence. Among the instruments for the brief screening assessment of symptoms of anxiety and depression, the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) is one of the more widely used. Previous studies have demonstrated the reliability of the RCADS for different assessment settings and different versions. The aims of this study were to examine the mean reliability of the RCADS and the influence of the moderators on the RCADS reliability. We searched in EBSCO, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and NCBI databases and other articles manually from lists of references of extracted articles. A total of 146 studies were included in our meta-analysis. The RCADS showed robust internal consistency reliability in different assessment settings, countries, and languages. We only found that reliability of the RCADS was significantly moderated by the version of RCADS. However, these differences in reliability between different versions of the RCADS were slight and can be due to the number of items. We did not examine factor structure, factorial invariance across gender, age, or country, and test-retest reliability of the RCADS. The RCADS is a reliable instrument for cross-cultural use, with the advantage of providing more information with a low number of items in the assessment of both anxiety and depression symptoms in children and adolescents. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Sensitivity to changes during antidepressant treatment: a comparison of unidimensional subscales of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) in patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Isabella; Wagner, Stefanie; Mergl, Roland; Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Hautzinger, Martin; Henkel, Verena; Hegerl, Ulrich; Tadić, André

    2012-06-01

    In the efficacy evaluation of antidepressant treatments, the total score of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) is still regarded as the 'gold standard'. We previously had shown that the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) was more sensitive to detect depressive symptom changes than the HAMD17 (Helmreich et al. 2011). Furthermore, studies suggest that the unidimensional subscales of the HAMD, which capture the core depressive symptoms, outperform the full HAMD regarding the detection of antidepressant treatment effects. The aim of the present study was to compare several unidimensional subscales of the HAMD and the IDS regarding their sensitivity to changes in depression symptoms in a sample of patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression (MIND). Biweekly IDS-C28 and HAMD17 data from 287 patients of a 10-week randomised, placebo-controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of sertraline and cognitive-behavioural group therapy in patients with MIND were converted to subscale scores and analysed during the antidepressant treatment course. We investigated sensitivity to depressive change for all scales from assessment-to-assessment, in relation to depression severity level and placebo-verum differences. The subscales performed similarly during the treatment course, with slight advantages for some subscales in detecting treatment effects depending on the treatment modality and on the items included. Most changes in depressive symptomatology were detected by the IDS short scale, but regarding the effect sizes, it performed worse than most subscales. Unidimensional subscales are a time- and cost-saving option in judging drug therapy outcomes, especially in antidepressant treatment efficacy studies. However, subscales do not cover all facets of depression (e.g. atypical symptoms, sleep disturbances), which might be important for comprehensively understanding the nature of the disease depression. Therefore, the cost-to-benefit ratio must be

  9. Beside the Geriatric Depression Scale: the WHO-Five Well-being Index as a valid screening tool for depression in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Kramer, Dietmar; Saravo, Barbara; Mergl, Roland; Fejtkova, Sabina; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare criterion validities of the WHO-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5) and the Geriatric Depression Scale 15-item version (GDS-15) and 4-item version (GDS-4) as screening instruments for depression in nursing home residents. Data from 92 residents aged 65-97 years without severe cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Examination ≥15) were analysed. Criterion validities of the WHO-5, the GDS-15 and the GDS-4 were assessed against diagnoses of major and minor depression provided by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Subanalyses were performed for major and minor depression. Areas under the receiver operating curve (AUCs) as well as sensitivities and specificities at optimal cut-off points were computed. Prevalence of depressive disorder was 28.3%. The AUC value of the WHO-5 (0.90) was similar to that of the GDS-15 (0.82). Sensitivity of the WHO-5 (0.92) at its optimal cut-off of ≤12 was significantly higher than that of the GDS-15 (0.69) at its optimal cut-off of ≥7. The WHO-5 was equally sensitive for the subgroups of major and minor depression (0.92), whereas the GDS-15 was sensitive only for major depression (0.85), but not for minor depression (0.54). For specificity, there was no significant difference between WHO-5 (0.79) and GDS-15 (0.88), but both instruments outperformed the GDS-4 (0.53). The WHO-5 demonstrated high sensitivity for major and minor depression. Being shorter than the GDS-15 and superior to the GDS-4, the WHO-5 is a promising screening tool that could help physicians improve low recognition rates of depression in nursing home residents. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Validation of an Arabic translation of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Russel; Al Saif, Abdulaziz; el-din Mohamed, Gamal

    2005-01-01

    Depression is a common condition in primary care medicine in all population groups. We wanted to validate an Arabic translation Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale for Arabic speakers as it has been validated in a number of other languages. The hospital translation service translated the English version into Arabic, which was verified by back translation. This version was tested in a pilot study with 40 bilingual Arabic-English clinicians and Arabic linguistic experts. Revised questions were subjected to another translation-back translation and the final version tested in a clinical trial with 240 consenting bilingual English-Arabic speakers. The subjects were randomly assigned to answer either the English or Arabic version of the Zung questionnaire first, ensuring that subjects had no access to previous answers when answering the questionnaire in the other language. The scores obtained were tested for agreement using the kappa statistic. We found substantial agreement between the scores obtained from the two questionnaires. The kappa measurement of agreement was 0.652 (95% confidence interval, 0.571-0.732) We believe the Arabic translation of the English Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale is valid and reliable, and will be useful to practitioners who would like to use this tool in Arabic-speaking patients.

  11. Normalization Procedure for the Baptista Depression Scale - Adult Version (EBADEP-A: Transferring of Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Oliveira Gomes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the standardization of psychological instruments, that is, the construction of referential interpretations of a test, we can find different procedures performed both by Classical Test Theory and the Theory of Item Response. Especially in this case (IRT, we can admit a test as a norm, in order to use its standardization and transfer the cut-off point to another instrument. Based on this information, the present study aimed to provide a cutoff score for the Baptista Depression Scale - Adult Version (EBADEP-A through procedures of norms-transfer based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies – Depression Scale (CES-D. The EBADEP-A presented good distribution and ability to discriminate depressive symptoms, and the sample, consisting of Brazilian College students, received a cutoff score of 32 points. It is emphasized that this is an exploratory and preliminary study, and it we suggest further analyzes to be performed with clinical samples for which results can be corroborated or confronted.

  12. The time has come to stop rotations for the identification of structures in the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Csillag, Claudio; Hellström, Lone;

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To use principal component analysis (PCA) to test the hypothesis that the items of the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17) have been selected to reflect depression disability, whereas some of the items are specific for sub-typing depression into typical vs. atypical depression. Method:...

  13. Postnatal Depression in Chinese Women%47例产后抑郁的临床特点及相关因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨先哲; 李彩云

    2003-01-01

    为了解产后抑郁的症状表现及影响产后抑郁的相关因素,对产后3~7周的妇女用爱丁堡产后抑郁量表(Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, EPDS)进行测评后作了统计分析.结果显示,在产前普及心理卫生知识及营造良好的社会支持系统是预防本病发生的关键.

  14. Cross-cultural validation of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Shi, Hai-Song; Geng, Fu-Lei; Zou, Lai-Quan; Tan, Shu-Ping; Wang, Yi; Neumann, David L; Shum, David H K; Chan, Raymond C K

    2016-05-01

    The gap between the demand and delivery of mental health services in mainland China can be reduced by validating freely available and psychometrically sound psychological instruments. The present research examined the Chinese version of the 21-item Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21). Study 1 administered the DASS-21 to 1,815 Chinese college students and found internal consistency indices (Cronbach's alpha) of .83, .80, and .82 for the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress subscales, respectively, and .92 for the total DASS total. Test-retest reliability over a 6-month interval was .39 to .46 for each of the 3 subscales and .46 for the total DASS. Moderate convergent validity of the Depression and Anxiety subscales was demonstrated via significant correlations with the Chinese Beck Depression Inventory (r = .51 at Time 1 and r = .64 at Time 2) and the Chinese State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (r = .41), respectively. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the original 3-factor model with 1 minor change (nonnormed fit index [NNFI] = .964, comparative fit index [CFI] = .968, and root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA] = .079). Study 2 examined the clinical utility of the Chinese DASS-21 in 166 patients with schizophrenia and 90 matched healthy controls. Patients had higher Depression and Anxiety but not Stress subscale scores than healthy controls. A discriminant function composed of the linear combination of 3 subscale scores correctly discriminated 69.92% of participants, which again supported the potential clinical utility of the DASS in mainland China. Taken together, findings in these studies support the cross-cultural validity of the DASS-21 in China. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. The Kimberley assessment of depression of older Indigenous Australians: prevalence of depressive disorders, risk factors and validation of the KICA-dep scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo P Almeida

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to develop a culturally acceptable and valid scale to assess depressive symptoms in older Indigenous Australians, to determine the prevalence of depressive disorders in the older Kimberley community, and to investigate the sociodemographic, lifestyle and clinical factors associated with depression in this population. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey of adults aged 45 years or over from six remote Indigenous communities in the Kimberley and 30% of those living in Derby, Western Australia. The 11 linguistic and culturally sensitive items of the Kimberley Indigenous Cognitive Assessment of Depression (KICA-dep scale were derived from the signs and symptoms required to establish the diagnosis of a depressive episode according to the DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10 criteria, and their frequency was rated on a 4-point scale ranging from 'never' to 'all the time' (range of scores: 0 to 33. The diagnosis of depressive disorder was established after a face-to-face assessment with a consultant psychiatrist. Other measures included sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, and clinical history. RESULTS: The study included 250 participants aged 46 to 89 years (mean±SD = 60.9±10.7, of whom 143 (57.2% were women. The internal reliability of the KICA-dep was 0.88 and the cut-point 7/8 (non-case/case was associated with 78% sensitivity and 82% specificity for the diagnosis of a depressive disorder. The point-prevalence of a depressive disorder in this population was 7.7%; 4.0% for men and 10.4% for women. Heart problems were associated with increased odds of depression (odds ratio = 3.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.2,8.8. CONCLUSIONS: The KICA-dep has robust psychometric properties and can be used with confidence as a screening tool for depression among older Indigenous Australians. Depressive disorders are common in this population, possibly because of increased stressors and health morbidities.

  16. An Intervention To Reduce Postpartum Depressive Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Elizabeth A; Bodnar-Deren, Susan; Balbierz, Amy; Loudon, Holly; Mora, Pablo A.; Zlotnick, Caron; Wang, Jason; Leventhal, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms and depression are a common complication of childbirth and a growing body of literature suggests that there are modifiable factors associated with their occurrence. We developed a behavioral educational intervention targeting these factors and successfully reduced postpartum depressive symptoms in a randomized trial among low-income black and Latina women. We now report results of 540 predominantly white, high income mothers in a second randomized trial. Mothers in the intervention arm received a 2-step intervention that prepared and educated mothers about modifiable factors associated with postpartum depressive symptoms (e.g., physical symptoms, low self-efficacy), bolstered social support, and enhanced management skills. The control arm received enhanced usual care. Participants were surveyed prior to randomization, 3-weeks, 3-months, and 6-months postpartum. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS of 10 or greater). Prevalence of depressive symptoms postpartum were unexpectedly low precluding detection of difference in rates of depressive symptoms among intervention vs. enhanced usual care post hospitalization: 3-weeks (6.0 % vs. 5.6%, p=.83), 3-months (5.1% vs. 6.5%, p=.53) and 6-months (3.6% vs. 4.6%, p=.53). PMID:24019052

  17. The Association between Hair Cortisol and Self-Reported Symptoms of Depression in Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikenius, Ellen; Moe, Vibeke; Kjellevold, Marian; Smith, Lars; Lyle, Robert; Waagbø, Rune; Page, Christian Magnus; Myhre, Anne Margrethe

    2016-01-01

    Depression has been linked to an imbalance in cortisol. Until recently, cortisol has been studied by measuring concentrations at single time points in blood or saliva samples. Cortisol concentrations vary with circadian rhythm and experiences, from time point to time point. The measurement of hair cortisol concentration (HCC) is a new method of accessing mean, long-term cortisol concentrations. Recent studies show positive associations between depression and HCC, and prenatal maternal cortisol is thought to influence the developing fetus. We therefore examined the association between HCC and self-reported symptoms of depression in second trimester pregnant women. Participants were 181 women, recruited between September 2011 and October 2013 to the Little-in-Norway (LiN)-study. These women answered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Rating Scale (EPDS) on self-reported symptoms of depression, and one cm maternal scalp hair was collected and analyzed for cortisol concentrations. Multiple regression analyses did not show depressive symptoms as a predictor for HCC in our selection of pregnant women, while gestational age was significantly related. In conclusion, our study indicated that symptoms of depression during pregnancy did not predict HCC, but further studies of clinically depressed, pregnant women using gestational age as an adjustment variable are warranted. PMID:27584584

