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Sample records for depression inventory-ii bdi-ii

  1. Psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) among community-dwelling older adults.

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    Segal, Daniel L; Coolidge, Frederick L; Cahill, Brian S; O'Riley, Alisa A

    2008-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) as a self-administered screening tool for depressive symptoms were examined in a sample of community-dwelling older and younger adults. Participants completed the BDI-II, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Coolidge Axis II Inventory, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Short Psychological Well-Being Scale. Internal reliability of the BDI-II was found to be good among older and younger adults. The average BDI-II depression score did not differ between younger and older adults. Solid evidence for convergent and discriminant validity was demonstrated by correlations between the BDI-II with the other measures. The BDI-II appears to have strong psychometric support as a screening measure for depression among older adults in the general population. Implications for using the BDI-II as an assessment instrument in behaviorally based psychotherapy are discussed.

  2. Severity of symptoms of depression among burned patients one week after injury, using Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II).

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    Ahrari, Farideh; Salehi, Seyyed Hamid; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Soltani, Madjid; Taghavi, Shahrzad; Samimi, Roghayeh

    2013-03-01

    This study was done to determine the severity of symptoms of depression in burned patients and to assess the effect of burn related factors on depression. This is a descriptive cross-sectional survey, performed in Burn center, Motahhari hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The population of the study included 300 hospitalized patients from April 2010 to May 2011 who were assessed for symptoms of depression one week after burn injury by Beck Depression Inventory-II. Three hundred subjects (50% female and 50% male) participated in the study. Age ranged from 13 to 75 with the mean of 35.06±12.79 years. 184 (61.3%) had symptoms of depression, 58 (19.3%) of them mild, 52 (17.3%) moderate and 74 (24.7%) severe depression symptoms. There was a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and age, gender, educational level, TBSA%, number of burn sites and amputation (p valueburned patients suggests that depression should be screened in such patients and treat if indicated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. The Latent Symptom Structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Outpatients with Major Depression

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    Quilty, Lena C.; Zhang, K. Anne; Bagby, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is a self-report instrument frequently used in clinical and research settings to assess depression severity. Although investigators have examined the factor structure of the BDI-II, a clear consensus on the best fitting model has not yet emerged, resulting in different recommendations regarding how to best…

  4. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

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    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  5. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

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    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  6. Longitudinal Stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II: A Latent Trait-State-Occasion Model

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    Wu, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    In a six-wave longitudinal study with two cohorts (660 adolescents and 630 young adults), this study investigated the longitudinal stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) using the Trait-State-Occasion (TSO) model. The results revealed that the full TSO model was the best fitting representation of the depression measured by the…

  7. An examination of racial bias in the Beck Depression Inventory-II.

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    Sashidharan, Tracy; Pawlow, Laura A; Pettibone, Jonathan C

    2012-04-01

    Historically, many psychological measures were developed and standardized based on a primarily Caucasian population. These tests are subsequently applied to minorities and may be inappropriate and possibly even pathologizing. The widely used Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was initially standardized on a sample of Caucasian university students and its use with minorities has only recently been investigated. This study examined the possibility of racial bias in the BDI-II by comparing Caucasian and African American Midwestern university students. A hierarchical multiple regression compared the scores of the BDI-II with a similar measure of depression that is standardized for use with African Americans. There was no evidence of racial bias discovered in the BDI-II in this sample. Implications and future directions of research are discussed.

  8. Validating the Beck Depression Inventory-II for Hong Kong Community Adolescents

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    Byrne, Barbara M.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Lee, Peter W. H.

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to test for the validity of a Chinese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (C-BDI-II) for use with Hong Kong community (i.e., nonclinical) adolescents. Based on a randomized triadic split of the data (N = 1460), we conducted exploratory factor analysis on Group1 (n = 486) and confirmatory factor…

  9. Psychometric properties of a Persian-language version of the Beck Depression Inventory--Second edition: BDI-II-PERSIAN.

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    Ghassemzadeh, Habibollah; Mojtabai, Ramin; Karamghadiri, Narges; Ebrahimkhani, Narges

    2005-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is perhaps the most commonly used screening instrument for depression in the general population. We examined the psychometric properties of a Persian-language version of the second edition of this instrument (BDI-II) [Beck et al., 1996] in an Iranian college-student sample. In a sample of 125 student volunteers from two Iranian universities, we compared mean item scores on the BDI-II-Persian with those on the English-language version administered to North American college students, and assessed internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the BDI-II-Persian and its concurrent validity against a measure of negative automatic thoughts in depression, the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire [Hollon and Kendall, 1980]. We also examined the factor structure of the BDI-II-Persian through comparing the fit of various proposed models to the data using confirmatory factor analysis. The BDI-II-Persian had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.87) and acceptable test-retest reliability (r=0.74). The instrument correlated strongly with the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire. In factor analysis, models with strongly correlated affective-cognitive and somatic-vegetative factors provided a better fit than models with one global factor. These data support the reliability and concurrent validity of the BDI-II-Persian as a measure of depressive symptoms in nonclinical samples. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) with Puerto Rican elderly.

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    Rodríguez-Gómez, José R; Dávila-Martínez, Mariel G; Collazo-Rodríguez, Luis C

    2006-06-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II; (1) is one of the most useful measures for depressive symptomatology in many countries (2). The psychometric properties of this inventory, however, have not been reported with Puerto Rican elderly. This paper reports, exploratory psychometric results with a sample of 410 elderly Puerto Rican (65 years and older; men=94, women=316). The assessment of the construct validity of the BDI-II yielded four factors accounting for 52% of total variance and an internal reliability coefficient (alpha Cronbach) of .89. A factor analysis with the 21 items of the BDI-II was performed using principal component analysis as the extraction method and Varimax rotation. This analysis revealed that the BDI-II was a good measure of the dimensions of depressive symptomatology in the present sample, which resembled prior findings reported with the general Puerto Rican Population (3). This study also reports further data supporting the reliability, validity, and practical utility of the BDI-II for the Puerto Rican population including elders. Implications for potential research with minorities and clinical uses of the BDI-II are also discussed.

  11. 50 YEARS OF THE BECK DEPRESSION INVENTORY: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR USING THE SPANISH ADAPTATION OF THE BDI-II IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

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    Jesús Sanz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The first Spanish adaptation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-I was published in 2011, which happened to be the 50th anniversary of the publication of its first edition. In this time, the BDI has become the most widely-used self-report questionnaire in Spain and in the world for evaluating the severity of depression. In this study, the basic characteristics of the BDI-II are presented and compared with its earlier versions (BDI-I and BDI-IA, the process of its adaptation to the Spanish population is described, the psychometric properties of this adaptation are summarized and its use in clinical practice is discussed. Concerning this use, guidelines and cut-off scores are proposed for measuring the severity of depression, evaluating the clinical significance of therapeutic change, screening for depression and assisting in the differential diagnosis of depressive disorders.

  12. Cross-Cultural Validation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II across U.S. and Turkish Samples

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    Canel-Cinarbas, Deniz; Cui, Ying; Lauridsen, Erica

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) for factorial invariance across Turkish and U.S. college student samples. The results indicated that (a) a two-factor model has an adequate fit for both samples, thus providing evidence of configural invariance, and (b) there is a metric invariance but "no" sufficient…

  13. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Scale for Depression (Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II)--A Study on a Sample of Students in the State of Kuwait Universities

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    Dahem, Ahmed Mohammed Faleh

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) the Arabized version by Gharib (2000); the study sample consisted of 500 male and female students from the Kuwaiti universities by 250 males and 250 females on whom the BDI-II scale was applied twice; the psychometric characteristics such as the…

  14. Prevalence of depression and validation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Children's Depression Inventory-Short amongst HIV-positive adolescents in Malawi

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    Maria H Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a remarkable dearth of evidence on mental illness in adolescents living with HIV/AIDS, particularly in the African setting. Furthermore, there are few studies in sub-Saharan Africa validating the psychometric properties of diagnostic and screening tools for depression amongst adolescents. The primary aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of depression amongst a sample of HIV-positive adolescents in Malawi. The secondary aim was to develop culturally adapted Chichewa versions of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II and Children's Depression Inventory-II-Short (CDI-II-S and conduct a psychometric evaluation of these measures by evaluating their performance against a structured depression assessment using the Children's Rating Scale, Revised (CDRS-R. Study design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We enrolled 562 adolescents, 12–18 years of age from two large public HIV clinics in central and southern Malawi. Participants completed two self-reports, the BDI-II and CDI-II-S, followed by administration of the CDRS-R by trained clinicians. Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values for various BDI-II and CDI-II-S cut-off scores were calculated with receiver operating characteristics analysis. The area under the curve (AUC was also calculated. Internal consistency was measured by standardized Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and correlation between self-reports and CDRS-R by Spearman's correlation. Results: Prevalence of depression as measured by the CDRS-R was 18.9%. Suicidal ideation was expressed by 7.1% (40 using the BDI-II. The AUC for the BDI-II was 0.82 (95% CI 0.78–0.89 and for the CDI-II-S was 0.75 (95% CI 0.70–0.80. A score of ≥13 in BDI-II achieved sensitivity of >80%, and a score of ≥17 had a specificity of >80%. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.80 (BDI-II and 0.66 (CDI-II-S. The correlation between the BDI-II and CDRS-R was 0.42 (p<0.001 and between the CDI

  15. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in Dutch advanced cancer patients.

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    Warmenhoven, Franca; van Rijswijk, Eric; Engels, Yvonne; Kan, Cornelis; Prins, Judith; van Weel, Chris; Vissers, Kris

    2012-02-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in advanced cancer patients, but the diagnosis of depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer is difficult. Screening instruments could facilitate diagnosing depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the validity of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. Patients with advanced metastatic disease, visiting the outpatient palliative care department, were asked to fill out a self-questionnaire containing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question "Are you feeling depressed?" The mood section of the PRIME-MD was used as a gold standard. Sixty-one patients with advanced metastatic disease were eligible to be included in the study. Complete data were obtained from 46 patients. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristics analysis of the BDI-II was 0.82. The optimal cut-off point of the BDI-II was 16 with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 69%. The single screening question showed a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 94%. The BDI-II seems an adequate screening tool for a depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. The sensitivity of a single screening question is poor.

  16. Measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) across gender, race, and ethnicity in college students.

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    Whisman, Mark A; Judd, Charles M; Whiteford, Natalie T; Gelhorn, Heather L

    2013-08-01

    Measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) across gender, race, and ethnic groups was evaluated in a large sample of college students, using pooled data from 11 universities from diverse geographical regions in the United States (N = 7,369). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the fit of several possible factor structures, and the results from these analyses indicated that the BDI-II was most adequately represented by a hierarchical four-factor structure, composed of three first-order factors and one second-order factor. Results based on analyses of covariance structures indicated there was factorial invariance for this hierarchical four-factor structure across groups, suggesting that the BDI-II provides an assessment of severity of depressive symptoms that is equivalent across gender, race, and ethnicity in college students.

  17. Substance Use and Depression Symptomatology: Measurement Invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) among Non-Users and Frequent-Users of Alcohol, Nicotine and Cannabis.

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    Moore, Ashlee A; Neale, Michael C; Silberg, Judy L; Verhulst, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a highly heterogeneous condition, and identifying how symptoms present in various groups may greatly increase our understanding of its etiology. Importantly, Major Depressive Disorder is strongly linked with Substance Use Disorders, which may ameliorate or exacerbate specific depression symptoms. It is therefore quite plausible that depression may present with different symptom profiles depending on an individual's substance use status. Given these observations, it is important to examine the underlying construct of depression in groups of substance users compared to non-users. In this study we use a non-clinical sample to examine the measurement structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) in non-users and frequent-users of various substances. Specifically, measurement invariance was examined across those who do vs. do not use alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis. Results indicate strict factorial invariance across non-users and frequent-users of alcohol and cannabis, and metric invariance across non-users and frequent-users of nicotine. This implies that the factor structure of the BDI-II is similar across all substance use groups.

  18. Substance Use and Depression Symptomatology: Measurement Invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II among Non-Users and Frequent-Users of Alcohol, Nicotine and Cannabis.

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    Ashlee A Moore

    Full Text Available Depression is a highly heterogeneous condition, and identifying how symptoms present in various groups may greatly increase our understanding of its etiology. Importantly, Major Depressive Disorder is strongly linked with Substance Use Disorders, which may ameliorate or exacerbate specific depression symptoms. It is therefore quite plausible that depression may present with different symptom profiles depending on an individual's substance use status. Given these observations, it is important to examine the underlying construct of depression in groups of substance users compared to non-users. In this study we use a non-clinical sample to examine the measurement structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in non-users and frequent-users of various substances. Specifically, measurement invariance was examined across those who do vs. do not use alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis. Results indicate strict factorial invariance across non-users and frequent-users of alcohol and cannabis, and metric invariance across non-users and frequent-users of nicotine. This implies that the factor structure of the BDI-II is similar across all substance use groups.

  19. Activation as an overlooked factor in the BDI-II: a factor model based on core symptoms and qualitative aspects of depression.

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    Bühler, Joël; Keller, Ferdinand; Läge, Damian

    2014-09-01

    An adequate assessment of depression has been of concern to many researchers over the last half-century. These efforts have brought forth a manifold of depression rating scales, of which the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is 1 of the most commonly used self-assessment scales. Since its revision, the item structure of the BDI-II has been examined in many factor analytic studies, yet it has not been possible to achieve a consensus about the underlying factor structure. Recent findings from a nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis (Bühler, Keller, & Läge, 2012) of the German norming sample of the BDI-II emphasized a structure with different qualitative aspects of depression, which suggested that the existing factor models do not adequately represent the data. The NMDS results were reviewed, and on the basis of these findings, a different factor model is proposed. In contrast to the common factor models in the literature, the presented model includes an additional factor, which is associated with the activation level of the BDI-II symptoms. The model was evaluated with a 2nd sample of patients diagnosed with a primary affective disorder (N = 569) and obtained good fit indices that even exceeded the fit of the most reliable factor model (Ward, 2006) described in the literature so far. Furthermore, emphasis is placed on the methodological question of how factor models may be derived from the results of NMDS analyses. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Development of the Perinatal Depression Inventory (PDI)-14 using item response theory: a comparison of the BDI-II, EPDS, PDI, and PHQ-9.

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    Brodey, Benjamin B; Goodman, Sherryl H; Baldasaro, Ruth E; Brooks-DeWeese, Amy; Wilson, Melanie Elliott; Brodey, Inger S B; Doyle, Nora M

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a simple, brief, self-report perinatal depression inventory that accurately measures severity in a number of populations. Our team developed 159 Likert-scale perinatal depression items using simple sentences with a fifth-grade reading level. Based on iterative cognitive interviewing (CI), an expert panel improved and winnowed the item pool based on pre-determined criteria. The resulting 67 items were administered to a sample of 628 pregnant and 251 postpartum women with different levels of depression at private and public sector obstetrics clinics, together with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Edinburg Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), as well as Module A of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Diagnoses (SCID). Responses were evaluated using Item Response Theory (IRT). The Perinatal Depression Inventory (PDI)-14 items are highly informative regarding depression severity and function similarly and informatively across pregnant/postpartum, white/non-white, and private-clinic/public-clinic populations. PDI-14 scores correlate well with the PHQ-9, EPDS, and BDI-II, but the PDI-14 provides a more precise measure of severity using far fewer words. The PDI-14 is a brief depression assessment that excels at accurately measuring depression severity across a wide range of severity and perinatal populations.

  1. Cross-cultural examination of measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory-II.

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    Dere, Jessica; Watters, Carolyn A; Yu, Stephanie Chee-Min; Bagby, R Michael; Ryder, Andrew G; Harkness, Kate L

    2015-03-01

    Given substantial rates of major depressive disorder among college and university students, as well as the growing cultural diversity on many campuses, establishing the cross-cultural validity of relevant assessment tools is important. In the current investigation, we examined the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) among Chinese-heritage (n = 933) and European-heritage (n = 933) undergraduates in North America. The investigation integrated 3 distinct lines of inquiry: (a) the literature on cultural variation in depressive symptom reporting between people of Chinese and Western heritage; (b) recent developments regarding the factor structure of the BDI-II; and (c) the application of advanced statistical techniques to the issue of cross-cultural measurement invariance. A bifactor model was found to represent the optimal factor structure of the BDI-II. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis showed that the BDI-II had strong measurement invariance across both culture and gender. In group comparisons with latent and observed variables, Chinese-heritage students scored higher than European-heritage students on cognitive symptoms of depression. This finding deviates from the commonly held view that those of Chinese heritage somatize depression. These findings hold implications for the study and use of the BDI-II, highlight the value of advanced statistical techniques such as multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, and offer methodological lessons for cross-cultural psychopathology research more broadly.

  2. Adaptation and latent structure of the Swahili version of beck depression inventory-II in a low literacy population in the context of HIV

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    Abubakar, Amina; Kalu, Raphael Birya; Katana, Khamis; Kabunda, Beatrice; Hassan, Amin S.; Newton, Charles R.; Van De Vijver, Fons

    2016-01-01

    Objective We set out to adapt the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II in Kenya and examine its factorial structure. Methods In the first phase we carried out in-depth interviews involving 29 adult members of the community to elicit their understanding of depression and identify aspects of the BDI-II

  3. Validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a community sample.

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    Gomes-Oliveira, Marcio Henrique; Gorenstein, Clarice; Lotufo Neto, Francisco; Andrade, Laura Helena; Wang, Yuan Pang

    2012-12-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is used worldwide for detecting depressive symptoms. This questionnaire has been revised (1996) to match the DSM-IV criteria for a major depressive episode. We assessed the reliability and the validity of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the BDI-II for non-clinical adults. The questionnaire was applied to 60 college students on two occasions. Afterwards, 182 community-dwelling adults completed the BDI-II, the Self-Report Questionnaire, and the K10 Scale. Trained psychiatrists performed face-to-face interviews with the respondents using the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-I), the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale, and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Descriptive analysis, signal detection analysis (Receiver Operating Characteristics), correlation analysis, and discriminant function analysis were performed to investigate the psychometric properties of the BDI-II. The intraclass correlation coefficient of the BDI-II was 0.89, and the Cronbach's alpha coefficient of internal consistency was 0.93. Taking the SCID as the gold standard, the cut-off point of 10/11 was the best threshold for detecting depression, yielding a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 87%. The concurrent validity (a correlation of 0.63-0.93 with scales applied simultaneously) and the predictive ability of the severity level (over 65% correct classification) were acceptable. The BDI-II is reliable and valid for measuring depressive symptomatology among Portuguese-speaking Brazilian non-clinical populations.

  4. Assessment of depression in medical patients: A systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory-II

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    Yuan-Pang Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To perform a systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory for detecting depression in medical settings, this article focuses on the revised version of the scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, which was reformulated according to the DSM-IV criteria for major depression. We examined relevant investigations with the Beck Depression Inventory-II for measuring depression in medical settings to provide guidelines for practicing clinicians. Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria seventy articles were retained. Validation studies of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, in both primary care and hospital settings, were found for clinics of cardiology, neurology, obstetrics, brain injury, nephrology, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, oncology, and infectious disease. The Beck Depression Inventory-II showed high reliability and good correlation with measures of depression and anxiety. Its threshold for detecting depression varied according to the type of patients, suggesting the need for adjusted cut-off points. The somatic and cognitive-affective dimension described the latent structure of the instrument. The Beck Depression Inventory-II can be easily adapted in most clinical conditions for detecting major depression and recommending an appropriate intervention. Although this scale represents a sound path for detecting depression in patients with medical conditions, the clinician should seek evidence for how to interpret the score before using the Beck Depression Inventory-II to make clinical decisions.

  5. Adaptation and Latent Structure of the Swahili Version of Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Low Literacy Population in the Context of HIV

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    Amina Abubakar; Raphael Birya Kalu; Khamis Katana; Beatrice Kabunda; Hassan, Amin S; Newton, Charles R; Fons Van de Vijver

    2016-01-01

    Objective We set out to adapt the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II in Kenya and examine its factorial structure. Methods In the first phase we carried out in-depth interviews involving 29 adult members of the community to elicit their understanding of depression and identify aspects of the BDI-II that required adaptation. In the second phase, a modified version of BDI-II was administered to 221 adults randomly selected from the community to allow for the evaluation of its psychometric prope...

  6. Factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II among South Africans receiving antiretroviral therapy.

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    Kagee, Ashraf; Nel, Adriaan; Saal, Wylene

    2014-02-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that mood disturbance is common among patients living with HIV and may be an important barrier to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Thus the assessment of depressed mood is an important and necessary aspect of the experience of persons living with HIV as it may impact the health status of individuals directly and indirectly. We sought to determine the factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) among a sample of 185 South Africans living with HIV and receiving ART. The mean BDI score was 16.5 (SD 12.15) with a range from 0-50 (out of a possible 63), indicating on average moderate levels of depression. Cronbach's alpha for the total scale was 0.90. Although the four factors had eigenvalues that were technically above 1.0, only three factors could logically be extracted, the combination of which accounted for 47.29% of the variance. These three factors were Cognitive, Affective and Somatic. The results indicate that the BDI-II is a reliable measure of symptoms of depression among persons living with HIV. The factor structure among South Africans receiving ART is similar to that of other samples, although surprisingly, the item assessing appetite disturbance did not load on any factor. The results of the study suggest that the BDI-II is a useful measure among South Africans living with HIV. In the context of the need to rapidly identify depressed mood among persons receiving ART in public health clinics, the BDI may be a useful instrument. We end the paper with certain cautions associated with routine screening.

  7. Depressive symptoms in people with and without alcohol abuse: factor structure and measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II across groups.

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    Cecilie Skule

    Full Text Available This study explored differences in the factor structure of depressive symptoms in patients with and without alcohol abuse, and differences in the severity of depressive symptoms between the two groups. In a sample of 358 patients without alcohol problems and 167 patients with comorbid alcohol problems, confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the same factor structures, Beck et al.'s two-factor Somatic Affective-Cognitive (SA-C model, and Buckley et al.'s three-factor Cognitive-Affective- Somatic (C-A-S model, demonstrated the best fit to the data in both groups. The SA-C model was preferred due to its more parsimonious nature. Evidence for strict measurement invariance across the two groups for the SA-C model was found. MIMIC (multiple-indicator-multiple-cause modeling showed that the level of depressive symptoms was found to be highest on both factors in the group with comorbid alcohol problems. The magnitude of the differences in latent mean scores suggested a moderate difference in the level of depressive symptoms between the two groups. It is argued that patients with comorbid depression and alcohol abuse should be offered parallel and adequate treatment for both conditions.

  8. Dimensional and hierarchical models of depression using the Beck Depression Inventory-II in an Arab college student sample

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    Ohaeri Jude U

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An understanding of depressive symptomatology from the perspective of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA could facilitate valid and interpretable comparisons across cultures. The objectives of the study were: (i using the responses of a sample of Arab college students to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in CFA, to compare the "goodness of fit" indices of the original dimensional three-and two-factor first-order models, and their modifications, with the corresponding hierarchical models (i.e., higher - order and bifactor models; (ii to assess the psychometric characteristics of the BDI-II, including convergent/discriminant validity with the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25. Method Participants (N = 624 were Kuwaiti national college students, who completed the questionnaires in class. CFA was done by AMOS, version 16. Eleven models were compared using eight "fit" indices. Results In CFA, all the models met most "fit" criteria. While the higher-order model did not provide improved fit over the dimensional first - order factor models, the bifactor model (BFM had the best fit indices (CMNI/DF = 1.73; GFI = 0.96; RMSEA = 0.034. All regression weights of the dimensional models were significantly different from zero (P Conclusion The broadly adequate fit of the various models indicates that they have some merit and implies that the relationship between the domains of depression probably contains hierarchical and dimensional elements. The bifactor model is emerging as the best way to account for the clinical heterogeneity of depression. The psychometric characteristics of the BDI-II lend support to our CFA results.

  9. Factors associated with risk of depression and relevant predictors of screening for depression in clinical practice: a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected individuals in Denmark

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    Slot, Maria; Sodemann, Morten; Gabel, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors associated with risk of depression. RESULTS: Symptoms of depression (BDI-II score ≥ 14) were observed in 75 patients (35%), and symptoms of moderate to major depression (BDI-II score ≥ 20......OBJECTIVES: Depression and psychiatric disorders are frequent among HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of depression and describe the psychiatric history of HIV-infected individuals in an out-patient clinic in Denmark and to identify factors of clinical...... importance that may be used to identify patients at risk of depression. METHODS: In 2013, 212 HIV-infected patients were included in a questionnaire study. We used the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI-II score ≥ 20 were...

  10. The Sensitivity and Specificity of Depression Screening Tools among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

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    Ailey, Sarah H.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the validity and the sensitivity and specificity of depression screening tools among adults with intellectual and disabilities (ID). Subjects (N = 75) were interviewed with the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and the Glasgow Depression Scale for People with a Learning Disability (GDS-LD) and also completed a clinical…

  11. Adaptation and Latent Structure of the Swahili Version of Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Low Literacy Population in the Context of HIV.

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    Amina Abubakar

    Full Text Available We set out to adapt the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in Kenya and examine its factorial structure.In the first phase we carried out in-depth interviews involving 29 adult members of the community to elicit their understanding of depression and identify aspects of the BDI-II that required adaptation. In the second phase, a modified version of BDI-II was administered to 221 adults randomly selected from the community to allow for the evaluation of its psychometric properties. In the third phase of the study we evaluated the discriminative validity of BDI-11 by comparing a randomly chosen community sample (n = 29 with caregivers of adolescents affected by HIV (n = 77.A considerable overlap between the BDI symptoms and those generated in the interviews was observed. Relevant idioms and symptoms such as 'thinking too much' and 'Kuchoka moyo (having a tired heart' were identified. The administration of the BDI had to be modified to make it suitable for the low literacy levels of our participants. Fit indices for several models (one factorial, two-factor model and a three factor model were all within acceptable range. Evidence indicated that while multidimensional models could be fitted, the strong correlations between the factors implied that a single factor model may be the best suited solution (alpha [0.89], and a significant correlation with locally identified items [r = 0.51] confirmed the good psychometric properties of the adapted BDI-II. No evidence was found to support the hypothesis that somatization was more prevalent. Lastly, caregivers of HIV affected adolescents had significantly higher scores compared to adults randomly selected from the community F(1, 121 = 23.31, p < .001 indicating the discriminative validity of the adapted BDI = II.With an adapted administration procedure, the BDI-II provides an adequate measure of depressive symptoms which can be used alongside other measures for proper diagnosis in a low literacy population.

  12. Correlates of Depression in First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatte, Aude; Marcotte, Diane; Potvin, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and rank the personal, family-related, social, and academic correlates of depressive symptoms in first-year college students. A questionnaire that included the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was administered to 389 first-year college students (mean age = 18.9; SD = 3.38; 59.4% female). Eight variables…

  13. Can depression be diagnosed by response to mother's face? A personalized attachment-based paradigm for diagnostic fMRI.

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    Xian Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Objective measurement of depression remains elusive. Depression has been associated with insecure attachment, and both have been associated with changes in brain reactivity in response to viewing standard emotional and neutral faces. In this study, we developed a method to calculate predicted scores for the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II using personalized stimuli: fMRI imaging of subjects viewing pictures of their own mothers. METHODS: 28 female subjects ages 18-30 (14 healthy controls and 14 unipolar depressed diagnosed by MINI psychiatric interview were scored on the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II and the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI coherence of mind scale of global attachment security. Subjects viewed pictures of Mother (M, Friend (F and Stranger (S, during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Using a principal component regression method (PCR, a predicted Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II score was obtained from activity patterns in the paracingulate gyrus (Brodmann area 32 and compared to clinical diagnosis and the measured BDI-II score. The same procedure was performed for AAI coherence of mind scores. RESULTS: Activity patterns in BA-32 identified depressed subjects. The categorical agreement between the derived BDI-II score (using the standard clinical cut-score of 14 on the BDI-II and depression diagnosis by MINI psychiatric interview was 89%, with sensitivity 85.7% and specificity 92.8%. Predicted and measured BDI-II scores had a correlation of 0.55. Prediction of attachment security was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Brain activity in response to viewing one's mother may be diagnostic of depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging using personalized paradigms has the potential to provide objective assessments, even when behavioral measures are not informative. Further, fMRI based diagnostic algorithms may enhance our understanding of the neural mechanisms of depression by

  14. Pattern classification of brain activation during emotional processing in subclinical depression : psychosis proneness as potential confounding factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modinos, Gemma; Mechelli, Andrea; Pettersson-Yeo, William; Allen, Paul; McGuire, Philip; Aleman, Andre

    2013-01-01

    We used Support Vector Machine (SVM) to perform multivariate pattern classification based on brain activation during emotional processing in healthy participants with subclinical depressive symptoms. Six-hundred undergraduate students completed the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). Two groups w

  15. Pattern classification of brain activation during emotional processing in subclinical depression : psychosis proneness as potential confounding factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modinos, Gemma; Mechelli, Andrea; Pettersson-Yeo, William; Allen, Paul; McGuire, Philip; Aleman, Andre

    2013-01-01

    We used Support Vector Machine (SVM) to perform multivariate pattern classification based on brain activation during emotional processing in healthy participants with subclinical depressive symptoms. Six-hundred undergraduate students completed the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). Two groups

  16. Validating the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Indonesia’s general population and coronary heart disease patients

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    Henndy Ginting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio evalúa la validez y determina los puntos de corte del Inventario de Depresión de Beck -II (BDI-II en Indonesia. La versión indonesia del BDI-II (BDI-II Indo se administró a 720 personas sanas de la población general, a 215 pacientes con Enfermedad Coronaria (EC y a 102 pacientes con depresión. El análisis factorial confirmatorio mostró similitud factorial de las tres muestras. Las correlaciones entre el Indo BDI-II y otras medidas de auto-percepción relacionadas con la depresión fueron significativas, mostrando la validez de constructo del Indo BDI-II. Además, la diferencia de puntuación del Indo BDI-II entre los participantes deprimidos y no deprimidos fue altamente significativa. La consistencia interna y la fiabilidad re- test fueron suficientemente altas. La curva ROC (receiver operating characteristic indicó que el punto de corte de la BDI-II para el nivel de gravedad leve de depresión la población de Indonesia es igual a 17. En conclusión, el Indo BDI-II es una medida válida de depresión, tanto para la población general indonesia como en pacientes con EC.

  17. Depressive symptoms and associated factors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karol, David E; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa G; Lin, Min; Clowse, Megan E B

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms affect anywhere from 11% to 71% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which may be related to SLE disease activity, other clinical variables, or sociodemographic factors. We aimed to measure the rate of depressive symptoms in our cohort of patients with SLE and to identify modifiable factors associated with depressive symptoms. Patients in our university-based SLE registry completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), pain scores, and demographic information. Disease activity was measured using the physician's global assessment (PGA) and Selena-SLE disease activity index (Selena-systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI)). Patients were identified as having moderate or severe depressive symptoms (BDI-II ≥ 18) or not (BDI-II lupus arthritis (P lupus arthritis, may result in alleviation of depressive symptoms in patients with SLE. Copyright © 2013 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Factor models of the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Validation with coronary patients and a critique of Ward's model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pino Pérez, Antonio; Ibáñez Fernández, Ignacio; Bosa Ojeda, Francisco; Dorta González, Ruth; Gaos Miezoso, María Teresa

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to validate in a sample of 205 coronary patients a factor model for the BDI-II, especially a model that would allow for modeling of depressive symptoms after explicitly removing bias related to somatic symptoms of depression that would overlap those of heart disease. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses for ordinal data were conducted. A one-factor model, six correlated two-factor models and, derivatives thereof, seven models with a single General Depression factor and two uncorrelated factors, were analyzed. Exploratory analysis extracted two factors, Somatic-affective and Cognitive. Confirmatory factor analyses showed the worst fit for the one-factor model. Two-factor models were surpassed in goodness of fit by the models of general-factor and group factors. Among these, the General, Somatic-affective and Cognitive (G-Sa-C) model of Beck with students is noteworthy. The reduced General, Somatic and Cognitive (G-S-C) model of Ward showed the worst goodness of fit. Our model surpasses the cutoff criteria of all fit indexes. We conclude that the inclusion of a general-factor and group factors in all the models surpasses the results of G-S-C model and, therefore, questions it. The G-Sa-C model is strengthened.

  19. Factorial Structure of Depressive Symptoms in Anglophone Caribbean University Students: Psychometric Properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II

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    Michael H. Campbell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio buscó establecer propiedades psicométricas del Inventario de Depresión de Beck-Segunda Edición (BDI-II con estudiantes de una universidad del Caribe (n=400, 76% mujeres, edad media=25.2. Además, administramos la Escala de Elasticidad de Ego-89, La Escala de Tensión Percibida, La Escala de Ansiedad Estado-Rasgo (Versión de Rasgo y La Escala de Depresión de Zung. El análisis factorial confirmativo comparó la estructura observada con las estructuras oblicuas propuestas en los modelos de dos factores. Las estimaciones factoriales y los índices de calidad de ajuste sugirieron adecuado ajuste para modelos de dos factores. La consistencia interna (=.86 y la fiabilidad test-retest (n=57, r=.78 eran fuertes. Las correlaciones de validez eran significativas en las direcciones teóricamente esperadas. Los resultados apoyan el uso del BDI-II con estudiantes del Caribe.

  20. Gender Differences in Self-Reported Symptoms of Depression among Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

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    Lorraine Frazier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the prevalence of self-reported depressive symptoms and the self reported somatic depressive symptoms as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II among patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (ACS, and explored the impact of gender on both. A convenience sample of 789 adults (248 women and 541 men was recruited for the study during hospital admission for ACS and participants were screened for self-reported depressive symptoms. BDI-II scores of ≥14 indicate a moderate level of depressive symptoms and this cut-off score was used to categorize patients into depressed and non-depressed groups. Pearson chi-square tests for independence (categorical variables and t tests for independent samples (continuous variables were used for gender comparisons. Results showed that depressive symptoms during ACS episodes were different between women and men. Women reported greater overall depressive symptoms (BDI-II mean = 11.89, S.D. = 9.68 than men (BDI-II mean = 9.00, S.D. = 7.93 (P<0.000. Significantly more women (7.66% were identified positive for somatic depressive symptoms (sleep and appetite disturbances and fatigue than men (2.22% (P=0.0003. Findings support that there are gender differences in depressive symptoms experienced by patients hospitalized for ACS. Somatic symptoms of depression may be important indicators of depression especially among female ACS patients.

  1. Screening for Depression after Cardiac Events Using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Geriatric Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gail D.; Hubley, Anita M.

    2007-01-01

    Despite findings that depression is a risk factor for heart disease and for death following cardiac events and that depressed cardiac patients experience significantly reduced quality of life and are less likely to follow treatment regimens, depression is neither adequately identified nor treated in cardiac patients. Recent calls in the literature…

  2. Somatic symptom overlap in Beck Depression Inventory-II scores following myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Pilote, Louise; Dozois, David J. A.; Beck, Aaron T.; Dobson, Keith S.; Fuss, Samantha; de Jonge, Peter; Grace, Sherry L.; Stewart, Donne E.; Ormel, Johan; Abbey, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Depression measures that include somatic symptoms may inflate severity estimates among medically ill patients, including those with cardiovascular disease. Aims To evaluate whether people receiving in-patient treatment following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) had higher somatic symptom

  3. A Psychometric Evaluation of the STAI-Y, BDI-II, and PAI Using Single and Multifactorial Models in Young Adults Seeking Psychoeducational Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Benjamin D.; Musso, Mandi; Jones, Glenn N.; Pella, Russell D.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2013-01-01

    A psychometric evaluation on the measurement of self-report anxiety and depression using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Form-Y (STAI-Y), and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) was performed using a sample of 534 generally young adults seeking psychoeducational evaluation at a university-based clinic.…

  4. Depression and major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Tanaka, Teruaki; Nakagawa, Shin; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2010-01-15

    The prevalence of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) varies greatly. In this study, we investigated major depressive disorder (MDD) and depressive symptoms without MDD in patients with PD. The psychopathological characteristics of depressive symptoms were assessed by a psychiatric interview. A total of 105 Japanese patients with PD without dementia were included. The Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) with a cutoff score of 13/14 was used to screen for depression. Using a structured interview, a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation of patients with BDI-II scores >13 (high BDI patients) was completed using the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR. Forty patients (38%) had a BDI-II >13, but 29 did not show any depressed mood. Five cases met the criteria for MDD (three current, two past) and one patient was diagnosed with minor depressive disorder. A slight depressed mood that was associated with worrying about PD was seen in 6 of 34 patients without any depressive disorder and fluctuated with aggravation of PD symptoms in two of these patients. For the diagnosis of MDD, the number of positive items from the DSM-IV-TR definition of MDD is most important and useful for differentiating MDD and non-MDD. The low-prevalence rate of MDD in our patient population suggests that PD may be a psychological stressor for MDD, but does not necessarily induce MDD.

  5. The Effects of Powdered Fertilized Eggs on Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Ester

    2011-01-01

    This 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of fertilized egg powder (Young Tissue Extract; YTE®) intake on outcome measures for depression. Fifty-five patients with depression were randomly assigned to receive YTE, YTE plus Melissa officinalis, or placebo for 12 weeks. At baseline, there were no significant differences in scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) or Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) among the 3 groups. At 12 weeks, the HAM-D...

  6. Depression Is Associated With Muscle Mass And Strength In Patients With End Stage Renal Disease

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    Young Rim Song

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is the most common psychiatric complication in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Sarcopenia, defined as loss of muscle mass and strength, is expected to be associated with depression, because both are closely linked to physical inactivity and functional impairment. We investigated the association of sarcopenia with depression in patients with ESRD. A total of 115 patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD were included in this study. Muscle mass was assessed by lean tissue index (LTI using portable whole body bioimpedance spectroscopy, and muscle strength was measured with handgrip strength (HGS. Depression was defined as Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II score ≥16. About 60% of prevalent HD patients had depression. Compared to subjects without depression, depressed patients had a higher prevalence of sarcopenia (45.5 vs. 8.2%, p<0.001 and significantly increased serum IL-6 and hs-CRP level. However, (prealbumin and body mass index (BMI failed to correlate with BDI-II. HGS and LTI had a consistent negative effect on BDI-II even after adjusting other parameters including inflammation. In multivariate analysis, lower , increased IL-6 and β2-microglobulin,and sarcopenia were significant predictors for depression; sarcopenia was most powerful [odds ratio 9.01, 95% CI 3.60-12.22, p=0.001]. In conclusion, the prevalence of sarcopenia and depression was considerably high and and the presence of sarcopenia was an important predictor for depression.

  7. Comparison of pre-procedural anxiety and depression scores for patients undergoing chorion villus sampling and amniocentesis: An alternative perspective on prenatal invasive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhal, Cem Yasar; Mendilcioglu, Inanc; Ozekinci, Murat; Simsek, Mehmet; Bozkurt, Selen

    2015-01-01

    To compare the pre-procedural anxiety and depression levels of patients undergoing chorion villus sampling (CVS) and amniocentesis (AC). Patients referred to our department for fetal karyotype analysis with a positive first or second trimester screening test for aneuploidy between January 2013 to June 2015 were included. CVS and AC procedures were performed in patients with gestation periods of between 11-14 and 16-20 weeks, respectively. Anxiety was evaluated using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and depression was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). A total of 1,400 patients were included. Compared to first trimester controls, patients undergoing CVS had significantly higher STAI-state and BDI-II results. Likewise, patients undergoing AC had higher STAI-state and BDI-II scores than controls in the second trimester. In terms of STAI-trait results, no difference was found between the groups. Our results also showed that, compared to AC group, patients undergoing CVS had similar STAI-state, STAI-trait and but higher BDI-II scores. We conclude that evaluating the stress and depression levels of these patients should be one of the routine procedures in pregnancy follow-up.

  8. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Computerized Interactive Media-Based Problem Solving Treatment for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Luis R; Buckey, Jay C; Ainslie, Ricardo; Tombari, Martin; Stone, William; Hegel, Mark T

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of an interactive media-based, computer-delivered depression treatment program (imbPST) compared to a no-treatment control condition (NTC) in a parallel-group, randomized, controlled trial conducted in an outpatient psychiatric research clinic. 45 adult participants with major depressive disorder or dysthymia were randomized to receive either 6 weekly sessions of imbPST or no treatment (No Treatment Control; NTC). The primary outcome measure was the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). There was a significant Group x Time interaction effect [F (1.73, 43)= 58.78; p<.001; η2=.58, Cohens d=1.94], such that the patients receiving imbPST had a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms compared to the patients in the NTC condition. Participants in the imbPST group improved their depression symptoms significantly from moderate (BDI-II=21.9±4.20) to mild levels of depression (BDI-II=17.9±4.0) after receiving 3 weekly sessions of imbPST (p<0.001), and progressed to still milder levels of depression after six weekly sessions (BDI-II=14.5±3.7, p<0.001). NTC participants showed no significant reduction in BDI-II scores (BDI-II=21.8±4.2 pre, BDI-II=21.5±5.2 post, N.S.). Additionally, 40% of the imbPST group showed a clinically significant and reliable change in depression levels while none of the NTC group met this criterion. imbPST participants rated the program highly usable on the system usability scale (SUS) after the first session (SUS Session 1=74.6±7.2) and usability scores increased significantly by the last session (SUS Session 6=85.4±5.6). We conclude that imbPST is an effective, engaging, and easily used depression treatment program that warrants further evaluation with heterogeneous depressed populations in a stand-alone, self-administered fashion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Depressive symptoms and white matter dysfunction in retired NFL players with concussion history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Jeremy; Didehbani, Nyaz; Cullum, C Munro; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Conover, Heather; Kraut, Michael A; Hart, John; Womack, Kyle B

    2013-07-02

    To determine whether correlates of white matter integrity can provide general as well as specific insight into the chronic effects of head injury coupled with depression symptom expression in professional football players. We studied 26 retired National Football League (NFL) athletes who underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scanning. Depressive symptom severity was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) including affective, cognitive, and somatic subfactor scores (Buckley 3-factor model). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were processed using tract-based spatial statistics from FSL. Correlations between FA and BDI-II scores were assessed using both voxel-wise and region of interest (ROI) techniques, with ROIs that corresponded to white matter tracts. Tracts demonstrating significant correlations were further evaluated using a receiver operating characteristic curve that utilized the mean FA to distinguish depressed from nondepressed subjects. Voxel-wise analysis identified widely distributed voxels that negatively correlated with total BDI-II and cognitive and somatic subfactors, with voxels correlating with the affective component (p NFL athletes correlate negatively with FA using either an unbiased voxel-wise or an ROI-based, tract-wise approach. DTI is a promising biomarker for depression in this population.

  10. Depressive symptoms and concussions in aging retired NFL players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didehbani, Nyaz; Munro Cullum, C; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Conover, Heather; Hart, John

    2013-08-01

    We examined the relationship between a remote history of concussions with current symptoms of depression in retired professional athletes. Thirty retired National Football League (NFL) athletes with a history of concussion and 29 age- and IQ-matched controls without a history of concussion were recruited. We found a significant correlation between the number of lifetime concussions and depressive symptom severity using the Beck Depression Inventory II. Upon investigating a three-factor model of depressive symptoms (affective, cognitive, and somatic; Buckley et al., 2001) from the BDI-II, the cognitive factor was the only factor that was significantly related to concussions. In general, NFL players endorsed more symptoms of depression on all three Buckley factors compared with matched controls. Findings suggest that the number of self-reported concussions may be related to later depressive symptomology (particularly cognitive symptoms of depression).

  11. Depressive Symptoms and Concussions in Aging Retired NFL Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didehbani, Nyaz; Munro Cullum, C.; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Conover, Heather; Hart, John

    2013-01-01

    We examined the relationship between a remote history of concussions with current symptoms of depression in retired professional athletes. Thirty retired National Football League (NFL) athletes with a history of concussion and 29 age- and IQ-matched controls without a history of concussion were recruited. We found a significant correlation between the number of lifetime concussions and depressive symptom severity using the Beck Depression Inventory II. Upon investigating a three-factor model of depressive symptoms (affective, cognitive, and somatic; Buckley et al., 2001) from the BDI-II, the cognitive factor was the only factor that was significantly related to concussions. In general, NFL players endorsed more symptoms of depression on all three Buckley factors compared with matched controls. Findings suggest that the number of self-reported concussions may be related to later depressive symptomology (particularly cognitive symptoms of depression). PMID:23644673

  12. Validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a community sample Validação da versão brasileira em português do Inventário de Depressão de Beck-II numa amostra da comunidade

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    Marcio Henrique Gomes-Oliveira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI is used worldwide for detecting depressive symptoms. This questionnaire has been revised (1996 to match the DSM-IV criteria for a major depressive episode. We assessed the reliability and the validity of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the BDI-II for non-clinical adults. METHODS: The questionnaire was applied to 60 college students on two occasions. Afterwards, 182 community-dwelling adults completed the BDI-II, the Self-Report Questionnaire, and the K10 Scale. Trained psychiatrists performed face-to-face interviews with the respondents using the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-I, the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale, and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Descriptive analysis, signal detection analysis (Receiver Operating Characteristics, correlation analysis, and discriminant function analysis were performed to investigate the psychometric properties of the BDI-II. RESULTS: The intraclass correlation coefficient of the BDI-II was 0.89, and the Cronbach's alpha coefficient of internal consistency was 0.93. Taking the SCID as the gold standard, the cut-off point of 10/11 was the best threshold for detecting depression, yielding a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 87%. The concurrent validity (a correlation of 0.63-0.93 with scales applied simultaneously and the predictive ability of the severity level (over 65% correct classification were acceptable. CONCLUSION: The BDI-II is reliable and valid for measuring depressive symptomatology among Portuguese-speaking Brazilian non-clinical populations.OBJETIVOS: O Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB é utilizado mundialmente para detectar sintomas depressivos. Este questionário foi revisado (1996 para se adequar aos critérios do DSM-IV para episódio depressivo maior. Avaliamos a confiabilidade e validade da versão I em português-brasileiro do IDB-I em uma amostra não clínica de adultos. MÉTODOS: O questionário foi aplicado em duas

  13. Depression among patients with type-II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Akmal; Sultan, Sayed Mohammad; Nazli, Rubina; Akhtar, Tasleem; Khan, Mudasar Ahmad; Sher, Nabila; Aslam, Hina

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the frequency of depression among patients with type-II diabetes mellitus in Peshawar at Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar, from March to September 2010. Depression was assessed by using Beck Depressive Inventory-II (BDI-II). Out of 140 patients with type-II diabetes, 85 (61%) were women and 55 (39%) were men. Mean age was 45±7.45 years. Eighty four (60%) patients presented with severe depression. Depression was higher in females than males and widows. Depression was high in diabetic patients, especially in females and widows. It is of essence that psychiatric attention may be necessary to be incorporated in diabetes care both for prevention and treatment.

  14. Vitamin D Deficiency and Depressive Symptomatology in Psychiatric Patients Hospitalized with a Current Depressive Episode: A Factor Analytic Study.

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    Roland von Känel

    Full Text Available Low vitamin D levels have been associated with depressive symptoms in population-based studies and non-clinical samples as well as with clinical depression. This study aimed to examine the association of vitamin D levels with the severity and dimensions of depressive symptoms in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression taking into account confounding variables.We investigated 380 patients (mean age 47 ± 12 years, 70% women who were consecutively hospitalized with a main diagnosis of an ICD-10 depressive episode. All patients self-rated depressive symptom severity with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D, the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, and the Brief Symptom Inventory. A principal component analysis was performed with all 34 items of these questionnaires and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH D were measured.Vitamin D deficiency ( 75 nmol/l were present in 55.5%, 31.8% and 12.6%, respectively, of patients. Patients with vitamin D deficiency scored higher on the HADS-D scale and on an anhedonia symptom factor than those with insufficient (p-values ≤ 0.023 or sufficient (p-values ≤ 0.008 vitamin D. Vitamin D deficient patients also scored higher on the BDI-II scale than those with sufficient vitamin D (p = 0.007; BDI-II cognitive/affective symptoms, but not somatic/affective symptoms, were higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency (p = 0.005 and insufficiency (p = 0.041 relative to those with sufficient vitamin D. Effect sizes suggested clinically relevant findings.Low vitamin D levels are frequent in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression. Especially 25-OH D levels < 50 nmol/l were associated with cognitive/affective depressive symptoms, and anhedonia symptoms in particular.

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency and Depressive Symptomatology in Psychiatric Patients Hospitalized with a Current Depressive Episode: A Factor Analytic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Känel, Roland; Fardad, Nasser; Steurer, Nadine; Horak, Nicole; Hindermann, Esther; Fischer, Franz; Gessler, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Low vitamin D levels have been associated with depressive symptoms in population-based studies and non-clinical samples as well as with clinical depression. This study aimed to examine the association of vitamin D levels with the severity and dimensions of depressive symptoms in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression taking into account confounding variables. We investigated 380 patients (mean age 47 ± 12 years, 70% women) who were consecutively hospitalized with a main diagnosis of an ICD-10 depressive episode. All patients self-rated depressive symptom severity with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D), the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and the Brief Symptom Inventory. A principal component analysis was performed with all 34 items of these questionnaires and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH D) were measured. Vitamin D deficiency ( 75 nmol/l) were present in 55.5%, 31.8% and 12.6%, respectively, of patients. Patients with vitamin D deficiency scored higher on the HADS-D scale and on an anhedonia symptom factor than those with insufficient (p-values ≤ 0.023) or sufficient (p-values ≤ 0.008) vitamin D. Vitamin D deficient patients also scored higher on the BDI-II scale than those with sufficient vitamin D (p = 0.007); BDI-II cognitive/affective symptoms, but not somatic/affective symptoms, were higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency (p = 0.005) and insufficiency (p = 0.041) relative to those with sufficient vitamin D. Effect sizes suggested clinically relevant findings. Low vitamin D levels are frequent in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression. Especially 25-OH D levels < 50 nmol/l were associated with cognitive/affective depressive symptoms, and anhedonia symptoms in particular.

  16. Selective neurocognitive deficits and poor life functioning are associated with significant depressive symptoms in alcoholism-HIV infection comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, Stephanie A; Rosenbloom, Margaret J; Fama, Rosemary; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2012-09-30

    Alcoholism, HIV, and depressive symptoms frequently co-occur and are associated with impairment in cognition and life function. We administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), measures of life function, and neurocognitive tests to 67 alcoholics, 56 HIV+ patients, 63 HIV+ alcoholics, and 64 controls to examine whether current depressive symptom level (significant, BDI-II>14 vs. minimal, BDI-IIalcoholism-HIV comorbidity. Participants with significant depressive symptoms demonstrated slower manual motor speed and poorer visuospatial memory than those with minimal depressive symptoms. HIV patients with depressive symptoms showed impaired manual motor speed. Alcoholics with depressive symptoms showed impaired visuospatial memory. HIV+ alcoholics with depressive symptoms reported the poorest quality of life; alcoholics with depressive symptoms, irrespective of HIV status, had poorest life functioning. Thus, significant depressive symptoms were associated with poorer selective cognitive and life functioning in alcoholism and in HIV infection, even though depressive symptoms had neither synergistic nor additive effects on cognition in alcoholism-HIV comorbidity. The results suggest the relevance of assessing and treating current depressive symptoms to reduce cognitive compromise and functional disability in HIV infection, alcoholism, and their comorbidity.

  17. Validation of Standardized Questionnaires Evaluating Symptoms of Depression in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Approaches to Screening for a Frequent Yet Underrated Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englbrecht, Matthias; Alten, Rieke; Aringer, Martin; Baerwald, Christoph G; Burkhardt, Harald; Eby, Nancy; Fliedner, Gerhard; Gauger, Bettina; Henkemeier, Ulf; Hofmann, Michael W; Kleinert, Stefan; Kneitz, Christian; Krueger, Klaus; Pohl, Christoph; Roske, Anne-Eve; Schett, Georg; Schmalzing, Marc; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Peter Tony, Hans; Wendler, Joerg

    2017-01-01

    To validate standard self-report questionnaires for depression screening in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and compare these measures to one another and to the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), a standardized structured interview. In 9 clinical centers across Germany, depressive symptomatology was assessed in 262 adult RA patients at baseline (T0) and at 12 ± 2 weeks followup (T1) using the World Health Organization 5-Item Well-Being Index (WHO-5), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). The construct validity of these depression questionnaires (using convergent and discriminant validity) was evaluated using Spearman's correlations at both time points. The test-retest reliability of the questionnaires was evaluated in RA patients who had not undergone a psychotherapeutic intervention or received antidepressants between T0 and T1. The sensitivity and the specificity of the questionnaires were calculated using the results of the MADRS, a structured interview, as the gold standard. According to Spearman's correlation coefficients, all questionnaires met convergent validity criteria (ρ > |0.50|), with the BDI-II performing best, while correlations with age and disease activity for all questionnaires met the criteria for discriminant validity (ρ questionnaire to meet the predefined retest reliability criterion (ρ ≥ 0.70) was the BDI-II (rs  = 0.77), which also achieved the best results for both sensitivity and specificity (>80%) when using the MADRS as the gold standard. The BDI-II best met the predefined criteria, and the PHQ-9 met most of the validity criteria, with lower sensitivity and specificity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Depressive Symptoms among Fourth Form Students in St. Kitts and Nevis High Schools

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    Gillian A. Lowe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been limited research on depressive symptoms among high school students in St. Kitts and Nevis. This project examines levels of depressive symptoms among fourth form (grade 10 students attending all high schools in St. Kitts and Nevis. Students enrolled in the fourth form during the 2006/2007 academic year in all high schools were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II. A near census of the students was conducted (n = 744 students; 50.4% females, 47.6% males, and 2% no gender reported; age 13–19 years, mean = 15.5 ± 0.8 years. Six in every ten students (62.1% reported some symptoms of depression, with 14.8% reporting moderate to severe and 9.7% reporting severe symptoms of depression. Females reported significantly higher BDI-II scores (t(727 = 7.11, p < 0.01 with 70% of females reporting some level of depressive symptoms compared with 52% of their male counterparts (X2(1 = 24.6, p < 0.05. Additionally, 34% of females were in the moderate to severe or severe range of depressive symptoms, while 15% of males were in the same range. Students who were older than expected for their grade (i.e., 17 years or older reported significantly higher BDI-II scores (F(2,740 = 2.88, p < 0.05 than students who were younger or at the expected age (i.e., 14–16 years. Students whose mothers had a high school or postsecondary education reported significantly lower levels of depressive symptoms than students whose mothers had less than a high school education (F(3, 637, = 4.23, p < 0.05. Symptoms of depression among fourth form students in St. Kitts and Nevis are a prevalent problem that is influenced by students’ age, gender, and social class as indicated by maternal education.

  19. Rendimiento diagnóstico y estructura factorial del Inventario de Depresión de Beck-II (BDI-II)

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús Sanz; María Paz García-Vera

    2013-01-01

    Este estudio tenía dos objetivos. Primero, analizar el rendimiento diagnóstico de la versión española del Inventario de Depresión de Beck-II (BDI-II) en una muestra de pacientes con trastornos psicológicos y, segundo, examinar si las soluciones unifactoriales y bifactoriales del BDI-II encontradas previamente en muestras similares son replicables y, de ser así, analizar la contribución relativa del factor general y de los dos factores específicos a la varianza del BDI-II. El BDI-II, junto con...

  20. The effect of acupuncture on mood and working memory in patients with depression and schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peggy Bosch; Maurits van den Noort; Sujung Yeo; Sabina Lim; Anton Coenen; Gilles van Luijtelaar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with depression, as wel as in patients with schizophrenia, both mood and working memory performance are often impaired. Both issues can only be addressed and improved with medication to some extent. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the mood and the working memory performance in patients with depression or schizophrenia and whether acupuncture can improve these. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: A pragmatic clinical trial design was used. The study was conducted in a psychiatric clinic. Fifty patients with depression and 50 with schizophrenia were randomly divided into an experimental and a waiting-list group. Additional y, 25 healthy control participants were included. Twelve weeks of individualized acupuncture treatment was used as the clinical intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Al patients were tested before (T1) and after (T2) acupuncture treatment on a mood scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, BDI-II), a simple working memory task (digit span), and a complex working memory task (letter-number sequencing); the healthy controls were tested at T1 only. RESULTS: Patients with depression scored worse than the others on the BDI-II, and patients with schizophrenia scored worse than the healthy controls. On the digit span, patients with schizophrenia did not differ from healthy controls whereas they scored worse of al on the letter-number sequencing. With respect to the acupuncture findings, first, the present study showed that the use of acupuncture to treat patients with schizophrenia was both practical and safe. Moreover, acupuncture had a positive effect on the BDI-II for the depression group, but acupuncture had no effect on the digit span and on the letter-number sequencing performance for the two clinical groups. CONCLUSION: The clinical improvement in patients with depression after acupuncture treatment was not accompanied by any significant change in a simple working memory task or in a more complex working memory

  1. Telephone cognitive-behavioral therapy for subthreshold depression and presenteeism in workplace: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Toshi A; Horikoshi, Masaru; Kawakami, Norito; Kadota, Masayo; Sasaki, Megumi; Sekiya, Yuki; Hosogoshi, Hiroki; Kashimura, Masami; Asano, Kenichi; Terashima, Hitomi; Iwasa, Kazunori; Nagasaku, Minoru; Grothaus, Louis C

    2012-01-01

    Subthreshold depression is highly prevalent in the general population and causes great loss to society especially in the form of reduced productivity while at work (presenteeism). We developed a highly-structured manualized eight-session cognitive-behavioral program with a focus on subthreshold depression in the workplace and to be administered via telephone by trained psychotherapists (tCBT). We conducted a parallel-group, non-blinded randomized controlled trial of tCBT in addition to the pre-existing Employee Assistance Program (EAP) versus EAP alone among workers with subthreshold depression at a large manufacturing company in Japan. The primary outcomes were depression severity as measured with Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and presenteeism as measured with World Health Organization Health and Work Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ). In the course of the trial the follow-up period was shortened in order to increase acceptability of the study. The planned sample size was 108 per arm but the trial was stopped early due to low accrual. Altogether 118 subjects were randomized to tCBT+EAP (n = 58) and to EAP alone (n = 60). The BDI-II scores fell from the mean of 17.3 at baseline to 11.0 in the intervention group and to 15.7 in the control group after 4 months (pdepression. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach in longer terms. The study was funded by Sekisui Chemicals Co. Ltd. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00885014.

  2. Religion, coping and outcome in out-patients with depression or diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadi, K U; Uwakwe, R; Odinka, P C; Ndukuba, A C; Muomah, C R; Ohaeri, J U

    2016-06-01

    The study assesses the association between religiosity and coping style with the outcome of depression and diabetes. Using a simple random sampling, we recruited 112 participants with diabetes and an equal number with depression consecutively, matching for gender. Religiosity was determined using Religious Orientation Scale (revised) (ROS-R), coping styles with Brief Religious Coping (Brief RCOPE) scale and Mental Adjustment to Cancer (MAC) scale (adapted). Primary and secondary outcomes were evaluated using Sheehan's Disability Scale (SDS) and Becks Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) respectively. Among participants with diabetes, BDI-II total scores correlated negatively with ROS-R Extrinsic Social (r = -0.2, P < 0.05) and Fighting Spirit (r = -0.3, P < 0.05) but correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.3, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.4, P < 0.05). SDS global scores correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.3, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.4, P < 0.05). Among participants with depression, BDI-II total scores correlated negatively with Intrinsic religiosity (r = -0.2, P < 0.05) and Fighting Spirit (r = -0.4, P < 0.05) but correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.6, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.7, P < 0.05). SDS global scores correlated negatively with Intrinsic religiosity (r = -0.2, P < 0.05) and Fighting Spirit (r = -0.3, P < 0.05) but correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.5, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.4, P < 0.05). High intrinsic and extrinsic religiosities are likely to be associated with positive coping skills and better treatment outcome in patients with depression or diabetes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effectiveness of meta-cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapy in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Ahmad; Atef Vahid, Mohammad Kazem; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Rasoulian, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effectiveness of metacognitive therapy (MCT) and cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) in treating Iranian patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Thirty three outpatients meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for MDD without any other axis I and II disorders were randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions, i.e. MCT, CBT and pharmacotherapy. The Beck Depression Inventory-II-Second Edition (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Ruminative Response Scale (RRS) and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) were administered for pre-treatment, post-treatment and follow-up. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Based on repeated measures ANOVA, all the participants demonstrated improvement in depression, anxiety, dysfunctional attitude and ruminative response. Based on percentage results, all the patients in MCT and CBT groups showed significant improvement at post-treatment phase. MCT and CBT were more effective than pharmacotherapy alone In treatment of MDD. None.

