WorldWideScience

Sample records for depression inventory results

  1. Sensitivity and specificity of the Major Depression Inventory in outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noteboom Annemieke

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI is a new, brief, self-report measure for depression based on the DSM-system, which allows clinicians to assess the presence of a depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV, but also to assess the severity of the depressive symptoms. Methods We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and psychometric qualities of the MDI in a consecutive sample of 258 psychiatric outpatients. Of these patients, 120 had a mood disorder (70 major depression, 49 dysthymia. A total of 139 subjects had a comorbid axis-I diagnosis, and 91 subjects had a comorbid personality disorder. Results Crohnbach's alpha of the MDI was a satisfactory 0.89, and the correlation between the MDI and the depression subscale of the SCL-90 was 0.79 (p Conclusion The MDI is an attractive, brief depression inventory, which seems to be a reliable tool for assessing depression in psychiatric outpatients.

  2. Concurrent Validity of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory Depression Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joel O.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Compared two new measures of depression (Millon Multiaxial Inventory Dysthymia and Major Depression subscales) with two established instruments: Beck Depression Inventory, a self-report measure which emphasizes the cognitive-affective aspects of depression, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, an interview measure that emphasizes somatic…

  3. The Latent Symptom Structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Outpatients with Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Lena C.; Zhang, K. Anne; Bagby, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is a self-report instrument frequently used in clinical and research settings to assess depression severity. Although investigators have examined the factor structure of the BDI-II, a clear consensus on the best fitting model has not yet emerged, resulting in different recommendations regarding how to best…

  4. The construct validity of the Major Depression Inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Germund; Ørnbøl, Eva; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the measurement properties of the ten-item Major Depression Inventory when used on clinical suspicion in general practice by performing a Rasch analysis. METHODS: General practitioners asked consecutive persons to respond to the web-based Major Depression Inventory...... and scalability. RESULTS: Our Rasch analysis showed misfit concerning the sleep and appetite items (items 9 and 10). The response categories were disordered for eight items. After modifying the original six-point to a four-point scoring system for all items, we achieved ordered response categories for all ten...... items. The person separation reliability was acceptable (0.82) for the initial model. Dimensionality testing did not support combining the ten items to create a total score. The scale appeared to be well targeted to this clinical sample. No significant differential item functioning was observed...

  5. The Depression Inventory Development Workgroup: A Collaborative, Empirically Driven Initiative to Develop a New Assessment Tool for Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarino, Anthony L; Evans, Kenneth R; Kalali, Amir H; Kennedy, Sidney H; Engelhardt, Nina; Frey, Benicio N; Greist, John H; Kobak, Kenneth A; Lam, Raymond W; MacQueen, Glenda; Milev, Roumen; Placenza, Franca M; Ravindran, Arun V; Sheehan, David V; Sills, Terrence; Williams, Janet B W

    2016-01-01

    The Depression Inventory Development project is an initiative of the International Society for CNS Drug Development whose goal is to develop a comprehensive and psychometrically sound measurement tool to be utilized as a primary endpoint in clinical trials for major depressive disorder. Using an iterative process between field testing and psychometric analysis and drawing upon expertise of international researchers in depression, the Depression Inventory Development team has established an empirically driven and collaborative protocol for the creation of items to assess symptoms in major depressive disorder. Depression-relevant symptom clusters were identified based on expert clinical and patient input. In addition, as an aid for symptom identification and item construction, the psychometric properties of existing clinical scales (assessing depression and related indications) were evaluated using blinded datasets from pharmaceutical antidepressant drug trials. A series of field tests in patients with major depressive disorder provided the team with data to inform the iterative process of scale development. We report here an overview of the Depression Inventory Development initiative, including results of the third iteration of items assessing symptoms related to anhedonia, cognition, fatigue, general malaise, motivation, anxiety, negative thinking, pain and appetite. The strategies adopted from the Depression Inventory Development program, as an empirically driven and collaborative process for scale development, have provided the foundation to develop and validate measurement tools in other therapeutic areas as well.

  6. Relativity Concept Inventory: Development, Analysis, and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanides, J. S.; Savage, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a concept inventory for special relativity: the development process, data analysis methods, and results from an introductory relativity class. The Relativity Concept Inventory tests understanding of relativistic concepts. An unusual feature is confidence testing for each question. This can provide additional information; for example,…

  7. Relativity Concept Inventory: Development, Analysis, and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanides, J. S.; Savage, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a concept inventory for special relativity: the development process, data analysis methods, and results from an introductory relativity class. The Relativity Concept Inventory tests understanding of relativistic concepts. An unusual feature is confidence testing for each question. This can provide additional information; for example,…

  8. Longitudinal Stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II: A Latent Trait-State-Occasion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    In a six-wave longitudinal study with two cohorts (660 adolescents and 630 young adults), this study investigated the longitudinal stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) using the Trait-State-Occasion (TSO) model. The results revealed that the full TSO model was the best fitting representation of the depression measured by the…

  9. Diagnosing Depression in Chronic Pain Patients: DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Knaster; Ann-Mari Estlander; Hasse Karlsson; Jaakko Kaprio; Eija Kalso

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosing depression in chronic pain is challenging due to overlapping somatic symptoms. In questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), responses may be influenced more by pain than by the severity of depression. In addition, previous studies have suggested that symptoms of negative self-image, a key element in depression, are uncommon in chronic pain-related depression. The object of this study is to assess the relationship of the somatic and cognitive-emotional ...

  10. Assessment of depression in medical patients: A systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Pang Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To perform a systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory for detecting depression in medical settings, this article focuses on the revised version of the scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, which was reformulated according to the DSM-IV criteria for major depression. We examined relevant investigations with the Beck Depression Inventory-II for measuring depression in medical settings to provide guidelines for practicing clinicians. Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria seventy articles were retained. Validation studies of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, in both primary care and hospital settings, were found for clinics of cardiology, neurology, obstetrics, brain injury, nephrology, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, oncology, and infectious disease. The Beck Depression Inventory-II showed high reliability and good correlation with measures of depression and anxiety. Its threshold for detecting depression varied according to the type of patients, suggesting the need for adjusted cut-off points. The somatic and cognitive-affective dimension described the latent structure of the instrument. The Beck Depression Inventory-II can be easily adapted in most clinical conditions for detecting major depression and recommending an appropriate intervention. Although this scale represents a sound path for detecting depression in patients with medical conditions, the clinician should seek evidence for how to interpret the score before using the Beck Depression Inventory-II to make clinical decisions.

  11. Internet Addiction and Beck Depression Inventory in the University Students at a Student Hostel

    OpenAIRE

    Atilla Senih Mayda 1; Muammer Yılmaz 1; Filiz Bolu; et. al.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between internet addiction and depression in students at a student hostel. Methods: The data of this descriptive study was collected with questionnaires applied to 698 of 1000 university students by face to face interview. Data was collected with Beck Depression Inventory and with the interview form that includes 15 questions about sociodemographic characteristics and 7 questions they were prepared using Goldberg’s diagnostic criteria. Results: A...

  12. A Study of the Predictive Validity of the Children's Depression Inventory for Major Depression Disorder in Puerto Rican Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Medina, Carmen L.; Bernal, Guillermo; Rossello, Jeannette; Cumba-Aviles, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the predictive validity of the Children's Depression Inventory items for major depression disorder (MDD) in an outpatient clinic sample of Puerto Rican adolescents. The sample consisted of 130 adolescents, 13 to 18 years old. The five most frequent symptoms of the Children's Depression Inventory that best predict the…

  13. Prevalence of depression and validation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Children's Depression Inventory-Short amongst HIV-positive adolescents in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria H Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a remarkable dearth of evidence on mental illness in adolescents living with HIV/AIDS, particularly in the African setting. Furthermore, there are few studies in sub-Saharan Africa validating the psychometric properties of diagnostic and screening tools for depression amongst adolescents. The primary aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of depression amongst a sample of HIV-positive adolescents in Malawi. The secondary aim was to develop culturally adapted Chichewa versions of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II and Children's Depression Inventory-II-Short (CDI-II-S and conduct a psychometric evaluation of these measures by evaluating their performance against a structured depression assessment using the Children's Rating Scale, Revised (CDRS-R. Study design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We enrolled 562 adolescents, 12–18 years of age from two large public HIV clinics in central and southern Malawi. Participants completed two self-reports, the BDI-II and CDI-II-S, followed by administration of the CDRS-R by trained clinicians. Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values for various BDI-II and CDI-II-S cut-off scores were calculated with receiver operating characteristics analysis. The area under the curve (AUC was also calculated. Internal consistency was measured by standardized Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and correlation between self-reports and CDRS-R by Spearman's correlation. Results: Prevalence of depression as measured by the CDRS-R was 18.9%. Suicidal ideation was expressed by 7.1% (40 using the BDI-II. The AUC for the BDI-II was 0.82 (95% CI 0.78–0.89 and for the CDI-II-S was 0.75 (95% CI 0.70–0.80. A score of ≥13 in BDI-II achieved sensitivity of >80%, and a score of ≥17 had a specificity of >80%. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.80 (BDI-II and 0.66 (CDI-II-S. The correlation between the BDI-II and CDRS-R was 0.42 (p<0.001 and between the CDI

  14. Psychometric evaluation of the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) as depression severity scale using the LEAD (Longitudinal Expert Assessment of All Data) as index of validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Timmerby, N; Martiny, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Major Depression Inventory (MDI) was developed to cover the universe of depressive symptoms in DSM-IV major depression as well as in ICD-10 mild, moderate, and severe depression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the standardization of the MDI as a depression severity......-IV major depression. The conventional VAS scores for no, mild, moderate, and severe depression were used for the standardization of the MDI. RESULTS: The inter-correlation for the MDI with the clinician ratings (VAS, MES, HAM-D17 and HAM-D6) increased over the rating weeks in terms of Pearson coefficients....... After nine weeks of therapy the coefficient ranged from 0.74 to 0.83. Using the clinician-rated VAS depression severity scale, the conventional MDI cut-off scores for no or doubtful depression, and for mild, moderate and severe depression were confirmed. CONCLUSIONS: Using the VAS as index of external...

  15. 48 CFR 1245.508-2 - Reporting results of inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... inventories. 1245.508-2 Section 1245.508-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... 1245.508-2 Reporting results of inventories. The inventory report shall also include the following: (a) Name and title of the individual(s) that performed the physical inventory; (b) An itemized,...

  16. Determining a diagnostic cut-off on the Teate Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balsamo M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Michela Balsamo, Aristide SagginoDepartment of Psychological Sciences, Humanities and Territory, G. d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, ItalyAbstract: A small but growing body of literature suggests that the Teate Depression ­Inventory (TDI may be an “objective” measure of depression compared with other commonly used scales. Furthermore, the TDI has strong psychometric properties in both clinical and nonclinical samples. The present study aimed to extend the use of TDI by identifying cut-off scores that could differentiate varying levels of depression severity in a group of clinically diagnosed depression disorder patients (N=125. Three receiver operating characteristic curve analyses indicated cut-off scores of 21 (sensitivity =0.86, specificity =0.94, and classification accuracy =0.90; 36 (sensitivity =0.84, specificity =0.96, and classification accuracy =0.92; and 50 (sensitivity =0.81, specificity =0.93, and classification accuracy =0.90, for minimal, mild, moderate, and severe depression, respectively. Results suggest that the TDI measures depression severity across a broad range with high test accuracy and may be appropriately used to screen for depression.Keywords: major depression, ROC curve, self-report scales, Rasch analysis, depression screening

  17. Building a new Rasch-based self-report inventory of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balsamo M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Michela Balsamo,1 Giuseppe Giampaglia,2 Aristide Saggino11DiSPUTer, Department of Psychological Sciences, Humanities and Territory, “G d'Annunzio” University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy; 2Department of Economics and Statistics, “Federico-II” University, Naples, ItalyAbstract: This paper illustrates a sequential item development process to create a new self-report instrument of depression refined with Rasch analysis from a larger pool of potential diagnostic items elicited through a consensus approach by clinical experts according to the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for major depression. A 51-item pool was administered to a sample of 529 subjects (300 healthy community-dwelling adults and 229 psychiatric outpatients. Item selection resulted in a 21-item set, named the Teate Depression Inventory, with an excellent Person Separation Index and no evidence of bias due to an item–trait interaction (χ2=147.71; df =168; P=0.48. Additional support for the unidimensionality, local independence, appropriateness of the response format, and discrimination ability between clinical and nonclinical subjects was provided. No substantial differential item functioning by sex was observed. The Teate Depression Inventory shows considerable promise as a unidimensional tool for the screening of depression. Finally, advantages and disadvantages of this methodology will be discussed in terms of subsequent possible mathematical analyses, statistical tests, and implications for clinical investigations.Keywords: depression, scale development, self-report scales, Rasch analysis

  18. Prevalence of depression and its associated factors using Beck Depression Inventory among students of a medical college in Karnataka

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ganesh S; Jain, Animesh; Hegde, Supriya

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective: Depression among medical students is an area of increasing concern worldwide. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of depression and its associated factors among medical students. Materials and Methods: A stratified random sample of 400 students was assessed using Beck Depression Inventory by investigators. Associations between depression and class of studying, social factors like alcohol use, drug addiction, family problems, family history of depression, and st...

  19. Low openness on the revised NEO personality inventory as a risk factor for treatment-resistant depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michio Takahashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, we reported that low reward dependence, and to a lesser extent, low cooperativeness in the Temperature and Character Inventory (TCI may be risk factors for treatment-resistant depression. Here, we analyzed additional psychological traits in these patients. METHODS: We administered Costa and McCrae's five-factor model personality inventory, NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R, to antidepressant-treatment resistant depressed patients (n=35, remitted depressed patients (n=27, and healthy controls (n=66. We also evaluated the relationships between scores on NEO and TCI, using the same cohort of patients with treatment-resistant depression, as our previous study. RESULTS: Patients with treatment-resistant depression showed high scores for neuroticism, low scores for extraversion, openness and conscientiousness, without changes in agreeableness, on the NEO. However, patients in remitted depression showed no significant scores on NEO. Patients with treatment-resistant depression and low openness on NEO showed positive relationships with reward dependence and cooperativeness on the TCI. CONCLUSIONS: Many studies have reported that depressed patients show high neuroticism, low extraversion and low conscientiousness on the NEO. Our study highlights low openness on the NEO, as a risk mediator in treatment-resistant depression. This newly identified trait should be included as a risk factor in treatment-resistant depression.

  20. The Correlation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory with Depression and Anxiety in Veterans with Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwei Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The mechanisms of tinnitus are known to alter neuronal circuits in the brainstem and cortex, which are common to several comorbid conditions. This study examines the relationship between tinnitus and anxiety/depression. Subjects and Methods. Ninety-one male veterans with subjective tinnitus were enrolled in a Veterans Affairs Tinnitus Clinic. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI was used to assess tinnitus severity. ICD-9 codes for anxiety/depression were used to determine their prevalence. Pure tone averages (PTA were used to assess hearing status. Results. Descriptive analyses revealed that 79.1% of the 91 tinnitus sufferers had a diagnosis of anxiety, 59.3% had depression, and 58.2% suffered from both anxiety/depression. Patients with anxiety had elevated total THI scores as compared to patients without anxiety (p<0.05. Patients with anxiety or depression had significantly increased Functional and Emotional THI scores, but not Catastrophic THI score. Significant positive correlations were illustrated between the degree of tinnitus and anxiety/depression (p<0.05. There were no differences in PTA among groups. Conclusions. A majority of patients with tinnitus exhibited anxiety and depression. These patients suffered more severe tinnitus than did patients without anxiety and depression. The data support the need for multidisciplinary intervention of veterans with tinnitus.

  1. A comparison of the major depression inventory (MDI) and the beck depression inventory (BDI) in severely depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konstantinidis, Anastasios; Martiny, Klaus; Bech, Per

    2011-01-01

    We set out to examine the psychometric properties of the MDI in comparison to the BDI in a mixed group of patients with primary depression.......We set out to examine the psychometric properties of the MDI in comparison to the BDI in a mixed group of patients with primary depression....

  2. Development of a distress inventory for cancer: preliminary results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Advances in cancer treatment have led to cure and prolongation of patients′ lives; however associated psychosocial problems, including distress, can detrimentally affect patients′ compliance with treatment and ultimately, their outcome. Symptom distress has been well addressed in many studies; however, psychological distress has only been quantified by using depression or anxiety scales/checklists or quality of life scales containing a distress sub scale/component or by the use of scales that are not psychological distress-specific. AIMS: The present study is an attempt to construct a psychological distress inventory for specific use with cancer patients. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The standardisation sample consisted of 63 randomly selected patients with head and neck cancer who had undergone/ were undergoing curative treatment at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Distress Inventory for Cancer contained 57 positively and negatively toned items. An item analysis was conducted, followed by a factor analysis, thereby identifying the domains influencing distress. RESULTS: The final questionnaire contained 26 items subdivided into four domains viz. the personal, spiritual, physical, and the family domains, with each domain providing a sub score. The reliability coefficient (Cronbach′s alpha of the scale was found to be 0.85. CONCLUSIONS: These are the preliminary results of an ongoing study on global distress and tool development process. Reported here is the first step towards development of such tool.