  18. Association of glucocorticoid and type 1 corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors gene variants and risk for depression during pregnancy and post-partum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Neelam; Darwin, Lucy; Nishigandh, Deole; Ngianga-Bakwin, Kandala; Smith, Steve C; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K

    2013-09-01

    Women with postnatal depression (PND) appear to have abnormal hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis responses to stress, which might involve a genetic variability component. We investigated association of genetic variants in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, NR3C1) and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) genes with increased risk for PND. Two hundred pregnant women were recruited prospectively and PND risk was assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) during pregnancy and again 2-8 weeks post-natally (CW-GAPND study). The BclI and ER22/23EK single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the GR and the haplotype-tagged rs1876828, rs242939 and rs242941 SNPs of the CRHR1 associated with genetic risk to depressive disorders were genotyped. A cut-off score of 10 was used to detect increased risk of PND. Association analysis was carried out in 140 patients that completed the study protocol. The BclI and rs242939 SNPs were over-represented in women with postnatal EPDS score ≥10 with significant allele association (p = 0.011 and genetics of high-risk for depression during pregnancy and postpartum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Large-Scale Hypoconnectivity Between Resting-State Functional Networks in Unmedicated Adolescent Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchet, Matthew D; Ho, Tiffany C; Connolly, Colm G; Tymofiyeva, Olga; Lewinn, Kaja Z; Han, Laura Km; Blom, Eva H; Tapert, Susan F; Max, Jeffrey E; Frank, Guido Kw; Paulus, Martin P; Simmons, Alan N; Gotlib, Ian H; Yang, Tony T

    2016-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) often emerges during adolescence, a critical period of brain development. Recent resting-state fMRI studies of adults suggest that MDD is associated with abnormalities within and between resting-state networks (RSNs). Here we tested whether adolescent MDD is characterized by abnormalities in interactions among RSNs. Participants were 55 unmedicated adolescents diagnosed with MDD and 56 matched healthy controls. Functional connectivity was mapped using resting-state fMRI. We used the network-based statistic (NBS) to compare large-scale connectivity between groups and also compared the groups on graph metrics. We further assessed whether group differences identified using nodes defined from functionally defined RSNs were also evident when using anatomically defined nodes. In addition, we examined relations between network abnormalities and depression severity and duration. Finally, we compared intranetwork connectivity between groups and assessed the replication of previously reported MDD-related abnormalities in connectivity. The NBS indicated that, compared with controls, depressed adolescents exhibited reduced connectivity (pdepression was significantly correlated with reduced connectivity in this set of network interactions (p=0.020, corrected), specifically with reduced connectivity between components of the dorsal attention network. The dorsal attention network was also characterized by reduced intranetwork connectivity in the MDD group. Finally, we replicated previously reported abnormal connectivity in individuals with MDD. In summary, adolescents with MDD show hypoconnectivity between large-scale brain networks compared with healthy controls. Given that connectivity among these networks typically increases during adolescent neurodevelopment, these results suggest that adolescent depression is associated with abnormalities in neural systems that are still developing during this critical period.

  20. PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTY OF FATIGUE SEVERITY SCALE AND CORRELATION WITH DEPRESSION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN CIRRHOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danusa ROSSI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common complaint in cirrhotic patients and may be considered a debilitating symptom with negative impact on quality of life. Research on its etiology and treatment has been hampered by the lack of relevant and reproducible measures of fatigue. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS in cirrhotic patients and to correlate with depressive symptomatology and quality of life. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with a convenience sample of 106 cirrhotic patients, aged between 18 and 70 years, both genders, literate, pre and post liver transplantation in outpatient follow-up. Internal consistency, reproducibility, discriminant validity, criterion validity, construct validity, responsiveness criterion, depressive symptomatology and quality of life were evaluated through questionnaires between January and October 2015. RESULTS: The mean age was 54.75±9.9 years, 65.1% male and 32.1% of the sample had cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus. The mean FSS score was 4.74±1.64. Cronbach’s alpha was 0.93, and the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient was 0.905 (95% CI: 0.813-0.952. For discriminant validity, FSS differentiated scores from different groups (P=0.009 and presented a correlation with the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (r=0.606, P=0.002. FSS correlated significantly and positively with depressive symptomatology and correlated negatively with the SF-36 domains for construct validity. For responsiveness, no significant changes were observed in the fatigue scores in the pre and post-liver transplantation periods (P=0.327. CONCLUSION: FSS showed good psychometric performance in the evaluation of fatigue in patients with cirrhosis. Fatigue presented a strong correlation with depressive symptomatology and quality of life.

  1. 人格类型与产后抑郁的相关性分析%Analysis of correlations between personality type and postpartum depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱宁; 刘春红; 陶晨; 汪淑娟

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the correlation between personality type and postpartum depression so as to provide theoretical support for improving the quality of obstetric care. Methods We used Myers-Briggs Typer Indicator ( MBTI ) -G to test 447 puerpera for their personality type and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for their postpartum depression. Scores of MBTI-G and EPDS were calculated and their relations were analyzed. Results The incidence of maternity blues ( MB ) was 23.49%, and that of postpartum depression was 12.75%; The dichotomies regarding EI (Extraversion-Introversion) and TF (Thinking-Feeling)( subscales of MBTI-G) had positive relation with scores of EPDS. Conclusions Puerpera with introvert and feeling-dependent personality types are more prone to suffer from postpartum depression, which suggests that in the process of obstetric nursing, appropriate psychological cares should be performed on puerpera with different personalities, special attention shall be paid to puerpera with introvert and feeling-dependent personality types from both medical nursing and family support so as to effectively reduce the occurrence of postpartum depression.%目的 研究不同人格类型与产后抑郁的相关性,为提高产科护理质量提供理论支持.方法 采用MBTI-G人格类型量表对447例产妇进行人格类型测试,采用爱丁堡产后抑郁量表(EPDS)对产妇进行抑郁测查,分析不同人格类型量表得分与EPDS得分的相关性.结果 产后心绪不良(MB)发生率为23.49%,产后抑郁发生率为12.75%;EI维度和TF维度与EPDS得分呈相关关系(P<0.01或P<0.05).结论 性格内向性和以情感为重的人格类型产妇更易发生产后抑郁,提示在对产科进行护理的过程中,要善于针对不同人格类型的产妇进行有针对性的心理护理,特别要重视内向型性格和情感至上的产妇,从医疗护理的细节和家庭支持人手,可有效减少其产后抑郁的发生.

  2. Preparation of YSZ film by EPD and its application in SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Li [Center for Condensed Matter Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Physics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Lue Zhe [Center for Condensed Matter Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Huang Xiqiang [Center for Condensed Matter Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu Zhiguo [Center for Condensed Matter Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen Kongfa [Center for Condensed Matter Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sha Xueqing [Center for Condensed Matter Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li Guoqing [Department of Physics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Su Wenhui [Center for Condensed Matter Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China) and Department of Physics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China) and International Center for Materials Physics, Academia Sinica, Shenyang 110015 (China)]. E-mail: suwenhui@hit.edu.cn

    2006-11-09

    An electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method was applied for the preparation of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin film on a NiO-YSZ porous anode substrate for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Dense YSZ film with uniform thickness can be readily prepared with the EPD method using isopropanol as solvent and iodine as dispersant. As EPD electrode, the NiO-YSZ substrate was covered with a graphite layer to obtain enough electric conductivity. A series of experiments, such as suspension concentration, sintering shrinkage, and so on, were conducted in order to optimize the EPD technique. A planar-type SOFC was fabricated using La{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF) as the cathode and YSZ film deposited onto the NiO-YSZ anode substrate as the electrolyte. The fuel cell exhibited an open circuit voltage of about 1.0 V and a maximum power density of 440 mW/cm{sup 2} at 900 deg. C. Thus, the EPD method was a suitable technology for the formation of gas-tight YSZ film.

  3. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  4. Adaptation to Portuguese of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS) Adaptación para la lengua portuguesa de la Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) Adaptação para a língua portuguesa da Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS)

    OpenAIRE

    João Luís Alves Apóstolo; Aida Cruz Mendes; Zaida Aguiar Azeredo

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to adapt to Portuguese, of Portugal, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales, a 21-item short scale (DASS 21), designed to measure depression, anxiety and stress. Method: After translation and back-translation with the help of experts, the DASS 21 was administered to patients in external psychiatry consults (N=101), and its internal consistency, construct validity and concurrent validity were measured. Results: The DASS 21 properties certify its quality to measure emotional state...

  5. Creation and validation of the Cognitive and Behavioral Response to Stress Scale in a depression trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Adam S; Schueller, Stephen M; Lattie, Emily G; Mohr, David C

    2015-12-30

    The Cognitive and Behavioral Response to Stress Scale (CB-RSS) is a self-report measure of the use and helpfulness of several cognitive and behavioral skills. Unlike other measures that focus on language specific to terms used in therapy, the CB-RSS was intended to tap the strategies in ways that might be understandable to those who had not undergone therapy. The measure was included in a clinical trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression and completed by 325 participants at baseline and end of treatment (18 weeks). Psychometric properties of the scale were assessed through iterative exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. These analyses identified two subscales, cognitive and behavioral skills, each with high reliability. Validity was addressed by investigating relationships with depression symptoms, positive affect, perceived stress, and coping self-efficacy. End of treatment scores predicted changes in all outcomes, with the largest relationships between baseline CB-RSS scales and coping self-efficacy. These findings suggest that the CB-RSS is a useful tool to measure cognitive and behavioral skills both at baseline (prior to treatment) as well as during the course of treatment.

  6. Escalas de rastreamento para depressão pós-parto: uma revisão sistemática Escalas de rastreo para depresión postparto: una revisión sistemática Postpartum depression screening scales: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Machado Schardosim

    2011-03-01

    delivery among women above 15 years old. Articles were searched in 4 databases. The included articles should precisely describe the definition and the validation of the used instruments. Out of the 424 abstracts found, 62 complete articles were accessed, and only 18 articles that fulfilled the above-mentioned requirements were included. PPD screening period varied from 2 to 10 days postpartum, and patients were retested between 8 to 16 weeks postpartum. PPD was diagnosed in 8.8 to 40% of the patients sampled in those studies. The most frequent used scale was the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS. It was concluded that scales are frequently used in research studies, and may allow the identification of PPD in gestating and puerperal patient care.

  7. The self-stigma of depression scale: Translation and validation of the Arabic version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Ahmed Darraj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-stigma may feature strongly and be detrimental for people with depression, but the understanding of its nature and prevalence is limited by the lack of psychometrically validated measures. This study is aimed to validate the Arabic version self-stigma of depression scale (SSDS among adolescents. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study involved 100 adolescents randomly selected. The analyses include face validation, factor analysis, and reliability testing. A test–retest was conducted within a 2-week interval. Results: The mean score for self-stigma of depression among study participants was 68.9 (Standard deviation = 8.76 median equal to 71 and range was 47. Descriptive analysis showed that the percentage of those who scored below the mean score (41.7% is shown less than those who scored above the mean score (58.3%. Preliminary construct validation analysis confirmed that factor analysis was appropriate for the Arabic-translated version of the SSDS. Furthermore, the factor analysis showed similar factor loadings to the original English version. The total internal consistency of the translated version, which was measured by Cronbach's alphas ranged from 0.70 to 0.77 for the four subscales and 0.84 for the total scale. Test–retest reliability was assessed in 65 respondents after 2 weeks. Cronbach's alphas ranged from 0.70 to 0.77 for the four subscales and 0.84 for the total scale. Conclusions: Face validity, construct validity, and reliability analysis were found satisfactory for the Arabic-translated version of the SSDS. The Arabic-translated version of the SSDS was found valid and reliable to be used in future studies, with comparable properties to the original version and to previous studies.

  8. The evaluation of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale : Depressed and Positive Affect in cancer patients and healthy reference subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroevers, MJ; Sanderman, R; van Sonderen, E; Ranchor, AV

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of a two-factor structure of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale. The study was conducted in a large group of cancer patients (n = 475) and a matched reference group (n = 255). Both groups filled in a questionnaire at two

  9. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Scale for Depression (Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II)--A Study on a Sample of Students in the State of Kuwait Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahem, Ahmed Mohammed Faleh

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) the Arabized version by Gharib (2000); the study sample consisted of 500 male and female students from the Kuwaiti universities by 250 males and 250 females on whom the BDI-II scale was applied twice; the psychometric characteristics such as the…

  10. Validation of the Rasch-based Depression Screening in a large scale German general population sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norra Christine

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study aimed at presenting normative data for both parallel forms of the "Rasch-based Depression Screening (DESC", to examine its Rasch model conformity and convergent and divergent validity based on a representative sample of the German general population. Methods The sample was selected with the assistance of a demographic consulting company applying a face to face interview (N = 2509; mean age = 49.4, SD = 18.2; 55.8% women. Adherence to Rasch model assumptions was determined with analysis of Rasch model fit (infit and outfit, unidimensionality, local independence (principal component factor analysis of the residuals, PCFAR and differential item functioning (DIF with regard to participants' age and gender. Norm values were calculated. Convergent and divergent validity was determined through intercorrelations with the depression and anxiety subscales of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D and HADS-A. Results Fit statistics were below critical values (rDESC-I = .61 and rDESC-II = .60, whereas correlations with HADS-A were rDESC-I = .62 and rDESC-II = .60. Conclusions This study provided further support for the psychometric quality of the DESC. Both forms of the DESC adhered to Rasch model assumptions and showed intercorrelations with HADS subscales that are in line with the literature. The presented normative data offer important advancements for the interpretation of the questionnaire scores and enhance its usefulness for clinical and research applications.