  4. Impact of a switch to fingolimod on depressive symptoms in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis: An analysis from the EPOC (Evaluate Patient OutComes) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Samuel F; Agius, Mark; Miller, Deborah M; Cutter, Gary; Barbato, Luigi; McCague, Kevin; Meng, Xiangyi; Agashivala, Neetu; Chin, Peter; Hollander, Eric

    2016-06-15

    Depression is common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), may confound evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness and may be impacted by MS-specific treatments. First, to assess the impact on depressive symptoms of a switch to fingolimod versus remaining on an injectable disease-modifying therapy (iDMT) in a post-hoc analysis of prospectively collected data from the EPOC study. Secondly, to investigate the underlying Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) factor structure in patients with MS, and estimate treatment differences using the resulting subscales. EPOC was a 6-month, open-label study assessing patient-reported outcomes after switch from iDMT to oral fingolimod 0.5mg versus remaining on iDMT in 1053 patients with relapsing-remitting MS. At end of study (EOS), a greater proportion of patients on fingolimod versus iDMT no longer had BDI-II scores indicating depression (p<0.001). Fewer mildly and moderately symptomatic patients developed severe depressive symptoms, and fewer severely symptomatic patients continued to have scores indicating severe depression at EOS on fingolimod versus iDMT (p=0.027, p=0.038, p=0.030, respectively). Two BDI-II subscales were identified and labelled Somatic and Affective; fingolimod demonstrated more reduction on both subscales at EOS versus iDMTs (p<0.0001 and p=0.0001, respectively). A switch to fingolimod versus remaining on/switching to another iDMT was associated with an improvement in depressive symptoms in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Advising depression patients to reduce alcohol and drug use: factors associated with provider intervention in outpatient psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satre, Derek D; Leibowitz, Amy S; Mertens, Jennifer R; Weisner, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Mental health clinicians have an important opportunity to help depression patients reduce co-occurring alcohol and drug use. This study examined demographic and clinical patient characteristics and service factors associated with receiving a recommendation to reduce alcohol and drug use from providers in a university-based outpatient psychiatry clinic. The sample consisted of 97 participants ages 18 and older who reported hazardous drinking (≥3 drinks/occasion), illegal drug use (primarily cannabis) or misuse of prescription drugs, and who scored ≥15 on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Participants were interviewed at intake and 6 months. At 6-month telephone interview, 30% of participants reported that a clinic provider had recommended that they reduce alcohol or drug use. In logistic regression, factors associated with receiving advice to reduce use included greater number of drinks consumed in the 30 days prior to intake (p = .035); and greater depression severity on the BDI-II (p = .096) and hazardous drinking at 6 months (p = .05). While participants with greater alcohol intake and depression symptom severity were more likely to receive advice to reduce use, the low overall rate of recommendation to reduce use highlights the need to improve alcohol and drug use intervention among depression patients, and potentially to address alcohol and drug training and treatment implementation issues among mental health providers. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  6. Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Depressive Symptoms, and Cognitive Performance in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazereeuw, Graham; Herrmann, Nathan; Oh, Paul I.; Ma, David W.L.; Wang, Cheng Tao; Kiss, Alexander; Lanctôt, Krista L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This trial investigated the efficacy of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) treatment for improving depressive symptoms and cognitive performance in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) participating in cardiac rehabilitation. Patients with CAD aged 45 to 80 years were randomized to receive either 1.9-g/d n-3 PUFA treatment or placebo for 12 weeks. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D, primary outcome) and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria were used to identify a depressive episode at baseline. Cognitive performance was measured using a standardized battery for vascular cognitive impairment. In 92 patients (age, 61.7 ± 8.7 y; 76% male, 40% depressed; HAM-D, 6.9 ± 5.9; BDI-II, 12.3 ± 10.9; n = 45 n-3 PUFA, n = 47 placebo), depression decreased (HAM-D, F3,91 = 2.71 and P = 0.049; BDI-II, F3,91 = 6.24 and P < 0.01), and cognitive performance improved (attention/processing speed, F1,91 = 5.57, P = 0.02; executive function, F1,91 = 14.64, P < 0.01; visuospatial memory, F1,91 = 4.01, P = 0.04) over cardiac rehabilitation. Omega-3 PUFA treatment increased plasma eicosapentaenoic acid (F1,29 = 33.29, P < 0.01) and docosahexaenoic acid (F1,29 = 15.29, P < 0.01) concentrations but did not reduce HAM-D (F3,91 = 1.59, P = 0.20) or BDI-II (F3,91 = 0.46, P = 0.50) scores compared with placebo. Treatment did not improve cognitive performance; however, n-3 PUFAs significantly increased verbal memory compared with placebo in a subgroup of nondepressed patients (F1,54 = 4.16, P = 0.04). This trial suggests that n-3 PUFAs do not improve depressive and associated cognitive symptoms in those with CAD. The possible benefits of n-3 PUFAs for verbal memory may warrant investigation in well-powered studies. PMID:27529771

  7. Assessing Latina/o Undergraduates' Depressive Symptomatology: Comparisons of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and the Self-Report Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Rico, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of depression scales as screening tools at university and college centers is increasing and thus, the question of whether scales are culturally valid for different student groups is increasingly more relevant with increased severity of depression for students and changing student demographics. As such, this study examined the reliability…

  8. Body-Related Social Comparison and Disordered Eating among Adolescent Females with an Eating Disorder, Depressive Disorder, and Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Le Grange

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between body-related social comparison (BRSC and eating disorders (EDs by: (a comparing the degree of BRSC in adolescents with an ED, depressive disorder (DD, and no psychiatric history; and (b investigating whether BRSC is associated with ED symptoms after controlling for symptoms of depression and self-esteem. Participants were 75 girls, aged 12–18 (25 per diagnostic group. To assess BRSC, participants reported on a 5-point Likert scale how often they compare their body to others’. Participants also completed a diagnostic interview, Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE. Compared to adolescents with a DD and healthy adolescents, adolescents with an ED engaged in significantly more BRSC (p ≤ 0.001. Collapsing across groups, BRSC was significantly positively correlated with ED symptoms (p ≤ 0.01, and these associations remained even after controlling for two robust predictors of both ED symptoms and social comparison, namely BDI-II and RSE. In conclusion, BRSC seems to be strongly related to EDs. Treatment for adolescents with an ED may focus on reducing BRSC.

  9. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression among adults in Japanese clinical settings: a single-group study

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    Kikuchi Toshiaki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical support for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT for treating Japanese patients with major depression is lacking, therefore, a feasibility study of CBT for depression in Japanese clinical settings is urgently required. Findings A culturally adapted, 16-week manualized individual CBT program for Japanese patients with major depressive disorder was developed. A total of 27 patients with major depression were enrolled in a single-group study with the purpose of testing the feasibility of the program. Twenty six patients (96% completed the study. The mean total score on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II for all patients (Intention-to-treat sample improved from 32.6 to 11.7, with a mean change of 20.8 (95% confidence interval: 17.0 to 24.8. Within-group effect size at the endpoint assessment was 2.64 (Cohen's d. Twenty-one patients (77.7% showed treatment response and 17 patients (63.0% achieved remission at the end of the program. Significant improvement was observed in measurement of subjective and objective depression severity (assessed by BDI-II, Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Rated, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, dysfunctional attitude (assessed by Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, global functioning (assessed by Global Assessment of Functioning of DSM-IV and subjective well-being (assessed by WHO Subjective Well-being Inventory (all p values Conclusions Our manualized treatment comprised of a 16-week individual CBT program for major depression appears feasible and may achieve favorable treatment outcomes among Japanese patients with major depression. Further research involving a larger sample in a randomized, controlled trial design is warranted. Trial registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000002542.

  10. Adolescent pregnancy and depression: is there an association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalak, Z; Köşüş, N; Köşüş, A; Hizli, D; Akçal, B; Kafali, H; Canbal, M; Isaoğlu, Ü

    2016-01-01

    The impact of being an adolescent and socio-demographic parameters on depression development during pregnancy were evaluated in this study. Between September 2010 and September 2011, 105 consecutive adolescent women ≤ 17 years of age were defined as the study group and 105 consecutive pregnant women over 18 years of age and matched for gestational age, were defined as the control group. Groups were compared according to depression development. The predictors of depression were analyzed by regression analysis. Median Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) scores in adolescent and control groups were 16 and 6, respectively. The difference was statistically significant. In the adolescent group, 39.0% of patients had mild depression, 37.1% moderate, and 10.5% had severe depression. Only 4.8% of patients in the control group had mild depression while none of the control cases had moderate or severe depression. Multivariate analysis showed that most important factor that was associated with depression development during pregnancy was being an adolescent. Depression risk was increased 18.2-fold in adolescent patients with pregnancy. Therefore psychiatric evaluation should be considered for these patients.

  11. The association of academic tracking to depressive symptoms among adolescents in three Caribbean countries

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    Clarke Nelson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Students who are tracked into low performing schools or classrooms that limit their life chances may report increased depressive symptoms. Limited research has been conducted on academic tracking and its association with depressive symptoms among high school students in the Caribbean. This project examines levels of depressive symptoms among tenth grade students tracked within and between high schools in Jamaica, St. Vincent and St. Kitts and Nevis. Methods Students enrolled in grade ten of the 2006/2007 academic year in Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis and St. Vincent were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II. In Jamaica and St. Vincent, academic tracking was operationalized using data provided by the local Ministries of Education. These Ministries ranked ordered schools according to students' performance on Caribbean school leaving examinations. In St. Kitts and Nevis tracking was operationalized by classroom assignments within schools whereby students were grouped into classrooms according to their levels of academic achievement. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between academic tracking and BDI-II depression scores. Results A wide cross-section of 4th form students in each nation was sampled (n = 1738; 278 from Jamaica, 737 St. Kitts and Nevis, 716 from St. Vincent; 52% females, 46.2% males and 1.8% no gender reported; age 12 to 19 years, mean = 15.4 yrs, sd = .9 yr. Roughly half (53% of the students reported some symptoms of depression with 19.2% reporting moderate and 10.7% reporting severe symptoms of depression. Students in Jamaica reported significantly higher depression scores than those in either St. Kitts and Nevis or St. Vincent (p Conclusions There appears to be an association between academic tracking and depressive symptoms that is differentially manifested across the islands of Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis and St. Vincent.

  12. Rendimiento diagnóstico y estructura factorial del Inventario de Depresión de Beck-II (BDI-II

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    Jesús Sanz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio tenía dos objetivos. Primero, analizar el rendimiento diagnóstico de la versión española del Inventario de Depresión de Beck-II (BDI-II en una muestra de pacientes con trastornos psicológicos y, segundo, examinar si las soluciones unifactoriales y bifactoriales del BDI-II encontradas previamente en muestras similares son replicables y, de ser así, analizar la contribución relativa del factor general y de los dos factores específicos a la varianza del BDI-II. El BDI-II, junto con el módulo de los trastornos del estado de ánimo de la Entrevista Clínica Estructurada para los Trastornos del Eje I del DSM-IV (SCID-I VC y un listado de cotejo de síntomas depresivos completado por el clínico, fueron aplicados a una muestra española de 322 pacientes adultos ambulatorios con diversos trastornos psicológicos. Tomando como criterio el diagnóstico clínico basado en la SCID-I VC y el listado de cotejo de síntomas depresivos, el BDI-II demostró un rendimiento diagnóstico aceptable para discriminar entre pacientes con trastorno depresivo mayor y pacientes sin depresión. Los análisis factoriales indicaron que el BDI-II mide una dimensión general de depresión compuesta por dos factores relacionados (somático y cognitivo, pero estos factores apenas explicaban varianza adicional más allá de la puntuación global.

  13. Suicide risk and prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) among individuals infected with HIV-1 subtype C versus B in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Sergio Monteiro; Barbosa, Francisco Jaime; Kamat, Rujvi; de Pereira, Ana Paula; Raboni, Sonia Mara; Rotta, Indianara; Ribeiro, Clea Elisa; Cherner, Mariana; Ellis, Ronald J; Atkinson, Joseph Hampton

    2016-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is among the most prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders associated with HIV infection; however, its risks and neurobiologic correlates in diverse cultures are poorly understood. This study aimed to examine the frequency of MDD among HIV+ participants in southern Brazil. We hypothesized that the frequency and severity of MDD would be higher among individuals with HIV+ compared with HIV- and higher in HIV subtype B compared with C. Individuals with HIV (n = 39) as well as seronegative controls (n = 22) were enrolled in a cross-sectional, prospective, observational study. Current and lifetime history of MDD was diagnosed by MINI-Plus; symptom severity was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Current and past episodes of MDD were significantly more frequent in the HIV+ versus HIV- group: current MDD, 15 (38.5 %) vs. 0 (0 %), p = 0.0004; past MDD, 24 (61.5 %) vs. 3 (13.6 %), p = 0.0004. The median BDI-II score in the HIV+ group was significantly higher than that in the HIV- (13 (8-27.5) vs. 2.5 (1-5.5); p < 0.0001). Current suicide risk, defined as during the last month, was found in 18 % of participants in the HIV-positive and none in the HIV-negative group. Neither current MDD frequency (8 (57.1 %) vs. 6 (40 %), p = 0.47) nor BDI-II score differed across subtypes B and C. HIV+ group may be more likely to experience current MDD than HIV-. This was the first study to compare the frequency and severity of MDD in HIV subtypes B and C; we found no difference between HIV subtypes B and C.

  14. Inpatients with major depressive disorder: Psychometric properties of the new Multidimensional Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darharaj, Mohammad; Habibi, Mojtaba; Power, Michael J; Farzadian, Farzaneh; Rahimi, Maesoumeh; Kholghi, Habibeh; Kazemitabar, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    The New Multi-dimensional Depression Scale (NMDS) is one of the most comprehensive scales that measures depression symptoms in four domains, including emotional, cognitive, somatic, and interpersonal. This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the NMDS in a group of Iranian inpatients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). At first, the scale was translated into Persian and used as part of a battery consisting of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). The battery was administered to 271 inpatients with MDD (90 men and 181 women) aged from 18 to 60 who had been referred to psychiatric hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Persian version of the NMDS upheld its original four-factor structure. Moreover, the results showed its good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient ranging from 0.70 for the emotional subscale to 0.83 for the interpersonal subscale). In addition, the NMDS scores were correlated with other constructs in empirically and theoretically expected ways, which provides evidence for the convergent (positive significant relationships with anxiety and cognitive and somatic-affective symptoms of depression) and divergent (negative significant relationships with happiness and mental health and physical health) validity of the scale. These findings supported the Persian version of the NMDS as a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of depression symptoms in patients with MDD.

  15. Effectiveness of Compassionate Mind Training on Depression, Anxiety, and Self-Criticism in a Group of Iranian Depressed Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Noorbala

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of compassionate mind training (CMT on symptoms of depression and anxiety in Iranian depressed sufferers .Method:Nineteen depressed patients aged 20 to 40 (Beck Depression Inventory value≥20 were randomly assigned into two groups. The experimental group participated in 12 sessions of group therapy based on Paul Gilbert’s manual of CMT. The control group was given no intervention. The participants were assessed by Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, Anxiety Scale (AS, and Levels of Self-Criticism (LSCS questionnaires at the beginning and immediately after the intervention. To follow-up the therapeutic effect of CMT, the three questionnaires were answered again by participants two months after the end of the intervention. Data were analyzed by independent samples ttest. Results:The results revealed that CMT significantly decreases depression (P<0.05 and anxiety score (P<0.05 in the follow-up study, but not immediately after the intervention. Although CMT decreased selfcriticism, this effect was marginally insignificant.Conclusion:The findings indicated that CMT could alleviatedepression and anxiety in a group of Iranian depressed patients.

  16. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: translation and validation for a Greek sample

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    Kogevinas Manolis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is an important screening instrument that is used routinely with mothers during the postpartum period for early identification of postnatal depression. The purpose of this study was to validate the Greek version of EPDS along with sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Methods 120 mothers within 12 weeks postpartum were recruited from the perinatal care registers of the Maternity Departments of 4 Hospitals of Heraklion municipality, Greece. EPDS and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II surveys were administered in random order to the mothers. Each mother was diagnosed with depression according to the validated Greek version of BDI-II. The psychometric measurements that were performed included: two independent samples t-tests, One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, reliability coefficients, Explanatory factor analysis using a Varimax rotation and Principal Components Method. Confirmatory analysis -known as structural equation modelling- of principal components was conducted by LISREL (Linear Structural Relations. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. Results 8 (6.7% of the mothers were diagnosed with major postnatal depression, 14 (11.7% with moderate and 38 (31.7% with mild depression on the basis of BDI-II scores. The internal consistency of the EPDS Greek version -using Chronbach's alpha coefficient- was found 0.804 and that of Guttman split-half coefficient 0.742. Our findings confirm the multidimensionality of EPDS, demonstrating a two-factor structure which contained subscales reflecting depressive symptoms and anxiety. The Confirmatory Factor analysis demonstrated that the two factor model offered a very good fit to our data. The area under ROC curve AUC was found 0.7470 and the logistic estimate for the threshold score of 8/9 fitted the model sensitivity at 76.7% and model specificity at 68

  17. Is immediate adjunctive CBT more beneficial than delayed CBT in treating depression?: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Sakina J; Zaretsky, Ari; Schaffer, Ayal; Levitt, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious first-line therapy for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Due to the limited accessibility of CBT, long wait lists result in delayed treatment, which may affect treatment outcomes. The goal of this pilot study was to obtain preliminary data from a randomized controlled trial to determine whether delayed CBT reduces the effectiveness of the therapy compared to immediate CBT in patients with MDD receiving pharmacotherapy. Patients were randomized to receive immediate CBT (n=18) or to begin CBT after 6 months (n=20) and received 14 weekly sessions, followed by two additional booster sessions. During the active treatment months, patients in the immediate group demonstrated reductions in scores on the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) that were similar to those in the delayed CBT group. However, when the analysis was performed using only data from patients in the delayed group who were still in a depressive episode, there was an overall greater decrease in BDI-II scores in the immediate group vs. the delayed group over the active treatment months, but not specifically at the 6-month endpoint. These findings suggest delays in depression treatment, similar to what occurs with real-world wait list times, may not have a significant impact on the effectiveness of CBT in patients who are already receiving treatment as usual. However, such delays may affect the effectiveness of CBT in those patients who remain depressed during the time delay. A larger trial is necessary to confirm these findings. (Journal of Psychiatric Practice 2015;21:107-113).

  18. Depressive Symptoms and Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Stephen; Samad, Zainab; Becker, Richard C.; Williams, Redford; Kuhn, Cynthia; Ortel, Thomas L.; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Prybol, Kevin; Rogers, Joseph; O’Connor, Christopher; Velazquez, Eric J.; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The primary focus of this study was to examine associations between depressive symptoms and mental stress induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods Adult patients with documented CHD were recruited for baseline mental stress and exercise stress screening testing as a part of the enrollment process of the REMIT trial. Patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD). Following a 24-48-hour Beta-blocker withdrawal, consented patients completed three mental stress tests followed by a treadmill exercise test. Ischemia was defined as 1) any development or worsening of any wall motion abnormality (WMA), 2) reduction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥ 8% by transthoracic echocardiography, and/or ischemic ST-segment change by electrocardiography during stress testing. MSIMI was considered present when ischemia occurred in at least one mental test. Data were analyzed using logistic regression adjusting for age, gender, and resting left ventricular ejection fraction. Results One hundred twenty five (44.2 %) of 283 patients were found to have MSIMI and 93 (32.9%) had ESIMI. Unadjusted analysis showed that BDI-II scores were positively associated with the probability of MSIMI (OR = .1.30: 95% CI 1.06 – 1.60, p = .013) and number of MSIMI positive tasks (all p < .005). These associations were still significant after adjustment for covariates (ps ≤ .05). Conclusions In CHD patients, depressive symptoms were associated with a higher probability of MSIMI. These observations may enhance our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the association of depressive symptoms to future cardiovascular events. PMID:24163385

  19. Psychological distress, anxiety and depression among nursing students in Greece

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    Sapountzi-Krepia D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is usually observed that nursing students undergo tremendous stress during various stages oftheir course but the knowledge about the stress process and depressive symptoms in this population is limited. TheAim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of psychological distress, anxiety and depression amongnursing students in Greece. For that purpose 170 nursing students (34 males, 136 females of the Department of Nursingof the Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki completed 3 self-report questionnaires, the General HealthQuestionnaire (GHQ, the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. The mean agewas 21.5 years. No difference in stress and depression on the basis of gender was observed. Our results showed that thescores on the GHQ, BDI and STAI tend to increase in the year 2 and 3. The majority of students reported relatively highscores on the GHQ suggesting increased psychiatric morbidity. 52.4% of students experienced depressive symptoms(34.7% mild, 12.9% moderate and 4.7% severe. The scores on the state scale were higher in the years 2 and 3, whilethe majority of students who had no or mild stress was observed in the first and the last year. Low stress personalitytraits were also observed in the first and the last year. However, no significant differences between the four years wereobserved. Our results suggest that nursing students experience different levels of stress and depression and that thesefactors are positively correlated.

  20. Depression and Anxiety after Acute Myocardial Infarction Treated by Primary PCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Petr; Hudakova, Nela; Jurajda, Michal; Kasparek, Tomas; Ustohal, Libor; Parenica, Jiri; Sebo, Marek; Holicka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Aims The main objective of the study was to find out prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms in the population of patients with AMI with ST-segment elevation (STEMI), treated with primary PCI (pPCI). Secondary target indicators included the incidence of sleep disorders and loss of interest in sex. Methods and results The project enrolled 79 consecutive patients with the first AMI, aged <80 years (median 61 years, 21.5% of women) with a follow-up period of 12 months. Symptoms of depression or anxiety were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory II tests (BDI-II, cut-off value ≥14) and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS, cut-off ≥ 45) within 24 hours of pPCI, before the discharge, and in 3, 6 and 12 months). Results with the value p<0.05 were considered as statistically significant. The BDI-II positivity was highest within 24 hours after pPCI (21.5%) with a significant decline prior to the discharge (9.2%), but with a gradual increase in 3, 6 and 12 months (10.4%; 15.4%; 13.8% respectively). The incidence of anxiety showed a relatively similar trend: 8.9% after pPCI, and 4.5%, 10.8% and 6.2% in further follow-up. Conclusions Patients with STEMI treated by primary PCI have relatively low overall prevalence of symptoms of depression and anxiety. A significant decrease in mental stress was observed before discharge from the hospital, but in a period of one year after pPCI, prevalence of both symptoms was gradually increasing, which should be given medical attention. PMID:27074002

  1. Altered soluble epoxide hydrolase-derived oxylipins in patients with seasonal major depression: An exploratory study.

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    Hennebelle, Marie; Otoki, Yurika; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D; Levitt, Anthony J; Taha, Ameer Y; Swardfager, Walter

    2017-02-27

    Many cytochrome p450-derived lipids promote resolution of inflammation, in contrast to their soluble epoxide hydrolase(sEH)-derived oxylipin breakdown products. Here we compare plasma oxylipins and precursor fatty acids between seasons in participants with major depressive disorder with seasonal pattern (MDD-s). Euthymic participants with a history of MDD-s recruited in summer-fall were followed-up in winter. At both visits, a structured clinical interview (DSM-5 criteria) and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) were administered. Unesterified and total oxylipin pools were assayed by liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Precursor fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography. In nine unmedicated participants euthymic at baseline who met depression criteria in winter, BDI-II scores increased from 4.9±4.4 to 19.9±7.7. Four sEH-derived oxylipins increased in winter compared to summer-fall with moderate to large effect sizes. An auto-oxidation product (unesterified epoxyketooctadecadienoic acid) and lipoxygenase-derived 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid also increased in winter. The cytochrome p450-derived 20-COOH-leukotriene B4 (unesterified) and total 14(15)-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, and the sEH-derived 14,15-dihydroxyeicostrienoic acid (unesterified), decreased in winter. We conclude that winter depression was associated with changes in cytochrome p450- and sEH-derived oxylipins, suggesting that seasonal shifts in omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid metabolism mediated by sEH may underlie inflammatory states in symptomatic MDD-s.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy versus talking and usual care for depressed older people in primary care

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    Leurent Baptiste E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst evidence suggests cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT may be effective for depressed older people in a primary care setting, few studies have examined its cost-effectiveness. The aim of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT, a talking control (TC and treatment as usual (TAU, delivered in a primary care setting, for older people with depression. Methods Cost data generated from a single blind randomised controlled trial of 204 people aged 65 years or more were offered only Treatment as Usual, or TAU plus up to twelve sessions of CBT or a talking control is presented. The Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II was the main outcome measure for depression. Direct treatment costs were compared with reductions in depression scores. Cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using non-parametric bootstrapping. The primary analysis focussed on the cost-effectiveness of CBT compared with TAU at 10 months follow up. Results Complete cost data were available for 198 patients at 4 and 10 month follow up. There were no significant differences between groups in baseline costs. The majority of health service contacts at follow up were made with general practitioners. Fewer contacts with mental health services were recorded in patients allocated to CBT, though these differences were not significant. Overall total per patient costs (including intervention costs were significantly higher in the CBT group compared with the TAU group at 10 month follow up (difference £427, 95% CI: £56 - £787, p Conclusions CBT is significantly more costly than TAU alone or TAU plus TC, but more clinically effective. Based on current estimates, CBT is likely to be recommended as a cost-effective treatment option for this patient group if the value placed on a unit reduction in BDI-II is greater than £115. Trial Registration isrctn.org Identifier: ISRCTN18271323

  3. The Effects of Powdered Fertilized Eggs on Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of fertilized egg powder (Young Tissue Extract; YTE®) intake on outcome measures for depression. Fifty-five patients with depression were randomly assigned to receive YTE, YTE plus Melissa officinalis, or placebo for 12 weeks. At baseline, there were no significant differences in scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) or Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) among the 3 groups. At 12 weeks, the HAM-D scores in groups treated with YTE or YTE with M. officinalis were both significantly lower than those in the placebo group. In addition, both treatment groups showed a significant improvement in depression as measured by the change in HAM-D scores from baseline to 12 weeks, whereas the placebo group showed no significant change. There were no significant differences between the 2 treatment groups. The study indicates that the fertilized egg powder has an antidepressive effect and may be an alternative or adjunct to antidepressive medication for some patients, but further research is necessary. PMID:21631360

  4. Internet-delivered therapist-guided physical activity for mild to moderate depression: a randomized controlled trial

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    Morgan Ström

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main hypothesis, and the objective of the study, was to test if the participants allocated to the treatment group would show a larger reduction in depressive symptoms than those in the control group. Methods. This study was a randomized nine week trial of an Internet-administered treatment based on guided physical exercise for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD. A total of 48 participants with mild to moderate depression, diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, were randomized either to a treatment intervention or to a waiting-list control group. The main outcome measure for depression was the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, and physical activity level was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. The treatment program consisted of nine text modules, and included therapist guidance on a weekly basis. Results. The results showed significant reductions of depressive symptoms in the treatment group compared to the control group, with a moderate between-group effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.67; 95% confidence interval: 0.09–1.25. No difference was found between the groups with regards to increase of physical activity level. For the treatment group, the reduction in depressive symptoms persisted at six months follow-up. Conclusions. Physical activity as a treatment for depression can be delivered in the form of guided Internet-based self-help. Trial Registration. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01573130.

  5. Validity and clinical utilization of the Chinese version of the Gotland Male Depression Scale at a men’s health polyclinic

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    Chu CL

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Lin Chu,1–3 Yu Chen,1,3,4 Kun-Hao Jiang,1,3,5 Jiun-Liang Chen,1,3,5 Chin-Pang Lee,1–3 Yeuk-Lun Chau,1,2 Ching-Yen Chen1–3 1Men’s Health Center, 2Department of Psychiatry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, 3School of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 4Department of Urology, 5Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan Introduction: Symptoms of depression in males, such as aggression and irritability, are different from those in females. However, there are no adequate scales for detecting possible diagnoses in the Chinese population. The aim of this study was to assess whether the Chinese version of the Gotland Male Depression Scale (CV-GMDS could identify male depression as effectively as the English version. Materials and methods: A total of 231 male outpatients were sampled from a men’s health polyclinic. We used questionnaires to evaluate the characteristics and mood status of participants, including the CV-GMDS, the Chinese version of the Beck Depressive Inventory II (CV-BDI-II, and the Chinese version of the Aging Males’ Symptoms (CV-AMS scale. Cronbach’s α-coefficient and Levene’s test were used to investigate internal consistency and homogeneity, respectively. External validity was evaluated using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. A factor analysis was conducted to evaluate the conceptual structure of the CV-GMDS, and a regression analysis was used to determine the relationship of the CV-AMS scale with the CV-GMDS and CV-BDI-II. Results: The mean age of the 231 participants was 46.1 years (standard deviation 11.0. Of the participants, 36.8% (n=85 were found to have depression according to the CV-GMDS and 34.6% (n=80 according to the CV-BDI-II. The internal consistency of the CV-GMDS was demonstrated by a Cronbach’s α of 0.933, and the test of homogeneity revealed a P-value of 0.762. The external validity for the CV-GDMS and CV-BDI-II was demonstrated

  6. Metacognitive therapy in recurrent depression: a case replication series in Denmark.

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    Callesen, Pia; Jensen, Anne Backhausen; Wells, Adrian

    2014-02-01

    Metacognitive therapy (MCT) for depression is derived from the Wells and Matthews (1994) self-regulatory model, in which a Cognitive-Attentional Syndrome (CAS) is the cause of psychological disorders. MCT for depression focuses on identifying patients' CAS and helps them to stop it. The CAS consists of worry, rumination and dysfunctional coping strategies. The focus in MCT is on removing the CAS by challenging positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and eliminating dysfunctional behaviors. In this case series, MCT was delivered to four depressed Danes and treatment was evaluated in 5-11 sessions of up to one hour each. An A-B design with follow-up at 3 and 6 months was conducted and the primary outcome was Beck's Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). We measured CAS processes with the Major depressive Disorder Scale (MDD-S). The results of the case series showed clinically significant improvements in depressive symptoms, rumination and metacognitive beliefs and the effects were still present at follow-up for all patients. The small number of patients and decreasing baselines observed in some cases limits the conclusions. However, the results suggest that this treatment is feasible and was associated with large improvements in symptoms when delivered away from its point of origin and in a Danish help-seeking sample.

  7. Effects of an Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) program in Manga format on improving subthreshold depressive symptoms among healthy workers: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Kotaro; Kawakami, Norito; Furukawa, Toshi A; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Shimazu, Akihito; Umanodan, Rino; Kawakami, Sonoko; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new Internet-based computerized cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) program in Manga format, the Japanese cartoon, for workers and to examine the effects of the iCBT program on improving subthreshold depression using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design among workers employed in private companies in Japan. All workers in a company (n = 290) and all workers in three departments (n = 1,500) at the headquarters of another large company were recruited by an invitation e-mail. Participants who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were randomly allocated to intervention or control groups (N = 381 for each group). A six-week, six-lesson iCBT program using Manga (Japanese comic) story was developed. The program included several CBT skills: self-monitoring, cognitive restructuring, assertiveness, problem solving, and relaxation. The intervention group studied the iCBT program at a frequency of one lesson per week. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory II; BDI-II) was assessed as a primary outcome at baseline, and three- and six-month follow-ups for both intervention and control groups were performed. The iCBT program showed a significant intervention effect on BDI-II (t = -1.99, p<0.05) with small effect sizes (Cohen's d: -0.16, 95% Confidence Interval: -0.32 to 0.00, at six-month follow-up). The present study first demonstrated that a computerized cognitive behavior therapy delivered via the Internet was effective in improving depression in the general working population. It seems critical to improve program involvement of participants in order to enhance the effect size of an iCBT program. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000006210.

  8. Prevalence and Correlates of Depressive Symptoms Among High School Students in Hanover, Jamaica

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    Olaniyi J. Ekundayo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Jamaican adolescents and examine its association with individual and family factors. We used an abbreviated form of the Beck's Depression Inventory II (BDI-II to assess depressive symptoms among 748 students, attending public high schools in the parish of Hanover Jamaica. In the analysis, we classified adolescents with scores in the upper quartile of the depressive symptom score as having depressive symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the predictors of depressive symptoms. 14.2% of participants reported depressive symptoms. There was association between engagement in sexual activity [Odds Ratio (OR = 1.61, 95% Confidence Interval (CI = 1.02-2.51], parental monitoring of adolescent activity (OR=2.04, 95%CI=1.33 -3.12, maternal affection and support (OR= 4.07, 95%CI= 2.62-6.33, and paternal affection and support (OR= 1.58, 95%CI= 1.05-2.39 with self reported depressive symptoms at the bivariate level. In the final model, depressive symptoms was associated with perceived lack of maternal affection and support (OR= 4.06, 95%CI= 2.61-6.32 and showed marginal association with being sexually experienced (OR= 1.59, 95%CI= 1.00-2.52. As most homes are female-headed, establishing support systems for the mother to take care of their adolescent children may decrease the odds of depressive symptoms. Sexually experienced adolescents may require screening for depression. Further research is required to fully explore all factors that could predispose Jamaican adolescents to depression.

  9. Psychometric functioning, socio-demographic variability of childhood maltreatment in the general population and its effects of depression.

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    Schulz, Andrea; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Appel, Katja; Mahler, Jessie; Spitzer, Carsten; Wingenfeld, Katja; Barnow, Sven; Driessen, Martin; Freyberger, Harald J; Völzke, Henry; Grabe, Hans J

    2014-09-01

    Maltreatment of children is a major public-health and social-welfare problem but socio-demographic variability has received little attention. This work addresses such variability in a general population cohort and associations with depression. Analyses were based on the cross-sectional SHIP-LEGEND examination among 2265 adults (29-89 years). Childhood maltreatment was multi-dimensionally assessed with the German 28-item Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ): emotional neglect; emotional abuse; physical neglect; physical abuse; sexual abuse. Non-linear associations between CTQ responses and age were assessed with fractional polynomials and cubic splines. Scale properties were analysed with confirmatory factor analyses and item response models. Associations between childhood maltreatment domains and depression [Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II)] were assessed. The majority (58.9%) reported events indicative of at least mild levels of childhood maltreatment. CTQ subscales showed characteristically different non-linear associations to age across the five studied domains, indicating methodological issues like recall bias and the influence of seminal events. Psychometric scale properties were acceptable to good for all subscales except for physical neglect. Associations to depression measures varied systematically across socio-demographic strata. We conclude that socio-demographic variability is a major issue when studying self-reported childhood maltreatment in a community sample. This needs to be taken into account for the study of associations to psychiatric key outcomes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Depressive symptoms are associated with mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia after acute myocardial infarction.

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    Jingkai Wei

    Full Text Available Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI, and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI.We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men age 38-60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task, and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS, obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores.There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30, p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56, p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress.Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological stress.

  11. Randomized Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder in a Community-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeblad, Annika; Falkenström, Fredrik; Andersson, Gerhard; Vestberg, Robert; Holmqvist, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Several head-to-head comparisons have been made, mostly in the United States. In this trial, we compared the two treatments in a small-town outpatient psychiatric clinic in Sweden. The patients had failed previous primary care treatment and had extensive Axis-II comorbidity. Outcome measures were reduction of depressive symptoms and attrition rate. Ninety-six psychiatric patients with MDD (DSM-IV) were randomized to 14 sessions of CBT (n = 48) or IPT (n = 48). A noninferiority design was used with the hypothesis that IPT would be noninferior to CBT. A three-point difference on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used as noninferiority margin. IPT passed the noninferiority test. In the ITT group, 53.5% (23/43) of the IPT patients and 51.0% (24/47) of the CBT patients were reliably improved, and 20.9% (9/43) and 19.1% (9/47), respectively, were recovered (last BDI score depressed psychiatric patients in a community-based outpatient clinic. CBT had significantly more dropouts than IPT, indicating that CBT may be experienced as too demanding. Since about half the patients did not recover, there is a need for further treatment development for these patients. The study should be considered an effectiveness trial, with strong external validity but some limitations in internal validity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy vs. psycho-education for patients with major depression who did not achieve remission following antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Alberto; Castagner, Vittoria; Andrisano, Costanza; Serretti, Alessandro; Mandelli, Laura; Porcelli, Stefano; Giommi, Fabio

    2015-04-30

    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) showed efficacy for currently depressed patients. However, most of the available studies suffer from important methodological shortcomings, including the lack of adequate control groups. The present study aims to compare MBCT with a psycho-educational control group designed to be structurally equivalent to the MBCT program but excluding the main putative "active ingredient" of MBCT (i.e., mindfulness meditation practice) for the treatment of patients with major depression (MD) who did not achieve remission following at least 8 weeks of antidepressant treatment. Out of 106 screened subjects, 43 were randomized to receive MBCT or psycho-education and were prospectively followed for 26 weeks. MD severity was assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Measures of anxiety, mindfulness, and quality of life were also included. All assessments were performed at baseline, 4, 8, 17 and 26-weeks. Both HAM-D and BDI scores, as well as quality of life and mindfulness scores, showed higher improvements, which were particularly evident over the long-term period, in the MBCT group than in the psycho-education group. Although limited by a small sample size, the results of this study suggest the superiority of MBCT over psycho-education for non-remitted MD subjects.

  13. Quality of life of depressed and suicidal patients seeking services from traditional and faith healers in rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musyimi, Christine W; Mutiso, Victoria N; Nayak, Sameera S; Ndetei, David M; Henderson, David C; Bunders, Joske

    2017-05-08

    In rural Kenya, traditional and faith healers provide an alternative pathway to health care, including mental health care. However, not much is known about the characteristics of the populations they serve. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between depression, suicidal ideation, and socio-demographic variables with Quality of Life (QoL) indicators in a sample seeking mental health services from traditional and faith healers in rural Kenya. Understanding QoL in this sample can help develop mental health policy and training to improve the well-being of this population. This was a cross-sectional epidemiological survey (n = 443) conducted over a period of 3 months among adult patients seeking care from traditional and faith healers in rural Kenya. Data were collected using the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II), Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSS) and WHO Quality of Life Survey- BREF (WHOQOL-BREF), and analyzed using correlation analyses, parametric tests, and regression analyses. Increasing levels of depression were associated with lower QoL among patients seeking care from traditional and faith healers. BSS scores were significantly negatively correlated with overall, physical, psychological, and environmental QoL, p Kenya. Evidence suggests that traditional and faith healers treat patients with a variety of QoL issues. Further research should focus on understanding how these issues tie into QoL, and how these healers can target these to improve care.

  14. Pattern classification of brain activation during emotional processing in subclinical depression: psychosis proneness as potential confounding factor

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    Gemma Modinos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We used Support Vector Machine (SVM to perform multivariate pattern classification based on brain activation during emotional processing in healthy participants with subclinical depressive symptoms. Six-hundred undergraduate students completed the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II. Two groups were subsequently formed: (i subclinical (mild mood disturbance (n = 17 and (ii no mood disturbance (n = 17. Participants also completed a self-report questionnaire on subclinical psychotic symptoms, the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences Questionnaire (CAPE positive subscale. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI paradigm entailed passive viewing of negative emotional and neutral scenes. The pattern of brain activity during emotional processing allowed correct group classification with an overall accuracy of 77% (p = 0.002, within a network of regions including the amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex. However, further analysis suggested that the classification accuracy could also be explained by subclinical psychotic symptom scores (correlation with SVM weights r = 0.459, p = 0.006. Psychosis proneness may thus be a confounding factor for neuroimaging studies in subclinical depression.

  15. Pattern classification of brain activation during emotional processing in subclinical depression: psychosis proneness as potential confounding factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modinos, Gemma; Mechelli, Andrea; Pettersson-Yeo, William; Allen, Paul; McGuire, Philip; Aleman, Andre

    2013-01-01

    We used Support Vector Machine (SVM) to perform multivariate pattern classification based on brain activation during emotional processing in healthy participants with subclinical depressive symptoms. Six-hundred undergraduate students completed the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). Two groups were subsequently formed: (i) subclinical (mild) mood disturbance (n = 17) and (ii) no mood disturbance (n = 17). Participants also completed a self-report questionnaire on subclinical psychotic symptoms, the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences Questionnaire (CAPE) positive subscale. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm entailed passive viewing of negative emotional and neutral scenes. The pattern of brain activity during emotional processing allowed correct group classification with an overall accuracy of 77% (p = 0.002), within a network of regions including the amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex. However, further analysis suggested that the classification accuracy could also be explained by subclinical psychotic symptom scores (correlation with SVM weights r = 0.459, p = 0.006). Psychosis proneness may thus be a confounding factor for neuroimaging studies in subclinical depression.

  16. PROSPECTIVE ASSOCIATIONS OF DEPRESSIVE RUMINATION AND SOCIAL PROBLEM SOLVING WITH DEPRESSION: A 6-MONTH LONGITUDINAL STUDY(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Hattori, Yosuke; Nishimura, Haruki; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2015-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine whether depressive rumination and social problem solving are prospectively associated with depressive symptoms. Nonclinical university students (N = 161, 64 men, 97 women; M age = 19.7 yr., SD = 3.6, range = 18-61) recruited from three universities in Japan completed the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II), the Ruminative Responses Scale, Social Problem-Solving Inventory-Revised Short Version (SPSI-R:S), and the Means-Ends Problem-Solving Procedure at baseline, and the BDI-II again at 6 mo. later. A stepwise multiple regression analysis with the BDI-II and all subscales of the rumination and social problem solving measures as independent variables indicated that only the BDI-II scores and the Impulsivity/carelessness style subscale of the SPSI-R:S at Time 1 were significantly associated with BDI-II scores at Time 2 (β = 0.73, 0.12, respectively; independent variables accounted for 58.8% of the variance). These findings suggest that in Japan an impulsive and careless problem-solving style was prospectively associated with depressive symptomatology 6 mo. later, as contrasted with previous findings of a cycle of rumination and avoidance problem-solving style.

  17. The moderating effects of group cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression among substance users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sarah B; Witkiewitz, Katie; Watkins, Katherine E; Paddock, Susan M; Hepner, Kimberly A

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the prospective longitudinal relationship between changes in depressive symptoms on alcohol and/or drug (i.e., substance) use among addiction participants in treatment, and whether group cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression (GCBT-D) moderated the relationship. Using a quasi-experimental intent-to-treat design, 299 residential addiction treatment clients with depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II, BDI-II scores > 17; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) were assigned to either usual care (n = 159) or usual care plus a 16-session GCBT-D intervention (n = 140). Two follow-up interviews were conducted, one 3 months after the baseline interview corresponding to the end of the intervention, and then one 3 months later. Parallel-process growth modeling was used to examine changes in depressive symptoms and the associated changes in abstinence and negative consequences from substance use over time. Treatment group was included as a moderator of the association. Participants in the GCBT-D condition showed a greater increase in abstinence and greater decreases in depressive symptoms and negative consequences over time. There were significant interaction effects, such that the associations between depressive symptoms, negative consequences, and abstinence changes were larger in the usual-care condition than in the GCBT-D condition. The results suggest that the intervention may be effective by attenuating the association between depressive symptoms and substance use outcomes. These findings contribute to the emerging literature on the prospective longitudinal associations between depressive symptoms and substance use changes by being the first to examine them among a sample receiving GCBT-D in an addiction treatment setting. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  18. Apathy and depression in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguru, Miyako; Tachibana, Hisao; Toda, Kazuo; Okuda, Bungo; Oka, Nobuyuki

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical correlates of apathy and depression in Parkinson disease (PD), and to clarify whether apathy can be dissociated from depression. One hundred fifty patients with PD completed the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II), Starkstein's Apathy Scale (AS), and a quality of life (QOL) battery. Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were performed on the same day. Apathy (AS score > or = 16) was diagnosed in 60% of patients and depression (BDI-II score > or = 14) in 56%. Apathy coexisted with depression in 43% of patients, compared with depression without apathy in 13% and apathy without depression in 17%. Apathy scale score was significantly correlated with UPDRS scores, HY stage, and age, whereas BDI-II score was correlated only with UPDRS scores. Both AS and BDI-II scores were negatively correlated with QOL. However, multiple regression analysis revealed that depression was strongly and negatively associated with emotional well-being and communication, whereas apathy was mainly associated with cognition and stigma. These findings suggest that apathy and depression may be separable in PD, although both are common in patients with PD and are associated with QOL.

  19. Impaired decision making and delayed memory are related with anxiety and depressive symptoms in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Iris; Santos, Alicia; Valassi, Elena; Pires, Patricia; Webb, Susan M; Resmini, Eugenia

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of cognitive function in acromegaly has revealed contradictory findings; some studies report normal cognition in patients with long-term cured acromegaly, while others show attention and memory deficits. Moreover, the presence of affective disorders in these patients is common. Our aim was to evaluate memory and decision making in acromegalic patients and explore their relationship with affective disorders like anxiety and depressive symptoms. Thirty-one patients with acromegaly (mean age 49.5 ± 8.5 years, 14 females and 17 males) and thirty-one healthy controls participated in this study. The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) were used to evaluate decision making, verbal memory, anxiety, and depressive symptoms, respectively. Acromegalic patients showed impairments in delayed verbal memory (p < 0.05) and more anxiety and depressive symptoms (p < 0.05) than controls. In the IGT, acromegalic patients presented an altered decision-making strategy compared to controls, choosing a lower number of the safer cards (p < 0.05) and higher number of the riskier cards (p < 0.05). Moreover, multiple correlations between anxiety and depressive symptoms and performance in memory and decision making were found. Impaired delayed memory and decision making observed in acromegalic patients are related to anxiety and depressive symptoms. Providing emotional support to the patients could improve their cognitive function. A key clinical application of this research is the finding that depressive symptoms and anxiety are essentially modifiable factors.

  20. Behavioral and brain oscillatory correlates of affective processing in subclinical depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodskoy-Plusnin, Jaroslav

    2017-09-15

    Named among the most dangerous diseases of the modern era, depression is characterized primarily by distortions in the affective sphere. Despite extensive investigations of underlying the neural background, mechanisms of the distortion still remain unknown. The current study analyzed brain oscillatory dynamics in different frequencies during resting state and presentation of affective stimuli in nonclinical individuals with high Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) scores (HB) versus controls. Both behavioral and electrocortical "markers" of clinical depression were apparent at subclinical level. A resting-state electroencephalogram (EEG) of HB revealed increased power in low frequencies, predominantly in the frontal cortical areas, that is in accordance with a "spatio-temporal dysfunction" model of depression. Related to that, transition from an eyes-closed to eyes-open condition was associated with diminished alpha blockade in HB, suggesting difficulties with the relocation of attention focus from inner processes toward environmental stimuli. Subsequently, independently of a sign of emotion, five out of six discrete emotions were evaluated as less valenced and four out of six as less intense by HB than by controls, corroborating the view of emotion context insensitivity (ECI) associated with depression. Underlying brain oscillatory dynamics revealed that depression was associated with deficits in the early, implicit, processing stages of emotional stimuli. Later processing stages were characterized by prominent power surges in low and alpha frequencies, presumably indicating emotion upregulation processes and increased engagement of cognitive mechanisms in affective tasks. The study provides brain oscillatory-based mechanisms of emotion processing distortions associated with depression.

  1. Adaptación española del Inventario para la Depresión de Beck-II (BDI-II: 3. Propiedades psicométricas en pacientes con trastornos psicológicos

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    JESÚS SANZ

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan datos sobre la fiabilidad y validez de la adaptación española del Inventario para la Depresión de Beck-II (BDI-II; Beck, Steer y Brown, 1996, obtenidos con una muestra de 305 pacientes ambulatorios con diversos diagnósticos psicopatológicos según el DSM-IV. El coeficiente alfa de fiabilidad fue alto (alfa = 0,89. Las correlaciones con otras medidas autoaplicadas y heteroaplicadas de depresión fueron elevadas y significativamente mayores que la correlación con una medida de ansiedad, lo que avala la validez convergente y discriminante del BDI-II, respectivamente. Respecto a la validez de criterio, los resultados demostraron que los pacientes diagnosticados con un trastorno depresivo mayor tenían niveles de depresión más elevados, medidos con el BDI-II, que los pacientes de otros grupos diagnósticos, aunque no hubo diferencias con los pacientes con trastornos de personalidad. Finalmente, la validación factorial del BDI-II proporcionó una solución bifactorial (factor somático- motivacional y factor cognitivo que coincide con la hallada en estudios previos. Se concluye que el BDI es un instrumento válido de detección y cuantificación de síntomas depresivos en pacientes, si bien su utilidad como herramienta para el diagnóstico diferencial de la depresión es una cuestión pendiente de investigación.

  2. Depression and hopelessness in patients with acute leukemia: the psychological impact of an acute and life-threatening disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheihman, Galina; Zimmermann, Camilla; Deckert, Amy; Fitzgerald, Peter; Mischitelle, Ashley; Rydall, Anne; Schimmer, Aaron; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Chris; Rodin, Gary

    2016-08-01

    Acute leukemia (AL) is a life-threatening cancer associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly in older adults. Given that there has been little research on the psychological impact of such malignancies with acute onset, we assessed the prevalence and correlates of depression and hopelessness in patients with AL. Three hundred forty-one participants were recruited within 1 month of diagnosis or relapse and completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and other psychosocial measures. Multivariate regression analyses identified correlates of depression and hopelessness. 17.8% reported clinically significant depressive symptoms (BDI-II ≥ 15), 40.4% of which were in the moderate-severe range (BDI-II ≥ 20). 8.5% reported significant symptoms of hopelessness (BHS ≥ 8). Depression was associated with greater physical symptom burden (adjusted R(2)  = 48.4%), while hopelessness was associated with older age and lower self-esteem (adjusted R(2)  = 45.4%). Both were associated with poorer spiritual well-being. Clinically significant depressive symptoms were common early in the course of AL and related to physical symptom burden. Hopelessness was less common and associated with older age and lower self-esteem. The results suggest that whereas depression in AL may be related to disease burden, the preservation of hope may be linked to individual resilience, life stage, and realistic prognosis.Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Adaptación española del Inventario para la Depresión de Beck-II (BDI-II: 2. Propiedades psicométricas en población general

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    JESÚS SANZ

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan por primera vez datos normativos y de fiabilidad y validez factorial de la adaptación española del Inventario para la Depresión de Beck-II (BDI-II; Beck, Steer y Brown, 1996 obtenidos con una muestra de 470 adultos seleccionados de la población general española. La fiabilidad de consistencia interna del BDI-II fue elevada (coeficiente alfa de 0,87. Los análisis factoriales indicaron que el BDI-II mide una dimensión general de depresión compuesta por dos factores altamente relacionados, uno cognitivo-afectivo y otro somático-motivacional. En términos de consistencia interna y validez factorial, el BDI-II parece mejor instrumento para evaluar sintomatología depresiva en población general que su predecesor, el BDI-IA. La distribución de la puntuación total del BDI-II fue similar a la encontrada en estudios previos, con una media superior en 2 puntos a la que se suele obtener con el BDI-IA, lo que justifica incrementar las puntuaciones para definir las categorías de gravedad de la depresión. Además, se hallaron diferencias significativas en tales puntuaciones en función del sexo, la edad, el nivel de educación y el estado civil: las mujeres puntuaban más alto que los varones, las personas mayores de 60 años más que las personas de menor edad, las personas con estudios básicos o sin estudios más que las personas con estudios secundarios o universitarios, y las personas divorciadas, separadas o viudas más que las personas casadas o conviviendo con una pareja. Se ofrecen puntuaciones normativas para la muestra total, y se discute su utilidad para evaluar la significación clínica de los resultados de los tratamientos contra la depresión.

  4. Patterns of self-reported depressive symptoms in relation to morningness-eveningness in inpatients with a depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias Johannes; Olschinski, Christiane; Kundermann, Bernd; Cabanel, Nicole

    2016-05-30

    The stable and persisting preference for activities in the late evening (i.e. eveningness) is associated with a higher risk for depression, suicidality, and non-remission in major depression. The present study investigated symptom patterns in hospitalized patients with depressive syndromes in relation to morningness-eveningness (chronotypes). Depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI-II]) and chronotype (German version of the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire [D-MEQ]) were assessed after admission and before discharge in inpatients with mainly major depression. Group differences of BDI-II single items and three BDI-II factors (cognitive, affective, somatic) between patients divided at the D-MEQ sample median into "morning preference" (MP) and "evening preference" (EP) were calculated. Data from 64 consecutively admitted patients (31MP/33EP) were analyzed. Both groups (MP/EP) were comparable regarding age, sex, diagnosis, length of stay, and subjective sleep quality, BDI-II scores were significantly higher in EP than in MP at admission. At admission and discharge, cognitive symptoms were significantly more pronounced in EP vs. MP; non-significant differences between EP and MP were found for affective and somatic symptoms. The results underline the importance of the trait-like chronotype for severity and symptomatology in patients with depressive disorders. The patients' chronotype should be taken into account in diagnostics and treatment of depressive disorders.

  5. Attenuated DHEA and DHEA-S response to acute psychosocial stress in individuals with depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoling; Zhong, Wen; An, Haiyan; Fu, Mingyu; Chen, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhenggang; Xiao, Zhongju

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, a relationship between depression and basal dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) levels has frequently been suggested, but responses of these adrenal steroids to psychosocial stress have not been examined in individuals with depressive disorders. In this study, we examined salivary DHEA, DHEA-S, and cortisol/DHEA response to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in individuals with depressive disorders and in healthy controls to discover whether the responses of DHEA and DHEA-S to acute psychosocial stress could be a more sensitive marker of HPA dysfunction in depressive disorders. We compared salivary cortisol, DHEA, DHEA-S, and cortisol/DHEA levels to the TSST tests between 38 individuals with depression and 43 healthy controls aged 18.4-25.9 years. Depression severity was assessed by the self-reported Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Salivary samples were evaluated at four time points: the baseline (-10 time point), before the TSST started (0 time point), the end of the TSST (+20 time point), and the recovery (+50 time points). No significant differences existed in the basal adrenal hormonal levels between subjects with depressive disorders and controls; however, at the end of TSST, attenuated DHEA and DHEA-S response was identified in subjects with depressive disorders compared to that found in healthy subjects. The differences in the DHEA and DHEA-S levels at the +20 time point, as well as the differences in the cortisol/DHEA at the +50 time point, exhibited negative correlations with depression severity. Attenuated DHEA and DHEA-S response to acute psychosocial stress was identified in subjects with depressive disorders. These findings help us to discover the bi-directional relationship between depression and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, hence furthering our understanding of whether altered DHEA and DHEA-S response to psychosocial stress may be a more sensitive method than

  6. Adaptación española del Inventario para la Depresión de Beck-II (BDI-II): 3. Propiedades psicométricas en pacientes con trastornos psicológicos

    OpenAIRE

    JESÚS SANZ; MARÍA PAZ GARCÍA-VERA; REGINA ESPINOSA; MARÍA FORTÚN; CARMELO VÁZQUEZ

    2005-01-01

    Se presentan datos sobre la fiabilidad y validez de la adaptación española del Inventario para la Depresión de Beck-II (BDI-II; Beck, Steer y Brown, 1996), obtenidos con una muestra de 305 pacientes ambulatorios con diversos diagnósticos psicopatológicos según el DSM-IV. El coeficiente alfa de fiabilidad fue alto (alfa = 0,89). Las correlaciones con otras medidas autoaplicadas y heteroaplicadas de depresión fueron elevadas y significativamente mayores que la correlación con una medida de ansi...

  7. A STUDY OF DEPRESSION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS OF PRIVATE MEDICAL COLLEGE IN SOUTH INDIA

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    Jai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Medical Education in Private Medical Colleges is a great contributor to stress among the medical students & possibly even in developing syndromic depression among medical students which is an area of concern worldwide. The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms and its associate factors among medical students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross sectional survey was conducted among 400 medical students from first to fourth year in Private Medical College of South India. Beck Depression Inventory-II was used to assess the level of depression with score of 10 or higher considered depressive. Association between depression and sex, year of study, medium of teaching in 10+2, social factors like alcohol & other substance abuse, family history of depression & family problems, hostel-stay etc. were analyzed by EPI info version 7. RESULTS: A total of 400 medical students participated in the study and the overall prevalence was found to be 64%. The prevalence of depression was higher (79% among newly entered students (1st year as compared to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year which was 60%, 57% and 53%, respectively. It was statistically significant (X2=38.54, p=0.001252 with Yate’s correction. Students who were facing language problem in their MBBS course, because English was not the medium of teaching in their 10+2, reported symptoms suggestive of depression (X2=9.2091, p=0.0024. On the other hand students who undertook regular physical exercise were likely to suffer less depression (statistically significant, X2=34, p=0.000. Students taking alcohol (X2=8.315, p=0.00392 and with other substance abuse (X2=6.277, p=0.01233 reported more symptoms suggestive of depression. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of depression among students with family history and staying in hostel. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of depression is quite high in students of Private Medical College as revealed by this study

  8. 50 AÑOS DE LOS INVENTARIOS DE DEPRESIÓN DE BECK: CONSEJOS PARA LA UTILIZACIÓN DE LA ADAPTACIÓN ESPAÑOLA DEL BDI-II EN LA PRÁCTICA CLÍNICA

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    Jesús Sanz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available En 2011 se publicó la primera adaptación española del Inventario de Depresión de Beck-II (BDI-II, justo cuando se cumplía el 50º aniversario de la publicación de su primera edición. En este tiempo, el BDI se ha convertido en el cuestionario autoaplicado más utilizado en España y en el mundo para evaluar la gravedad de la depresión. En este trabajo se presentan las características básicas del BDI-II en relación con sus versiones anteriores (BDI-I y BDI-IA y el proceso de su adaptación a la población española, se resumen las propiedades psicométricas de dicha adaptación y se discute su utilización en la práctica clínica, proponiéndose pautas y puntuaciones de corte para la evaluación de la gravedad de la depresión, la evaluación de la significación clínica de los cambios terapéuticos, el cribado de personas con depresión y la ayuda en el diagnóstico diferencial de los trastornos depresivos.

  9. Duloxetine for the long-term treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in patients aged 65 and older: an open-label study

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    Watkin John G

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late-life depression is a common, chronic and recurring disorder for which guidelines recommend long-term therapy. The safety and efficacy of duloxetine for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD were evaluated using data from elderly patients (age ≥ 65 years; n = 101 who participated in a large, multinational, open-label study. Methods Patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD received duloxetine 80 mg/d (40 mg twice daily (BID to 120 mg/d (60 mg BID for up to 52 weeks. Efficacy measures included the Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S scale, the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD17, the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I scale, and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS. Safety and tolerability were evaluated using discontinuation rates, spontaneously reported adverse events, and changes in vital signs, ECG, and laboratory analytes. Results Mean changes in HAMD17 total score at Weeks 6, 28, and 52 were -13.0, -17.4 and -17.5 (all p-values 10% of patients included dizziness, nausea, constipation, somnolence, insomnia, dry mouth, and diarrhea. Most events occurred early in the study. Mean changes at endpoint in blood pressure and body weight were less than 2.0 mm Hg, and -0.1 kg, respectively. Conclusions In this open-label study, duloxetine was effective, safe, and well tolerated in the long-term treatment of MDD in patients aged 65 and older.

  10. Escala Baptista de Depressão (Versão Adulto - EBADEP-A: validade convergente e estabilidade temporal Escala Baptista de Depresión (Versión Adulto - EBADEP-A: validez convergente y estabilidad temporal Escala Baptista de Depressão (Versão Adulto - EBADEP-A: convergent validity and temporal stability

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    Makilim Nunes Baptista

    2012-12-01

    convergent validity between the Escala Baptista de Depressão (Versão Adulto - EBADEP-A and the Beck Depression Inventory II - BDI-II, and to assess the temporal stability of EBADEP-A through the test and re-test method in a one-month period. The present study included 173 college students with an average of 24.45 years of age (SD=8.45, mostly women. After a one month period, 65 participants, mostly women (90.8%, with an average of 21 years of age (SD=5.48 answered the instrument a second time. The results showed, according to international standards, high correlation indices between scales, and the test-retest as well, demonstrating adequate psychometric qualities of EBADEP-A also in these questions, confirming other previous studies. These results and the limitations of the study are also discussed.