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  4. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  5. Poor Sleep in Multiple Sclerosis Correlates with Beck Depression Inventory Values, but Not with Polysomnographic Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Veauthier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI values correlate with depression, but studies investigating the relationship between PSQI values and polysomnographic (PSG data showed inconsistent findings. Methods. Sixty-five consecutive patients with multiple sclerosis (MS were retrospectively classified as “good sleepers” (GS (PSQI ≤ 5 and “poor sleepers” (PS (PSQI > 5. The PSG data and the values of the Visual Analog Scale (VAS of fatigue, Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS, Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were compared. Results. No significant differences were found either for PSG data or for ESS, MFIS, and FSS values; but PS showed significantly increased BDI and VAS values. Conclusions. Poor sleep is associated with increased depression and fatigue scale values.

  6. Persistent Depression as a Novel Diagnostic Category: Results from the Menderes Depression Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ILDIRLI, Saliha; ŞAİR, Yaşan Bilge; DEREBOY, Ferhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Persistent depressive disorder (PDD) introduced in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) 5 as a novel diagnostic category represents a consolidation of two separate DSM-IV categories, chronic major depressive disorder (MDD) and dysthymic disorder. The present study aims to investigate the frequency and clinical as well as socio-demographic correlates of PDD in comparison with those of episodic MDD among patients seeking treatment for depressive symptoms. Methods Participants were 140 depressive out-and in-patients under treatment at the psychiatry clinic of the Adnan Menderes University Research Hospital. Each patient was assessed by means of a structured clinical interview (SCID-I) and relevant psychometric instruments including the Hamilton Depression Inventory and Eskin Suicidal Behavior Inventory. Results Among the depressive patients, 61% fulfilled the criteria for PDD and 39% for episodic MDD. As compared with patients with episodic MDD, the PDD patients were older (d=.54), lower in educational attainment (d=.55), more likely to have comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (OR=3.7), and more prone to report symptoms of anxiety, hopelessness, pessimism, and somatic complaints. Nevertheless, the PDD patients displayed heterogeneous characteristics with respect to clinical severity and suicidal behavior. Conclusion Our findings suggest that majority of depressive patients, including those fulfilling the criteria for MDD, have been suffering from a persistent ailment rather than an episodic disorder. Clinicians with a cross-sectional perspective are more likely to diagnose MDD, whereas those with a longitudinal perspective are more likely to identify PDD in the majority of depressive patients. The incorporation of both of these perspectives into DSM-5 in a complementary manner will possibly enhance our insight into depressive disorders and improve our treatment results. PMID:28360740

  7. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Depression Inventories When Used with an Elderly Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Arleen J.; Kligman, Evan

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is a self-reported inventory tapping current feelings only. A short form was published in 1972 consisting of 13 items from the original BDI, called the BDI-SF. In 1978 the original version was modified to eliminate double negative statements and alternative ways of asking the same question and then referred to…

  8. Cross-Cultural Validation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II across U.S. and Turkish Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canel-Cinarbas, Deniz; Cui, Ying; Lauridsen, Erica

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) for factorial invariance across Turkish and U.S. college student samples. The results indicated that (a) a two-factor model has an adequate fit for both samples, thus providing evidence of configural invariance, and (b) there is a metric invariance but "no" sufficient…

  9. Meta-Analysis of the English Version of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erford, Bradley T.; Johnson, Erin; Bardoshi, Gerta

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviewed 144 studies from 1996 to 2013 using the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition. Internal consistency was 0.89 and test-retest reliability 0.75. Convergent comparisons were robust across 43 depression instruments. Structural validity supported both one- and two-factor solutions and diagnostic accuracy varied according…

  10. Psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory applied to college students: factor analysis and relation to the Beck Depression Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, L; Gorenstein, C; Vieira Filho, A H; Tung, T C; Artes, R

    2001-03-01

    The psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the trait form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T) and its relation to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were evaluated in a large Brazilian college student sample containing 845 women and 235 men. STAI-T scores tended to be higher for women, singles, those who work, and subjects under 30 years. Factor analysis of the STAI-T for total sample and by gender yielded two factors: the first representing a mood dimension and the second being related to worrying or cognitive aspects of anxiety. In order to study the relation between anxiety and depression measures, factor analysis of the combination of the 21 BDI items and the 20 STAI-T items was also carried out. The analysis resulted in two factors that were analyzed according to the tripartite model of anxiety and depression. Most of the BDI items (measuring positive affectivity and nonspecific symptoms of depression) were loaded on the first factor and four STAI-T items that measure positive affectivity. The remaining STAI-T items, all of them measuring negative affect, remained in the second factor. Thus, factor 1 represents a depression dimension and factor 2 measures a mood-worrying dimension. The findings of this study suggest that, although widely used as an anxiety scale, the STAI-T in fact measures mainly a general negative affect.

  11. Psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory applied to college students: factor analysis and relation to the Beck Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade L.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the trait form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T and its relation to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were evaluated in a large Brazilian college student sample containing 845 women and 235 men. STAI-T scores tended to be higher for women, singles, those who work, and subjects under 30 years. Factor analysis of the STAI-T for total sample and by gender yielded two factors: the first representing a mood dimension and the second being related to worrying or cognitive aspects of anxiety. In order to study the relation between anxiety and depression measures, factor analysis of the combination of the 21 BDI items and the 20 STAI-T items was also carried out. The analysis resulted in two factors that were analyzed according to the tripartite model of anxiety and depression. Most of the BDI items (measuring positive affectivity and nonspecific symptoms of depression were loaded on the first factor and four STAI-T items that measure positive affectivity. The remaining STAI-T items, all of them measuring negative affect, remained in the second factor. Thus, factor 1 represents a depression dimension and factor 2 measures a mood-worrying dimension. The findings of this study suggest that, although widely used as an anxiety scale, the STAI-T in fact measures mainly a general negative affect.

  12. Prevalence of depression and its associated factors using Beck Depression Inventory among students of School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz, Iran in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Safiri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is a debilitating disease which is caused by social and environmental factors in additionto genetic factors. University students are among the young and vulnerable population to depression and theirpopulation is increasing with increase in universities and higher education institutions. Therefore, any disturbance instudent's mental and physical health is a serious threat for the next generation. In this study, we aimed to estimate theprevalence of depression and its related factors in students of School of Health and Nutrition at Tabriz University ofMedical Sciences, Iran. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey on 175 students selected by stratified random sampling, educating indifferent fields at School of Health and Nutrition in 2009. The data collection tool was the short form of the standardBeck Depression Inventory (BDI which is used for screening depression. The collected data were analyzed by softwareStata Statistical Software, Release 10.0 (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA. RESULTS: The results showed that 62.7% of the students had depression and from these 10.9% suffered from severedepression. Significantly higher depression rates were seen in students with worrisome about the future. Marriedstudents, those interested in their field of study, those performing prayers and regularly reading the Quran hadsignificantly lower rates of depression. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the high prevalence of depression, screening strategies should be implemented to identifydepressed students. Counseling services should be available and accessible to students at risk.

  13. Reliability, validity and psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the Major Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiptsios I

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI is a brief self-rating scale for the assessment of depression. It is reported to be valid because it is based on the universe of symptoms of DSM-IV and ICD-10 depression. The aim of the current preliminary study was to assess the reliability, validity and psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the MDI. Methods 30 depressed patients of mean age 23.41 (± 5.77 years, and 68 controls patients of mean age 25.08 (± 11.42 years, entered the study. In 18 of them, the instrument was re-applied 1–2 days later and the Translation and Back Translation made. Clinical diagnosis was reached with the use of the SCAN v.2.0 and the International Personality Disorders Examination (IPDE. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D and the Zung Depression Rating Scale (ZDRS were applied for cross-validation purposes. Statistical analysis included ANOVA, the Spearman Product Moment Correlation Coefficient, Principal Components Analysis and the calculation of Cronbach's α. Results Sensitivity and specificity were 0.86 and 0.94, respectively, at 26/27. Cronbach's α for the total scale was equal to 0.89. The Spearman's rho between MDI and CES-D was 0.86 and between MDI and ZDRS was 0.76. The factor analysis revealed two factors but the first accounted for 54% of variance while the second only for 9%. The test-retest reliability was excellent (Spearman's rho between 0.53 and 0.96 for individual items and 0.89 for total score. Conclusion The current study provided preliminary evidence concerning the reliability and validity of the Greek translation of the MDI. Its properties are similar to those reported in the international literature, but further research is necessary.

  14. Dimensional and hierarchical models of depression using the Beck Depression Inventory-II in an Arab college student sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohaeri Jude U

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An understanding of depressive symptomatology from the perspective of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA could facilitate valid and interpretable comparisons across cultures. The objectives of the study were: (i using the responses of a sample of Arab college students to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in CFA, to compare the "goodness of fit" indices of the original dimensional three-and two-factor first-order models, and their modifications, with the corresponding hierarchical models (i.e., higher - order and bifactor models; (ii to assess the psychometric characteristics of the BDI-II, including convergent/discriminant validity with the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25. Method Participants (N = 624 were Kuwaiti national college students, who completed the questionnaires in class. CFA was done by AMOS, version 16. Eleven models were compared using eight "fit" indices. Results In CFA, all the models met most "fit" criteria. While the higher-order model did not provide improved fit over the dimensional first - order factor models, the bifactor model (BFM had the best fit indices (CMNI/DF = 1.73; GFI = 0.96; RMSEA = 0.034. All regression weights of the dimensional models were significantly different from zero (P Conclusion The broadly adequate fit of the various models indicates that they have some merit and implies that the relationship between the domains of depression probably contains hierarchical and dimensional elements. The bifactor model is emerging as the best way to account for the clinical heterogeneity of depression. The psychometric characteristics of the BDI-II lend support to our CFA results.

  15. Factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II among South Africans receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagee, Ashraf; Nel, Adriaan; Saal, Wylene

    2014-02-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that mood disturbance is common among patients living with HIV and may be an important barrier to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Thus the assessment of depressed mood is an important and necessary aspect of the experience of persons living with HIV as it may impact the health status of individuals directly and indirectly. We sought to determine the factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) among a sample of 185 South Africans living with HIV and receiving ART. The mean BDI score was 16.5 (SD 12.15) with a range from 0-50 (out of a possible 63), indicating on average moderate levels of depression. Cronbach's alpha for the total scale was 0.90. Although the four factors had eigenvalues that were technically above 1.0, only three factors could logically be extracted, the combination of which accounted for 47.29% of the variance. These three factors were Cognitive, Affective and Somatic. The results indicate that the BDI-II is a reliable measure of symptoms of depression among persons living with HIV. The factor structure among South Africans receiving ART is similar to that of other samples, although surprisingly, the item assessing appetite disturbance did not load on any factor. The results of the study suggest that the BDI-II is a useful measure among South Africans living with HIV. In the context of the need to rapidly identify depressed mood among persons receiving ART in public health clinics, the BDI may be a useful instrument. We end the paper with certain cautions associated with routine screening.

  16. The Correlation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory with Depression and Anxiety in Veterans with Tinnitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jinwei Hu; Jane Xu; Matthew Streelman; Helen Xu; O’neil Guthrie

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The mechanisms of tinnitus are known to alter neuronal circuits in the brainstem and cortex, which are common to several comorbid conditions. This study examines the relationship between tinnitus and anxiety/depression. Subjects and Methods. Ninety-one male veterans with subjective tinnitus were enrolled in a Veterans Affairs Tinnitus Clinic. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) was used to assess tinnitus severity. ICD-9 codes for anxiety/depression were used to determine their p...

  17. [Study of symptoms and structure of depressive mood in puberty using Kovacs' Child Depression Inventory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobert, W

    1990-01-01

    This study is based on the German Language version "GCDI" of the "CDI" according to Maria KOVACS used in investigations on random selection of normal school population between the 7th and 9th grades (n = 130). The pupils ages ranged between 13 and 15 years. A second group was also used, made up of children of approximately the same age (n = 145) from a clinic. Among this second group, 58 suffered from clinical depression. The comparison provided a clear separation between the depressive patients and the normal random participants--and the GCDI/CDI total value = 20 was decided to the optimal separation value. Comparisons with the Canadian group of school pupils (n = 850) agreed well with the above. Follow-up examinations on the randomly selection of normal school population resulted in the detection of a lasting condition of depressive mood for 7 per cent of the participants. It is apparent, that for the clarification for the structure of depressive mood not only are the simple total scores necessary--but also a factor analysis of the 27 items. Four factors were detected: 1) primarily affective disturbance, 2) motivation and cognition disturbances, 3) contact disturbances, 4) disturbances in school performances and behavior. Under consideration of the Fürntratt criterium, 25 of the 27 items in the GCDI could classified into the four factors and achieve a significant correlation. GCDI is useful for international comparative investigations. Clinical use is possible too.

  18. The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology - the self-report Romanian version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackl, E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical depression is a debilitating disorder affecting a significant percentage of population. In this context, having reliable screening instruments for depression represents a major advantage. A widely used screening tool is the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology – Self-Report version (QIDS-SR. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric proprieties of the Romanian version of QIDS-SR as a diagnostic measure for depression. The data were collected from Romanian adult participants (N = 148 who expressed interest in an online therapeutic program for depression. Our sample included both normal (N = 48 and clinically depressed (N = 100 participants. Diagnostic assessments were conducted using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. The Romanian QIDS-SR demonstrated high convergent validity with Beck Depression Inventory - II (r=.83 and good internal consistency (α=.74. Receiver operating characteristics analysis demonstrated satisfactory diagnostic validity for the QIDS-SR. The optimal ratio between sensitivity and specificity was set at 15 for the QIDS-SR. It was concluded that QIDS-SR represents an adequate, useful and cost-effective screening instrument for clinical depression in Romania.

  19. Development and validation of the geriatric depression inventory in Chinese culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhijuan; Lv, Xiaozhen; Hu, Yongdong; Ma, Wanxin; Xie, Hengge; Lin, Kai; Yu, Xin; Wang, Huali

    2015-09-01

    Depression among older adults is under-recognized either in the community or in general hospitals in Chinese culture. This study aimed to develop a culturally appropriate screening instrument for late-life depression in the non-psychiatric settings and to test its reliability and validity for a diagnosis of depression. Using a Delphi method, we developed a geriatric depression inventory (GDI), consisting of 12 core symptoms of depressive disorder in old age. We investigated its reliability and validity on 89 patients with late-life depression and 249 non-depression controls. Both self-report (GDI-SR) and physician-interview (GDI-RI) versions were assessed. Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.843 for GDI-SR and 0.880 for GDI-RI. Both GDI-SR and GDI-RI showed good concurrent validity with the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) (GDI-SR: r = 0.750, p depression versus non-depression. Using a cut-off of three items endorsed, sensitivity and specificity were 92.1% and 81.9% for GDI-SR, and 93.3% and 87.1% for GDI-RI. The GDI, either based on self-report or rater interview, is a reliable and valid instrument for the detection of depression among older adults in non-psychiatric medical settings in Chinese culture.

  20. Development of the Perinatal Depression Inventory (PDI)-14 using item response theory: a comparison of the BDI-II, EPDS, PDI, and PHQ-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodey, Benjamin B; Goodman, Sherryl H; Baldasaro, Ruth E; Brooks-DeWeese, Amy; Wilson, Melanie Elliott; Brodey, Inger S B; Doyle, Nora M

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a simple, brief, self-report perinatal depression inventory that accurately measures severity in a number of populations. Our team developed 159 Likert-scale perinatal depression items using simple sentences with a fifth-grade reading level. Based on iterative cognitive interviewing (CI), an expert panel improved and winnowed the item pool based on pre-determined criteria. The resulting 67 items were administered to a sample of 628 pregnant and 251 postpartum women with different levels of depression at private and public sector obstetrics clinics, together with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Edinburg Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), as well as Module A of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Diagnoses (SCID). Responses were evaluated using Item Response Theory (IRT). The Perinatal Depression Inventory (PDI)-14 items are highly informative regarding depression severity and function similarly and informatively across pregnant/postpartum, white/non-white, and private-clinic/public-clinic populations. PDI-14 scores correlate well with the PHQ-9, EPDS, and BDI-II, but the PDI-14 provides a more precise measure of severity using far fewer words. The PDI-14 is a brief depression assessment that excels at accurately measuring depression severity across a wide range of severity and perinatal populations.