  11. Performance of the EPD-N2 dosemeter for monitoring aircrew doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpelz, R I; Cezeaux, J R

    2015-03-01

    United States Air Force (USAF) aircrew fly at altitudes and for durations where doses from cosmic radiation are significant enough to warrant monitoring. This study evaluated a candidate radiological monitoring system for USAF aircrew, the Thermo Scientific electronic personnel dosemeter (EPD-N2). The evaluation consisted of characterising the device in a well-characterised radiation field at a European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) accelerator, and aboard an USAF aircraft. The performance of the EPDs was evaluated by comparison with accepted values for dose at the CERN facility, comparison with the value calculated by flight dose software and comparison with the value estimated by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter aboard the aircraft. This study recommends that a correction factor of 1/CF = 1/3.9 be applied to EPD-N2 measurements aboard aircraft flights. The uncertainty in this correction factor is 11.8 %.

  12. The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) for Solar Orbiter - Sensor Status and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Rodriguez-Pacheco, J.; Mason, G. M.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Prieto, M.; Böttcher, S. I.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Panitzsch, L.; Sanchez, S.; Ho, G. C.; Kohler, J.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Blanco, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Solar Orbiter will solve the puzzle how the Sun creates and controls the heliosphere, the giant plasma bubble which forms as a result of the interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium. Energetic particles are part of this puzzle and help understand the various driving forces and energy release processes in the solar corona. The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) will determine how the Sun energizes particles to very high energies and sometimes fills the heliosphere with particle radiation. It consists of a suite of sensors which will measure protons (electrons) from 3 (2) keV up to 100 (20) MeV and ions from few tens of keV/nuc to 200 MeV/nuc. We will discuss the scientific aims of EPD as well as the current status and calibration of the EPD sensor (STEP, EPT, SIS, HET).

  13. [Three new observational scales for use in Dutch nursing homes: scales from the Resident Assessment Instrument for Activities of Daily Living, cognition and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, D.; Ooms, M; Steverink, N.; Frijters, D.; Bezemer, D.; Ribbe, M

    2004-01-01

    The reliability and validity of three MDS scales for ADL, cognition and depression are described. The scales consist of items of the Minimum Data Set of the Resident Assessment Instrument and are available just after an MDS assessment. Data collection took place in nine Dutch nursing homes (N = 227)

  14. Depressão pós-parto e percepção de suporte social durante a gesta��ão Postpartum depression and perceived social support during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Elizabeth Konradt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar o impacto da percepção de baixo suporte social durante a gestação como fator de risco para a depressão no período de 30 a 60 dias pós-parto. MÉTODO: Este estudo de coorte teve como população-alvo gestantes atendidas no Sistema Único de Saúde na cidade de Pelotas (RS. Para avaliar depressão pós-parto, foi utilizada a Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS. Foram consideradas deprimidas as parturientes que atingiram ≥ 13 pontos na escala. RESULTADOS: Das 1.019 mulheres avaliadas, 168 (16,5% apresentaram depressão pós-parto. Aquelas que não receberam suporte do companheiro (p = 0,000, de familiares (p = 0,000 e de amigos (p = 0,000 demonstraram maior risco de ter depressão pós-parto. CONCLUSÃO: Nossos achados sugerem que a percepção de suporte social durante a gravidez pode ser um fator protetor para a depressão pós-parto.OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of low perceived social support during pregnancy as a risk factor for depression within 30 to 60 days postpartum. METHOD: This cohort study included pregnant women treated at public hospitals (Brazilian Unified Health System in the city of Pelotas, state of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. Postpartum depression was assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS. Women with scores ≥ 13 points were considered to be depressed. RESULTS: Of the total of 1,019 women assessed, 168 (16.5% presented postpartum depression. Women who did not receive support from their partners (p = 0.000, their families (p = 0.000, and friends (p = 0.000 were at higher risk for developing postpartum depression. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that perceived social support during pregnancy may be a protective factor against postpartum depression.

  15. Comparative study of occurrence of depression in the third age in closed and open structures of elderly care according to the Hamilton depression scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Zintrou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a serious mental disorder that is a leading cause of morbidity in the elderly and affects the daily lives of the elderly leading to the marginalization and stigmatization. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression in the elderly, both in the community and in closed structures and identify possible differences between these two groups. Material and Method: The studied population consisted of 200 elderly people. One hundred of them came from closed structure care (nursing home and the remaining 100 by Open Care Centres (KAPI. For data collection, a specially designed questionnaire that included demographic data, information about their health and their daily habits and Depression Scale Hamilton, were used. Results: The majority of the sample (50.5% was men. Depressive symptomatology was showed by 44% (31% mild and 13% moderate. The men of the nursing home had greater depression than men of KAPI and showed a greater percentage of women (27.3 % mild and 12.1 % moderate, with women of the nursing home outweighing the percentages of those in KAPI. Depressive symptomatology exhibited by widowers, people with multiple pathology and those who did not exercise, with rates of 61.5%, 34.6% and 73.1% respectively. Big difference appeared between closed and open structure, where the elderly in nursing home seemed to show greater depression by 53%, versus 35% of those in KAPI. Conclusions: Gender, marital status, presence of pathology, exercise and living in closed structures of care, seem to influence the occurrence of depression in the elderly.

  16. File list: NoD.Epd.20.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Epd.20.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 hg19 No description Epidermis Fibrobl GM03348 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Epd.20.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348.bed ...

  17. File list: NoD.Epd.10.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Epd.10.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348 hg19 No description Epidermis Fibrobl GM03348 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Epd.10.AllAg.Fibrobl_GM03348.bed ...

  18. Prediction of perinatal depression from adolescence and before conception (VIHCS): 20-year prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, George C; Romaniuk, Helena; Spry, Elizabeth; Coffey, Carolyn; Olsson, Craig; Doyle, Lex W; Oats, Jeremy; Hearps, Stephen; Carlin, John B; Brown, Stephanie

    2015-08-29

    Perinatal depression is a neglected global health priority, affecting 10-15% of women in high-income countries and a greater proportion in low-income countries. Outcomes for children include cognitive, behavioural, and emotional difficulties and, in low-income settings, perinatal depression is associated with stunting and physical illness. In the Victorian Intergenerational Health Cohort Study (VIHCS), we aimed to assess the extent to which women with perinatal depressive symptoms had a history of mental health problems before conception. VIHCS is a follow-up study of participants in the Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study (VAHCS), which was initiated in August, 1992, in the state of Victoria, Australia. In VAHCS, participants were assessed for health outcomes at nine timepoints (waves) from age 14 years to age 29 years. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule and the General Health Questionnaire. Enrolment to VIHCS began in September, 2006, during the ninth wave of VAHCS; depressive symptoms at this timepoint were measured with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. We contacted women every 6 months (from age 29 years to age 35 years) to identify any pregnancies. We assessed perinatal depressive symptoms with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) by computer-assisted telephone interview at 32 weeks of gestation, 8 weeks after birth, and 12 months after birth. We defined perinatal depression as an EPDS score of 10 or more. From a stratified random sample of 1000 female participants in VAHCS, we enrolled 384 women with 564 pregnancies. 253 (66%) of these women had a previous history of mental health problems at some point in adolescence or young adulthood. 117 women with a history of mental health problems in both adolescence and young adulthood had 168 pregnancies, and perinatal depressive symptoms were reported for 57 (34%) of these pregnancies, compared with 16 (8%) of 201 pregnancies in 131 women

  19. The Diagnostic Apathia Scale predicts a dose-remission relationship of T-PEMF in treatment-resistant depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Lunde, Marianne; Lauritzen, Lise

    2014-01-01

    of fatigue, concentration and memory problems, lack of interests, difficulties in making decisions, and sleep problems. We evaluated 65 patients with therapy-resistant depression. In total, 34 of these patients received placebo T-PEMF in the afternoon and active T-PEMF in the morning, that is, one daily dose....... The remaining 31 patients received active T-PEMF twice daily. Duration of treatment was 8 weeks in both groups. The Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D17) and the Bech-Rafaelsen Melancholia Scale (MES) were used to measure remission. We also focused on the Diagnostic Apathia Scale, which is based on a mixture...

  20. Prevalence and predictors of positive screening for postpartum depression in minority parturients in the South Bronx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Samfee; LoBue, Stephen; Hamaoui, Abraham; Rezai, Shadi; Henderson, Cassandra E; Mercado, Ray

    2017-04-01

    It is reported that the rates of perinatal depressive disorders are high in ethnic minority groups from non-English speaking countries. However, very few studies have compared the prevalence of positive screening for postpartum depression (PPD) in minority communities living in an inner city. The goal of this study is to determine the prevalence and the predictors of positive screening for postpartum depression in minority parturients in the South Bronx. The study is a chart review of 314 minority parturients, Black or Hispanic, screened for postpartum depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) tool. The overall prevalence of a positive EPDS screen among Black and Hispanic women was similar, 24.04 and 18.75%, respectively. The Black immigrant cohort had comparable positive screens with 23.81 as African Americans. Hispanic women born in the USA had the least prevalence of positive screens, 7.14%, and those who moved from the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico had a prevalence of 17.24% of positive screens. The women who immigrated from Mexico, Central America, or South America had the highest prevalence of positive screens for PPD, 32.26%. As to the socioeconomic status (SES), there was a significant increase of 27.04 vs. 13.95% (P < 0.019) in positive screens for PPD for the unemployed mothers. Overall, Black and Hispanic parturients had similar rates of positive screens for PPD. Among the Hispanic women, immigrants had higher rates of positive screens, with those from Mexico, Central, and South America as the highest. The hospital experience did not affect the rates of positive screens. Neither did the SES with one exception; those unemployed had the higher rates of positive screens.

  1. Social capital and antenatal depression among Chinese primiparas: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chi; Ogihara, Atsushi; Chen, Hao; Wang, Weijue; Huang, Liu; Zhang, Baodan; Zhang, Xueni; Xu, Liangwen; Yang, Lei

    2017-08-24

    The aim of this study is to investigate the associations between social capital and antenatal depression among Chinese primiparas. A cross-sectional design was used and a questionnaire survey was conducted with 1471 participants using the intercept method at the provincial hospital in Zhejiang in 2016. Antenatal depression was evaluated using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and social capital was assessed by the Chinese version of Social Capital Assessment Questionnaire (C-SCAQ). The prevalence of antenatal depression was assessed among Chinese primiparas in their third trimesters. The antenatal depression prevalence among sub-groups with lower social trust (ST), social reciprocity (SR), social network (SN), and social participation (SP) were significantly higher than those among higher score sub-groups. In the fully adjusted model, primiparas' antenatal depression was significantly associated with ST, SR, SN, and SP. Compared to the structural social capital, the cognitive social capital was a more crucial dimension to the prevalence of antenatal depression. For future community pregnancy health care management programs in China, it might be beneficial to add more social capital related intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Factor structure and reliability of the depression, anxiety and stress scales in a large Portuguese community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos-Raposo, José; Fernandes, Helder Miguel; Teixeira, Carla M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the factor structure and reliability of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS-21) in a large Portuguese community sample. Participants were 1020 adults (585 women and 435 men), with a mean age of 36.74 (SD = 11.90) years. All scales revealed good reliability, with Cronbach's alpha values between .80 (anxiety) and .84 (depression). The internal consistency of the total score was .92. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the best-fitting model (*CFI = .940, *RMSEA = .038) consisted of a latent component of general psychological distress (or negative affectivity) plus orthogonal depression, anxiety and stress factors. The Portuguese version of the DASS-21 showed good psychometric properties (factorial validity and reliability) and thus can be used as a reliable and valid instrument for measuring depression, anxiety and stress symptoms.

  3. Alteração tireoidiana: um fator de risco associado à depressão pós-parto? Thyroid dysfunction: a risk factor associated with post-partum depression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Enrico Cabral Ruschi

    2009-06-01

    greater than or equal to twelve on the Edinburgh Post-Partum Depression Scale (EPDS. The thyroid was assessed using serum dosages of thyroid stimulating hormone, (TSH, free thyroxin (T4 free and anti-peroxidase antibodies (TPO. Evaluation of the results was carried out using descriptive analysis and the χ2 test, with a level of significance of 5%. RESULTS: 115 women (39.4% scored higher than 12 on the EPDS and were thereby deemed to be depressed; 117 (60.6% scoring lower than 12 were considered not to be depressed. The prevalence of post-partum depression in the group with thyroid dysfunction was 36% and 40% in the group without thyroid dysfunction. There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of depression between patients with or without thyroid dysfunction (χ2=0.131;p=0.717. CONCLUSIONS: the frequency of PPD was high but no association was observed between post-partum depression and thyroid dysfunction.