  11. Comparison of anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms in relatives of ICU patients in an American and an Indian public hospital

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    Hrishikesh S Kulkarni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: An intensive care unit (ICU admission of a patient causes considerable stress among relatives. Whether this impact differs among populations with differing sociocultural factors is unknown. Aims: The aim was to compare the psychological impact of an ICU admission on relatives of patients in an American and Indian public hospital. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was carried out in ICUs of two tertiary care hospitals, one each in major metropolitan cities in the USA and India. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 relatives visiting patients were verbally administered a questionnaire between 48 hours and 72 hours of ICU admission that included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II and Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R for post-traumatic stress response. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using the Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests. Results: Relatives in the Indian ICU had more anxiety symptoms (median HADS-A score 11 [inter-quartile range 9-13] vs. 4 [1.5-6] in the American cohort; P30. 55% of all relatives had an incongruous perception regarding "change in the patient′s condition" compared to the objective change in severity of illness. "Change in worry" was incongruous compared to the "perception of improvement of the patient′s condition" in 78% of relatives. Conclusions: Relatives of patients in the Indian ICU had greater anxiety and depression symptoms compared to those in the American cohort, and had significant differences in factors that may be associated with this psychological impact. Both groups showed substantial discordance between the perceived and objective change in severity of illness.

  12. Sustained effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Healthy Activity Programme, a brief psychological treatment for depression delivered by lay counsellors in primary care: 12-month follow-up of a randomised controlled trial.

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    Benedict Weobong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Healthy Activity Programme (HAP, a brief behavioural intervention delivered by lay counsellors, enhanced remission over 3 months among primary care attendees with depression in peri-urban and rural settings in India. We evaluated the sustainability of the effects after treatment termination, the cost-effectiveness of HAP over 12 months, and the effects of the hypothesized mediator of activation on clinical outcomes.Primary care attendees aged 18-65 years screened with moderately severe to severe depression on the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9 were randomised to either HAP plus enhanced usual care (EUC (n = 247 or EUC alone (n = 248, of whom 95% completed assessments at 3 months, and 91% at 12 months. Primary outcomes were severity on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II and remission on the PHQ-9. HAP participants maintained the gains they showed at the end of treatment through the 12-month follow-up (difference in mean BDI-II score between 3 and 12 months = -0.34; 95% CI -2.37, 1.69; p = 0.74, with lower symptom severity scores than participants who received EUC alone (adjusted mean difference in BDI-II score = -4.45; 95% CI -7.26, -1.63; p = 0.002 and higher rates of remission (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] = 1.36; 95% CI 1.15, 1.61; p < 0.009. They also fared better on most secondary outcomes, including recovery (aPR = 1.98; 95% CI 1.29, 3.03; p = 0.002, any response over time (aPR = 1.45; 95% CI 1.27, 1.66; p < 0.001, higher likelihood of reporting a minimal clinically important difference (aPR = 1.42; 95% CI 1.17, 1.71; p < 0.001, and lower likelihood of reporting suicidal behaviour (aPR = 0.71; 95% CI 0.51, 1.01; p = 0.06. HAP plus EUC also had a marginal effect on WHO Disability Assessment Schedule score at 12 months (aPR = -1.58; 95% CI -3.33, 0.17; p = 0.08; other outcomes (days unable to work, intimate partner violence toward females did not statistically significantly differ between the two arms. Economic analyses

  13. Detailed course of depressive symptoms and risk for developing depression in late adolescents with subthreshold depression: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinnin, Ran; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Takagaki, Koki; Nishiyama, Yoshiko; Yamamura, Takanao; Okamoto, Yuri; Miyake, Yoshie; Takebayashi, Yoshitake; Tanaka, Keisuke; Sugiura, Yoshinori; Shimoda, Haruki; Kawakami, Norito; Furukawa, Toshi A; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Despite its clinical importance, adolescent subthreshold depression remains a largely neglected topic. The aims of this study were to accurately identify the natural course of depressive symptoms and the risk for developing major depressive episode (MDE) in late adolescents with subthreshold depression over 1 year. Patients and methods One hundred and seventy-two participants <20 years of age (mean age: 18.32 years, standard deviation: 0.50), who did not meet the full criteria for an MDE, were selected from 2,494 screened freshmen based on the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-II). We conducted a cohort study of three groups (low-, middle-, and high-symptom groups) divided based on BDI-II scores, over a 1 year period with the use of bimonthly assessments. Temporal changes of depressive symptoms were analyzed using linear mixed modeling and growth mixture modeling. Results First, we found that late adolescents with subthreshold depression (high depressive symptoms) were split between the increasing and decreasing depressive symptoms groups, whereas the majority of the less-symptoms group remained stable during 1 year. Second, in comparison with late adolescents with less depressive symptoms, those with subthreshold depression had an elevated risk of later depression. Conclusion Some late adolescents with subthreshold depression had increased depressive symptoms and developed an MDE during 1 year. Therefore, it is necessary for us to rigorously assess the changes in subthreshold depressive symptoms over time in late adolescents. PMID:28053534

  14. Eating and Psychological Profiles of Women with Higher Depressive Symptoms Who Are Trying to Lose Weight

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    C. Bégin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether women with higher depressive symptoms differed from women with lower depressive symptoms on early weight-loss, eating behaviors and psychological profiles. Among a sample of 45 overweight/obese women who had undertaken a self-initiated weight-loss attempt, two groups were formed based on scores from the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, one with lower depressive symptoms (BDI-II < 10; n=21 and one with higher depressive symptoms (BDI ≥ 10; n=24. Even if some women in the higher depressive symptom group did not reach the clinical cut-off for depression (BDI = 14, this group tended to lose less weight in the first two months of their weight-loss attempt and to show a more disturbed eating and psychological profile compared to the group with lower depressive symptoms. In addition, among women with higher depressive symptoms, eating and psychological variables were systematically related to one another whereas these variables were not related among the other group. Results highlight the relevance of considering the presence of depressive symptoms as a marker of clinical severity among the overweight/obese population, and suggest that the BDI-II could be an interesting screening instrument to identify this particular subgroup.

  15. The effects of the gender-culture interaction on self-reports of depressive symptoms: cross-cultural study among Egyptians and Canadians

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    Vivian Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Research in depression has revealed differences in the way depressed individuals across cultures report their symptoms. This literature also points to possible differences in symptom reporting patterns between men and women. Using data from a larger dataset (Beshai et al. 2016, the current study examined whether non-depressed and depressed Egyptian and Canadian men and women differed in their self-report of the various domains of the Beck Depression Inventory –II (BDI-II. Method We recruited a total of 131 depressed and non-depressed participants from both Egypt (n = 29 depressed; n = 29 non-depressed and Canada (n = 35 depressed; n = 38 non-depressed. Depression status was ascertained using a structured interview. All participants were asked to complete the BDI-II along with other self-report measures of depression. BDI-II items were divided into two subscales in accordance with Dozois, Dobson & Ahnberg (1998 factor analysis: cognitive-affective and somatic-vegetative subscales. Results We found a significant three-way interaction effect on the cognitive-affective (F(1,121 = 9.51, p = .003 and main effect of depression status on somatic-vegetative subscales (F(1,121 = 42.80, p < .001. Post hoc analyses revealed that depressed Egyptian men reported lower scores on the cognitive-affective subscale of the BDI-II compared to their depressed Canadian male counterparts. Conclusions These results suggest that males across cultures may differentially report cognitive symptoms of depression. These results also suggest that clinicians and clinical scientists need to further examine the interaction effect of culture and gender when investigating self-reported symptoms of depression.

  16. Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for the treatment of depression in people with multiple sclerosis: external pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Cindy L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with multiple sclerosis (MS are at high risk of depression. We undertook a pilot trial of computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (CCBT for the treatment of depression in people with MS to test the feasibility of undertaking a full trial. Methods Participants with a diagnosis of MS and clinical levels of depression were recruited through out-patient clinics and postal screening questionnaires at two UK centres and randomised to CCBT or usual care. Clinical outcomes included the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29 at baseline, 8 and 21 weeks. Feasibility outcomes included: recruitment rate; reasons for refusal, withdrawal and dropout; feasibility and acceptability of the proposed outcome measures; sample size estimation and variation in and preferences for service delivery. Results Twenty-four participants were recruited. The recruitment rate, calculated as the proportion of those invited to fill in a screening questionnaire who were consented into the trial, was 4.1%. Recruitment through out-patient clinics was somewhat slower than through screening questionnaire mail-out but the overall recruitment yield was similar. Of the 12 patients in the CCBT arm, 9 (75% completed at least four, and 6 completed all 8 CCBT sessions. For completers, the median time (IQR to complete all eight CCBT sessions was 15 (13 to 20 weeks. Participants expressed concern about the face validity of the Beck Depression Inventory II for the measurement of self-reported depression in people with MS. The MSIS-29 was the patient-reported outcome measure which participants felt best reflected their concerns. The estimated sample size for a full trial is between 180 and 390 participants. NHS partners were not delivering CCBT in community facilities and participants preferred to access CCBT at home, with no one expressing a preference for use of CCBT in an alternative location. Conclusions A definitive

  17. Relationship between Temperament, Depression, Anxiety, and Hopelessness in Adolescents: A Structural Equation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Iliceto; Maurizio Pompili; David Lester; Xenia Gonda; Cinzia Niolu; Nicoletta Girardi; Zoltán Rihmer; Gabriella Candilera; Paolo Girardi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the validity of affective temperaments for predicting psychiatric morbidity and suicide risk, using a two-factor model to explain the relationships between temperament, anxiety, depression, and hopelessness. We investigated 210 high school students, 103 males and 107 females, 18-19 years old, who were administered self-report questionnaires to assess temperament (TEMPS-A), depression (BDI-II), anxiety (STAI) and hopelessness (BHS). The final structural mo...

  18. Contribution to the validation of the Kutcher Adolescent Depression Scale (KADS-6 in a Portuguese population

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    Sónia Quintão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The KADS-6 is a self-report assessment instrument known for its ease application in assessing depression in young people. This study aimed to contribute to the validation of the Portuguese version of this tool and analyze its psychometric characteristics in comparison with other self-report instruments for depression in adolescents, in Portugal. Two samples were collected, a non-clinical group of in school youth (n=773; 52.4% male and a clinical sample (n=134 youth; 44% male. Comparisons also used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI. Results: The factor analysis revealed the unidimensionality of the measure. The KADS-6 demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha in both clinical (.74 and school (.80 samples. Its convergent validity with the BDI-II and CDI was r=.44; r=.61, respectively in the clinical sample and r=.60; r=.57 in the school sample. The KADS-6, a short and time efficient instrument, showed good psychometric characteristics in terms of internal consistency and convergent validity in comparison with the BDI-II and the CDI. Given its ease of use and scoring, the KADS-6 could be considered for use in both school and clinical settings when addressing adolescent depression.

  19. Schema therapy, motivational interviewing, and collaborative-mapping as treatment for depression among low income, second generation Latinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilemann, MarySue V; Pieters, Huibrie C; Kehoe, Priscilla; Yang, Qing

    2011-12-01

    US-born Latinos report significantly more depression than foreign-born Latinos in the US, and Latinas have twice the rate of depression than Latino men. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of an innovative, short-term program of Schema Therapy (ST) combined with Motivational Interviewing (MI) techniques to reduce depression and increase resilience among second generation Latinas of low income in the US. In addition to blending ST and MI strategies with a focus on resilience, a novel technique called collaborative-mapping was a crucial strategy within treatment. Scheduling for sessions was flexible and patients had unlimited cell phone access to the therapist outside of sessions, although few used it. A mixed linear regression model for BDI-II scores of 8 women who completed all eight 2-h sessions demonstrated that the treatment significantly decreased BDI-II scores during the course of treatment (p = .0003); the average decreasing rate in BDI-II scores was 2.8 points per visit. Depression scores remained sub-threshold for 12 months after treatment completion. Resilience scores significantly increased after treatment completion and remained high at all follow-up visits through 1 year (p therapy, which resulted in an appealing, desirable, and accessible depression treatment for this severely understudied, underserved sample of low income, second generation Latinas in the US.

  20. Innovative Service Delivery for Secondary Prevention of PTSD in At-Risk OIF-OEF Service Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    psychosocial domains. Exposure techniques are typically trauma -focused; thus, these techniques may not ameliorate depressive symptoms that bear more direct...efficiency (> .70), and robust psychometrics with a variety of trauma populations. Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI): The BDI-II is a 21-item, 4...preliminary investigation. Psychological Trauma : Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 5(1): 93-100. PMID: 23869250. 12. Strachan, M.K., Gros, D.F

  1. The effect of optimism on depression: the mediating and moderating role of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk Yan Sing; Wong, Wing S

    2011-11-01

    This article aims to clarify if insomnia exerts a mediating or moderating effect on the optimism-depression association in Chinese college students. 529 Chinese college students completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Revised Life Orientation Test (LOT-R) and the Multidimensional Scale of Social Support (MSPSS). The results failed to show any moderating effect but after adjustment for age, gender and social support, a mediating effect was observed. In conclusion, insomnia qualifies as a mediator, suggesting considerable variance in depressive symptoms of college students could be due to change in their sleep status.

  2. Initial investigation of behavioral activation therapy for co-morbid major depressive disorder and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoto, Sherry; Bodenlos, Jamie S; Schneider, Kristin L; Olendzki, Barbara; Spates, C Richard; Ma, Yunsheng

    2008-09-01

    More than one-third of treatment-seeking obese patients are clinically depressed. No evidence-based treatments exist for individuals with comorbid depression and obesity. Behavioral activation (BA), an effective treatment for depression, might also facilitate weight loss. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of BA plus nutrition counseling for weight loss among individuals with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) and obesity. The BA intervention targeted both weight reduction and depression in 14 obese patients (79% female; 86% Caucasian) who met criteria for MDD. At baseline, mean Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) score was 26.71, and mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score was 16.00. Significant reductions at 12-weeks in both BDI-II and HDRS were observed with 10 participants reaching full remission at post treatment. Reductions in body weight, daily caloric intake, and physical activity were observed. BA with nutrition counseling appears to have potential as a weight loss treatment in the context of depression. Results support the need for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of BA for both weight loss and depression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. A Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Study Evaluating UP165 and S-Adenosyl-l-Methionine on Depression, Anxiety and Psychological Well-Being

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    Douglas S. Kalman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this pilot clinical trial was to evaluate the effects of UP165 (derived from Zea mays L., commonly known as corn over time. The secondary objective was the comparison for outcomes versus S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM-e. Subjects with mild depression or anxiety were given the Beck Depression Inventory second edition (BDI-II, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, and the Schwartz Outcome Scale (SOS-10. Forty-two subjects (21–65 years old were randomized to eight-weeks of supplementation with UP165 or SAM-e with questionnaires being administered at randomization, week four and eight. Those receiving UP165 achieved significant reduction from baseline at weeks four and eight, respectively for the BDI-II, as well as a trend for reduction in BAI at week four and significance at week eight. There was a trend for improvement on the SOS at week four and significance at week eight. SAM-e demonstrated a trend for improvement on the BDI-II by week eight over the UP165 with no differences between the two for the BAI or the SOS. Overall, this study indicates that there may be benefit to UP165 for mood enhancement in those with mild depression or anxiety. Randomized placebo comparator trials appear warranted.

  4. Depression and anxiety are not related to nummular headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Peñacoba-Puente, Cecilia; López-López, Almudena; Valle, Begoña; Cuadrado, María Luz; Barriga, Francisco J; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-12-01

    Nummular headache (NH) is a clinical picture characterized by head pain that is exclusively felt in a round, elliptical, or oval area of the head. Although there is evidence supporting an organic origin for NH, some authors question this origin, hypothesizing a potential role for psychological factors. Our aims were to investigate the differences in anxiety and depression between NH patients and healthy controls, and to analyse if these conditions were related to pain parameters in NH patients. The Beck depression inventory (BDI-II) and the trait anxiety scale from state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) were administered to 26 patients with NH and 34 comparable matched controls. No significant interactions between group (NH patients, controls) in either depression (U = 391; p = 0.443) or anxiety levels (U = 336; p = 0.113) were found. Both groups showed similar scores in the BDI-II (patients: 3.9 +/- 2.9; controls: 3.46 +/- 3.15) and STAI (patients: 17.23 +/- 10.3; controls: 13.5 +/- 7.9). Moreover, neither depression nor anxiety showed association with mean pain intensity, pain intensity in exacerbations, size of pain area, or pain frequency. Our study demonstrated that self-reported depression and anxiety were not related to the presence of NH. Further, longitudinal studies are still needed to elucidate the role of mood state in the course of NH.

  5. Guided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care: a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Access to Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT for depression is limited. One solution is CBT self-help books. Trial Objectives: To assess the impact of a guided self-help CBT book (GSH-CBT on mood, compared to treatment as usual (TAU. HYPOTHESES: GSH-CBT will have improved mood and knowledge of the causes and treatment of depression compared to the control receiving TAUGuided self-help will be acceptable to patients and staff. METHODS AND FINDINGS: PARTICIPANTS: Adults attending seven general practices in Glasgow, UK with a BDI-II score of ≥14. 141 randomised to GSH-CBT and 140 to TAU. INTERVENTIONS: RCT comparing 'Overcoming Depression: A Five Areas Approach' book plus 3-4 short face to face support appointments totalling up to 2 hours of guided support, compared with general practitioner TAU. PRIMARY OUTCOME: The BDI (II score at 4 months. Numbers analysed: 281 at baseline, 203 at 4 months (primary outcome, 117 at 12 months. OUTCOME: Mean BDI-II scores were lower in the GSH-CBT group at 4 months by 5.3 points (2.6 to 7.9, p<0.001. At 4 and 12 months there were also significantly higher proportions of participants achieving a 50% reduction in BDI-II in the GSH-CBT arm. The mean support was 2 sessions with 42.7 minutes for session 1, 41.4 minutes for session 2 and 40.2 minutes of support for session 3. Adverse effects/Harms: Significantly less deterioration in mood in GSH-CBT (2.0% compared to 9.8% in the TAU group for BDI-II category change. LIMITATIONS: Weaknesses: Our follow-up rate of 72.2% at 4 months is better than predicted but is poorer at 12 months (41.6%. In the GSH-CBT arm, around 50% of people attended 2 or fewer sessions. 22% failed to take up treatment. CONCLUSIONS: GSH-CBT is substantially more effective than TAU. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN13475030.

  6. The effect of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate on postnatal depression: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singata-Madliki, Mandisa; Hofmeyr, G Justus; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2016-07-01

    Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is the most commonly used hormonal contraceptive method in South Africa. It is frequently administered in the immediate postnatal period, yet it is unclear whether it affects the risk of postnatal depression (PND). To determine whether DMPA increases the risk of PND compared with the copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) when administered after delivery. A single-blind randomised controlled trial conducted at two teaching hospitals in East London, South Africa. Eligible, consenting women (N=242) requiring postnatal contraception were randomised to receive DMPA or an IUD within 48 hours of childbirth and interviewed at 1 and 3 months postpartum. Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Resumption of sexual intercourse, menstrual symptoms and breastfeeding rates were also assessed. One-month EPDS depression scores were statistically significantly higher in the DMPA arm compared with IUD arm (p=0.04). Three-month BDI-II scores were significantly higher in the DMPA arm than in the IUD arm (p=0.002) and, according to the BDI-II but not the EPDS, more women in the DMPA arm had major depression at this time-point (8 vs 2; p=0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in other outcome measures except that fewer women had resumed sexual activity by 1 month postpartum in the DMPA arm (13% vs 26%; p=0.02). The possibility that immediate postnatal DMPA use is associated with depression cannot be excluded. These findings justify further research with longer follow-up. PACTR201209000419241. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Depressants KidsHealth > For Teens > Depressants A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Depressants What Are Depressants? Depressants are drugs that calm nerves and relax ...

  8. Personality features, dissociation, self-stigma, hope, and the complex treatment of depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasko, Jan; Ociskova, Marie; Grambal, Ales; Sigmundova, Zuzana; Kasalova, Petra; Marackova, Marketa; Holubova, Michaela; Vrbova, Kristyna; Latalova, Klara; Slepecky, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Identifying the predictors of response to psychiatric and psychotherapeutic treatments may be useful for increasing treatment efficacy in pharmacoresistant depressive patients. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of dissociation, hope, personality trait, and selected demographic factors in treatment response of this group of patients. Methods Pharmacoresistant depressive inpatients were enrolled in the study. All patients completed Clinical Global Impression – both objective and subjective form (CGI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) at baseline and after 6 weeks of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (group cognitive-behavioral or group psychodynamic) treatment as an outcome measures. The Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMI), Dissociative Experience Scale (DES), Adult Dispositional Hope Scale (ADHS), and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-R) were completed at the start of the treatment with the intention to find the predictors of treatment efficacy. Results The study included 72 patients who were hospitalized for the pharmacoresistant major depression; 63 of them completed the study. The mean scores of BDI-II, BAI, subjCGI, and objCGI significantly decreased during the treatment. BDI-II relative change statistically significantly correlated with the total ISMI score, Discrimination Experience (ISMI subscale), and Harm Avoidance (TCI-R personality trait). According to stepwise regression, the strongest factors connected to BDI-II relative change were the duration of the disorder and Discrimination Experience (domain of ISMI). ObjCGI relative change significantly correlated with the level of dissociation (DES), the total ISMI score, hope in ADHS total score, and Self-Directedness (TCI-R). According to stepwise regression, the strongest factor connected to objCGI relative change was Discrimination Experience (domain of ISMI). The existence of comorbid personality disorder did not

  9. Personality features, dissociation, self-stigma, hope, and the complex treatment of depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasko, Jan; Ociskova, Marie; Grambal, Ales; Sigmundova, Zuzana; Kasalova, Petra; Marackova, Marketa; Holubova, Michaela; Vrbova, Kristyna; Latalova, Klara; Slepecky, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the predictors of response to psychiatric and psychotherapeutic treatments may be useful for increasing treatment efficacy in pharmacoresistant depressive patients. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of dissociation, hope, personality trait, and selected demographic factors in treatment response of this group of patients. Pharmacoresistant depressive inpatients were enrolled in the study. All patients completed Clinical Global Impression - both objective and subjective form (CGI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) at baseline and after 6 weeks of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (group cognitive-behavioral or group psychodynamic) treatment as an outcome measures. The Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMI), Dissociative Experience Scale (DES), Adult Dispositional Hope Scale (ADHS), and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-R) were completed at the start of the treatment with the intention to find the predictors of treatment efficacy. The study included 72 patients who were hospitalized for the pharmacoresistant major depression; 63 of them completed the study. The mean scores of BDI-II, BAI, subjCGI, and objCGI significantly decreased during the treatment. BDI-II relative change statistically significantly correlated with the total ISMI score, Discrimination Experience (ISMI subscale), and Harm Avoidance (TCI-R personality trait). According to stepwise regression, the strongest factors connected to BDI-II relative change were the duration of the disorder and Discrimination Experience (domain of ISMI). ObjCGI relative change significantly correlated with the level of dissociation (DES), the total ISMI score, hope in ADHS total score, and Self-Directedness (TCI-R). According to stepwise regression, the strongest factor connected to objCGI relative change was Discrimination Experience (domain of ISMI). The existence of comorbid personality disorder did not influence the treatment

  10. Predictors of complicated grief and depression in bereaved caregivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Kjaergaard; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern; Jensen, Anders Bonde;

    2016-01-01

    and depressive symptoms, caregiver burden, preparedness for death, communication about dying and socio-economic factors predicted complicated grief and post-loss depressive symptoms. METHODS: We conducted a population-based, prospective Danish survey of caregivers. Questionnaires for their closest caregiver were...... (BDI-II) and predictive factors were analyzed with mutually adjusted multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: At six-month follow-up, 7.6% reported complicated grief and 12.1% reported post-loss depressive symptoms, whereas the levels of grief and depressive symptoms were higher pre......CONTEXT: Complicated grief and depressive symptoms in bereaved caregivers have been associated with female gender, spousal relation and pre-loss psychological distress, but population-based, prospective studies are scarce. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate whether severe pre-loss grief...

  11. Detailed course of depressive symptoms and risk for developing depression in late adolescents with subthreshold depression: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinnin R

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ran Jinnin,1 Yasumasa Okamoto,1 Koki Takagaki,1 Yoshiko Nishiyama,1 Takanao Yamamura,1 Yuri Okamoto,2 Yoshie Miyake,2 Yoshitake Takebayashi,3 Keisuke Tanaka,4 Yoshinori Sugiura,5 Haruki Shimoda,6 Norito Kawakami,6 Toshi A Furukawa,7 Shigeto Yamawaki1 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, 2Health Service Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; 3Risk Analysis Research Center, The Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo, Japan; 4Graduated School of Education, Joetsu University of Education, Niigata, Japan; 5Graduated School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; 6Department of Mental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 7Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Purpose: Despite its clinical importance, adolescent subthreshold depression remains a largely neglected topic. The aims of this study were to accurately identify the natural course of depressive symptoms and the risk for developing major depressive episode (MDE in late adolescents with subthreshold depression over 1 year.Patients and methods: One hundred and seventy-two participants <20 years of age (mean age: 18.32 years, standard deviation: 0.50, who did not meet the full criteria for an MDE, were selected from 2,494 screened freshmen based on the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-II. We conducted a cohort study of three groups (low-, middle-, and high-symptom groups divided based on BDI-II scores, over a 1 year period with the use of bimonthly assessments. Temporal changes of depressive symptoms were analyzed using linear mixed modeling and growth mixture modeling.Results: First, we found that late adolescents with subthreshold depression (high depressive symptoms were split between the increasing and decreasing depressive symptoms groups, whereas the majority of the less-symptoms group remained

  12. Pretreatment depression as a prognostic indicator of survival and nutritional status in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Ae; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Lee, Sang-Ah; Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Sung-Bae; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2016-01-01

    The emotional status of cancer patients is associated with disease course and treatment outcomes. In this study, the authors evaluated associations between the presence of pretreatment depression and pretreatment quality of life (QOL), nutritional status, and survival outcomes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). For this prospective study, 241 patients with previously untreated HNSCC who underwent curative treatments were enrolled. Patients completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 30-item Core QOL Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), and the EORTC QLQ Head and Neck Cancer module (QLQ-H&N35). EORTC QLQ scores were compared between depressive and nondepressive patients, as determined according to pretreatment BDI-II scores ≥ 14 and nutritional status and laboratory data. Pretreatment depression was present in 60 patients (24.9%). In depressive and nondepressive patients, the 3-year overall survival rates were 70.8% and 82.7%, respectively (P = .045), and the 3-year DFS rates were 63.5% and 79.1%, respectively (P = .015). After controlling for clinical factors, the presence of depression was predictive of 3-year DFS (P = .032). EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-HN35 scores on all items except feeding tube, nutritional supplement, and problem with mouth opening differed between depressive and nondepressive patients (P nutritional status, and survival outcomes in patients with HNSCC. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  13. Impact of Depression, Fatigue, and Global Measure of Cortical Volume on Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Nunnari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the influence of demographic and clinical variables, such as depression, fatigue, and quantitative MRI marker on cognitive performances in a sample of patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods. 60 MS patients (52 relapsing remitting and 8 primary progressive underwent neuropsychological assessments using Rao’s Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests (BRB-N, the Beck Depression Inventory-second edition (BDI-II, and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. We performed magnetic resonance imaging to all subjects using a 3 T scanner and obtained tissue-specific volumes (normalized brain volume and cortical brain volume. We used Student’s t-test to compare depressed and nondepressed MS patients. Finally, we performed a multivariate regression analysis in order to assess possible predictors of patients’ cognitive outcome among demographic and clinical variables. Results. 27.12% of the sample (16/59 was cognitively impaired, especially in tasks requiring attention and information processing speed. From between group comparison, we find that depressed patients had worse performances on BRB-N score, greater disability and disease duration, and brain volume decrease. According to multiple regression analysis, the BDI-II score was a significant predictor for most of the neuropsychological tests. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the presence of depressive symptoms is an important determinant of cognitive performance in MS patients.

  14. Depression and intimate relationships of adolescents from divorced families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadžikapetanović, Halima; Babić, Tajib; Bjelošević, Edin

    2017-02-01

    Aim To determine an impact of parental divorce to depression and intimate relationships of young people during adolescence, and prevalence of symptoms of depression and the level of intimacy in relations to adolescents living in intact families and those from divorced families. Methods This prospective descriptive research was conducted on a sample of 168 examinees of which 64 (38.1%) were students of the University Zenica, and 104 (61.9%) high students schools from Zenica and Maglaj cities during May and June 2011. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) II, Miller Social Intimacy Scale and sociodemographic questionnaire were used. Results Adolescents from divorced families had statistically significantly higher level of depression (pintimate relationships, with a legislative introduction of premarital and marriage counseling for parents in the conflict. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  15. A Retrospective Chart Review of 10 Hz Versus 20 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristie L. DeBlasio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a retrospective chart review to examine the progress of patients with depression who received different frequencies of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS delivered to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. rTMS is a safe and effective alternative treatment for patients with various psychological and medical conditions. During treatment, a coil delivering a time-varying magnetic pulse placed over the scalp penetrates the skull, resulting in clinical improvement. There were 47 patients and three distinct treatment groups found: 10 Hz, 20 Hz, and a separate group who received both frequencies (10/20 Hz. The primary outcome indicator was the difference in Beck Depression Inventory–II (BDI-II scores. Secondary outcomes included categorical indicators of remission, response, and partial response rates as assessed with the BDI-II. In all 3 groups, the majority of patients had depression that remitted, with the highest rate occurring in the 20 Hz group. There were similar response rates in the 10 Hz and 20 Hz groups. There were no patients in the 10/20 Hz group whose depression responded and the highest partial response and nonresponse rates occurred in this group. Although within-group differences were significant from baseline to end of treatment, there were no between-group differences.

  16. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003213.htm Depression - overview To use the sharing features on this ... older adults Major depression Persistent depressive disorder Postpartum depression Premenstrual ... Review Date 1/4/2016 Updated by: Timothy Rogge, ...

  17. Depression in HIV-positive women is associated with changes in antiretroviral treatment regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Philippe Küpper-Tetzel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is a co-morbidity of clinical significance in HIV-positive patients with an estimated prevalence of more than 20%. Sex and gender-related differences in depression are well described in HIV-negative populations, demonstrating that more women are being affected. So far little is known about frequency and characteristics of depression in HIV-positive men and women. Materials and Methods: Primary objective of our prospective epidemiological study was the evaluation of the Beck score for depression in male and female patients of the Frankfurt HIV Cohort. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II is a self-report symptom inventory made up of 21 questions, each with 4 possible answers, correlating with a certain point value. Interpretation: score 14–19: mild depression; score 20–28: moderate depression; score ≥29: severe depression. Secondary objectives of the analysis were factors that might possibly influence the disposition for depression in HIV-positive patients, e.g. age, antiretroviral treatment history, co-morbidities and socioeconomic status. Results: Between January and October 2013, 348 patients were enrolled in the study, 161 women and 187 men of the Frankfurt HIV Cohort, who had a routine appointment at the HIV-Center of the University Clinic Frankfurt. The mean age of all study participants was 45 years (range 22–80. The majority of patients were on antiretroviral therapy (91% at study entrance. The median BDI-II score in all patients was 8 (0–49; in female patients 10 (0–42, in male patients 6 (0–49, respectively (Table 1. Significant more women than men showed a score for moderate depression (p=0.006. Factors associated with a BDI-II score ≥20 in women were older age (>45 years, living alone, unemployment and the number of prior changes in antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions: Depression in people living with HIV shows sex and gender-related differences that might also influence antiretroviral

  18. Simple and practical screening approach to identify HIV-infected individuals with depression or at risk of developing depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjaer, L; Gabel, C; Laursen, T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies have shown that depression and other mental illnesses are under-diagnosed among HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of mental health history and questionnaire-based screening instruments to identify HIV-infected individuals at risk...... of depression. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that the mental health of HIV-infected individuals should be reviewed and a "risk-flag" three-step approach should be used (1) to screen routinely with the two verbal questions suggested by the EACS, (2) to identify whether there is a risk of depression and then screen...... with the BDI-II, and (3) to identify whether there is still a risk and then perform a full evaluation and obtain an accurate psychiatric diagnosis by a psychiatrist....

  19. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  20. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    , that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression......The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued...

  1. Depressive mood, eating disorder symptoms, and perfectionism in female college students: a mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Villamisar, Domingo; Dattilo, John; Del Pozo, Araceli

    2012-01-01

    Although perfectionism has long been established as an important risk factor for depressive mood and eating disorders, the mechanisms through which this temperamental predisposition mediates the relationship between depressive mood and eating disorder symptoms are still relatively unclear. In this study we hypothesized that both perfectionism dimensions, self-oriented perfectionism and socially prescribed perfectionism, would mediate the relationship between current symptoms of depression and eating disorders in a non-clinical sample of Spanish undergraduate females. Two hundred sixteen female undergraduate students of the University Complutense of Madrid (Spain) completed the Spanish versions of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40), the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS), OBQ-44, and BDI-II and BAI. Results demonstrated the importance of socially prescribed perfectionism in mediation of the relationship between depressive mood and symptoms of eating disorders. Socially prescribed perfectionism mediates the relationship between depressive mood and eating disorder symptoms for female college students.

  2. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  3. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, but not CRP, are inversely correlated with severity and symptoms of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frank M; Schröder, Thomas; Kirkby, Kenneth C; Sander, Christian; Suslow, Thomas; Holdt, Lesca M; Teupser, Daniel; Hegerl, Ulrich; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2016-05-30

    To clarify findings of elevated cytokine levels in major depression (MD), this study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum levels of cytokines, symptoms of MD and antidepressant treatment outcome. At baseline (T0) and 4 weeks following initiation of antidepressant treatment (T1), levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating-factor (GM-CSF), CRP and depression ratings HAMD-17 and BDI-II were assessed in 30 patients with MD and 30 age-and sex-matched controls. At T0, in the patient group, cytokines, but not CRP, negatively correlated with individual BDI-II-items, factors and severities and showed both negative and positive correlations with HAMD-17 items. At T1 and within the controls, no such relationships were observed. At T0 and T1, levels of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were significantly higher in treatment responders (ΔHAMD-17T0-T1≥50%,n=15) compared to non-responders. When controlled for baseline BDI, differences between groups were only found significant for IL-2 at T0. The results suggest cytokines are not generally pro-depressive but rather relate to more specific regulation of symptoms and severities in MD. Together with the association between cytokines and treatment responder status, these data support cytokines as a promising but still controversial biomarker of depression.

  4. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  5. One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients’ Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jo Chiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD. The secondary outcomes were automatic thoughts measured by automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ. Both groups were evaluated at the pretest (before 2 weeks, posttest (after 12 therapy sessions, and short- (3 months, medium- (6 months, and long-term (12 months follow-up. After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P<0.001. Similar effects were seen on the HRSD. ATQ significantly decreased at the 12th session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P<0.001. We concluded that CBGT is effective for reducing depression and continued to be effective at 1 year of follow-up.

  6. One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients' Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kai-Jo; Chen, Tsai-Hui; Hsieh, Hsiu-Tsu; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Ou, Keng-Liang; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year) effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT) on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT) or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group) and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). The secondary outcomes were automatic thoughts measured by automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ). Both groups were evaluated at the pretest (before 2 weeks), posttest (after 12 therapy sessions), and short- (3 months), medium- (6 months), and long-term (12 months) follow-up. After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P < 0.001). We concluded that CBGT is effective for reducing depression and continued to be effective at 1 year of follow-up.

  7. Mother-Infant Attachment Style as a Predictor of Depression among Female Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Amani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: There are an increasing number of studies showing an association of adult attachment styles to psychopathology. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the relation between attachment style and depression among students of Bu-Ali Sina University in Iran. Methods: This descriptive correlational study was conducted on 157 girl students who were randomly selected. They were evaluated by demographic questionnaire, Adult Attachment Inventory (AAI (Hazan and Shaver, and theBeck Depression Inventory (BDI-II. The data was analysis by using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis in SPSS 16 statistical package. Results: Findings indicated that secure attachment style had no significant correlation with depression and insecure attachment styles had a significant positive correlation with depression (p

  8. Relationship between Temperament, Depression, Anxiety, and Hopelessness in Adolescents: A Structural Equation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Iliceto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the validity of affective temperaments for predicting psychiatric morbidity and suicide risk, using a two-factor model to explain the relationships between temperament, anxiety, depression, and hopelessness. We investigated 210 high school students, 103 males and 107 females, 18-19 years old, who were administered self-report questionnaires to assess temperament (TEMPS-A, depression (BDI-II, anxiety (STAI and hopelessness (BHS. The final structural model had a good fit with the data, with two factors significantly correlated, the first labeled unstable cyclothymic temperament including Dysthymic/Cyclothymic/Anxious temperament, Irritable temperament and Depression, and the second labeled Demoralization including Anxiety (State/Trait and Hopelessness. Depression, anxiety and hopelessness are in a complex relationship partly mediated by temperament.

  9. A Comparative Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Group Cognitive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Tamannaeifar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT is a new method of psychotherapy for major depressive disorder (MDD. The aim of this experimental study is evaluating the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 19 depressive out-patients were randomly divided into 2 groups (acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy. Twelve therapeutic sessions administered in consulting center of Tehran University twice a week. All the subjects were tested by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS before and after the treatments. Data were analyzed by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA. Results: The results show no significant differences between the two groups in terms of the variables of depression and rumination. Conclusion: Overall, the results suggest that ACT is an effective treatment, the effectiveness of which appears equivalent to that of CT.

  10. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that depression is000  a common comorbid health issue in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Reviews have also concluded that depression in diabetes is associated with higher HbA1c levels, less optimal self-care behaviours, lower quality of life, incident vascular...... complications and higher mortality rates. However, longitudinal studies into the course of depression in people with type 1 diabetes remain scarce. In this issue of Diabetologia, Kampling and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4123-0 ) report the 5 year trajectories of depression in adults with newly diagnosed...... type 1 diabetes (mean age, 28 years). Their baseline results showed that shortly after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes a major depressive episode was diagnosed in approximately 6% of participants, while 8% suffered from an anxiety disorder. The longitudinal depression data showed that, in a 5 year...

  11. Working and Non-Working University Students: Anxiety, Depression, and Grade Point Average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounsey, Rebecca; Vandehey, Michael A.; Diekhoff, George M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the differences between 110 working and non-working students in terms of mental health, academic achievement, and perceptions about student employment. Anxiety and depression were measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Academic achievement was measured by grade point average. Perceptions of…

  12. Early Detection of Depression and Associated Risk Factors in Adults with Mild/Moderate Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, Jane A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presentation and risk factors for depression in adults with mild/moderate intellectual disability (ID). A sample of 151 adults (83 males and 68 females) participated in a semi-structured interview. According to results on the Beck Depression Inventory II, 39.1% of participants evinced symptoms of…

  13. Working and Non-Working University Students: Anxiety, Depression, and Grade Point Average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounsey, Rebecca; Vandehey, Michael A.; Diekhoff, George M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the differences between 110 working and non-working students in terms of mental health, academic achievement, and perceptions about student employment. Anxiety and depression were measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Academic achievement was measured by grade point average. Perceptions of…

  14. Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in treating depression and suicidal ideation in Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Robyn D; Garvert, Donn W; Karlin, Bradley E; Trockel, Mickey; Ryu, Danielle M; Taylor, C Barr

    2015-11-01

    This paper examines the effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for depression (ACT-D), and the specific effects of experiential acceptance and mindfulness, in reducing suicidal ideation (SI) and depression among Veterans. Patients included 981 Veterans, 76% male, mean age 50.5 years. Depression severity and SI were assessed using the BDI-II. Experiential acceptance and mindfulness were measured with the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II) and the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, respectively. Of the 981 patients, 647 (66.0%) completed 10 or more sessions or finished early due to symptom relief. For Veterans with SI at baseline, mean BDI-II score decreased from 33.5 to 22.9. For Veterans with no SI at baseline, mean BDI-II score decreased from 26.3 to 15.9. Mixed models with repeated measurement indicated a significant reduction in depression severity from baseline to final assessment (b = -10.52, p acceptance and mindfulness, patients with SI at baseline demonstrated significantly greater improvement in depression severity during ACT-D treatment, relative to patients with no SI at baseline (b = -2.81, p = .001). Furthermore, increases in experiential acceptance and mindfulness scores across time were associated with a reduction in depression severity across time (b = -0.44, p acceptance scores across time were associated with lower odds of SI across time (odds ratio = 0.97, 95% CI [0.95, 0.99], p = .016) and the attenuating effect of experiential acceptance on SI increased across time (odds ratio = 0.96, 95% CI [0.92, 0.99], p = .023). Overall the number of patients with no SI increased from 44.5% at baseline to 65% at follow-up. Veterans receiving ACT-D demonstrated decreased depression severity and decreased odds of SI during treatment. Increases in experiential acceptance and mindfulness scores were associated with reduction in depression severity across time and increases in experiential acceptance scores were associated with reductions

  15. Association of different levels of depressive symptoms with symptomatology, overall disease severity, and quality of life in women with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Amris, Kirstine; Ortega, Francisco B

    2015-01-01

    .4-23.7), as well as poorer sleep quality (3.2-units; 95 % CI 1.7-4.7) and mental component of HRQoL (-17.0-units; 95 % CI -21.0 to -12.9) than participants with minimal signs of depression. There was no association of signs of depression with pain sensitivity, exercise capacity, or the physical component of HRQo......PURPOSE: This study examined the associations of different levels of depression with pain, sleep quality, fatigue, functional exercise capacity, overall fibromyalgia (FM) severity, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in women with FM. METHODS: A total of 451 women with FM participated...... in this cross-sectional study. Depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory; BDI-II), pain intensity (numerical rating scale; NRS), pain sensitivity (algometry), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory), functional exercise capacity (6-min walk test), FM...

  16. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  17. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  18. Dissociative symptoms reflect levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha in patients with unipolar depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizik G

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gustav Bizik,1 Petr Bob,1 Jiri Raboch,1 Josef Pavlat,1 Jana Uhrova,2 Hana Benakova,2 Tomas Zima2 1Center for Neuropsychiatric Research of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry and UHSL, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Recent evidence indicates that the nature of interactions between the nervous system and immune system is important in the pathogenesis of depression. Specifically, alterations in pro-inflammatory cytokines have been related to the development of several psychological and neurobiological manifestations of depressive disorder, as well as to stress exposure. A number of findings point to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α as one of the central factors in these processes. Accordingly, in the present study, we test the hypothesis that specific influences of chronic stressors related to traumatic stress and dissociation are related to alterations in TNF-α levels. We performed psychometric measurement of depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]-II, traumatic stress symptoms (Trauma Symptom Checklist [TSC]-40, and psychological and somatoform dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale [DES] and Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire [SDQ]-20, respectively, and immunochemical measure of serum TNF-α in 66 inpatients with unipolar depression (mean age 43.1 ± 7.3 years. The results show that TNF-α is significantly related to DES (Spearman R=−0.42, P<0.01, SDQ-20 (Spearman R=−0.38, P<0.01, and TSC-40 (Spearman R=−0.41, P<0.01, but not to BDI-II. Results of the present study suggest that TNF-α levels are related to dissociative symptoms and stress exposure in depressed patients. Keywords: depression, dissociation, TNF-alpha, traumatic stress

  19. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Different people have different symptoms. Some symptoms of depression include: Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness ...

  20. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty may trigger depression in some people. Medical illness – ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary ...

  1. Comparing telehealth-based and clinic-based group cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depression and anxiety: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatri N

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nasreen Khatri, Elsa Marziali, Illia Tchernikov, Nancy ShepherdRotman Research Institute, Toronto, ON, CanadaBackground: The primary objective of this pilot study was to demonstrate reliable adherence to a group cognitive behavioral (CBT therapy protocol when delivered using on-line video conferencing as compared with face-to-face delivery of group CBT. A secondary aim was to show comparability of changes in subject depression inventory scores between on-line and face-to-face delivery of group CBT.Methods: We screened 31 individuals, 18 of whom met the criteria for a DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition diagnosis of mood and/or anxiety disorder. All qualifying participants had the necessary equipment (computer, webcam, Internet for participation in the study, but could exercise their preference for either the on-line or face-to-face format. Eighteen completed the 13 weekly session intervention program (ten face-to-face; eight video conferencing. We coded adherence to protocol in both intervention formats and generated pre–post changes in scores on the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II for each participant.Results: Application of the CBT protocol coding system showed reliable adherence to the group CBT intervention protocol in both delivery formats. Similarly, qualitative analysis of the themes in group discussion indicated that both groups addressed similar issues. Pre–post intervention scores for the BDI-II were comparable across the two delivery formats, with 60% of participants in each group showing a positive change in BDI-II severity classification (eg, from moderate to low symptoms.Conclusion: This pilot study demonstrates that group CBT could be delivered in a technology-supported environment (on-line video conferencing and can meet the same professional practice standards and outcomes as face-to-face delivery of the intervention program.Keywords: psychotherapy, gerontology, mood

  2. Assessing Depression in Cardiac Patients: What Measures Should Be Considered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ceccarini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is highly recommended to promptly assess depression in heart disease patients as it represents a crucial risk factor which may result in premature deaths following acute cardiac events and a more severe psychopathology, even in cases of subsequent nonfatal cardiac events. Patients and professionals often underestimate or misjudge depressive symptomatology as cardiac symptoms; hence, quick, reliable, and early mood changes assessments are warranted. Failing to detect depressive signals may have detrimental effects on these patients’ wellbeing and full recovery. Choosing gold-standard depression investigations in cardiac patients that fit a hospitalised cardiac setting well is fundamental. This paper will examine eight well established tools following Italian and international guidelines on mood disorders diagnosis in cardiac patients: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, the Cognitive Behavioural Assessment Hospital Form (CBA-H, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the two and nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2, PHQ-9, the Depression Interview and Structured Hamilton (DISH, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D/HRSD, and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. Though their strengths and weaknesses may appear to be homogeneous, the BDI-II and the PHQ are more efficient towards an early depression assessment within cardiac hospitalised patients.

  3. Objective Methods for Reliable Detection of Concealed Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia eSolomon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that it is possible to automatically detect clinical depression from audio-visual recordings. Before considering integration in a clinical pathway, a key question that must be asked is whether such systems can be easily fooled. This work explores the potential of acoustic features to detect clinical depression in adults both when acting normally and when asked to conceal their depression. Nine adults diagnosed with mild to moderate depression as per the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 were asked a series of questions and to read a excerpt from a novel aloud under two different experimental conditions. In one, participants were asked to act naturally and in the other, to suppress anything that they felt would be indicative of their depression. Acoustic features were then extracted from this data and analysed using paired t-tests to determine any statistically significant differences between healthy and depressed participants. Most features that were found to be significantly different during normal behaviour remained so during concealed behaviour. In leave-one-subject-out automatic classification studies of the 9 depressed subjects and 8 matched healthy controls, an 88% classification accuracy and 89% sensitivity was achieved. Results remained relatively robust during concealed behaviour, with classifiers trained on only non-concealed data achieving 81% detection accuracy and 75% sensitivity when tested on concealed data. These results indicate there is good potential to build deception-proof automatic depression monitoring systems.

  4. Personality features, dissociation, self-stigma, hope, and the complex treatment of depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasko J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jan Prasko,1 Marie Ociskova,1 Ales Grambal,1 Zuzana Sigmundova,1 Petra Kasalova,1 Marketa Marackova,1 Michaela Holubova,1,2 Kristyna Vrbova,1 Klara Latalova,1 Milos Slepecky3 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic; 3Department of Psychology Sciences, Faculty of Social Science and Health Care, Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Nitra, Slovak Republic Objective: Identifying the predictors of response to psychiatric and psychotherapeutic treatments may be useful for increasing treatment efficacy in pharmacoresistant depressive patients. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of dissociation, hope, personality trait, and selected demographic factors in treatment response of this group of patients.Methods: Pharmacoresistant depressive inpatients were enrolled in the study. All patients completed Clinical Global Impression – both objective and subjective form (CGI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI at baseline and after 6 weeks of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (group cognitive-behavioral or group psychodynamic treatment as an outcome measures. The Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMI, Dissociative Experience Scale (DES, Adult Dispositional Hope Scale (ADHS, and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-R were completed at the start of the treatment with the intention to find the predictors of treatment efficacy.Results: The study included 72 patients who were hospitalized for the pharmacoresistant major depression; 63 of them completed the study. The mean scores of BDI-II, BAI, subjCGI, and objCGI significantly decreased during the treatment. BDI-II relative change statistically significantly correlated with the total ISMI score, Discrimination Experience (ISMI subscale, and Harm Avoidance (TCI-R personality trait

  5. Attachment as Moderator of Treatment Outcome in Major Depression: A Randomized Control Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Carolina; Atkinson, Leslie; Quilty, Lena C.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Anxiety and avoidance dimensions of adult attachment insecurity were tested as moderators of treatment outcome for interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Fifty-six participants with major depression were randomly assigned to these treatment conditions. Beck Depression Inventory-II, Six-Item Hamilton Rating Scale…

  6. Validation of the Curiosity and Exploration Inventory-II (CEI-II) Among Chinese University Students in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shengquan; Ng, Ting Kin; Yim, Kin Hang; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at validating the Curiosity and Exploration Inventory-II (CEI-II; Kashdan et al., 2009 ) in a Chinese context. A total of 294 Chinese first-year undergraduate students in Hong Kong completed the CEI-II and measures of satisfaction with university life, the Big Five personality traits, and human values. The results of exploratory structural equation modeling, parallel analysis, and confirmatory factor analysis supported a 1-factor solution and did not replicate the original 2-factor structure. Time invariance of the 1-factor structure was obtained among 242 participants who completed the questionnaires again after 4 months. The latent means and correlation indicated that curiosity as measured by the CEI-II was quite stable over the period of investigation. The CEI-II was found to be positively correlated with satisfaction with university life, extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, openness to experience, and openness to change values, but negatively with neuroticism and conservation values. The results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed that the CEI-II score had incremental validity above and beyond the Big Five personality traits in predicting human values and satisfaction with university life.

  7. Community-oriented family-based intervention superior to standard treatment in improving depression, hopelessness and functioning among adolescents with any psychosis-risk symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granö, Niklas; Karjalainen, Marjaana; Ranta, Klaus; Lindgren, Maija; Roine, Mikko; Therman, Sebastian

    2016-03-30

    The aim of the present study was to compare change in functioning, affective symptoms and level of psychosis-risk symptoms in symptomatic adolescents who were treated either in an early intervention programme based on a need-adapted Family- and Community-orientated integrative Treatment Model (FCTM) or in standard adolescent psychiatric treatment (Treatment As Usual, TAU). 28 pairs were matched by length of follow-up, gender, age, and baseline functioning. At one year after the start of treatment, the matched groups were compared on change in functioning (GAF-M), five psychosis-risk dimensions of the Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes (SIPS), and self-reported anxiety, depression, and hopelessness symptoms (BAI, BDI-II, BHS). FCTM was more effective in improving functioning (20% vs. 6% improvement on GAF-M), as well as self-reported depression (53% vs. 14% improvement on BDI-II) and hopelessness (41% vs. 3% improvement on BHS). However, for psychosis-risk symptoms and anxiety symptoms, effectiveness differences between treatment models did not reach statistical significance. To conclude, in the present study, we found greater improvement in functioning and self-reported depression and hopelessness among adolescents who received a need-adapted Family- and Community-orientated integrative Treatment than among those who were treated in standard adolescent psychiatry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhancing rigour in the validation of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs: bridging linguistic and psychometric testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Gwerfyl

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strong consensus exists for a systematic approach to linguistic validation of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs and discrete methods for assessing their psychometric properties. Despite the need for robust evidence of the appropriateness of measures, transition from linguistic to psychometric validation is poorly documented or evidenced. This paper demonstrates the importance of linking linguistic and psychometric testing through a purposeful stage which bridges the gap between translation and large-scale validation. Findings Evidence is drawn from a study to develop a Welsh language version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II and investigate its psychometric properties. The BDI-II was translated into Welsh then administered to Welsh-speaking university students (n = 115 and patients with depression (n = 37 concurrent with the English BDI-II, and alongside other established depression and quality of life measures. A Welsh version of the BDI-II was produced that, on administration, showed conceptual equivalence with the original measure; high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.90; 0.96; item homogeneity; adequate correlation with the English BDI-II (r = 0.96; 0.94 and additional measures; and a two-factor structure with one overriding dimension. Nevertheless, in the student sample, the Welsh version showed a significantly lower overall mean than the English (p = 0.002; and significant differences in six mean item scores. This prompted a review and refinement of the translated measure. Conclusions Exploring potential sources of bias in translated measures represents a critical step in the translation-validation process, which until now has been largely underutilised. This paper offers important findings that inform advanced methods of cross-cultural validation of PROMs.

  9. Internet treatment for depression: a randomized controlled trial comparing clinician vs. technician assistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolai Titov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT for depression is effective when guided by a clinician, less so if unguided. QUESTION: Would guidance from a technician be as effective as guidance from a clinician? METHOD: Randomized controlled non-inferiority trial comparing three groups: Clinician-assisted vs. technician-assisted vs. delayed treatment. Community-based volunteers applied to the VirtualClinic (www.virtualclinic.org.au research program, and 141 participants with major depressive disorder were randomized. Participants in the clinician- and technician-assisted groups received access to an iCBT program for depression comprising 6 online lessons, weekly homework assignments, and weekly supportive contact over a treatment period of 8 weeks. Participants in the clinician-assisted group also received access to a moderated online discussion forum. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Patient Health QUESTIONnaire-9 Item (PHQ-9. Completion rates were high, and at post-treatment, both treatment groups reduced scores on the BDI-II (p<0.001 and PHQ-9 (p<0.001 compared to the delayed treatment group but did not differ from each other. Within group effect sizes on the BDI-II were 1.27 and 1.20 for the clinician- and technician-assisted groups respectively, and on the PHQ-9, were 1.54 and 1.60 respectively. At 4-month follow-up participants in the technician group had made further improvements and had significantly lower scores on the PHQ-9 than those in the clinician group. A total of approximately 60 minutes of clinician or technician time was required per participant during the 8-week treatment program. CONCLUSIONS: Both clinician- and technician-assisted treatment resulted in large effect sizes and clinically significant improvements comparable to those associated with face-to-face treatment, while a delayed treatment control group did not improve. These results provide support for large

  10. Effectiveness of Emotional Schema Therapy on Severity of Depression and Rumination in People with Major Depressive Disorder

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    M rezaee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The emotional schema model emphasises on mind rumination and other emotional schemas in depression. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of Emotional Schema Therapy (EST on severity of depression and rumination in people with major depression disorder. Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial study using pre-test and post-test-follow up with the control group. Among all patients with major depressive disorder visited in Imam Hossein hospital and Rahyar clinic of Tehran, 32 patients were selected through inclusion or exclusion criteria and convenience sampling then they were randomly assigned into two equal groups; experimental (16 persons and control (16 persons. Experimental group experienced 14 weeks of emotional schema therapy, while the control grouprecieved no treatment intervention. Revised Beck depression inventory (BDI-II and ruminative response scale (RRS were used in base lines, post-test and follow up as the assessment instruments. Data were analyzed by mixed analysis of variance via SPSS19 software. Results: The results of this research showed that the means of depression and rumination in the experimental group were reduced significantly in comparison with the control group in post-test and follow up (P<0.05. Conclusion: The study findings proposed that Emotional Schema Therapy can be used as an effective intervention in order to reduce the depression and mind rumination in people with major depressive disorder.

  11. Treating postnatal depressive symptoms in primary care: a randomised controlled trial of GP management, with and without adjunctive counselling

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    Leigh Bronwyn

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal depression (PND is under-diagnosed and most women do not access effective help. We aimed to evaluate comparative management of (PND following screening with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, using three best-practice care pathways by comparing management by general practitioners (GPs alone compared to adjunctive counselling, based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT, delivered by postnatal nurses or psychologists. Methods This was a parallel, three-group randomised controlled trial conducted in a primary care setting (general practices and maternal & child health centres and a psychology clinic. A total of 3,531 postnatal women were screened for symptoms of depression; 333 scored above cut-off on the screening tool and 169 were referred to the study. Sixty-eight of these women were randomised between the three treatment groups. Results Mean scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II at entry were in the moderate-to-severe range. There was significant variation in the post-study frequency of scores exceeding the threshold indicative of mild-to-severe depressive symptoms, such that more women receiving only GP management remained above the cut-off score after treatment (p = .028. However, all three treatment conditions were accompanied by significant reductions in depressive symptoms and mean post-study BDI-II scores were similar between groups. Compliance was high in all three groups. Women rated the treatments as highly effective. Rates of both referral to the study (51%, and subsequent treatment uptake (40% were low. Conclusions Data from this small study suggest that GP management of PND when augmented by a CBT-counselling package may be successful in reducing depressive symptoms in more patients compared to GP management alone. The relatively low rates of referral and treatment uptake, suggest that help-seeking remains an issue for many women with PND, consistent with previous research. Trial

  12. Web-based acceptance and commitment therapy for depressive symptoms with minimal support: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Lappalainen, Päivi; Langrial, Sitwat; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Tolvanen, Asko; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2015-11-01

    Low-intensity interventions for people suffering from depressive symptoms are highly desirable. The aim of the present study was to investigate the outcomes of a web-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT)-based intervention without face-to-face contact for people suffering from depressive symptoms. Participants (N = 39) with depressive symptoms were randomly assigned to an Internet-delivered acceptance and commitment therapy (iACT) intervention or a waiting list control condition (WLC). Participants were evaluated with standardized self-reporting measures (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI-II], Symptom Checklist-90 [SCL-90], Acceptance and Action Questionnaire [AAQ-2], Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire [FFMQ], Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire [ATQ], and White Bear Suppression Inventory [WBSI]) at pre- and post-measurement. Long-term effects in the iACT group were examined using a 12-month follow-up. The iACT program comprised home assignments, online feedback given by master's-level students of psychology over a 7-week intervention period, and automated email-based reminders. Significant effects were observed in favor of the iACT group on depression symptomatology (between effect sizes [ESs] at post-treatment, iACT/WLC, g = .83), psychological and physiological symptoms (g = .60), psychological flexibility (g = .67), mindfulness skills (g = .53), and frequency of automatic thoughts (g = .57) as well as thought suppression (g = .53). The treatment effects in the iACT group were maintained over the 12-month follow-up period (within-iACT ES: BDI-II, g = 1.33; SCL-90, g = 1.04; ATQF/B [Frequency/Believability], FFMQ, WBSI, AAQ-II, g = .74-1.08). The iACT participants stated that they would be happy to recommend the same intervention to others with depressive symptoms. We conclude that an ACT-based guided Internet-delivered treatment with minimal contact can be effective for people with depressive symptoms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Depression.

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    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  14. Observing the determinants of the psychotherapeutic process in depressive disorders. A clinical case study within a psychodynamic approach

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    Osmano eOasi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the relationship between depressive disorders, personality configurations, and mental functioning. A years treatment of a young man with the diagnosis of Depression is presented: the clinical and empirical points of view are described in depth through an assessment at the beginning and at one year after of an oriented psychodynamic psychotherapy. SCID I and II and HAMRS were administered to the patient in assessement phase. In the same phase he filled in BDI-II, and DEQ; the psychotherapist completed SWAP-200. These clinician instruments were used again after one year of the treatment. The PDM point of view is also presented. All sessions are audiotaped: twelve verbatim transcripts were coded with the Defense Mechanisms Rating Scale and CCRT. The results show a decrease in depressive symptoms, a change in some personality configurations, but a substantial invariance of the introjective profile, and a modification in mental functioning.