  1. Validation of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) in Cocaine Dependent Inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suris, Alina; Kashner, T. Michael; Gillaspy, James A., Jr.; Biggs, Melanie; Rush, A. John

    2001-01-01

    While the reliability and validity of Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) scores have been established with outpatient adults being treated in community psychiatric clinics, it has not been used in special or dually diagnosed populations. Establishes internal consistency, concurrent validity, and construct validity for both the clinical…

  2. Validating the Beck Depression Inventory-II for Hong Kong Community Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Barbara M.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Lee, Peter W. H.

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to test for the validity of a Chinese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (C-BDI-II) for use with Hong Kong community (i.e., nonclinical) adolescents. Based on a randomized triadic split of the data (N = 1460), we conducted exploratory factor analysis on Group1 (n = 486) and confirmatory factor…

  3. Testing the Hierarchical Structure of the Children's Depression Inventory: A Multigroup Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Luis F.; Aluja, Anton; del Barrio, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, the aims were (a) to obtain, describe, and compare different solutions of three, five, and six first-order factors raised in the previous literature about the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI); (b) analyze the number and nature of the second-order factors; (c) test which model best reproduces…

  4. A Factor Analytic Study of the Beck Depression Inventory for Female College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedl, John J., Jr.

    Previous factor studies of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) have not analyzed the item data as a function of sex, or reported more than one factor solution. To further study the factor structure of the BDI, items were factor analyzed and multiple solutions were examined for simple structure, parsimony, and psychological meaningfulness. A sample…

  5. Assessing Measurement Invariance of the Children's Depression Inventory in Chinese and Italian Primary School Student Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenfeng; Lu, Yongbiao; Tan, Furong; Yao, Shuqiao; Steca, Patrizia; Abela, John R. Z.; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the measurement invariance of Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and compared its factorial variance/covariance and latent means among Chinese and Italian children. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis of the original five factors identified by Kovacs revealed that full measurement invariance did not hold. Further analysis…

  6. The Beck Depression Inventory: Testing for Invariant Measurement and Structure across Gender for Nonclinical Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Barbara M.; And Others

    Extending the earlier work of B. M. Byrne and P. Baron (1990), the factorial invariance of the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was tested using 351 non-clinical adolescent males and 334 non-clinical adolescent females. All subjects were in grades 9 through 12 and attended the same secondary school in a large metropolitan area in central…

  7. First Results from the Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardar, Erin M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents results from a two-semester field test of the Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI). Statistical analysis indicates that the LSCI has the sensitivity to measure statistically significant changes in students' understanding of light-related topics due to instruction in introductory astronomy courses and to distinguish…

  8. The manifestation of depression in the context of urban poverty: a factor analysis of the Children's Depression Inventory in low-income urban youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeremy J; Grant, Kathryn E; Amrhein, Kelly; Carter, Jocelyn Smith; Farahmand, Farahnaz; Harrison, Aubrey; Thomas, Kina J; Carleton, Russell A; Lugo-Hernandez, Eduardo; Katz, Brian N

    2014-12-01

    The current study used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to compare the fit of 2 factor structures for the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) in an urban community sample of low-income youth. Results suggest that the 6-factor model developed by Craighead and colleagues (1998) was a strong fit to the pattern of symptoms reported by low-income urban youth and was a superior fit with these data than the original 5-factor model of the CDI (Kovacs, 1992). Additionally, results indicated that all 6 factors from the Craighead model contributed to the measurement of depression, including School Problems and Externalizing Problems especially for older adolescents. This pattern of findings may reflect distinct contextual influences of urban poverty on the manifestation and measurement of depression in youth.

  9. Seasonality in depressive and anxiety symptoms among primary care patients and in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders; results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winthorst Wim H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about seasonality of specific depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in different patient populations. This study aims to assess seasonal variation of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a primary care population and across participants who were classified in diagnostic groups 1 healthy controls 2 patients with a major depressive disorder, 3 patients with any anxiety disorder and 4 patients with a major depression and any anxiety disorder. Methods Data were used from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA. First, in 5549 patients from the NESDA primary care recruitment population the Kessler-10 screening questionnaire was used and data were analyzed across season in a multilevel linear model. Second, in 1090 subjects classified into four groups according to psychiatric status according to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, overall depressive symptoms and atypical versus melancholic features were assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms. Anxiety and fear were assessed with the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Fear questionnaire. Symptom levels across season were analyzed in a linear regression model. Results In the primary care population the severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms did not show a seasonal pattern. In the diagnostic groups healthy controls and patients with any anxiety disorder, but not patients with a major depressive disorder, showed a small rise in depressive symptoms in winter. Atypical and melancholic symptoms were both elevated in winter. No seasonal pattern for anxiety symptoms was found. There was a small gender related seasonal effect for fear symptoms. Conclusions Seasonal differences in severity or type of depressive and anxiety symptoms, as measured with a general screening instrument and symptom questionnaires, were absent or small in effect size in a primary care population and in patient populations with a major depressive disorder and

  10. Norms and Screening Utility of the Dutch Version of the Children's Depression Inventory in Clinical and Nonclinical Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Jeffrey; Braet, Caroline; Rood, Lea; Timbremont, Benedikte; van Vlierberghe, Leen; Goossens, Lien; van Breukelen, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to (a) assess relationships between the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and "DSM"-oriented depression and anxiety scales of the Youth Self Report, (b) develop reliable norms for the CDI, and (c) determine CDI cutoff scores for selecting youngsters at risk for depression and anxiety. A total of 3,073 nonclinical and…

  11. The Beck depression inventory as a measure of subjective well-being : A cross-national study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, D.A.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Poortinga, Y.H.

    2002-01-01

    The present study examined the question whether the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), which is one of the most widely used instruments to assess depression, can be used to measure differences in subjective well-being at national level. In order to establish the meaning of depression scores at country

  12. The Beck depression inventory as a measure of subjective well-being : A cross-national study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, D.A.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Poortinga, Y.H.

    2002-01-01

    The present study examined the question whether the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), which is one of the most widely used instruments to assess depression, can be used to measure differences in subjective well-being at national level. In order to establish the meaning of depression scores at country

  13. Substance Use and Depression Symptomatology: Measurement Invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) among Non-Users and Frequent-Users of Alcohol, Nicotine and Cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ashlee A; Neale, Michael C; Silberg, Judy L; Verhulst, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a highly heterogeneous condition, and identifying how symptoms present in various groups may greatly increase our understanding of its etiology. Importantly, Major Depressive Disorder is strongly linked with Substance Use Disorders, which may ameliorate or exacerbate specific depression symptoms. It is therefore quite plausible that depression may present with different symptom profiles depending on an individual's substance use status. Given these observations, it is important to examine the underlying construct of depression in groups of substance users compared to non-users. In this study we use a non-clinical sample to examine the measurement structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) in non-users and frequent-users of various substances. Specifically, measurement invariance was examined across those who do vs. do not use alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis. Results indicate strict factorial invariance across non-users and frequent-users of alcohol and cannabis, and metric invariance across non-users and frequent-users of nicotine. This implies that the factor structure of the BDI-II is similar across all substance use groups.

  14. Substance Use and Depression Symptomatology: Measurement Invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II among Non-Users and Frequent-Users of Alcohol, Nicotine and Cannabis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee A Moore

    Full Text Available Depression is a highly heterogeneous condition, and identifying how symptoms present in various groups may greatly increase our understanding of its etiology. Importantly, Major Depressive Disorder is strongly linked with Substance Use Disorders, which may ameliorate or exacerbate specific depression symptoms. It is therefore quite plausible that depression may present with different symptom profiles depending on an individual's substance use status. Given these observations, it is important to examine the underlying construct of depression in groups of substance users compared to non-users. In this study we use a non-clinical sample to examine the measurement structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in non-users and frequent-users of various substances. Specifically, measurement invariance was examined across those who do vs. do not use alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis. Results indicate strict factorial invariance across non-users and frequent-users of alcohol and cannabis, and metric invariance across non-users and frequent-users of nicotine. This implies that the factor structure of the BDI-II is similar across all substance use groups.

  15. 48 CFR 3045.508-2 - Reporting results of inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... inventories. 3045.508-2 Section 3045.508-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... inventories. The inventory report shall also include the following: (a) Name and title of the individual(s) that performed the physical inventory; (b) An itemized, categorized listing of all property...

  16. Validez Convergente de la Version Espanola Preliminar del Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depresion y Aduste Marital (Convergent Validity of the Preliminary Spanish Version of the Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depression and Marital Adjustment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruabarrena, M. Ignacia; de Paul, Joaquin

    1992-01-01

    "Convergent validity" of preliminary Spanish version of Child Abuse Potential (CAP) Inventory was studied. CAP uses ecological-systemic model of child maltreatment to evaluate individual, family, and social factors facilitating physical child abuse. Depression and marital adjustment were measured in three groups of mothers. Results found…

  17. Validez Convergente de la Version Espanola Preliminar del Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depresion y Aduste Marital (Convergent Validity of the Preliminary Spanish Version of the Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depression and Marital Adjustment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruabarrena, M. Ignacia; de Paul, Joaquin

    1992-01-01

    "Convergent validity" of preliminary Spanish version of Child Abuse Potential (CAP) Inventory was studied. CAP uses ecological-systemic model of child maltreatment to evaluate individual, family, and social factors facilitating physical child abuse. Depression and marital adjustment were measured in three groups of mothers. Results found…

  18. Network analysis of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology: Reanalysis of the STAR*D clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhoo, Manisha; Levine, Stephen Z

    2016-11-01

    Network analysis is yet to be used to examine patient-reported symptom severity and change during citalopram treatment for major depressive disorder. We aimed to identify: (I) network systems; (II) central symptoms; and (III) network differences, in patient-reported depression for baseline, endpoint and change scores. STAR*D data during citalopram treatment were reanalyzed to examine depression based on the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR). Network analyses were computed from the QIDS-SR item-level severity scores at baseline and endpoint, and from estimated change scores based on mixed models, adjusted for confounding by dose and baseline severity. Centrality indices for each symptom were computed. Networks were contrasted for connectivity with permutation tests. Network analyses grouped symptoms consistently as: Sleep disturbances, cognitive and physical avolition, Affect and Appetite. Symptom centrality was highest for Energy at baseline, Mood at endpoint, and Mood and Concentration on change scores. Generally, permutation tests showed that the networks all significantly (p<.05) differed. Results demonstrated: (I) a replicable network group of the symptoms of depression that modestly mapped onto well-known mechanisms for depression; (II) symptoms with high centrality that may be future treatment targets (e.g., mood); and (III) that the form of the networks differed across treatment time-points, thereby contributing centrality as a possible mechanism to the initial severity debate. These findings highlight the utility of focusing on symptoms rather than total scores to understand how treatment unfolds, and tentative mechanisms.

  19. Adolescent Depression: Children's Depression Inventory Norms, Suicidal Ideation, and (Weak) Gender Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, George M.; Lassen, Maureen K.

    1994-01-01

    Surveys of nonreferred students in grades 7 through 12 found that girls endorsed more depressive symptomatology than did boys, but the magnitude of the effect was trivial. Over one-third of the sample reported suicidal ideation. It is suggested that effect-size analyses may advance understanding of normative research on depression. (RJM)

  20. Annual inventory report for Pennsylvania's forests: results from the first two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. McWilliams; Carol A. Alerich; Daniel A. Devlin; Tonya W. Lister; Stephen L. Sterner; James A. Westfall

    2002-01-01

    In 2000, the USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program implemented a new system for inventory and monitoring Pennsylvania?s forest resources. The most salient benefit of the new inventory process will be a nearly threefold improvement in timeliness. This report summarizes the results of the first 2 years of annual inventory measurements...

  1. Screening for Depression after Cardiac Events Using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Geriatric Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gail D.; Hubley, Anita M.

    2007-01-01

    Despite findings that depression is a risk factor for heart disease and for death following cardiac events and that depressed cardiac patients experience significantly reduced quality of life and are less likely to follow treatment regimens, depression is neither adequately identified nor treated in cardiac patients. Recent calls in the literature…

  2. Factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) with Puerto Rican elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, José R; Dávila-Martínez, Mariel G; Collazo-Rodríguez, Luis C

    2006-06-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II; (1) is one of the most useful measures for depressive symptomatology in many countries (2). The psychometric properties of this inventory, however, have not been reported with Puerto Rican elderly. This paper reports, exploratory psychometric results with a sample of 410 elderly Puerto Rican (65 years and older; men=94, women=316). The assessment of the construct validity of the BDI-II yielded four factors accounting for 52% of total variance and an internal reliability coefficient (alpha Cronbach) of .89. A factor analysis with the 21 items of the BDI-II was performed using principal component analysis as the extraction method and Varimax rotation. This analysis revealed that the BDI-II was a good measure of the dimensions of depressive symptomatology in the present sample, which resembled prior findings reported with the general Puerto Rican Population (3). This study also reports further data supporting the reliability, validity, and practical utility of the BDI-II for the Puerto Rican population including elders. Implications for potential research with minorities and clinical uses of the BDI-II are also discussed.

  3. Reliability and validity of the short form Beck Depression Inventory with older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, F; Beutler, L; Corbishley, A; Hamblin, D

    1988-11-01

    This study investigated the reliability and validity of the short form Beck Depression Inventory with older adults. Sixty-one clinically depressed older outpatients and 57 non-patient older volunteers comprised the sample. The patient group completed the BDI prior to and at completion of depression treatment. Estimates of internal reliability suggest that the short form BDI possesses adequate Spearman-Brown and alpha coefficients. Congruent validity estimates were less satisfactory, as the correlation between the BDI and the HRSD was statistically significant, but low. Criterion group validity, diagnostic sensitivity, and sensitivity to change estimates were all acceptable. Thus, the short form BDI is adequately reliable to suggest its use as a research and clinical tool with older adults, although further study of the instrument's validity is needed.

  4. Sensitivity of Amazon rainforest to drought: results from forest inventories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteucci G

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A recent study based on inventory data from the RAINFOR network, published in the journal Science, reported a relevant effect of an anomalous dry year (2005 on biomass accumulation and mortality in Amazon old-growth forests. Results were obtained by comparing inventory data taken before and after the dry year and point to biomass losses in consequence of drought. These losses were driven by large mortality increases at some plots and by small but diffuse declines in growth. If upscaled to the area affected by drought, the release of carbon (1.21 PgC would be much larger than that resulting from deforestation in the area (0.3÷0.8 PgC and would offset the carbon gained in the recent past (0.5 PgC. As the frequency of extreme dry years is expected to increase in future climate scenarios, regional carbon balances may be strongly impacted with a positive feedback on climate change. The main results of the paper are briefly presented and commented.

  5. Neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in depressive disorder Correlation between 1H-MRS and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Xia; Minjie Yang; Yi Lei; Yicheng Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies using magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)and functional MRI to study depression have primarily focused on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy(1H-MRS)appearance in various areas of the brain and volume measurements in the limbic system.However,results have not been consistent.To the best of our knowledge,very little is known about the relationship between 1H-MRS appearance and depression inventory.In the present study,the relationship between 1H-MRS appearance in depressive patients and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 scale was analyzed.MRI and 1H-MRS exhibited widened sulci and cisterns,as well as an absence of abnormal signals in depressive patients.In addition,N-acetyl aspartate/total creatine ratios in bilateral hippocampi and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly less in depressive patients than in control subjects(P < 0.01).In contrast,choline-containing compounds/total creatine ratios in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly greater in depressive patients than in control subjects(P < 0.01).These ratios significantly and positively correlated with patient total depression scores as assessed using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 scale(r=0.934 7,0.878 7,P < 0.01).These results suggested that 1H-MRS could be used to reveal a reduced number of neurons in the hippocampus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex,as well as altered membrane phospholipid metabolism in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex,in patients with depressive disorder.Abnormal mechanisms partially reflected severity of depressive disorder.

  6. Self-statements, self-esteem, and locus of control in discriminating college students' scores on the Beck Depression Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, S; Philpot, V D

    1996-04-01

    To study the use of the ratio of positive to negative self-statements, locus of control, and self-esteem in discriminating between scores on the Beck Depression Inventory 145 undergraduate college students were administered the Beck Depression Inventory, Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire-Revised, Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory-Adult Form, and the Rotter Locus of Control scale in their classrooms. A stepwise discriminant analysis indicated that five variables combined to yield a statistically significant discrimination among low, middle, and high scores on the Beck Depression Inventory. The classification analysis indicated that 77.1% (n = 111) of the undergraduate students were correctly classified; 93.2% (82 of 88) were correctly classified as low scorers and 73.3% (18 of 46) were correctly classified as high scorers.