  4. Prevalence and Predictors of Depression among Pregnant Women in Debretabor Town, Northwest Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisetegn, Telake Azale; Mihretie, Getnet; Muche, Tefera

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression during pregnancy is a major health problem because it is prevalent and chronic, and its impact on birth outcome and child health is serious. Several psychosocial and obstetric factors have been identified as predictors. Evidence on the prevalence and predictors of antenatal depression is very limited in Ethiopia. This study aims to determine prevalence and associated factors with antenatal depression. Methods Community based cross-sectional study was conducted among 527 pregnant women recruited in a cluster sampling method. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews on socio-demographic, obstetric, and psychosocial characteristics. Depression symptoms were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). The List of Threatening Experiences questionnaire (LTE-Q) and the Oslo Social Support Scale (OSS-3) were used to assess stressful events and social support, respectively. Data were entered into Epi-info and analyzed using SPSS-20. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were carried out. Results The prevalence of antenatal depression was found to be 11.8%. Having debt (OR = 2.79, 95% CI = 1.33, 5.85), unplanned pregnancy (OR = 2.39, 95% CI = (1.20, 4.76), history of stillbirth (OR = 3.97, 95% CI = (1.67,9.41), history of abortion (OR = 2.57, 95% CI = 1.005, 6.61), being in the third trimester of pregnancy (OR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.07,2.72), presence of a complication in the current pregnancy (OR = 3.29, 95% CI = 1.66,6.53), and previous history of depression (OR = 3.48, 95% CI = 1.71,7.06) were factors significantly associated with antenatal depression. Conclusion The prevalence of antenatal depression was high, especially in the third trimester. Poverty, unmet reproductive health needs, and obstetric complications are the main determinants of antenatal depression. For early detection and appropriate intervention, screening for depression during the routine antenatal care should be promoted. PMID:27618181

  5. Validation of a Portuguese version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale for Children (CES-DC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Carvalho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Depression is one of the most common mental disorders in children, and in adolescents, as in adults. Once its occurrence during childhood and adolescence leads to serious consequences in adulthood, its early detection is an important goal. Self-report instruments have a key role on accessing thoughts, feelings and behaviors in an easily, reliably and validly way. The aim of the current study is to assess psychometric properties (reliability and validity of the Portuguese translation of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale for Children (CES-DC. Methods: A school-based sample of 417 adolescents aged 12–18 years (M = 15,20, SD = 1,72 was involved in this study. Translation and Back Translation was made. To study convergent and divergent validity there were used the Portuguese versions of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS 21, of the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI, and of the Students' Life Satisfaction Scale (SLSS which measure, respectively, negative emotional states (depression, anxiety and stress, depressive symptoms and global life satisfaction. Results: Factor analysis revealed three factors (mood, interpersonal relationships and happiness that explain 54% of the variance. The results show that the scale has an excellent internal consistency (α = 0,90, good temporal stability (r = 0,72 as an adequate convergent and divergent validity. Results showed that depressive symptoms varied in function of age and gender. Conclusions: The results of the present study provide initial adequate validity and reliability of the CES-DC. Nevertheless some limitations to this study, the results suggest that CES-DC can be a useful questionnaire in the assessment of depressive symptoms in Portuguese adolescents.

  6. Factorial Validity and Internal Consistency of Malaysian Adapted Depression Anxiety Stress Scale - 21 in an Adolescent Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Hairul Anuar Hashim; Freddy Golok; Rosmatunisah Ali

    2011-01-01

    Background: Psychometrically sound measurement instrument is a fundamental requirement across broad range of research areas. In negative affect research, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) has been identified as a psychometrically sound instrument to measure depression, anxiety and stress, especially the 21-item version. However, its psychometric properties in adolescents have been less consistent. Objectives: Thus, the present study sought to examine the factorial validity and internal c...

  7. Evaluating the psychometric properties of the attitudes towards depression and its treatments scale in an Australian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Benedetto M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fadia Isaac1, Kenneth Mark Greenwood2, Mirella Di Benedetto31Cairnmillar Institute School of Psychology Counselling and Psychotherapy, Camberwell, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Psychology and Social Science Faculty of Computing, Health and Science, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia; 3School of Health Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Bundoora, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Individuals’ attitudes towards depression and its treatments may influence their likelihood of seeking professional help and adherence to treatment when depressed. Objective measures, such as the Attitudes Towards Depression and its Treatments scale (ATDT, have been developed to assess such attitudes. The aims of this research were to test the reliability and validity of ATDT on an Australian sample who were not depressed during the study or who had previously been depressed, to explore the attitudes of the Australian public towards depression, and to compare these attitudes to those of a Canadian sample of people with depression.Methods: A sample of 63 males and 140 females (mean age = 32.2 years, SD = 12.9 years from Melbourne, Australia took part in this study. Fourteen of the males and 52 of the female participants (mean age = 35.4 years, SD = 13.2 years stated that they had been previously diagnosed with depression.Results: The attitudes of the Australian sample and the subset of that sample who had previously experienced depression differed from those of the Canadian outpatient sample: they were less ashamed of depression, more likely to take antidepressants and consider psychotherapy, and more likely to seek help from professionals or significant others in their lives. However, those in the Australian sample were more likely to report that antidepressants made them lose control, and they were less willing to consider electric shock as a treatment option for their depression. The internal reliability as

  8. A Korean validation study of the Clinically Useful Anxiety Outcome Scale: Comorbidity and differentiation of anxiety and depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Won; Han, Changsu; Ko, Young-Hoon; Yoon, Seoyoung; Pae, Chi-Un; Choi, Joonho; Kim, Jae-Min; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Hoseon; Patkar, Ashwin A; Zimmerman, Mark

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Clinically Useful Anxiety Outcome Scale (CUXOS) and to examine the current diagnostic comorbidity and differential severity of anxiety symptoms between major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders. In total, 838 psychiatric outpatients were analyzed at their intake appointment. Diagnostic characteristics were examined using the structured clinical interview from the DSM-IV because the DSM5 was not available at the start of the study. The CUXOS score was measured and compared with that of 3 clinician rating scales and 4 self-report scales. The CUXOS showed excellent results for internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.90), test-retest reliability (r = 0.74), and discriminant and convergent validity. The CUXOS significantly discriminated between different levels of anxiety severity, and the measure was sensitive to change after treatment. Approximately 45% of patients with MDD were additionally diagnosed with anxiety disorders while 55% of patients with anxiety disorders additionally reported an MDD. There was a significant difference in CUXOS scores between diagnostic categories (MDD only, anxiety only, both disorders, and no MDD or anxiety disorder). The CUXOS scores differed significantly between all categories of depression (major, minor, and non-depression) except for the comparison between minor depression and non-depression groups. The Korean version of the CUXOS is a reliable and valid measure of the severity of anxiety symptoms. The use of the CUXOS could broaden the understanding of coexisting and differentiating characteristics of anxiety and depression.

  9. Validation of the depression anxiety stress scales (DASS 21 as a screening instrument for depression and anxiety in a rural community-based cohort of northern Vietnamese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thach Duc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression and anxiety are recognised increasingly as serious public health problems among women in low- and lower-middle income countries. The aim of this study was to validate the 21-item Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS21 for use in screening for these common mental disorders among rural women with young children in the North of Vietnam. Methods The DASS-21 was translated from English to Vietnamese, culturally verified, back-translated and administered to women who also completed, separately, a psychiatrist-administered Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV Axis 1 diagnoses of depressive and anxiety disorders. The sample was a community-based representative cohort of adult women with young children living in Ha Nam Province in northern Viet Nam. Cronbach’s alpha, Exploratory Factor Analyses (EFA and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC analyses were performed to identify the psychometric properties of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress subscales and the overall scale. Results Complete data were available for 221 women. The internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha of each sub-scale and the overall scale were high, ranging from 0.70 for the Stress subscale to 0.88 for the overall scale, but EFA indicated that the 21 items all loaded on one factor. Scores on each of the three sub-scales, and the combinations of two or three of them were able to detect the common mental disorders of depression and anxiety in women with a sensitivity of 79.1% and a specificity of 77.0% at the optimal cut off of >33. However, they did not distinguish between those experiencing only depression or only anxiety. Conclusions The total score of the 21 items of the DASS21-Vietnamese validation appears to be comprehensible and sensitive to detecting common mental disorders in women with young children in primary health care in rural northern Vietnam and therefore might also be useful to screen for these conditions in other resource

  10. The validity of dysthymia to predict clinical depressive symptoms as measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale at the 5-year follow-up of patients with first episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In long-term follow-up studies on depression, the Eysenck Neuroticism Scale (ENS) at the score level of dysthymia has been found to be valid at predicting poor outcome. AIMS: The ENS dysthymia level was compared with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) level to predict the prevalence......, and HAM-D from 2005-2007. At 5-year follow-up from 2011-2013, the participants were re-assessed by HAM-D. The HAM-D was used to measure depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. The Mokken analysis was used to indicate scalability of the BDI and ENS. RESULTS: A total of 185 participants were available...... as measured by the two self-rating scales ENS and BDI can be considered part of a 'double depression' in patients with first episode depression, implying an existence of depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Evaluation of dysthymia or neuroticism is important to perform, even...

  11. Rasch model analysis of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tennant Alan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing awareness of the need for easily administered, psychometrically sound screening tools to identify individuals with elevated levels of psychological distress. Although support has been found for the psychometric properties of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS using classical test theory approaches it has not been subjected to Rasch analysis. The aim of this study was to use Rasch analysis to assess the psychometric properties of the DASS-21 scales, using two different administration modes. Methods The DASS-21 was administered to 420 participants with half the sample responding to a web-based version and the other half completing a traditional pencil-and-paper version. Conformity of DASS-21 scales to a Rasch partial credit model was assessed using the RUMM2020 software. Results To achieve adequate model fit it was necessary to remove one item from each of the DASS-21 subscales. The reduced scales showed adequate internal consistency reliability, unidimensionality and freedom from differential item functioning for sex, age and mode of administration. Analysis of all DASS-21 items combined did not support its use as a measure of general psychological distress. A scale combining the anxiety and stress items showed satisfactory fit to the Rasch model after removal of three items. Conclusion The results provide support for the measurement properties, internal consistency reliability, and unidimensionality of three slightly modified DASS-21 scales, across two different administration methods. The further use of Rasch analysis on the DASS-21 in larger and broader samples is recommended to confirm the findings of the current study.

  12. Insight in bipolar disorder: a comparison between mania, depression and euthymia using the Insight Scale for Affective Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Assis da Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate whether having general insight into bipolar disorder and its symptoms is affected by the mood state of the patient, using the Insight Scale for Affective Disorders, a hetero-application scale for people with mood disorders.Methods: Ninety-five patients with bipolar disorder were evaluated and divided into different groups according to the mood state presented during assessment (i.e., euthymia, mania and depression. Sociodemographic and clinical data (Hamilton Depression Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Clinical Global Impressions Scale were recorded. Insight was evaluated using the Insight Scale for Affective Disorders.Results: Patients with bipolar disorder in mania show less insight about their condition than patients in depression or euthymia, and less insight about their symptoms than patients with depression, with the exception of awareness of weight change.Conclusions: Loss of insight during mania may have important implications for treatment compliance and adherence and needs to be taken into account in the clinical management of people with bipolar disorder.

  13. Relationship between depression anxiety stress scale (DASS) and urinary hydroxyproline and proline concentrations in hospital workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keou Won; Kim, Soo Jeong; Park, Jae Beom; Lee, Kyung Jong

    2011-01-01

    Although increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) is caused by stress accelerates collagen degradation, there was no data on the relationship between stress and urinary hydroxyproline (Hyp) and proline (Pro), a good marker of collagen degradation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between depression, anxiety, and stress (DAS) and concentrations of urinary Hyp and Pro. 97 hospital employees aged 20 to 58 were asked to fill out comprehensive self-administrated questionnaires containing information about their medical history, lifestyle, length of the work year, shift-work and DAS. depression anxiety stress scale (DASS) was applied to evaluate chronic mental disorders. Urine samples were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with double derivatization for the assay of hydroxyproline and proline. The mean value of Hyp and Pro concentration in all subjects was 194.1 ± 113.4 μmol/g and 568.2 ± 310.7 μmol/g. DASS values and urinary Pro concentrations were differentiated by sex (female > male, p others, p stress (Adjusted r2 = 0.051) and anxiety and job (Adjusted r2 = 0.199), respectively. We found that stress and anxiety were correlated with urinary Hyp and Pro concentrations. To identifying a definite correlation, further study in large populations will be needed.