  15. Unintended pregnancy and perinatal depression trajectories in low-income, high-risk Hispanic immigrants.

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    Christensen, Anna L; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Perry, Deborah F; Le, Huynh-Nhu

    2011-09-01

    Perinatal depression is a prevalent and detrimental condition. Determining modifiable factors associated with it would identify opportunities for prevention. This paper: 1) identifies depressive symptom trajectories and heterogeneity in those trajectories during pregnancy through the first-year postpartum, and 2) examines the association between unintended pregnancy and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms (BDI-II) were collected from low-income Hispanic immigrants (n=215) five times from early pregnancy to 12-months postpartum. The sample was at high-risk for perinatal depression and recruited from two prenatal care settings. Growth mixture modeling (GMM) was used to identify distinct trajectories of depressive symptoms over the perinatal period. Multinomial logistic regression was then conducted to examine the association between unintended pregnancy (reported at baseline) and the depression trajectory patterns. Three distinct trajectory patterns of depressive symptoms were identified: high during pregnancy, but low postpartum ("Pregnancy High": 9.8%); borderline during pregnancy, with a postpartum increase ("Postpartum High": 10.2%); and low throughout pregnancy and postpartum ("Perinatal Low": 80.0%). Unintended pregnancy was not associated with the "Pregnancy High" pattern, but was associated with a marginally significant nearly four fold increase in risk of the "Postpartum High" pattern in depressive symptoms (RRR=3.95, ppregnancies during prenatal care must be educated of their increased risk, even if they do not exhibit antenatal depressive symptoms. Routine depression screening should occur postpartum, and referral to culturally appropriate treatment should follow positive screening results.

  16. Quality of Life, Depression, Anxiety and Coping Strategies after Heart Transplantation

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    Fulvio Bergamo Trevizan

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Heart transplantation is the therapeutic procedure indicated to increase the survival of patients with refractory heart failure. Improvement in overall functioning and quality of life are expected factors in the postoperative period. Objective: To identify and evaluate mental disorders and symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, quality of life and coping strategies in the post-surgical situation of heart transplantation. Methods: A cross-sectional, quantitative study with patients who have undergone heart transplantation. Participants answered to the Sociodemographic Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Escala Modos de Enfrentamento de Problemas (Ways of Coping Scale (EMEP and World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF. For data analysis, the significance level was considered P≤0.05. Results: A total of 33 patients participated in the study. The BDI-II results indicated that 91% (n=30 of the patients presented a minimal level. In BAI, 94% (n=31 of the patients demonstrated minimal level of anxiety symptoms. WHOQOL-BREF showed a perception of quality of life considered good in all domains. The EMEP data have registered a problem-focused coping strategy. According to MINI, a single case of major depressive episode, current and recurrent was recorded. Conclusion: Although most participants in the sample had symptoms of depression and anxiety, only one patient was identified with moderate symptoms in both domains. The most used strategy was coping focused on the problem. Patients have classified the perceptions of quality of life as 'good', pointing out satisfaction with their health.

  17. Relation Between Emotional Intelligence, Socio-Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Depressive Disorders.

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    Abdellatif, Sayeda Ahmed; Hussien, El-Sayed Saleh; Hamed, Warda Elshahat; Zoromba, Mohamed Ali

    2017-02-01

    The present study aims to assess the emotional intelligence in relation to socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with depressive disorders. A descriptive correlational study was utilized with a sample of (106) depressed patients who were diagnosed by a psychiatrist with depressive disorders at psychiatric outpatient clinics in Mansoura University Hospital. Data were collected through assessing socio demographic and clinical characteristics, assessing level of depression using Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II, and assessing emotional intelligence using Barchard emotional intelligence scales. Results revealed that emotional intelligence not related significantly to socio demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with depressive disorders, there is a highly significant relationship between emotional intelligence in relation to level of depression and other practices used to alleviate depression. Therefore, it is recommended to conduct a periodical workshops and training programs for adolescents and young in the universities, schools, social clubs, camps and youth organizations to enhance their emotional intelligence in order to prevent depression. In addition, assessing the effect of emotional intelligence programs on preventing and managing depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Collaborative care for depression in general practice: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

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    Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Curth, Nadja Kehler; Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Mikkelsen, John Hagel; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Lundsteen, Merete; Csillag, Claudio; Christensen, Kaj Sparle; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Nordentoft, Merete; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2017-07-21

    Depression is a common illness with great human costs and a significant burden on the public economy. Previous studies have indicated that collaborative care (CC) has a positive effect on symptoms when provided to people with depression, but CC has not yet been applied in a Danish context. We therefore developed a model for CC (the Collabri model) to treat people with depression in general practice in Denmark. Since systematic identification of patients is an "active ingredient" in CC and some literature suggests case finding as the best alternative to standard detection, the two detection methods are examined as part of the study. The aim is to investigate if treatment according to the Collabri model has an effect on depression symptoms when provided to people with depression in general practice in Denmark, and to examine if case finding is a better method to detect depression in general practice than standard detection. The trial is a cluster-randomised, clinical superiority trial investigating the effect of treatment according to the Collabri model for CC, compared to treatment as usual for 480 participants diagnosed with depression in general practice in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary outcome is depression symptoms (Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II)) after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include depression symptoms (BDI-II) after 15 months, anxiety symptoms (Beck's Anxiety Inventory (BAI)), level of functioning (Global Assessment of Function (GAF)) and psychological stress (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R)). In addition, case finding (with the recommended screening tool Major Depression Inventory (MDI)) and standard detection of depression is examined in a cluster-randomized controlled design. Here, the primary outcome is the positive predictive value of referral diagnosis. If the Collabri model is shown to be superior to treatment as usual, the study will contribute with important knowledge on how to improve treatment of depression in

  19. [Influence between early maladaptive schemas and depression].

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    Cormier, A; Jourda, B; Laros, C; Walburg, V; Callahan, S

    2011-09-01

    Early maladaptive schemas developed during childhood are relatively stable. Once activated, these early maladaptive schemas could influence reality perceptions and create cognitive distortions. Previous studies showed that early maladaptive schemas are linked to depression: early maladaptive schemas could be a risk factor for depression (Young, 2001) and a vulnerability marker for depression (Dozoïs, 2007). The main objective of the present study was to explore the influence of early maladaptive schemas on depression severity among a French adult population. One hundred and sixty-two participants (mean age 29 years; SD=13.86) were enrolled, 66 men (mean age 29 years; SD=13.65) and 106 women (mean age 30; SD=14.07). Participants were invited to complete the Young Schema Questionnaire, short version (YSQ-S1-Young 1994) and the Beck depression Inventory, 2nd version (BDI-II-Beck 1994). Fifty-six participants were randomly selected to complete a paper version of the scales, and 95 participants completed an online electronic version. Fifty-two percent of the participants were not depressed, 15% slightly depressed, 17% moderately depressed and 16% met criteria of severe depression. All 15 schemas scores were positively correlated to depression scores. Comparing schema scores and depression severity it can be noted that for severely depressed participants all schema scores were significantly higher, and six of 15 schemas were significantly higher in the case of moderate depression. In addition, three schemas (imperfection, vulnerability, fusional relation) are significantly and positively linked to depression scores, whereas one schema (everything is owed to me) appears to be a significantly negative predictor of associated depression. This study confirms results of previous research concerning the link between early maladaptive schemas and depression. What is more, the results show that the importance of these schemas increases with depression severity. The most

  20. Chronic and Recurrent Depression in Primary Care: Socio-Demographic Features, Morbidity, and Costs

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    Elaine M. McMahon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major depression is often chronic or recurrent and is usually treated within primary care. Little is known about the associated morbidity and costs. Objectives. To determine socio-demographic characteristics of people with chronic or recurrent depression in primary care and associated morbidity, service use, and costs. Method. 558 participants were recruited from 42 GP practices in the UK. All participants had a history of chronic major depression, recurrent major depression, or dysthymia. Participants completed questionnaires including the BDI-II, Work and Social Adjustment Scale, Euroquol, and Client Service Receipt Inventory documenting use of primary care, mental health, and other services. Results. The sample was characterised by high levels of depression, functional impairment, and high service use and costs. The majority (74% had been treated with an anti-depressant, while few had seen a counsellor (15% or a psychologist (3% in the preceding three months. The group with chronic major depression was most depressed and impaired with highest service use, whilst those with dysthymia were least depressed, impaired, and costly to support but still had high morbidity and associated costs. Conclusion. This is a patient group with very significant morbidity and high costs. Effective interventions to reduce both are required.

  1. The relationship between depression, anxiety and medication adherence among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

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    Nel, Adriaan; Kagee, Ashraf

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, a small but growing body of literature on the associations between common mental disorders and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has emerged. The present study builds on the growing body of research by investigating associations between symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and adherence to ART. We studied a convenience sample of 101 South African ART users to determine the severity of symptoms of depression and anxiety and their association with self-reported adherence to ART. Based on the standardised cut-off scores recorded using the Beck Depression Inventory - Second Edition (BDI II), 40.4% of participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of depression. Moreover, results from the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) indicated that 28.7% of the study participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety. Biserial correlations and logistic regression analysis demonstrated a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and adherence. The results indicate that patients reporting non-perfect adherence were approximately three times more likely (OR=2.73; CI=1.09-6.82) to have moderate to severe symptoms of depression than those reporting perfect adherence. The present findings are in keeping with those of previous studies, suggesting that depression may act as a barrier to ART adherence.

  2. Reasoning with linear orders: Differential parietal cortex activation in subclinical depression. An fMRI investigation in subclinical depression and controls

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    Elanor C. Hinton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity to learn new information and manipulate it for efficient retrieval has long been studied through reasoning paradigms, which also has applicability to the study of social behaviour. Humans can learn about the linear order within groups using reasoning, and the success of such reasoning may vary according to affective state, such as depression. We investigated the neural basis of these latter findings using functional neuroimaging. Using BDI-II criteria, 14 non-depressed and 12 mildly depressed volunteers took part in a linear-order reasoning task during fMRI. The hippocampus, parietal and prefrontal cortices were activated during the task, in accordance with previous studies. In the learning phase and in the test phase, greater activation of the parietal cortex was found in the depressed group, which may be a compensatory mechanism in order to reach the same behavioural performance as the non-depressed group, or evidence for a different reasoning strategy in the depressed group.

  3. Tavistock Adult Depression Study (TADS: a randomised controlled trial of psychoanalytic psychotherapy for treatment-resistant/treatment-refractory forms of depression

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    Taylor David

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term forms of depression represent a significant mental health problem for which there is a lack of effective evidence-based treatment. This study aims to produce findings about the effectiveness of psychoanalytic psychotherapy in patients with treatment-resistant/treatment-refractory depression and to deepen the understanding of this complex form of depression. Methods/Design INDEX GROUP: Patients with treatment resistant/treatment refractory depression. DEFINITION & INCLUSION CRITERIA: Current major depressive disorder, 2 years history of depression, a minimum of two failed treatment attempts, ≥14 on the HRSD or ≥21 on the BDI-II, plus complex personality and/or psycho-social difficulties. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Moderate or severe learning disability, psychotic illness, bipolar disorder, substance dependency or receipt of test intervention in the previous two years. DESIGN: Pragmatic, randomised controlled trial with qualitative and clinical components. TEST INTERVENTION: 18 months of weekly psychoanalytic psychotherapy, manualised and fidelity-assessed using the Psychotherapy Process Q-Sort. CONTROL CONDITION: Treatment as usual, managed by the referring practitioner. RECRUITMENT: GP referrals from primary care. RCT MAIN OUTCOME: HRSD (with ≤14 as remission. SECONDARY OUTCOMES: depression severity (BDI-II, degree of co-morbid disorders Axis-I and Axis-II (SCID-I and SCID-II-PQ, quality of life and functioning (GAF, CORE, Q-les-Q, object relations (PROQ2a, Cost-effectiveness analysis (CSRI and GP medical records. FOLLOW-UP: 2 years. Plus: a. Qualitative study of participants’ and therapists’ problem formulation, experience of treatment and of participation in trial. (b Narrative data from semi-structured pre/post psychodynamic interviews to produce prototypes of responders and non-responders. (c Clinical case-studies of sub-types of TRD and of change. Discussion TRD needs complex, long-term intervention and

  4. The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory II: stability over time? A seven-year follow-up study of substance abusers in treatment.

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    Ravndal, Edle; Vaglum, Per

    2010-01-01

    Measuring personality disorders among substance abusers may entail special problems related to the reliability and validity of the instruments. The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory II (MCMI-II), a well-known self-reporting instrument, was used in a prospective study of drug abusers from 21 treatment programs in Norway (n = 481) to investigate the influence of substance abuse on the reliability and stability of the MCMI personality traits at intake to treatment and after 7 years (n = 342). As regards the drug-abusing and drug-free subgroups, the MCMI-II dimensional scores were equally reliable and stable in both groups, and were not influenced by the abusing state. Using the MCMI-II in a categorical diagnostic way did not show sufficient predictive validity. The MCMI-II dimensional scores should therefore be used to measure personality disorder traits among help-seeking and former drug abusers.

  5. Moderation of adult depression by the serotonin transporter promoter variant (5-HTTLPR), childhood abuse and adult traumatic events in a general population sample.

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    Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Schwahn, Christian; Mahler, Jessie; Schulz, Andrea; Spitzer, Carsten; Fenske, Kristin; Appel, Katja; Barnow, Sven; Nauck, Matthias; Schomerus, Georg; Biffar, Reiner; Rosskopf, Dieter; John, Ulrich; Völzke, Henry; Freyberger, Harald Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    The impact of the promoter polymorphisms of the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) on mood has been studied by two-way interaction models comprising one environmental factor and genotype variants. However, childhood abuse is assumed to be associated with different psychobiological long-term effects than adult traumatic events. Both types of trauma may interact on an individual basis throughout the lifespan moderating the impact of the 5-HTTLPR s allele on depressive disorders. Therefore, the hypothesis of a three-way interaction among the 5-HTTLPR, childhood abuse and adult traumatic experience was tested. Caucasian subjects (1,974) from the general population in Germany (Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP)) were analyzed. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Childhood abuse was assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Adult traumatic events were derived from the SCID interview (DSM-IV) on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Global three-way interactions among the 5-HTTLPR, adult traumatic experiences and childhood abuse (P = 0.0007) were found. Carriers of the ss or sl genotypes who had been exposed to childhood abuse and to more than two adult traumatic events had higher mean BDI-II scores (16.0 [95% CI 8.4-23.6]) compared to those carrying the ll genotype (7.6 [4.5-10.7]). These results were supported using a second, more severe definition of childhood abuse (P = 0.02). No two-way interactions were observed (P > 0.05). Childhood abuse and adult traumatic events may act synergistically in interaction with the s allele of the 5-HTTLPR to increase the risk for depressive symptoms independently from the lifetime diagnosis of PTSD. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cognitive Performance in Older Adults with Stable Heart Failure: Longitudinal Evidence for Stability and Improvement

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    Alosco, Michael L.; Garcia, Sarah; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; van Dulmen, Manfred; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is prevalent in heart failure (HF), though substantial variability in the pattern of cognitive impairment is found across studies. To clarify the nature of cognitive impairment in HF, we examined longitudinal trajectories across multiple domains of cognition in HF patients using latent growth class modeling. 115 HF patients completed a neuropsychological battery at baseline, 3-months and 12-months. Participants also completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Latent class growth analyses revealed a three-class model for attention/executive function, four-class model for memory, and a three-class model for language. The slope for attention/executive function and language remained stable, while improvements were noted in memory performance. Education and BDI-II significantly predicted the intercept for attention/executive function and language abilities. The BDI-II also predicted baseline memory. The current findings suggest that multiple performance-based classes of neuropsychological test performance exist within cognitive domains, though case-controlled prospective studies with extended follow-ups are needed to fully elucidate changes and predictors of cognitive function in HF. PMID:23906182

  7. Depression and psychoactive substances consumption in Mexican college undergraduates Depresión y consumo de sustancias psicoactivas en universitarios mexicanos Risco de depressão e consumo de substâncias psicoactivas em universitários mexicanos

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    Francisco Rafael Guzmán Facundo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore the relationship between risk of depression and psychoactive substances consumption in college undergraduates. Methodology. Cross sectional descriptive study in which an instrument that included a sociodemographic variables, b Beck depression inventory II (BDI-II and c questions about psychoactive substances consumption in life, in the last year and in the last month, was applied to 32 college undergraduates. Results. 52.9% of the students had drunk alcohol and other 33.6% had smoked in the last month. For illicit substances: 3.7% used cocaine, 3.4% marihuana and 0.5% amphetamines. The risk of depression for the sample was: 6.6% had low risk, 3.4% moderate and 1.8% severe risk. Significant differences were found between consumers and non consumers DBI-II means in regards to: alcohol, tobacco, marihuana, and any illicit drug. Conclusion. College undergraduates who have consumed alcohol or marihuana at least once in their life have a higher risk of depression compared to non consumers.Objetivo. Explorar la relación entre el riesgo de depresión y el consumo de sustancias psicoactivas en universitarios. Metodología. Estudio descriptivo de corte transversal en el que se aplicó a una muestra representativa de 432 universitarios un instrumento que incluía: a variables sociodemográficas, b Inventario de Depresión de Beck II (DBI-II y c preguntas sobre el consumo de sustancias psicoactivas en la vida, en el último año y en el último mes. Resultados. En el último mes el 52.9% de los estudiantes ha bebido alcohol y otro 33.6% ha consumido tabaco; en cuanto a las sustancias ilícitas: 3.7% cocaína, 3.4% marihuana y 0.5% anfetaminas. El riesgo de depresión para la muestra fue: 6.6% leve; 3.4% moderada y 1.8% grave. Se encontraron diferencias significativas entre las medianas del DBI-II de consumidores y no consumidores en: alcohol, tabaco, marihuana y alguna droga ilícita. Conclusión. Los universitarios que han consumido

  8. Can the concepts of depression and quality of life be integrated using a time perspective?

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    McGee Hannah

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is understood about the conceptual relationship of depression and quality of life (QoL. Judgments concerning both, implicitly or explicitly, involve a time perspective. The aim of this study was to test de Leval's theoretical model linking depression and QoL with a time perspective. The model predicts that changes in cognitions about one's past, present and future QoL, will be associated with changes in depressive symptomatology. Methods Eighteen psychiatric in-patients with a clinically confirmed diagnosis of depression were assessed on commencing treatment and 12 weeks later. QoL was assessed by the Schedule for Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life (SEIQoL, depression by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and hopelessness by the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS. Time perspective was incorporated by asking QoL questions about the past, present and future. Results Depression and hopelessness were associated with a poorer present QoL. Depression lowered present QoL but did not alter future QoL, as these remained consistently high whether participants were depressed or recovering. However, depressed individuals had a larger gap between their actual present QoL and future (aspired to QoL. Changes in QoL were influenced by depression and hopelessness. Contrary to the model, perception of "past" QoL was not affected by depression or hopelessness. Conclusions de Leval's model was largely confirmed. Thus depression and hopelessness influence a person's present and future QoL. The analysis of a temporal horizon was helpful in understanding the link between depression and QoL.

  9. Dejian Mind-Body Intervention on Depressive Mood of Community-Dwelling Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Agnes S. Chan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a short-term mind-body intervention program on improving the depressive mood of an adult community sample. Forty adult volunteers with various degrees of depressive mood were randomly assigned to the experimental group (Dejian Mind-Body Intervention, DMBI and control group (Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, CBT. For each group, a total of four 90-min weekly sessions were conducted. Treatment-related changes were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, an electroencephalographic indicator of positive affect (i.e., prefrontal activation asymmetry, and self-report ratings on physical health. Results indicated that both the DMBI and the CBT group demonstrated significant reduction in depressive mood. However, among individuals with moderate to severe depressive mood at baseline, only those in the DMBI but not the CBT group showed significant reduction in depressive mood. Besides, only the DMBI group demonstrated a significant increase in prefrontal activation asymmetry, suggesting increase in positive affect. While most psychological therapies for depressive mood normally take several months to show treatment effect, the present findings provided initial data suggesting that the DMBI was effective in improving depressive mood of community adults after 1 month of training.

  10. [Prevalence of Depressive and Anxious Symptomatology in 14-18 ys-old Students from a Private School in Medellin].

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    Ramírez, Carmenza Ricardo; Álvarez, Matilde; Prieto, Germán Valencia; Otálvaro, Felipe Tirado

    2012-09-01

    This study describes prevalence of depressive and anxious symptoms together with family, environmental and personal risk factors in a group of adolescents between 14 and 18 years of age in a private school of Medellín. An analytic observational cross sectional study was performed in 152 adolescents, evaluating sociodemographic aspects and prevalence of depressive and anxious symptomatology, as established through BDI-II and BAI. Average age was 15.4 ± 0.9 years old, with a 25% prevalence of anxiety symptoms and 25.7% of depressive symptoms. From the 38 (25%) students with BAI positive, 26 (68.4%) were BDI positive, and from the 39 (25.6%) students with BDI positive, 26 (66.7%) were BAI positive. the risk factors for anxiety and depressive symptomatology were: being a woman, being a victim of bullying and abuse. Having friends was the protective factors for depressive symptomatology. There was a statistical association between self-report of depressive and anxiety symptomatology; between the anxiety self-report and the depressive symptomatology; as well as between depressive and anxiety symptomatology and parents' perception of such symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Overgeneral autobiographical memory predicts higher prospective levels of depressive symptoms and intrusions in borderline patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Kris; Pieters, Guido; Claes, Laurence; Berens, Ann; Raes, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Overgeneral memory (OGM), the tendency to retrieve categories of events from autobiographical memory instead of single events, is found to be a reliable predictor for future mood disturbances and post-traumatic symptom severity. Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) often report co-morbid episodes of major depressive disorder (MDD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, we investigated whether OGM would predict depression severity and (post-traumatic) stress symptoms in BPD patients. At admission (N = 54) and at six-month follow-up (N ≥ 31), BPD patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders, the Assessment of DSM-IV Personality Disorders, the Autobiographical Memory Test, the Beck Depression Inventory-2nd edition (BDI-II), and the Impact of Event Scale. OGM at baseline predicted (a) higher levels of depressive symptoms at follow-up and (b) more intrusions related to a stressful event over and above baseline levels of borderline symptoms, depressive symptoms, and intrusions, respectively. No association was found between memory specificity and event-related avoidance at follow-up. Despite previous findings suggesting that OGM in BPD is less robust than in MDD and PTSD, our results suggest that memory specificity in BPD patients may have some relevance for the course of depressive and stress symptomatology in BPD.

  12. Parenting and depressive symptoms among adolescents in four Caribbean societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The strategies that parents use to guide and discipline their children may influence their emotional health. Relatively little research has been conducted examining the association of parenting practices to depressive symptoms among Caribbean adolescents. This project examines the association of parenting styles to levels of depressive symptoms among adolescents in Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Kitts and Nevis, and St. Vincent. Methods Adolescents attending grade ten of academic year 2006/2007 in Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Vincent, and St. Kitts and Nevis were administered the Parenting Practices Scale along with the BDI-II. Authoritative, Authoritarian, Permissive and Neglectful parenting styles were created using a median split procedure of the monitoring and nurturance subscales of the Parenting Practices Scale. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationships of parenting styles to depressive symptoms. Results A wide cross-section of tenth grade students in each nation was sampled (n = 1955; 278 from Jamaica, 217 from the Bahamas, 737 St. Kitts and Nevis, 716 from St. Vincent; 52.1% females, 45.6% males and 2.3% no gender reported; age 12 to 19 years, mean = 15.3 yrs, sd = .95 yrs). Nearly half (52.1%) of all adolescents reported mild to severe symptoms of depression with 29.1% reporting moderate to severe symptoms of depression. In general, authoritative and permissive parenting styles were both associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms in adolescents. However, the relationship of parenting styles to depression scores was not consistent across countries (p parenting, caregivers in this study used a mixture of different parenting styles with the two most popular styles being authoritative and neglectful parenting. Conclusions There appears to be an association between parenting styles and depressive symptoms that is differentially manifested across the islands of Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Kitts and Nevis and St

  13. Parenting and depressive symptoms among adolescents in four Caribbean societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipps Garth

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The strategies that parents use to guide and discipline their children may influence their emotional health. Relatively little research has been conducted examining the association of parenting practices to depressive symptoms among Caribbean adolescents. This project examines the association of parenting styles to levels of depressive symptoms among adolescents in Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Kitts and Nevis, and St. Vincent. Methods Adolescents attending grade ten of academic year 2006/2007 in Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Vincent, and St. Kitts and Nevis were administered the Parenting Practices Scale along with the BDI-II. Authoritative, Authoritarian, Permissive and Neglectful parenting styles were created using a median split procedure of the monitoring and nurturance subscales of the Parenting Practices Scale. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationships of parenting styles to depressive symptoms. Results A wide cross-section of tenth grade students in each nation was sampled (n = 1955; 278 from Jamaica, 217 from the Bahamas, 737 St. Kitts and Nevis, 716 from St. Vincent; 52.1% females, 45.6% males and 2.3% no gender reported; age 12 to 19 years, mean = 15.3 yrs, sd = .95 yrs. Nearly half (52.1% of all adolescents reported mild to severe symptoms of depression with 29.1% reporting moderate to severe symptoms of depression. In general, authoritative and permissive parenting styles were both associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms in adolescents. However, the relationship of parenting styles to depression scores was not consistent across countries (p  Conclusions There appears to be an association between parenting styles and depressive symptoms that is differentially manifested across the islands of Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Kitts and Nevis and St. Vincent.

  14. Determinants of subjective health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Yeh; Ma, Mi-Chia; Yang, Tsung-Tsair

    2014-04-01

    To identify the determinants of schizophrenia-specific HRQoL levels, five types of factors (i.e., sociodemographic, clinical, psychopathological, neurocognitive, and psychosocial factors) were simultaneously investigated in the same cross-sectional sample. A total of 120 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia but not spectrum conditions were recruited by convenience sampling. Subjective HRQoL levels were measured using the disease-specific S-QoL-C. After sociodemographic and clinical data were collected, psychopathological data were self-rated with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and were assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) by professionally trained raters. Two neurocognitive assessments were conducted by licensed occupational therapists (OTs). Psychosocial factors were assessed using self-reports measures, including the, General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and Social Impact Scale (SIS). All measures were administered in random order. OTs, PANSS raters, and participants were blinded to score computation, and multiple hierarchical regression with the stepwise method was conducted. The S-QoL-C scores were most strongly affected by psychosocial factors and the psychopathological factors, followed by clinical and sociodemographic factors. Total scores on the BDI-II had the largest contributions to S-QoL-C index scores and seven of eight S-QoL-C subscales. In addition, the GSES, RSES, and SIS showed effects across the S-QoL-C subscales. The BDI-II, GSES, and RSES all influenced the S-QoL-C index scores, in addition to the number of hospitalizations. Psychosocial factors and psychopathological factors measured by the BDI-II had the greatest impact on schizophrenia-specific HRQoL levels. Psychiatric treatment programs focusing on psychosocial status and depressive symptoms can improve schizophrenia-specific HRQoL levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy for treatment-resistant depression in primary care: the CoBalT randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Nicola; Thomas, Laura; Abel, Anna; Barnes, Maria; Carroll, Fran; Ridgway, Nicola; Sherlock, Sofie; Turner, Nicholas; Button, Katherine; Odondi, Lang'o; Metcalfe, Chris; Owen-Smith, Amanda; Campbell, John; Garland, Anne; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Jerrom, Bill; Kessler, David; Kuyken, Willem; Morrison, Jill; Turner, Katrina; Williams, Chris; Peters, Tim; Lewis, Glyn

    2014-05-01

    Only one-third of patients with depression respond fully to treatment with antidepressant medication. However, there is little robust evidence to guide the management of those whose symptoms are 'treatment resistant'. The CoBalT trial examined the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) as an adjunct to usual care (including pharmacotherapy) for primary care patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) compared with usual care alone. Pragmatic, multicentre individually randomised controlled trial with follow-up at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. A subset took part in a qualitative study investigating views and experiences of CBT, reasons for completing/not completing therapy, and usual care for TRD. General practices in Bristol, Exeter and Glasgow, and surrounding areas. Patients aged 18-75 years who had TRD [on antidepressants for ≥ 6 weeks, had adhered to medication, Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd version (BDI-II) score of ≥ 14 and fulfilled the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth edition criteria for depression]. Individuals were excluded who (1) had bipolar disorder/psychosis or major alcohol/substance abuse problems; (2) were unable to complete the questionnaires; or (3) were pregnant, as were those currently receiving CBT/other psychotherapy/secondary care for depression, or who had received CBT in the past 3 years. Participants were randomised, using a computer-generated code, to usual care or CBT (12-18 sessions) in addition to usual care. The primary outcome was 'response', defined as ≥ 50% reduction in depressive symptoms (BDI-II score) at 6 months compared with baseline. Secondary outcomes included BDI-II score as a continuous variable, remission of symptoms (BDI-II score of anxiety and antidepressant use at 6 and 12 months. Data on health and social care use, personal costs, and time off work were collected at 6 and 12 months. Costs from these three perspectives were

  16. Neurocognitive processing of emotion facial expressions in individuals with self-reported depressive symptoms: the role of personality and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardaga, S; Iakimova, G

    2014-11-01

    Neurocognition may constitute one of the numerous factors that mediate the reciprocal influences between personality and depression. The present study explored the influence of personality and anxiety traits on the neurocognitive processing of emotional faces and specifically focused on personal characteristics related to negative (harm avoidance - HA) and positive affectivity (self-directedness - SD) and to anxiety. Twenty participants with self-reported depressive symptoms and 18 control participants were selected based on their BDI-II scores. Personality (TCI-R), anxiety and attention were measured and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during an implicit emotional face perception task (fear, sadness, happiness, neutrality). The participants who self-reported depressive symptoms had higher HA, lower SD and higher anxiety compared to controls. Controls showed enhanced P300 and LPP amplitudes for fear. Individuals with self-reported depression showed reduced ERPs amplitudes for happiness. HA did not account for the difference between the groups but high HA and high anxiety were positively correlated with enhanced P300 amplitude for fear in participants with depressive symptoms. In contrast, SD accounted for the difference between the groups but was not correlated to the ERP components' amplitudes recorded for facial expressions. Other personality dimensions (reward dependence, cooperativeness) influenced the ERPs recorded for facial emotions. Personality dimensions influence the neurocognitive processing of emotional faces in individuals with self-reported depressive symptoms, which may constitute a cognitive vulnerability to depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Stress, depression, quality of life and salivary cortisol levels in community health agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Berenice Scaletzky; Cocco, Rafaela Abreu; Radtke, Vinicius Augusto; Medeiros, João Ricardo Carvalho; Oses, Jean Pierre; Wiener, Carolina David; Jansen, Karen

    2016-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of and factors associated with depression and stress with perceived quality of life and the salivary cortisol levels in Community Health Agent (CHA). Materials and Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study of CHAs in Pelotas-RS, Brazil. Data collection, including sociodemographic information and factors related to work and health. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) II was used to assess depressive symptoms, Inventory of Stress Symptoms Lipp (ISSL) was used for the analysis of stress and the WHOQOL-BREF was used to investigate quality of life. Salivary cortisol was quantified via ELISA test. The assessments showed that 71.0% are in a state of stress resistance, 30.5% were in the alert state of stress and 32.8% were in the stress state of exhaustion. Depressive episodes (BDI≥12) were observed in 28.2%. The environmental domain had the lowest score for quality of life. We observed significantly higher salivary cortisol levels in CHAs with less than 1 year of service and with the lowest quality of life scores in the environmental subsection. A high prevalence of stress and depression was observed in this sample of CHAs. In addition, the worst levels of quality of life were identified in the environmental subsection. Cortisol levels corroborate these findings regarding quality of life within the environmental domain and began working less than a year previously.

  18. Effect of 'Exercise Without Movement' yoga method on mindfulness, anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbaños Roche, Laura; Miró Barrachina, María Teresa; Ibáñez Fernández, Ignacio

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the effect of the 'Exercise Without Movement' (E.W.M) yoga method on mindfulness and on the improvement of anxiety and depression symptoms. A quasi-experimental study examined the effect of one month E.W.M. intervention among 38 participants who were enrolled voluntarily to both groups, study (n = 16) and control (n = 22). Five participants dropped out during the study. The State Mindfulness Scale (SMS) was used to measure mindfulness. The Anxiety Inventory Beck (BAI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) were used to measure the anxiety and depression symptoms, respectively, before and after the intervention. Study group showed both a statistically significant increase in mindfulness and decrease in anxiety and depression symptoms, compared with the control group. The E.W.M. has been useful in the development of mindfulness and in the treatment of anxiety and depression symptoms and may represent a new method in the mindfulness-based therapeutic application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anxiety, depression, and quality of life in mothers of children with intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Raj Gogoi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intellectual disability (ID in children can trigger a range of psychological responses in parents. The present study was an attempt to investigate psychological conditions of mothers of children with ID and to determine whether these problems were more prominent in mothers of children with ID than mothers with healthy children. Aim and objectives were to investigate psychological impact (i.e. anxiety, depression, and quality of life [QOL] on mothers of children with ID. Materials and methods comprised of two groups of subjects, i.e. mothers of sixty children with ID and mothers of sixty healthy children. The study was conducted at the Outpatient Department of Lokopriya Gopinath Bordoloi Regional Institute of Mental Health (LGBRIMH, Tezpur, Assam. Both groups were assessed with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II; State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and World Health Organization QOL-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF. Data was analysed by descriptive statistics, correlation, and t test. Result: The results of the study conclusively found out that the mothers of children with ID were having higher anxiety and depression than mothers with healthy children. The anxiety and depression had negative correlation with QOL of mothers of children with ID. Conclusion: This study shows that anxiety and depression affected QOL in mothers of children with ID.

  20. Relationship among depression level, executive function and rumination in patients with depression%抑郁症患者抑郁水平与其执行功能、反刍思维间的关系分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金玲; 王海荣; 白华羽

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨抑郁症患者的抑郁水平与其执行功能、反刍思维之间的关系。方法选取103例抑郁症患者,采用一般资料问卷、执行功能行为评定量表( BRIEF-A)、反刍反应量表( RRS)和贝克抑郁量表( BDI-II)评估患者的抑郁严重程度、生态学执行功能、反刍思维倾向等,分析抑郁情绪与反刍思维、执行功能的关系。结果本组患者抑郁症状得分平均(25.12±12.85)分,反刍思维量表得分平均(48.84±15.46)分,执行功能行为评定量表总分平均(119.40±28.55)分。抑郁量表总分与反刍思维各维度和执行功能总分呈正相关,有统计学意义( r值分别为0.424,0.603,0.469,0.565;P<0.01)。回归分析显示,反刍思维对执行功能和抑郁存在部分中介作用,中介效应占总效应的39.4%。结论抑郁与反刍思维呈正相关,与执行功能的受损程度呈正相关,反刍思维与执行功能的受损程度呈正相关,反刍思维在执行功能与抑郁的关系中起部分中介作用。%Objective To explore the relationship among depression level, executive function and rumination in patients with depression. Methods We selected 103 patients with depression. And then, we investigated them about the depression level, ecological executive function, dispositions and so on with the general condition questionnaire, behavior rating inventory of executive function-adult version ( BRIEF-A ) , ruminative responses scale ( RRS) and Beck depression rating scale ( BDI-II) and analyzed the relationship among depressive emotion, executive function and rumination.Results The score of the depressive symptoms, RRS and BRIEF-A was (25.12±12.85),(48.84±15.46),(119.40±28.55). The total score of BDI-II had positive correlations with the score of all dimensions of RRS and the total score of BRIEF-A with significant differences ( r=0.424,0.603,0.469, 0.565;P<0.01). Regression analysis showed that rumination had a partly mediating effect

  1. Sensitivity to criticism differentially mediates the relationship between interpersonal problems and state and trait depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Adam P; Nelson, Sharon M; Lengu, Ketrin J; Huprich, Steven K

    2016-11-01

    Both state- and trait-like manifestations of depression have been associated with poor interpersonal functioning. One mechanism by which this could occur is through individuals' sensitivity to criticism. In the present study, 414 undergraduates were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (Beck et al. 1996) and Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory (Huprich et al. 1996) as representative measures of state and trait depression respectively. They also were assessed with self-report measures of sensitivity to criticism and interpersonal problems. Sensitivity to criticism significantly mediated the relationship between state and trait depression within five dimensions of interpersonal problems. However, sensitivity to criticism was more strongly related to the trait depression-interpersonal problems relationship than the state depression-interpersonal problems relationship, when controlling for state depression and trait depression respectively. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Changes in depression in a cohort of Danish HIV-positive individuals: time for routine screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjaer, Lotte; Laursen, Tinne; Christensen, Nils B

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to follow a cohort of HIV-positive individuals for 3 years in order to assess changes in depression, adherence, unsafe sex and emotional strains from living with HIV. Methods: Participants were assessed for depression, adherence, emotional strain and unsafe sex...... via a questionnaire. The Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI) was used to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI score of 20 or above (moderate to major depression) were offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Results: In 2005, 205 HIV......-positive individuals participated in the study. Symptoms of depression (BDI >14) were observed in 77 (38%) and major depression (BDI ≥20) in 53 (26%) individuals. In 2008, 148 participants were retested (72% of original sample). Depression (BDI >14) was observed in 38 (26%) and symptoms of major depression (BDI ≥20...

  3. Risks and protective factors associated with symptoms of depression in low-income African American and Caucasian women during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, D Elizabeth; Walcott-McQuigg, Jacqueline; Mariella, Anne; Swanson, Melvin S

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the risks and protective factors for symptoms of depression in pregnancy among low-income African American and Caucasian women. Data were collected from 130 women who were between 16 and 28 weeks' gestation and enrolled in an urban prenatal clinic. The questionnaires used in the face-to-face interviews consisted of sociodemographic items, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), the Prenatal Psychosocial Profile (PPP), 3 items from the Jarel Spiritual Well-Being Scale, the Spiritual Perspective Scale, and 4 items on health risk behaviors. Twenty-seven percent of the women reported depressive symptoms at levels indicating risk for clinical depression. However, there were no significant differences between African American and Caucasian women. Sociodemographic factors accounted for 13% of the variance (P self-esteem and social support, and higher religiosity had a significant relationship with more symptoms of depression. This supports the need to routinely screen for and to assess factors associated with depressive symptoms in pregnant low-income women.

  4. Group cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: Effects on sleep and depressive symptomatology in a sample with comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norell-Clarke, Annika; Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus; Tillfors, Maria; Holländare, Fredrik; Engström, Ingemar

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effects of group CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) on insomnia and depressive symptomatology in a comorbid sample through a randomised controlled trial with a 6 month follow-up. 64 participants were recruited through advertisements and randomised to receive CBT-I or an active control (relaxation training: RT) during four group sessions. Insomnia Severity Index and BDI-II were the primary outcome measures, assessed pre-treatment, post-treatment and at 6 month follow-up. Insomnia and depressive diagnoses, and functional impairment were assessed before and after treatment, whereas sleep diary data was gathered continuously from one week before treatment until after treatment. CBT-I was more efficient than RT in reducing insomnia severity and equally effective in reducing depressive symptoms, although CBT-I was associated with a higher proportion of remitted persons than RT, regarding both insomnia and depression diagnoses. Also, CBT-I was associated with less functional impairment, shorter sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset but both treatments had equal improvements of sleep quality, early morning awakenings and total sleep time. Group CBT-I is an efficient form of insomnia-treatment for people with insomnia comorbid with depressive symptomatology. The mixed results regarding depression outcomes warrants replication and further studies into treatment mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-esteem as an important factor in quality of life and depressive symptoms in anosmia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollndorfer, K; Reichert, J L; Brückler, B; Hinterleitner, V; Schöpf, V

    2017-02-25

    Previous research has reported a negative impact of olfactory dysfunction on quality of life (QoL) and depressive symptoms. As self-esteem was identified as a contributing factor to depression, this study aimed to investigate QoL, depressive symptoms and self-esteem in patients with smell loss. Prospective controlled study. Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna, in co-operation with the Department of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. Twenty-two anosmic patients (12 females, 10 males) and 25 healthy controls (15 females, 10 males) participated in this study. Olfactory performance was assessed using the Sniffin' Sticks battery. In addition, psychological questionnaires that covered the topics quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), depressive symptoms (BDI-II) and self-esteem (MSWS) were conducted. The results of this study revealed a decrease in QoL and reduced body-related self-esteem in anosmic patients. Furthermore, QoL and self-esteem were correlated with depressive symptoms. As self-esteem, QoL and depressive symptoms in anosmia interact with each other, we suggest that self-esteem should be considered in the medical history, in order to provide a personalised intervention, adapted to the patient's needs. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Otolaryngology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Physical activity in European adolescents and associations with anxiety, depression and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Elaine M; Corcoran, Paul; O'Regan, Grace; Keeley, Helen; Cannon, Mary; Carli, Vladimir; Wasserman, Camilla; Hadlaczky, Gergö; Sarchiapone, Marco; Apter, Alan; Balazs, Judit; Balint, Maria; Bobes, Julio; Brunner, Romuald; Cozman, Doina; Haring, Christian; Iosue, Miriam; Kaess, Michael; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Nemes, Bogdan; Podlogar, Tina; Poštuvan, Vita; Sáiz, Pilar; Sisask, Merike; Tubiana, Alexandra; Värnik, Peeter; Hoven, Christina W; Wasserman, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, physical activity, sport participation and associations with well-being, anxiety and depressive symptoms were examined in a large representative sample of European adolescents. A school-based survey was completed by 11,110 adolescents from ten European countries who took part in the SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe) study. The questionnaire included items assessing physical activity, sport participation and validated instruments assessing well-being (WHO-5), depressive symptoms (BDI-II) and anxiety (SAS). Multi-level mixed effects linear regression was used to examine associations between physical activity/sport participation and mental health measures. A minority of the sample (17.9 % of boys and 10.7 % of girls; p anxiety and depressive symptoms, up to a threshold of moderate frequency of activity. In a multi-level mixed effects model more frequent physical activity and participation in sport were both found to independently contribute to greater well-being and lower levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms in both sexes. Increasing activity levels and sports participation among the least active young people should be a target of community and school-based interventions to promote well-being. There does not appear to be an additional benefit to mental health associated with meeting the WHO-recommended levels of activity.

  7. Depressive Symptoms are the Main Predictor for Subjective Sleep Quality in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment--A Controlled Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Seidel

    Full Text Available Controlled data on predictors of subjective sleep quality in patients with memory complaints are sparse. To improve the amount of comprehensive data on this topic, we assessed factors associated with subjective sleep quality in patients from our memory clinic and healthy individuals.Between February 2012 and August 2014 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and subjective cognitive decline (SCD from our memory clinic and healthy controls were recruited. Apart from a detailed neuropsychological assessment, the subjective sleep quality, daytime sleepiness and depressive symptoms were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II.One hundred fifty eight consecutive patients (132 (84% MCI patients and 26 (16% SCD patients and 75 healthy controls were included in the study. Pairwise comparison of PSQI scores showed that non-amnestic MCI (naMCI patients (5.4 ± 3.5 had significantly higher PSQI scores than controls (4.3 ± 2.8, p = .003 Pairwise comparison of PSQI subscores showed that naMCI patients (1.1 ± 0.4 had significantly more "sleep disturbances" than controls (0.9 ± 0.5, p = .003. Amnestic MCI (aMCI (0.8 ± 1.2, p = .006 and naMCI patients (0.7 ± 1.2, p = .002 used "sleep medication" significantly more often than controls (0.1 ± 0.6 Both, aMCI (11.5 ± 8.6, p < .001 and naMCI (11.5 ± 8.6, p < .001 patients showed significantly higher BDI-II scores than healthy controls (6.1 ± 5.3. Linear regression analysis showed that the subjective sleep quality was predicted by depressive symptoms in aMCI (p < .0001 and naMCI (p < .0001 patients as well as controls (p < .0001. This means, that more depressive symptoms worsened subjective sleep quality. In aMCI patients we also found a significant interaction between depressive symptoms and global cognitive function (p = .002.Depressive symptoms were the main predictor of subjective sleep quality in MCI

  8. The Depression in Visual Impairment Trial (DEPVIT): trial design and protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margrain, Tom H; Nollett, Claire; Shearn, Julia; Stanford, Miles; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Ryan, Barbara; Bunce, Catey; Casten, Robin; Hegel, Mark T; Smith, Daniel J

    2012-06-06

    The prevalence of depression in people with a visual disability is high but screening for depression and referral for treatment is not yet an integral part of visual rehabilitation service provision. One reason for this may be that there is no good evidence about the effectiveness of treatments in this patient group. This study is the first to evaluate the effect of depression treatments on people with a visual impairment and co morbid depression. The study is an exploratory, multicentre, individually randomised waiting list controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to receive Problem Solving Therapy (PST), a 'referral to the GP' requesting treatment according to the NICE's 'stepped care' recommendations or the waiting list arm of the trial. The primary outcome measure is change (from randomisation) in depressive symptoms as measured by the Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II) at 6 months. Secondary outcomes include change in depressive symptoms at 3 months, change in visual function as measured with the near vision subscale of the VFQ-48 and 7 item NEI-VFQ at 3 and 6 months, change in generic health related quality of life (EQ5D), the costs associated with PST, estimates of incremental cost effectiveness, and recruitment rate estimation. Depression is prevalent in people with disabling visual impairment. This exploratory study will establish depression screening and referral for treatment in visual rehabilitation clinics in the UK. It will be the first to explore the efficacy of PST and the effectiveness of NICE's 'stepped care' approach to the treatment of depression in people with a visual impairment. ISRCTN46824140.

  9. The Depression in Visual Impairment Trial (DEPVIT: trial design and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrain Tom H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of depression in people with a visual disability is high but screening for depression and referral for treatment is not yet an integral part of visual rehabilitation service provision. One reason for this may be that there is no good evidence about the effectiveness of treatments in this patient group. This study is the first to evaluate the effect of depression treatments on people with a visual impairment and co morbid depression. Methods /design The study is an exploratory, multicentre, individually randomised waiting list controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to receive Problem Solving Therapy (PST, a ‘referral to the GP’ requesting treatment according to the NICE’s ‘stepped care’ recommendations or the waiting list arm of the trial. The primary outcome measure is change (from randomisation in depressive symptoms as measured by the Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI-II at 6 months. Secondary outcomes include change in depressive symptoms at 3 months, change in visual function as measured with the near vision subscale of the VFQ-48 and 7 item NEI-VFQ at 3 and 6 months, change in generic health related quality of life (EQ5D, the costs associated with PST, estimates of incremental cost effectiveness, and recruitment rate estimation. Discussion Depression is prevalent in people with disabling visual impairment. This exploratory study will establish depression screening and referral for treatment in visual rehabilitation clinics in the UK. It will be the first to explore the efficacy of PST and the effectiveness of NICE’s ‘stepped care’ approach to the treatment of depression in people with a visual impairment. Trial registration ISRCTN46824140

  10. Cognitive Functions and Depression in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

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    Per G. Farup

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is associated with depression and depression with impaired cognitive functions. The primary aim was to study associations between depression and cognitive functions in patients with IBS. Methods. IBS (according to the Rome III criteria, cognitive functions (evaluated with a set of neuropsychological tests, and depression (measured with Beck Depression Inventory II and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale were analysed in patients with idiopathic depression and in patients with unspecified neurological symptoms. Results. 18 and 48 patients with a mean age of 47 and 45 years were included in the “Depression” and “Neurological” group, respectively. In the “Depression” group, the degree of depression was significantly higher in patients with IBS than in those without. Depression was associated with impaired cognitive function in 6 out of 17 neuropsychological tests indicating reduced set shifting, verbal fluency, attention, and psychomotor speed. IBS was statistically significantly associated with depression but not with any of the tests for cognitive functions. Conclusions. IBS was associated with depression but not with impaired cognitive functions. Since the idiopathic depression was associated with cognitive deficits, the findings could indicate that the depression in patients with IBS differs from an idiopathic depression.

  11. Depression symptomatology and the neural correlates of infant face and cry perception during pregnancy.

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    Rutherford, Helena J V; Graber, Kelsey M; Mayes, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    Depression symptoms during pregnancy may affect emerging maternal sensitivity and have lasting consequences for the dyadic relationship. Here, we examined whether depression was associated with the neural correlates of infant face and cry perception during pregnancy. In 36 women between 34 and 38 weeks gestation, we examined the P300 elicited by infant emotional (happy, distressed, and neutral) faces and cries (high- and low-distress cries and a neutral tone). The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory-II were employed to measure current depression symptomatology. Higher depression symptoms were associated with an attenuated P300 to distressed infant faces, but not with happy or neutral infant faces. There was no association between depression symptoms and the P300 elicited by infant cries. These results suggest that depression symptoms during pregnancy may affect neural processing of infant faces, especially when the infant face is expressing distress.

  12. Psychometric Properties of the Attitudes toward Self-Revised in Italian Young Adults

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    Marco Innamorati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives and Methods. Several researchers have provided support for the critical role of cognitive vulnerabilities in the development of depression. The Attitudes toward Self-Revised (ATS-R was designed to assess three potential self-regulatory vulnerabilities to depression: High Standards (HS, Self-Criticism (SC, and Negative Generalization (NG. The aim of the study was to assess the psychometric properties of the ATS-R in the Italian young adult population. The ATS-R, the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS, and the Teate Depression Inventory (TDI were administered to 857 (320 men and 537 women young adults. Results. The best-fitting solution for the ATS-R was a 2-factor model, which obtained satisfactory homogeneity of content (HS/SC: Cronbach ; mean interitem correlation = 0.46. NG: Cronbach ; mean interitem correlation = 0.43 and significant correlation with the BDI-II (NG: Pearson , , the TDI (HS/SC: Pearson , , and the BHS (HS/SC: Pearson , ; NG: Pearson , . Conclusions. The Italian version of the ATS-R seems to be a valid instrument for the study of the role of cognitive tendencies as potential vulnerability for depression.

  13. Usefulness of the Reliable Change Index for psychology and psychiatry in clinical practice: a case report of cognitive-behavioral therapy

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    Danielle de Souza Costa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The reliable change index (RCI is a simple statistical computation which estimate if changes in two psychometric measures are probably due to measurement error or can be accounted by other factor, as a clinical intervention. Despite its clinical usefulness, the method is underutilized by psychiatrists and psychologists. We consider the use of the RCI in clinical practice by a case report of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Method: a female patient of 40 years old sought cognitive-behavioral therapy due to symptoms of depression. We structured the intervention in 16 sessions and used Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II for the assessment of depressive symptoms and answered in each session. Using published data about the BDI-II reliability and its standard deviation, we calculated the RCI before and after the intervention. Results and conclusions: The patient started the treatment with moderate to severe symptoms of depression and showed almost a linear decrease of the symptoms along the sections. Although no reliable change could be associated with the first month of treatment, starting at the second month, we documented a reliable decrease in the depressive symptoms from session 4 to 16. The RCI index it’s a useful method to assess if changes in psychometric measures may represent real change or occur by measurement error.

  14. Elevated social stress levels and depressive symptoms in primary hyperhidrosis.

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    Gross, Katharina M; Schote, Andrea B; Schneider, Katja Kerstin; Schulz, André; Meyer, Jobst

    2014-01-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis is defined as excessive sweating of certain body areas without physiological reasons. Hyperhidrotic individuals report a high psychological strain and an impairment of their quality of life. Thus, the aim of the study is to investigate the relation between hyperhidrosis and different psychological as well as physiological aspects of chronic stress as a co-factor for the etiology of depression. In this study, forty hyperhidrotic subjects were compared to forty age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. The Trier Inventory of Chronic Stress ('Trierer Inventar zum chronischen Stress': TICS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Screening for Somatoform Disorders (SOMS-2) were used to examine the correlation between primary hyperhidrosis and stress as well as accompanying depressive and somatic symptoms. The cortisol awakening response of each subject was analyzed as a physiological stress correlate. In hyperhidrotics, we found a significant lack of social recognition as well as significantly more depressive symptoms compared to the control subjects. A subgroup of patients with axillary hyperhidrosis had the highest impact on these increased issues of chronic stress, pointing to a higher embarrassment in these subjects. Especially in social situations, hyperhidrotics showed higher stress levels, whereby a vicious circle of stress and sweating is triggered. However, the cortisol awakening response did not significantly differ between hyperhidrotics and controls. Moreover, affected persons suffer from more depressive symptoms, which may be caused by feelings of shame and a lack of self-confidence. This initial study provides an impetus for further investigation to reveal a causative relationship between hyperhidrosis and its psychological concomitants.

  15. Elevated social stress levels and depressive symptoms in primary hyperhidrosis.

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    Katharina M Gross

    Full Text Available Primary hyperhidrosis is defined as excessive sweating of certain body areas without physiological reasons. Hyperhidrotic individuals report a high psychological strain and an impairment of their quality of life. Thus, the aim of the study is to investigate the relation between hyperhidrosis and different psychological as well as physiological aspects of chronic stress as a co-factor for the etiology of depression. In this study, forty hyperhidrotic subjects were compared to forty age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. The Trier Inventory of Chronic Stress ('Trierer Inventar zum chronischen Stress': TICS, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Screening for Somatoform Disorders (SOMS-2 were used to examine the correlation between primary hyperhidrosis and stress as well as accompanying depressive and somatic symptoms. The cortisol awakening response of each subject was analyzed as a physiological stress correlate. In hyperhidrotics, we found a significant lack of social recognition as well as significantly more depressive symptoms compared to the control subjects. A subgroup of patients with axillary hyperhidrosis had the highest impact on these increased issues of chronic stress, pointing to a higher embarrassment in these subjects. Especially in social situations, hyperhidrotics showed higher stress levels, whereby a vicious circle of stress and sweating is triggered. However, the cortisol awakening response did not significantly differ between hyperhidrotics and controls. Moreover, affected persons suffer from more depressive symptoms, which may be caused by feelings of shame and a lack of self-confidence. This initial study provides an impetus for further investigation to reveal a causative relationship between hyperhidrosis and its psychological concomitants.

  16. Branched-Chain Amino Acids as New Biomarkers of Major Depression - A Novel Neurobiology of Mood Disorder

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    Baranyi, Andreas; Amouzadeh-Ghadikolai, Omid; von Lewinski, Dirk; Rothenhäusler, Hans-Bernd; Theokas, Simon; Robier, Christoph; Mangge, Harald; Reicht, Gerhard; Hlade, Peter; Meinitzer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background The proteinogenic branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) valine, leucine and isoleucine might play an unrecognised crucial role in the development of depression through their activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. The aim of this research project is to evaluate whether BCAAs are altered in patients with major depression and might thus be appropriate biomarkers for major depression. Methods The concentrations of valine, leucine and isoleucine were determined in 71 in-patients with major depression and 48 healthy controls by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Psychiatric and laboratory assessments were obtained at the time of in-patient admittance. Results The BCAAs are significantly decreased in patients with major depression in comparison with healthy subjects (valine: Mann-Whitney-U: 968.0; p <0.0001, leucine: Mann-Whitney-U: 1246.5; p = 0.013, isoleucine: Mann-Whitney-U: 1252.5; p = 0.014). Furthermore, as shown by Spearman's rank correlation coefficients, there is a significant negative correlation between valine, leucine and isoleucine concentrations and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) as well as Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) scores. Conclusions Our study results are strong evidence that in patients with major depression, BCAAs might be appropriate biomarkers for depression. Reduced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) due to a reduction of BCAAs might play a crucial unrecognised factor in the etiology of depression and may evoke depressive symptomatology and lower energy metabolism in patients with major depression. In the future, mTor and its up- and downstream signalling partners might be important targets for the development of novel antidepressants. PMID:27490818

  17. ICF, quality of life, and depression in breast cancer: perceived disability in disease-free women 6 months after mastectomy.

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    Giardini, Anna; Anna, Giardini; Pisoni, Camilla; Camilla, Pisoni; Giorgi, Ines; Ines, Giorgi; Borelli, Veronica; Veronica, Borelli; Scoccia, Elisabetta; Elisabetta, Scoccia; Majani, Giuseppina; Giuseppina, Majani

    2013-09-01

    Aim of the present observational study is to focus on health-related quality of life (HRQL), mood and everyday life of breast cancer affected women disease-free 6 months after mastectomy, paying particular attention to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework contribution. Sixty-five breast cancer-affected women disease-free 6 months after mastectomy hospitalized for reconstructive surgery (mean age 46.3 ± 7.3) were enrolled. Their depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-BDI-II), HRQL, and every day life functioning/barriers and facilitators (ICF) were assessed. At the BDI-II, 6 patients (9.2 %) reported mild depression and 6 (9.2 %) severe depression; when the subscales were considered, 7 (10.8%) resulted depressed at the somatic-affective factor and 16 (24.6 %) at the cognitive factor. Compared to normative data no differences emerged at the HRQL Physical Component Summary (46.4 ± 9.3 vs 49.1 ± 10.1), whereas patients reported lower scores at the Mental HRQL Component Summary (45.9 ± 10.1 vs 51.5 ± 9.1; p = 0.00001 t = -4.3). As for the activity and participation domain, 11 of the 42 categories investigated were compromised in at least 20% of the sample: lifting and carrying objects (d430), acquisition of goods and services (d620), doing housework (d640), remunerative employment (d850), and many categories relating to interpersonal relationships; moreover the caregiver seems to be perceived as an important and positive modulator of disability. The addition of the ICF evaluation to the usual psychological assessment gives a more complete picture, enabling a broader perspective of the psychological-clinical implications. Mainly, the women that we have evaluated continue to function in their everyday lives, thanks in part to their ability to accept help from their own families. However, they inevitably carry signs of their disease which some translating into problems with interpersonal relationships

  18. Intimate partner violence: relationships between alexithymia, depression, attachment styles, and coping strategies of battered women.

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    Craparo, Giuseppe; Gori, Alessio; Petruccelli, Irene; Cannella, Vincenza; Simonelli, Chiara

    2014-06-01

    One of the most common forms of violence against women is the intimate partner violence (IPV). This term includes physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and controlling behaviors by an intimate partner. This exploratory study investigates the relationship between alexithymia, adult attachment styles, depression, and coping strategies in a group of female victims of IPV and a control group. Participants were 80 female victims of IPV with an age range from 18 years to 54 years (mean 31.62; standard deviation 9.81). The control group included 80 women with no history of IPV with an age range from 19 years to 37 years (mean 25.05; standard deviation 3.67). We administered the following self-report questionnaires: (i) 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20); (ii) Coping Orientation Problems Experienced; (iii) Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II; and (iv) Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ). Compared with control group, the IPV group showed higher mean scores on TAS-20 (52.9 vs. 41.1, P relationships as secondary (P relationships (P relationships on ASQ, but not with the secure attachment style. In comparison to the control group, alexithymia, depressive symptoms, and an insecure attachment style were negatively correlated with the ability to cope with stress for women in the IPV group. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  19. The influence of comorbid personality disorder on the effects of behavioural activation vs. antidepressant medication for major depressive disorder: results from a randomized trial in Iran.

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    Moradveisi, Latif; Huibers, Marcus J H; Renner, Fritz; Arasteh, Modabber; Arntz, Arnoud

    2013-08-01

    There is a disagreement about the impact of personality disorder (PD) on treatment outcome for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). 100 out-patients with MDD were randomized to 16 sessions of behavioural activation (BA) (n = 50) or antidepressant medication (ADM) (n = 50) in Iran. Main outcome was depression severity, measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), and assessed at 0, 4, 13 and 49 weeks. Participants with comorbid PDs had higher scores on BDI and HRSD at baseline and throughout the study than participants without comorbid PD. Patients with and without comorbid personality pathology responded equally to treatment on the short-and the long-term. Overall, BA was better in reducing symptoms in patients but this effect was not influenced by comorbid PD. Similar effects were found for a dimensional PD-measure. Only cluster-C PD-traits turned out to be associated with overall depression severity. Cluster-A PD-traits predicted poorer long-term treatment response to ADM and BA, but only on the BDI, not on the HRSD. No effects of cluster-B PD-traits were found. However, PD was associated with higher dropout. The general conclusion is that comorbid PD pathology, especially from cluster-C, is associated with higher depression severity, but not with less response to treatment. Comorbid PD did predict increased chance of dropout.