  7. Cross-cultural examination of measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Jessica; Watters, Carolyn A; Yu, Stephanie Chee-Min; Bagby, R Michael; Ryder, Andrew G; Harkness, Kate L

    2015-03-01

    Given substantial rates of major depressive disorder among college and university students, as well as the growing cultural diversity on many campuses, establishing the cross-cultural validity of relevant assessment tools is important. In the current investigation, we examined the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) among Chinese-heritage (n = 933) and European-heritage (n = 933) undergraduates in North America. The investigation integrated 3 distinct lines of inquiry: (a) the literature on cultural variation in depressive symptom reporting between people of Chinese and Western heritage; (b) recent developments regarding the factor structure of the BDI-II; and (c) the application of advanced statistical techniques to the issue of cross-cultural measurement invariance. A bifactor model was found to represent the optimal factor structure of the BDI-II. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis showed that the BDI-II had strong measurement invariance across both culture and gender. In group comparisons with latent and observed variables, Chinese-heritage students scored higher than European-heritage students on cognitive symptoms of depression. This finding deviates from the commonly held view that those of Chinese heritage somatize depression. These findings hold implications for the study and use of the BDI-II, highlight the value of advanced statistical techniques such as multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, and offer methodological lessons for cross-cultural psychopathology research more broadly.

  8. An examination of racial bias in the Beck Depression Inventory-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashidharan, Tracy; Pawlow, Laura A; Pettibone, Jonathan C

    2012-04-01

    Historically, many psychological measures were developed and standardized based on a primarily Caucasian population. These tests are subsequently applied to minorities and may be inappropriate and possibly even pathologizing. The widely used Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was initially standardized on a sample of Caucasian university students and its use with minorities has only recently been investigated. This study examined the possibility of racial bias in the BDI-II by comparing Caucasian and African American Midwestern university students. A hierarchical multiple regression compared the scores of the BDI-II with a similar measure of depression that is standardized for use with African Americans. There was no evidence of racial bias discovered in the BDI-II in this sample. Implications and future directions of research are discussed.

  9. Psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Daniel L; Coolidge, Frederick L; Cahill, Brian S; O'Riley, Alisa A

    2008-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) as a self-administered screening tool for depressive symptoms were examined in a sample of community-dwelling older and younger adults. Participants completed the BDI-II, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Coolidge Axis II Inventory, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Short Psychological Well-Being Scale. Internal reliability of the BDI-II was found to be good among older and younger adults. The average BDI-II depression score did not differ between younger and older adults. Solid evidence for convergent and discriminant validity was demonstrated by correlations between the BDI-II with the other measures. The BDI-II appears to have strong psychometric support as a screening measure for depression among older adults in the general population. Implications for using the BDI-II as an assessment instrument in behaviorally based psychotherapy are discussed.

  10. Screening for depression and anxiety among older Chinese immigrants living in Western countries: The use of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoping; Haralambous, Betty; Pachana, Nancy A; Bryant, Christina; LoGiudice, Dina; Goh, Anita; Dow, Briony

    2016-03-01

    Depression and anxiety are two common mental health problems among older people. There is evidence that using well-validated screening tools can improve detection of depression and anxiety among this group. The review explored the use of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI) for screening depression and anxiety among older Chinese immigrants, one of the largest and fastest growing groups of older immigrants in Western society. It focused on the GDS and GAI because both are designed specifically for older people. Online literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. A narrative approach was used to review included papers. A total of 21 articles were included. There were limited data on anxiety among older Chinese immigrants, with only one unpublished report identified. There were 13 studies (20 articles) using the GDS with this group. Results of these studies indicated that the GDS is a reliable tool in this population; however, there was limited validity data. Two versions of the GDS-15 have been used with older Chinese immigrants, including the standard GDS-15 and Mui's GDS-15. Prevalence of depression ranged between 20% and 30% in most reviewed studies. Results of this review have practical implications for clinicians in their use of these tools with older Chinese immigrants in Western countries, such as the different GDS versions. It also suggests a number of directions for future research, such as the inclusion of clinical samples and consideration of the diversity within this group. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Children's Depression Inventory: A unidimensional factor structure for American Indian and Alaskan native youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Walter D; Clapp, Joshua; Mileviciute, Inga; Mousseau, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Given that American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) youth are at increased risk for a variety of depression-related outcomes and may experience depression uniquely, the fact that the factor structure of the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 1992) is unknown for these populations represents a significant obstacle. In Study 1 with an AI youth sample, we conducted confirmatory factor analyses and failed to find support for either of the 2 predominant CDI multifactor models (Craighead, Smucker, Craighead, & Ilardi, 1998; Kovacs, 1992). In subsequent exploratory structural equation modeling, we found the most support for a unidimensional factor structure. In Study 2, using confirmatory modeling with independent AI/AN youth samples, we found further support for this unidimensional model. Finally, in Study 3, we found support across AI/AN groups varying in gender and age for measurement invariance with respect to both factor structure and factor loadings. Overall, for these AI/AN youth populations, our findings support the practice of calculating total CDI scores, and they suggest a unique construction of the depression experience.

  12. Changes in the Temperament and Character Inventory dimensions after paroxetine treatment in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Tetsu; Kaneda, Ayako; Nakagami, Taku; Kaneko, Sunao; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have reported changes in the dimensions of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) after patients with major depressive disorder are treated. We aimed to investigate the changes in the TCI dimensions after paroxetine treatment in patients with major depressive disorder. Forty-eight patients were enrolled in this study and were treated with 10-40 mg/day of paroxetine for 6 weeks. The TCI was completed twice, at weeks 0 and 6. We used the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) to evaluate patients. The participants were divided into three groups (responders, non-responders, and early responders) based on treatment response. The scores of each dimension of the TCI were compared before and after treatment using repeated-measures two-way analyses of variance. In the responders group (n = 24), no TCI dimension scores changed significantly during treatment, but the interaction between sex and MADRS score change was significantly associated with the results. In the non-responders group (n = 15), the self-directedness score increased significantly during the treatment period (p = 0.000), and the change in MADRS score significantly affected the results. In the early responders group (n = 9), no TCI dimension scores changed significantly during treatment. The results of the present study may reveal a possible correlation between paroxetine treatment and changes in personality traits. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Factors Influencing Depression Endpoints Research (FINDER: baseline results of Italian patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grassi Luigi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors Influencing Depression Endpoints Research (FINDER is a 6-month, prospective, observational study carried out in 12 European countries aimed at investigating health-related quality of life (HRQoL in outpatients receiving pharmacological treatment for a first or new depressive episode. Baseline characteristics of patients enrolled in Italy are presented. Methods All treatment decisions were at the discretion of the investigator. Data were collected at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of treatment. Baseline evaluations included demographics, medical and psychiatric history, and medications used in the last 24 months and prescribed at enrolment. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, was adopted to evaluate depressive symptoms, while somatic and painful physical symptoms were assessed by using the Somatic Symptom Inventory (SSI and a 0 to 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS, HRQoL via 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36, and the European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions (EQ-5D instrument. Results A total of 513 patients were recruited across 38 sites. The mean ± standard deviation (SD age at first depressive episode was 38.7 ± 15.9 years, the mean duration of depression 10.6 ± 12.3 years. The most common psychiatric comorbidities in the previous 24 months were anxiety/panic (72.6% and obsessive/compulsive disorders (13.4%, while 35.9% had functional somatic syndromes. Most patients (65.1% reported pain from any cause. Monotherapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs was prescribed at enrolment in 64.5% and 6.4% of the cases, respectively. The most commonly prescribed agents were sertraline (17.3%, escitalopram (16.2%, venlaflaxine (15.6% and paroxetine (14.8%. The mean HADS subscores for depression and anxiety were 13.3 ± 4.2 and 12.2 ± 3.9, respectively; 76.4% of patients could be defined as being 'probable cases' for depression and 66.2% for anxiety. The

  14. The Coronal Loop Inventory Project: Expanded Analysis and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Christian, G. M.; Chastain, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    We have expanded upon earlier work that investigates the relative importance of coronal loops with isothermal versus multithermal cross-field temperature distributions. These results are important for determining if loops have substructure in the form of unresolved magnetic strands. We have increased the number of loops targeted for temperature analysis from 19 to 207 with the addition of 188 new loops from multiple regions. We selected all loop segments visible in the 171 Å images of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) that had a clean background. Eighty-six of the new loops were rejected because they could not be reliably separated from the background in other AIA filters. Sixty-one loops required multithermal models to reproduce the observations. Twenty-eight loops were effectively isothermal, that is, the plasma emission to which AIA is sensitive could not be distinguished from isothermal emission, within uncertainties. Ten loops were isothermal. Also, part of our inventory was one small flaring loop, one very cool loop whose temperature distribution could not be constrained by the AIA data, and one loop with inconclusive results. Our survey can confirm an unexpected result from the pilot study: we found no isothermal loop segments where we could properly use the 171-to-193 ratio method, which would be similar to the analysis done for many loops observed with TRACE and EIT. We recommend caution to observers who assume the loop plasma is isothermal, and hope that these results will influence the direction of coronal heating models and the effort modelers spend on various heating scenarios.

  15. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in Dutch advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmenhoven, Franca; van Rijswijk, Eric; Engels, Yvonne; Kan, Cornelis; Prins, Judith; van Weel, Chris; Vissers, Kris

    2012-02-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in advanced cancer patients, but the diagnosis of depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer is difficult. Screening instruments could facilitate diagnosing depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the validity of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. Patients with advanced metastatic disease, visiting the outpatient palliative care department, were asked to fill out a self-questionnaire containing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question "Are you feeling depressed?" The mood section of the PRIME-MD was used as a gold standard. Sixty-one patients with advanced metastatic disease were eligible to be included in the study. Complete data were obtained from 46 patients. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristics analysis of the BDI-II was 0.82. The optimal cut-off point of the BDI-II was 16 with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 69%. The single screening question showed a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 94%. The BDI-II seems an adequate screening tool for a depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. The sensitivity of a single screening question is poor.

  16. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Scale for Depression (Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II)--A Study on a Sample of Students in the State of Kuwait Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahem, Ahmed Mohammed Faleh

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) the Arabized version by Gharib (2000); the study sample consisted of 500 male and female students from the Kuwaiti universities by 250 males and 250 females on whom the BDI-II scale was applied twice; the psychometric characteristics such as the…

  17. The Anxiety Depression Distress Inventory-27 (ADDI-27): a short version of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Augustine; Freedenthal, Stacey; Gutierrez, Peter M; Wong, Jane L; Emmerich, Ashley; Lozano, Gregorio

    2011-06-01

    The authors conducted three studies to construct and examine the psychometric properties of a 27-item version of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire-90 (MASQ-90; Watson & Clark, 1991a). The Anxiety Depression Distress Inventory-27 (ADDI-27) contains three empirically derived scales: Positive Affect, Somatic Anxiety, and General Distress, which are relevant dimensions of the tripartite model of affect. Each scale is composed of nine items, and the estimate of scale reliability for each scale score was ≥ .80 across the three studies. Results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses provided adequate support for a 3-factor model. Additional estimates of concurrent validity documented the ADDI-27 scales' convergent and discriminant validity. We also identified three construct relevant correlates for each scale score. Overall, the ADDI-27 appears to be a content valid, reliable, and multidimensional measure of the tripartite model of affect.

  18. Use of the Beck Depression Inventory for assessing depression in patients hospitalized with severe burn. Disentangling symptoms of depression from injury and treatment factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Brett D

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) are biased by injury severity among hospitalized survivors of burn (N=262). A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) model was developed with a general depression factor that loaded on all items and somatic and cognitive factors that were orthogonal to the general factor and to each other. The model fit the data well and substantially better than an alternative three-factor model with correlated factors. Percent total body surface area burned (TBSA) was significantly associated with the general depression factor (p=.04), but also with the orthogonal somatic factor (pburn injury. Analysis of item communalities, however, suggested that only approximately 2% of total predicted item variance was associated with bias related to injury severity. It was concluded that, despite a small amount of bias, the BDI is a reasonably accurate clinical tool even in the context of severe burn. Appropriate adjustments for bias, however, should be made in research with the BDI among patients with acute burn.

  19. Evaluation of the SHIFT-Depression® Inventory With a Sample of Australian Women, Demonstrating the Centrality of Gendered Role Expectations to Their Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C. Vidler

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To address the double fold incidence and prevalence rates of depression in women compared to men needs more than symptom management. In primary health care where time does not normally allow for thorough assessments of what causes or maintains depression, using a brief questionnaire is warranted. A means must be found to address system level barriers to care and the poor quality of life so many women experience. Using an online survey and mixed method design, initial evaluation of a measure developed to identify individual and contextual issues connected to depression in women, examined underlying factor structure. 266 depressed women aged 18 to 85yrs also completed the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CESD and provided written commentary about any further issues. The SHIFT-Depression® Inventory analysis revealed five reliable underlying factors explaining 59% of the variance. The factors identified were; 'diminished self/feels powerless/focused on other's care'; 'financial problems, lacks access to healthcare, healthy food, housing, exercise’; 'relationship difficulties, loss/betrayal/abuse’; ‘women’s problems’ and 'lack of social support/feels isolated'. Analysis of participant’s comments found four groupings similar to the identified factors. This initial evaluation of the SHIFT-Depression® Inventory showed evidence of the multiple issues impacting on depressed women spanning the physical, intrapsychic, relational, social and contextual areas. The inventory provides preliminary assessment which can identify when more extensive questioning and referrals to various services may be appropriate. It could be used in primary health care settings when consultation times are brief, or as an adjunct to assessment in the mental health setting.

  20. The accuracy of diagnosis of major depression in patients with Parkinson's disease: a comparative study among the UPDRS, the geriatric depression scale and the Beck depression inventory A precisão do diagnóstico de depressão na doença de Parkinson: um estudo comparativo entre a UPDRS, a escala geriátrica de depressão e o inventário de depressão de Beck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Tumas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the accuracy of diagnosis of major depression in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD using the UPDRS, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15 and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. METHOD: 50 consecutive patients with PD were evaluated. The diagnosis of major depression was made according to the DSM-IV criteria. RESULTS: We found a 24% prevalence of major depression. All depression scales were highly correlated but UPDRS depression item had the lowest diagnostic value. The GDS15 had the more appropriate "receiver operating characteristics" curve. The best cut-off scores for screening depression were 17/18 for BDI and 8/9 for GDS15. We did not find any correlation between the level of depression and intensity of motor symptoms, functional capacity and duration of the disease. CONCLUSION: GDS15 is better than the BDI and the UPDRS for screening depression in PD and depression is not related to the degree of parkinsonian symptoms.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a precisão do diagnóstico de depressão em pacientes com doença de Parkinson avaliados pela UPDRS, pela Escala Geriátrica de Depressão com 15 itens (EGD15 e pelo Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB. MÉTODO: 50 pacientes com DP foram avaliados. O diagnóstico de depressão maior foi feito segundo os critérios do DSM-IV. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de depressão foi 24%. As escalas de depressão tiveram elevada correlação entre si. A UPDRS apresentou a menor sensibilidade para o diagnóstico. A EGD15 mostrou uma curva ROC mais apropriada que o IDB. Os melhores escores-de-corte para diagnóstico de depressão foram 17/18 para o IDB e 8/9 para a EGD15. Não houve correlação entre os níveis de depressão e a intensidade do parkinsonismo, a capacidade funcional ou a duração da doença. CONCLUSÃO: A EGD15 é melhor que o IDB para diagnosticar depressão na DP. A depressão não está relacionada à gravidade dos sintomas parkinsonianos.

  1. Associations of depression and depressive symptoms with preeclampsia: results from a Peruvian case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Pedro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preeclampsia involves endothelial dysfunction, platelet dysfunction/activation and sympathetic over-activity similar to cardiovascular disorders (CVD. Depression, an independent risk factor for progression of CVD, was found to be associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia among Finnish women. We examined the relation between depression/depressive symptoms and preeclampsia risk among Peruvian women. Methods The study included 339 preeclamptic cases and 337 normotensive controls. Depression and depressive symptoms during pregnancy were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated from logistic regression models. Results The prevalence of moderate depression was 11.5% among cases and 5.3% among controls. The corresponding figures for moderate-severe depression were 3.5% for cases and 2.1% for controls. Compared with non-depressed women, those with moderate depression had a 2.3-fold increased risk of preeclampsia (95% CI: 1.2–4.4, while moderate-severe depression was associated with a 3.2-fold (95% CI: 1.1–9.6 increased risk of preeclampsia. Associations of each of the 9-items of the PHQ-9 depression screening module with preeclampsia risk were also observed. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with the only other published report on this topic. Collectively, available data support recent calls for expanded efforts to study and address depression among pregnant women.