  14. Clinical utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for an outpatient fibromyalgia education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seungree; Tin, Diane; Bain, Lorna; Thorne, J Carter; Ginsburg, Liane

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines the clinical utility of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in the context of evaluating the Fibromyalgia Outpatient Education Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre (Newmarket, Canada). A pre-test/post-test design was implemented for data analysis. A total of 232 patients' data were obtained through retrospective patient chart review. Complete pre-post data were available for 70 patients and qualitative analysis was done for 12 patients. Main outcome measures included HADS and Arthritis Self-Efficacy (ASE) scores. At the end of the education program, subgroups of patients (high attendance, high exercise habit, low medication) experienced significant improvement on HADS-depression and ASE scores. Linear regression analysis found that HADS pre-program scores explain far more variance in HADS post-test scores than ASE pre-program scores explain in ASE post-program scores; more variance in ASE post-program scores was explained by other variables. In contrast to the quantitative analysis of the Anxiety subscale of HADS, patients in the focus group indicated that their anxiety level decreased through attending the education program. These findings suggest that HADS is an appropriate tool for evaluating fibromyalgia and related patient education programs. Moreover, patient education programs have positive effects on enhancing patients' psychological well-being and self-confidence in controlling fibromyalgia-related symptoms.

  15. Depression, alcohol use, and stigma in younger versus older HIV-infected pregnant women initiating antiretroviral therapy in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Marcia; Myer, Landon; Zerbe, Allison; Phillips, Tamsin; Petro, Greg; Mellins, Claude A; Remien, Robert H; Shiau, Stephanie; Brittain, Kirsty; Abrams, Elaine J

    2017-02-01

    HIV-infected pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa are at risk for depression and alcohol abuse. Young women may be more vulnerable, but little is known about the psychosocial functioning of this population. We compared younger (18-24 years old) and older (≥25 years old) HIV-infected pregnant women initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Cape Town, South Africa. Women were assessed on a range of psychosocial measures, including the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Among 625 women initiating ART, 16 % reported risky alcohol use and 21 % alcohol-related harm; these percentages were similar across age groups. When younger women were stratified by age, 37 % of 18-21 years old versus 20 % of 22-24 years old reported alcohol-related harm (p = 0.02). Overall, 11 % of women had EPDS scores suggesting probable depression, and 6 % reported self-harming thoughts. Younger women reported more depressive symptoms. Report of self-harming thoughts was 11 % in younger and 4 % in older women (p = 0.002). In multivariable analysis, age remained significantly associated with depressive symptoms and report of self-harming thoughts. Level of HIV-related stigma and report of intimate partner violence modified the association between age and depressive symptoms. Young HIV-infected pregnant women in South Africa were more likely to report depressive symptoms and self-harming thoughts compared to older women, and the youngest women reported the highest levels of alcohol-related harm. HIV-related stigma and intimate partner violence may be moderating factors. These findings have implications for maternal and infant health, underscoring the urgent need for effective targeted interventions in this vulnerable population.

  16. Prevalence of Antenatal Depression and Associated Risk Factors among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinics in Abeokuta North Local Government Area, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Okechukwu; Ajayi, IkeOluwapo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The prevalence of antenatal depression (AD) and associated risk factors among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Abeokuta North Local Government Area, Nigeria, was determined. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted, interviewing 314 pregnant women selected by multistage sampling technique from among those attending antenatal clinics. Information was collected using structured questionnaire and a screening tool, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), to assess probable depression. Results. The prevalence of antenatal depression was 24.5%. There were significant associations between antenatal depression and attending public health facility (P = 0.000), young maternal age (P = 0.012), single marital status (P = 0.010), not having formal education (P = 0.022), large family size (P = 0.029), planned pregnancy (P = 0.014), coexisting medical conditions (P = 0.034), history of previous caesarian section (P = 0.032), drinking alcohol during pregnancy (P = 0.004), and gender based abuse (P = 0.001). On health seeking behaviour for antenatal depression among depressed pregnant women, most, 68.9%, consulted their husbands about their symptoms; 57.3% took the decision to get treatment from doctors, and 52% sought prayer in the church. Conclusion. Antenatal depression is prevalent in this study population. Interventions to address its risk factors should be carried out and physicians should suspect depression in pregnant women reporting alcohol use and gender abuse.

  17. Risk factors for prenatal depressive symptoms among Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Pekow, Penelope; Dole, Nancy; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2011-11-01

    Prior studies of risk factors for depressive symptoms during pregnancy are sparse and the majority have focused on non-Hispanic white women. Hispanics are the largest minority group in the US and have the highest birth rates. We examined associations between pre and early pregnancy factors and depressive symptoms in early pregnancy among 921 participants in Proyecto Buena Salud, an ongoing cohort of pregnant Puerto Rican and Dominican women in Western Massachusetts. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (mean=13 weeks gestation) by bilingual interviewers who also collected data on sociodemographic, acculturation, behavioral, and psychosocial factors. A total of 30% of participants were classified as having depressive symptoms (EPDS scores>12) with mean+SD scores of 9.28+5.99. Higher levels of education (college/graduate school vs. depressive symptoms. There was the suggestion that failure to discontinue cigarette smoking with the onset of pregnancy (RR=1.32; 95% CI 0.97-1.71) and English language preference (RR=1.33; 95% CI 0.96-1.70) were associated with higher risk. Single marital status, second generation in the U.S., and higher levels of alcohol consumption were associated with higher risk of depressive symptoms in univariate analyses, but were attenuated after adjustment for other risk factors. Findings in the largest, fastest-growing ethnic minority group can inform intervention studies targeting Hispanic women at risk of depression in pregnancy.

  18. The accuracy of diagnosis of major depression in patients with Parkinson's disease: a comparative study among the UPDRS, the geriatric depression scale and the Beck depression inventory A precisão do diagnóstico de depressão na doença de Parkinson: um estudo comparativo entre a UPDRS, a escala geriátrica de depressão e o inventário de depressão de Beck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Tumas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the accuracy of diagnosis of major depression in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD using the UPDRS, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15 and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. METHOD: 50 consecutive patients with PD were evaluated. The diagnosis of major depression was made according to the DSM-IV criteria. RESULTS: We found a 24% prevalence of major depression. All depression scales were highly correlated but UPDRS depression item had the lowest diagnostic value. The GDS15 had the more appropriate "receiver operating characteristics" curve. The best cut-off scores for screening depression were 17/18 for BDI and 8/9 for GDS15. We did not find any correlation between the level of depression and intensity of motor symptoms, functional capacity and duration of the disease. CONCLUSION: GDS15 is better than the BDI and the UPDRS for screening depression in PD and depression is not related to the degree of parkinsonian symptoms.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a precisão do diagnóstico de depressão em pacientes com doença de Parkinson avaliados pela UPDRS, pela Escala Geriátrica de Depressão com 15 itens (EGD15 e pelo Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB. MÉTODO: 50 pacientes com DP foram avaliados. O diagnóstico de depressão maior foi feito segundo os critérios do DSM-IV. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de depressão foi 24%. As escalas de depressão tiveram elevada correlação entre si. A UPDRS apresentou a menor sensibilidade para o diagnóstico. A EGD15 mostrou uma curva ROC mais apropriada que o IDB. Os melhores escores-de-corte para diagnóstico de depressão foram 17/18 para o IDB e 8/9 para a EGD15. Não houve correlação entre os níveis de depressão e a intensidade do parkinsonismo, a capacidade funcional ou a duração da doença. CONCLUSÃO: A EGD15 é melhor que o IDB para diagnosticar depressão na DP. A depressão não está relacionada à gravidade dos sintomas parkinsonianos.

  19. Fifty years with the Hamilton scales for anxiety and depression. A tribute to Max Hamilton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P

    2009-01-01

    From the moment Max Hamilton started his psychiatric education, he considered psychometrics to be a scientific discipline on a par with biochemistry or pharmacology in clinical research. His clinimetric skills were in operation in the 1950s when randomised clinical trials were established...... as the method for the evaluation of the clinical effects of psychotropic drugs. Inspired by Eysenck, Hamilton took the long route around factor analysis in order to qualify his scales for anxiety (HAM-A) and depression (HAM-D) as scientific tools. From the moment when, 50 years ago, Hamilton published his first...... placebo-controlled trial with an experimental anti-anxiety drug, he realized the dialectic problem in using the total score on HAM-A as a sufficient statistic for the measurement of outcome. This dialectic problem has been investigated for more than 50 years with different types of factor analyses without...

  20. A psychometric validation analysis of Eysenck’s Neuroticism and Extraversion Scales in a sample of first time depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Stine Bjerrum; Bech, Per; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2015-01-01

    Eysenck and Eysenck identified the two-factor structure of personality, namely neuroticism and extraversion which has been widely used in clinical psychiatry, and generated much research on the psychometric properties of the scales. Using a classical psychometric approach the neuroticism...... and extraversion scales have shown robust psychometric properties. The present study used both classical psychometric and item response theory (IRT) analyses to evaluate the neuroticism and extraversion scales and improve scalability of the instrument neuroticism and extraversion. A first time depressed sample...... symptoms related to interpersonal sensitivity were identified. For the extraversion scale a shorter and psychometrically more robust version was identified together with a short introversion scale. Clinically discriminant validity was analysed using correlations. The correlation between depression (Ham...

  1. Chilean experimental version of the State-Trait Depression Questionnaire (ST-DEP: Trait sub-scale (T-DEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Vera-Villarroel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This instrumental study presents the first validity and reliability data for the Trait subscale (T-DEP of the Chilean experimental version of the State and Trait Depression Inventory (ST-DEP: Euthymia and Dysthymia. The data were obtained from a sample of 300 university students. The internal consistency values for the TDEP were high (.90. The test-retest values from eight weeks time interval (fifty six days were elevated (.78. A factorial analysis of the principal components revealed a principal factor for all of the constructed items in this experimental version of the TDEP. The last, promax rotation showed two clear main factors similar in size: negative affectivity (Dysthymia and positive affectivity (Euthymia. The convergent validity indexes for the Beck Depression Inventory and the Zung Self Rating Depression Scale, were also high, with indexes ranging from .64 to .71. The correlation between State- Trait Anxiety Inventory and the depression scales used in this study was high (between .63 and .78, once again indicating the usual overlapping between anxiety and depression seen in most depression inventories.

  2. Psychometric Limitations of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale for Assessing Depressive Symptoms among Adults with HIV/AIDS: A Rasch Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl L. Gay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D scale is a widely used measure of depressive symptoms, but its psychometric properties have not been adequately evaluated among adults with HIV/AIDS. This study used an item response theory approach (Rasch analysis to evaluate the CES-D’s validity and reliability in relation to key demographic and clinical variables in adults with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 347 adults with HIV/AIDS (231 males, 93 females, and 23 transgenders; age range 22–77 years completed the CES-D. A Rasch model application was used to analyze the CES-D’s rating scale functioning, internal scale validity, person-response validity, person-separation validity, internal consistency, differential item functioning (DIF, and differential test functioning. CES-D scores were generally high and associated with several demographic and clinical variables. The CES-D distinguished 3 distinct levels of depression and had acceptable internal consistency but lacked unidimensionality, five items demonstrated poor fit to the model, 15% of the respondents demonstrated poor fit, and eight items demonstrated DIF related to gender, race, or AIDS diagnosis. Removal of misfitting items resulted in minimal improvement in the CES-D’s substantive and structural validity. CES-D scores should be interpreted with caution in adults with HIV/AIDS, particularly when comparing scores across gender and racial groups.

  3. Reliability and validity of the Ethiopian version of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS in HIV infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayalu Aklilu Reda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS is a widely used instrument for evaluating psychological distress from anxiety and depression. HADS has not yet been validated in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Amharic (Ethiopian language version of HADs among HIV infected patients. METHODS: The translated scale was administered to 302 HIV/AIDS patients on follow up for and taking anti-retroviral treatment. Consistency assessment was conducted using Cronbach's alpha, test-retest reliability using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC. Construct validity was examined using principal components analysis (PCA. Parallel analysis, Kaiser's criterion and the scree test were used for factor extraction. RESULTS: The internal consistency was 0.78 for the anxiety, 0.76 for depression subscales and 0.87 for the full scale of HADS. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC was 80%, 86%, and 84% for the anxiety and depression subscales, and total score respectively. PCA revealed a one dimensional scale. CONCLUSION: This preliminary validation study of the Ethiopian version of the HADs indicates that it has promising acceptability, reliability and validity. The adopted scale has a single underlying dimension as indicated by Razavi's model. The HADS can be used to examine psychological distress in HIV infected patients. Findings are discussed and recommendations made.