  20. Evaluation of a system of structured, pro-active care for chronic depression in primary care: a randomised controlled trial

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    Beecham Jennifer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with chronic depression are frequently lost from effective care, with resulting psychological, physical and social morbidity and considerable social and financial societal costs. This randomised controlled trial will evaluate whether regular structured practice nurse reviews lead to better mental health and social outcomes for these patients and will assess the cost-effectiveness of the structured reviews compared to usual care. The hypothesis is that structured, pro-active care of patients with chronic depression in primary care will lead to a cost-effective improvement in medical and social outcomes when compared with usual general practitioner (GP care. Methods/Design Participants were recruited from 42 general practices throughout the United Kingdom. Eligible participants had to have a history of chronic major depression, recurrent major depression or chronic dsythymia confirmed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. They also needed to score 14 or above on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II at recruitment. Once consented, participants were randomised to treatment as usual from their general practice (controls or the practice nurse led intervention. The intervention includes a specially prepared education booklet and a comprehensive baseline assessment of participants' mood and any associated physical and psycho-social factors, followed by regular 3 monthly reviews by the nurse over the 2 year study period. At these appointments intervention participants' mood will be reviewed, together with their current pharmacological and psychological treatments and any relevant social factors, with the nurse suggesting possible amendments according to evidence based guidelines. This is a chronic disease management model, similar to that used for other long-term conditions in primary care. The primary outcome is the BDI-II, measured at baseline and 6 monthly by self-complete postal questionnaire

  1. Extreme sensory processing patterns show a complex association with depression, and impulsivity, alexithymia, and hopelessness.

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    Serafini, Gianluca; Gonda, Xenia; Canepa, Giovanna; Pompili, Maurizio; Rihmer, Zoltan; Amore, Mario; Engel-Yeger, Batya

    2017-03-01

    The involvement of extreme sensory processing patterns, impulsivity, alexithymia, and hopelessness was hypothesized to contribute to the complex pathophysiology of major depression and bipolar disorder. However, the nature of the relation between these variables has not been thoroughly investigated. This study aimed to explore the association between extreme sensory processing patterns, impulsivity, alexithymia, depression, and hopelessness. We recruited 281 euthymic participants (mean age=47.4±12.1) of which 62.3% with unipolar major depression and 37.7% with bipolar disorder. All participants completed the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP), Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), second version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS), and Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS). Lower registration of sensory input showed a significant correlation with depression, impulsivity, attentional/motor impulsivity, and alexithymia. It was significantly more frequent among participants with elevated hopelessness, and accounted for 22% of the variance in depression severity, 15% in greater impulsivity, 36% in alexithymia, and 3% in hopelessness. Elevated sensory seeking correlated with enhanced motor impulsivity and decreased non-planning impulsivity. Higher sensory sensitivity and sensory avoiding correlated with depression, impulsivity, and alexithymia. The study was limited by the relatively small sample size and cross-sectional nature of the study. Furthermore, only self-report measures that may be potentially biased by social desirability were used. Extreme sensory processing patterns, impulsivity, alexithymia, depression, and hopelessness may show a characteristic pattern in patients with major affective disorders. The careful assessment of sensory profiles may help in developing targeted interventions and improve functional/adaptive strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Acupuncture, Counseling, and Usual care for Depression (ACUDep: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    MacPherson Hugh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence on the effect of acupuncture or counseling for depression is not conclusive yet is sufficient to warrant further research. Our aim is to conduct a full-scale RCT to determine the clinical and cost effectiveness of acupuncture and counseling compared to usual care alone. We will explore the experiences and perspectives of patients and practitioners. Methods/Design Randomized controlled trial with three parallel arms: acupuncture plus usual care, counseling plus usual care, and usual care alone, in conjunction with a nested qualitative study using in-depth interviews with purposive samples of trial participants. Participants: Patients aged over 18 years diagnosed with depression or mood disorder by their GP and with a score of 20 or above on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II. Randomization: Computer randomization by York Trials Unit to acupuncture, counseling, and usual care alone in proportions of 2:2:1, respectively, with secure allocation concealment. Interventions: Patients allocated to acupuncture and counseling groups receive the offer of up to 12 weekly sessions. Both interventions allow flexibility to address patient variation, yet are constrained within defined protocols. Acupuncture is based on traditional Chinese medicine and counseling is non-directive within the humanistic tradition. Outcome: The PHQ-9 is the primary outcome measure, collected at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Also measured is BDI-II, SF-36 Bodily pain subscale, and EQ-5D. Texted mood scores are collected weekly over the first 15 weeks. Health-related resource use is collected over 12 months. Analysis: The sample size target was for 640 participants, calculated for an effect size of 0.32 on the PHQ-9 when comparing acupuncture with counseling given 90% power, 5% significance, and 20% loss to follow-up. Analysis of covariance will be used on an intention-to-treat basis. Thematic analysis will be used for qualitative data. We will

  3. Aripiprazole Augmentation in the Treatment of Military-Related PTSD with Major Depression: a retrospective chart review

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    Fikretoglu Deniz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this chart review, we attempted to evaluate the benefits of adding aripiprazole in veterans with military-related PTSD and comorbid depression, who had been minimally or partially responsive to their existing medications. Methods A retrospective chart review of patients who received an open-label, flexible-dose, 12- week course of adjunctive aripiprazole was conducted in 27 military veterans meeting DSM-IV criteria for PTSD and comorbid major depression. Concomitant psychiatric medications continued unchanged, except for other antipsychotics which were discontinued prior to initiating aripiprazole. The primary outcome variable was a change from baseline in the PTSD checklist-military version (PCL-M and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II. Results PTSD severity (Total PCL scores decreased from 56.11 at baseline to 46.85 at 12-weeks (p Conclusions The addition of aripiprazole contributed to a reduction in both PTSD and depression symptomatology in a population that has traditionally demonstrated poor pharmacological response. Further investigations, including double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, are essential to confirm and further demonstrate the benefit of aripiprazole augmentation in the treatment of military related PTSD.

  4. The Effectiveness of Cognitive-Existential Group Therapy on Increasing Hope and Decreasing Depression in Women-Treated With Haemodialysis.

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    Bahmani, Bahman; Motamed Najjar, Maryam; Sayyah, Mansour; Shafi-Abadi, Abdollah; Haddad Kashani, Hamed

    2015-11-17

    Hopefulness is one of the most significant predictors of adaptation in hemodialysis patients, and plays a vital role in the recovery process. In contrast to hopefulness, depression is a frequent psychological reaction of the hemodialysis treatment with many negative consequences. The current research was designed to examine the effect of cognitive-existential treatment on the level of hopefulness and depression in hemodialysis patients. This quasi-experimental research included 22 female patients suffering from chronic kidney failure disease undergoing hemodialysis treatment for at least 3 months. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups of experimental and control conditions. The experimental group received a combination of treatment including some elements of "existentialism" philosophy and a "cognitive" approach designed for the Iranian population. The treatment protocol lasted for 12 sessions of 90 minutes twice per week prior to the entry of the patient to the dialysis session.  Miller's hope scale and BDI-II-21 were employed to collect the data. Statistical analysis was performed on the data using analysis of covariance by SPSS: 16 software. The result of the analysis indicated that there was a significant improvement in hopefulness level and decrease in depression of the patients in the experiment condition (Pexistential treatment resulted in the increase of hopefulness and decrease level of depression in the hemodialysis patients suffering from chronic kidney failure.

  5. The Effectiveness of Cognitive-Existential Group Therapy on Increasing Hope and Decreasing Depression in Women-Treated with Haemodialysis

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    Bahmani, Bahman; Najjar, Maryam Motamed; Sayyah, Mansour; Shafi-Abadi, Abdollah; Kashani, Hamed Haddad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hopefulness is one of the most significant predictors of adaptation in hemodialysis patients, and plays a vital role in the recovery process. In contrast to hopefulness, depression is a frequent psychological reaction of the hemodialysis treatment with many negative consequences. The current research was designed to examine the effect of cognitive-existential treatment on the level of hopefulness and depression in hemodialysis patients. Materials & Methods: This quasi-experimental research included 22 female patients suffering from chronic kidney failure disease undergoing hemodialysis treatment for at least 3 months. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups of experimental and control conditions. The experimental group received a combination of treatment including some elements of “existentialism” philosophy and a “cognitive” approach designed for the Iranian population. The treatment protocol lasted for 12 sessions of 90 minutes twice per week prior to the entry of the patient to the dialysis session. Miller’s hope scale and BDI-II-21 were employed to collect the data. Statistical analysis was performed on the data using analysis of covariance by SPSS: 16 software. Results: The result of the analysis indicated that there was a significant improvement in hopefulness level and decrease in depression of the patients in the experiment condition (Pexistential treatment resulted in the increase of hopefulness and decrease level of depression in the hemodialysis patients suffering from chronic kidney failure. PMID:26755466

  6. Childhood abuse increases the risk of depressive and anxiety symptoms and history of suicidal behavior in Mexican pregnant women

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    Ma. Asunción Lara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To explore the relationship between individual and co-occurring childhood sexual, physical, and verbal abuse, prenatal depressive (PDS and anxiety symptoms (PAS, and history of suicidal behavior (HSB among Mexican pregnant women at risk of depression.Methods:A sample of 357 women screened for PDS was interviewed using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire (CECA-Q, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, the anxiety subscale of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist (SCL-90, and specific questions on verbal abuse and HSB.Results:Logistic regression analyses showed that women who had experienced childhood sexual abuse (CSA were 2.60 times more likely to develop PDS, 2.58 times more likely to develop PAS, and 3.71 times more likely to have HSB. Childhood physical abuse (CPA increased the risk of PAS (odds ratio [OR] = 2.51 and HSB (OR = 2.62, while childhood verbal abuse (CVA increased PDS (OR = 1.92. Experiencing multiple abuses increased the risk of PDS (OR = 3.01, PAS (OR = 3.73, and HSB (OR = 13.73.Conclusions:Childhood sexual, physical, and verbal abuse, especially when they co-occur, have an impact on PDS and PAS and lifetime HSB. These findings suggest that pregnant women at risk for depression should also be screened for trauma as a risk factor for perinatal psychopathology.

  7. Interaction between anxiety, depression, quality of life and clinical parameters in chronic tension-type headache.

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    Peñacoba-Puente, Cecilia; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; González-Gutierrez, Jose L; Miangolarra-Page, Juan C; Pareja, Juan A

    2008-10-01

    Our aim was to investigate the mediating or moderating role of anxiety and depression in the relationship between headache clinical parameters and quality of life in Chronic Tension-Type Headache (CTTH). Twenty-five patients diagnosed with CTTH according to the criteria of the International Headache Society were studied. A headache diary was kept for 4 weeks in order to substantiate the diagnosis and record the pain history. Quality of life was assessed by means of the Medical Outcome Study (MOS) 36-Item Short-Form (SF-36) questionnaire. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) was used to assess depression, and the Trait Anxiety Scale (TA) from the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was administered in order to assess anxiety. Moderating and mediating analyses were conducted with ordinary least squares multiple regression analysis using the SPSS General Linear Model procedure. Anxiety mediated the effect between headache frequency and quality of life, but not the effect of either headache intensity or duration. Anxiety totally mediated the effects of headache frequency on vitality, social functioning and mental health. On the other hand, depression modulated the effect in the mental health domain. The effect in the mental health domain was a function of the interaction between headache duration and depression (beta=-0.34, p<0.05), after controlling for age, gender, the main effects of headache duration, and depression. We did not find anxiety to be a moderating factor between intensity, frequency or duration of headache and perceived quality of life. Anxiety exerts a mediating effect, conditioning the relationship between headache frequency and some quality of life domains; depression seems to play an inherent role in the reduced quality of life of these patients, that is, it has a moderating effect.

  8. Magnitude of negative interpretation bias depends on severity of depression.

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    Lee, Jong-Sun; Mathews, Andrew; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the hypothesis that the magnitude of negative interpretation bias displayed by those with depression is related to the degree of depression they experience. Seventy one depressed participants (scoring 14 and above on the Beck Depression Inventory II) completed tasks spanning three domains of possible negative interpretations: semantic ambiguity; nonverbal ambiguity and situational ambiguity. Regression analyses revealed that just under half of the variance in depressive symptom severity was explained by the combination of negative interpretation bias tasks, with the strongest predictor of depressive symptom severity being negative interpretation of semantic ambiguity when reading ambiguous text descriptions. Subsidiary group analyses confirmed that severely depressed individuals interpreted emotionally ambiguous information in a more negative way than did their mildly or moderately depressed counterparts. These findings indicate that the degree of negative interpretive bias is closely related to depression severity and that bias manifests especially strongly at the most severe levels of depression. Our findings may help us to refine cognitive theories of depression and be helpful in guiding therapy.

  9. Association Between Perceived Social Support and Depression in Postmenopausal Women

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    Tadayon Najafabadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The most common symptom in early menopausal women is depression. Depression is a type of chronic disease that impacts on postmenopausal women’s life. Social support plays a protective role for women and enables them to solve their life problems and thus, feel less depressed. Objectives We assessed depression as a chronic disease and evaluated the association between perceived social support and depression in postmenopausal women. Patients and Methods This correlation-analytic study was conducted on 321 postmenopausal women using 2-stage cluster sampling in Ahvaz in 2014. Data collecting instruments were comprised of a demographic questionnaire, a depression scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, and a social support questionnaire (PRQ 85-Part 2. Data analysis was done using SPSS, version 20. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the relationship between perceived social support and depression, and the χ2 test was employed to assess the relationship between perceived social support and demographic characteristics. Results The Spearman correlation test revealed a significant reverse relationship between perceived social support and depression (r = -0.468; P = 0.001. There were significant relationships between perceived social support and some personal variables such as marital status, education level, and job status (P 0.05. Conclusions We found a reverse relationship between perceived social support and depression in postmenopausal women. Raising awareness in society apropos the relationship between social support and depression in postmenopausal women can enhance their quality of life.

  10. The effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy in treating a case of obsessive compulsive disorder.

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    Vakili, Yaghoob; Gharraee, Banafshe

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in treating obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). In a single-subject experiment trial, the treatment process was carried out on a 39-year old male subject. The patient satisfied the DSM-IV-TR criteria for OCD and was assessed for pre-duration and post treatment. The scales used in this study included: The Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale(Y-BOCS), Beck Depression Inventory-II-second edition (BDI-II), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). In addition, all scales were again completed by the subject at 1-month, 3-months, and 6-months follow-ups. The treatment led to reductions in symptoms of OCD, depression and anxiety. Gains were maintained at follow-ups. The treatment approach appears to be effective in the treatment of OCD.

  11. The effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy in treating a case of obsessive compulsive disorder.

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    Yaghoob Vakili

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT in treating obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD.In a single-subject experiment trial, the treatment process was carried out on a 39-year old male subject. The patient satisfied the DSM-IV-TR criteria for OCD and was assessed for pre-duration and post treatment. The scales used in this study included: The Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale(Y-BOCS, Beck Depression Inventory-II-second edition (BDI-II, and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI. In addition, all scales were again completed by the subject at 1-month, 3-months, and 6-months follow-ups.The treatment led to reductions in symptoms of OCD, depression and anxiety. Gains were maintained at follow-ups.The treatment approach appears to be effective in the treatment of OCD.

  12. The Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy on Reduction of Craving, Depression and Anxiety Symptoms among the Opiate Abusers Under MMT

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    Fereshtwh Momeni

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of cognitive behavior group therapy on reduction of craving, depression and anxiety symptoms among the Opiate abusers under MMT. Method: In this experimental research, 36 addicts on MMT were selected between the entire opiate addicts referred to Iranian national center for addiction studies (INCAS by convenience sampling and were randomly assigned into experimental and control groups. In experimental group, cognitive behavior group therapy was performed in 8 sessions, one each week. Sessions were performed for craving, depression and anxiety management. Data was gathered by demographic questionnaire, scale of relapse predicts craving assessment, BDI-II and BAI for depression and anxiety symptoms assessment. The data was analyzed, independent and paired samples t test. Results: Data analysis revealed that craving index was decreased in post- test and follow-up and it was statistically significant. Also beck depression and anxiety symptoms were decreased significantly in post-test and follow-up. Conclusion: The results show that cognitive-behavior group therapy was efficient on reduction of drug craving, depression, and anxiety symptoms in post-test and follow-up, and it can apply as a method of treatment.

  13. Serum Magnesium Status in Patients Subjects with Depression in the City of Yazd in Iran 2013-2014.

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    Rajizadeh, Afsaneh; Mozaffari-Khosravi, Hassan; Yassini-Ardakani, Mojtaba; Dehghani, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Depression is the most common mental disorder and involves many factors. The regulatory effects of magnesium on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) channels make it a factor in the treatment of depression. The present study investigated the level of serum magnesium in subjects diagnosed with depression in the city of Yazd in Iran. This cross-sectional study was done from January 2013 to January 2014 on 650 patients with depression who agreed to participate in this study. Diagnosis was made using the Beck Depression Inventory test (BDI-II); those scoring higher than 11 were sent to the medical school laboratory for further testing of serum magnesium levels. The mean age of the patients was 34.16 ± 9.12 years. Of the 650 subjects, 195 were male (30 %) and 455 were female (70 %). The total mean serum magnesium was 2.1 ± 0.26 mg/dl. The prevalence of hypomagnesemia 13.7 %, hypermagnesemia 8.3 %, and sub-optimal magnesium levels was 26.5 %. Sub-optimal prevalence in women (28.1 %) was higher than in men (26.2 %). A significant relationship was observed between depression and serum magnesium level (p = 0.02). The results indicated that the prevalence of hypomagnesemia in subjects diagnosed with depression is high compared to non-depressed individuals. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between hypomagnesemia and intensity of depression that suggests a role for this element in the pathogenesis of the disorder. The high sub-optimal prevalence among women indicates that increased attention should be paid to this group.

  14. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DEPRESSION AND ATTENTION IN PATIENTS WITH MILD CRANEOENCEPHALIC TRAUMA

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    NATALIA BECERRA

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this correlational descriptive study was to explore the relationship between depression and attention onpatients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI. The Spanish version of The Stroop Color and Word Test and the BeckDepression Inventory-II were applied to a sample of 64 participants between 19 and 61 years old. The t, chi square andPearson correlation tests were applied. In the healthy controls there was no significative relation, while in the patients withMTBI a relationship in the condition of the color-word from the Stroop Color and Word Test was identified.

  15. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DEPRESSION AND ATTENTION IN PATIENTS WITH MILD CRANEOENCEPHALIC TRAUMA

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    NATALIA BECERRA; JUAN RESTREPO; JORGE HERRERA

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this correlational descriptive study was to explore the relationship between depression and attention onpatients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). The Spanish version of The Stroop Color and Word Test and the BeckDepression Inventory-II were applied to a sample of 64 participants between 19 and 61 years old. The t, chi square andPearson correlation tests were applied. In the healthy controls there was no significative relation, while in the patients withMTBI a relation...

  16. Post-traumatic stress, depression, and community integration a long time after whiplash injury

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    Britt-Marie Stålnacke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychological factors such as post-traumatic stress and depression may play an important role in the recovery after whiplash injuries. Difficulties in psychosocial functioning with limitations in everyday life may dominate for some time after the injury. Our study therefore investigates the relationships between pain, post-traumatic stress, depression, and community integration. A set of questionnaires was answered by 191 persons (88 men, 103 women five years after a whiplash injury to assess pain intensity (visual analogue scale, VAS, whiplash-related symptoms, post-traumatic stress (impact of event scale, IES, depression (Beck depression inventory, BDI-II, community integration (community integration questionnaire, CIQ, life satisfaction (LiSat-11. One or more depressive symptoms were reported by 74% of persons; 22% reported scores that were classified as mild to severe depression. The presence of at least one post-traumatic symptom was reported by 70% of persons, and 38% reported mild to severe stress. Total scores of community integration for women were statistically significantly higher than for men. The total VAS score was correl-ated positively to the IES (r=0.456, P less than 0.456, the BDI (r=0.646, P less than 0.001, and negatively to the CIQ (r=-0.300, P less than 0.001. These results highlight the view that a significant proportion of people experience both pain and psycho- logical difficulties for a long time after a whiplash injury. These findings should be taken into consideration in the management of subjects with chronic whiplash symptoms and may support a multi-professional rehabilitation model that integrates physical, psychological, and psychosocial factors.

  17. Smartphone-Supported versus Full Behavioural Activation for Depression: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

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    Kien Hoa Ly

    Full Text Available There is need for more cost and time effective treatments for depression. This is the first randomised controlled trial in which a blended treatment--including four face-to-face sessions and a smartphone application--was compared against a full behavioural treatment. Hence, the aim of the current paper was to examine whether a blended smartphone treatment was non-inferior to a full behavioural activation treatment for depression.This was a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial (NCT01819025 comparing a blended treatment (n=46 against a full ten-session treatment (n=47 for people suffering from major depression. Primary outcome measure was the BDI-II, that was administered at pre- and post-treatment, as well as six months after the treatment.Results showed significant improvements in both groups across time on the primary outcome measure (within-group Cohen's d=1.35; CI [-0.82, 3.52] to d=1.47; CI [-0.41, 3.35]; between group d=-0.13 CI [-2.37, 2.09] and d=-0.10 CI [-2.53, 2.33]. At the same time, the blended treatment reduced the therapist time with an average of 47%.We could not establish whether the blended treatment was non-inferior to a full BA treatment. Nevertheless, this study points to that the blended treatment approach could possibly treat nearly twice as many patients suffering from depression by using a smartphone application as add-on. More studies are needed before we can suggest that the blended treatment method is a promising cost-effective alternative to regular face-to-face treatment for depression.Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment of Depression With Smartphone Support NCT01819025.

  18. The effects of "The Work" meditation (Byron Katie) on psychological symptoms and quality of life--a pilot clinical study.

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    Smernoff, Eric; Mitnik, Inbal; Kolodner, Ken; Lev-Ari, Shahar

    2015-01-01

    "The Work" is a meditative technique that enables the identification and investigation of thoughts that cause an individual stress and suffering. Its core is comprised of four questions and turnarounds that enable the participant to experience a different interpretation of reality. We assessed the effect of "The Work" meditation on quality of life and psychological symptoms in a non-clinical sample. This study was designed as a single-group pilot clinical trial (open label). Participants (n = 197) enrolled in a nine-day training course ("The School for The Work") and completed a set of self-administered measures on three occasions: before the course (n = 197), after the course (n = 164), and six months after course completion (n = 102). Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS), Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Report (QIDS-SR16), Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ-45.2), State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2), and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). A mixed models analysis revealed significant positive changes between baseline compared to the end of the intervention and six-month follow-up in all measures: BDI-II (t = 10.24, P Work" meditation technique as an effective intervention for improvement in psychological state and quality of life in the general population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. PREDICTORS OF QUALITY OF LIFE IN 165 PATIENTS WITH ACROMEGALY: RESULTS FROM A SINGLE-CENTER STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Buchfelder, Michael; Kleist, Bernadette; Kohlmann, Johannes; Menzel, Christa; Buslei, Rolf; Kołtowska-Häggsträm, Maria; Strasburger, Christian; Siegel, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Even if treated, acromegaly has a considerable impact on patient quality of life (QoL); despite this, the exact clinical determinants of QoL in acromegaly are unknown. This study retrospectively examines a cohort of treated patients with acromegaly, with the aim of identifying these determinants. Retrospective survey analysis, with 165 patients included in the study. All patients completed a survey, which included demographic data and the clinical details of their disease, the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), the revised Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), and the Bern Embitterment Inventory (BEI). Stepwise regression was used to identify predictors of QoL. The strongest predictors of the physical component score of the SF-36 were (in order of declining strength of association): Delay between first presentation of the disease and diagnosis, body mass index (BMI), number of doctors visited before the diagnosis of acromegaly, and age at diagnosis. For the mental component score, the strongest predictors were: number of doctors visited, previous radiotherapy, and age at study entry; and, for the BDI-II score: number of doctors visited, previous radiotherapy, age at study entry, and employment status at the time of diagnosis. The following were predictors of the BEI score: number of doctors visited, and age at study entry. Diagnostic delay and lack of diagnostic acumen in medical care provision are strong predictors of poor QoL in patients with acromegaly. Other identified parameters are radiotherapy, age, BMI, and employment status. An efficient acromegaly service should address these aspects when devising disease management plans. BDI-II = Beck Depression Inventory II BEI = Bern Embitterment Inventory BMI = body mass index IGF-1 = insulin-like growth factor 1 MCS = mental component summary (score) PCS = physical component summary (score) QoL = quality of life SDS = standard deviation score SF-36 = Short Form-36 Health Survey.

  20. The effect of brief behavioral activation treatment on symptoms of depression, mental health and quality of life among the patients with opioid abuse

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    Jafar Hasani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is one of the most common mental disorders comorbid with with substance use disorder. This research was aimed to evaluate the effect of brief behavioral activation treatment on the symptoms of depression, mental health and quality of life among the patients with opioid use disorders. Methods: In a quasi-experimental study with pretest-posttest control group design, 24 patients taking opiates were selected through convenience sampling method and randomly assigned into experimental and control groups. The experimental group was treated for two months. BDI-II, GHQ-28, WHOQOL-BREF were given to both groups before and after treatment and in the 2-month followup period. The results were analyzed using mixed analysis of variance. Results: The results showed that brief behavioral activation treatment significantly reduced the symptoms of depression (P0.05. Conclusion: brief behavioral activation treatment is capable of reducing the severity of symptoms of depression and improving the mental health of patients with substance use disorders.

  1. Depression (Major Depressive Disorder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... generally miserable or unhappy without really knowing why. Depression symptoms in children and teens Common signs and ... in normal activities, and avoidance of social interaction. Depression symptoms in older adults Depression is not a ...

  2. Effects of a selective educational system on fatigue, sleep problems, daytime sleepiness, and depression among senior high school adolescents in Taiwan

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    Chen TY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tien-Yu Chen,1,2 Yu-Ching Chou,3 Nian-Sheng Tzeng,1,2,4 Hsin-An Chang,1,2,4 Shin-Chang Kuo,1,2,5 Pei-Yin Pan,1,2 Yi-Wei Yeh,1,2,5 Chin-Bin Yeh,1,2 Wei-Chung Mao1,2,6 1Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, 2School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, 3School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, 4Student Counseling Center, National Defense Medical Center, 5Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, 6Institute of Brain Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Objective: The aim of the study reported here was to clarify the effects of academic pressure on fatigue, sleep problems, daytime sleepiness, and depression among senior high school adolescents in Taiwan. Methods: This cross-sectional study enrolled 757 senior high school adolescents who were classified into four groups: Grade 1 (n=261, Grade 2 (n=228, Grade 3T (n=199; Grade 3 students who had another college entrance test to take, and Grade 3S (n=69; Grade 3 students who had succeeded in their college application. Fatigue, sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and depression were assessed using the Chinese version of the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory – Short Form, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-Taiwan Form, the Chinese version of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the Chinese version of the Beck Depression Inventory®-II (BDI-II, respectively. Results: Physical, emotional, and mental fatigue scores were all higher in higher-grade groups. The Grade 3T (test students had the worst fatigue severity, and the Grade 3S (success students had the least fatigue severity. More than half of the students (60.9% went to bed after 12 am, and they had on average 6.0 hours of sleep per night. More than 30% of the students in Grade 2 (37.3% and Grades 3T/S (30.2%/30.4% possibly had daily sleepiness problems. The students in Grade 3T had the worst BDI-II score (13.27±9.24, and the Grade 3S

  3. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: influence of slight-to-moderate depressive symptom severity and worrying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamoen, Astrid B H; Redlich, Else M; de Weerd, Al W

    2014-08-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a well-known, effective treatment for primary insomnia. However, the majority of sleeping problems occur in the presence of another medical or psychiatric disorder. Depression and general anxiety disorder (with a main feature of excessive generalized worrying) are disorders that frequently co-occur with insomnia. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether depressive symptom severity or worrying influences the subjective effectiveness of CBT-I. Patients with a complaint of insomnia received CBT-I. At the beginning of the therapy, patients completed a sleep evaluation list, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II-NL, N = 92), and the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ, N = 119). Based on the BDI and the PSWQ, the sample was divided into different groups: patients with low versus high depression scores, low worriers versus high worriers, and patients without depressive symptoms who were also classified as low worriers and patients with depressive symptoms who were also classified as high worriers. The sleep evaluation list was completed directly after the treatment and 6 months later. Sleep evaluation scores, subjective total sleep time, subjective sleep onset latency, and subjective wake after sleep onset all changed in a positive way after CBT-I and remained that way over the next 6 months for all patients. These positive effects of CBT-I did not differ between the subgroups. Results suggest that CBT-I improves subjective sleep experiences, regardless of depressive symptom severity or worrying. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Development of depression and deterioration in quality of life in German dental medical students in preclinical semesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, P H M; Neumann, C; Ropohl, A; Paulsen, F; Scholz, M

    2016-11-01

    Early intervention to counter mental disorders during the course of studies in dentistry is indicated in view of the pronounced prevalence of burnout in this student collective. To assess the proportion of students in whom these risk states can be quantified in measurable parameters for concrete mental disorders, we conducted surveys among students of dental medicine during the first 2.5 years of their studies. We surveyed a total of 163 students of dental medicine in their first 5 semesters of study. Standardized, validated psychological questionnaires on depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory; BDI-II) and mental and physical quality of life (Short Form Survey; SF-12) were used in the survey, with per-semester participant quotas of around 90%. Regarding depression, the students were within the range of the normal populace at the beginning of the 1st semester. Symptoms of depression then became more pronounced with every succeeding semester. In the fifth semester, the average levels determined were equivalent to a depression with a clinical treatment indication. Hardly any change was registered for physical wellbeing in the quality of life questionnaire. The mental sum scores, however, reflected dramatic downturns in quality of life. Highly significant correlations between the parameters described here - depressivity and mental quality of life - were observed in all semesters. The participating students begin their course of studies at the level of the average populace for the symptoms surveyed, then develop, on average, a clinically manifest depression after 2.5 years. The personal experience of a deterioration of mental quality of life appears to be crucial in the phenomena observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. [The effect of parent training program on children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders and/or pervasive developmental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Kazunori; Matsuzaka, Tetsuo; Nagaoka, Tamao; Matsuo, Mitsuhiro

    2012-07-01

    Mothers of 18 children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders (AD/HD) and 6 with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) underwent a parent training (PT) program. After the program, the Beck Depression Inventory- II (BDI - II) score, which indicates parenting stress, significantly decreased from 15 to 8 (p=0.036). A total of 22 mothers had increased parenting self-esteem, and better parent-child relationships were noted in these cases. An analysis of children's behavior by using Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist showed that introversion tendency, physical failure, aggressive behavior, and extroversion score improved significantly after PT (pchildren and continued in 5. We conclude that PT for mothers of children with AD/HD and/or high-functioning PDD is effective in improving both the parenting skills of mothers and adaptive behaviors of children.

  6. An investigation into the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy on patients with chronic depression: a small case series

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    Horn GL

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gemma Louise HornUniversity of Dundee, Scotland, UKBackground: National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE guidelines recommend a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT and antidepressants to treat chronic depression. The Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP is the only therapy model specifically designed for the treatment of chronic depression.Objectives: To determine the clinical response to the CBASP of patients in a specialist clinical service for affective disorder and to ascertain their views on the value of the CBASP for their condition.Methods: Qualitative data from interviews including a questionnaire and objective data from Becks Depression Inventory II symptom rating scales were used to monitor the progress of a small case series of five patients with chronic, treatment refractory depression as they received the CBASP over a 10-month period.Results: Common themes from patient interviews show very positive engagement and attitudes to the CBASP from the questionnaire. Rating scales from Becks Depression Inventory II pre- and posttreatment showed very little change for three patients with improvements between 2 and 7 points but deterioration in symptoms of 2 points for the fourth patient.Conclusion: The CBASP is a well-liked and positive therapy that helps patients manage their lives and deal with personal relationships, although objective data indicate little change in symptom severity.Keywords: cognitive behavioral therapy, chronic depression, CBASP

  7. Depressive symptoms moderate the effects of a self-discrepancy induction on overgeneral autobiographical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Jorien; Griffith, James W; Wessel, Ineke; Walschaerts, Dominique; Raes, Filip

    2013-01-01

    According to the CaRFAX model, rumination is one of the key underlying mechanisms of overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM). The association between rumination and OGM is well established in clinical populations, but this relationship is not robust in nonclinical samples. A series of null findings is reported in the current paper. Additionally we followed up on recent findings suggesting that a state of rumination needs to be active in order to detect a relationship between trait-rumination and OGM. Secondary school students (N= 123) completed questionnaires assessing trait-rumination and depressive symptoms as well as two autobiographical memory tests (AMTs), one before and one after a self-discrepancy induction. This induction should trigger state-rumination, which would subsequently promote the retrieval of general rather than specific memories. Trait-rumination failed to predict increases in OGM. We did find, however, that higher BDI-II scores were positively related to an increase in OGM following the induction. This adds to the growing body of evidence that OGM reactivity might be more important than baseline memory specificity.

  8. Brief web-based intervention for college students with comorbid risky alcohol use and depressed mood: does it work and for whom?

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    Geisner, Irene M; Varvil-Weld, Lindsey; Mittmann, Angela J; Mallett, Kimberly; Turrisi, Rob

    2015-03-01

    College is a time of increased risk for problematic alcohol use and depressed mood. The comorbidity of these conditions is well documented, but is less well understood, with few interventions designed to prevent or reduce the related consequences. The current study evaluated a web-based personalized intervention for students (N=311) who reported an AUDIT score of 8 or more, a BDI-II score of 14 or more, and reported drinking four (women) or five (men) or more drinks on at least one occasion in the past month. Invited participants were randomly selected from all enrolled undergraduates at a large, public, Pacific Northwestern University. Participants completed a screening and baseline assessment, and those who met study eligibility criteria were randomized to one of four conditions (alcohol only, depressed mood only, integrated, and referral-only control). Follow-up occurred one-month post-intervention. While no main effects for the interventions were found, there were moderation effects, such that students in the alcohol only and integrated conditions who had lower levels of depressed mood or alcohol-related problems at baseline showed greater reductions in alcohol-related problems at follow-up compared to students in the control condition. Implications for interventions are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of proportion and determinants of depression among college students in Mangalore city

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    Sarah Naushad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Onset of depression is occurring earlier in life today than in past decades. Adolescence being transitional period from childhood to adulthood is a stage of emotional instability resulting from demand for separation and independence. Evidence suggests that early intervention for depression in children can improve long-term outcomes. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in January 2010 to find out the prevalence of depression among pre university students in Mangalore city. Prevalence of depression was assessed using Beck′s Depression Inventory II. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Out of 308 participants, depression was seen among 79.2% students. A majority (41.2% were found to be suffering from moderate followed by mild (26.6% depression. Prevalence of depression (P = 0.027 and severity of depression (P = 0.0357 was found to significantly increase with age of the participants. Students of commerce were found to be significantly more depressed than students of science stream (P = 0.002. No association of depression with gender of participants or with the type of college they were studying in was observed. Conclusion: There is a need for college students to be educated about depression in order to improve recognition and diagnosis. Also student counselling service offering mental health assistance needs to be established at colleges.

  10. Depression - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  11. Role of gender in depressive disorder outcome for individual and group cognitive-behavioral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hunna J; Nathan, Paula R

    2008-12-01

    Gender in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for outcome for depression has been inadequately examined in previous research. Thirty-five men and 55 women diagnosed with a depressive disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) completed individual CBT at an outpatient community mental health clinic and 56 men and 105 women completed group CBT. Depression severity was measured before treatment and at endpoint using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) along with secondary outcomes of anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory; Beck, Epstein, Brown, & Steer, 1988) and quality of life (Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire; Endicott, Nee, Harrison, & Blumenthal, 1993). Men and women demonstrated equivalent pretreatment and posttreatment illness severity, a comparable gradient of improvement on outcomes, and attainment of clinically meaningful benchmarks. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Contingency management for cigarette smokers with depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secades-Villa, Roberto; Vallejo-Seco, Guillermo; García-Rodríguez, Olaya; López-Núñez, Carla; Weidberg, Sara; González-Roz, Alba

    2015-10-01

    Despite depressive symptoms being very common among smokers from the general population, few studies have examined the effects of depressive symptoms on smoking treatment outcomes, and even less research has been carried out in the context of contingency management (CM). The authors conducted a secondary analysis to assess the interrelation between treatment condition, depressive symptoms and treatment outcomes among treatment-seeking smokers. The sample was made up of 147 treatment-seeking smokers who were randomly allocated 2 treatment conditions: cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT; n = 74), or CBT + CM (n = 73). CBT was applied in 1-hr group-based sessions over 6 weeks. The CM protocol was voucher-based with maximum earnings of €300 (US$339). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Smoking abstinence was verified though cotinine and carbon monoxide. Several analyses were conducted to explore the effect of treatment condition and baseline depressive symptoms on treatment outcomes, as well as the effect of treatment condition and smoking status on depressive symptoms. The CBT + CM condition was more effective than CBT, independent of depressive symptoms. The presence of depressive symptoms decreased the number of days of continuous smoking abstinence. Participants with a greater number of days of continuous smoking abstinence had fewer depressive symptoms than those with fewer days of continuous smoking abstinence. Findings suggest that health care providers should consider encouraging their patients with depressive symptoms to seek smoking cessation services that include both smoking cessation protocols and behavioral activation for mood management, thus maximizing both smoking and depressive outcomes.

  13. Postpartum depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - postpartum; Postnatal depression; Postpartum psychological reactions ... behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT) are types of talk therapy that often help postpartum depression. ...

  14. Is positive affect in pregnancy protective of postpartum depression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Carvalho Bos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the predictive/protective role of negative affect/positive affect in late pregnancy on the outcome of postpartum depression. METHODS: A total of 491 pregnant women participated in the study. The participants were asked to fill out a series of questionnaires, which included the Profile of Mood States, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, psychosocial variables and socio-demographic characteristics and were asked to participate in a psychiatric interview. After delivery, 272 mothers participated again in the study and filled out a similar series of questionnaires. RESULTS: Negative affect was associated with more intense depressive symptomatology, more self-perceived stress, lower self-reported social support, lower quality of life and perception of having a more difficult infant. By contrast, positive affect was negatively associated with these variables. Negative affect in late pregnancy increased the likelihood of experiencing postpartum depression (DSM-IV/OR = 2.1, 95%CI = 1.3-3.4, p = .003; ICD-10/OR = 2.1, 95%CI = 1.5-3.0, p < .001, while positive affect increased the odds of not having this condition (DSM-IV/OR = 2.0, 95%CI = 1.5-2.7, p = .042. CONCLUSION: In pregnancy, negative affect was a predictor of postpartum depression, whereas positive affect showed a protective role. Future studies are required to explore whether psychotherapeutic strategies focusing on decreasing negative affect and enhancing positive affect in the last trimester of pregnancy can reduce the risk of postpartum depression.

  15. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) reduces the association between depressive symptoms and suicidal cognitions in patients with a history of suicidal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhofer, Thorsten; Crane, Catherine; Brennan, Kate; Duggan, Danielle S; Crane, Rebecca S; Eames, Catrin; Radford, Sholto; Silverton, Sarah; Fennell, Melanie J V; Williams, J Mark G

    2015-12-01

    In patients with a history of suicidal depression, recurrence of depressive symptoms can easily reactivate suicidal thinking. In this study, we investigated whether training in mindfulness, which is aimed at helping patients "decenter" from negative thinking, could help weaken the link between depressive symptoms and suicidal cognitions. Analyses were based on data from a recent randomized controlled trial, in which previously suicidal patients were allocated to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), an active control treatment, cognitive psychoeducation (CPE), which did not include any meditation practice, or treatment as usual (TAU). After the end of the treatment phase, we compared the associations between depressive symptoms, as assessed through self-reports on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996), and suicidal thinking, as assessed through the Suicidal Cognitions Scale (Rudd et al., 2001). In patients with minimal to moderate symptoms at the time of assessment, comparisons of the correlations between depressive symptoms and suicidal cognitions showed significant differences between the groups. Although suicidal cognitions were significantly related to levels of symptoms in the 2 control groups, there was no such relation in the MBCT group. The findings suggest that, in patients with a history of suicidal depression, training in mindfulness can help to weaken the association between depressive symptoms and suicidal thinking, and thus reduce an important vulnerability for relapse to suicidal depression. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Training in and implementation of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for depression in the Veterans Health Administration: therapist and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Robyn D; Karlin, Bradley E; Trockel, Mickey; Mazina, Barbara; Barr Taylor, C

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has implemented a national dissemination and training initiative to promote the availability of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for depression (ACT-D). This paper reports on therapist and patient outcomes associated with competency-based training in and implementation of ACT-D. Therapist and patient outcomes were assessed on eleven cohorts of therapists (n = 391) and their patients (n = 745). Three-hundred thirty four therapists successfully completed all requirements of the Training Program. Ninety-six percent of therapists achieved competency by the end of training, compared to 21% at the outset of training. Mixed effects model analysis indicated therapists' overall ACT-D competency scores increased from 76 to 112 (conditional SD = 6.6), p therapy. Mixed effects model analysis revealed that mean BDI-II scores decreased from 30 at baseline assessment to 19 (conditional SD = 5.6) at final assessment, t(367) = -20.3, p < 0.001. Quality of life scores also increased. Training in and implementation of ACT-D in the treatment of Veterans is associated with significant increases in therapist competency and robust improvements in patient outcomes. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. An epidemiological study of depression among college students in district Faridkot, Punjab, India

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    Preeti Padda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is one of the most under diagnosed and under reported in primary health settings. Depression is highly common and according to WHO by 2020, it would be the second-most prevalent condition worldwide. Physical illnesses and bio-psychosocial factors are common determinants of depression. Aims & Objectives: 1. To estimate prevalence of depression, 2. To determine associated factors among college going students. Material & Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among college going students. Half of the colleges were selected randomly and sample size was distributed on the basis of probability proportional to size (PPS. Assigned number of students from each college was selected by simple random sampling. Sample size of 1300 was calculated using formula (n = ( Z1-α 2 P (100 - P / ε2. General Health Questionnaire (12 items was used to diagnose psychiatric morbidity and those with this were administered Becks Depression Inventory II (21 items scale for assessing the prevalence and level of depression. Both the scales were translated in local language and self-administered. The data was compiled and analyzed using Epi InfoTM. Results: A total of 1300 students were enrolled, psychiatric morbidity was present in 35% and prevalence of depression was 33%. Mild depression was found in 87% of the students with depression. Depression was higher among those aged >25 years, females, residing in nuclear families and studying science stream. Conclusion: Family support and adequate treatment are most important pillars of management.

  18. The effect of social networking sites on the relationship between perceived social support and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Matthew A; Walsh, Michael; Wattier, Kristina; Knigge, Ryan; Miller, Lindsey; Stevermer, Michalene; Fogas, Bruce S

    2016-12-30

    This study examined whether Social Networking Sites (SNSs) have a negative moderator effect on the established relationship between perceived social support and depression in psychiatric inpatients. Survey instruments assessing for depression, perceived social support, and SNS use, were filled out by 301 psychiatric inpatients. Additional data on age, gender, and primary psychiatric diagnosis were collected. A step-wise multiple regression analysis was performed to determine significant interactions. There was no significant interaction of SNS use on the relationship between perceived social support and depression when measured by Social Media Use Integration Scale or by hours of SNS use per day. There was a significant negative relationship between perceived social support and depression, and a significant positive relationship between hours of SNS use per day and depression, measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Limitations include a gender discrepancy among participants, generalizability, recall bias, and SNS measurement. This is the first study to look at SNS use and depression in psychiatric inpatients. SNS use did not affect perceived social support or the protective relationship between perceived social support and depression. Hours of SNS use per day were correlated with depression scores. Future studies between SNS use and depression should quantify daily SNS use.

  19. Behavioural activation versus mindfulness-based guided self-help treatment administered through a smartphone application: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Kien Hoa; Trüschel, Anna; Jarl, Linnea; Magnusson, Susanna; Windahl, Tove; Johansson, Robert; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard

    2014-01-09

    Evaluating and comparing the effectiveness of two smartphone-delivered treatments: one based on behavioural activation (BA) and other on mindfulness. Parallel randomised controlled, open, trial. Participants were allocated using an online randomisation tool, handled by an independent person who was separate from the staff conducting the study. General community, with recruitment nationally through mass media and advertisements. 40 participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder received a BA treatment, and 41 participants received a mindfulness treatment. 9 participants were lost at the post-treatment. An 8-week long behaviour programme administered via a smartphone application. Mindfulness: An 8-week long mindfulness programme, administered via a smartphone application. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Scale (PHQ-9). 81 participants were randomised (mean age 36.0 years (SD=10.8)) and analysed. Results showed no significant interaction effects of group and time on any of the outcome measures either from pretreatment to post-treatment or from pretreatment to the 6-month follow-up. Subgroup analyses showed that the BA treatment was more effective than the mindfulness treatment among participants with higher initial severity of depression from pretreatment to the 6-month follow-up (PHQ-9: F (1, 362.1)=5.2, p<0.05). In contrast, the mindfulness treatment worked better than the BA treatment among participants with lower initial severity from pretreatment to the 6-month follow-up (PHQ-9: F (1, 69.3)=7.7, p<0.01); BDI-II: (F(1, 53.60)=6.25, p<0.05). The two interventions did not differ significantly from one another. For participants with higher severity of depression, the treatment based on BA was superior to the treatment based on mindfulness. For participants with lower initial severity, the treatment based on mindfulness worked significantly better than the treatment based on BA. Clinical Trials

  20. Prevalence and risk of depressive symptoms 3-4 months post-surgery in a nationwide cohort study of Danish women treated for early stage breast-cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren; Zachariae, Robert; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2009-01-01

    breast cancer during the 2 1/2 year study period. Of these, 3343 women (68%) participated in a questionnaire study 12-16 weeks following surgery. Depressive symptoms (Beck's Depression Inventory II) and health-related behaviors were assessed by questionnaire. The Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group......BACKGROUND: Elevated levels of depressive symptoms are generally found among cancer patients, but results from existing studies vary considerably with respect to prevalence and proposed risk factors. PURPOSE: To study the prevalence of depressive symptoms and major depression 3-4 months following...... surgery for breast cancer, and to identify clinical risk factors while adjusting for pre-cancer sociodemographic factors, comorbidity, and psychiatric history. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study cohort consists of 4917 Danish women, aged 18-70 years, receiving standardized treatment for early stage invasive...

  1. Screening for depression while patients dialyse: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcot, Joseph; Wellsted, David; Farrington, Ken

    2008-08-01

    The lack of routine depression screening among the haemodialysis (HD) population may contribute to depression being under-recognised. While screening patients could be beneficial, the optimum screening procedure remains unclear. One method would be to screen HD patients while they receive their treatment. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI) could be administered while patients dialysed. Forty HD patients completed the BDI while dialysing and again at a time when off-dialysis. Level of agreement analysis (Bland and Altman) was undertaken to determine if the assessment condition influenced BDI scoring. The off-dialysis assessment also involved a short clinical interview that was compared with the BDI assessment. There was a high level of agreement between the on- and off-dialysis assessments, but differences in response to the somatic items on the BDI scale were apparent between the conditions. The clinical interview revealed that 22% of the sample met the DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder. The optimal cut-off value for the BDI as determined by receiver operating characteristic curves was >or=16, with 88.9% sensitivity and 87.1% specificity. The results indicate that the procedure of on-dialysis assessment using the BDI is a viable screening procedure. The practicality of employing this screening procedure may facilitate improved detection of depression in the dialysis population.

  2. Drug interactions between antineoplastic and antidepressant agents: analysis of patients seen at an oncology clinic at a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Araújo Reinert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms among oncology patients and identify simultaneous use of antineoplastic and antidepressant agents.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study that interviewed 56 oncology patients using two data collection instruments: a questionnaire covering clinical and sociodemographic data and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, for assessment of depressive symptoms. For data analysis, descriptive statistics were used to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms and the chi-square test was used to evaluate associations between sociodemographic and clinical variables and depressive symptoms.Results: A 26.7% (15 patients prevalence of depression was detected. Just eight of these 15 patients (53.3% were receiving treatment for depression. In the sample as a whole, 13 of the patients interviewed (23.2% were taking antidepressants and 11 of these 13 patients (19.6% were taking antidepressive and antineoplastic agents simultaneously. A total of five (8.9% of the sample contraindicated drug interactions were detected.Conclusions:Depressive symptoms are more prevalent among cancer patients than in the general population, but they are generally under-diagnosed and under-treated. Simultaneous use of antidepressant and antineoplastic agents is common and so, in order to reduce the number of harmful adverse effects, possible drug interactions must be identified before antidepressants are prescribed to cancer patients.

  3. Somatic symptoms evoked by exam stress in university students: the role of alexithymia, neuroticism, anxiety and depression.

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    Matthias Zunhammer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The etiology of somatization is incompletely understood, but could be elucidated by models of psychosocial stress. Academic exam stress has effectively been applied as a naturalistic stress model, however its effect on somatization symptoms according to ICD-10 and DSM-IV criteria has not been reported so far. Baseline associations between somatization and personality traits, such as alexithymia, have been studied exhaustively. Nevertheless, it is largely unknown if personality traits have an explanatory value for stress induced somatization. METHODS: This longitudinal, quasi-experimental study assessed the effects of university exams on somatization - and the reversal of effects after an exam-free period. Repeated-observations were obtained within 150 students, measuring symptom intensity before, during and after an exam period, according to the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms 7-day (SOMS-7d. Additionally, self-reports on health status were used to differentiate between medically explained and medically unexplained symptoms. Alexithymia, neuroticism, trait-anxiety and baseline depression were surveyed using the Toronto-Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20, the Big-Five Personality Interview (NEO-FFI, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II. These traits were competitively tested for their ability to explain somatization increases under exam stress. RESULTS: Somatization significantly increased across a wide range of symptoms under exam stress, while health reports pointed towards a reduction in acute infections and injuries. Neuroticism, alexithymia, trait anxiety and depression explained variance in somatization at baseline, but only neuroticism was associated with symptom increases under exam stress. CONCLUSION: Exam stress is an effective psychosocial stress model inducing somatization. A comprehensive quantitative description of bodily symptoms under exam stress is supplied. The results do not

  4. The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology - the self-report Romanian version

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    Hackl, E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical depression is a debilitating disorder affecting a significant percentage of population. In this context, having reliable screening instruments for depression represents a major advantage. A widely used screening tool is the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology – Self-Report version (QIDS-SR. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric proprieties of the Romanian version of QIDS-SR as a diagnostic measure for depression. The data were collected from Romanian adult participants (N = 148 who expressed interest in an online therapeutic program for depression. Our sample included both normal (N = 48 and clinically depressed (N = 100 participants. Diagnostic assessments were conducted using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. The Romanian QIDS-SR demonstrated high convergent validity with Beck Depression Inventory - II (r=.83 and good internal consistency (α=.74. Receiver operating characteristics analysis demonstrated satisfactory diagnostic validity for the QIDS-SR. The optimal ratio between sensitivity and specificity was set at 15 for the QIDS-SR. It was concluded that QIDS-SR represents an adequate, useful and cost-effective screening instrument for clinical depression in Romania.

  5. Group cognitive behavioural therapy for stroke survivors with depression and their carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K Ward, Susan; Turner, Alyna; A Hambridge, John; A Halpin, Sean; E Valentine, Megan; L Sweetapple, Anne; H White, Jennifer; Hackett, Maree L

    2016-10-01

    Depression in stroke survivors is common, leads to poorer outcomes and often not treated. A group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) program (Brainstorm) for stroke survivors with depression, and their carers has been running as part of usual care since 2007. To evaluate the implementation and acceptability of Brainstorm, a closed group intervention consisting of up to 10 sessions of education, activity planning, problem solving and thought challenging. Participating stroke survivors and their carers complete assessment measures at baseline, post-treatment and 1-month and 6-months follow-up. A mixed models for repeated measures data was conducted with depression and anxiety scores for stroke survivors (Beck Depression Inventory-II; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and the assessment of depression, anxiety and carer burden for carers. Acceptability was assessed by session attendance and written and open participant feedback upon completion of the program. Forty-eight community dwelling stroke survivors and 34 carers attended Brainstorm, with a median attendance of 88% of sessions. Follow-up assessments were completed by 77% (post-treatment), 46% (1-month) and 38% (6-month) of stroke survivors. Stroke survivors' depression scores decreased from baseline to post-treatment (pBrainstorm group intervention for depression in stroke survivors appears to have been effectively implemented and is acceptable to stroke survivors and carers.

  6. Effects of Yoga on Heart Rate Variability and Depressive Symptoms in Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, I-Hua; Wu, Wen-Lan; Lin, I-Mei; Chang, Yu-Kai; Lin, Yuh-Jen; Yang, Pin-Chen

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of a 12-week yoga program on heart rate variability (HRV) and depressive symptoms in depressed women. This was a randomized controlled trial. Twenty-six sedentary women scoring ≥14 on the Beck Depression Inventory-II were randomized to either the yoga or the control group. The yoga group completed a 12-week yoga program, which took place twice a week for 60 min per session and consisted of breathing exercises, yoga pose practice, and supine meditation/relaxation. The control group was instructed not to engage in any yoga practice and to maintain their usual level of physical activity during the course of the study. Participants' HRV, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress were assessed at baseline and post-test. The yoga group had a significant increase in high-frequency HRV and decreases in low-frequency HRV and low frequency/high frequency ratio after the intervention. The yoga group also reported significantly reduced depressive symptoms and perceived stress. No change was found in the control group. A 12-week yoga program was effective in increasing parasympathetic tone and reducing depressive symptoms and perceived stress in women with elevated depressive symptoms. Regular yoga practice may be recommended for women to cope with their depressive symptoms and stress and to improve their HRV.

  7. Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... starts about 1–3 weeks after childbirth. What causes postpartum depression? Postpartum depression probably is caused by a combination ... better. Can antidepressants cause side effects? Antidepressants can ... If your depression worsens soon after starting medication or if you ...

  8. Caregiver Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not sell or share your name. Caregiver Depression Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print Many caregivers ... depression See your doctor Treatment Coping Symptoms of depression Caregiving is hard — and can lead to feelings ...

  9. Collaborative care for depression symptoms in an outpatient cardiology setting: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Robert M; Freedland, Kenneth E; Steinmeyer, Brian C; Rubin, Eugene H; Ewald, Gregory

    2016-09-15

    Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. Finding effective methods for identifying and treating depression in these patients is a high priority. The purpose of this study was to determine whether collaborative care (CC) for patients who screen positive for depression during an outpatient cardiology visit results in greater improvement in depression symptoms and better medical outcomes than seen in patients who screen positive for depression but receive only usual care (UC). Two hundred-one patients seen in an outpatient cardiology clinic who screened positive for depression during an outpatient visit were randomized to receive either CC or UC. Recommendations for depression treatment and ongoing support and monitoring of depression symptoms were provided to CC patients and their primary care physicians (PCPs) for up to 6months. There were no differences between the arms in mean Beck Depression Inventory-II scores(CC, 15.9; UC, 17.4; p=.45) or in depression remission rates(CC, 32.5%; UC, 26.2%; p=0.34) after 6months, or in the number of hospitalizations after 12months (p=0.73). There were fewer deaths among the CC (1/100) than UC patients (8/101) (p=0.03). This trial did not show that CC produces better depression outcomes than UC. Screening led to a higher rate of depression treatment than was expected in the UC group, and delays in obtaining depression treatment from PCPs may have reduced treatment effectiveness for the CC patients. A different strategy for depression treatment following screening in outpatient cardiology services is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Quality of life, self-stigma, and hope in schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbova, Kristyna; Prasko, Jan; Ociskova, Marie; Kamaradova, Dana; Marackova, Marketa; Holubova, Michaela; Grambal, Ales; Slepecky, Milos; Latalova, Klara

    2017-01-01

    Goals The aim of this study was to explore the quality of life, self-stigma, personality traits, and hope in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Patients and methods A total of 52 outpatients participated in this cross-sectional study. The attending psychiatrist assessed each patient with Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). The patients then completed Quality of Life Satisfaction and Enjoyment Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q), Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) Scale, Temperament and Character Inventory – Revised (TCI-R), Adult Dispositional Hope Scale (ADHS), Drug Attitude Inventory 10 (DAI-10), and Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS)-Self-report. The psychiatrist evaluated Clinical Global Impression Severity – the objective version (objCGI-S), and the patients completed the Clinical Global Impression Severity – the subjective version (subjCGI-S). Each participant also completed Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Results The quality of life was significantly higher in employed patients and individuals with higher hope, self-directedness (SD), and persistence (PS). The quality of life was lower among patients with higher number of psychiatric hospitalizations, those with higher severity of the disorder, and individuals who were taking higher doses of antipsychotics. Patients with more pronounced symptoms of depression, anxiety, and social anxiety had a lower quality of life. Finally, the quality of life was lower among individuals with higher harm avoidance (HA) and self-stigmatization (ISMI). Backward stepwise regression was applied to identify the most significant factors connected to self-stigma. The regression analysis showed that occupation, level of depression (BDI-II), attitude to using medication (DAI-10), social anxiety (LSAS), and antipsychotic index were the most relevant factors associated with lower quality of life. Conclusion Detection of the quality of life in the context of

  11. An exploratory mixed methods study of the acceptability and effectiveness of mindfulness -based cognitive therapy for patients with active depression and anxiety in primary care

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    Mercer Stewart W

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT is an 8-week course developed for patients with relapsing depression that integrates mindfulness meditation practices and cognitive theory. Previous studies have demonstrated that non-depressed participants with a history of relapsing depression are protected from relapse by participating in the course. This exploratory study examined the acceptability and effectiveness of MBCT for patients in primary care with active symptoms of depression and anxiety Methods 13 patients with recurrent depression or recurrent depression and anxiety were recruited to take part in the study. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted three months after completing the MBCT programme. A framework approach was used to analyse the data. Beck depression inventories (BDI-II and Beck anxiety inventories (BAI provided quantitative data and were administered before and three months after the intervention. Results The qualitative data indicated that mindfulness training was both acceptable and beneficial to the majority of patients. For many of the participants, being in a group was an important normalising and validating experience. However most of the group believed the course was too short and thought that some form of follow up was essential. More than half the patients continued to apply mindfulness techniques three months after the course had ended. A minority of patients continued to experience significant levels of psychological distress, particularly anxiety. Statistically significant reductions in mean depression and anxiety scores were observed; the mean pre-course depression score was 35.7 and post-course score was 17.8 (p = 0.001. A similar reduction was noted for anxiety with a mean pre-course anxiety score of 32.0 and mean post course score of 20.5 (p = 0.039. Overall 8/11 (72% patients showed improvements in BDI and 7/11 (63% patients showed improvements in BAI. In general the results

  12. Association of stress coping strategies with Internet addiction in college students: The moderating effect of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wei-Po; Ko, Chih-Hung; Kaufman, Erin A; Crowell, Sheila E; Hsiao, Ray C; Wang, Peng-Wei; Lin, Jin-Jia; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the association between stress-related coping strategies and Internet addiction and the moderating effect of depression in a sample of Taiwanese college students. A total of 500 college students (238 men and 262 women) participated in this study. Internet addiction was assessed using the Chen Internet Addiction Scale. Participants' stress coping strategies and depressive symptoms were measured using the Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced and the Beck Depression Inventory-II, respectively. We used t and chi-square tests to examine differences in demographic characteristics, depression, and stress coping strategies between participants with and without Internet addiction. Significant variables were used in a logistic regression model to examine the association between stress coping strategies and Internet addiction and the moderating effect of depression on the association. Results indicated that use of restraint coping was negatively associated with Internet addiction (odds ratio [OR]=0.886, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.802-0.977), whereas denial (OR=1.177, 95% CI: 1.029-1.346) and mental disengagement (OR=2.673, 95% CI: 1.499-4.767) were positively associated with Internet addiction. Depression had a moderating effect on the association between denial and Internet addiction (OR=0.701, 95% CI: 0.530-0.927). Stress coping strategies and depression are important factors to evaluate when developing intervention programs targeting college undergraduate students with Internet addiction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Subjective well-being as a mediator for curiosity and depression

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    Kaczmarek Łukasz D.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Curiosity is a personality trait that is inversely related to depression and positively related to subjective wellbeing. However, the relationship between curiosity and these two outcomes is still unclear which hampers our general understanding of well-being. Based on research within positive psychology that showed character strengths such as curiosity can indirectly decrease depression, we hypothesized that the inverse relationship between curiosity and depression would be mediated by subjective well-being. Two hundred and fifty seven participants, between 18 and 64 years old (M = 24.50, SD = 8.33 completed a web-based survey comprising: The Curiosity and Exploration Inventory - II, Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression and the Steen Happiness Index. We found that well-being mediated the relationship between curiosity and depression. The results indicate that curious individuals tend to report higher levels of subjective well-being which, in turn, is associated with lower levels of depression. Our findings contribute to the understanding of positive results obtained from clinical samples that underwent positive psychotherapy of depression.