  2. [Depressive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease: preliminary results of the REAL.FR study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbus, C; Andrieu, S; Amouyal-Barkate, K; Nourhashémi, F; Schmitt, L; Vellas, B

    2003-10-01

    The Alzheimer's disease (AD) is today regarded as a degenerative pathology with a serious and common complication: occurrence of mental and behavioral disturbances. Among this neuropsychiatrics symptoms, the depressive symptoms occupy a significant place by their frequency and their consequences on the caregiver's burden. The prevalence of such disorders is very variously appreciated in the literature. To assess with precision depressive symptoms in a population with Alzheimer's disease rated on neuropsychiatric inventory NPI. Cross-sectional study of patients with AD presenting at the consultation of psycho-geriatic, geriatric or neurologic services in 16 french university hospitals. The frequency of the depression was evaluated with the NPI on a population of 578 subjects with AD. We studied the association existing between these symptoms and the antecedents of depression and we studied the gravity of these disorders according to the cognitive status. Caregivers describe less one depressive symptom for approximately 40% of the subjects included in the study n = 229. The average score of gravity is close to 4 and is thus clinically significant. More the stage of dementia is severe more the number of subjects presenting a clinically significant score is important. Scores of depression evolve parallel to the stage of dementia. The antecedents of depression are a risk factor for depressive symptoms in the AD p < 0.001. These results confirm those of primary studies. In our study, more than the prevalence of depressive symptoms it seems that is the severity of the disorder which is associated with the dementia severity. The continuation of this work will allow a prospective evaluation of depressive symptoms in the AD.

  3. 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory Riparian Inventory Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keller, David C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zemlick, Catherine M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-03-29

    A total length of 36.7 kilometers of riparian habitat were inventoried within LANL boundaries between 2007 and 2011. The following canyons and lengths of riparian habitat were surveyed and inventoried between 2007 and 2011. Water Canyon (9,669 m), Los Alamos Canyon (7,131 m), Pajarito Canyon (6,009 m), Mortandad Canyon (3,110 m), Two-Mile Canyon (2,680 m), Sandia Canyon (2,181 m), Three-Mile Canyon (1,883 m), Canyon de Valle (1,835 m), Ancho Canyon (1,143 m), Canada del Buey (700 m), Sandia Canyon (221 m), DP Canyon (159 m) and Chaquehui Canyon (50 m). Effluent Canyon, Fence Canyon and Potrillo Canyon were surveyed but no areas of riparian habitat were found. Stretches of inventoried riparian habitat were classified for prioritization of treatment, if any was recommended. High priority sites included stretches of Mortandad Canyon, LA Canyon, Pajarito Canyon, Two-Mile Canyon, Sandia Canyon and Water Canyon. Recommended treatment for high priority sites includes placement of objects into the stream channel to encourage sediment deposition, elimination of channel incision, and to expand and slow water flow across the floodplain. Additional stretches were classified as lower priority, and, for other sites it was recommended that feral cattle and exotic plants be removed to aid in riparian habitat recovery. In June 2011 the Las Conchas Wildfire burned over 150,000 acres of land in the Jemez Mountains and surrounding areas. The watersheds above LA Canyon, Water Canyon and Pajarito Canyon were burned in the Las Conchas Wildfire and flooding and habitat alteration were observed in these canyon bottoms (Wright 2011). Post fire status of lower priority areas may change to higher priority for some of the sites surveyed prior to the Las Conchas Wildfire, due to changes in vegetation cover in the adjacent upland watershed.

  4. Psychometric properties of the Spanish-language child depression inventory with Hispanic children who are secondary victims of domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Carmen Soto; Gómez, José Rodriguez; Pastrana, Maria C Vélez

    2009-01-01

    The Child Depression Inventory (CDI), a self-report instrument that measures depressive symptomatology in children, has been shown to have adequate construct validity (Kovacs, 1983, 1992). However, limited research has been conducted with minority children and adolescents. In the present study, the construct validity of the Spanish-language version of the Child Depression Inventory (CDI-S) ages 8-12 years (N = 100). The CDI was developed by Maria Kovacs (1992) and has been a widely used instrument for screening depression in children. Fifty of the children had witnessed domestic violence (secondary victims of domestic violence) and received psychological services for victims of domestic violence, and fifty had not witnessed domestic violence. To identify the group of non-victims of domestic violence, their mothers completed the Conflict Tactic Scale (CIS). The CDI is a self-report instrument used to measure symptoms of depression. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed including the 27 items that make up the instrument, using principal component analysis as the extraction method and Varimax rotations. This analysis revealed that the CDI measures five dimensions of depression in the child. However, differences were found in the factor structure of the Spanish CDI when compared with the original version. Additionally, its internal consistency was documented.

  5. Severity of symptoms of depression among burned patients one week after injury, using Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrari, Farideh; Salehi, Seyyed Hamid; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Soltani, Madjid; Taghavi, Shahrzad; Samimi, Roghayeh

    2013-03-01

    This study was done to determine the severity of symptoms of depression in burned patients and to assess the effect of burn related factors on depression. This is a descriptive cross-sectional survey, performed in Burn center, Motahhari hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The population of the study included 300 hospitalized patients from April 2010 to May 2011 who were assessed for symptoms of depression one week after burn injury by Beck Depression Inventory-II. Three hundred subjects (50% female and 50% male) participated in the study. Age ranged from 13 to 75 with the mean of 35.06±12.79 years. 184 (61.3%) had symptoms of depression, 58 (19.3%) of them mild, 52 (17.3%) moderate and 74 (24.7%) severe depression symptoms. There was a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and age, gender, educational level, TBSA%, number of burn sites and amputation (p valueburned patients suggests that depression should be screened in such patients and treat if indicated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Combined detection of depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients using the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy and the World Health Organization well-being index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Pilebæk; Amiri, Moshgan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate the Danish version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E), and compare it with the World Health Organization index for psychological well-being (WHO-5) as screening tests for depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients. METHODS: Epilepsy...... there are 17% false positives. CONCLUSION: NDDI-E in Danish is valid and slightly better than WHO-5 in the detection of depression in epilepsy patients. WHO-5 is valid for the detection of anxiety disorders. Combined use of NDDI-E and WHO-5 is recommended, since 95% of all epilepsy patients with depression and....../or anxiety disorder are identified with only a modest number of false positives....

  7. Scores on Adjective Check List, Eysenck Personality Inventory, and Depression Adjective Chck List for a male prison pupulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, B; Horned, C M; Knapp, R R

    1977-10-01

    Normative data are presented for a male prison population on the Adjective Check List (Gough & Heilbrun, 1965), Form A of the Eysenck Personality Inventory (Eysenck & Eysenck, 1975) and Form C of Depression Adjective Check List (Lubin, 1967). The intercorrelations among the instruments also are presented. In the sample were 60 recently admitted male inmates of a maximum security correctional institution randomly drawn from a large sample of 205 consecutive admissions. Subjects described themselves as markedly depressed, high on neuroticism, low in personal adjustment, low in self-confidence, and low in self-control.

  8. Authoritarian parenting and youth depression: Results from a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keith A; Vidourek, Rebecca A; Merianos, Ashley L

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent illness affecting youth across the nation. The study purpose was to examine depression and authoritarian parenting among youth from 12 to 17 years of age. A secondary data analysis of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health was performed in the present study. All participants in the present study were youth (N = 17,399) nationwide. The results revealed that 80.6% of youth participants reported having five or more depressive symptoms. Parenting styles based on depression significantly differed among males, females, 12-13-year-olds, 14-15-year-olds, and 16-17-year-olds. Specifically, those who reported experiencing authoritarian parenting practices were more likely to report depressive symptoms compared to their counterparts who experienced authoritative parenting practices. Emphasizing the role of the parents and teaching positive parenting practices and authoritative parenting styles may increase success of prevention programs.

  9. The Factors Influencing Depression Endpoints Research (FINDER study: final results of Italian patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quail Deborah

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors Influencing Depression Endpoints Research (FINDER is a 6-month, prospective, observational study carried out in 12 European countries aimed at investigating health-related quality of life (HRQoL in outpatients receiving treatment for a first or new depressive episode. The Italian HRQoL data at 6 months is described in this report, and the factors associated with HRQoL changes were determined. Methods Data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months of treatment. HRQoL was measured using components of the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36; mental component summary (MCS, physical component summary (PCS and the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D; visual analogue scale (VAS and health status index (HSI. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS was adopted to evaluate depressive symptoms, while somatic and painful physical symptoms were assessed by using the 28-item Somatic Symptom Inventory (SSI-28 and a VAS. Results Of the initial 513 patients, 472 completed the 3-month observation and 466 the 6-month observation. The SF-36 and EQ-5D mean (± SD scores showed HRQoL improvements at 3 months and a further smaller improvement at 6 months, with the most positive effects for SF-36 MCS (baseline 22.0 ± 9.2, 3 months 34.6 ± 10.0; 6 months 39.3 ± 9.5 and EQ-5D HSI (baseline 0.4 ± 0.3; 3 months 0.7 ± 0.3; 6 months 0.7 ± 0.2. Depression and anxiety symptoms (HADS-D mean at baseline 13.3 ± 4.2; HADS-A mean at baseline 12.2 ± 3.9 consistently decreased during the first 3 months (8.7 ± 4.3; 7.5 ± 3.6 and showed a further positive change at 6 months (6.9 ± 4.3; 5.8 ± 3.4. Somatic and painful symptoms (SSI and VAS significantly decreased, with the most positive changes in the SSI-28 somatic item (mean at baseline 2.4 ± 0.7; mean change at 3 months: -0.5; 95% CI -0.6 to -0.5; mean change at 6 months: -0.7; 95% CI -0.8 to -0.7; in 'interference of overall pain with daily activities' (mean at baseline 45

  10. Validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Oliveira, Marcio Henrique; Gorenstein, Clarice; Lotufo Neto, Francisco; Andrade, Laura Helena; Wang, Yuan Pang

    2012-12-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is used worldwide for detecting depressive symptoms. This questionnaire has been revised (1996) to match the DSM-IV criteria for a major depressive episode. We assessed the reliability and the validity of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the BDI-II for non-clinical adults. The questionnaire was applied to 60 college students on two occasions. Afterwards, 182 community-dwelling adults completed the BDI-II, the Self-Report Questionnaire, and the K10 Scale. Trained psychiatrists performed face-to-face interviews with the respondents using the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-I), the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale, and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Descriptive analysis, signal detection analysis (Receiver Operating Characteristics), correlation analysis, and discriminant function analysis were performed to investigate the psychometric properties of the BDI-II. The intraclass correlation coefficient of the BDI-II was 0.89, and the Cronbach's alpha coefficient of internal consistency was 0.93. Taking the SCID as the gold standard, the cut-off point of 10/11 was the best threshold for detecting depression, yielding a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 87%. The concurrent validity (a correlation of 0.63-0.93 with scales applied simultaneously) and the predictive ability of the severity level (over 65% correct classification) were acceptable. The BDI-II is reliable and valid for measuring depressive symptomatology among Portuguese-speaking Brazilian non-clinical populations.

  11. Measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) across gender, race, and ethnicity in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisman, Mark A; Judd, Charles M; Whiteford, Natalie T; Gelhorn, Heather L

    2013-08-01

    Measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) across gender, race, and ethnic groups was evaluated in a large sample of college students, using pooled data from 11 universities from diverse geographical regions in the United States (N = 7,369). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the fit of several possible factor structures, and the results from these analyses indicated that the BDI-II was most adequately represented by a hierarchical four-factor structure, composed of three first-order factors and one second-order factor. Results based on analyses of covariance structures indicated there was factorial invariance for this hierarchical four-factor structure across groups, suggesting that the BDI-II provides an assessment of severity of depressive symptoms that is equivalent across gender, race, and ethnicity in college students.

  12. Features of Intangible Assets Inventory Technique and the Recognition of Its Results

    OpenAIRE

    Nataliya Kantsedal

    2014-01-01

    Practical implementation of science-based inventory methodology promotes objective and reliable estimates of results for further interpretation in the accounting system, as well the decision-making on eliminated shortcomings and violations. The scope of the article is an analysis of the legal provisions of inventory of intangible assets and organizing the views of the individual authors to identify problem issues to be addressed in terms of specification of technique for intangible assets inv...

  13. The Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Public Outdoor Lighting Inventory: Phase I: Survey Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Smalley, Edward; Haefer, R.

    2014-09-30

    This document presents the results of a voluntary web-based inventory survey of public street and area lighting across the U.S. undertaken during the latter half of 2013.This survey attempts to access information about the national inventory in a “bottoms-up” manner, going directly to owners and operators. Adding to previous “top down” estimates, it is intended to improve understanding of the role of public outdoor lighting in national energy use.

  14. Features of Intangible Assets Inventory Technique and the Recognition of Its Results

    OpenAIRE

    Nataliya Kantsedal

    2014-01-01

    Practical implementation of science-based inventory methodology promotes objective and reliable estimates of results for further interpretation in the accounting system, as well the decision-making on eliminated shortcomings and violations. The scope of the article is an analysis of the legal provisions of inventory of intangible assets and organizing the views of the individual authors to identify problem issues to be addressed in terms of specification of technique for intangible assets inv...

  15. Teoria da resposta ao item aplicada ao Inventário de Depressão Beck Item response theory applied to the Beck Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Maris de Jezus Castro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O Inventário de Depressão Beck (BDI, uma escala que mede o traço latente de intensidade de sintomas depressivos, pode ser avaliado através da Teoria da Resposta ao Item (TRI. Este estudo utilizou o modelo TRI de Resposta Gradual na avaliação da intensidade de sintomas depressivos de 4.025 indivíduos que responderam ao BDI, de modo a explorar eficientemente a informação disponível nos diferentes aspectos possibilitados pelo uso desta metodologia. O ajuste foi efetuado no software PARSCALE. Foram identificados 13 itens do BDI nos quais pelo menos uma categoria de resposta não tinha chance maior que as demais de ser escolhida, de modo que estes itens tiveram de ser recategorizados. Os itens com maior capacidade de discriminação são relativos à tristeza, pessimismo, sentimento de fracasso, insatisfação, auto-aversão, indecisão e dificuldade para trabalhar. Os itens mais graves são aqueles relacionados com perda de peso, retraimento social e idéias suicidas. O grupo dos 202 indivíduos com as maiores intensidades de sintomas depressivos foi composto por 74% de mulheres, e praticamente 84% possuíam diagnóstico de algum transtorno psiquiátrico. Os resultados evidenciam alguns dos inúmeros ganhos advindos da utilização da TRI na análise de traços latentes.The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, a scale that measures the latent trait intensity of depression symptoms, can be assessed by the Item Response Theory (IRT. This study used the Graded-Response model (GRM to assess the intensity of depressive symptoms in 4,025 individuals who responded to the BDI, in order to efficiently use the information available on different aspects enabled by the use of this methodology. The fit of this model was done in PARSCALE software. We identified 13 items of the BDI in which at least one response category was not more likely than others to be chosen, so that these items had to be categorized again. The items with greater power of

  16. Test Review: Kovacs, M. "Children's Depression Inventory 2 (CDI 2)" (2nd ed.). North Tonawanda, NY: Multi-Health Systems Inc, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yunhee

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a review of the Children's Depression Inventory 2 (CDI 2), published by Multi-Health Systems (MHS) to assess depressive symptoms in 7- to 17-year-old children and adolescents. Given the importance of early diagnosis and treatment (Kovacs & Devlin, 1998), the CDI 2 can assist professionals to pinpoint critical depressive…

  17. Adaptation and latent structure of the Swahili version of beck depression inventory-II in a low literacy population in the context of HIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abubakar, Amina; Kalu, Raphael Birya; Katana, Khamis; Kabunda, Beatrice; Hassan, Amin S.; Newton, Charles R.; Van De Vijver, Fons

    2016-01-01

    Objective We set out to adapt the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II in Kenya and examine its factorial structure. Methods In the first phase we carried out in-depth interviews involving 29 adult members of the community to elicit their understanding of depression and identify aspects of the BDI-II

  18. Seasonality in depressive and anxiety symptoms among primary care patients and in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders; results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winthorst, Wim H; Post, Wendy J; Meesters, Ybe; Penninx, Brenda W H J; Nolen, Willem A

    2011-12-19

    Little is known about seasonality of specific depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in different patient populations. This study aims to assess seasonal variation of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a primary care population and across participants who were classified in diagnostic groups 1) healthy controls 2) patients with a major depressive disorder, 3) patients with any anxiety disorder and 4) patients with a major depression and any anxiety disorder. Data were used from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). First, in 5549 patients from the NESDA primary care recruitment population the Kessler-10 screening questionnaire was used and data were analyzed across season in a multilevel linear model. Second, in 1090 subjects classified into four groups according to psychiatric status according to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, overall depressive symptoms and atypical versus melancholic features were assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms. Anxiety and fear were assessed with the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Fear questionnaire. Symptom levels across season were analyzed in a linear regression model. In the primary care population the severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms did not show a seasonal pattern. In the diagnostic groups healthy controls and patients with any anxiety disorder, but not patients with a major depressive disorder, showed a small rise in depressive symptoms in winter. Atypical and melancholic symptoms were both elevated in winter. No seasonal pattern for anxiety symptoms was found. There was a small gender related seasonal effect for fear symptoms. Seasonal differences in severity or type of depressive and anxiety symptoms, as measured with a general screening instrument and symptom questionnaires, were absent or small in effect size in a primary care population and in patient populations with a major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders.