  4. Correlations between BDNF genetic polymorphism and postpartum depression in cesarean section parturient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-yong ZHOU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the correlations between the genetic polymorphism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and the postpartum depression (PPD in cesarean section parturient. Methods Three hundred and sixty parturients, who underwent cesarean section under spinal anesthesia from Feb. 2014 to Feb. 2015 in Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University or Hunan Maternal and Child Health Hospital, were selected as subjects. The general information of parturients was recorded and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS was used to evaluate the depression condition of parturients at the prenatal 1 day and the 42th day postpartum, and with a cut-off point of 12/13 for identifying PPD. The genotypes of BDNF gene locus G712A, rs56164415, rs11030100, rs11030101 and rs6265 were measured by Sequenom® Mass Array SNP. Finally, the correlations of PPD to different genotypes and general information of parturients were statistically analyzed. Results The incidence of PPD among the selected subjects was 7.2%. Pregnancy mental stress, poor pregnancy mood, perinatal elevated monocyte count, prenatal depression mood and BDNF gene locus rs6265 mutation all could affect the incidence of PPD in cesarean section parturients (P0.05, and their haploid forms were not related to PPD also. Conclusion BDNF rs6265CC genotype, pregnancy mental stress, poor pregnancy mood, perinatal elevated monocyte count and prenatal depression mood are the risk factors for postpartum depression. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.06.11

  5. [Physical activity and childbirth classes during a pregnancy and the level of perceived stress and depressive symptoms in women after childbirth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Joanna; Olszowa, Daria; Markowska, Dominika; Teplik, Marzena; Rymaszewska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to answer the question of whether physical activity during pregnancy and participation in childbirth classes prepare women for childbirth; further, does it influence the levels of perceived stress and the occurrence of depressed mood. 100 women participated in the study. Half of the women had taken part in the childbirth classes before giving birth. A questionnaires of own authorship, Edinburgh Postnatal Depressioni Scale (EPDS) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) were used. There was no significant relationship observed between participation in childbirth classes and the results of EPDS and PSS-10. The mood of women after childbirth correlated significantly with the level of stress in the whole study group (pstress were observed in women who stayed in a relationship (p =0.0029, p = 0.0008). Women physically active during pregnancy were also characterized by better mood and lower levels of perceived stress (6.7 and 14.4 vs. 8.4 and 16.0). Among women exercising during pregnancy the participants in childbirth classes was far more numerous (ppregnancy was linked to lower levels of stress experienced by women and less severe depressive symptoms after childbirth,; espe- cially in the group of childbirth classes participants.

  6. Influence of body posture on the association between postpartum depression and pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita di Cássia de Oliveira Angelo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between postpartum depression (PPD, intensification of back pain and exacerbation of changes in postural alignment intrinsic to puerperium. METHODS: Eighty women at 2 to 30 weeks postpartum were included in the study according to the following criteria: literate mothers, gestation of 34 to 42 weeks, and healthy live-born infants. All mothers agreed to participate in the study. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS. Pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS and the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ, and posture, using real time naturalistic observation. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant association between PPD and pain intensity (p = 0.002. The upper back was the most frequent pain site among depressed women, both before (p = 0.04 and after delivery (p = 0.01. There were no associations between PPD and type of posture (p = 0.328. However, pain intensity was greater among depressed women in the swayback group (p < 0.001. CONCLUSION: The intensification of puerperal pain is closely associated with PPD. Our results suggest that back pain may be both a risk factor and a comorbidity of PPD among puerperal women and that pain and type of posture are interdependent.

  7. The Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale-Short Version: Scale Reduction via Exploratory Bifactor Modeling of the Broad Anxiety Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebesutani, Chad; Reise, Steven P.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Ale, Chelsea; Regan, Jennifer; Young, John; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine; Weisz, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Using a school-based (N = 1,060) and clinic-referred (N = 303) youth sample, the authors developed a 25-item shortened version of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) using Schmid-Leiman exploratory bifactor analysis to reduce client burden and administration time and thus improve the transportability characteristics of this…

  8. Cross-cultural adaptation into Punjabi of the English version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Rod S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We wanted to use a Punjabi version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS to enable non-English speaking patients to participate in a clinical trial. The aim of the study was to translate and validate the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale into Punjabi. Methods The HADS was translated into Punjabi by a multidisciplinary team, verified against the original version, and administered to 73 bilingual patients attending an outpatient clinic. Results One sample t-tests and the Bland-Altman plots demonstrated acceptable linguistic agreement between the two versions of the HADS. Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficients (p Conclusion The Punjabi HADS is an acceptable, reliable and valid measure of anxiety and depression among physically ill Punjabi speaking people in the United Kingdom.

  9. Effects of relaxation on depression levels in women with high-risk pregnancies: a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Scherrer de Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyse the effects of relaxation as a nursing intervention on the depression levels of hospitalised women with high-risk pregnancies. Methods: a randomised clinical trial realised in a reference centre for high-risk pregnancies. The sample consisted of 50 women with high-risk pregnancies (25 in the control group and 25 in the intervention group. The Benson relaxation technique was applied to the intervention group for five days. Control variables were collected using a predesigned form, and the signs and symptoms of depression were evaluated using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS, version 20.0, was used with a significance level of 5%. The Wilcoxon and paired t-tests were used to evaluate depression levels between two timepoints. Using categorical data, the McNemar test was used to analyse differences in depression severity before and after the intervention. Results: depression levels decreased in the intervention group five days after the relaxation technique was applied (4.5 ± 3, p<0.05 compared with the levels at the first timepoint (10.3±5.9. Conclusion: as a nursing intervention, relaxation was effective in decreasing the symptoms of depression in hospitalised women with high-risk pregnancies.

  10. Impact of Monochorionicity and Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome on Prenatal Attachment, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauquier-Maccotta, Berengere; Chalouhi, Gihad E; Picquet, Anne-Laure; Carrier, Aude; Bussières, Laurence; Golse, Bernard; Ville, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Monochronioric (MC) twin pregnancies are considered as high-risk pregnancies with potential complications requiring in-utero interventions. We aimed to assess prenatal attachment, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive symptoms in MC pregnancies complicated with Twin-To-Twin-transfusion syndrome (TTTS) in comparison to uncomplicated monochorionic (UMC) and dichorionic pregnancies (DC). Auto-questionnaires were filled out at diagnosis of TTTS and at successive milestones. Prenatal attachment, PTSD, anxiety and perinatal depression were evaluated respectively by the Prenatal Attachment Inventory (PAI) completed for each twin, the Post-traumatic Checklist Scale (PCLS), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale (EPDS). There was no significant difference in the PAI scores between the two twins. In the DC and UMC groups, PAI scores increased throughout pregnancy, whilst it didn't for TTTS group. TTTS and DC had a similar prenatal attachment while MC mothers expressed a significantly higher attachment to their fetuses and expressed it earlier. At the announcement of TTTS, 72% of the patients present a score over the threshold at the EPDS Scale, with a higher score for TTTS than for DC (p = 0.005), and UMC (p = 0.007) at the same GA. 30% of mothers in TTTS group have PTSD during pregnancy. 50% of TTTS- patients present an anxiety score over the threshold (STAI-Scale), with a score significantly higher in TTTS than in UMC (pPTSD, high level of anxiety and an alteration of the prenatal attachment. These results should guide the psychological support provided to these patients.

  11. Dealing with missing data in a multi-question depression scale: a comparison of imputation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Heather

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Missing data present a challenge to many research projects. The problem is often pronounced in studies utilizing self-report scales, and literature addressing different strategies for dealing with missing data in such circumstances is scarce. The objective of this study was to compare six different imputation techniques for dealing with missing data in the Zung Self-reported Depression scale (SDS. Methods 1580 participants from a surgical outcomes study completed the SDS. The SDS is a 20 question scale that respondents complete by circling a value of 1 to 4 for each question. The sum of the responses is calculated and respondents are classified as exhibiting depressive symptoms when their total score is over 40. Missing values were simulated by randomly selecting questions whose values were then deleted (a missing completely at random simulation. Additionally, a missing at random and missing not at random simulation were completed. Six imputation methods were then considered; 1 multiple imputation, 2 single regression, 3 individual mean, 4 overall mean, 5 participant's preceding response, and 6 random selection of a value from 1 to 4. For each method, the imputed mean SDS score and standard deviation were compared to the population statistics. The Spearman correlation coefficient, percent misclassified and the Kappa statistic were also calculated. Results When 10% of values are missing, all the imputation methods except random selection produce Kappa statistics greater than 0.80 indicating 'near perfect' agreement. MI produces the most valid imputed values with a high Kappa statistic (0.89, although both single regression and individual mean imputation also produced favorable results. As the percent of missing information increased to 30%, or when unbalanced missing data were introduced, MI maintained a high Kappa statistic. The individual mean and single regression method produced Kappas in the 'substantial agreement' range

  12. Does the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measure anxiety symptoms consistently across adolescence? The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathyssek, Christina M.; Olino, Thomas M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Van Oort, Floor V. A.

    We assessed if the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measures anxiety symptoms similarly across age groups within adolescence. This is crucial for valid comparison of anxiety levels between different age groups. Anxiety symptoms were assessed biennially in a representative

  13. Does the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measure anxiety symptoms consistently across adolescence? The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathyssek, Christina M.; Olino, Thomas M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Van Oort, Floor V. A.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed if the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measures anxiety symptoms similarly across age groups within adolescence. This is crucial for valid comparison of anxiety levels between different age groups. Anxiety symptoms were assessed biennially in a representative populatio

  14. Does the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measure anxiety symptoms consistently across adolescence? The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Mathyssek (Christina); T.M. Olino (Thomas); C.A. Hartman; J. Ormel (Johan Hans); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); F.V.A. van Oort (Floor)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe assessed if the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale (RCADS) measures anxiety symptoms similarly across age groups within adolescence. This is crucial for valid comparison of anxiety levels between different age groups. Anxiety symptoms were assessed biennially in a representati

  15. Can a one-item mood scale do the trick? Predicting relapse over 5.5-years in recurrent depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijsbergen, Gerard D.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Berking, Matthias; Koeter, Maarten W.J.; Schene, Aart H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine whether a simple Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) is able to predict time to relapse over 5.5-years. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 187 remitted recurrently depressed out-patients were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) a

  16. The Short Version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21): Factor Structure in a Young Adolescent Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the factor structure of the short form of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21; Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995b) in a young adolescent sample. A group of 484 high school students ("Mean" age = 13.62 years, Min = 11.83, Max = 15.67 years, 52 % boys) completed the DASS-21. Several models were tested using Confirmatory Factor…

  17. The Consequences of Perfectionism Scale: Factorial Structure and Relationships with Perfectionism, Performance Perfectionism, Affect, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeber, Joachim; Hoyle, Azina; Last, Freyja

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the Consequences of Perfectionism Scale (COPS) and its relationships with perfectionism, performance perfectionism, affect, and depressive symptoms in 202 university students using confirmatory factor analysis, correlations, and regression analyses. Results suggest that the COPS is a reliable and valid measure of positive…

  18. The Consequences of Perfectionism Scale: Factorial structure and relationships with perfectionism, performance perfectionism, affect, and depressive symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Stoeber, Joachim; Hoyle, Alison J.; Last, Freyja

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the Consequences of Perfectionism Scale (COPS) and its relationships with perfectionism, performance perfectionism, affect, and depressive symptoms in 202 university students using confirmatory factor analysis, correlations, and regression analyses. Results suggest that the COPS is a reliable and valid measure of positive and negative consequences of perfectionism.

  19. A new clinical rating scale for work absence and productivity: validation in patients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatham Lakshmi N

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD is highest in working age people and depression causes significant impairment in occupational functioning. Work productivity and work absence should be incorporated into clinical assessments but currently available scales may not be optimized for clinical use. This study seeks to validate the Lam Employment Absence and Productivity Scale (LEAPS, a 10-item self-report questionnaire that takes 3-5 minutes to complete. Methods The study sample consisted of consecutive patients attending a Mood Disorders outpatient clinic who were in full- or part-time paid work. All patients met DSM-IV criteria for MDD and completed during their intake assessment the LEAPS, the self-rated version of the Quick Inventory for Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-SR, the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS and the Health and Work Performance Questionnaire (HPQ. Standard psychometric analyses for validation were conducted. Results A total of 234 patients with MDD completed the assessments. The LEAPS displayed excellent internal consistency as assessed by Cronbach's alpha of 0.89. External validity was assessed by comparing the LEAPS to the other clinical and work functioning scales. The LEAPS total score was significantly correlated with the SDS work disability score (r = 0.63, p Conclusion The LEAPS displays good internal and external validity in a population of patients with MDD attending an outpatient clinic, which suggests that it may be a clinically useful tool to assess and monitor work functioning and productivity in depressed patients.

  20. Construction and validation of a patient- and user-friendly nursing home version of the Geriatric Depression Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K.; Gerritsen, D. L.; Beekman, A. T. F.; Eisses, A. M. H.; Kluiter, H.; Ribbe, M. W.