  14. DRD2 and SLC6A3 moderate impact of maternal depressive symptoms on infant cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludmer, Jaclyn A; Levitan, Robert; Gonzalez, Andrea; Kennedy, James; Villani, Vanessa; Masellis, Mario; Basile, Vincenzo S; Atkinson, Leslie

    2015-12-01

    Both maternal depressive symptoms and infants' dopamine-related genetic characteristics have been linked to infants' hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) functioning. This study investigated the interactive influence of maternal depressive symptoms and infant DRD2 and SLC6A3 genotypes on infant cortisol reactivity; whether this interaction reflects diathesis-stress or differential susceptibility; and whether this interaction influences the flexibility of the infant cortisol response across challenges known to exert differential effects on infant cortisol reactivity. A community sample of 314 mother-infant dyads participated in toy frustration (age 16 months) and maternal separation (age 17 months) challenges, and salivary cortisol was collected at baseline, +20, and +40min. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory-II at infant age 16 months. Infant buccal cells were collected at both time points for genotyping. DRD2 and SLC6A3 genotypes moderated the relation between maternal depressive symptomatology and infant cortisol reactivity in a diathesis-stress manner in the context of toy frustration, and in a differential susceptibility manner in the context of maternal separation. Higher levels of maternal depressive symptoms predicted reduced cortisol flexibility across challenges for infants with at least one A1 allele of DRD2 and infants with the 10/10 genotype of SLC6A3. Results suggest that maternal depressive symptomatology is related to infants' cortisol reactivity and to the flexibility of that reactivity across psychosocial challenges, but this relation is dependent on the infant's genetic characteristics.

  15. Readability: an important issue impacting healthcare for women with postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, M Cynthia; Hutti, Marianne H

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the reading level of depression-screening instruments commonly used in postpartum depression (PPD) and evaluate the reading level of prevalent consumer pamphlets and books on PPD. Descriptive study evaluating the reading level of four PPD instruments (the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, The Center for Epidemiologic Symptoms of Depression, the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale, and the Beck Depression Inventory-II), five pamphlets from grassroots organizations, and seven consumer books using the Fry Readability Graph. The readability of the postpartum screening instruments varied, but all were at or below the recommended 6th grade reading level. CES-D had the lowest reading level (grade 2). The readability of the consumer publications also varied, but all had a higher reading level than the recommended 6th grade level, some at the college reading level. Readability is an important consideration in the choice of depression-screening instruments and written materials for consumers. Nurses using any of the four postpartum screening instruments studied can feel confident that women who can read will be able to read them. The readability of a book, pamphlet, or instrument should be of concern to nurses who work with women during the postpartum period.

  16. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in Japanese Parkinson’s disease patients: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmei, Issei; Kobayashi, Kei; Oe, Yuki; Takagishi, Yuriko; Kanie, Ayako; Ito, Masaya; Takebayashi, Yoshitake; Murata, Miho; Horikoshi, Masaru; Dobkin, Roseanne D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the feasibility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for Japanese Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with depression. To increase cultural acceptability, we developed the CBT program using manga, a type of Japanese comic novel. Methods Participants included 19 non-demented PD patients who had depressive symptoms (GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score ≥8). A CBT program comprising six sessions was individually administered. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of the CBT program in terms of the dropout rate and occurrence of adverse events. The primary outcome was depressive symptom reduction in the GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression upon completion of CBT. Secondary outcomes included changes in the self-report measures of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression), anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale), functional impairment, and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey). Results Of the 19 participants (mean age =63.8 years, standard deviation [SD] =9.9 years; mean Hohen–Yahr score =1.7, SD =0.8), one patient (5%) withdrew. No severe adverse event was observed. The patients reported significant improvements in depression (Hedges’ g =−1.02, 95% confidence interval =−1.62 to −0.39). The effects were maintained over a 3-month follow-up period. Most of the secondary outcome measurements showed a small-to-moderate but nonsignificant effect size from baseline to post-intervention. Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence that CBT is feasible among Japanese PD patients with depression. Similar approaches may be effective for people with PD from other cultural backgrounds. The results warrant replication in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:27354802

  17. Informal caregiver burden in middle-income countries Results from Memory Centers in Lima - Peru

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    Nilton Custodio

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate caregiver burden based on Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI and depression in caregivers on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II. METHODS: Literate individuals, 18 years or older, who spoke Spanish as their native language were included. Demographic characteristics: Age, sex, education, relationship to person with dementia, length of time caregiving, other sources of help for caring, impact on the household economy, family support, and perception of impaired health; and Clinical data on care-recipients: type of dementia, time since diagnosis, treatment, and Global Deterioration Scale (GDS; the ZBI and BDI-II. Descriptive and analytical statistics were employed to assess caregiver burden and predictors of higher burden in caregivers. RESULTS: A total of 92 informal caregivers were evaluated. Regarding care-recipients, 75% were 69 years old or over, 75% had at least one year since diagnosis, 73.9% had Alzheimer's disease, 84.8% received treatment, 75% scored 5 or over on the GDS. For caregivers, 75% were 55.5 years old or over, predominantly female (81.5%, married (83.7%, the spouse of care-recipients (60.87%, had at least 10 years of education (75.0% and one year of caregiving (75%, reduced entertainment time (90.2% and self-perception of impaired health (83.7%. Median score on the ZBI was 37.5 (minimum value = 3; and maximum value = 74. The coefficient of BDI was 1.38 (p-value <0.001. CONCLUSION: This sample of Peruvian informal caregivers showed elevated ZBI values. Self-perception of worsened health, repercussion on the family economy and time caregiving were the main determinants of ZBI, although only BDI was a consistent predictor of ZBI.

  18. The relation between the patient health questionnaire-15 and DSM somatic diagnoses

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    Shih-Cheng Liao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15 in Taiwan, and to explore its relation to somatoform disorders (DSM-IV and to somatic symptom and related disorders (DSM-5. Methods We recruited 471 individuals, 151 with somatoform disorders and 200 with somatic symptom and related disorders. Subjects completed the Chinese version of the PHQ-15, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, and received a DSM-IV- and DSM-5-based diagnostic interview. We performed exploratory factor analysis and assessed test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and correlation with BDI-II/BAI to confirm reliability and validity, and carried out ROC curve analysis to determine suitability for evaluation or screening purposes. PHQ-15 scores were compared between patients with various DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses (such as DSM-IV somatoform disorders, panic disorder, other anxiety/depressive disorders or no DSM-IV diagnosis and patients with DSM-5 somatic symptom and related disorders or no DSM-5 diagnosis. Results The Chinese version identified cardiopulmonary, pain-fatigue, and gastrointestinal as major factors and had good reliability (0.803–0.930, internal consistency (0.637–0.861, and correlation coefficients with BDI-II/BAI (0.407–0.619, 0.536–0.721, respectively. The PHQ-15 scores were similar in patients with somatoform disorders and patients with panic disorder; higher in patients with somatoform disorders and panic disorder than in patients with other anxiety/depressive disorders; and significantly higher in patients with somatic symptom and related disorders than in patients without this diagnosis. The AUC of the PHQ-15 was 0.678 (cutoff 6/7 for screening somatoform disorders (DSM-IV and 0.725 (cutoff 4/5 for screening somatic symptom and related disorders (DSM-5. Conclusions The Chinese version of the PHQ-15 is suitable for

  19. The relation between the patient health questionnaire-15 and DSM somatic diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shih-Cheng; Huang, Wei-Lieh; Ma, Huei-Mei; Lee, Min-Tzu; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Chen, I-Ming; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2016-10-18

    Our purpose was to examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15) in Taiwan, and to explore its relation to somatoform disorders (DSM-IV) and to somatic symptom and related disorders (DSM-5). We recruited 471 individuals, 151 with somatoform disorders and 200 with somatic symptom and related disorders. Subjects completed the Chinese version of the PHQ-15, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and received a DSM-IV- and DSM-5-based diagnostic interview. We performed exploratory factor analysis and assessed test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and correlation with BDI-II/BAI to confirm reliability and validity, and carried out ROC curve analysis to determine suitability for evaluation or screening purposes. PHQ-15 scores were compared between patients with various DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses (such as DSM-IV somatoform disorders, panic disorder, other anxiety/depressive disorders) or no DSM-IV diagnosis and patients with DSM-5 somatic symptom and related disorders or no DSM-5 diagnosis. The Chinese version identified cardiopulmonary, pain-fatigue, and gastrointestinal as major factors and had good reliability (0.803-0.930), internal consistency (0.637-0.861), and correlation coefficients with BDI-II/BAI (0.407-0.619, 0.536-0.721, respectively). The PHQ-15 scores were similar in patients with somatoform disorders and patients with panic disorder; higher in patients with somatoform disorders and panic disorder than in patients with other anxiety/depressive disorders; and significantly higher in patients with somatic symptom and related disorders than in patients without this diagnosis. The AUC of the PHQ-15 was 0.678 (cutoff 6/7) for screening somatoform disorders (DSM-IV) and 0.725 (cutoff 4/5) for screening somatic symptom and related disorders (DSM-5). The Chinese version of the PHQ-15 is suitable for evaluating somatic symptom and related disorders. The

  20. [Recited depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucci, M; Cossio, M

    1984-01-01

    Several subjects who tell their depression and play a part of it in front of the doctor without being really depressed are reported. Some of them try to hide the symptoms (irritability or erethism, ceremonials of obsessive neurosis, shunning of phobia) which, in their opinion, might be detrimental to their reputation. Others neglect to describe some of the symptoms of their polymorphous clinical picture only underlining the depressive signs. Some others play a part of depression because they have believed to recognize themselves in persons presented by mass media, because it seems to them a duty to show an adequate depression in case of mournful event, or because they "convert" their problem into a depression. Some others use depression as a blackmail, or to obtain an advantage from doctor's conviction about their illness. The reason for the high frequency of similar cases in the present time are examined: the scientific divulgation and the acceptance of depression by the modern society are among the most important ones. The peculiar semantic vicissitudes of the word depression are also reviewed. A widening of the boundaries of depression has contributed to an increase in the number of the cases. Finally, in addition to patients who are depressed without being aware of it, the authors focus the inverse possibility: patients who believed or try to make their doctor believe (playing the part of depression in front of them) that they are depressed.

  1. A study on effective of increasing right frontal alpha and decreasing left frontal alpha on treatment of major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Eskandari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Various studies have shown some relationship between brain wave abnormalies and depression. The current study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the real neurofeedback treatment compared with mock neurofeedback in decreasing major depression severity of symptoms and change on ? waves into a desirable pattern among some patients who suffer from major depression disorder. The study chooses six patients who were suffering from major depression sufferers and they were randomly placed in two groups called real neurofeedback and mock neurofeedback group (placebo. The two groups were treated for a twenty sessions twice a week. The two groups were examined before, during and after the treatment by Beck Depression Inventory II, Hamilton Depression Scale. The research data were examined through the analysis of the size effect, improvement percentage and charts. The data resulting from the size effect and the improvement percentage suggested that the real neurofeedback was more effective in regulating brain waves and in decreasing major depression disorder symptoms in comparison with the mock neuro-feedback and the groups were significantly different from the clinical point of view. The effectiveness of the real neurofeedback was not from the changes in placebo and it can be used as a complementary treatment in treating major depression disorder. The findings of the current research were congruent with those of the related studies.

  2. Long-term effects of psychotherapy on moderate depression: a comparative study of narrative therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rodrigo T; Gonçalves, Miguel M; Fassnacht, Daniel B; Machado, Paulo P P; Sousa, Inês

    2014-01-01

    In a previous clinical controlled trial (Lopes et al., 2014), narrative therapy (NT) showed promising results in ameliorating depressive symptoms with comparable outcomes to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) when patients completed treatment. This paper aims to assess depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems in this clinical sample at follow-up. Using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 Interpersonal Relations Scale, naturalistic prospective follow-up assessment was conducted at 21 and 31 months after the last treatment session. At follow-up, patients kept improving in terms of depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems. The odds that a patient maintained recovery from depressive symptoms at follow-up were five times higher than the odds that a patient maintained recovery from interpersonal problems. In the same way, the odds of a patient never recovering from interpersonal problems were five times higher than the odds of never recovering from depressive symptoms. The study did not control for the natural course of depression or treatment continuation. For depressed patients with greater interpersonal disabilities, longer treatment plans and alternative continuation treatments should be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychosocial intervention improves depression, quality of life, and fluid adherence in hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukor, Daniel; Ver Halen, Nisha; Asher, Deborah Rosenthal; Coplan, Jeremy D; Weedon, Jeremy; Wyka, Katarzyna E; Saggi, Subodh J; Kimmel, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Patients with ESRD have high rates of depression, which is associated with diminished quality of life and survival. We determined whether individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) reduces depression in hemodialysis patients with elevated depressive affect in a randomized crossover trial. Of 65 participants enrolled from two dialysis centers in New York, 59 completed the study and were assigned to the treatment-first group (n=33) or the wait-list control group (n=26). In the intervention phase, CBT was administered chairside during dialysis treatments for 3 months; participants were assessed 3 and 6 months after randomization. Compared with the wait-list group, the treatment-first group achieved significantly larger reductions in Beck Depression Inventory II (self-reported, P=0.03) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (clinician-reported, Pimprovements in quality of life, assessed with the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form (P=0.04), and interdialytic weight gain (P=0.002) than the wait-list group, although no effect on compliance was evident at follow-up. In summary, CBT led to significant improvements in depression, quality of life, and prescription compliance in this trial, and studies should be undertaken to assess the long-term effects of CBT on morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD.

  4. Anxiety and Depressed Mood Decline Following Smoking Abstinence in Adult Smokers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Lirio S; Hu, Mei-Chen; Winhusen, Theresa; Lima, Jennifer; Berlin, Ivan; Nunes, Edward

    2015-12-01

    A preponderance of relevant research has indicated reduction in anxiety and depressive symptoms following smoking abstinence. This secondary analysis investigated whether the phenomenon extends to smokers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study setting was an 11-Week double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial of osmotic release oral system methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) as a cessation aid when added to nicotine patch and counseling. Participants were 255 adult smokers with ADHD. The study outcomes are: anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI)) and depressed mood (Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI)) measured one Week and six Weeks after a target quit day (TQD). The main predictor is point-prevalence abstinence measured at Weeks 1 and 6 after TQD. Covariates are treatment (OROS-MPH vs placebo), past major depression, past anxiety disorder, number of cigarettes smoked daily, demographics (age, gender, education, marital status) and baseline scores on the BAI, BDI, and the DSM-IV ADHD Rating Scale. Abstinence was significantly associated with lower anxiety ratings throughout the post-quit period (panxiety (pAnxiety and depression ratings at baseline predicted increased ratings of corresponding measures during the post-quit period. Stopping smoking yielded reductions in anxiety and depressed mood in smokers with ADHD treated with nicotine patch and counseling. Treatment with OROS-MPH yielded mood reductions in delayed manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Depressive symptoms in HIV-infected and seronegative control subjects in Cameroon: Effect of age, education and gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanmogne, Georgette D.; Qiu, Fang; Ntone, Félicien E.; Fonsah, Julius Y.; Njamnshi, Dora M.; Kuate, Callixte T.; Doh, Roland F.; Kengne, Anne M.; Tagny, Claude T.; Nchindap, Emilienne; Kenmogne, Léopoldine; Mbanya, Dora; Cherner, Mariana; Heaton, Robert K.; Njamnshi, Alfred K.

    2017-01-01

    Depression is a leading cause of HIV/AIDS disease burden; it worsens health outcomes and quality of life. Addressing this problem requires accurate quantification of the extra burden of depression to HIV/AIDS in a given population, and knowledge of the baseline depression prevalence in the general population. There has been no previous study of depression in the general Cameroonian population. The current study attempts to address that important need. We used the Beck Depression Inventory-II to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms in 270 HIV-infected and seronegative Cameroonians. Univariate analyses showed a trend toward higher depressive symptoms among cases, compared to controls (p = 0.055), and among older subjects (>40 years), compared to younger subjects (≤40 years) (p = 0.059). Analysis of depression severity showed that 33.73% of cases had moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms, compared to 19.8% of controls (p<0.01). However, multivariable negative binomial regression analyses showed no effect of age, HIV status, CD4 levels, viral loads, ART, or opportunistic infections on the risk of depressive symptoms. Both univariate and multivariable regression analyses showed significantly higher risk of depressive symptoms among females compared to males; this was significant for both female controls and female cases. Female cases had significantly higher CD4 cell counts and lower viral loads, compared to males. Both univariate and multivariable regression analyses showed that lower education (≤10 years) was associated with increased risk of depressive symptoms. This study shows a high prevalence of depressive symptoms among seronegative controls and HIV-infected Cameroonians. Integrating care for mental disorders such as depression into primary health care and existing HIV/AIDS treatment programs in Cameroon may improve the wellbeing of the general population and could lower the HIV/AIDS burden. PMID:28231258

  6. Depressive symptoms in HIV-infected and seronegative control subjects in Cameroon: Effect of age, education and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanmogne, Georgette D; Qiu, Fang; Ntone, Félicien E; Fonsah, Julius Y; Njamnshi, Dora M; Kuate, Callixte T; Doh, Roland F; Kengne, Anne M; Tagny, Claude T; Nchindap, Emilienne; Kenmogne, Léopoldine; Mbanya, Dora; Cherner, Mariana; Heaton, Robert K; Njamnshi, Alfred K

    2017-01-01

    Depression is a leading cause of HIV/AIDS disease burden; it worsens health outcomes and quality of life. Addressing this problem requires accurate quantification of the extra burden of depression to HIV/AIDS in a given population, and knowledge of the baseline depression prevalence in the general population. There has been no previous study of depression in the general Cameroonian population. The current study attempts to address that important need. We used the Beck Depression Inventory-II to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms in 270 HIV-infected and seronegative Cameroonians. Univariate analyses showed a trend toward higher depressive symptoms among cases, compared to controls (p = 0.055), and among older subjects (>40 years), compared to younger subjects (≤40 years) (p = 0.059). Analysis of depression severity showed that 33.73% of cases had moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms, compared to 19.8% of controls (p<0.01). However, multivariable negative binomial regression analyses showed no effect of age, HIV status, CD4 levels, viral loads, ART, or opportunistic infections on the risk of depressive symptoms. Both univariate and multivariable regression analyses showed significantly higher risk of depressive symptoms among females compared to males; this was significant for both female controls and female cases. Female cases had significantly higher CD4 cell counts and lower viral loads, compared to males. Both univariate and multivariable regression analyses showed that lower education (≤10 years) was associated with increased risk of depressive symptoms. This study shows a high prevalence of depressive symptoms among seronegative controls and HIV-infected Cameroonians. Integrating care for mental disorders such as depression into primary health care and existing HIV/AIDS treatment programs in Cameroon may improve the wellbeing of the general population and could lower the HIV/AIDS burden.

  7. Anti-ribosomal P antibodies related to depression in early clinical course of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Karimifar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric lupus is still a major challenge in clinical practice. We investigated the association between depression and anti-ribosomal P (anti-P antibodies in a sample of Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on adult patients with SLE referring to a referral out-patient clinic of rheumatology. Demographic data and clinical data with regards to measuring disease activity with the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index were gathered. Anti-P antibodies were measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Depression severity was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Results: One hundred patients (80% female and 20% male, age = 34.8 ± 10.9 years were included. Anti-P antibodies were present more frequently in depressed than non-depressed patients (30% vs. 10%, P = 0.015. Depression severity was correlated with anti-P antibodies level only in patients with disease duration of less than 2 years (r = 0.517, P = 0.019. There was no association between the depression severity and disease activity. Binary logistic regression analysis showed age (B = 0.953, CI 95%: 0.914-0.993 and positive anti-P antibodies (B = 4.30, CI 95%: 1.18-15.59 as factors that independently associated with depression. Conclusion: We found an association between depression and presence of anti-P antibodies, and also strong correlation between depression severity and anti-P antibodies level in newly diagnosed SLE patients. Depression severity in newly diagnosed SLE patients may reflect a neuropsychiatric involvement, and in later phases, it is more affected by the chronicity of the disease as well as other environmental factors.

  8. Atypical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... satisfaction and control in your life Help ease depression symptoms such as hopelessness and anger As part of your treatment, it's important to also address other conditions that often accompany atypical depression, in particular anxiety and drug or alcohol use, ...

  9. Teen Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression is a real, treatable brain illness, or health problem. Depression can be caused by big transitions in life, stress, or changes in your body’s chemicals that affect your thoughts and moods. Even if you feel ...

  10. Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not need treatment. The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. You may ... treatment right away, often in the hospital. Postpartum depression can begin anytime within the first year after ...

  11. Depression Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3286 After hours (404) 639-2888 Contact Media Depression Treatment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... How Do I Know if I Am Experiencing Depression? The following questions may help you determine if ...

  12. Depression Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Diseases + Condition Centers Mental Health Medical Library Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  13. Economic evaluation of a guided and unguided internet-based CBT intervention for major depression: Results from a multi-center, three-armed randomized controlled trial conducted in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, Antonio; Luciano, Juan V.; García Campayo, Javier; Gili, Margalida; Botella, Cristina; Baños, Rosa; Castro, Adoración; López-Del-Hoyo, Yolanda; Pérez Ara, Mª Ángeles; Modrego-Alarcón, Marta; Mayoral Cleríes, Fermín

    2017-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common mental disorders and will become one of the leading causes of disability in the world. Internet-based CBT programs for depression have been classified as “well established” following the American Psychological Association criteria for empirically supported treatments. The aim of this study is to analyze the cost effectiveness at 12-month follow-up of the Internet-based CBT program “Smiling is fun” with (LITG) and without psychotherapist support (TSG) compared to usual care. The perspective used in our analysis is societal. A sample of 296 depressed patients (mean age of 43.04 years; 76% female; BDI-II mean score = 22.37) from primary care services in four Spanish regions were randomized in the RCT. The complete case and intention-to-treat (ITT) perspectives were used for the analyses. The results demonstrated that both Internet-based CBT interventions exhibited cost utility and cost effectiveness compared with a control group. The complete case analyses revealed an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €-169.50 and an incremental cost-utility ratio (ICUR) of €-11389.66 for the TSG group and an ICER of €-104.63 and an ICUR of €-6380.86 for the LITG group. The ITT analyses found an ICER of €-98.37 and an ICUR of €-5160.40 for the TSG group and an ICER of €-9.91 and an ICUR of €496.72 for the LITG group. In summary, the results of this study indicate that the two Internet-based CBT interventions are appropriate from both economic and clinical perspectives for depressed patients in the Spanish primary care system. These interventions not only help patients to improve clinically but also generate societal savings. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov NCT01611818 PMID:28241025

  14. Internalized weight bias in weight-loss surgery patients: psychosocial correlates and weight loss outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, Michelle R; Napolitano, Melissa A; Wood, G Craig; Argyropoulos, George; Gerhard, Glenn S; Hayes, Sharon; Foster, Gary D; Collins, Charlotte A; Still, Christopher D

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we examined the relationship between pre-operative internalized weight bias and 12-month post-operative weight loss in adult bariatric surgery patients. Bariatric surgery patients (n=170) from one urban and one rural medical center completed an internalized weight bias measure (the weight bias internalization scale, WBIS) and a depression survey (Beck depression inventory-II, BDI-II) before surgery, and provided consent to access their medical records. Participants (BMI=47.8 kg/m2, age=45.7 years) were mostly female (82.0 %), White (89.5 %), and underwent gastric bypass (83.6 %). The average WBIS score by item was 4.54 ± 1.3. Higher pre-operative WBIS scores were associated with diminished weight loss at 12 months after surgery (p=0.035). Pre-operative WBIS scores were positively associated with depressive symptoms (p<0.001). Greater internalized weight bias was associated with more depressive symptoms before surgery and less weight loss 1 year after surgery.

  15. Attachment to Parents and Depressive Symptoms in College Students: The Mediating Role of Initial Emotional Adjustment and Psychological Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Smojver-Ažić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to explore the role of parental attachment in students' depressive symptoms. We have examined wheather initial emotional adjustment and psychological needs would serve as a mediator of the relationship between attachment dimensions (anxiety and avoidance and depressive symptoms.A sample consisted of 219 students (143 females randomly selected from the University of Rijeka, Croatia, with mean age 19.02 years. Participants provided self-report on the Experiences in Close Relationship Inventory and The Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire at the beginning of the first year of college, and The Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II at the third year of college.Results of hierarchical regression analyses confirm that emotional adjustment had a full mediation effect on anxiety dimension and partial mediation on avoidance dimension. Only a partial mediation effect of psychological needs for autonomy and relatedness between attachment and depressive symptoms was found.The findings of this study give support to the researches indicating the importance of parental attachment for college students not only through its direct effects on depressive symptoms, but also through effects on the initial emotional adjustment and satisfaction of psychological needs. The results of the mediation analysis suggest that both attachment dimensions and emotional adjustment as well as psychological need satisfaction have a substantial shared variance when predicting depressive symptoms and that each variable also gives a unique contribution to depressive symptoms.

  16. Effects of cognitive behavioral coaching on depressive symptoms in a sample of type 2 diabetic inpatients in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyechi, Kay Chinonyelum Nwamaka; Eseadi, Chiedu; Okere, Anthony U; Onuigbo, Liziana N; Umoke, Prince C I; Anyaegbunam, Ngozi Joannes; Otu, Mkpoikanke Sunday; Ugorji, Ngozi Juliet

    2016-08-01

    Depression is one of the mental health problems confronting those with diabetes mellitus and may result from self-defeating thoughts and lifestyles. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cognitive behavioral coaching (CBC) program on depressive symptoms in a sample of the Type 2 diabetic inpatients in Onitsha metropolis of Anambra State, Nigeria. The design of the study was pretest-post-test randomized control group design. The participants were 80 Type 2 diabetic inpatients randomly assigned to the treatment and control groups. The primary outcome measures were Beck's Depression Inventory-II and a Diabetic Inpatient's Depressive Symptoms Observation Checklist. Mean, standard deviation, repeated measures analysis of covariance, and partial eta squared were used for data analysis. The results revealed that the baseline of depressive symptoms was similar between the control and treatment groups of the Type 2 diabetic inpatients. But, exposing the Type 2 diabetic inpatients to a cognitive behavioral coaching program significantly reduced the depressive symptoms in the treatment group compared to those in the control group at the end of the intervention. The effects of cognitive behavioral coaching program on the depressive symptoms of those in the treatment group remained consistent at a 6 month follow-up meetings compared to the control group. Given the potential benefits of a cognitive behavioral coaching program, clinicians and mental health professionals are urged to support and implement evidence-based cognitive-behavioral coaching interventions aimed at promoting diabetic inpatients' wellbeing in the Nigerian hospitals.

  17. Predicting Optimal Outcomes in Cognitive Therapy or Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Individuals Using the Personalized Advantage Index Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus J H Huibers

    Full Text Available Although psychotherapies for depression produce equivalent outcomes, individual patients respond differently to different therapies. Predictors of outcome have been identified in the context of randomized trials, but this information has not been used to predict which treatment works best for the depressed individual. In this paper, we aim to replicate a recently developed treatment selection method, using data from an RCT comparing the effects of cognitive therapy (CT and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT.134 depressed patients completed the pre- and post-treatment BDI-II assessment. First, we identified baseline predictors and moderators. Second, individual treatment recommendations were generated by combining the identified predictors and moderators in an algorithm that produces the Personalized Advantage Index (PAI, a measure of the predicted advantage in one therapy compared to the other, using standard regression analyses and the leave-one-out cross-validation approach.We found five predictors (gender, employment status, anxiety, personality disorder and quality of life and six moderators (somatic complaints, cognitive problems, paranoid symptoms, interpersonal self-sacrificing, attributional style and number of life events of treatment outcome. The mean average PAI value was 8.9 BDI points, and 63% of the sample was predicted to have a clinically meaningful advantage in one of the therapies. Those who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment (either CT or IPT had an observed mean end-BDI of 11.8, while those who received their predicted non-optimal treatment had an end-BDI of 17.8 (effect size for the difference = 0.51.Depressed patients who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment fared much better than those randomized to their predicted non-optimal treatment. The PAI provides a great opportunity for formal decision-making to improve individual patient outcomes in depression. Although the utility of the PAI

  18. Predicting Optimal Outcomes in Cognitive Therapy or Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Individuals Using the Personalized Advantage Index Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huibers, Marcus J. H.; Cohen, Zachary D.; Lemmens, Lotte H. J. M.; Arntz, Arnoud; Peeters, Frenk P. M. L.; Cuijpers, Pim; DeRubeis, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although psychotherapies for depression produce equivalent outcomes, individual patients respond differently to different therapies. Predictors of outcome have been identified in the context of randomized trials, but this information has not been used to predict which treatment works best for the depressed individual. In this paper, we aim to replicate a recently developed treatment selection method, using data from an RCT comparing the effects of cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Methods 134 depressed patients completed the pre- and post-treatment BDI-II assessment. First, we identified baseline predictors and moderators. Second, individual treatment recommendations were generated by combining the identified predictors and moderators in an algorithm that produces the Personalized Advantage Index (PAI), a measure of the predicted advantage in one therapy compared to the other, using standard regression analyses and the leave-one-out cross-validation approach. Results We found five predictors (gender, employment status, anxiety, personality disorder and quality of life) and six moderators (somatic complaints, cognitive problems, paranoid symptoms, interpersonal self-sacrificing, attributional style and number of life events) of treatment outcome. The mean average PAI value was 8.9 BDI points, and 63% of the sample was predicted to have a clinically meaningful advantage in one of the therapies. Those who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment (either CT or IPT) had an observed mean end-BDI of 11.8, while those who received their predicted non-optimal treatment had an end-BDI of 17.8 (effect size for the difference = 0.51). Discussion Depressed patients who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment fared much better than those randomized to their predicted non-optimal treatment. The PAI provides a great opportunity for formal decision-making to improve individual patient outcomes in depression. Although

  19. Development of Japanese version of the checklist individual strength questionnaire in a working population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aratake, Yutaka; Tanaka, Katsutoshi; Wada, Koji; Watanabe, Mayumi; Katoh, Noritada; Sakata, Yumi; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2007-11-01

    The aims of the present study were to develop and validate the Japanese version of the checklist individual strength questionnaire (CIS) which is used to measure prolonged fatigue not only in the general population but also in the working population. We obtained permission to use CIS from its author and translated the questionnaire into Japanese. Then, the Japanese version of the questionnaire was translated back into English by a bilingual person. The author of the original version agreed that the back-translated version was conceptually and linguistically equivalent to the original CIS. To validate CIS, 399 workers (66.7% were men) from different companies answered the Japanese version of the CIS (CIS-J), Maslach burnout inventory-general survey (MBI-GS), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), visual analogue scale (VAS) questionnaires for subjective fatigue, number of overtime hours and number of hours of sleep. Cronbach's alpha for the total CIS-J score was 0.91. The test-retest reliability assessed with an intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.82. Although confirmatory factor analysis did not show an ideal model fit, the correlation coefficients between the total CIS score and the MBI-GS exhaustion score, the BDI-II score and the VAS score were 0.58 (p<0.01), 0.66 (p<0.01) and 0.63 (p<0.01), respectively. The less workers slept and the longer they worked, the higher their total CIS score became. CIS-J showed good reliability and acceptable validity in the working population. Thus, it could be useful for studying fatigue among Japanese working populations.

  20. Experiential avoidance and anxiety sensitivity in patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia: Do both constructs measure the same?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane K. Kämpfe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se examinó si la sensibilidad a la ansiedad (SA y la evitación experiencial (EE, dos constructos potencialmente relevantes en la evolución de los trastornos de ansiedad relacionadas con importantes consecuencias de los tratamientos cognitivoconductuales, se relacionan de forma diferencial con la expresión de síntomas en pacientes con trastorno de pánico y agorafobia. Dentro de un estudio multicentro, 369 pacientes que cumplían con los criterios DSM-IV-TR para el trastorno de pánico con agorafobia (TP/AG completaron la Panic and Agoraphobia Scale (PAS, el Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI, el Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II y el Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II. Paralelamente se examina la validez predictiva de la SA y la EE mediante análisis exploratorio de los ítems y análisis de regresión múltiple. SA y EE correlacionaron de forma moderada entre sí (r = 0,50, p < 0,01. SA explicó un porcentaje de la varianza de las subescalas Ansiedad anticipatoria y Pánico relacionado con la incapacidad, pero no de Ataques de pánico, Evitación agorafóbica y Preocupaciones por la salud. ASI, AAQ-II y BDI-II explicaron un porcentaje de varianza entre bajo y moderado de las cinco subescalas PAS (R 2 = 0,04-0,29, p < 0,005. SA y EE se superponen en constructos distintos. Los resultados sugieren que SA contribuye a una comprensión mucho mejor de la vulnerabilidad, al menos en pacientes con TP/AG.

  1. The Comparison of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in the Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaghoob Vakili

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, and the combination of ACT and SSRIs in the treatment of adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Materials and Methods: In This experimental study 32 outpatients meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for OCD were randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions: ACT, SSRIs, and combined treatment. The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS, Beck Depression Inventory-II-Second edition (BDI-II, and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI were administered at pre- and post-treatment. Twenty-seven patients completed the study. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVAs and one - way analysis of covariance (ANCOVAs, clinically significant change, and complete remission status. Results: Analyses with ANCOVA revealed that the patients treated with ACT and combined treatment experienced a significantly greater improvement in obsessive- compulsive symptoms at post-treatment as compared to those treated with SSRIs alone. However, there were no significant differences between ACT and combined treatment on OC symptoms. In addition, no significant differences were found between all the 3 treatment groups regarding reduction in the BDI-II and BAI scores at post-treatment. Clinically significant change and complete remission status results also showed that, unlike the SSRI, the ACT and combined treatment lead to more improvement in OC symptoms. Conclusion: ACT and combined treatment are more effective than SSRIs alone in treating OC symptoms. However, it seems that adding SSRIs to ACT does not increase the effectiveness of ACT in the treatment of adults with OCD in the short-term.

  2. TEACCH-based group social skills training for children with high-functioning autism: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Kayoko; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Ando, Masahiko; Anme, Tokie; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Yamaguchi, Hinako; Nakayama, Takeo

    2013-10-01

    Although social skills training programs for people with high-functioning autism (HFA) are widely practiced, the standardization of curricula, the examination of clinical effectiveness, and the evaluation of the feasibility of future trials have yet to be done in Asian countries. To compensate for this problem, a Japanese pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Handicapped Children (TEACCH)-based group social skills training for children with HFA and their mothers was conducted. Eleven children with HFA, aged 5-6 years, and their mothers were randomly assigned to the TEACCH program (n=5) or a waiting-list control group (n=6). The program involved comprehensive group intervention and featured weekly 2-hour sessions, totaling 20 sessions over six months. The adaptive behaviors and social reciprocity of the children, parenting stress, and parent-child interactions were assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), Parenting Stress Index (PSI), Beck depression inventory-II (BDI-II), and Interaction Rating Scale (IRS). Through this pilot trial, the intervention and evaluation of the program has been shaped. There were no dropouts from the program and the mothers' satisfaction was high. The outcome measurements improved more in the program group than in the control group, with moderate effect sizes (SDQ, 0.71; PSI, 0.58; BDI-II, 0.40; and IRS, 0.69). This pilot trial also implied that this program is more beneficial for high IQ children and mothers with low stress than for those who are not. We have standardized the TEACCH program, confirmed the feasibility of a future trial, and successfully estimated the positive effect size. These findings will contribute to a larger trial in the future and to forthcoming systematic reviews with meta-analyses. UMIN000004560.

  3. Gender differences in somatic symptoms, quality of life, and functional impairment in depressive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sreevani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Investigate gender related differences in somatic symptoms, severity of depression, quality of life (QOL, and functional impairment, and correlate somatic symptoms with QOL and functional impairment. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted with 100 consecutive outpatients seeking treatment for depressive disorder at district hospital psychiatric outpatient clinic, Kolar, Karnataka, India. This study utilised the Beck Depression Inventory II, Physical Distress Scale, Work and Social Adjustment Scale, and World Health Organization QOL BREF instrument. Results: Mean constipation scores and back pain scores were higher in women compared to men. There were no statistically significant differences between male and female patients with regard to depression scores, total somatic symptom scores, QOL, and functional impairment scores. Somatic symptoms scores are positively correlated with depression scores and functional impairment scores, and negatively correlated with QOL scores. Conclusion: Women had higher constipation and back pain scores compared to men. If the symptoms of same disease differ between men and women, this has important implications for the history collection, diagnosis, and treatment process.

  4. Symptom severity, quality of sleep, and treatment adherence among patients suffering from schizophrenia and depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peggy Bosch; Janina Waberg; Maurits van den Noort; Heike Staudte; Sabina Lim; Jos Egger

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Treatment non-adherence is a common problem in patients suffering from schizophrenia and depression. This study investigated the possible relationships between symptom severity, quality of sleep, and treatment adherence.Methods: Thirty outpatients with schizophrenia and 58 outpatients with depression were enroled in this study. The beck depression Inventory-II, the positive and negative syndrome scale, and the pittsburgh sleep quality index were used to assess symptom severity and quality of sleep, and sleep log data were used to measure treatment adherence.Results: The preliminary results showed no signiifcant relationship between symptom severity and treatment adherence or between quality of sleep and treatment adherence in patients with depression. However, a signiifcant positive relationship was found between negative symptoms and treatment adherence and a signiifcant negative relationship between quality of sleep and treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia.Conclusion: The present exploratory study revealed a positive relationship between symptom severity and treatment adherence and a negative relationship between quality of sleep and treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia, but no signiifcant relationships in patients with depression were found. Future studies are needed in order to gain a better understanding of possible risk factors related to treatment non-adherence.

  5. Effectiveness, relapse prevention and mechanisms of change of cognitive therapy vs. interpersonal therapy for depression: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roefs Anne

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depression is a common mental disorder that substantially impairs quality of life and has high societal costs. Although psychotherapies have proven to be effective antidepressant treatments, initial response rates are insufficient and the risk of relapse and recurrence is high. Improvement of treatments is badly needed. Studying the mechanisms of change in treatment might be a good investment for improving everyday mental health care. However, the mechanisms underlying therapeutic change remain largely unknown. The objective of the current study is to assess both the effectiveness of two commonly used psychotherapies for depression in terms of reduction of symptoms and prevention of relapse on short and long term, as well as identifying underlying mechanisms of change. Methods In a randomised trial we will compare (a Cognitive Therapy (CT with (b Interpersonal therapy (IPT, and (c an 8-week waiting list condition followed by treatment of choice. One hundred eighty depressed patients (aged 18-65 will be recruited in a mental health care centre in Maastricht (the Netherlands. Eligible patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three intervention groups. The primary outcome measure of the clinical evaluation is depression severity measured by the Beck Depression Intenvory-II (BDI-II. Other outcomes include process variables such as dysfunctional beliefs, negative attributions, and interpersonal problems. All self-report outcome assessments will take place on the internet at baseline, three, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve and twenty-four months. At 24 months a retrospective telephone interview will be administered. Furthermore, a rudimentary analysis of the cost-effectiveness will be embedded. The study has been ethically approved and registered. Discussion By comparing CT and IPT head-to-head and by investigating multiple potential mediators and outcomes at multiple time points during and after therapy, we

  6. Evaluation of major risk factors related to depression among medical students of NRS medical college.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay Prianka, Sain Sonali, Mandal Nirmal Kumar, Saha Tushar Kanti , Dey Indira, Chattopadhyay Amitava

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Medical students experience depression, burnout, and mental illness at a higher rate than general population. A better understanding of related risk factors can help target appropriate support services for them. The aim of the study was to assess the occurrence of depression and identify its risk factors among undergraduate students in a medical College in Kolkata, India. Methodology: A descriptive, cross-sectional study using a two stage, stratified cluster sampling technique was used to select a sample of 289 students. Data were collected using a self-administered, anonymous questionnaire based on Becks Depression Inventory II. Results: The mean score of students on depression scale was 10.47±10.39. 22.5 % of students tested positive for some form of depression while 6.2% had severe to extreme depression. The risk factors of depressive symptoms identified were older age, lower family income, students who did not choose admission in MBBS course on their own, had addictions, felt negatively about results, faced difficulty with study course and had relationship issues. Students with relationship issues in their personal lives were 3.7 times more likely to exhibit depressive symptoms than without them. Students who faced difficulty coping with study course were 2.18 times more likely to exhibit depressive symptoms than without them. Conclusion: Academic performance alone doesn’t influence the mental health of students, rather factors like older age, socioeconomic status, role in choice of medical career, negative perception of academic performance, difficulty with study course and relationship issues are also important.

  7. Characteristics of Social Network Gamers: in between Social Networking and Online Role-Playing Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga eGeisel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Current research on internet addiction (IA reported moderate to high prevalence rates of IA and comorbid psychiatric symptoms in users of social networking sites (SNS and online role-playing games. The aim of this study was to characterise adult users of an internet multiplayer strategy game within a SNS. Therefore, we conducted an exploratory study using an online survey to assess sociodemographic variables, psychopathology and the rate of IA in a sample of adult social network gamers by Young´s Internet Addiction Test (IAT, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS, the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II, the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R and the WHO Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF. All participants were listed gamers of combat zone in the SNS Facebook. In the IAT analysis, 16.2 % of the participants (n = 60 were categorized as subjects with IA and 19.5 % (n = 72 fulfilled the criteria for alexithymia. Comparing study participants with and without IA, the IA group had significantly more subjects with alexithymia, reported more depressive symptoms, and showed poorer quality of life. These findings suggest that social network gaming might also be associated with maladaptive patterns of internet use. Furthermore, a relationship between IA, alexithymia and depressive symptoms was found that needs to be elucidated by future studies.

  8. Relationship between alexithymia and dependent personality disorder: a dimensional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loas, Gwenolé; Baelde, Olympe; Verrier, Annie

    2015-02-28

    The present study had two aims and used two different samples. The first aim was to determine if alexithymia and dependent personality disorder (DPD) are distinct or overlapping constructs. The second aim was to determine the specificity and the stability of the relationship between alexithymia and DPD. The first study used exploratory principal components analysis (PCA) in a sample of 477 non-clinical subjects who completed three questionnaires measuring alexithymia (Twenty item Toronto Alexithymia Scale, i.e. TAS-20), dependent personality disorder (Dependent Personality Questionnaire, i.e. DPQ) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II, i.e. BDI-II). The second study used a sample of 305 subjects consecutively admitted to an outpatient department of legal medicine. The subjects completed (at admission and 3 months later) the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, screen questionnaire (SCID-II-SQ), the TAS-20 and the BDI. Multiple regressions were done. For the first study, the PCA yielded a four-factor solution with no overlap of the significant factor loadings for the items from each scale and with the factors corresponding to their respective construct. For the second study, multiple regressions showed that only avoidant personality disorder was an independent predictor of the TAS-20 scores. Alexithymia is a construct that is distinct and separate from DPD and depression. Alexithymia is not a stable feature of DPD while it is a core feature of avoidant personality disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in depression, anxiety and hopelessness symptoms during family- and community-oriented intervention for help-seeking adolescents and adolescents at risk of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granö, Niklas; Karjalainen, Marjaana; Edlund, Virve; Saari, Erkki; Itkonen, Arja; Anto, Jukka; Roine, Mikko

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about how symptoms are changed in adolescents who receive treatment in an early detection and intervention service. The aims of the present research were to study change in depression, anxiety and hopelessness symptoms in a sample of help-seeking adolescents who participated in a community- and family-oriented early intervention programme. The data was collected in Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH), Finland, by the JERI (Jorvi Early psychosis Recognition and Intervention) early intervention team; 85 help-seeking adolescents filled questionnaires of anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory), depression (Beck Depression Inventory II) and hopelessness (Beck Hopelessness Scale). The PROD screen was used to assess risk of psychosis. Paired samples t-test of anxiety, depression and hopelessness showed statistically significant improvement on all scales (P depression (P hopelessness (P depression and 88.2% in symptoms of hopelessness. Of sub-group of participants at risk of psychosis, 58.8% were at a remission level of symptoms in anxiety, 76.4% in symptoms of depression and 79.4% in symptoms of hopelessness. Present results suggest that there is both statistically and clinically remarkable improvement in anxiety, depression and hopelessness symptoms after the intervention. These findings should be considered in the psychiatric care of help-seeking adolescents and adolescents at risk of psychosis.

  10. Effectiveness of taking in the good based-bibliotherapy intervention program among depressed Filipino female adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, John; De Guzman, Rosalito G

    2016-10-01

    Adolescent depression is a severe mental health problem. Philippines has the highest incidence of depression in South East Asia. Depressed female adolescents habitually seek and retain negative experiences. Aim of this research was to develop and to assess effectiveness of a Taking in the Good Based-Bibliotherapy Intervention Program for female adolescents. As an innovative type of psychotherapy treatment, program aimed to build up their inner strengths by experiencing, enriching and absorbing daily events with a positive attitude and installing them in brain. Program was conducted in two phases: 1. Development of taking in the good based-bibliotherapy intervention. 2. Implementation and assessment of pioneering treatment for alleviating depression and thereby increasing positive cognitive appraisal by employing true experimental research design particularly between subjects. Beck Depression Inventory-II, Asian Adolescent Depression Scale and Kutcher Adolescent Depression Scale-11 were administered before and after implementation of the program. A total of 30 female adolescents, Filipino High School students, (mean age=13.9), were randomly assigned to experimental (n=15) and control (n=15) conditions. Data analysis was done by employing percentage and frequency distribution, mean scores, standard deviation, dependent t-test, independent t-test statistics and Cohen's d. The null hypothesis was tested at the 0.05 level of significance. Statistical analysis between the pre-test and post-test scores of the experimental group showed significant difference (p=0.000) and scores of control and experimental group showed significant difference (p=0.000) in all dependent variables in the post-test. These results revealed that "Taking in the Good based-Bibliotherapy Intervention" was effective in reducing depression in female adolescents.

  11. Sudden gains in cognitive-behavior therapy for treatment-resistant depression: Processes of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Anna; Hayes, Adele M; Henley, William; Kuyken, Willem

    2016-08-01

    Sudden gains were investigated in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Client and therapist processes in sessions proximal to sudden gains were examined to better understand the antecedents of sudden gains and potential mechanisms linking them to outcome. Participants were 156 adults with TRD in a randomized controlled trial of CBT as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy (Wiles et al., 2013). Depression symptoms were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory-II at each session. In a subsample of 50 clients, audio-recordings of 125 therapy sessions were rated for hope, emotional processing, and therapist competence in case-conceptualization. Sudden gains were experienced by 54% of participants. Those with gains reported significantly lower depression severity at 12-month follow-up and more remission of symptoms than those without gains. Sudden gains also predicted lower depression at follow-up, beyond the slope of linear change in symptoms across treatment. Therapists demonstrated greater competence in case conceptualization with clients who reported sudden gains, and those with gains expressed more hope in sessions prior to a gain. In addition, more hope and emotional processing in the pregain sessions predicted less depression at follow-up, controlling for depression scores in the prior session. Better therapist conceptualization skills and more client hope in the baseline and pregain sessions were also associated with more emotional processing in those same sessions. This study extends the phenomenon of sudden gains in CBT for depression to a treatment-resistant population and identified important therapy processes that predicted long-term outcomes: hope and emotional processing. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Compassion-Based Meditation in African Americans: Self-Criticism Mediates Changes in Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Suzanne B; Goodnight, Bradley L; Zhang, Huaiyu; Daboin, Irene; Patterson, Bobbi; Kaslow, Nadine J

    2017-03-21

    This study examines self-criticism as a mechanism through which compassion meditation reduces depressive symptoms in low-income African American men and women (N = 59) who had recently attempted suicide. After completing several measures, including the Levels of Self-Criticism Scale and Beck Depression Inventory-II, participants were randomly assigned to receive either a six-session compassion meditation (CM) group (Grady Compassion and Meditation Program) or a six-session support group. As predicted, path analysis results showed that treatment condition led to changes in self-criticism from pre- to posttreatment, with those receiving CM showing greater reductions in levels of self-criticism than those randomized to the support group. Path analyses also revealed that changes in self-criticism fully mediated the link between condition and changes in depressive symptoms. These findings highlight the importance and value of targeting levels of self-criticism in compassion-based interventions to reduce the depressive symptoms of suicidal African Americans.

  13. Behavioral activation for late adolescents with subthreshold depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagaki, Koki; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Jinnin, Ran; Mori, Asako; Nishiyama, Yoshiko; Yamamura, Takanao; Yokoyama, Satoshi; Shiota, Syouichi; Okamoto, Yuri; Miyake, Yoshie; Ogata, Akiko; Kunisato, Yoshihiko; Shimoda, Haruki; Kawakami, Norito; Furukawa, Toshi A; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2016-11-01

    The main behavioral characteristic of subthreshold depression that is observed in adolescents is the low frequency of exposure to environmental rewards. Therefore, it was considered that a simple intervention conducted in short sessions, focusing on increasing access to positively reinforcing activities, would be efficacious in increasing the availability of rewards. We conduct a randomized controlled trial to examine the efficacy of such a behavioral activation program that was conducted weekly for 5 weeks in 60-min sessions. Late adolescent university students aged 18-19 years with subthreshold depression were randomly allocated to a treatment (n = 62) or a control group (n = 56). The primary outcome of the study was the Beck Depression Inventory-II score. Results indicated that late adolescent students in the treatment group showed significant improvements in their depressive symptoms (effect size -0.90, 95 % CI -1.28 to -0.51) compared to the control group. Students in the treatment group also showed significant improvements in self-reported rating of quality of life and in behavioral characteristics. It is concluded that this intervention had a large and significant effect despite being short and simple and that this low-intensity cognitive behavioral therapy program could be conducted in many different types of institutions. It is suggested that the long-term effects of the treatment program should be targeted for investigation in future studies.

  14. Depression, anxiety, hopelessness and quality of life in users of cocaine/crack in outpatient treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Camila Bosse; Ferreira, Isadora Borne; Bosa, Vera Lúcia; Narvaez, Joana Corrêa de Magalhães

    2017-01-01

    To identify symptoms of anxiety, depression, and feelings of hopelessness in patients in outpatient treatment for substance dependency and to test for correlations with various aspects of their quality of life. A cross-sectional study of a sample of 25 men in recuperation from substance dependency, selected by convenience. We assessed symptoms of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory), hopelessness (Beck Hopelessness Scale), and quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument-Abbreviated version [WHOQOL-Bref]), and also analyzed sociodemographic profile, substance abuse, and family history. Categorical variables were expressed as frequencies and percentages and quantitative variables as means and standard deviations or as medians and interquartile ranges. We also analyzed Spearman correlations to a 5% significance level. The study revealed prevalence rates of 32% for depression, 24% for anxiety, and 12% for hopelessness, at a moderate/severe level. Correlations between Beck scales and WHOQOL-Bref were significant; but impacts differed in the four areas evaluated. Overall, we observe global negative impacts on subjects' lives, affecting their psychiatric symptoms and quality of life and their relationships and occupational factors to a similar degree. The results show that the lower the scores on these scales, the better the quality of life in some areas, indicating that there is a negative correlation between psychiatric symptoms and quality of life.

  15. Depressive Symptoms and Their Interactions With Emotions and Personality Traits Over Time: Interaction Networks in a Psychiatric Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semino, Laura N; Marksteiner, Josef; Brauchle, Gernot; Danay, Erik

    2017-04-13

    Associations between depression, personality traits, and emotions are complex and reciprocal. The aim of this study is to explore these interactions in dynamical networks and in a linear way over time depending on the severity of depression. Participants included 110 patients with depressive symptoms (DSM-5 criteria) who were recruited between October 2015 and February 2016 during their inpatient stay in a general psychiatric hospital in Hall in Tyrol, Austria. The patients filled out the Beck Depression Inventory-II, a German emotional competence questionnaire (Emotionale Kompetenz Fragebogen), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, and the German versions of the Big Five Inventory-short form and State-Trait-Anxiety-Depression Inventory regarding symptoms, emotions, and personality during their inpatient stay and at a 3-month follow-up by mail. Network and regression analyses were performed to explore interactions both in a linear and a dynamical way at baseline and 3 months later. Regression analyses showed that emotions and personality traits gain importance for the prediction of depressive symptoms with decreasing symptomatology at follow-up (personality: baseline, adjusted R2 = 0.24, P personality traits is significantly denser and more interconnected (network comparison test: P = .03) at follow-up than at baseline, meaning that with decreased symptoms interconnections get stronger. During depression, personality traits and emotions are walled off and not strongly interconnected with depressive symptoms in networks. With decreasing depressive symptomatology, interfusing of these areas begins and interconnections become stronger. This finding has practical implications for interventions in an acute depressive state and with decreased symptoms. The network approach offers a new perspective on interactions and is a way to make the complexity of these interactions more tangible.

  16. Adolescence depressions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matot, J P

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the depressive problematics emerging during adolescence in the frame of the transformations that characterize this period of life, with a focus on the interference of socio-cultural dimensions...

  17. Postpartum Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne

    Background: In three academic articles, this PhD thesis investigates maternal postpartum depression (PPD) as a risk factor for the infant-mother attachment and infant development. Previous studies have been contradictory with respect to the question of whether PPD can have long term effects...... on offspring. This may be due to not differing between when PPD is only occurring in the postpartum period and when effects are also due to ongoing or recurrent depression. However, it may also be due to viewing maternal depression as a unitary construct, and not considering underlying maternal psychological...... difficulties which may moderate potential adverse effects. The present thesis investigates two potential maternal moderators of risk:. Comorbid personality disorder and adult attachment insecurity. Moreover, the question of early environmental effects of PPD versus effects of later or ongoing depression...

  18. Evaluating the autonomic nervous system in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wan-Ju; Shu, Chih-Hung; Chou, Kun-Ta; Wang, Yi-Fen; Hsu, Yen-Bin; Ho, Ching-Yin; Lan, Ming-Ying

    2013-06-01

    The pathogenesis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) remains unclear. It is linked to but distinct from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which has been shown to be related to disturbed autonomic regulation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether autonomic dysfunction also plays a role in the pathogenesis of LPR. Case-control study. Tertiary care center. Seventeen patients with LPR and 19 healthy controls, aged between 19 and 50 years, were enrolled in the study. The patients were diagnosed with LPR if they had a reflux symptom index (RSI) ≥ 13 and a reflux finding score (RFS) ≥ 7. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis was used to assess autonomic function. Anxiety and depression levels measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) were also conducted. In HRV analysis, high frequency (HF) represents the parasympathetic activity of the autonomic nervous system, whereas low frequency (LF) represents the total autonomic activity. There were no significant differences in the LF power and HF power between the 2 groups. However, significantly lower HF% (P = .003) and a higher LF/HF ratio (P = .012) were found in patients with LPR, who demonstrated poor autonomic modulation and higher sympathetic activity. Anxiety was also frequently observed in the patient group. The study suggests that autonomic dysfunction seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of LPR. The potential beneficial effect of autonomic nervous system modulation as a therapeutic modality for LPR merits further investigation.

  19. Self-Reported Mindful Attention and Awareness, Go/No-Go Response-Time Variability, and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Julian R; Blackwood, Mallory E; Mathew, Rano T; Lecci, Len B

    2017-06-01

    The abilities to stabilize the focus of attention, notice attention lapses, and return attention to an intended object following lapses are precursors for mindfulness. Individuals diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are deficient in the attentional and self-control skills that characterize mindfulness. The present study assessed the relationship between mindfulness and ADHD in young adults using the Mindful Attention and Awareness Scale (MAAS), a computerized Go/No-Go task (the Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA)), the World Health Organization Adult Self-Report Scale (ASRS), a tool used as an adult ADHD screen, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). We recruited 151 adult volunteers (ages 18 to 40); 100 with confirmed ADHD diagnoses and 51 control participants. Overall, participants with prior diagnoses of ADHD scored lower on the MAAS than controls and ASRS scores were strongly negatively correlated MAAS scores. Attention performance index, response time, and response-time variability subscales of the TOVA were positively correlated with MAAS scores and negatively correlated with ASRS scores. Intrasubject response-time variability on the TOVA, a parameter associated with attention lapses, was also strongly negatively correlated with MAAS scores. Overall, participants' self-reported mindfulness, as measured by the MAAS, was strongly related to self-reports on a clinical measure of attention disorders, anxiety, depression, and multiple indices of concentration and mind wandering on a standardized Go/No-Go task, the TOVA.

  20. Affective alterations in patients with Cushing's syndrome in remission are associated with decreased BDNF and cortisone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valassi, E; Crespo, I; Keevil, B G; Aulinas, A; Urgell, E; Santos, A; Trainer, P J; Webb, S M

    2017-02-01

    Affective alterations and poorer quality of life often persist in patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) in remission. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and is highly expressed in brain areas controlling mood and response to stress. Our aims were to assess affective alterations after long-term remission of CS and evaluate whether they are associated with serum BDNF, salivary cortisol (SalF) and/or cortisone (SalE) concentrations. Thirty-six CS patients in remission (32 females/4 males; mean age (±s.d.), 48.8 ± 11.8 years; median duration of remission, 72 months) and 36 gender-, age- and BMI-matched controls were included. Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Positive Affect Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and EuroQoL and CushingQoL questionnaires were completed and measured to evaluate anxiety, depression, stress perception and quality of life (QoL) respectively. Salivary cortisol was measured using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/TMS). BDNF was measured in serum using an ELISA. Remitted CS patients showed worse scores in all questionnaires than controls: STAI (P cortisone was inversely associated with trait anxiety (r = -0.377, P = 0.040) and depressed affect (r = -0.392, P = 0.032) in CS patients. Delay to diagnosis was associated with depressive symptoms (BDI-II: r = 0.398, P = 0.036 and CES-D: r = 0.449, P = 0.017) and CushingQoL scoring (r = -0.460, P < 0.01). Low BDNF levels are associated with affective alterations in 'cured' CS patients, including depression, anxiety and impaired stress perception. Elevated levels of SalE might also be related to poor affective status in these patients. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  1. Effects of a Multicomponent Life-Style Intervention on Weight, Glycemic Control, Depressive Symptoms, and Renal Function in Low-Income, Minority Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Results of the Community Approach to Lifestyle Modification for Diabetes Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrieft, Ashley E.; Llabre, Maria M.; McCalla, Judith Rey; Gutt, Miriam; Mendez, Armando J.; Gellman, Marc D.; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Schneiderman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Few interventions have combined life-style and psychosocial approaches in the context of Type 2 diabetes management. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a multicomponent behavioral intervention on weight, glycemic control, renal function, and depressive symptoms in a sample of overweight/obese adults with Type 2 diabetes and marked depressive symptoms. Methods A sample of 111 adults with Type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to a 1-year intervention (n = 57) or usual care (n = 54) in a parallel groups design. Primary outcomes included weight, glycosylated hemoglobin, and Beck Depression Inventory II score. Estimated glomerular filtration rate served as a secondary outcome. All measures were assessed at baseline and 6 and 12 months after randomization by assessors blind to randomization. Latent growth modeling was used to examine intervention effects on each outcome. Results The intervention resulted in decreased weight (mean [M] = 0.322 kg, standard error [SE] = 0.124 kg, p = .010) and glycosylated hemoglobin (M = 0.066%, SE = 0.028%, p = .017), and Beck Depression Inventory II scores (M = 1.009, SE = 0.226, p < .001), and improved estimated glomerular filtration rate (M = 0.742 ml·min−1·1.73 m−2, SE = 0.318 ml·min−1·1.73 m−2, p = .020) each month during the first 6 months relative to usual care. Conclusions Multicomponent behavioral interventions targeting weight loss and depressive symptoms as well as diet and physical activity are efficacious in the management of Type 2 diabetes. Trial Registration: This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT01739205. PMID:27359176

  2. Systematic reviews of randomised clinical trials examining the effects of psychotherapeutic interventions versus "no intervention" for acute major depressive disorder and a randomised trial examining the effects of "third wave" cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based treatment for acute major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian

    2014-10-01

    % confidence interval -3.98 to -2.03; p = 0.00001), no significant heterogeneity between trials). Trial sequential analysis confirmed this result. The second systematic review included 12 randomised trials examining the effects of cognitive therapy versus "no intervention" for major depressive disorder. Altogether a total of 669 participants were randomised. All trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that cognitive therapy significantly reduced depressive symptoms on the HDRS compared with "no intervention" (four trials; mean difference -3.05 (95% confidence interval, -5.23 to -0.87; p = 0.006)). Trial sequential analysis could not confirm this result. The trial protocol showed that it seemed feasible to conduct a randomised trial with low risks of bias and low risks of random errors examining the effects of "third wave" cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy in a setting in the Danish healthcare system. It turned out to be much more difficult to recruit participants in the randomised trial than expected. We only included about half of the planned participants. The results from the randomised trial showed that participants randomised to "third wave" therapy compared with participants randomised to mentalization-based treatment had borderline significantly lower HDRS scores at 18 weeks in an unadjusted analysis (mean difference -4.14 score; 95% CI -8.30 to 0.03; p = 0.051). In the adjusted analysis, the difference was significant (p = 0.039). Five (22.7%) of the participants randomised to "third wave" cognitive therapy had remission at 18 weeks versus none of the participants randomised to mentalization-based treatment (p = 0.049). Sequential analysis showed that these findings could be due to random errors. No significant differences between the two groups was found regarding Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI II), Symptom Checklist 90 Revised (SCL 90-R), and The World Health Organization-Five Well-being Index 1999 (WHO 5). We concluded that cognitive

  3. Can Lupus Cause Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lupus Living well with lupus Can lupus cause depression? Life with lupus can be challenging. With symptoms ... treatable illness called clinical depression. Symptoms of Clinical Depression People are considered clinically depressed when they have ...