  19. Depressive symptoms in youth with type 1 or type 2 diabetes: Results of the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium screening assessment of depression in diabetes study

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the frequency of depressive symptoms and the diagnosis and management of depression in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) enrolled in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium T1D and T2D registries. The Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) 2 Self-Report (Short) version ...

  20. Relation of depression to perceived social support: results from a randomized adolescent depression prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Gau, Jeff; Ochner, Chris

    2011-05-01

    Theorists posit that certain behaviors exhibited by depressed individuals (e.g., negative self-statements, dependency, reassurance seeking, inappropriate or premature disclosures, passivity, social withdrawal) reduce social support, yet there have been few experimental tests of this hypothesis. Using data from a randomized depression prevention trial (N=253) involving adolescents (M age=15.5, SD=1.2), we tested whether a cognitive behavioral group intervention that significantly reduced depressive symptoms relative to bibliotherapy and educational brochure control conditions through 2-year follow-up produced improvements in perceived parental and friend social support and whether change in depressive symptoms mediated the effect on change in social support. Cognitive behavioral group participants showed significantly greater increases in perceived friend social support through 1-year follow-up relative to bibliotherapy and brochure controls, but there were no significant effects for perceived parental support. Further, change in depressive symptoms appeared to mediate the effects of the intervention on change in perceived friend support. Results provide experimental support for the theory that depressive symptoms are inversely related to perceived social support, but imply that this effect may be specific to friend vs. parental support for adolescents.

  1. Lessons from a large-scale assessment: Results from conceptual inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Beth; Dulli, Hani; Pattillo, Dave; West, Keith

    2014-12-01

    We report conceptual inventory results of a large-scale assessment project at a large university. We studied the introduction of materials and instructional methods informed by physics education research (PER) (physics education research-informed materials) into a department where most instruction has previously been traditional and a significant number of faculty are hesitant, ambivalent, or even resistant to the introduction of such reforms. Data were collected in all of the sections of both the large algebra- and calculus-based introductory courses for a number of years employing commonly used conceptual inventories. Results from a small PER-informed, inquiry-based, laboratory-based class are also reported. Results suggest that when PER-informed materials are introduced in the labs and recitations, independent of the lecture style, there is an increase in students' conceptual inventory gains. There is also an increase in the results on conceptual inventories if PER-informed instruction is used in the lecture. The highest conceptual inventory gains were achieved by the combination of PER-informed lectures and laboratories in large class settings and by the hands-on, laboratory-based, inquiry-based course taught in a small class setting.

  2. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  3. Sensitivity to changes during antidepressant treatment: a comparison of unidimensional subscales of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) in patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Isabella; Wagner, Stefanie; Mergl, Roland; Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Hautzinger, Martin; Henkel, Verena; Hegerl, Ulrich; Tadić, André

    2012-06-01

    In the efficacy evaluation of antidepressant treatments, the total score of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) is still regarded as the 'gold standard'. We previously had shown that the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) was more sensitive to detect depressive symptom changes than the HAMD17 (Helmreich et al. 2011). Furthermore, studies suggest that the unidimensional subscales of the HAMD, which capture the core depressive symptoms, outperform the full HAMD regarding the detection of antidepressant treatment effects. The aim of the present study was to compare several unidimensional subscales of the HAMD and the IDS regarding their sensitivity to changes in depression symptoms in a sample of patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression (MIND). Biweekly IDS-C28 and HAMD17 data from 287 patients of a 10-week randomised, placebo-controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of sertraline and cognitive-behavioural group therapy in patients with MIND were converted to subscale scores and analysed during the antidepressant treatment course. We investigated sensitivity to depressive change for all scales from assessment-to-assessment, in relation to depression severity level and placebo-verum differences. The subscales performed similarly during the treatment course, with slight advantages for some subscales in detecting treatment effects depending on the treatment modality and on the items included. Most changes in depressive symptomatology were detected by the IDS short scale, but regarding the effect sizes, it performed worse than most subscales. Unidimensional subscales are a time- and cost-saving option in judging drug therapy outcomes, especially in antidepressant treatment efficacy studies. However, subscales do not cover all facets of depression (e.g. atypical symptoms, sleep disturbances), which might be important for comprehensively understanding the nature of the disease depression. Therefore, the cost-to-benefit ratio must be

  4. Psychometric properties of a Persian-language version of the Beck Depression Inventory--Second edition: BDI-II-PERSIAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemzadeh, Habibollah; Mojtabai, Ramin; Karamghadiri, Narges; Ebrahimkhani, Narges

    2005-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is perhaps the most commonly used screening instrument for depression in the general population. We examined the psychometric properties of a Persian-language version of the second edition of this instrument (BDI-II) [Beck et al., 1996] in an Iranian college-student sample. In a sample of 125 student volunteers from two Iranian universities, we compared mean item scores on the BDI-II-Persian with those on the English-language version administered to North American college students, and assessed internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the BDI-II-Persian and its concurrent validity against a measure of negative automatic thoughts in depression, the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire [Hollon and Kendall, 1980]. We also examined the factor structure of the BDI-II-Persian through comparing the fit of various proposed models to the data using confirmatory factor analysis. The BDI-II-Persian had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.87) and acceptable test-retest reliability (r=0.74). The instrument correlated strongly with the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire. In factor analysis, models with strongly correlated affective-cognitive and somatic-vegetative factors provided a better fit than models with one global factor. These data support the reliability and concurrent validity of the BDI-II-Persian as a measure of depressive symptoms in nonclinical samples. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Sintomas depressivos no câncer de mama: Inventário de Depressão de Beck - Short Form Depressive symptoms in breast cancer: Beck Depression Inventory - Short Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Oliveira Cangussu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Verificar a prevalência de sintomas depressivos em mulheres com câncer de mama e identificar os fatores de risco associados à sua ocorrência. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo transversal, em que foram entrevistadas 71 mulheres com câncer de mama. Foram empregados dois instrumentos: um questionário para verificar os dados sociodemográficos e clínicos e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck - Short Form (BDI-SF, para avaliação dos sintomas depressivos. Para análise dos dados, utilizaram-se medidas descritivas e o teste de qui-quadrado, que avaliou a associação entre variáveis sociodemográficas e clínicas e os sintomas depressivos. O nível de significância considerado foi de 5%. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de sintomas depressivos foi de 29,6%. Os fatores associados à presença desses sintomas foram o tratamento quimioterápico (p = 0,021, presença de dor (p = 0,018 e limitação do movimento do membro superior (p = 0,010 e pior percepção da saúde (p = 0,018. CONCLUSÃO: Sintomas depressivos são frequentes no câncer de mama, assim a saúde mental das mulheres com esse tipo de câncer deve ser investigada e tratada quando necessário, reduzindo o impacto desses sintomas na vida da mulher.OBJECTIVES: To verify the prevalence of depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer and identify risk factors associated to its occurrence. METHODS: It was a transversal study where 71 women with breast cancer were interviewed. Two instruments were applied, being one questionnaire used to verify sociodemographic and clinical data, and the Beck Depression Inventory - Short Form to evaluate depressive symptoms. Descriptive methods and chi-square test were utilized to analyze data, evaluating association between depressive symptoms, sociodemographic and clinical data. Significance level was considered of 5%. RESULTS: Depressive symptoms prevalence was 29,6%. Factors associated to the presence of this kind of symptoms were

  6. The new Inventory of Italian Glaciers: Present knowledge, applied methods and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiraglia, Claudio; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; D'Agata, Carlo; Maragno, Davide; Baroni, Carlo; Mortara, Gianni; Perotti, Luigi; Bondesan, Aldino; Salvatore, Cristina; Vagliasindi, Marco; Vuillermoz, Elisa

    2013-04-01

    A new Glacier Inventory is an indispensable requirement in Italy due to the importance of evaluating the present glacier coverage and the recent changes driven by climate. Furthermore Alpine glaciers represent a not negligible water and touristic resource then to manage and promote them is needed to know their distribution, size and features. The first Italian Glacier Inventory dates back to 1959-1962. It was compiled by the Italian Glaciological Committee (CGI) in cooperation with the National Research Council (CNR); this first inventory was mainly based on field data coupled with photographs (acquired on the field) and high resolution maps. The Italian glaciation resulted to be spread into 754 ice bodies which altogether were covering 525 km2. Moreover in the Eighties a new inventory was compiled to insert Italian data into the World Glacier Inventory (WGI); aerial photos taken at the end of the Seventies (and in some cases affected by a high and not negligible snow coverage) were used as the main source of data. No other national inventory were compiled after that period. Nevertheless during the last decade the largest part of the Italian Alpine regions have produced regional and local glacier inventories which in several cases are also available and queried through web sites and web GIS application. The actual need is now to obtain a complete, homogeneous and contemporary picture of the Italian Glaciation which encompasses the already available regional and local data and all the new updated information coming from new sources of data (e.g.: orthophotos, satellite imagines, etc..). The challenge was accepted by the University of Milan, the EvK2CNR Committee and the Italian Glaciological Committee who, with the sponsorship of Levissima Spa, are presently working to compile the new updated Italian Glacier Inventory. The first project step is to produce a unique homogeneous glacier database including glacier boundary and surface area and the main fundamental

  7. Lessons from a Large-Scale Assessment: Results from Conceptual Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Beth; Dulli, Hani; Pattillo, Dave; West, Keith

    2014-01-01

    We report conceptual inventory results of a large-scale assessment project at a large university. We studied the introduction of materials and instructional methods informed by physics education research (PER) (physics education research-informed materials) into a department where most instruction has previously been traditional and a significant…

  8. Synthesizing Results from an Interest and a Personality Inventory to Improve Career Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Illustrates how career counselors can integrate results of Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory (SCII) to enhance client's decision-making ability. Includes detailed description of MBTI and brief explanation of SCII and discussion of how both instruments can be used jointly to promote career decision making.…

  9. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that depression is000  a common comorbid health issue in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Reviews have also concluded that depression in diabetes is associated with higher HbA1c levels, less optimal self-care behaviours, lower quality of life, incident vascular...... complications and higher mortality rates. However, longitudinal studies into the course of depression in people with type 1 diabetes remain scarce. In this issue of Diabetologia, Kampling and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4123-0 ) report the 5 year trajectories of depression in adults with newly diagnosed...... type 1 diabetes (mean age, 28 years). Their baseline results showed that shortly after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes a major depressive episode was diagnosed in approximately 6% of participants, while 8% suffered from an anxiety disorder. The longitudinal depression data showed that, in a 5 year...

  10. Somatic symptom overlap in Beck Depression Inventory-II scores following myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Pilote, Louise; Dozois, David J. A.; Beck, Aaron T.; Dobson, Keith S.; Fuss, Samantha; de Jonge, Peter; Grace, Sherry L.; Stewart, Donne E.; Ormel, Johan; Abbey, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Depression measures that include somatic symptoms may inflate severity estimates among medically ill patients, including those with cardiovascular disease. Aims To evaluate whether people receiving in-patient treatment following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) had higher somatic symptom

  11. Factor structure and clinical utility of the Beck depression inventory in patients with binge eating disorder and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoko; McKee, Sherry A; Grilo, Carlos M

    2015-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is often used to assess depression symptoms, but its factor structure and its clinical utility have not been evaluated in patients with binge eating disorder (BED) and obesity. A total of 882 treatment-seeking obese patients with BED were administered structured interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Axis I Disorders) and completed self-report questionnaires. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a brief 16-item BDI version with a three-factor structure (affective, attitudinal and somatic). Both 21- and 16-item versions showed excellent internal consistency (both α=0.89) and had significant correlation patterns with different aspects of eating disorder psychopathology; three factors showed significant but variable associations with eating disorder psychopathology. Area under the curves (AUC) for both BDI versions were significant in predicting major depressive disorder (MDD; AUC=0.773 [16-item], 73.5% sensitivity/70.2% specificity, AUC=0.769 [21-item], 79.5% sensitivity/64.1% specificity) and mood disorders (AUC=0.763 [16-item], 67.1% sensitivity/71.5% specificity, AUC=0.769 [21-item], 84.2% sensitivity/55.7% specificity). The 21-item BDI (cutoff score ≥16) showed higher negative predictive values (94.0% vs. 93.0% [MDD]; 92.4% vs. 88.3% [mood disorders]) than the brief 16-item BDI (cutoff score ≥13). Both BDI versions demonstrated moderate performance as a screening instrument for MDD/mood disorders in obese patients with BED. Advantages and disadvantages for both versions are discussed. A three-factor structure has potential to inform the conceptualization of depression features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Defining anxious depression in later life: a scaring heterogeneity in results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, D.C.; Comijs, Hannie C; van Zelst, Willeke H; Schoevers, Robert A; Oude Voshaar, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety in depression is challenging as it results in more functional impairment and a worse prognosis. No consensus exists on the definition of anxious depression. METHODS: In 359 older patients with major depressive disorder, we examined the agreement between anxious depression based o

  13. Defining anxious depression in later life: a scaring heterogeneity in results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, D.C.; Comijs, Hannie C; van Zelst, Willeke H; Schoevers, Robert A; Oude Voshaar, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety in depression is challenging as it results in more functional impairment and a worse prognosis. No consensus exists on the definition of anxious depression. METHODS: In 359 older patients with major depressive disorder, we examined the agreement between anxious depression based

  14. 50 YEARS OF THE BECK DEPRESSION INVENTORY: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR USING THE SPANISH ADAPTATION OF THE BDI-II IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Sanz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The first Spanish adaptation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-I was published in 2011, which happened to be the 50th anniversary of the publication of its first edition. In this time, the BDI has become the most widely-used self-report questionnaire in Spain and in the world for evaluating the severity of depression. In this study, the basic characteristics of the BDI-II are presented and compared with its earlier versions (BDI-I and BDI-IA, the process of its adaptation to the Spanish population is described, the psychometric properties of this adaptation are summarized and its use in clinical practice is discussed. Concerning this use, guidelines and cut-off scores are proposed for measuring the severity of depression, evaluating the clinical significance of therapeutic change, screening for depression and assisting in the differential diagnosis of depressive disorders.

  15. Gender differences in major depressive disorder : Results from the Netherlands study of depression and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuch, Jerome J. J.; Roest, Annelieke M.; Nolen, Willem A.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; de Jonge, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although an overall gender difference in prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) has been well established, several questions concerning gender differences in the clinical manifestation of depression remain. This study aims to identify gender differences in psychopathology, treatme

  16. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Depressants KidsHealth > For Teens > Depressants A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Depressants What Are Depressants? Depressants are drugs that calm nerves and relax ...