    Objective To construct a patient- and user-friendly shortened version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is especially suitable for nursing home patients. Methods The study was carried out on two different data bases including 23 Dutch nursing homes. Data on the GDS (n = 410), the Mini

  1. Construction and validation of a patient- and user-friendly nursing home version of the Geriatric Depression Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K.; Gerritsen, D. L.; Beekman, A. T. F.; Eisses, A. M. H.; Kluiter, H.; Ribbe, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To construct a patient- and user-friendly shortened version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is especially suitable for nursing home patients. Methods The study was carried out on two different data bases including 23 Dutch nursing homes. Data on the GDS (n = 410), the Mini Men

  2. Investigation on Depression State of Early Pregnant Women in Chengdu%成都市部分早孕妇女抑郁状态的调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲晓芬; 王玉琼

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the depression state of certain early pregnant women so as to provide the basis for psychological intervention.Methods From July 1st to December 31th 2009,1350 women who were confirmed pregnancy,with gestational age ≤ 12 weeks,voluntarily participated in this study and underwent survey with Edinburgh postnatal depression scale(EPDS).Results The depression rate of women with early pregnancy was 39.2%.“When things go wrong,I blame myself unnecessarily” scored the highest in the EPDS general, depression group and non- depression group.The depression rates of the groups of less than 24 years old and over 35 years old were significantly higher than that of the group between 25 to 34 years old(P<0.05).Conclusion Early pregnant women are prone to depression,especially younger and older pregnant women, which deserves particular attention on the psychological state of women of early pregnancy.%目的 调查成都市部分早孕妇女的抑郁状态,为对早孕妇女进行心理干预提供依据.方法 从2009年7月1日至12月31日对1 350名B超确诊为怀孕、孕周≤12+6周、自愿参加本研究的孕妇给予爱丁堡产后抑郁量表(Edinburgh postnatal depression scale,EPDS)进行调查.结果 早孕妇女抑郁发生率为39.2%."当事情出错时,我毫无必要地责备自己"条目在EPDS总体、抑郁组、无抑郁组得分均为最高.年龄≤24岁组和年龄大≥35岁组的孕妇抑郁发生率高于年龄25~34岁组(P<0.05).结论 早孕妇女容易产生抑郁情绪,且在低龄和高龄孕妇中更为明显,故应对早孕妇女的心理状态给予特别关注.

  3. Validation of the Arab Youth Mental Health scale as a screening tool for depression/anxiety in Lebanese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakkash Rima

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection of common mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety, among children and adolescents requires the use of validated, culturally sensitive, and developmentally appropriate screening instruments. The Arab region has a high proportion of youth, yet Arabic-language screening instruments for mental disorders among this age group are virtually absent. Methods We carried out construct and clinical validation on the recently-developed Arab Youth Mental Health (AYMH scale as a screening tool for depression/anxiety. The scale was administered with 10-14 year old children attending a social service center in Beirut, Lebanon (N = 153. The clinical assessment was conducted by a child and adolescent clinical psychiatrist employing the DSM IV criteria. We tested the scale's sensitivity, specificity, and internal consistency. Results Scale scores were generally significantly associated with how participants responded to standard questions on health, mental health, and happiness, indicating good construct validity. The results revealed that the scale exhibited good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86 and specificity (79%. However, it exhibited moderate sensitivity for girls (71% and poor sensitivity for boys (50%. Conclusions The AYMH scale is useful as a screening tool for general mental health states and a valid screening instrument for common mental disorders among girls. It is not a valid instrument for detecting depression and anxiety among boys in an Arab culture.

  4. A Reexamination of the Factor Structure of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: Is a One-Factor Model Plausible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael C.; Cheavens, Jennifer S.; Heiy, Jane E.; Cukrowicz, Kelly C.

    2010-01-01

    The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) is one of the most widely used measures of depressive symptoms in research today. The original psychometric work in support of the CES-D (Radloff, 1977) described a 4-factor model underlying the 20 items on the scale. Despite a long history of evidence supporting this structure,…

  5. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) as screening instruments for depression in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Tim J; Friedrich, Michael; Johansen, Christoffer; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Faller, Herman; Koch, Uwe; Brähler, Elmar; Härter, Martin; Keller, Monika; Schulz, Holger; Wegscheider, Karl; Weis, Joachim; Mehnert, Anja

    2017-06-27

    Depression screening in patients with cancer is recommended by major clinical guidelines, although the evidence on individual screening tools is limited for this population. Here, the authors assess and compare the diagnostic accuracy of 2 established screening instruments: the depression modules of the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D), in a representative sample of patients with cancer. This multicenter study was conducted with a proportional, stratified, random sample of 2141 patients with cancer across all major tumor sites and treatment settings. The PHQ-9 and HADS-D were assessed and compared in terms of diagnostic accuracy and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition diagnosis of major depressive disorder using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview for Oncology as the criterion standard. The diagnostic accuracy of the PHQ-9 and HADS-D was fair for diagnosing major depressive disorder, with areas under the ROC curves of 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.79) and 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.77), respectively. The 2 questionnaires did not differ significantly in their areas under the ROC curves (P = .15). The PHQ-9 with a cutoff score ≥7 had the best screening performance, with a sensitivity of 83% (95% confidence interval, 78%-89%) and a specificity of 61% (95% confidence interval, 59%-63%). The American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline screening algorithm had a sensitivity of 44% (95% confidence interval, 36%-51%) and a specificity of 84% (95% confidence interval, 83%-85%). In patients with cancer, the screening performance of both the PHQ-9 and the HADS-D was limited compared with a standardized diagnostic interview. Costs and benefits of routinely screening all patients with cancer should be weighed carefully. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Screening for depression and anxiety among older Chinese immigrants living in Western countries: The use of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoping; Haralambous, Betty; Pachana, Nancy A; Bryant, Christina; LoGiudice, Dina; Goh, Anita; Dow, Briony

    2016-03-01

    Depression and anxiety are two common mental health problems among older people. There is evidence that using well-validated screening tools can improve detection of depression and anxiety among this group. The review explored the use of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI) for screening depression and anxiety among older Chinese immigrants, one of the largest and fastest growing groups of older immigrants in Western society. It focused on the GDS and GAI because both are designed specifically for older people. Online literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. A narrative approach was used to review included papers. A total of 21 articles were included. There were limited data on anxiety among older Chinese immigrants, with only one unpublished report identified. There were 13 studies (20 articles) using the GDS with this group. Results of these studies indicated that the GDS is a reliable tool in this population; however, there was limited validity data. Two versions of the GDS-15 have been used with older Chinese immigrants, including the standard GDS-15 and Mui's GDS-15. Prevalence of depression ranged between 20% and 30% in most reviewed studies. Results of this review have practical implications for clinicians in their use of these tools with older Chinese immigrants in Western countries, such as the different GDS versions. It also suggests a number of directions for future research, such as the inclusion of clinical samples and consideration of the diversity within this group. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Unhappiness with the Fetal Gender is associated with Depression in Adult Pregnant Women Attending Prenatal Care in a Public Hospital in Durango, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sifuentes-Alvarez, Antonio; Salas-Martinez, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Depression during pregnancy has been scantily studied in Mexican women. We aimed to determine the prevalence and correlates of depression in adult pregnant women attending a public hospital in the northern Mexican city of Durango, Mexico. Through a cross-sectional study design, we assessed depression in 270 adult pregnant women attended for prenatal care in a public hospital using a validated Mexican version of the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale in pregnancy and further confirmation by a psychiatric evaluation using the DSM-IV criteria for depression. Prevalence association with socio-demographic, clinical and psychosocial characteristics of the pregnant women was also investigated. Of the 270 pregnant women studied, 101 (37.4%) had EPDS scores equal to or higher than nine. Depression was confirmed in 56 (20.7%) women. Of them, 42 suffered from minor depression and 14 from major depression. Multivariate analysis of socio-demographic, clinical and psychosocial characteristics of the women showed that depression was associated with depression before pregnancy (OR = 3.36; 95% CI: 1.20-9.40; P=0.02), anxiety during pregnancy (OR = 9.38; 95% CI: 1.87-46.96; P=0.006), smoking (OR = 25.05; 95% CI: 1.77-353.07; P=0.01), unhappy with the fetal sex (OR = 8.53; 95% CI: 2.46-29.48; Pwomen studied had confirmed depression. This is the first report of an association of prenatal depression with unhappiness with the fetal sex. Factors associated with prenatal depression found in this study may help for the optimal design of preventive measures against prenatal depression.

  8. Improved virtual queuing and dynamic EPD techniques for TCP over ATM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.; Siu, K.Y.; Ren, W.

    1998-11-01

    It is known that TCP throughput can degrade significantly over UBR service in a congested ATM network, and the early packet discard (EPD) technique has been proposed to improve the performance. However, recent studies show that EPD cannot ensure fairness among competing VCs in a congested network, but the degree of fairness can be improved using various forms of fair buffer allocation techniques. The authors propose an improved scheme that utilizes only a single shared FIFO queue for all VCs and admits simple implementation for high speed ATM networks. The scheme achieves nearly perfect fairness and throughput among multiple TCP connections, comparable to the expensive per-VC queuing technique. Analytical and simulation results are presented to show the validity of this new scheme and significant improvement in performance as compared with existing fair buffer allocation techniques for TCP over ATM.

  9. Mania and depression in the perinatal period among women with a history of major depressive disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Angela J; Hippman, Catriona L; Carrion, Prescilla B; Honer, William G; Austin, Jehannine C

    2014-01-01

    Background Women with a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) have increased risks for postpartum depression, but less is known about postpartum mania in this population. Objectives To prospectively determine the frequency with which mania occurs in the postpartum among women who have a history of MDD, and to explore temporal relationships between onset of mania/hypomania and depression. Methods We administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV disorders (SCID) to pregnant women with a self-reported history of MDD to confirm diagnosis and exclude women with any history of mania/hypomania. Participants completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Altman Self-Rated Mania scale (ASRM): once during the pregnancy (~26 weeks), and one week, one month, and three months postpartum. Results Among women (N=107) with a SCID-confirmed diagnosis of MDD, 34.6% (n=37) experienced mania/hypomania (defined by an ASRM score of ≥6) at ≥1 timepoint during the postpartum: and for just over half (20/37, 54%), onset was during the postpartum. The highest frequency of mania/hypomania (26.4%, n=26) was at one week postpartum. Women who experienced mania/hypomania at one week postpartum had significantly more symptoms of mania/hypomania later in the postpartum. Conclusion A substantive proportion of women with a history of MDD may experience first onset of mania/hypomania symptoms in the early postpartum, others may experience first onset during pregnancy. Taken with other recent data, these findings suggest a possible rationale for screening women with a history of MDD for mania/hypomania during the early postpartum period, but issues with screening instruments are discussed. PMID:24402681

  10. Factorial Validity and Internal Consistency of Malaysian Adapted Depression Anxiety Stress Scale - 21 in an Adolescent Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairul Anuar Hashim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychometrically sound measurement instrument is a fundamental requirement across broad range of research areas. In negative affect research, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS has been identified as a psychometrically sound instrument to measure depression, anxiety and stress, especially the 21-item version. However, its psychometric properties in adolescents have been less consistent. Objectives: Thus, the present study sought to examine the factorial validity and internal consistency of the adapted 21-item version of DASS in Malaysian adolescents. Method: Using cross-sectional study design, DASS-21 was administered to 750 Malaysian adolescents (Mean age = 13.40 ± 0.49. The data were then analyzed using Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, in which the original DASS-21 factor structure (depression-stress-anxiety was compared to 8 other alternative models.Results: CFA results revealed a weak support for DASS-21 as a differentiated measure of depression, anxiety and stress in Malaysian adolescents. Extremely high latent factors intercorrelations were observed in the model reflecting original DASS factor structure. On the other hand, despite the best overall fit of a 4-factor model consisting of depression, anxiety, and stress, as well as a general negative affect factor, individual factor loadings for the specific factors were uninterpretable. Although model fit of 1-factor model was inferior when compared the other competing models, this model (1-factor exhibit reasonable model fit. Conclusion: We concluded that the use of Malaysian adapted DASS-21 as a differentiated measure stress, anxiety, and depression in Malaysian adolescent should proceed with caution and further refinement of the scale is necessary before a concrete conclusion can be made.