  4. Older Adults and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find more information? Reprints Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... depression need treatment to feel better. Types of Depression There are several types of depression. The most ...

  5. Depression and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptoms Depression Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Depression Depression Fatigue Walking (Gait) Difficulties Numbness or Tingling ... away from addictive substances such as alcohol. Clinical depression It’s important to distinguish between mild, everyday “blues” — ...

  6. Prevalence of Depression and Associated Factors among Diabetic Patients at Mekelle City, North Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossie, Tilahun Belete; Berhe, Gebreselassie Hagos; Kahsay, Gebremedhin Haile; Tareke, Minale

    2017-01-01

    Background: Coexistence of mental health problems on diabetes mellitus can result in poor management of the illness, poor adherence to treatment, and low quality of life. Therefore, it is highly crucial to assess these problems; thus we carried out this study with the aim of determining the prevalence of depression and identifying related factors among diabetic patients at city of Mekelle, North Ethiopia. Methods: Hospital-based cross-sectional study was employed among 264 diabetic patients, and participants were selected through systematic random sampling technique. We used local language versions of Beck Depression Inventory-II, Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Morisky 8 Item Medication Adherence Scale to assess the levels of depression, anxiety, and medication adherence, respectively. Socio-demographic and clinical factors were also assessed. We accomplish data entry, cleaning, and analysis through Statistical Package for Social Sciences window 20; also the level of significance was determined using adjusted odds ratio (OR). Results: The prevalence of depression among diabetic patients is 17% (95% confidence interval [CI]: [12.9%, 21.6%]). In addition, 28% and 18.2% has low medication adherence and comorbid anxiety, respectively. We identify anxiety disorder (AOR = 10.52, 95% CI: [4.56, 24.28]), poor medication adherence (AOR = 4.38, 95%CI: [1.98, 9.64]), and coexistence of other physical illness (AOR = 3.04, 95% CI: [1.11, 8.34]) as risk factors for depression. Conclusions: Depression is a common mental health problem among diabetic patients which is related to poor treatment adherence coexistence of other physical illness and anxiety disorder. This emphasizes to formulate a mechanism for early detection and appropriate intervention.

  7. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in Japanese Parkinson's disease patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinmei I

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Issei Shinmei,1,2 Kei Kobayashi,3 Yuki Oe,1 Yuriko Takagishi,1,4 Ayako Kanie,1 Masaya Ito,1 Yoshitake Takebayashi,1,5 Miho Murata,3 Masaru Horikoshi,1 Roseanne D Dobkin6 1National Center for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Research, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi, Japan; 3Department of Neurology, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan; 4Department of Psychology, Surugadai University, Saitama, Japan; 5Risk Analysis Research Center, The Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo, Japan; 6Department of Psychiatry, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical school, NJ, USA Objectives: This study evaluated the feasibility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT for Japanese Parkinson’s disease (PD patients with depression. To increase cultural acceptability, we developed the CBT program using manga, a type of Japanese comic novel.Methods: Participants included 19 non-demented PD patients who had depressive symptoms (GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score ≥8. A CBT program comprising six sessions was individually administered. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of the CBT program in terms of the dropout rate and occurrence of adverse events. The primary outcome was depressive symptom reduction in the GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression upon completion of CBT. Secondary outcomes included changes in the self-report measures of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression, anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale, functional impairment, and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey.Results: Of the 19 participants (mean age =63.8 years, standard deviation [SD] =9.9 years; mean Hohen–Yahr score

  8. A comparison of mindfulness, nonjudgmental, and cognitive dissonance-based approaches to mirror exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luethcke, Cynthia A; McDaniel, Leda; Becker, Carolyn Black

    2011-06-01

    This study compares different versions of mirror exposure (ME), a body image intervention with research support. ME protocols were adapted to maximize control and comparability, and scripted for delivery by research assistants. Female undergraduates (N=168) were randomly assigned to receive mindfulness-based (MB; n=58), nonjudgmental (NJ; n=55), or cognitive dissonance-based (CD, n=55) ME. Participants completed the Body Image Avoidance Questionnaire (BIAQ), Body Checking Questionnaire (BCQ), Satisfaction with Body Parts Scale (SBPS), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 1-month follow-up. Mixed models ANOVAs revealed a significant main effect of time on all measures, and no significant time by condition interaction for any measures except the SBPS. Post-hoc analysis revealed that only CD ME significantly improved SBPS outcome. Results suggest that all versions of ME reduce eating disorder risk factors, but only CD ME improves body satisfaction.

  9. Psychological distress of patients suffering from restless legs syndrome: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohnen Ralf

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a chronic disorder with substantial impact on quality of life similar to that seen in diabetes mellitus or osteoarthritis. Little is known about the psychological characteristics of RLS patients although psychological factors may contribute to unfavourable treatment outcome. Methods In an observational cross-sectional design, we evaluated the psychological features of 166 consecutive RLS patients from three outpatient clinics, by means of the Symptom Checklist 90-R (SCL-90-R questionnaire. Additionally, the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II and the International RLS Severity Scale (IRLS were measured. Both treated and untreated patients were included, all patients sought treatment. Results Untreated patients (n = 69 had elevated but normal scores on the SCL-90-R Global Severity Index (GSI; p = 0.002 and on the sub-scales somatisation (p Conclusion Severely affected RLS patients show psychological impairment in multiple psychological domains which has to be taken into account in the treatment regimen.

  10. The “Other” Side of Infidelity: The Experience of the “Other” Partner, Anxious Love, and Implications for Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul DePompo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on affairs has failed to acknowledge the “other woman” or “other man,” focusing only on the married spouses. The goal of this study was to explore the unique experience of the “other” partner to determine aspects critical to the navigation and healing process of these relationships. In this qualitative study, 49 participants, between the ages of 23 and 60 (N = 49; 31f, 18m, who were engaged in meaningful relationships with married partners completed a set of questionnaires and engaged in a semi-structured interview. Measures, which included the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, and The Experience in Close Relationships Questionnaire Revised (ECR-R, indicated clinical levels of anxiety and maladaptive attachment styles among all participants. Seven themes emerged into a model that incorporates the role of anxiety, along with the origin and maintenance of these relationships. A protocol that combines areas of trauma, GAD, and social anxiety will likely be beneficial.

  11. The Saratoga WarHorse project: a case study of the treatment of psychological distress in a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevins, Robert; Finch, Sharon; Hickling, Edward J; Barnett, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    We theorized that ability to direct and control a horse will lead to a sense of empowerment, facilitate a relationship between horse and veteran, lead to a decrease in anxiety, and improve physical and social functioning. This case study utilizes the Connection methodology: nonverbal language of the horse in a predictable, sequential, and repeatable method. Psychological testing occurred immediately pre- and post-Connection with follow-up occurring at 2, 4, 6, and 12 wks post-Connection. Twice-deployed combat medic who served in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Saratoga Springs, New York. Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II); Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL-C); the Response to Stressful Experiences Scale (RSES); the Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI); and the Modified Social Support Survey (MSSS). The participant demonstrated significant improvement in measures of psychological functioning (eg, over 12 wks); both PCL-C and RSES scores decreased 58% and 44%, respectively. Participant further reported an increase in sleep quality. The results of this case study strongly support the potential for the intervention and indicate the need for a controlled, randomized study that might more stringently investigate the impact of the intervention.

  12. Depression in Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy and Its Relation to Severity and Type of Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Sajedi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nChildren with cerebral palsy (CP suffer from several problems, so the family especially the mothers undertake a lot of social and emotional difficulties. The purpose of this study was to determine the severity of depression in mothers of children with CP in comparison with mothers who have normal children and its relation to the type of CP and severity of the disability. During this descriptive-analytic study, 43 mothers who had younger than 8 year-old children with CP under rehabilitation services in SABA clinic, related to the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences (USWR, Tehran, Iran, were selected as the case group by simple sampling. A data registration form and the Beck Depression Inventory II were completed by them. The type of CP and the severity of disability were determined by a pediatrician and an occupational therapist respectively, using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Seventy-seven mothers of normal children, serving as the control group for comparing with case group, filled in the same questionnaires. There were significant differences in the mean depression scores (P=0.003 between the two groups. Having a child with CP also increases the risk of developing depression in mothers as much as 2.26 times (OR=2.26. There were no statistically significant differences in depression scores and the severity of disability and also among the five types of CP. It seems that having a child with CP is probably associated with higher prevalence and severity of depression in mothers. So treatment or prevention of depression in mothers of children with CP is highly recommended for improving the rehabilitation process and achieve better results in these children.

  13. Depression in Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy and Its Relation to Severity and Type of Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Sajedi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Children with cerebral palsy (CP suffer from several problems, so the family especially the mothers undertake a lot of social and emotional difficulties. The purpose of this study was to determine the severity of depression in mothers of children with CP in comparison with mothers who have normal children and its relation to the type of CP and severity of the disability. During this descriptive-analytic study, 43 mothers who had younger than 8 year-old children with CP under rehabilitation services in SABA clinic, related to the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences (USWR, Tehran, Iran, were selected as the case group by simple sampling. A data registration form and the Beck Depression Inventory II were completed by them. The type of CP and the severity of disability were determined by a pediatrician and an occupational therapist respectively, using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Seventy-seven mothers of normal children, serving as the control group for comparing with case group, filled in the same questionnaires. There were significant differences in the mean depression scores (P=0.003 between the two groups. Having a child with CP also increases the risk of developing depression in mothers as much as 2.26 times (OR=2.26. There were no statistically significant differences in depression scores and the severity of disability and also among the five types of CP. It seems that having a child with CP is probably associated with higher prevalence and severity of depression in mothers. So treatment or prevention of depression in mothers of children with CP is highly recommended for improving the rehabilitation process and achieve better results in these children.

  14. Helping your teen with depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teen depression - helping; Teen depression - talk therapy; Teen depression - medicine ... teen the most. The most effective treatments for depression are: Talk therapy Antidepressant medicines If your teen ...

  15. Depression and Anxiety in Iranian Mothers of Children with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh SOLTANIFAR

    2012-03-01

    childrenwith epilepsy and their mothers. Epilepsy Behav 2004Dec;5(6:958-64.15. Yam WK, Ronen GM, Cherk SW, Rosenbaum P, ChanKY, Streiner DL, et al. Health-related quality of lifeof children with epilepsy in Hong Kong: how does itcompare with that of youth with epilepsy in Canada?Epilepsy Behav 2008 Apr;12(3:419-26.16. Ghassemzadeh H, Mojtabai R, Karamghadiri N,Ebrahimkhani N. Psychometric properties of a Persianlanguageversion of the Beck Depression Inventory Second edition: BDI-II-PERSIAN. Depress Anxiety2005;21(4:185-92.17. Hojat M, Shapurian R, Mehryar AH. Psychometricproperties of a Persian version of the short form of theBeck Depression Inventory for Iranian college students.Psychol Rep 1986 Aug;59(1:331-8.18. Kalkhoran MA, Karimollahi M. Religiousness andpreoperative anxiety: a correlational study. Ann GenPsychiatry 2007;6:17.19. Mu PF, Kuo HC, Chang KP. Boundary ambiguity, copingpatterns and depression in mothers caring for children withepilepsy in Taiwan. Int J Nurs Stud 2005 Mar;42(3:273-82.20. Lv R, Wu L, Jin L, Lu Q, Wang M, Qu Y, et al. Depression,anxiety and quality of life in parents of children withepilepsy. Acta Neurol Scand 2009 Nov;120(5:335-41.21. (Wood LJ, Sherman E, Hamiwka LD, Blackman M,Wirrell E. Depression, anxiety, and quality of life insiblings of children with intractable epilepsy. EpilepsyBehav 2008 Jul;13(1:144-8.22. Tosun A, Gokcen S, Ozbaran B, Serdaroglu G, Polat M,Tekgul H, et al. The effect of depression on academicachievement in children with epilepsy. Epilepsy Behav2008 Oct;13(3:494-8.23. Rodenburg R, Meijer AM, Dekovic M, Aldenkamp AP. Family factors and psychopathology in childrenwith epilepsy: a literature review. Epilepsy Behav 2005Jun;6(4:488-503.24. Wirrell EC, Wood L, Hamiwka LD, Sherman EM. Parenting stress in mothers of children with intractableepilepsy. Epilepsy Behav 2008 Jul;13(1:169-73.

  16. Cognition and belief in paranormal phenomena: gestalt/feature-intensive processing theory and tendencies toward ADHD, depression, and dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, Matthew J; Matthews, Justin; Asten, Janet

    2006-11-01

    Belief in paranormal phenomena and cryptids--unknown animals such as Bigfoot--may predispose individuals to interpret real-world objects and events in the same way that eyewitness identification can be biased by unrelated information (P. James and N. Thorpe, 1999). Psychological tendencies toward attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dissociation, and depression, even at subclinical levels, may be associated systematically with particular paranormal or cryptozoological beliefs. The authors evaluated these psychological tendencies using the Conners Adult ADHD Rating Scales (C. K. Conners, D. Erhardt, and E. Sparrow, 1999), the Dissociative Experiences Scale (L. Coleman & J. Clark, 1999), and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (A. T. Beck, 1996). They performed regression analyses against beliefs in ghosts, unidentified flying objects (UFOs), extrasensory perception (ESP), astrology, and cryptids. ADHD, dissociation, and depression were associated with enhanced tendencies toward paranormal and cryptozoological beliefs, although participants who believed in each of the phenomena differed from one another in predictable and psychologically distinguishable ways. Cognitively biasing influences of preexisting psychological tendencies may predispose individuals to specific perceptual and cognitive errors during confrontation of real-world phenomena.

  17. What is depression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Fosgerau, Christina Fogtmann

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of depression is defined by psychiatrists, and guidelines for treatment of patients with depression are created in psychiatry. However, most patients with depression are treated exclusively in general practice. Psychiatrists point out that general practitioners' (GPs') treatment of ...

  18. Sadness and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Sadness and Depression KidsHealth > For Kids > Sadness and Depression A A ... big difference in your life. When Sadness Is Depression When you're in a sad mood, it ...

  19. Depression Strikes…Anyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Depression Depression Strikes… Anyone Winter 2017 Table of Contents Anyone can suffer from depression. And almost everyone has a friend or family ...

  20. Depression and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depression and other mental health issues? Reference Share Depression and College Students Download PDF Download ePub Order ... Answers to college students’ frequently asked questions about depression Feeling moody, sad, or grouchy? Who doesn’t ...

  1. Sadness and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Sadness and Depression KidsHealth > For Kids > Sadness and Depression Print A ... big difference in your life. When Sadness Is Depression When you're in a sad mood, it ...

  2. Postpartum Depression Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Where can I find more information? Share Postpartum Depression Facts Download PDF Download ePub Download Mobi Order ... for herself or her family. What is postpartum depression? Postpartum depression is a mood disorder that can ...

  3. Recognizing teen depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000648.htm Recognizing teen depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... life. Be Aware of the Risk for Teen Depression Your teen is more at risk for depression ...

  4. Men and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in crisis? For more information Share Men and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone feels sad or irritable sometimes, or has ...

  5. Various forms of depression

    OpenAIRE

    BENAZZI, FRANCO

    2006-01-01

    The current subtyping of depression is based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) categorical division of bipolar and depressive disorders. Current evidence, however, supports a dimensional approach to depression, as a continuum/spectrum of overlapping disorders, ranging from bipolar I depression to major depressive disorder. Types of depression which have recently been the focus of most research will be reviewed ; bipolar II depressi...

  6. [Depressive symptoms and sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The mutually reinforcing dyad of depressive symptoms and erectile dysfunction is scientifically established. The cure of depression improves sexual dysfunction (SD) and the treatment of SD induces improvement of depression. Most of anti-depressants induce negative sexual side effects that lead to non-compliance of these treatments. The knowledge of interrelation between depression, anti-depressants and sexuality is of great importance in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Effectiveness of Acceptance-Commitment Therapy on Anxiety and Depression among Patients on Methadone Treatment: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedy, Mozhgan; Kooshki, Shirin; Jamali Firouzabadi, Mahmoud; Emamipour, Susan; Rezaei Ardani, Amir

    2015-03-01

    Substance dependence disorder is a psychiatric disorders with different factors that influence its nature, severity, outcome, and treatment options. This study evaluates the effectiveness of Acceptance-Commitment Therapy (ACT) to decrease anxiety and depression in patients with opioid dependencies who are undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). The present study was done in Mashhad from 2011-2012. Twenty-eight patients (18-50 yr) with opioid dependency who were on MMT were selected using purposive sampling and were divided equally between case and control groups. The case group received 8 sessions of individual psychotherapy with ACT. The level of depression and anxiety of these patients were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and Beck Anxiety Inventory before the initiation of ACT as a pretest, 2 weeks after the termination of ACT as the posttest, and 3-months after the termination as a follow-up. The collected data was analyzed with SPSS (ver. 20) using χ2, paired t-test, ANOVA, and MANOVA. The pretest-posttest-follow up of anxiety showed no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.05); however, the case group had lower depression scores in the posttest and follow-up than the control group (P = 0.04). Evaluating the results of the case group revealed that depression significantly decreased in the posttest group when compared to the pretest (P = 0.01) and there were no significant decreases in the follow up compared to the pretest (P = 0.34). Short-term ACT for opioid dependent patients on MMT are not associated with a significant decrease in the level of anxiety; however, it is associated with a significant decrease in the level of depression. Nonetheless, this reduction was not maintained long term.

  8. Effectiveness of Acceptance-Commitment Therapy on Anxiety and Depression among Patients on Methadone Treatment: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedy, Mozhgan; Kooshki, Shirin; Jamali Firouzabadi, Mahmoud; Emamipour, Susan; Rezaei Ardani, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Substance dependence disorder is a psychiatric disorders with different factors that influence its nature, severity, outcome, and treatment options. Objectives: This study evaluates the effectiveness of Acceptance-Commitment Therapy (ACT) to decrease anxiety and depression in patients with opioid dependencies who are undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Materials and Methods: The present study was done in Mashhad from 2011-2012. Twenty-eight patients (18-50 yr) with opioid dependency who were on MMT were selected using purposive sampling and were divided equally between case and control groups. The case group received 8 sessions of individual psychotherapy with ACT. The level of depression and anxiety of these patients were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and Beck Anxiety Inventory before the initiation of ACT as a pretest, 2 weeks after the termination of ACT as the posttest, and 3-months after the termination as a follow-up. The collected data was analyzed with SPSS (ver. 20) using χ2, paired t-test, ANOVA, and MANOVA. Results: The pretest-posttest-follow up of anxiety showed no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.05); however, the case group had lower depression scores in the posttest and follow-up than the control group (P = 0.04). Evaluating the results of the case group revealed that depression significantly decreased in the posttest group when compared to the pretest (P = 0.01) and there were no significant decreases in the follow up compared to the pretest (P = 0.34). Conclusion: Short-term ACT for opioid dependent patients on MMT are not associated with a significant decrease in the level of anxiety; however, it is associated with a significant decrease in the level of depression. Nonetheless, this reduction was not maintained long term. PMID:26251660

  9. Escitalopram is associated with reductions in pain severity and pain interference in opioid dependent patients with depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I; Herman, Debra S; Kettavong, Malyna; Anderson, Bradley J; Stein, Michael D

    2011-11-01

    Pain is common among opioid-dependent patients, yet pharmacologic strategies are limited. The aim of this study was to explore whether escitalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was associated with reductions in pain. The study used longitudinal data from a randomized, controlled trial that evaluated the effects of escitalopram on treatment retention in patients with depressive symptoms who were initiating buprenorphine/naloxone for treatment of opioid dependence. Participants were randomized to receive escitalopram 10 mg or placebo daily. Changes in pain severity, pain interference, and depression were assessed at 1-, 2-, and 3-month visits with the visual analog scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory II, respectively. Fixed-effects estimators for panel regression models were used to assess the effects of intervention on changes in outcomes over time. Additional models were estimated to explore whether the intervention effect was mediated by within-person changes in depression. In this sample of 147 adults, we found that participants randomized to escitalopram had significantly larger reductions on both pain severity (b=-14.34, t=-2.66, P<.01) and pain interference (b=-1.20, t=-2.23, P<.05) between baseline and follow-up. After adjusting for within-subject changes in depression, the estimated effects of escitalopram on pain severity and pain interference were virtually identical to the unadjusted effects. This study of opioid-dependent patients with depressive symptoms found that treatment with escitalopram was associated with clinically meaningful reductions in pain severity and pain interference during the first 3 months of therapy.

  10. Assessment of health status and quality of life of homeless persons in Belgrade, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarajlija Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Homelessness is a problem with social, medical, economic, political and other implications. Despite a large number of studies, reports about health-related quality of life (HRQoL of homeless persons remain sparse. There is a summary of consistent evidence that homeless people have higher prevalence of chronic disease (mental and somatic than general population. The aim of this study was to assess HRQoL and depression in homeless persons in Belgrade, to describe their sociodemographic factors and health status (the presence of chronic mental and somatic diseases and addiction disorders and analyse impact of sociodemographic factors and health status to HRQoL and depression of homeless persons. Methods. The study was conducted in the Shelter for Adult and Elderly Persons in Belgrade, from January 1 to January 31, 2012. A set of questionnaires used in survey included Serbian translation of SF-36 questionnaire, Serbian translation of Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II and sociodemographic questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed by descriptive and analytic methods. Results. Our study sample consisted of 104 adult participants. The majority of them were male (74% and the mean age in the sample was 48.2 ± 13.0 years. We have found that 35.6% participants had lifetime diagnosis of psychiatric disorder, most frequently depression (lifetime prevalence of 15.4% in the study group. The history of suicide attempts was registered in 28 (26.9% participants. Lifetime illicit drugs use was reported by 12.5%, daily smoking by 82.7% and daily alcohol consumption by 8.7% of the participants. Most common somatic chronic diseases were cardiovascular while chronic lung diseases were the second most frequent. Single chronic disease was present in 33 (31.7% of the participants and comorbidity of 2 chronic diseases was present in 20 of them. A statistically significant difference between participants` HRQoL SF-36 domain scores and norms of

  11. [Causes of depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Francisco Alonso

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes four nosological categories of depressive disorder according to the fundamental or prime cause: endogen depression, situative depression, psychogen depression and somatogen (also pharmacogen or addictive) depression. Recent advances in neurobiology provide the commun pathogenic mechanism distribuited in neurochemical, neuroendocrine and neuroinmune factors, with at the end a cellular and molecular sequence beyond the synapse. There is an increased risk of depression multiplied by three or four in the elderly, obese, unemployed and inmigrant and it is very frequent in terminally ill patients with a pervasive desire for death. Finally, eight personalized preventive guidelines enable to decrease the individual risk of depression in more than a fifty per cent.

  12. The correlation of apnea hypopnea index to the symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with obstructive sleep apnea -hypopnea syndrome%阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停低通气综合征患者呼吸暂停低通气指数与抑郁、焦虑症状关系的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐永芳; 徐长青; 冯月娟; 陈刚

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停低通气综合征(obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome, OSAHS)患者呼吸暂停低通气指数(apnea hypopnea index, AHI)与贝克抑郁评分(Beck Depression Inventory-II,BDI-II)、贝克焦虑评分(Beck Anxiety Inventory,BAI)之间的关系。方法对63例 OSAHS 患者进行抑郁、焦虑症状评分,同时对临床资料、多导睡眠监测(polysomnography,PSG)结果进行分析。结果男性 AHI5.6~72(48.6±24.6),女性5~64.8(43.3±26.1),男性 AHI 高于女性,差异有统计学意义(P <0.05)。44.4%患者伴随精神症状。 AHI 与 BDI(r =0.24,P=0.73)、BAI(r =0.09,P =0.45)均无显著关联。结论 OSAHS 患者抑郁焦虑症状非常显著,但是未发现 OSAHS严重程度与精神症状之间有相关性。%Objective To determine the correlation of apnea -hyponea index(AHI) to depression (as scored with Beck Depression Inventory(BDI)) and anxiety (as scored with Beck Anxiety Inventory(BAI) ) in patients of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) .Method 63 OSAHS patients were chosen as the subjects of study.They were then evaluated with BDI-II and BAI.The patients’clinical data and polysomnography (PSG)data were obtained and analyzed. Findings AHI was higher in males than in females.44.4% patients were found to experience depression or anxiety. However, no significant correlation was found between AHI and BDI or BAI.Conclusion Patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome suffered obvious depressive and anxious symptoms.However, a strong link between OSAHS severity and psychological symptoms was not identified in the study.

  13. Therapieresistente Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holsboer-Trachsler E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In der Behandlung einer Depression wird ein Nichtansprechen auf zwei adäquate Antidepressivatherapien während je 6–8 Wochen als Therapieresistenz bezeichnet. Da häufig zu geringe Dosierungen oder eine zu kurze Behandlungsdauer die Ursache für ein Nichtansprechen sind, sollte in einem ersten Schritt die medikamentöse Therapie hinsichtlich Dauer und Dosierung, eventuell unter Einbezug von Plasmaspiegelbestimmungen, überprüft und optimiert werden. Als pharmakologische Maßnahmen werden zunächst ein Wechsel des Antidepressivums und danach eine Kombination von verschiedenen Antidepressiva mit unterschiedlichem biochemischem Wirkungsansatz empfohlen. Zeigen beide nicht den gewünschten Erfolg, so sollte zusätzlich zur bestehenden Antidepressivabehandlung eine Augmentationstherapie, primär mit Lithium und/oder dem Schilddrüsenhormon T3, durchgeführt werden. Ein neuer, vielversprechender Behandlungsansatz ist eine Augmentationstherapie mit atypischen Neuroleptika. Als akut wirkende nichtpharmakologische Zusatzmaßnahme hat sich der partielle Schlafentzug bewährt. Weitere nichtpharmakologische Strategien umfassen Psychotherapie, Elektrokrampftherapie und Vagusnervstimulationsbehandlung.

  14. Domestic violence against women as a risk factor for depressive and anxiety disorders: findings from domestic violence household survey in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzad-Asl, Masoud; Davoudi, Farnoush; Zarei, Noushin; Mohammad-Sadeghi, Homa; Rasoulian, Maryam

    2016-10-01

    Domestic violence (DV) especially intimate partner violence is a global health problem responsible for significant part of burden of diseases in women. Mental health problems such as depression and anxiety are possibly results and resulted in IPV. To investigate correlation between IPV and depression and anxiety among married women, in a household survey of married women in Tehran, Iran, at summer 2011, we recruited 615 samples with cluster sampling method and they are directly asked about experience of 23 different types of physical and non-physical IPV during marital life and last 12 months. Depression and anxiety were assessed by Beck depression inventory II (BDI) and Beck Anxiety inventory (BAI). Multinominal regression model was used to assess the independent relationship of factor on IPV. Mean (±SE) age and duration of marriage were 42.6 ± 0.9 and 22 ± 0.8, respectively. Non-physical violence and physical violence during marital life reported in 77.2 and 35.1 %. Clinically significant depression and anxiety was reported in 15.3 and 32.7 % of women, respectively. The odds ratio (95 % CI) of clinically significant depression and anxiety in DV victims were 5.8 (2.3-14.6) and 2.6 (1.6-4.3). DV as a social factor is significantly correlated factor with depression and anxiety. Comprehensive view and collaborative work to detect and address social determinants of mental illness like DV is a crucial point in mental health promotion programs.

  15. Psychological Treatment of Depression in People Aged 65 Years and Over: A Systematic Review of Efficacy, Safety, and Cost-Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Ulf; Bertilsson, Göran; Gyllensvärd, Harald; Söderlund, Anne; Tham, Anne; Andersson, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Depression in elderly people is a major public health concern. As response to antidepressants is often unsatisfactory in this age group, there is a need for evidence-based non-pharmacological treatment options. Our objectives were twofold: firstly, to synthesize published trials evaluating efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of psychological treatment of depression in the elderly and secondly, to assess the quality of evidence. Method The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAL, Scopus, and PsycINFO were searched up to 23 May 2016 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological treatment for depressive disorders or depressive symptoms in people aged 65 years and over. Two reviewers independently assessed relevant studies for risk of bias. Where appropriate, the results were synthesized in meta-analyses. The quality of the evidence was graded according to GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). Results Twenty-two relevant RCTs were identified, eight of which were excluded from the synthesis due to a high risk of bias. Of the remaining trials, six evaluated problem-solving therapy (PST), five evaluated other forms of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and three evaluated life review/reminiscence therapy. In frail elderly with depressive symptoms, the evidence supported the efficacy of PST, with large but heterogeneous effect sizes compared with treatment as usual. The results for life-review/reminiscence therapy and CBT were also promising, but because of the limited number of trials the quality of evidence was rated as very low. Safety data were not reported in any included trial. The only identified cost-effectiveness study estimated an incremental cost per additional point reduction in Beck Depression Inventory II score for CBT compared with talking control and treatment as usual. Conclusion Psychological treatment is a feasible option for frail elderly with depressive symptoms

  16. Psychological Treatment of Depression in People Aged 65 Years and Over: A Systematic Review of Efficacy, Safety, and Cost-Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Ulf; Bertilsson, Göran; Allard, Per; Gyllensvärd, Harald; Söderlund, Anne; Tham, Anne; Andersson, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Depression in elderly people is a major public health concern. As response to antidepressants is often unsatisfactory in this age group, there is a need for evidence-based non-pharmacological treatment options. Our objectives were twofold: firstly, to synthesize published trials evaluating efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of psychological treatment of depression in the elderly and secondly, to assess the quality of evidence. The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAL, Scopus, and PsycINFO were searched up to 23 May 2016 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological treatment for depressive disorders or depressive symptoms in people aged 65 years and over. Two reviewers independently assessed relevant studies for risk of bias. Where appropriate, the results were synthesized in meta-analyses. The quality of the evidence was graded according to GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). Twenty-two relevant RCTs were identified, eight of which were excluded from the synthesis due to a high risk of bias. Of the remaining trials, six evaluated problem-solving therapy (PST), five evaluated other forms of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and three evaluated life review/reminiscence therapy. In frail elderly with depressive symptoms, the evidence supported the efficacy of PST, with large but heterogeneous effect sizes compared with treatment as usual. The results for life-review/reminiscence therapy and CBT were also promising, but because of the limited number of trials the quality of evidence was rated as very low. Safety data were not reported in any included trial. The only identified cost-effectiveness study estimated an incremental cost per additional point reduction in Beck Depression Inventory II score for CBT compared with talking control and treatment as usual. Psychological treatment is a feasible option for frail elderly with depressive symptoms. However, important questions about

  17. Internet-based behavioral activation and acceptance-based treatment for depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlbring, Per; Hägglund, Malin; Luthström, Anne; Dahlin, Mats; Kadowaki, Åsa; Vernmark, Kristofer; Andersson, Gerhard

    2013-06-01

    Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for depression has been tested in several trials but there are no internet studies on behavioral activation (BA), and no studies on BA over the internet including components of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). The aim of this study was to develop and test the effects of internet-delivered BA combined with ACT against a waiting list control condition as a first test of the effects of treatment. Selection took place with a computerized screening interview and a subsequent semi-structured telephone interview. A total of 80 individuals from the general public were randomized to one of two conditions. The treatment lasted for 8 weeks after which both groups were assessed. We also included a 3 month follow-up. The treatment included interactive elements online and a CD-ROM for mindfulness and acceptance exercises. In addition, written support and feedback was given by a therapist every week. Results at posttreatment showed a large between group effect size on the Beck Depression inventory II d=0.98 (95%CI=0.51-1.44). In the treated group 25% (10/40) reached remission defined as a BDI score ≤ 10 vs. 5% (2/40) in the control group. Results on secondary measures were smaller. While few dropped out from the study (N=2) at posttreatment, the average number of completed modules was M=5.1 out of the seven modules. The study only included a waiting-list comparison and it is not possible to determine which treatment components were the most effective. We conclude that there is initial evidence that BA with components of ACT can be effective in reducing symptoms of depression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An Internet-Based Intervention for Depression in Primary Care in Spain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Marín, Jesús; Araya, Ricardo; Mayoral, Fermín; Gili, Margalida; Botella, Cristina; Baños, Rosa; Castro, Adoración; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; López-Del-Hoyo, Yolanda; Nogueira-Arjona, Raquel; Vives, Margarita; Riera, Antoni; García-Campayo, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is the most prevalent cause of illness-induced disability worldwide. Face-to-face psychotherapeutic interventions for depression can be challenging, so there is a need for other alternatives that allow these interventions to be offered. One feasible alternative is Internet-based psychological interventions. This is the first randomized controlled trial (RCT) on the effectiveness of an Internet-based intervention on depression in primary health care in Spain. Objective Our aim was to compare the effectiveness of a low-intensity therapist-guided (LITG) Internet-based program and a completely self-guided (CSG) Internet-based program with improved treatment as usual (iTAU) care for depression. Methods Multicenter, three-arm, parallel, RCT design, carried out between November 2012 and January 2014, with a follow-up of 15 months. In total, 296 adults from primary care settings in four Spanish regions, with mild or moderate major depression, were randomized to LITG (n=96), CSG (n=98), or iTAU (n=102). Research completers at follow-up were 63.5%. The intervention was Smiling is Fun, an Internet program based on cognitive behavioral therapy. All patients received iTAU by their general practitioners. Moreover, LITG received Smiling is Fun and the possibility of psychotherapeutic support on request by email, whereas CSG received only Smiling is Fun. The main outcome was the Beck Depression Inventory-II at 3 months from baseline. Mixed-effects multilevel analysis for repeated measures were undertaken. Results There was no benefit for either CSG [(B coefficient=-1.15; P=.444)] or LITG [(B=-0.71; P=.634)] compared to iTAU, at 3 months. There were differences at 6 months [iTAU vs CSG (B=-4.22; P=.007); iTAU vs LITG (B=-4.34; P=.005)] and 15 months [iTAU vs CSG (B=-5.10; P=.001); iTAU vs LITG (B=-4.62; P=.002)]. There were no differences between CSG and LITG at any time. Adjusted and intention-to-treat models confirmed these findings. Conclusions An Internet

  19. Treating major depression with yoga: A prospective, randomized, controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Renee; Cochran, Ashly; Tungol, Jose Gabriel; Fayazmanesh, Nima; Weinmann, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Background Conventional pharmacotherapies and psychotherapies for major depression are associated with limited adherence to care and relatively low remission rates. Yoga may offer an alternative treatment option, but rigorous studies are few. This randomized controlled trial with blinded outcome assessors examined an 8-week hatha yoga intervention as mono-therapy for mild-to-moderate major depression. Methods Investigators recruited 38 adults in San Francisco meeting criteria for major depression of mild-to-moderate severity, per structured psychiatric interview and scores of 14–28 on Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI). At screening, individuals engaged in psychotherapy, antidepressant pharmacotherapy, herbal or nutraceutical mood therapies, or mind-body practices were excluded. Participants were 68% female, with mean age 43.4 years (SD = 14.8, range = 22–72), and mean BDI score 22.4 (SD = 4.5). Twenty participants were randomized to 90-minute hatha yoga practice groups twice weekly for 8 weeks. Eighteen participants were randomized to 90-minute attention control education groups twice weekly for 8 weeks. Certified yoga instructors delivered both interventions at a university clinic. Primary outcome was depression severity, measured by BDI scores every 2 weeks from baseline to 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes were self-efficacy and self-esteem, measured by scores on the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) at baseline and at 8 weeks. Results In intent-to-treat analysis, yoga participants exhibited significantly greater 8-week decline in BDI scores than controls (p-value = 0.034). In sub-analyses of participants completing final 8-week measures, yoga participants were more likely to achieve remission, defined per final BDI score ≤ 9 (p-value = 0.018). Effect size of yoga in reducing BDI scores was large, per Cohen’s d = -0.96 [95%CI, -1.81 to -0.12]. Intervention groups did not differ significantly in 8-week change scores for

  20. [Depression in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, A S

    1991-03-01

    Depressive symptoms are frequent during schizophrenia. Depression occurs in the course of a schizo affective psychose or in the course of a schizophrenia (either with acute psychotic symptoms, either without acute psychotic symptoms). Differentiating depression from negative symptoms of schizophrenia or from antipsychotic drug induced side effects can be difficult. The question to know whether depression is intrinsic to the disease process itself whether it is secondary to the schizophrenic process is still a matter of inquiry. Efficacy of antidepressive drugs during depression in schizophrenia remains a matter of controversy. Depression increases the risk for pejorative evolution and for suicide in schizophrenia.

  1. Impact of a switch to fingolimod versus staying on glatiramer acetate or beta interferons on patient- and physician-reported outcomes in relapsing multiple sclerosis: post hoc analyses of the EPOC trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkwood, Jonathan; Cree, Bruce; Crayton, Heidi; Kantor, Daniel; Steingo, Brian; Barbato, Luigi; Hashmonay, Ron; Agashivala, Neetu; McCague, Kevin; Tenenbaum, Nadia; Edwards, Keith

    2014-11-26

    The Evaluate Patient OutComes (EPOC) study assessed physician- and patient-reported outcomes in individuals with relapsing multiple sclerosis who switched directly from injectable disease-modifying therapy (iDMT; glatiramer acetate, intramuscular or subcutaneous interferon beta-1a, or interferon beta-1b) to once-daily, oral fingolimod. Post hoc analyses evaluated the impact of a switch to fingolimod versus staying on each of the four individual iDMTs. Overall, 1053 patients were randomized 3:1 to switch to fingolimod or remain on iDMT. The primary endpoint was the change in Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM) Global Satisfaction score. Secondary endpoints included changes in scores for TSQM Effectiveness, Side Effects and Convenience subscales, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Patient-Reported Outcome Indices for Multiple Sclerosis (PRIMUS) Activities, 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) Mental Component Summary (MCS) and Physical Component Summary (PCS) and mean investigator-reported Clinical Global Impressions of Improvement (CGI-I). All outcomes were evaluated after 6 months of treatment. Changes in TSQM Global Satisfaction scores were superior after a switch to fingolimod when compared with scores in patients remaining on any of the iDMTs (all p <0.001). Likewise, all TSQM subscale scores improved following a switch to fingolimod (all p <0.001), except when compared with glatiramer acetate for the TSQM Side Effects subscale (p = 0.111). FSS scores were found to be superior for fingolimod versus remaining on subcutaneous interferon beta-1a and interferon beta-1b, BDI-II scores were significantly improved for fingolimod except for the comparison with intramuscular interferon beta-1a, and SF-36 scores were superior with fingolimod compared with remaining on interferon beta-1b (MCS and PCS; p = 0.030 and p = 0.022, respectively) and subcutaneous interferon beta-1a (PCS only; p = 0

  2. Prophylactic onabotulinumtoxinA in patients with chronic migraine and comorbid depression: An open-label, multicenter, pilot study of efficacy, safety and effect on headache-related disability, depression, and anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Guy P; Grosberg, Brian M; McAllister, Peter J; Lipton, Richard B; Buse, Dawn C

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic migraine is associated with significant headache-related disability and psychiatric comorbidity. OnabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX®) is effective and well tolerated in the prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine. This study aimed to provide preliminary data on the efficacy and safety of prophylactic onabotulinumtoxinA in patients with chronic migraine and comorbid depressive symptoms. Methods This was a prospective, open-label, multicenter pilot study. Eligible patients met International Classification of Headache Disorders 2nd edition Revision criteria for chronic migraine and had associated depressive symptoms, including Patient Health Questionnaire depression module scores of 5–19. Eligible participants received 155 units of onabotulinumtoxinA, according to the PREEMPT protocol, at baseline and week 12. Assessments included headache frequency, the Headache Impact Test™, the Migraine Disability Assessment, the Beck Depression Inventory®-II, the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire depression module, and the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder questionnaire. Adverse events were also monitored. Results Overall, 32 participants received treatment. At week 24, there were statistically significant mean (standard deviation [SD]) improvements relative to baseline in the number of headache/migraine-free days (+8.2 [5.8]) (P<0.0001) and in the number of headache/migraine days (−8.2 [5.8]) (P<0.0001) per 30-day period. In addition, there were significant improvements in Headache Impact Test scores (−6.3 [6.9]) (P=0.0001) and Migraine Disability Assessment scores (−44.2 [67.5]) (P=0.0058). From baseline to week 24, statistically significant improvements were also seen in Beck Depression Inventory-II (−7.9 [6.0]) (P<0.0001), Patient Health Questionnaire depression module (−4.3 [4.7]) (P<0.0001), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder questionnaire (−3.5 [5.0]) (P=0.0002) scores. No serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events

  3. Memory training in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, E.S.; Vanderhasselt, M.A.; Vrijsen, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Memory biases, that is, general memory impairments as well as specific mood-congruent memory biases, are important vulnerability factors in depression. Recently, computerized memory trainings have been developed to target these biases, reducing rumination and lightening depressive symptoms. This

  4. Depression and Suicide Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression and Suicide Risk (2014) Definition: A mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and ... i Prevalence: 1. Ranges of lifetime risk for depression: from 6.7% overall to 40% in men, ...

  5. Depression and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Depression Thursday, 01 September 2016 In every pregnancy, a ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to depression may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  6. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  7. Learning about depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000325.htm Learning about depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... trigger or reason. What are the Signs of Depression? You may notice some or all of the ...

  8. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  9. Depression and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Depression Thursday, 01 September 2016 In every pregnancy, a ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to depression may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  10. Depression Disturbs Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The suicide of Robert Enke,the goalkeeper of the Germany national football team who had battled depression for years,stunned the country and cast depression into the national spotlight as a disturbing disease.

  11. Preventing Depression in Adults With Subthreshold Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buntrock, Claudia; Berking, Matthias; Smit, Filip

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychological interventions for the prevention of depression might be a cost-effective way to reduce the burden associated with depressive disorders. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a Web-based guided self-help intervention to prevent major depressive disorder (MDD......) in people with subthreshold depression (sD). METHODS: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial was conducted with follow-up at 12 months. Participants were recruited from the general population via a large statutory health insurance company and an open access website. Participants were randomized to a Web......-based guided self-help intervention (ie, cognitive-behavioral therapy and problem-solving therapy assisted by supervised graduate students or health care professionals) in addition to usual care or to usual care supplemented with Web-based psycho-education (enhanced usual care). Depression-free years (DFYs...

  12. Depression in cerebrovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Voskresenskaya, Tatyana

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses the topical problem of depression in cerebrovascular diseases. It shows its possible causes, mechanisms of occurrence, clinical picture and negative impact on the course of cerebrovascular disease and recovery of neurological functions. There is a bilateral association between stroke and depression: on the one hand, stroke is a risk factor for the development of depression and, on the other, depression is a both direct and indirect risk factor for the development of stroke...

  13. [Multiple mechanisms of depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Lin; Ruan, Ke-Feng; Gao, Jun-Wei; Wu, Fei; Zhang, Ji-Quan

    2013-08-01

    Depression is a grievous mental disease with an increasing high morbidity year by year and a serious social harm. The pathogenesises of depression is complicated and involves with multi-mechanisms and multi-organs. Recent studies demondtrate that in the nerval system and endocrine system there are many types of neurotransmitters and hormones, as well as their receptors, involved in depression. This paper reviews the research progress of depression in recent years.

  14. Method of treating depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henn, Fritz

    2013-04-09

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  15. Method of treating depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Fritz [East Patchogue, NY

    2012-01-24

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  16. Clinical Judgments of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Douglas N.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated degree to which judges could simulate Basic Personality Inventory (BPI) responses of a clinically depressed patient group. Judgmental profiles of depressed patients indicated very high reliabilities across information conditions, a high association with actual profiles of clinically depressed patients, and differentiation from other…

  17. Depression (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Depression KidsHealth > For Parents > Depression A A A What's ... to Help en español Comprender la depresión About Depression It's normal for kids to feel sad, down, ...

  18. Handling Depression | Smokefree 60+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everyone feels blue now and then. It's a part of life. But if your feelings last more than few days and interfere with your normal daily activities, you may be suffering from depression. On this page: Symptoms of depression Who gets depressed and why?

  19. Depression and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Marshall, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains four articles related to depression and aging. Compares normal adults with those having a major depressive disorder. Focuses on life satisfaction in the elderly, describing an individualized measure of life satisfaction. Describes similarities and differences between grief and depression. Contains a psychometric analysis of the Zung…

  20. Depression (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Depression KidsHealth > For Parents > Depression Print A A A ... to Help en español Comprender la depresión About Depression It's normal for kids to feel sad, down, ...

  1. Measuring psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Meyers, B S; Flint, A J

    Psychotic depression (PD) is a highly debilitating condition, which needs intensive monitoring. However, there is no established rating scale for evaluating the severity of PD. The aim of this analysis was to assess the psychometric properties of established depression rating scales and a number...... of new composite rating scales, covering both depressive and psychotic symptoms, in relation to PD....

  2. Measuring psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Meyers, B S; Flint, A J

    Psychotic depression (PD) is a highly debilitating condition, which needs intensive monitoring. However, there is no established rating scale for evaluating the severity of PD. The aim of this analysis was to assess the psychometric properties of established depression rating scales and a number...... of new composite rating scales, covering both depressive and psychotic symptoms, in relation to PD....

  3. Therapeutics of postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Michael; Sharma, Verinder

    2017-05-01

    Postpartum depression is a prevalent disorder affecting many women of reproductive age. Despite increasing public awareness, it is frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated leading to significant maternal morbidity and adverse child outcomes. When identified, postpartum depression is usually treated as major depressive disorder. Many studies have identified the postpartum as a period of high risk for first presentations and relapses of bipolar disorder. Areas covered: This article reviews the acute and prophylactic treatment of postpartum major depressive disorder, bipolar depression and major depressive disorder with mixed features. The safety of antidepressant and mood stabilizing medications in pregnancy and breastfeeding will also be reviewed. Expert commentary: Differentiating postpartum major depressive disorder and postpartum bipolar depression can be difficult given their clinical similarities but accurate identification is vital for initiating proper treatment. Antidepressants are the mainstay of drug treatment for postpartum major depressive disorder, yet randomized controlled trials have shown conflicting results. A paucity of evidence exists for the effectiveness of antidepressant prophylaxis in the prevention of recurrences of major depressive disorder. Mood stabilizing medications reduce the risk of postpartum bipolar depression relapse but no randomized controlled trials have examined their use in the acute or prophylactic treatment of postpartum bipolar depression.

  4. Seasonal variation of serotonin turnover in human cerebrospinal fluid, depressive symptoms and the role of the 5-HTTLPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luykx, J J; Bakker, S C; van Geloven, N; Eijkemans, M J C; Horvath, S; Lentjes, E; Boks, M P M; Strengman, E; DeYoung, J; Buizer-Voskamp, J E; Cantor, R M; Lu, A; van Dongen, E P A; Borgdorff, P; Bruins, P; Kahn, R S; Ophoff, R A

    2013-10-08

    Studying monoaminergic seasonality is likely to improve our understanding of neurobiological mechanisms underlying season-associated physiological and pathophysiological behavior. Studies of monoaminergic seasonality and the influence of the serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) on serotonin seasonality have yielded conflicting results, possibly due to lack of power and absence of multi-year analyses. We aimed to assess the extent of seasonal monoamine turnover and examined the possible involvement of the 5-HTTLPR. To determine the influence of seasonality on monoamine turnover, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were measured in the cerebrospinal fluid of 479 human subjects collected during a 3-year period. Cosine and non-parametric seasonal modeling were applied to both metabolites. We computed serotonin (5-HT) seasonality values and performed an association analysis with the s/l alleles of the 5-HTTLPR. Depressive symptomatology was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Circannual variation in 5-HIAA fitted a spring-peak cosine model that was significantly associated with sampling month (P=0.0074). Season of sampling explained 5.4% (P=1.57 × 10(-7)) of the variance in 5-HIAA concentrations. The 5-HTTLPR s-allele was associated with increased 5-HIAA seasonality (standardized regression coefficient=0.12, P=0.020, N=393). 5-HIAA seasonality correlated with depressive symptoms (Spearman's rho=0.13, P=0.018, N=345). In conclusion, we highlight a dose-dependent association of the 5-HTTLPR with 5-HIAA seasonality and a positive correlation between 5-HIAA seasonality and depressive symptomatology. The presented data set the stage for follow-up in clinical populations with a role for seasonality, such as affective disorders.

  5. Importance of Depression in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustman, Patrick J.; Clouse, Ray E.; Anderson, Ryan J.

    Depression doubles the likelihood of comorbid depression, which presents as major depression in 11% and subsyndromal depression in 31% of patients with the medical illness. The course of depression is chronic, and afflicted patients suffer an average of one episode annually. Depression has unique importance in diabetes because of its association…

  6. The Yoruba version of the Beck Hopelessness Scale: psychometric characteristics and correlates of hopelessness in a sample of Nigerian psychiatric outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloba, Olutayo; Akinsulore, Adesanmi; Mapayi, Boladale; Oloniniyi, Ibiduniyi; Mosaku, Kolawole; Alimi, Taiwo; Esan, Olufemi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies from the developed western countries have repeatedly demonstrated that hopelessness positively correlates with an increased risk of suicide in the context of chronic mental disorders such as schizophrenia and affective disorders. Despite this persistently strong association, the construct of hopelessness in terms of its factorial structure and correlates has not been explored among Nigerian psychiatric outpatients. The aim of this present study is to examine the psychometric characteristics of the Yoruba language culturally adapted version of the Beck Hopelessness Scale in a cross-sectional sample of psychiatric outpatients in South-western Nigeria. The participants were 327 Nigerian adult outpatients receiving treatment for schizophrenia, bipolar and depressive disorders, consecutively recruited from the outpatient psychiatric clinics of a university teaching hospital in South-western Nigeria. The outpatients were recruited over a one year period. They completed the Yoruba translated version of the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS-Y), a sociodemographic and illness-related questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Their level of functioning was assessed with the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF), psychopathology was evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the level of disability measured with the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS-II). Suicidality and confirmation of the diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar and depressive disorders were evaluated with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). The construct of hopelessness in terms of factorial structure, reliability, validity and correlates was explored. Exploratory Factor Analysis using Principal Component Analysis with Varimax rotation was used to examine the factorial structure of the BHS-Y. Internal consistency was examined with Cronbach's alpha, and the construct validity of the scale was assessed

  7. Understanding childhood depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Savita; Das, Partha Pratim

    2007-02-01

    Major depressive disorder in children is a severe and a chronically disabling disorder. This population appears to be a special group in terms of consequences of poor psychosocial and academic outcome and increased risk of substance abuse, and suicide. Studies have revealed several major findings in genetic, familial, psychological, and biological aspects of such depression, some of which have explored into the issue of its relationship with adult depression. Considerable advances have been made now in the area of childhood depression providing a better understanding of its nature. We review literature available on historical aspect, epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and aetiology of childhood depression.

  8. Depression in geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Asghar-Ali, A; Braun, U K

    2009-02-01

    While the most serious of depressive illnesses in the elderly is major depressive disorder, patients' quality of life can be significantly impacted by dysthmic disorder, sub-threshold depression (minor depression), or a depressive disorder due to a general medical condition, all of which have been shown to be more prevalent than major depression in the community dwelling population of older adults. Older adults are also more likely to develop grief reaction and frequently deal with issues of bereavement. This review will discuss the diagnoses of all relevant depressive diagnoses that primary care physicians are likely to encounter. Among the many different assessment tools that screen for depression the briefest instruments are a two-question screening tool recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and, specifically developed for older adults, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is available in a short 15- Yes/No-question version. Many medical illnesses are associated with depressive symptoms. The focus in this review is on dementing illnesses/cerebrovascular disease, dementia of the Alzheimer's type, and Parkinson disease. First-line pharmacological therapy of depression includes selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs), and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Side effects of particular drugs can often be geared towards achieving additional benefits, e.g. weight gain associated with the use of some SSRISs may be helpful for patients with dementia.

  9. Depression in adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapar, Anita; Collishaw, Stephan; Pine, Daniel S; Thapar, Ajay K

    2012-01-01

    Unipolar depressive disorder in adolescence is common worldwide but often unrecognised. The incidence, notably in girls, rises sharply after puberty and, by the end of adolescence, the 1 year prevalence rate exceeds 4%. The burden is highest in low-income and middle-income countries. Depression is associated with sub stantial present and future morbidity, and heightens suicide risk. The strongest risk factors for depression in adolescents are a family history of depression and exposure to psychosocial stress. Inherited risks, developmental factors, sex hormones, and psychosocial adversity interact to increase risk through hormonal factors and associated perturbed neural pathways. Although many similarities between depression in adolescence and depression in adulthood exist, in adolescents the use of antidepressants is of concern and opinions about clinical management are divided. Effective treatments are available, but choices are dependent on depression severity and available resources. Prevention strategies targeted at high-risk groups are promising. PMID:22305766

  10. [Depression and neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piber, D; Hinkelmann, K; Gold, S M; Heesen, C; Spitzer, C; Endres, M; Otte, C

    2012-11-01

    In many neurological diseases a depressive syndrome is a characteristic sign of the primary disease or is an important comorbidity. Post-stroke depression, for example, is a common and relevant complication following ischemic brain infarction. Approximately 4 out of every 10 stroke patients develop depressive disorders in the course of the disease which have a disadvantageous effect on the course and the prognosis. On the other hand depression is also a risk factor for certain neurological diseases as was recently demonstrated in a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies which revealed a much higher stroke risk for depressive patients. Furthermore, depression plays an important role in other neurological diseases with respect to the course and quality of life, such as Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. This article gives a review of the most important epidemiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of depressive disorders as a comorbidity of neurological diseases and as a risk factor for neurological diseases.

  11. Psychological and behavioral changes during confinement in a 520-day simulated interplanetary mission to mars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Basner

    Full Text Available Behavioral health risks are among the most serious and difficult to mitigate risks of confinement in space craft during long-duration space exploration missions. We report on behavioral and psychological reactions of a multinational crew of 6 healthy males confined in a 550 m(3 chamber for 520 days during the first Earth-based, high-fidelity simulated mission to Mars. Rest-activity of crewmembers was objectively measured throughout the mission with wrist-worn actigraphs. Once weekly throughout the mission crewmembers completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, Profile of Moods State short form (POMS, conflict questionnaire, the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT-B, and series of visual analogue scales on stress and fatigue. We observed substantial inter-individual differences in the behavioral responses of crewmembers to the prolonged mission confinement and isolation. The crewmember with the highest average POMS total mood disturbance score throughout the mission also reported symptoms of depression in 93% of mission weeks, which reached mild-to-moderate levels in >10% of mission weeks. Conflicts with mission control were reported five times more often than conflicts among crewmembers. Two crewmembers who had the highest ratings of stress and physical exhaustion accounted for 85% of the perceived conflicts. One of them developed a persistent sleep onset insomnia with ratings of poor sleep quality, which resulted in chronic partial sleep deprivation, elevated ratings of daytime tiredness, and frequent deficits in behavioral alertness. Sleep-wake timing was altered in two other crewmembers, beginning in the first few months of the mission and persisting throughout. Two crewmembers showed neither behavioral disturbances nor reports of psychological distress during the 17-month period of mission confinement. These results highlight the importance of identifying behavioral, psychological, and biological markers of characteristics that

  12. Neuropsychological performance in patients with myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Bárbara Eizaguirre

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects the neuromuscular transmission. Controversial findings had been reported about cognitive impairment in this disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the cognitive pattern of patients with myasthenia gravis. There were enrolled 24 patients with myasthenia gravis, anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies (ACRA positive, and 24 healthy controls. Patients: age 43.9 ± 14.8, years of education 10.9 ± 3.3. Controls: age 44.5 ± 15.4, years of education 11.5 ± 3.3. The following areas were evaluated: verbal memory: (long-term storage, retrieval, delayed recall of the Selective Remained Test; attention: Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT 2 and 3 seconds; executive functions: analogies and numbers-letters sequence. Also, it was administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI II. About 33.3% of patients obtained abnormal performance in two or more cognitive tests. 37.5% showed deterioration in attention; 33.3% in verbal memory; 29.2% in executive functions. Significant differences between patients and healthy controls were found in long-term storage (p = 0.001; retrieval (p = 0.007; delayed recall (p = 0.000; PASAT 3 (p = 0.009; PASAT 2 (p = 0.009 and analogies (p = 0.003. Evidence of depression was found: mild in 4.2% of patients; moderate in 25% and severe in 29.2%. Neuropsychological performance declines in patients with myasthenia gravis: attention was more affected than other cognitive areas

  13. [Neuropsychological performance in patients with myasthenia gravis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizaguirre, María Bárbara; Aguirre, Florencia; Yastremiz, Cecilia; Vanotti, Sandra; Villa, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects the neuromuscular transmission. Controversial findings had been reported about cognitive impairment in this disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the cognitive pattern of patients with myasthenia gravis. There were enrolled 24 patients with myasthenia gravis, anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies (ACRA) positive, and 24 healthy controls. age 43.9 ± 14.8, years of education 10.9 ± 3.3. age 44.5 ± 15.4, years of education 11.5 ± 3.3. The following areas were evaluated: verbal memory: (long-term storage, retrieval, delayed recall) of the Selective Remained Test; attention: Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT 2 and 3 seconds); executive functions: analogies and numbers-letters sequence. Also, it was administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI II). About 33.3% of patients obtained abnormal performance in two or more cognitive tests. 37.5% showed deterioration in attention; 33.3% in verbal memory; 29.2% in executive functions. Significant differences between patients and healthy controls were found in long-term storage (p = 0.001); retrieval (p = 0.007); delayed recall (p = 0.000); PASAT 3 (p = 0.009); PASAT 2 (p = 0.009) and analogies (p = 0.003). Evidence of depression was found: mild in 4.2% of patients; moderate in 25% and severe in 29.2%. Neuropsychological performance declines in patients with myasthenia gravis: attention was more affected than other cognitive areas.

  14. Standardization of depression measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Inka; Löwe, Bernd; Bjørner, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    comparisons among included measures. Large differences were found in their measurement precision and range, providing a rationale for instrument selection. Published scale-specific threshold scores of depression severity showed remarkable consistencies across different questionnaires. CONCLUSION: An IRT-based......OBJECTIVES: To provide a standardized metric for the assessment of depression severity to enable comparability among results of established depression measures. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A common metric for 11 depression questionnaires was developed applying item response theory (IRT) methods. Data...... instrument-independent metric for depression severity enables direct comparisons among established measures. The "common ruler" simplifies the interpretation of depression assessment by identifying key thresholds for clinical and epidemiologic decision making and facilitates integrative psychometric research...