  17. Correlação entre Inventário de Depressão de Beck e cortisol urinário em diabéticos tipo 2 Correlación entre el inventario de Depresión de Beck y el cortisol urinario en diabeticos tipo 2 Correlation between urine cortisol and scores on the Beck Depression inventory in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Bulgarelli do Nascimento

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a correlação entre o cortisol urinário e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck em diabéticos do tipo 2. MÉTODOS: O cortisol urinário foi avaliado em uma amostra composta por 40 pacientes da Liga de Controle de Diabetes da Disciplina de Endocrinologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo e para a avaliação dos sintomas de depressão foi aplicado o Inventário de Depressão de Beck. RESULTADOS: Alta confiabilidade para o Inventário de Depressão de Beck(Alfa de Cronbach=0,920e correlação significativa foi observada entre cortisol urinário e Inventário de Depressão de Beck(Spearman,r=0.523,pOBJETIVO: Verificar la correlación entre el cortisol urinario y el Inventario de Depresión de Beck en diabéticos del tipo 2. MÉTODOS: El cortisol urinario fue evaluado en una muestra compuesta por 40 pacientes de la Liga de Control de Diabetes de la Disciplina de Endocrinología del Hospital de las Clínicas de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Sao Paulo y para la evaluación de los síntomas de depresión fue aplicado el Inventario de Depresión de Beck. RESULTADOS: Alta confiabilidad para el Inventario de Depresión de Beck(Alfa de Cronbach=0,920 y correlación significativa observada entre el cortisol urinario e Inventario de Depresión de Beck (Spearman,r=0.523,pOBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between urinary cortisol and scores on the Beck Depression Inventory in type 2 diabetics. METHODS: The sample consisted of 40 patients with type 2 diabetes from the diabetes control league of the discipline of endocrinology of the HCFM-USP. Measures consisted of urinary cortisol and depression symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory. RESULTS: The Beck Depression Inventory had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.92. There was a statistically significant correlation between urinary cortisol and scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (Spearman r = 0.52, p < .001. CONCLUSIONS: The

  18. Summary of uncertainty estimation results for Hanford tank chemical and radionuclide inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferryman, T.A.; Amidan, B.G.; Chen, G. [and others

    1998-09-01

    The exact physical and chemical nature of 55 million gallons of radioactive waste held in 177 underground waste tanks at the Hanford Site is not known in sufficient detail to support safety, retrieval, and immobilization missions. The Hanford Engineering Analysis Best-Basis team has made point estimates of the inventories in each tank. The purpose of this study is to estimate probability distributions for each of the analytes and tanks for which the Hanford Best-Basis team has made point estimates. Uncertainty intervals can then be calculated for the Best-Basis inventories and should facilitate the cleanup missions. The methodology used to generate the results published in the Tank Characterization Database (TCD) and summarized in this paper is based on scientific principles, sound technical knowledge of the realities associated with the Hanford waste tanks, the chemical analysis of actual samples from the tanks, the Hanford Best-Basic research, and historical data records. The methodology builds on research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) over the last few years. Appendix A of this report summarizes the results of the study. The full set of results (in percentiles, 1--99) is available through the TCD, (http://twins.pnl.gov:8001).

  19. Development of the kinetic molecular theory of gases concept inventory: Preliminary results on university students’ misconceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Erceg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated students’ understanding of concepts related to the microscopic model of gas. We thoroughly reviewed the relevant literature and conducted think alouds with students by asking them to answer open-ended questions about the kinetic molecular theory of gases. Thereafter, we transformed the open-ended questions into multiple-choice questions, whereby distractors were based on the results of the think alouds. Thus, we obtained a set of 22 questions, which constitutes our current version of the kinetic molecular theory of gases concept inventory. The inventory has been administered to 250 students from different universities in Croatia, and its content validity has been investigated trough physics teacher surveys. The results of our study not only corroborate the existence of some already known student misconceptions, but also reveal new insights about a great spectrum of students’ misconceptions that had not been reported in earlier research (e.g., misconceptions about intermolecular potential energy and molecular velocity distribution. Moreover, we identified similar distribution of students’ responses across the surveyed student groups, despite the fact that they had been enrolled in different curricular environments.

  20. Adaptation and Latent Structure of the Swahili Version of Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Low Literacy Population in the Context of HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Amina Abubakar; Raphael Birya Kalu; Khamis Katana; Beatrice Kabunda; Hassan, Amin S; Newton, Charles R; Fons Van de Vijver

    2016-01-01

    Objective We set out to adapt the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II in Kenya and examine its factorial structure. Methods In the first phase we carried out in-depth interviews involving 29 adult members of the community to elicit their understanding of depression and identify aspects of the BDI-II that required adaptation. In the second phase, a modified version of BDI-II was administered to 221 adults randomly selected from the community to allow for the evaluation of its psychometric prope...

  1. Evaluation of Anxiety and Depressive Levels in Tinnitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Chang Gun; Chi, Jun Hyuk; Song, Jae-Jun; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Bo Hae

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the relationship between tinnitus and the level of anxiety and depression experienced by subjective tinnitus patients, and to determine the effect of the level of anxiety and depression to the results of tinnitus treatment. Subjects and Methods A total of 104 patients were included in this study. All the patients conducted Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State Trait Anxiety Inventory 1, 2 (ST...

  2. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

    2014-09-01

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  3. Population impact of depression on functional disability in elderly: results from "São Paulo Ageing & Health Study" (SPAH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Simone Almeida; Scazufca, Marcia; Menezes, Paulo R

    2013-03-01

    With the fast population aging, functional disability among the elderly is becoming a major public health issue. Depression is highly prevalent in this phase of life and may be associated with a significant proportion of the disability among elderly populations. We investigated the association of depressive symptoms and ICD-10 depression with functional disability in older adults and estimated the corresponding population attributable fractions (PAF). A cross-sectional one-phase population-based study was carried out with 2,072 individuals aged 65 years or over living in a low-income area of São Paulo, Brazil. Depressive symptoms and ICD-10 depression were assessed with the Geriatric Mental State and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. We assessed functional disability with the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule Instrument. Prevalence Ratios and PAF were calculated using Poisson regression. The prevalence of depressive symptoms and ICD-10 depression was 21.4 and 4.8 %, respectively. Depression and depressive symptoms were strongly associated with high functional disability, even after adjustment for demographic factors, socioeconomic conditions, physical morbidities, and dementia. The PAFs for depressive symptoms and ICD-10 depression were 12.0 % for each of the psychiatric morbidity. Depressive symptoms contributed as much as ICD-10 depression to the population burden of functional disability in the elderly. Effective management of clinically significant depressive symptoms, delivered mainly at the primary care level, may reduce the total population disability.

  4. Hyperhomocysteinemia is a result, rather than a cause, of depression under chronic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Chengfeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the accumulation of homocysteine (Hcy has been implicated in the pathogenesis of depression, whether Hcy is directly involved and acts as the primary cause of depressive symptoms remains unclear. The present study was designed to clarify whether increased Hcy plays an important role in stress-induced depression. RESULTS: We employed the chronic unpredictable mild stress model (CUMS of depression for 8 weeks to observe changes in the plasma Hcy level in the development of depression. The results showed that Wistar rats exposed to a series of mild, unpredictable stressors for 4 weeks displayed depression-like symptoms such as anhedonia (decreased sucrose preferences and a decreased 5-Hydroxy Tryptophan (5-HT concentration in the hippocampus. At the end of 8 weeks, the plasma Hcy level increased in the CUMS rats. The anti-depressant sertraline could decrease the plasma Hcy level and improve the depression-like symptoms in the CUMS rats. RhBHMT, an Hcy metabolic enzyme, could decrease the plasma Hcy level significantly, although it could not improve the depressive symptoms in the CUMS rats. CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained from the experiments did not support the hypothesis that the increased Hcy concentration mediated the provocation of depression in CUMS rats, and the findings suggested that the increased Hcy concentration in the plasma might be the result of stress-induced depression.

  5. [Factor models of the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Validation with coronary patients and a critique of Ward's model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pino Pérez, Antonio; Ibáñez Fernández, Ignacio; Bosa Ojeda, Francisco; Dorta González, Ruth; Gaos Miezoso, María Teresa

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to validate in a sample of 205 coronary patients a factor model for the BDI-II, especially a model that would allow for modeling of depressive symptoms after explicitly removing bias related to somatic symptoms of depression that would overlap those of heart disease. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses for ordinal data were conducted. A one-factor model, six correlated two-factor models and, derivatives thereof, seven models with a single General Depression factor and two uncorrelated factors, were analyzed. Exploratory analysis extracted two factors, Somatic-affective and Cognitive. Confirmatory factor analyses showed the worst fit for the one-factor model. Two-factor models were surpassed in goodness of fit by the models of general-factor and group factors. Among these, the General, Somatic-affective and Cognitive (G-Sa-C) model of Beck with students is noteworthy. The reduced General, Somatic and Cognitive (G-S-C) model of Ward showed the worst goodness of fit. Our model surpasses the cutoff criteria of all fit indexes. We conclude that the inclusion of a general-factor and group factors in all the models surpasses the results of G-S-C model and, therefore, questions it. The G-Sa-C model is strengthened.

  6. Resource Utilisation and Costs of Depressive Patients in Germany: Results from the Primary Care Monitoring for Depressive Patients Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Krauth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Depression is the most common type of mental disorder in Germany. It is associated with a high level of suffering for individuals and imposes a significant burden on society. The aim of this study was to estimate the depression related costs in Germany taking a societal perspective. Materials and Methods. Data were collected from the primary care monitoring for depressive patients trial (PRoMPT of patients with major depressive disorder who were treated in a primary care setting. Resource utilisation and days of sick leave were observed and analysed over a 1-year period. Results. Average depression related costs of €3813 were calculated. Significant differences in total costs due to sex were demonstrated. Male patients had considerable higher total costs than female patients, whereas single cost categories did not differ significantly. Further, differences in costs according to severity of disease and age were observed. The economic burden to society was estimated at €15.6 billion per year. Conclusion. The study results show that depression poses a significant economic burden to society. There is a high potential for prevention, treatment, and patient management innovations to identify and treat patients at an early stage.

  7. Lessons from a Large-Scale Assessment: Results from Conceptual Inventories

    CERN Document Server

    Thacker, Beth; Pattillo, Dave; West, Keith

    2013-01-01

    We report the conceptual inventory results of a large-scale assessment project at a large university. We studied an attempt at introducing materials and instructional methods informed by physics education research (PER-informed materials) into a department where most instruction has been traditional and a significant number of faculty are hesitant, ambivalent or even resistant about the introduction of such reforms. The changes were made in the laboratories and recitation sections of the introductory classes, both calculus-based and algebra-based, introducing PER-informed materials and training the teaching assistants in student-centered instructional methods. In addition to the results found in the large lecture classes, we present the results of a small PER-informed, inquiry-based, laboratory-based class that has been taught as a special section of the algebra-based course for about 10 years. The assessment reported in this paper was done using available PER-developed assessment instruments. The results of ...

  8. Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) Tasting and Reported Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Paul B.

    1986-01-01

    The phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taste test was investigated for its potential as a genetically based biological marker for depression. Results indicated PTC tasters reported significantly higher levels of depression on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) than nontasters and they scored higher on 5 of the 21 items. (Author/BL)

  9. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003213.htm Depression - overview To use the sharing features on this ... older adults Major depression Persistent depressive disorder Postpartum depression Premenstrual ... Review Date 1/4/2016 Updated by: Timothy Rogge, ...

  10. The interrelation between premenstrual syndrome and major depression: Results from a population-based sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Carine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research about the relationship between premenstrual syndrome (PMS and major depression is limited. This study examined the relationship between moderate to severe PMS and major depression in a population-based sample of women of reproductive age. The objectives of the study were to assess the association between premenstrual syndrome and major depression, to analyse how PMS and major depression differ and to characterise the group of women who report both PMS and major depression. Methods Data were obtained from the Swiss Health Survey 2007. Included in the analysis was data from women under the age of 55 without hysterectomy and who answered the questions on PMS symptoms. The population-based sample consisted of 3518 women. Weighted prevalence rates were calculated and relative risk ratios for PMS, major depression and women who reported both PMS and major depression, were calculated with logistic multinominal logit regression. Results The prevalence of major depression was 11.3% in women screening positive for moderate PMS and 24.6% in women screening positive for severe PMS. Compared to women without any of these conditions, women who reported moderate to severe alcohol consumption had a lower risk for PMS. Women reporting use of antidepressants, and use of oral contraceptives had a higher risk for major depression compared to women without any of these conditions. Women reporting work dissatisfaction had a higher risk for PMS. A higher relative risk to report both PMS and major depression compared to women without PMS or major depression was related to factors such as high psychological distress, low mastery, psychotropic drug consumption, and low self-rated health. Conclusions The results suggested that women who suffer from both PMS and major depression are more impaired compared to women with only one disorder. The results further indicated that PMS and major depression are different disorders that can, however, co-occur.

  11. [Background and first results about methodological characteristics of the Aachen Life Quality Inventory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütter, B O; Gilsbach, J M

    2001-01-01

    Health-related quality of life has become an important criterion for assessing disease impact and treatment outcome. Therefore, we developed a questionnaire called Aachen Life Quality Inventory (ALQI) for the use in neurosurgical patients with brain damage. The ALQI is derived from the German version of the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP). The 117 items are formulated on a concrete behavioral level covering the following dimensions of health-related quality of life: 1. activation; 2. mobility; 3. house-work; 4. social contact; 5. family relations; 6. ambulation; 7. work; 8. free-time activities; 9. autonomy; 10. communication; 11. cognitive capacity. As in the SIP, a summary score of total impairment (ALQI Total score), a summary score covering the psycho-social dimension (ALQI Psycho-social score) and a summary score covering aspects of physical functioning (ALQI Physical score) can be calculated. The ALQI consists of a self-rating and a parallel proxy-rating version. The ALQI was validated and psychometrically verified using the data of as yet 231 neurosurgical patients with brain damage of mixed etiology (subarachnoid hemorrhage, closed-head injury, benign brain tumors). Internal consistency (Cronbach's Alpha) ranged from.68 to.91 for the subscales, while it was.97 for the whole instrument,.94 for the psycho-social and.93 for the physical score. The internal consistency for the subscales of the proxy-rating version of the ALQI ranged between.77 and.92, while it was.97 for the whole inventory and.94 for the psycho-social and the physical scores, respectively. Examination of construct validity revealed substantial correlations with a wide range of relevant neurological, neurosurgical and neuropsychological parameters. Beyond other findings, substantial associations emerged with several neuropsychological tests (r =.30 to r =.50), the Glasgow Outcome Scale (r =.39; p <.00) and in patients after subarachnoid hemorrhage with the Hunt& Hess grading (r =.28; p <.001

  12. Assessing Latina/o Undergraduates' Depressive Symptomatology: Comparisons of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and the Self-Report Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Rico, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of depression scales as screening tools at university and college centers is increasing and thus, the question of whether scales are culturally valid for different student groups is increasingly more relevant with increased severity of depression for students and changing student demographics. As such, this study examined the reliability…

  13. Diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression in Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hapunda, Given; Abubakar, Amina; Pouwer, F

    2015-01-01

    Zambian patients with diabetes completed the Major Depression Inventory and a list of demographic indicators. RESULTS: Compared with control subjects (mean ± sd Major Depression Inventory score 15.10 ± 9.19), depressive symptoms were significantly more common in patients with diabetes (mean ± sd Major......AIMS: To replicate, in Zambia, a recent global study by the WHO, which reported that the odds of depression were not increased in African people with diabetes, and to explore the sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with depression. METHODS: A total of 773 control subjects and 157...... Depression Inventory score 19.12 ± 8.95; P depression. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to the WHO study, we...

  14. [Burnout syndrome of human services professionals--doctors, nurses, caregivers, teachers and clerks (1). Maslach Burnout Inventory: factor structures for samples of human services professionals, and its relation with Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuko, E; Yamagishi, M; Kishi, R; Miyake, H

    1989-07-01

    During the past decade, burnout syndrome has been widely discussed not only in the USA but also in Japan. To evaluate the state of "burnout," two major scales are available: the first is the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) developed by C. Maslach and the other is the burnout scale by A. Pines. MBI is suggested to be independent of and incompatible with Pines' burnout scale, but, Pines' burnout scale is predominantly used in Japan, while both are used in the USA. Since hardly any studies of burnout using MBI have been made in Japan, we measured and analyzed MBI to evaluate the burnout state of doctors, nurses, caregivers, teachers and clerks who are engaged in "human services professions." The available data were subjected to factor analysis, reliability analysis and multiple regression analysis using Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS). The following results were obtained. 1) The factor analysis showed that the factor loading pattern was similar to that of Maslach's, but two different factors were emerged in addition to the standard factors in the intensity subscale. 2) In the relationship with the state of depression, burnout is closely related to depression but simultaneously has its own factors. This suggest that burnout is not a subtype of the depressive state.

  15. Low socioeconomic position and depression persistence: longitudinal results from the GAZEL cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Maria; Chastang, Jean-François; Leclerc, Annette; Ribet, Céline; Rouillon, Frédéric

    2010-05-15

    Research examining the association between socioeconomic position and depression course has yielded inconsistent results. We tested the association between low socioeconomic position and 7-year depression persistence among 298 community-based individuals with depression (subset of the GAZEL cohort study based in France). Data were analyzed using Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE models). Low socioeconomic position predicted depression persistence (men: low vs. intermediate/high income: OR: 2.52, 95% CI 1.28-4.95; women: low vs. intermediate/high occupational grade: OR: 2.25, 95% CI 1.06-4.80). These associations were reduced and became statistically nonsignificant after controlling for baseline sociodemographic characteristics and stressful life events (men and women), overall health (men), and the severity of mental health difficulties (men and women). Overall, depressed individuals with low socioeconomic position appear disproportionately likely to experience multiple risk factors of long-term depression.

  16. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  17. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    , that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression......The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued...