  11. The Italian version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21: Factor structure and psychometric properties on community and clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottesi, Gioia; Ghisi, Marta; Altoè, Gianmarco; Conforti, Erica; Melli, Gabriele; Sica, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21) is the short version of a self-report measure that was originally developed to provide maximum differentiation between depressive and anxious symptoms. Despite encouraging evidence, the factor structure and other features of the DASS-21 are yet to be firmly established. A community sample of 417 participants and two clinical groups (32 depressive patients and 25 anxious patients) completed the Italian version of the DASS-21 along with several measures of psychopathology. Confirmatory factor analyses suggested that the DASS-21 is a measure of general distress plus three additional orthogonal dimensions (anxiety, depression, and stress). The internal consistency and temporal stability of the measure were good; each DASS-21 scale correlated more strongly with a measure of a similar construct, demonstrating good convergent and divergent validity. Lastly, the DASS-21 demonstrated good criterion-oriented validity. The validity of the Italian DASS-21 and its utility, both for community and clinical individuals, are supported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Postnatal depression and its associated factors among Northeastern Nigerian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dauda Sulyman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postnatal depression is a serious psychiatric condition that occurs in puerperium. It is associated with increased morbidity and can overwhelm new mothers and interfere with the care of their babies. This study aimed to determine the prevalence rate of postnatal depression and assess factors that are associated with its development among northeastern Nigerian women. Materials and Methods: Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS questionnaire was administered to four hundred and eighty-three women who delivered at the maternity unit of a tertiary health institution in northeastern Nigeria. Their sociodemographic and clinical variables were also obtained using pro forma questionnaire designed by the researchers. Results: One hundred and eight respondents scored 13 or more points on EPNDS, making the prevalence rate of postnatal depression 22.4%. Factors that are associated with the development of postnatal depression are unemployment [odds ratio (OR = 0.49, 95% (CI = 0.27-0.86, P value = 0.018, lack of support from the husband (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.19-0.60, P value = 0.000, and primiparity (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.35-0.88, P value = 0.013; others are unplanned pregnancy (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.35-0.88, P value = 0.013 and physical illness in the mother (OR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.77-2.79, P value = 0.007. Conclusion: The study showed that a significant proportion of new mothers have postnatal depression. This may negatively affect their parenting skills and may have adverse effects on them and their children. Early detection and effective management, together with an efficient collaboration among psychiatrists, obstetricians, and other health workers who are involved in the care of new mothers, will go a long way in reducing the negative consequences that may result from this condition.

  13. Prenatal and Postpartum Evening Salivary Cortisol Levels in Association with Peripartum Depressive Symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros I Iliadis

    Full Text Available The biology of peripartum depression remains unclear, with altered stress and the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal axis response having been implicated in its pathophysiology.The current study was undertaken as a part of the BASIC project (Biology, Affect, Stress, Imaging, Cognition, a population-based longitudinal study of psychological wellbeing during pregnancy and the postpartum period in Uppsala County, Sweden, in order to assess the association between evening salivary cortisol levels and depressive symptoms in the peripartum period. Three hundred and sixty-five pregnant women from the BASIC cohort were recruited at pregnancy week 18 and instructed to complete a Swedish validated version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at the 36th week of pregnancy as well as the sixth week after delivery. At both times, they were also asked to provide evening salivary samples for cortisol analysis. A comprehensive review of the relevant literature is also provided.Women with postpartum EPDS score ≥ 10 had higher salivary evening cortisol at six weeks postpartum compared to healthy controls (median cortisol 1.19 vs 0.89 nmol/L. A logistic regression model showed a positive association between cortisol levels and depressive symptoms postpartum (OR = 4.1; 95% CI 1.7-9.7. This association remained significant even after controlling for history of depression, use of tobacco, partner support, breastfeeding, stressful life events, and sleep problems, as possible confounders (aOR = 4.5; 95% CI 1.5-14.1. Additionally, women with postpartum depressive symptoms had higher postpartum cortisol levels compared to both women with depressive symptoms antenatally and controls (p = 0.019 and p = 0.004, respectively.Women with depressive symptoms postpartum had higher postpartum cortisol levels, indicating an altered response of the HPA-axis in postpartum depression.

  14. RELATED FACTORS AND PREVENTIVE MEASURES FOR POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION%产后抑郁症的相关因素及预防措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方国英

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] To investigate the occurrence of postpartum depression analysis of the relevant factors, and make women's postpaitum mental health care prevention measures. [Methods] 42d postpartum were reviewed in hospital, and investigated by questionnaires. The mother's mental state and adverse emotional reasons was recorded. Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) were evaluated. [Results] The incidence of postpartum depression rate of 12.86%, and neonatal gender and health status of labor pain and prolonged endurance were closely related. [Conclusion] The incidence of postpartum depression are closely related with the birth of mothers to provide targeted prevention measures and social support to prevent and reduce the incidence of postpartum depression.%[目的]调查分析产妇产后发生抑郁症的相关影响因素,提出产褥期妇女的精神卫生保健工作的预防措施.[方法]产妇产后42 d到医院进行产后复查时,采用调查问卷的方法,记录产妇的精神状态及出现不良情绪的原因,使用爱丁堡产后抑郁量表(EPDS)进行评定.[结果]本组产妇产后抑郁症的发生率为12.86%,与新生儿性别及健康状况、对分娩疼痛承受力及产程延长有密切的关系.[结论]产后抑郁的发生与分娩状况密切相关,对产妇提供有针对性的预防措施及社会支持,可以预防和降低产后抑郁症的发生.

  15. Validating a shortened depression scale (10 item CES-D among HIV-positive people in British Columbia, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To establish the reliability and validity of a shortened (10-item depression scale used among HIV-positive patients enrolled in the Drug Treatment Program in British Columbia, Canada. METHODS: The 10-item CES-D (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale was examined among 563 participants who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART between August 1, 1996 and June 30, 2002. Internal consistency of the scale was measured by Cronbach's alpha. Using the original CES-D 20 as primary criteria, comparisons were made using the Kappa statistic. Predictive accuracy of CES-D 10 was assessed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and negative predictive values. Factor analysis was also performed to determine if the CES-D 10 contained the same factors of positive and negative affect found in the original development of the CES-D. RESULTS: The correlation between the original and the shortened scale is very high (Spearman correlation coefficient  =0.97 (P<0.001. Internal consistency reliability coefficients of the CES-D 10 were satisfactory (Cronbach α=0.88. The CES-D 10 showed comparable accuracy to the original CES-D 20 in classifying participants with depressive symptoms (Kappa=0.82, P<0.001. Sensitivity of CES-D 10 was 91%; specificity was 92%; and positive predictive value was 92%. Factor analysis demonstrates that CES-D 10 contains the same underlying factors of positive and negative affect found in the original development of the CES-D 20. CONCLUSION: The 10-item CES-D is a comparable tool to measure depressive symptoms among HIV-positive research participants.

  16. Using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) on patients with epilepsy: Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Ying; Pakpour, Amir H

    2017-02-01

    The problems of mood disorders are critical in people with epilepsy. Therefore, there is a need to validate a useful tool for the population. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) has been used on the population, and showed that it is a satisfactory screening tool. However, more evidence on its construct validity is needed. A total of 1041 people with epilepsy were recruited in this study, and each completed the HADS. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch analysis were used to understand the construct validity of the HADS. In addition, internal consistency was tested using Cronbachs' α, person separation reliability, and item separation reliability. Ordering of the response descriptors and the differential item functioning (DIF) were examined using the Rasch models. The HADS showed that 55.3% of our participants had anxiety; 56.0% had depression based on its cutoffs. CFA and Rasch analyses both showed the satisfactory construct validity of the HADS; the internal consistency was also acceptable (α=0.82 in anxiety and 0.79 in depression; person separation reliability=0.82 in anxiety and 0.73 in depression; item separation reliability=0.98 in anxiety and 0.91 in depression). The difficulties of the four-point Likert scale used in the HADS were monotonically increased, which indicates no disordering response categories. No DIF items across male and female patients and across types of epilepsy were displayed in the HADS. The HADS has promising psychometric properties on construct validity in people with epilepsy. Moreover, the additive item score is supported for calculating the cutoff. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Utility of MMPI-2-RF Scale Scores in the Differential Diagnosis of Schizophrenia and Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tayla T C; Graham, John R; Arbisi, Paul A

    2017-04-07

    This study was designed to determine whether scores on selected Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scales could be used to differentiate between individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia (SCZ) and major depressive disorder (MDD). The sample was drawn from 2 psychiatric inpatient hospitals and included data from 199 individuals with SCZ and 808 individuals with MDD. A series of multivariate analyses of variance, analyses of variance, and odds ratios were calculated to determine which MMPI-2-RF scales provide the best differentiation between individuals presenting with these 2 disorders. Results indicated scales assessing internalizing dysfunction, including Emotional/Internalizing Dysfunction (EID), Restructured Clinical Scales Demoralization (RCd), Low Positive Emotions (RC2), Suicidal/Death Ideation (SUI), and Self Doubt (SFD) best discriminated MDD from SCZ. Scales assessing thought dysfunction, incluidng Thought Dysfunction (THD), Restructured Clinical Scales Ideas of Persecution (RC6) and Aberrant Experiences (RC8), and Psychoticism-Revised (PSYC-r) were demonstrated to best identify SCZ. Comparisons of the examined MMPI-2-RF scales to MMPI-2 scales assessing similar constructs suggested scales from the MMPI-2-RF perform similarly to their MMPI-2 counterparts in detecting MDD or SCZ, but might have increased ability to discriminate SCZ from other conditions. Overall, results of this study suggest that scores on the examined MMPI-2-RF scales provide important information about the differential diagnosis of MDD and SCZ to clinicians working in inpatient settings.

  18. Relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and depressive symptoms during late pregnancy and the early postpartum period: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Simpson

    Full Text Available Objective: Perinatal depressive symptoms often co-occur with other inflammatory morbidities of pregnancy. The goals of our study were 1 to examine whether changes in inflammatory markers from the third trimester of pregnancy to 12 weeks postpartum were associated with changes in depressive symptoms; 2 to examine whether third trimester inflammatory markers alone were predictive of postpartum depressive symptoms; and 3 to examine the relationship between inflammatory markers and depressive symptoms during the third trimester of pregnancy and at 12 weeks postpartum. Methods: Thirty-three healthy pregnant women were recruited from the Women’s Health Concerns Clinic at St. Joseph’s Healthcare in Hamilton, Canada. The impact of depressive symptoms on the levels of interleukin (IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and C-reactive protein (CRP at the third trimester of pregnancy, at 12 weeks postpartum, and across time was assessed using linear and mixed-model regression. Results: Regression analysis revealed no significant association between depressive symptoms and any of the candidate biomarkers during pregnancy, at 12 weeks postpartum, or over time. Pregnancy depressive symptoms (p > 0.001, IL-6 (p = 0.025, and IL-10 (p = 0.006 were significant predictors of postpartum Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale (EPDS score. Conclusions: Our study supports previous reports from the literature showing no relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and depressive symptoms during late pregnancy, early postpartum, or across time. Our study is the first to observe an association between late pregnancy levels of IL-6 and IL-10 and postpartum depressive symptoms. Further studies with larger samples are required to confirm these findings.

  19. Validation of the Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS)-Psychometric properties of the long and short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhr, Kristina; Hautzinger, Martin; Krisch, Katharina; Berking, Matthias; Ebert, David Daniel

    2016-04-01

    With the development of the Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) by Kanter, et al. [1], different behavioral aspects of depression like activation, rumination or avoidance, and functional impairment can be measured. The long and the short versions of the BADS, however, show differences in the quality of psychometric properties. We wanted to validate the short and long forms of the BADS. We therefore evaluated the factor structure, the psychometric properties, and the construct validity of the long version and the subscales in a clinically depressed German sample (n=258) in study 1. In study 2, we explored the factor structure and the psychometric properties of the short version of the BADS in a subsyndromal sample with elevated depressive symptoms (n=406). In study 1, our results replicated the four factor solution of the BADS-25 original version and showed good psychometric properties. However, with regard to the BADS-9 only the French factor solution of the short BADS-9 demonstrated acceptable fit with low internal consistency of the subscale Avoidance. Thus, only the total score of the short form can be recommended.

  20. Factor structure and dimensionality of the two depression scales in STAR*D using level 1 datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P; Fava, M; Trivedi, M H

    2011-01-01

    ). METHODS: The first treatment step (Level 1) in the STAR*D study provided a dataset of 4041 outpatients with DSM-IV nonpsychotic major depression. The HAM-D(17) and IDS-C(30) were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) without rotation. Mokken analysis tested the unidimensionality of the IDS-C(6......), which corresponds to the unidimensional HAM-D(6.) RESULTS: For both the HAM-D(17) and IDS-C(30), PCA identified a bi-directional factor contrasting the depressive symptoms versus the neurovegetative symptoms. The HAM-D(6) and the corresponding IDS-C(6) symptoms all emerged in the depression factor. Both...... the HAM-D(6) and IDS-C(6) were found to be unidimensional scales, i.e., their total scores are each a sufficient statistic for the measurement of depressive states. LIMITATIONS: STAR*D used only one medication in Level 1. CONCLUSIONS: The unidimensional HAM-D(6) and IDS-C(6) should be used when evaluating...