  15. Depression and attachment problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Pettem, O; M. West; Mahoney, A; Keller, A.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics related to attachment of 42 depressed psychiatric patients and 42 non-depressed psychiatric controls. The depressed subjects demonstrated an anxious pattern of attachment, characterized by either intense care-seeking in relation to their attachment figure or angry withdrawal from their attachment figure when their desire for security was frustrated. The results are discussed in terms of Bowlby's attachment construct.

  16. Leiden Index of Depression Sensitivity-Revised (LEIDS-R: Spanish validation proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Senín-Calderón

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptar y validar al espa˜nol la escala Leiden de Sensibilidad para la Depresión Revisada para evaluar la reactividad cognitiva al humor depresivo. Conocer la estructura factorial de la escala y hallar las propiedades psicométricas. La muestra consistió en 600 participantes (103 pacientes y 497 sujetos de población general. Se obtuvo una estructura de cuatro factores, se propuso un factor general que evalúa la reactividad cognitiva y se eliminaron 10 ítems. Se propone una versión reducida de la escala (LEIDS-R24. Los factores y la escala global presentan una adecuada consistencia interna y los resultados de la validación muestran que todos los factores de la escala predicen adecuadamente la sintomatología depresiva (BDI-II y muestran correlaciones elevadas con la Escala de Actitudes Disfuncionales y BDI-II. La escala completa discriminó adecuadamente en sintomatología depresiva entre sujetos de la población general y sujetos con trastornos de ansiedad y depresivos. No se hallaron diferencias significativas en la medida LEIDS-R24 entre sujetos con trastornos de ansiedad y depresivos. La escala LEIDS-R24 puede ser una medida útil y breve para evaluar la reactividad cognitiva al humor depresivo y analizar la vulnerabilidad común que puede darse entre personas con trastornos de ansiedad y depresivos.

  17. Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms in Young Adults with Coronary Artery Disease: Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort (THC-PAC Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hesameddin Abbasi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Depressed coronary artery disease (CAD patients may experience a poorer prognosis than non-depressed patients. The aim of this study was to find the associated factors for depressive symptoms in young adults with CAD.Method: This was a cross-sectional study within Tehran Heart Center's Premature Coronary Atherosclerosis Cohort (THC-PAC study. Young adult CAD patients (men ≤ 45 year-old and women ≤ 55 year-old were visited from March 2013 to February 2014. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected and all patients were asked to fill in the Beck Depression Inventory II. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. A logistic regression model was used to find multiple associated factors of depressive symptoms.Results: Seven hundred seventy patients (mean ±SD age: 45.34 ±5.75 y, men: 47.7% were visited. The point prevalence of depressive symptoms was 46.9% in women and 30.2% in men (p < 0.001. Logistic regressions model revealed that the most important associated factors for depressive symptoms in the male premature CAD patients were opium usage (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.33-4.43, major adverse cardiac events (MACE (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.17-3.93, initial coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG treatment (OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.07-4.06, positive family history for CAD (OR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.11-3.01 and cigarette smoking (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 0.97-2.98. Hypertension showed a protective role in this group of patients (OR = 0.5, CI = 0.29-0.92. In the female patients, hypertension (OR = 1.5, CI = 0.96-2.22 and body mass index (BMI (OR = 1.1, CI = 1.02-1.10 were associated with depressive symptoms.Conclusion: In premature CAD male patients, opium usage, MACE, initial CABG treatment, positive family history for CAD and cigarette smoking were associated with depressive symptoms; and hypertension and BMI were associated with depressive symptoms in women.

  18. DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS IN EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koralia Todorova

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Depressive disorders are the most frequent psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy but very often remain unrecognized and untreated. We examined 103 epileptic patients, aged 18-60 years, 40 males and 63 females, for the presence of interictal depressive disorder. All subjects underwent clinical psychiatric examination, including evaluation on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D-17. A questionnaire for demographic and seizure-related variables was also completed. Concurrent depressive disorder (clinically presented according to ICD-10 diagnostic criteria affected 28.3% of all evaluated patients. Based on HAM-D-17 scores depression was defined as mild - 80% of all depressed patients, moderate - 17% and severe - 3%. Atypical presentation of interictal depressive disorder was frequent. Depression has a tremendous effect on one’s family, social and psychological functioning, even more than the actual seizure frequency and severity. Diagnostic difficulties come through the atypical mode of presentation of depressive disorders in epilepsy. Proper neuropsychiatric evaluation is essential for improving treatment and quality of life for patients with epilepsy.

  19. Depression after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegelstein, R C

    2001-01-01

    Depression is an independent risk factor for increased postmyocardial infarction morbidity and mortality, even after controlling for the extent of coronary artery disease, infarct size, and the severity of left ventricular dysfunction. This risk factor takes on added significance when one considers that almost half of patients recovering from a myocardial infarction have major or minor depression and that major depression alone occurs in about one in five of these individuals. Despite the well-documented risk of depression, questions remain about the mechanism of the relationship between mood disturbance and adverse outcome. The link may be explained by an association with lower levels of social support, poor adherence to recommended medical therapy and lifestyle changes intended to reduce the risk of subsequent cardiac events, disturbances in autonomic tone, enhanced platelet activation and aggregation, and systemic immune activation. Unfortunately, questions about the pathophysiologic mechanism of depression in this setting are paralleled by uncertainties about the optimal treatment of depression for patients recovering from a myocardial infarction and by a lack of knowledge about whether treating depression lowers the associated increased mortality risk. Ongoing research studies will help to determine the benefits of psychosocial interventions and of antidepressant therapy for patients soon after myocardial infarction. Although the identification of depression as a risk factor may by itself be a reason to incorporate a comprehensive psychological evaluation into the routine care of patients with myocardial infarction, this practice should certainly become standard if studies show that treating depression reduces the increased mortality risk of these patients.

  20. Nutritional Aspects of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Undine E. Lang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Several nutrition, food and dietary compounds have been suggested to be involved in the onset and maintenance of depressive disorders and in the severity of depressive symptoms. Nutritional compounds might modulate depression associated biomarkers and parallel the development of depression, obesity and diabetes. In this context, recent studies revealed new mediators of both energy homeostasis and mood changes (i.e. IGF-1, NPY, BDNF, ghrelin, leptin, CCK, GLP-1, AGE, glucose metabolism and microbiota acting in gut brain circuits. In this context several healthy foods such as olive oil, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, poultry, dairy and unprocessed meat have been inversely associated with depression risk and even have been postulated to improve depressive symptoms. In contrast, unhealthy western dietary patterns including the consumption of sweetened beverage, refined food, fried food, processed meat, refined grain, and high fat diary, biscuits, snacking and pastries have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of depression in longitudinal studies. However, it is always difficult to conclude a real prospective causal relationship from these mostly retrospective studies as depressed individuals might also change their eating habits secondarily to their depression. Additionally specific selected nutritional compounds, e.g. calcium, chromium, folate, PUFAs, vitamin D, B12, zinc, magnesium and D-serine have been postulated to be used as ad-on strategies in antidepressant treatment. In this context, dietary and lifestyle interventions may be a desirable, effective, pragmatical and non-stigmatizing prevention and treatment strategy for depression. At last, several medications (pioglitazone, metformin, exenatide, atorvastatin, gram-negative antibiotics, which have traditionally been used to treat metabolic disorders showed a certain potential to treat depression in first randomized controlled clinical trials.

  1. Nutritional aspects of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Undine E; Beglinger, Christoph; Schweinfurth, Nina; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Several nutrition, food and dietary compounds have been suggested to be involved in the onset and maintenance of depressive disorders and in the severity of depressive symptoms. Nutritional compounds might modulate depression associated biomarkers and parallel the development of depression, obesity and diabetes. In this context, recent studies revealed new mediators of both energy homeostasis and mood changes (i.e. IGF-1, NPY, BDNF, ghrelin, leptin, CCK, GLP-1, AGE, glucose metabolism and microbiota) acting in gut brain circuits. In this context several healthy foods such as olive oil, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, poultry, dairy and unprocessed meat have been inversely associated with depression risk and even have been postulated to improve depressive symptoms. In contrast, unhealthy western dietary patterns including the consumption of sweetened beverage, refined food, fried food, processed meat, refined grain, and high fat diary, biscuits, snacking and pastries have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of depression in longitudinal studies. However, it is always difficult to conclude a real prospective causal relationship from these mostly retrospective studies as depressed individuals might also change their eating habits secondarily to their depression. Additionally specific selected nutritional compounds, e.g. calcium, chromium, folate, PUFAs, vitamin D, B12, zinc, magnesium and D-serine have been postulated to be used as ad-on strategies in antidepressant treatment. In this context, dietary and lifestyle interventions may be a desirable, effective, pragmatical and non-stigmatizing prevention and treatment strategy for depression. At last, several medications (pioglitazone, metformin, exenatide, atorvastatin, gram-negative antibiotics), which have traditionally been used to treat metabolic disorders showed a certain potential to treat depression in first randomized controlled clinical trials.

  2. Poor quality of life, depressed mood, and memory impairment may be mediated by sleep disruption in patients with Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michelle; Wolf, Pedro S A; Ross, Ian L; Thomas, Kevin G F

    2015-11-01

    Standard replacement therapy for Addison's disease (AD) does not restore a normal circadian rhythm. In fact, hydrocortisone replacement in AD patients likely induces disrupted sleep. Given that healthy sleep plays an important role in improving quality of life, optimizing cognition, and ensuring affect regulation, the aim of this study was to investigate whether poor quality of life, mood alterations, and memory complaints reported by AD patients are associated with their disrupted sleep patterns. Sixty patients with AD and 60 matched healthy controls completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing perceived physical and mental health (Short-Form 36), mood (Beck Depression Inventory-II), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and cognition (Cognitive Failures Questionnaire). A latent variable model revealed that although AD had a significant direct effect on quality of life, the indirect effect of sleep was significantly greater. Furthermore, although AD had no direct effect on cognitive functioning, the indirect effect of sleep was significant. The overall model showed a good fit (comparative fit index = 0.91, root mean square of approximation = 0.09, and standardized root mean square residual = 0.05). Our findings suggest that disrupted sleep, and not the disease per se, may induce poor quality of life, memory impairment, and affect dysregulation in patients with AD. We think that improving sleep architecture may improve cognitive, affective, and physical functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Negative attributional style, hopelessness depression and endogenous depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, T E

    2001-02-01

    The hopelessness theory of depression [Abramson, L. Y., Metalsky, G. I. & Alloy, L. B. (1989). Hopelessness depression: a theory-based subtype of depression. Psychological Review, 96, 358-372.] postulates that a negative attributional style represents a risk factor for a particular constellation of depressive symptoms, termed 'hopelessness depression'. Four studies tested the relation of negative attributional style to hopelessness depression symptoms versus endogenous depression symptoms. Despite the considerable overlap of hopelessness and endogenous depression symptoms, negative attributional style was more related to the former than the latter, consistent with hopelessness theory.

  4. Depression During and After Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression during and after pregnancy fact sheet ePublications Depression during and after pregnancy fact sheet This information in Spanish (en español) Print this fact sheet Depression during and after pregnancy fact sheet (PDF, 260 ...

  5. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 3 items) Institute Announcements (24 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression ... why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression do work. One type of effective ...

  6. St. John's Wort and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... W X Y Z St. John's Wort and Depression: In Depth Share: On This Page Introduction Key ... will help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Depression Depression is a medical condition that affects about ...

  7. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 3 items) Institute Announcements (24 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression ... why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression do work. One type of effective ...

  8. Testosterone and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükrü Kartalcı

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgens have various effects on human body and mood. Testosterone, a hormone mainly secreted from testes and adrenals, is one of the most potent androgens. Multiple studies have found that testosterone plays a role in regulating sexual activity, libido, social behaviors, aggression, cognitive functions, sleep control and well-being in men and women. Testosterone deficiency in hypogonadic or elderly men leads to neuropsychiatric problems, such as fatigue, loss of libido, irritability, insomnia and depressive mood. Testosterone replacement therapy consistently reverses these sequel in men. On the other hand, hyperandrogenic states in women are related to aggression and antisocial behavior, which might lead to depressive mood. Low testosterone levels may also result in depression among oophorectomized women. Because of such effects, a relationship between testosterone and depression has long been an issue of speculation, but yet very few studies have addressed this relation. Along with clinical studies, experimental and epidemiological studies show that testosterone is related to depression in men and women. But studies of testosterone concentrations in depression have yielded inconsistent results reporting low as well as high testosterone levels associated with depression. In this article, the physiological and psychological effects of testosterone and evidence regarding its relationship to depressive disorders and possible gender differences have been reviewed.

  9. Depression in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Amy; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Gatz, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults, but it can have serious consequences. More than half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and are more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are depressed younger adults. Risk factors leading to the development of late-life depression likely comprise complex interactions among genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive diathesis, age-associated neurobiological changes, and stressful events. Insomnia is an often overlooked risk factor for late-life depression. We suggest that a common pathway to depression in older adults, regardless of which predisposing risks are most prominent, may be curtailment of daily activities. Accompanying self-critical thinking may exacerbate and maintain a depressed state. Offsetting the increasing prevalence of certain risk factors in late life are age-related increases in psychological resilience. Other protective factors include higher education and socioeconomic status, engagement in valued activities, and religious or spiritual involvement. Treatments including behavioral therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, cognitive bibliotherapy, problem-solving therapy, brief psychodynamic therapy, and life review/reminiscence therapy are effective but are too infrequently used with older adults. Preventive interventions including education for individuals with chronic illness, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving skills training, group support, and life review have also received support.

  10. Depression Begets Depression: Comparing the Predictive Utility of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms to Later Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Feng, Xin; Hipwell, Alison; Klostermann, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background: The high comorbidity between depressive and anxiety disorders, especially among females, has called into question the independence of these two symptom groups. It is possible that childhood anxiety typically precedes depression in girls. Comparing of the predictive utility of symptoms of anxiety with the predictive utility of symptoms…

  11. [Hashimoto encephalitis and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltman, E M; Rhebergen, D; van Exel, E; Stek, M L

    2015-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalitis (he) is an auto-immune disease, with 40-50% of patients developing psychopathology. This could require targeted treatment. HE and prednison could both cloud the identification of a concurrent depressive disorder. We saw a 78-year-old woman with he and a severe depression, and treated her succesfully with ect.

  12. Depression (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these simple actions. They can have a powerful effect on mood and help with depression: eat healthy foods get the right amount of ... dance, and find creative self-expression through art, music, or journaling. ... and well-being. Depression can be treated if you take the right ...

  13. Sleep deprivation and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenga, Simon

    1992-01-01

    The association between depression and sleep disturbances is perhaps as old as makind. In view of the longstanding experience with this association it is amazing that only some 20 years ago, a few depressed patients attracted attention to the fact that Total Sleep Deprivation (TSD) had

  14. Sleep deprivation and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenga, Simon

    1992-01-01

    The association between depression and sleep disturbances is perhaps as old as makind. In view of the longstanding experience with this association it is amazing that only some 20 years ago, a few depressed patients attracted attention to the fact that Total Sleep Deprivation (TSD) had antidepressan

  15. CIRCADIAN RHYTMICITY AND DEPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pregelj

    2008-11-01

    There is a grooving evidence that dysfunction in circadian rhythm regulation andmelatonergic system function is involved in depression pathogenesis. It is known thatclinically used antidepressants have influence on melatonergic system, probably throughchanged ratio between melatonergic type 1 and 2 receptors. With the clinical use of newcompounds like agomelatine that directly regulates melatonergic system new opportunities in depression treatment emerged

  16. Depression - older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slowly than in younger adults. To better manage depression at home: Exercise regularly, if the provider says it is OK. Surround yourself with caring, positive people and do fun activities. ... signs of depression, and know how to react if these occur. ...

  17. Depression and ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganovsky, K N; Vasilenko, Z L

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this at issue paper is the analysis of published data in correlation with the results of own research on the potential role of ionizing radiation in the genesis of depressive disorders. Depression is one of the most significant and long-term effect of the atomic bombings, nuclear testing and radiation emergences. The participants of the accident at the Chornobyl nuclear power plant increased prevalence of depression (18.0% and 13.1% in controls) and suicide rates. Depression is mainly observed in the structure of an organic mental disorder against cerebrovascular disease. The clinical pattern is dominated by asthenoadynamic and asthenoapathetic depression. Depressive disorders in radiation emergencies are multifactorial, that is the result of exposure to the complex psychogenic and radiological accident's factors, impact of traditional risk factors, somatic and neurological diseases, genetic predisposition, predisposition, etc. At the same time, exposure to ionizing radiation is a factor in the genesis of depression. This impact can be direct (to the Central Nervous System), and indirectly through the somatic and neurological abnormalities (multiorgan dysfunction) as well as by a variety of pathogenic mechanisms of ionizing radiation on the brain that have been discovered recently. It is strongly necessary analytical clinical and epidemiological studies with verification of depression and evidence-based establishment of the role of radiation and non-radiation risk factors. Loganovskyj K. N., Vasylenko Z. L., 2013.

  18. Cooperation and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendan Clark, C; Thorne, Christopher B; Hardy, Sonya; Cropsey, Karen L

    2013-09-25

    Deficits in pro-social cooperation are common in many individuals with mental illnesses such as depression. For decades, researchers have used economic game paradigms to compare cross-cultural cooperative behavior. However, research using economic games to assess cooperative behavior in clinical populations is in the early stages. We hypothesized that individuals with greater depressive symptoms would struggle to maintain reciprocity in iterative games, but not in single-iteration games measuring personal values. Participants (n=41) played four computer-based economic games (prisoner's dilemma, the public goods game, the ultimatum game, and the trust game) measuring different aspects of cooperation. Participants completed the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) and other measures of personality and demographics. Analyses assessed the relationships between game performance and psychological distress as measured by the DASS. Significant correlations were found between game performance and depressive symptoms, but not symptoms of anxiety or stress. Performance in the prisoner's dilemma and public goods game was significantly related to depression in a linear regression even when known associations with depressive affect such as age, gender, race, education, marital status, and neuroticism were controlled for. Depressive symptoms were associated with an inability to sustain reciprocal cooperation. Participants showed the predicted deficits in cooperation in these economic games. Economic games show the potential for assessing the social deficits associated with depressive symptoms. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Adolescent depression: a metasynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundon, Edith Emma

    2006-01-01

    Concerns about the adequate assessment and treatment of adolescent depression have been in the forefront of pediatric mental health literature in the recent past. While quantitative studies have provided valuable information, the voice of the adolescent has been lacking in the development of theory and treatment of this prevalent disorder. Using approach, a metasynthesis of six qualitative studies was conducted. This process revealed six themes that outline the course of adolescents who struggle with depression: (a) beyond the blues, (b) spiraling down and within, (c) breaking points, (d) seeing and being seen, (e) seeking solutions, and (f) taking control. Knowledge of the experience of adolescent depression will aid practitioners in recognition and early intervention for the increasing number of adolescents suffering with depression, as well as guide educational initiatives to provide needed information on the symptoms of depression and available resources for getting help.

  20. [Depression and suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2007-09-01

    Suicide is a major public health problem and the number of suicide victims has exceeded 30,000 a year since 1998 in Japan. The rates of depression are extremely high in suicide victims. Social and environmental factors, such as the slow recovery of Japanese economy, could have a strong effect on depression and suicide, especially in middle-aged men. To reduce the number of suicide victims, we need to use both population-based and high-risk approaches, targeting individuals with high psychological and socioeconomic risks of suicide, especially depressed patients. On the other hand, the role of antidepressants in suicide prevention is a major question given the high prevalence of both depression and depression-related suicidality. Because treatment and prevention of suicide are complex and encompass many factors, success will need multi-sector collaboration.

  1. Depression following myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjær

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe life event that is accompanied by an increased risk of depression. Mounting evidence suggests that post-MI depression is associated with adverse outcomes, but the underlying mechanisms of this association remain unclear, and no previous studies have examined...... whether the mental burden of MI is so heavy that it increases the risk of suicide. Although post-MI depression is common and burdensome, the condition remains under-recognised and under-treated. The development of new strategies to improve the quality of care for people with post-MI depression requires...... thorough understanding of the mechanisms that influence the prognosis as well as knowledge of the present care provided. The purpose of this PhD thesis is accordingly subdivided into four specific aims: 1. To estimate the prevalence of depression in people with MI after three months, and to estimate...

  2. Measuring psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Meyers, B S; Flint, A J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Psychotic depression (PD) is a highly debilitating condition, which needs intensive monitoring. However, there is no established rating scale for evaluating the severity of PD. The aim of this analysis was to assess the psychometric properties of established depression rating scales...... and a number of new composite rating scales, covering both depressive and psychotic symptoms, in relation to PD. METHOD: The psychometric properties of the rating scales were evaluated based on data from the Study of Pharmacotherapy of Psychotic Depression. RESULTS: A rating scale consisting of the 6-item......'s correlation coefficient between change in HAMD-BPRS11 and Clinical Global Impression - Improvement (CGI-I) scores = -0.74--0.78) and unidimensionality (Loevinger's coefficient of homogeneity = 0.41) in the evaluation of PD. The HAM-D6 fulfilled the same criteria, whereas the full 17-item Hamilton Depression...

  3. Depression and Political Participation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument—whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group. PMID:26924857

  4. Depression and Political Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument-whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group.

  5. [Severe depression : psychoanalysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet de la Maisonneuve, O

    2009-12-01

    The indication for psychoanalysis in severe depression is not clear. And yet, demands for this type of intervention are increasing, despite the absence of any form of consensus on the subject. Freud considered depression as a failure of analytical efforts and, based on this observation, revised his theory, in particular to include the notions of narcissism and the death drive. Many analysts have been reluctant to follow his teachings on this last point and provide depressed patients with analytical-type therapies aimed at restoring narcissism. Melanie Klein pushed Freud's ideas about depression even further and brought such therapies back to the heart of analytical practice. Jacques Lacan took the debate to another level by proposing an overhaul of the principles on which analysis has been based. Today, while following certain precautionary rules, true psychoanalyses can be proposed to patients with severe depression, whether of the bipolar, recurring or even neurotic type that can reach this level of severity.

  6. Adding smartphone-based cognitive-behavior therapy to pharmacotherapy for major depression (FLATT project): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Norio; Horikoshi, Masaru; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Shimodera, Shinji; Akechi, Tatsuo; Miki, Kazuhira; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Imai, Hissei; Tajika, Aran; Ogawa, Yusuke; Takeshima, Nozomi; Hayasaka, Yu; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2015-07-07

    Major depression is one of the most debilitating diseases in terms of quality of life. Less than half of patients suffering from depression can achieve remission after adequate antidepressant treatment. Another promising treatment option is cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT). However, the need for experienced therapists and substantive dedicated time prevent CBT from being widely disseminated. In the present study, we aim to examine the effectiveness of switching antidepressants and starting a smartphone-based CBT program at the same time, in comparison to switching antidepressants only, among patients still suffering from depression after adequate antidepressant treatment. A multi-center randomized trial is currently being conducted since September 2014. The smartphone-based CBT program, named the "Kokoro-App," for major depression has been developed and its feasibility has been confirmed in a previous open study. The program consists of an introduction, 6 sessions and an epilogue, and is expected to be completed within 9 weeks by patients. In the present trial, 164 patients with DSM-5 major depressive disorder and still suffering from depressive symptoms after adequate antidepressant treatment for more than 4 weeks will be allocated to the Kokoro-App plus switching antidepressant group or the switching antidepressant alone group. The participants allocated to the latter group will receive full components of the Kokoro-App after 9 weeks. The primary outcome is the change in the total score on the Patient Health Questionnaire through the 9 weeks of the program, as assessed at week 0, 1, 5 and 9 via telephone by blinded raters. The secondary outcomes include the change in the total score of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, change in side effects as assessed by the Frequency, Intensity and Burden of Side Effects Rating, and treatment satisfaction. An effective and reachable intervention may not only lead to healthier mental status among depressed patients, but also to

  7. Management of bipolar depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Seung Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with bipolar disorder spend more time in a depressed than manic state, even with individualized treatment. To date, bipolar depression is often misdiagnosed and ineffectively managed both for acute episodes and residual symptoms. This review attempts to summarize the current status of available treatment strategies in the treatment of bipolar depression. For acute and prophylactic treatment, a substantial body of evidence supports the antidepressive efficacy of lithium for bipolar disorders and its antisuicidal effects. Among numerous anticonvulsants with mood-stabilizing properties, valproate and lamotrigine could be first-line options for bipolar depression. Due to receptor profile, mood-stabilizing properties of second-generation antipsychotics have been explored, and up to date, quetiapine and olanzapine appear to be a reasonable option for bipolar depression. The usefulness of antidepressants in bipolar depression is still controversial. Current guidelines generally recommend the cautious antidepressant use in combination with mood stabilizers to reduce the risk of mood elevation or cycle acceleration. Results from clinical trials on psychosocial intervention are promising, especially when integrated with pharmacotherapy. Most patients with bipolar depression need individualized and combined treatment, although the published evidence on this type of treatment strategy is limited. Future studies on the utility of currently available agents and modalities including psychosocial intervention are required.

  8. Behandlingsresistent depression kan behandles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2011-01-01

    Depression is considered resistant when two treatment attempts with antidepressants from different classes fail to produce significant clinical improvement. In cases of treatment-resistant depression, it is recommended to reevaluate the diagnosis, clarify comorbidity, substance abuse and lack...... of compliance. Regarding treatment, evidence is sparse, but switching to a different antidepressant, and combination or augmentation with another agent, admission and treatment with ECT are the options. The choice of treatment must be based on the characteristics of the depression, the severity of treatment...

  9. Depression and erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlouf, Antoine; Kparker, Ashay; Niederberger, Craig S

    2007-11-01

    Depression and erectile dysfunction (ED) clearly are associated. Although urologists and psychiatrists have long recognized that antidepressant medications affect erectile function negatively, the interplay between the two conditions remains underappreciated. Psychiatrists may be reluctant to question a patient in detail about ED, and urologists seldom perform a formal assessment of the presence of depression in patients who have ED. This article gives a quick overview of the relationship between these two conditions and provides the clinician with the knowledge required to effectively manage ED with comorbid depression.

  10. Neuroticism in remitted major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders; Kristoffersen, Marius; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The personality trait of neuroticism is strongly related to depression, but depression is etiologically heterogeneous. Late-onset depression (LOD) may be more closely related to vascular factors, and previous studies of neuroticism in LOD versus early-onset depression (EOD) have not b...

  11. Do You Have Major Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression Do You Have Major Depression? Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Simple ... member may have major depression. —NIMH Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  12. Vision in depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubl, E.; Tebartz Van Elst, L.; Ebert, D.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Reduced dopaminergic transmission has been implicated in the pathophysiology of major depression. Furthermore, dopaminergic neurotransmission plays an important role in the physiology of visual contrast sensitivity (CS). To test the hypothesis that altered dopaminergic neurotransmissi...

  13. Telomere length and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Rode, Line

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression has been cross-sectionally associated with short telomeres as a measure of biological age. However, the direction and nature of the association is currently unclear. AIMS: We examined whether short telomere length is associated with depression cross-sectionally as well...... as prospectively and genetically. METHOD: Telomere length and three polymorphisms, TERT, TERC and OBFC1, were measured in 67 306 individuals aged 20-100 years from the Danish general population and associated with register-based attendance at hospital for depression and purchase of antidepressant medication....... RESULTS: Attendance at hospital for depression was associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally, but not prospectively. Further, purchase of antidepressant medication was not associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally or prospectively. Mean follow-up was 7.6 years (range 0...

  14. Doxepin (Depression, Anxiety)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxepin is used to treat depression and anxiety. Doxepin is in a class of medications called tricyclic antidepressants. It works by increasing the amounts of certain natural substances in the brain ...

  15. [Depression and myocardial infaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testuz, A

    2009-03-04

    Several works show an association between depression and the occurence of a first myocardial infarction. Depression after myocardial infarction seems to be a marker of poorer outcome, regardless of other risk factors or severity of the myocardial infarction. Dysautonomia and alteration of platelet activation are a few physiopathological changes shared by both affections, through which they might be related. Treatment of depression is not associated with better cardiovascular outcome, but selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown safe and efficient among patients with coronary heart disease. Cognitivo-comportemental approach and cardiovascular rehabilitation program after myocardial infarction also play a role in improving quality of life of the depressed patient with coronary heart disease.

  16. Depression (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people overcome depression. Talk therapy works by helping people to: understand their emotions, put feelings into words, and feel understood and supported build the confidence to deal with life's struggles work out problems ...

  17. Depression in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Printable Report Election Year: Mental Health and Politics Glossary and Citations Prevalence Data Ranking Guidelines Ranking ... Mental Health. “The Many Dimensions of Depression in Women: Women at Risk,” Accessed June 1999. Netscape: http:// ...

  18. The psychoneuroimmunology of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Brian E; Myint, Ayemu

    2009-04-01

    Chronic stress, by initiating changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the immune system, acts as a trigger for anxiety and depression. There is experimental and clinical evidence that the rise in the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoids, which occurs in a chronically stressful situation and also in depression, contribute to the behavioural changes associated with depression. A defect in serotonergic function is associated with these hormonal and immune changes. Neurodegenerative changes in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdalae are the frequent outcome of the changes in the HPA axis and the immune system. Such changes may provide evidence for the link between chronic depression and dementia in later life.

  19. Depression and codependency in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Hammer, C; Martsolf, D S; Zeller, R A

    1998-12-01

    Seven million American women are depressed, and 40 million Americans, primarily women, have been labeled as codependent. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of codependency in women undergoing treatment for depression, examine the relationship between codependency and depression, and determine which of the symptoms of codependency are most highly predictive of depression scores. Depression and codependency were measured in a sample of 105 depressed women by using the Beck Depression Inventory and the Codependency Assessment Tool. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's Product Moment Correlation, and multiple regression were used for analysis. Of these depressed women, 36% were moderately to severely codependent. Depression and codependency were strongly related, with the significant gamma = .92 (P codependency subscales, Low Self-Worth and Hiding Self correlate most strongly with depression; Other Focus/Self-Neglect added the least-independent--explanatory power. Thus, future research should be directed toward the relationship of codependency to power, alienation of self, and personality disorders.

  20. Identifying Depression on Twitter

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem, Moin

    2016-01-01

    Social media has recently emerged as a premier method to disseminate information online. Through these online networks, tens of millions of individuals communicate their thoughts, personal experiences, and social ideals. We therefore explore the potential of social media to predict, even prior to onset, Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in online personas. We employ a crowdsourced method to compile a list of Twitter users who profess to being diagnosed with depression. Using up to a year of pri...

  1. Anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzelere, Michele M; Wiseman, Pamela

    2002-06-01

    Evidence for alternative treatments for depression, anxiety, and insomnia are reviewed in this article. Treatment of depression with St. John's wort, L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, S-adenosylmethionine, dehydroepiandosterone, folate, exercise, acupuncture, and meditation are examined. Evidence for the efficacy of kava kava, exercise, relaxation therapies, and acupuncture in treatment anxiety is reviewed. The use of valerian, melatonin, chamomile, passionflower, exercise, acupuncture, and behavioral therapies (i.e., sleep restriction, stimulus control, relaxation, and sleep hygiene) for insomnia is discussed.

  2. [Depression in the workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezerai, Mustapha; Dahane, Abdelkrim; Tachon, Jean-Paul

    2006-05-01

    Depression is the object of a dense literature, and synthesizing it is more of a utopian ideal rather than a concrete possibility. Several specific risk factors for mental health are found in the workplace: work overloads, defective communications, role conflicts, competitive climate, and tolerance of violence. At the same time, few preventive measures have been implemented against mental disorders at work, nor are many protective factors present. One worker in ten suffers from depression, anxiety, stress, or overwork. To be distinguished from "burnout", depressive symptoms must induce clinically significant suffering with substantial deterioration in functioning at work. For depression to be recognized as a workplace accident, the employee must show that it was triggered by an unforeseen and sudden event (or at least one certainly) due to or at work. The causal link between an event at work and the depression must be shown (in particular by expert medical testimony about stress factors and indicators of vulnerability to depression). Its recognition as an occupational disease can be based on the presence of psychosocial factors described by models of workplace stress and on its description by the occupational physician.

  3. Depression and Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    There are exciting findings in the field of depression and coronary heart disease. Whether diagnosed or simply self-reported, depression continues to mark very high risk for a recurrent acute coronary syndrome or for death in patients with coronary heart disease. Many intriguing mechanisms have been posited to be implicated in the association between depression and heart disease, and randomized controlled trials of depression treatment are beginning to delineate the types of depression manage...

  4. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea severity and sleep, depression and anxiety symptoms in newly-diagnosed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macey, Paul M; Woo, Mary A; Kumar, Rajesh; Cross, Rebecca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2010-04-16

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs in at least 10% of the population, and leads to higher morbidity and mortality; however, relationships between OSA severity and sleep or psychological symptoms are unclear. Existing studies include samples with wide-ranging comorbidities, so we assessed relationships between severity of OSA and common sleep and psychological disturbances in recently diagnosed OSA patients with minimal co-morbidities. We studied 49 newly diagnosed, untreated OSA patients without major co-morbidities such as mental illness, cardiovascular disease, or stroke; subjects were not using psychoactive medications or tobacco (mean +/- std age: 46.8+/-9.1 years; apnea/hyponea index [AHI]: 32.1+/-20.5 events/hour; female/male: 12/37; weight sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index; PSQI), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II; BDI), and anxiety symptoms (Beck Anxiety Inventory; BAI), as well as sex and body mass index (BMI). AHI was similar in females and males. Mean levels of all symptoms were above normal thresholds, but AHI was not correlated with age, ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI; only BMI was correlated with OSA severity. No differences in mean AHI appeared when subjects were grouped by normal versus elevated values of ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI. Consistent with other studies, a strong link between OSA severity and psychological symptoms did not appear in these newly diagnosed patients, suggesting that mechanisms additional to the number and frequency of hypoxic events and arousals occurring with apneas contribute to adverse health effects in OSA. OSA patients presenting with mild or moderate severity, and no major co-morbidities will not necessarily have low levels of sleep or psychological disturbances.

  5. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea severity and sleep, depression and anxiety symptoms in newly-diagnosed patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA occurs in at least 10% of the population, and leads to higher morbidity and mortality; however, relationships between OSA severity and sleep or psychological symptoms are unclear. Existing studies include samples with wide-ranging comorbidities, so we assessed relationships between severity of OSA and common sleep and psychological disturbances in recently diagnosed OSA patients with minimal co-morbidities. We studied 49 newly diagnosed, untreated OSA patients without major co-morbidities such as mental illness, cardiovascular disease, or stroke; subjects were not using psychoactive medications or tobacco (mean +/- std age: 46.8+/-9.1 years; apnea/hyponea index [AHI]: 32.1+/-20.5 events/hour; female/male: 12/37; weight <125 kg. We evaluated relationships between the AHI and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale; ESS, sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index; PSQI, depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II; BDI, and anxiety symptoms (Beck Anxiety Inventory; BAI, as well as sex and body mass index (BMI. AHI was similar in females and males. Mean levels of all symptoms were above normal thresholds, but AHI was not correlated with age, ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI; only BMI was correlated with OSA severity. No differences in mean AHI appeared when subjects were grouped by normal versus elevated values of ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI. Consistent with other studies, a strong link between OSA severity and psychological symptoms did not appear in these newly diagnosed patients, suggesting that mechanisms additional to the number and frequency of hypoxic events and arousals occurring with apneas contribute to adverse health effects in OSA. OSA patients presenting with mild or moderate severity, and no major co-morbidities will not necessarily have low levels of sleep or psychological disturbances.

  6. Resting-state connectivity predictors of response to psychotherapy in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Andrew; Smoski, Moria J; Minkel, Jared; Moore, Tyler; Gibbs, Devin; Petty, Chris; Bizzell, Josh; Schiller, Crystal Edler; Sideris, John; Carl, Hannah; Dichter, Gabriel S

    2015-06-01

    Despite the heterogeneous symptom presentation and complex etiology of major depressive disorder (MDD), functional neuroimaging studies have shown with remarkable consistency that dysfunction in mesocorticolimbic brain systems are central to the disorder. Relatively less research has focused on the identification of biological markers of response to antidepressant treatment that would serve to improve the personalized delivery of empirically supported antidepressant interventions. In the present study, we investigated whether resting-state functional brain connectivity (rs-fcMRI) predicted response to Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression, an empirically validated psychotherapy modality designed to increase engagement with rewarding stimuli and reduce avoidance behaviors. Twenty-three unmedicated outpatients with MDD and 20 matched nondepressed controls completed rs-fcMRI scans after which the MDD group received an average of 12 sessions of psychotherapy. The mean change in Beck Depression Inventory-II scores after psychotherapy was 12.04 points, a clinically meaningful response. Resting-state neuroimaging data were analyzed with a seed-based approach to investigate functional connectivity with four canonical resting-state networks: the default mode network, the dorsal attention network, the executive control network, and the salience network. At baseline, the MDD group was characterized by relative hyperconnectivity of multiple regions with precuneus, anterior insula, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex seeds and by relative hypoconnectivity with intraparietal sulcus, anterior insula, and dACC seeds. Additionally, connectivity of the precuneus with the left middle temporal gyrus and connectivity of the dACC with the parahippocampal gyrus predicted the magnitude of pretreatment MDD symptoms. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that response to psychotherapy in the MDD group was predicted by pretreatment

  7. Lifestyle medicine for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; O'Neil, Adrienne; Coulson, Carolyn E; Schweitzer, Isaac; Berk, Michael

    2014-04-10

    The prevalence of depression appears to have increased over the past three decades. While this may be an artefact of diagnostic practices, it is likely that there are factors about modernity that are contributing to this rise. There is now compelling evidence that a range of lifestyle factors are involved in the pathogenesis of depression. Many of these factors can potentially be modified, yet they receive little consideration in the contemporary treatment of depression, where medication and psychological intervention remain the first line treatments. "Lifestyle Medicine" provides a nexus between public health promotion and clinical treatments, involving the application of environmental, behavioural, and psychological principles to enhance physical and mental wellbeing. This may also provide opportunities for general health promotion and potential prevention of depression. In this paper we provide a narrative discussion of the major components of Lifestyle Medicine, consisting of the evidence-based adoption of physical activity or exercise, dietary modification, adequate relaxation/sleep and social interaction, use of mindfulness-based meditation techniques, and the reduction of recreational substances such as nicotine, drugs, and alcohol. We also discuss other potential lifestyle factors that have a more nascent evidence base, such as environmental issues (e.g. urbanisation, and exposure to air, water, noise, and chemical pollution), and the increasing human interface with technology. Clinical considerations are also outlined. While data supports that some of these individual elements are modifiers of overall mental health, and in many cases depression, rigorous research needs to address the long-term application of Lifestyle Medicine for depression prevention and management. Critically, studies exploring lifestyle modification involving multiple lifestyle elements are needed. While the judicious use of medication and psychological techniques are still advocated

  8. Poststroke depression: Diagnosis of depression, phenomenology and specificity of depressive symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi-Žikić Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of depression. Depressive disorder is nowadays diagnosed by the two widely used diagnostic systems - International Classification of Diseases of the World Health Organization, 10th revision and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Criteria of the American Psychiatric Organisation, 4th edition. The criteria for depressive disorder used in these two systems are almost identical. Poststroke depression. The diagnosis of depression may be difficult to establish in stroke patients, especially in patients with aphasia/dysphasia, anosognosia and other cognitive dysfunction. Major vs. minor poststroke depression, specificity and sensitivity of depressive symptoms: The phenomenology of major poststroke depression has been found to be similar to that of primary depression, and it appears that minor and major are not stages of the same continuum, but rather separate entities. Contrary to common opinion, non specific somatic symptoms do not hinder the diagnosis of poststroke depression and can be highly discriminative and crucial in the evaluation of poststroke depression. Validity of the poststroke depression diagnosis Studies have shown that a valid diagnosis of poststroke depression may be established successfully using structured or semi-structured neuropsychiatric interviews, according to the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Criteria. Conclusion. It appears that no new diagnostic tools specific for major depression in stroke patients are necessary. The existing diagnostic procedures will fail to diagnose or misdiagnose depression only in few stroke patients.

  9. Postpartum Blues and Postpartum Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Ö et al.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum blues which is seen during the postpartum period is a transient psychological state. Most of the mothers experience maternity blues in postpartum period. It remains usually unrecognized by the others. Some sensitive families can misattribute these feelings as depression. In this article, we tried to review the characteristics of maternity blues and its differences from depression. We defined depression and presented the incidence and diagnostic criteria, of major depression as well as the risk factors and clinic findings of postpartum depression. Thus, especially at primary care we aimed to prevent misdiagnosis of both maternity blues and depression

  10. Depressive realism: effects of depression severity and interpretation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendree-Smith, N; Scogin, F

    2000-12-01

    This study examined the theory of depressive realism, which posits that depressed people often are more accurate in perceptions and judgments than nondepressed people. Two possible qualifications to this theory were examined: (1) severity of depression moderates the effect, and (2) length of processing time will impact the presence of bias in depressed people, that is, negative bias will develop over time. College students were presented with a bogus personality profile that actually consisted of items previously rated as neutral in desirability. Participants rated these profiles for desirability initially and then again three days later. Results indicated a significant effect of depression severity on desirability rating. Nondepressed and mildly depressed students found their profiles to be more positive than the moderately/severely depressed students, with both groups having scores in the positive range. However, those participants who were moderately/severely depressed showed a negative bias in their ratings. No support was found for the effect of different times of interpretation.

  11. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milgrom Jeannette

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Methods Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26–32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161 also completed questionnaires at 10–12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1. Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2. Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3. Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator

  12. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Bronwyn; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2008-04-16

    Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26-32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161) also completed questionnaires at 10-12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1). Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2). Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3). Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator for other risk factors. Risk factor profiles for

  13. STUDY OF DEPRESSION IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmesh V

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: The presence of depression in schizophrenia has been recognized since the time of Kraepelin and Bleuler. Depressive symptoms associated with schizophrenia have received considerable attention in recent years. It has been suggested that patient may manifest depressive symptoms during the onset of psychotic symptoms, during course of chronic schizophrenia or after the psychotic symptoms has been abated. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: 1. To study the prevalence of depression in schizophrenia. 2. To study the correlation between depression and subtype of schizophrenia. MATERALS & METHODS: 50 consecutive patients suffering from schizophrenia according to DSM-IV criteria, who were brought to psychiatric OPD were selected for this study. Patients between 15-55years age were included in this study. HDRS (Hamilton depression rating scale was administered to all patients to assess severity of depression. RESULTS: Out of 50 patients suffering from schizophrenia, 44% of patients suffering from schizophrenia were depressed. In this study the most common symptoms of depression were depressed mood, loss of interest on pleasure, sleep disturbance, loss of energy/fatigue, psychomotor disturbance, suicidal thought or death wish, feeling of hopelessness. CONCLUSION: Depression is common in patients suffering from schizophrenia. The severity of depression was mild to moderate, no one had severe depression. It is more common in patients who are living in nuclear family, who are divorced, who have paranoid type of schizophrenia, who were not on antipsychotic medicine.

  14. Hopelessness, Depression, Suicidal Ideation, and Clinical Diagnosis of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined relevance of clinical diagnosis of depression for explaining discrepant relationships of hopelessness and depression with suicidal ideation. Administered Beck Depression Inventory, Hopelessness Scale, and Scale for Suicide Ideation to 1,306 patients with mood disorder and 488 patients without mood disorder. Found that hopelessness was 1.3…

  15. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Opportunities & Announcements Funding Strategy for Grants Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research Training Labs at NIMH Labs ... Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression discuss how they got help. & ...

  16. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Autism (13 items) Bipolar Disorder (2 items) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (28 items) Eating Disorders ( ... Autism (13 items) Bipolar Disorder (2 items) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (28 items) Eating Disorders ( ...

  17. Major depression with psychotic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000933.htm Major depression with psychotic features To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Major depression with psychotic features is a mental disorder in ...

  18. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... why. Scientists at the National Institute of Mental Health are studying brain images of people who suffer from depression trying to learn why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression ...

  19. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... suffer from depression trying to learn why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression do work. One type of effective psychotherapy is called cognitive behavioral therapy or CBT. ...

  20. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a serious illness that affects many people. Symptoms can vary, but many depressed people lose interest in ... lot of weight. NARRATOR : A person with depression can feel irritable and restless, and have sleep problems. ...

  1. Executive Dysfunction in Geriatric Depression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lockwood, Kathryn A; Alexopoulos, George S; van Gorp, Wilfred G

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to characterize the neuropsychological presentation of geriatric depression and to determine whether depression-related executive dysfunction is more pronounced during advanced age. METHOD...

  2. Facebook Bullying Can Cause Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160991.html Facebook Bullying Can Cause Depression Social media attacks have ' ... Sept. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Negative experiences on Facebook can increase the odds of depression in young ...

  3. Self-compassion in depression: associations with depressive symptoms, rumination, and avoidance in depressed outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Tobias; Altenstein, David; Baettig, Isabelle; Doerig, Nadja; Holtforth, Martin Grosse

    2013-09-01

    Self-compassion involves being kind to oneself when challenged with personal weaknesses or hardship and has been claimed to be associated with resilience in various areas. So far, there are only a handful of studies that investigate self-compassion and its relation to clinical depression. Therefore, the principal goals of the present study were (a) to compare self-compassion in clinically depressed patients and never-depressed subjects, (b) to investigate self-compassion and its relation to cognitive-behavioral avoidance and rumination in depressed outpatients, and (c) to investigate rumination and avoidance as mediators of the relationship between self-compassion and depressive symptoms. One hundred and forty-two depressed outpatients and 120 never-depressed individuals from a community sample completed a self-report measure of self-compassion along with other measures. Results indicate that depressed patients showed lower levels of self-compassion than never-depressed individuals, even when controlled for depressive symptoms. In depressed outpatients, self-compassion was negatively related to depressive symptoms, symptom-focused rumination, as well as cognitive and behavioral avoidance. Additionally, symptom-focused rumination and cognitive and behavioral avoidance mediated the relationship between self-compassion and depressive symptoms. These findings extend previous research on self-compassion, its relation to depression, as well as processes mediating this relationship, and highlight the importance of self-compassion in clinically depressed patients. Since depressed patients seem to have difficulties adopting a self-compassionate attitude, psychotherapists are well advised to explore and address how depressed patients treat themselves.

  4. Exercise Against Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artal, Michal; Sherman, Carl

    1998-01-01

    Physical activity is useful for preventing and easing depression symptoms. When prescribing exercise as an adjunct to medication and psychotherapy, physicians must consider each patient's individual circumstances. Hopelessness and fatigue can make physical exercise difficult. A feasible, flexible, and pleasurable program has the best chance for…

  5. Clock genes in depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie Laage; Bouzinova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Data demonstrate that abnormal regulation of the circadian system can result in cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, obesity, immune dysfunction, increased risk for cancer, reproductive complications, etc. It is highly individual among depressed patients and may be expressed as a phase adv...

  6. Genetic Determinants of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. López León (Sandra)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the studies in this genetic epidemiological thesis was to investigate candidate genes that play a role in the etiology of depression and to obtain new insights about biological pathways that may be involved in this disorder. The introduction of the thesis presents a review of

  7. Depression and Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body techniques into your routine may help alleviate depression. Even 5 to 10 minutes of any of these techniques may be beneficial. These are some to try: Meditation Prayer Deep breathing Acupuncture Yoga Massage Listening to music Creating art Guided imagery Journaling Supplements: Herbal “over- ...

  8. Depression in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aspects of patients' lives to their condition more easily than psychiatrists. .... underdiagnose both dementia and depression in their elderly patients.20,21 A recent ... could lead to great improvement in the quality of life of many patients who ...

  9. Sadness, Depression, and Avoidance Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Allan M.

    2008-01-01

    Research into genetic, psychosocial, and cognitive explanations for depression (biopsychosocial models) provides support for the role of these variables in the etiology of depression. Regularly identified as basic to depression is loss, and the experience of loss has been found to be more influential than genetic factors in the causation of…

  10. Male Depression: Understanding the Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Depression (major depressive disorder) Male depression is a serious medical condition, but many men try to ignore it or refuse treatment. Learn the signs and symptoms — and what to do. By Mayo Clinic Staff Do you feel irritable, isolated or withdrawn? Do you find yourself working all ...

  11. Responding to a Student's Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crundwell, R. Marc A.; Killu, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Although depression is classified as an adult mental health disorder, middle to late adolescence is the age when symptoms most commonly surface. If teachers can recognize the signs of depression in students, Crundwell and Killu assert, they can provide a supportive, flexible school environment that enables depressed students to learn and thrive.…

  12. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 3 items) Institute Announcements (24 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression discuss how ... why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression do work. One type of effective psychotherapy is ...

  13. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the road to recovery. Depression treatment can take time to work, so don't give up. Read more about depression on this Web page. If the symptoms fit, get help now. Share More Video and Audio about Depression Contact ...

  14. Depressive Realism: Wiser or Quieter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Fernando; Matute, Helena; Vadillo, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Depressive realism consists of the lower personal control over uncontrollable events perceived by depressed as compared to nondepressed individuals. In this article, we propose that the realism of depressed individuals is caused not by an increased accuracy in perception, but by their more comprehensive exposure to the actual environmental…

  15. Overview of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Nyoman Wistya Tri Mayasari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Depression is a state of disorder tone generally feeling characterized by feelings of sadness, apathy, pessimism, and loneliness. Epidemiology of depression showed a lifetime prevalence of 7-12% for men and 20-25% for women. The reason for the prevalence differences between men and women not much can be explained, but biological factors and socio-cultural influences. In the depression is sadness lasts for days so that it can disrupt work, study, eat, sleep, and enjoyment. The cause of depression is not just one, but multifactorial. Most of the cause may arise from or the people themselves. Because it is not clear on anatomy, biochemistry, or physiology. To diagnose depression may use criteria of PPDGJ or using DSM-IV-TR /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  16. Cushing's syndrome masquerading as treatment resistant depression

    OpenAIRE

    Anil Kumar, B. N.; Sandeep Grover

    2016-01-01

    Treatment resistant depression (TRD) is a common clinical occurrence among patients treated for major depressive disorder. A significant proportion of patients remain significantly depressed in spite of aggressive pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches. Management of patient with treatment resistant depression requires thorough evaluation for physical causes. We report a case of recurrent depressive disorder, who presented with severe depressive episode without psychotic symptoms, n...

  17. Plain Talk about Depression. Plain Talk Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Marilyn

    Depression is defined as a "whole-body" illness, involving the body, mood, and thoughts. Three of the most prevalent types of depressive disorders are described: major depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disorders (formerly called manic-depressive illness). Eleven symptoms of depression and 10 symptoms of mania are listed. Causes of depression are…

  18. Activated depression: mixed bipolar disorder or agitated unipolar depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Alan C

    2013-08-01

    The combination of depression and activation presents clinical and diagnostic challenges. It can occur, in either bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder, as increased agitation as a dimension of depression. What is called agitation can consist of expressions of painful inner tension or as disinhibited goal-directed behavior and thought. In bipolar disorder, elements of depression can be combined with those of mania. In this case, the agitation, in addition to increased motor activity and painful inner tension, must include symptoms of mania that are related to goal-directed behavior or manic cognition. These diagnostic considerations are important, as activated depression potentially carries increased behavioral risk, especially for suicidal behavior, and optimal treatments for depressive episodes differ between bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder.

  19. Metacognitions and Mindful Attention Awareness in Depression: A Comparison Of Currently Depressed, Previously Depressed and Never Depressed Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solem, Stian; Hagen, Roger; Wang, Catharina E A; Hjemdal, Odin; Waterloo, Knut; Eisemann, Martin; Halvorsen, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to test (1) how metacognition relates to the concept of mindful attention awareness, and (2) whether metacognitions or mindful attention awareness best predicted symptoms of depression. Data was collected from three samples: currently depressed (n = 37), previously depressed (n = 81) and never depressed controls (n = 50). There was a moderate correlation between mindful attention awareness and three of five metacognitive subscales. Both mindful attention awareness and metacognition were significantly correlated with depression severity scores after controlling for anxiety. The depressed group had significantly more dysfunctional metacognitions and less mindful attention awareness than the never depressed group. Negative beliefs about worry and mindful attention awareness were also significantly different in the previously depressed group compared with the never depressed. This suggests that metacognitions and mindful attention awareness can be vulnerability factors for depression. The results also indicated that anxiety symptoms and negative beliefs about worry were the most important factors in predicting depression. In conclusion, the study shows that metacognitions and mindful attention awareness are two related but separate constructs and that metacognitions emerged as the best predictor of depression. These results provide support for the metacognitive model of emotional disorders. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Metacognitions and mindful attention awareness are related but separate constructs Both mindful attention awareness and metacognition are associated with depression Anxiety and negative beliefs about worry (metacognitions) are most important in predicting depression Addressing metacognitions in therapy should be considered in treatment of depression. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Couple Discord and Depression in Couples during Couple Therapy and in Depressed Individuals during Depression Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, David C.; Dimidjian, Sona; Bedics, Jamie D.; Christensen, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The association between depression and relationship distress as well as the impact of treatment for the one on the other was examined across 2 treatment-seeking samples: individuals seeking treatment for depression (N = 120) and couples seeking marital therapy (N = 134 couples). Although there was a baseline association between depression and…

  1. Couple Discord and Depression in Couples during Couple Therapy and in Depressed Individuals during Depression Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, David C.; Dimidjian, Sona; Bedics, Jamie D.; Christensen, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The association between depression and relationship distress as well as the impact of treatment for the one on the other was examined across 2 treatment-seeking samples: individuals seeking treatment for depression (N = 120) and couples seeking marital therapy (N = 134 couples). Although there was a baseline association between depression and…

  2. Unipolar Depression in Paroxysmal Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Bobrov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the current study, the clinical characteristics of unipolar depression in the clinical picture of schizophrenia with the paroxysmal type of disease course are presented. Given the concomitant depression with phobic symptoms, the following clinical variants are marked: depression with generalized social phobia and/or anthropophobia and depression with generalized pathological body sensations and hypochondriacal phobias. In other words, we are talking about a necessity to allocate a special type of schizophrenia with affective structure episodes and comorbid neurosis-like symptoms. Information on the basic treatment strategy of schizophrenia with depressive structure episodes and comorbid neurosis-like symptoms in everyday psychiatric practice is also provided.

  3. Prophylactic onabotulinumtoxinA in patients with chronic migraine and comorbid depression: An open-label, multicenter, pilot study of efficacy, safety and effect on headache-related disability, depression, and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudreau GP

    2015-02-01

    addition, there were significant improvements in Headache Impact Test scores (–6.3 [6.9] (P=0.0001 and Migraine Disability Assessment scores (–44.2 [67.5] (P=0.0058. From baseline to week 24, statistically significant improvements were also seen in Beck Depression Inventory-II (–7.9 [6.0] (P<0.0001, Patient Health Questionnaire depression module (–4.3 [4.7] (P<0.0001, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder questionnaire (-3.5 [5.0] (P=0.0002 scores. No serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events considered related to treatment occurred in 30% of patients and were mild or moderate. Conclusion: Prophylactic onabotulinumtoxinA was well tolerated in patients with chronic migraine and comorbid depression, and was effective in reducing headache frequency, impact, and related disability, which led to statistically significant improvements in depression and anxiety symptoms. Keywords: comorbid anxiety, headache-related disability, migraine prophylaxis

  4. Depression in Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Safaie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is one of the Common psychological disorders. From the cognitive point of view, the unhealthy attitudes increase the severity of the depression. The aim of this study was to investigate depression and unhealthy attitudes in coronary patients hospitalized at Tabriz Shahid Madani Heart Center. Methods: One hundred twenty eight hospitalized patients having myocardial Infarctions were studied regarding unhealthy attitudes, severity of depression and demographic data. Results: The study showed a significant relation between unhealthy attitudes, BDI (Beck Depression Inventory and severe depression. Moreover, a significant relation existed between gender and depression (P=0.0001. In addition, the level of education increased the intensity of unhealthy attitudes (P=0.0001. Several researches in both outside and inside Iran support the idea. Conclusion: Based on present study and more other investigations, it can be suggested to provide the necessary elements and parameters such as antidepressant medication, psychologists, complementary treatment for coping with negative mood and its unwanted consequences.

  5. Ethnicity, music experience, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Paul D; Swope, Alan J; Heide, Frederick J

    2009-01-01

    The researchers studied differences in self-reported music experience and depression across ethnic groups, as well as differences in the relationship between music experience and depression across groups. College participants (78 African Americans, 111 Asian Americans, 218 Whites, and 87 in other ethnic groups) completed the Music Experience Questionnaire (MEQ) and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Statistically significant differences across groups were found on depression as well as on the MEQ factor for Subjective/Physical Reactions to music and on MEQ scales for Commitment to Music, Affective Reactions, Positive Psychotropic Effects, and Reactive Musical Behavior. A distinctive pattern of relationship was found between music variables and depression in the Asian American group, relative to the White and Other group. In particular, among Asian Americans there were negative correlations between depression and the MEQ Subjective/ Physical Reactions factor as well as the Affective Reactions scale. Implications were discussed for the literature on ethnicity and depression, music experience, and music therapy.

  6. Stress, externality, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganellen, R J; Blaney, P H

    1984-12-01

    Previous research has found mixed support for the possibility that locus of control moderates the effects of life stress on depression. Two methodological choices may have influenced previous findings: the use of a unidimensional rather than a multidimensional locus of control scale, and reliance on linear statistical methods using median splits. We attempted to correct these choices by using the Levenson IPC scale (1974) and multiple regression analyses in a female undergraduate population (N = 158). The results supported use of a multidimensional scale, since Stress, Internality, and Powerful Others were found to have main effects on depression whereas Chance interacted with life stress. The question of whether locus of control refers to responsibility for causing an event, i.e., self-blame, or belief in control over future events, i.e., coping behavior, was discussed.

  7. Bibliotherapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Tegan

    2013-04-01

    Bibliotherapy can be used to treat mild to moderate depression or subthreshold depressive symptoms, as a sole or supplementary therapy. Bibliotherapy is a form of guided self-help. The patient works through a structured book, independently from the doctor. The role of the doctor is to support and motivate the patient as they continue through the book and to help clarify any questions or concerns the patient may have. Relevant books can be purchased or often borrowed from a library, with limited cost and good accessibility from a patient perspective. Patients need to have a reading age above 12 years and have a positive attitude toward self-help. Bibliotherapy has NHMRC Level 1 evidence of efficacy and no serious adverse effects have been reported. This article forms part of a series on non-drug treatments, which summarise the indications, considerations and the evidence, and where clinicians and patients can find further information.

  8. The Danish Depression Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbech, Poul Bror Hemming; Deleuran, Anette

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The purpose of the Danish Depression Database (DDD) is to monitor and facilitate the improvement of the quality of the treatment of depression in Denmark. Furthermore, the DDD has been designed to facilitate research. STUDY POPULATION: Inpatients as well as outpatients...... as an evaluation of the risk of suicide are measured before and after treatment. Whether psychiatric aftercare has been scheduled for inpatients and the rate of rehospitalization are also registered. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The database was launched in 2011. Every year since then ~5,500 inpatients and 7,500 outpatients...... have been registered annually in the database. A total of 24,083 inpatients and 29,918 outpatients have been registered. The DDD produces an annual report published on the Internet. CONCLUSION: The DDD can become an important tool for quality improvement and research, when the reporting is more...

  9. [Sulpiride and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestynek, J L

    1983-09-22

    For many years the antidepressive or uninhibiting effect of sulpiride has been a subject of controversy. Following recent reports underscoring an antidepressive action of sulpiride with mood inversion, we have studied 17 patients with depression in order to build a personal opinion. With a daily dosage of 150 mg, a satisfactory response was recorded in overall pathology in 76.5% of cases, and in depressive manifestations in 82% of cases. Therefore, we believe that sulpiride does have an antidepressive action, which begins approximately on the tenth day of treatment, while the uninhibiting effect becomes noticeable on the fifth day. It is to be pointed out that, among the 12 patients who had failed to respond to prior therapy with tricyclic antidepressants, 10 responded very satisfactorily to sulpiride.