  18. Evidências de validade entre a Escala de Depressão (EDEP, o BDI e o Inventário de Percepção de Suporte Familiar (IPSF Validity evidences between the Depression Scale (EDEP, the BDI and the Perception of Family Support Inventory (IPSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makilim Nunes Baptista

    2008-12-01

    's family support, understood as manifestation of attention, care, dialog, freedom, affective proximity, autonomy and independence between family members. The present research aimed to search for validity evidences to Depression Scale (EDEP based on the relation to other variables assessing the same construct, depression, being also assessed by Beck Depression Inventory - BDI, and assessing related constructs, family support, measured by Perception of Family Support Inventory - IPSF. 157 undergraduates from a private university located in south state of Minas Gerais, 75,5% from female gender and 24,5% from male gender, aging from 18 to 51 years old (M=23,2; DP=6,4 took part in this study. At the results, high, significant and positive correlations were found between EDEP and BDI, as expected, indicating that the higher the scores on both scales, higher the depressive symptoms. As for the correlations between EDEP and IPSF dimensions, significant and negative correlations were found, suggesting that the higher depressive symptoms lower the perception of family support on individuals. Only marginally significant differences were found between genders, as to depressive symptoms (EDEP and BDI, indicating that women would score more at the depression scales.

  19. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  20. Estimation on the First Cycle of the Annual Forest Inventory System: Methods, Preliminary Results, and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark H. Hansen; Gary J. Brand; Daniel G. Wendt; Ronald E. McRoberts

    2001-01-01

    The first year of annual FIA data collection in the North Central region was completed for 1999 in Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, and Missouri. Estimates of timberland area, total growing-stock volume and growing-stock volume per acre are presented. These estimates are based on data from 1 year, collected at the base Federal inventory intensity, a lower intensity sample...

  1. Results from a trial of an unsupported internet intervention for depressive symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Leykin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Internet interventions provide an option for those who either cannot or choose not to engage with traditional treatments. Most research on internet interventions involves guided or supported interventions. However, unsupported interventions offer considerably more scalability and cost-effectiveness, which makes them attractive for large-scale implementation. In this study, 309 participants recruited via Google AdWords entered an unsupported cognitive–behavioral internet intervention for depressive symptoms. To maximize the ecological validity of the study, participants received no incentives or live contact with study personnel. Furthermore, the study was open to individuals at any level of depressive symptoms, and all participants received the active intervention. The main outcome measures were depressive symptom level and self-efficacy in managing depressive symptoms. At follow-up, depression scores were significantly lower than baseline scores at each follow-up point (1, 2, 4, and 7 months, with pre–post effect sizes ranging from medium to large. Follow-up depression self-efficacy scores were significantly higher than baseline scores at each follow-up point, with pre–post effect sizes in the medium range. The results remained significant when analyzing only participants with depression scores indicative of a presence of a major depressive episode; results likewise remained significant when employing the conservative last observation carried forward convention, even in the presence of high attrition observed in this study. The results illustrate the potential of unsupported internet intervention to address the health needs of the global community.

  2. Low birth weight in offspring of women with depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy: results from a population based study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasreen Hashima E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a high prevalence of antepartum depression and low birth weight (LBW in Bangladesh. In high- and low-income countries, prior evidence linking maternal depressive and anxiety symptoms with infant LBW is conflicting. There is no research on the association between maternal mental disorders and LBW in Bangladesh. This study aims to investigate the independent effect of maternal antepartum depressive and anxiety symptoms on infant LBW among women in a rural district of Bangladesh. Methods A population-based sample of 720 pregnant women from two rural subdistricts was assessed for symptoms of antepartum depression, using the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS, and antepartum anxiety, using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and followed for 6-8 months postpartum. Infant birth weight of 583 (81% singleton live babies born at term (≥37 weeks of pregnancy was measured within 48 hours of delivery. Baseline data provided socioeconomic, anthropometric, reproductive, obstetric, and social support information. Trained female interviewers carried out structured interviews. Chi-square, Fisher's exact, and independent-sample t tests were done as descriptive statistics, and a multiple logistic regression model was used to identify predictors of LBW. Results After adjusting for potential confounders, depressive (OR = 2.24; 95% CI 1.37-3.68 and anxiety (OR = 2.08; 95% CI 1.30-3.25 symptoms were significantly associated with LBW (≤2.5 kg. Poverty, maternal malnutrition, and support during pregnancy were also associated with LBW. Conclusions This study provides evidence that maternal depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy predict the LBW of newborns and replicates results found in other South Asian countries. Policies aimed at the detection and effective management of depressive and anxiety symptoms during pregnancy may reduce the burden on mothers and also act as an important measure in the prevention of LBW

  3. Does occasional cannabis use impact anxiety and depression treatment outcomes?: Results from a randomized effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Jonathan B; Russo, Joan; Stein, Murray B; Sherbourne, Cathy; Craske, Michelle; Schraufnagel, Trevor J; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which occasional cannabis use moderated anxiety and depression outcomes in the Collaborative Care for Anxiety and Panic (CCAP) study, a combined cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy randomized effectiveness trial. Participants were 232 adults from six university-based primary care outpatient clinics in three West Coast cities randomized to receive either the CCAP intervention or the usual care condition. Results showed significant (Pcannabis use status (monthly vs. less than monthly) for depressive symptoms, but not for panic disorder or social phobia symptoms (all P>.05). Monthly cannabis users' depressive symptoms improved in the CCAP intervention just as much as those who used cannabis less than monthly, whereas monthly users receiving usual care had significantly more depressive symptoms than those using less than monthly. A combined CBT and medication treatment intervention may be a promising approach for the treatment of depression among occasional cannabis users. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Depression after CABG: a prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Joana Kátya Veras Rodrigues Sampaio; de Figueiredo Neto, José Albuquerque; de Sousa, Rosângela Maria Lopes; Costa, Vera Lívia Xavier de Castro; Silva, Flor de Maria Araújo Mendonça; da Hora, Ana Flávia Lima Teles; da Silva, Edna Lúcia Coutinho; Reis, Lívia Mariane Castelo Branco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Depression during or shortly after hospitalization elevated two to three times the risk of mortality or nonfatal cardiac events, significantly increasing the morbidity and mortality of these patients. Objective To assess the impact of revascularization on symptoms of depression in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods A prospective cohort study of 57 patients of both sexes undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting between June 2010 and June 2011. We used the SF-36 to assess quality of life, and the Beck Depression Inventory to detect depressive symptoms, applied preoperatively and six months. Results The prevalence of patients aged 60-69 years was 22 patients (38.60%), 39 men (68.42%), 26 described themselves as mixed race (45.61%), 16 literate (28.07 %) and 30 married (52.63%). The beck depression inventory score demonstrated increased after revascularization: 15 patients mild (26.32%) at time zero to 17 (29.82%) after. And with moderate, seven patients (12.28%) before and 10 (17.54%) after. In the categories of individuals with decreased minimum degree of 32 (56.14%) to 28 (49.12%), and severe of three (5.26%) for two (3.51%) patients. Association was observed between beck depression inventory, gender, age, lifestyle, comorbidities and quality of life. Conclusion There was a high prevalence of elevated beck depression inventory scores, lowest scores of depressive symptoms among men and association between the improvement of quality of life scores and beck depression inventory. PMID:24598954

  5. Depression after CABG: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Kátya Veras Rodrigues Sampaio Nunes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Depression during or shortly after hospitalization elevated two to three times the risk of mortality or nonfatal cardiac events, significantly increasing the morbidity and mortality of these patients. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of revascularization on symptoms of depression in patients with coronary artery disease. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of 57 patients of both sexes undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting between June 2010 and June 2011. We used the SF-36 to assess quality of life, and the Beck Depression Inventory to detect depressive symptoms, applied preoperatively and six months. RESULTS: The prevalence of patients aged 60-69 years was 22 patients (38.60%, 39 men (68.42%, 26 described themselves as mixed race (45.61%, 16 literate (28.07 % and 30 married (52.63%. The beck depression inventory score demonstrated increased after revascularization: 15 patients mild (26.32% at time zero to 17 (29.82% after. And with moderate, seven patients (12.28% before and 10 (17.54% after. In the categories of individuals with decreased minimum degree of 32 (56.14% to 28 (49.12%, and severe of three (5.26% for two (3.51% patients. Association was observed between beck depression inventory, gender, age, lifestyle, comorbidities and quality of life. CONCLUSION: There was a high prevalence of elevated beck depression inventory scores, lowest scores of depressive symptoms among men and association between the improvement of quality of life scores and beck depression inventory.

  6. Postpartum depression: identifying associations with bipolarity and personality traits. Preliminary results from a cross-sectional study in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Dominika; Jaeschke, Rafał; Siwek, Marcin; Mączka, Grzegorz; Topór-Mądry, Roman; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2014-01-30

    The goals of this study have been to determine the prevalence of the bipolar spectrum features in the population of women with postpartum depression (PPD) symptoms, as well as to analyze the personality differences between putative 'unipolar' and 'bipolar' PPD subjects. The sample enrolled into the cross-sectional study consisted of 344 women at 6-12 weeks postpartum. The authors used the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; cut-off score: 13 pts.) for the assessment of the PPD symptoms, the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ; cut-off scores: 7 or 8 pts.) for diagnosing the bipolar features, and the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) for the assessment of personality traits. The EPDS-positive subjects were more likely to score positively on the MDQ, as compared to the EPDS-negative ones. The EPDS-positive subjects who also scored ≥8 pts. on the MDQ were characterized by higher index of neuroticism, as compared to those who scored positively on the EPDS only. The results suggest that the presence of PPD symptoms is related to significantly higher scores of bipolarity and neuroticism. The more robust trait of neuroticism might be a marker of the 'bipolar' PPD, as compared to the 'unipolar' form of the disorder.

  7. Depressive symptoms in people with and without alcohol abuse: factor structure and measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II across groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilie Skule

    Full Text Available This study explored differences in the factor structure of depressive symptoms in patients with and without alcohol abuse, and differences in the severity of depressive symptoms between the two groups. In a sample of 358 patients without alcohol problems and 167 patients with comorbid alcohol problems, confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the same factor structures, Beck et al.'s two-factor Somatic Affective-Cognitive (SA-C model, and Buckley et al.'s three-factor Cognitive-Affective- Somatic (C-A-S model, demonstrated the best fit to the data in both groups. The SA-C model was preferred due to its more parsimonious nature. Evidence for strict measurement invariance across the two groups for the SA-C model was found. MIMIC (multiple-indicator-multiple-cause modeling showed that the level of depressive symptoms was found to be highest on both factors in the group with comorbid alcohol problems. The magnitude of the differences in latent mean scores suggested a moderate difference in the level of depressive symptoms between the two groups. It is argued that patients with comorbid depression and alcohol abuse should be offered parallel and adequate treatment for both conditions.

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Trinity Inventory of Precursors to Suicide (TIPS) and Its Relationship to Hopelessness and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Caroline L.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    Numerous existing measures assess attitudes toward suicide yet fail to account for contextual factors. The Trinity Inventory of Precursors to Suicide (TIPS) is presented as an alternative, with implications for the development of prevention programs. Having previously reported exploratory analysis of the TIPS; confirmatory factor analysis and…

  9. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  10. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  11. [Inventory of training of internal medicine in France: Results of a national survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, M; Terrier, B; Mangin, O; Mouthon, L

    2017-05-01

    To make an inventory of training of Internal Medicine in France. This study was conducted between May and September 2015 with coordinators (interviews of 45minutes) of local Internal Medicine training and fellows (online questionnaire). All coordinators (n=28) responded to the interviews. Local training of Internal Medicine exists in 86% of regions (3.1±3.1hours/month) and an interregional training in all interregions (34.7±13.9hours/year). When excluding Île-de-France, no correlation between the number of teachers and the amount of lessons was noted (P=0.61). Of the 550 fellows in Internal Medicine in 2014-2015, 223 (41%) responded to the online questionnaire. Mean level was 5.5±2.7 semesters. The rate of satisfaction (1=very dissatisfied and 5=very satisfied) was 3.0±1.0 and 3.8±0.8 for regional and interregional teaching, respectively (PInternal Medicine. This survey states for the first time an inventory of training of Internal Medicine dedicated to fellows in France. This report highlights that fellows wish to have a national program, be further evaluated and have access to more interactive approach of teaching. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. A methodology for elemental and organic carbon emission inventory and results for Lombardy region, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caserini, Stefano [Politecnico di Milano, DICA Environmental Engineering Section, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Galante, Silvia, E-mail: silvia1.galante@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, DICA Environmental Engineering Section, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ozgen, Senem; Cucco, Sara; Gregorio, Katia de [Politecnico di Milano, DICA Environmental Engineering Section, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Moretti, Marco [Environmental Protection Agency of Lombardia Region, ARPA, 20124 Milano (Italy)

    2013-04-15

    This paper presents a methodology and its application for the compilation of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) emission inventories. The methodology consists of the estimation of EC and OC emissions from available total suspended particulate matter (TSP) emission inventory data using EC and OC abundances in TSP derived from an extensive literature review, by taking into account the local technological context. In particular, the method is applied to the 2008 emissions of Lombardy region, Italy, considering 148 different activities and 30 types of fuels, typical of Western Europe. The abundances estimated in this study may provide a useful basis to assess the emissions also in other emission contexts with similar prevailing sources and technologies. The dominant sources of EC and OC in Lombardy are diesel vehicles for EC and the residential wood combustion (RWC) for OC which together account for about 83% of the total emissions of both pollutants. The EC and OC emissions from industrial processes and other fuel (e.g., gasoline, kerosene and LPG) combustion are significantly lower, while non-combustion sources give an almost negligible contribution. Total EC + OC contribution to regional greenhouse gas emissions is positive for every sector assuming whichever GWP100 value within the range proposed in literature. An uncertainty assessment is performed through a Monte Carlo simulation for RWC, showing a large uncertainty range (280% of the mean value for EC and 70% for OC), whereas for road transport a qualitative analysis identified a narrower range of uncertainty. - Highlights: ► Diesel and wood combustion contribute to more than 80% of total EC and OC. ► More than 50% of EC emissions come from road transport. ► Monte Carlo method is used to assess the uncertainty of wood combustion emissions. ► Residential wood combustion is the main source of uncertainty of EC OC inventory. ► In terms of CO{sub 2}eq, EC and OC correspond to 3% of CO{sub 2

  13. [Concept and results of an awareness campaign: the "Nuremberg Alliance against Depression"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althaus, D; Hegerl, U

    2003-03-10

    Currently, only a small percentage of patients with depressive disorders receive adequate pharmacological or psychotherapeutic treatment. Apart from deficits in diagnosis and treatment, misconceptions and prejudice with regard to depression on the part of the public at large are major reasons for this situation. Fear of medical treatment, in particular, is common. Within the framework of a multilevel depression and suicide prevention program conducted in Nuremberg ("Nuremberg Alliance against Depression") in the years 2001 and 2002, an intensive public awareness campaign was undertaken; two telephone surveys were carried out to evaluate the outcome in comparison with a control region. The results revealed that awareness and knowledge of the condition among the public was considerably improved,while negative attitudes towards antidepressant medication remained unchanged.

  14. Humorous Stimuli and Depression: An Examination of Beck's Premise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Forrest R.; Merbaum, Michael

    1983-01-01

    Studied the relationship between depression and humor in 85 college students who took the Beck Depression Inventory and then rated 10 cartoons. Results showed no difference between mildly depressed and nondepressed subjects. However, some trends were noted on a mood scale related to immediate feelings and humor preference. (Author/JAC)

  15. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Different people have different symptoms. Some symptoms of depression include: Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness ...

  16. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty may trigger depression in some people. Medical illness – ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary ...

  17. Vitamin D deficiency, depression course and mortality: Longitudinal results from the Netherlands Study on Depression in Older persons (NESDO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, K.S. van den; Marijnissen, R.M.; Brink, R.H. van den; Naarding, P.; Comijs, H.C.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of vitamin D levels on depression course and remission status after two years, as well as attrition and mortality, in an older cohort. METHODS: This study was part of the Netherlands Study on Depression in Older persons (NESDO), a prospective cohort study. 367 depresse

  18. Inventário de Depressão de Beck - BDI: validação fatorial para mulheres com câncer Beck Depression Inventory - BDI: factorial analysis for women with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Gandini

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve por objetivo validar fatorialmente o Inventário de Depressão de Beck - BDI para uma amostra de 208 mulheres com câncer. A validação fatorial do BDI foi realizada por meio da análise fatorial, método de extração dos componentes principais e rotação oblimin, tendo sido identificadas duas soluções fatoriais, uma bifatorial - sendo F1 composto por 8 itens (a = 0,82 denominado "visão negativa de si mesmo", explicando 32,4% da variância e F2 com 5 itens (a = 0,77 denominado "função física", explicando 8% da variância - e outra unifatorial com 13 itens, com fidedignidade altamente satisfatória (a = 0,86 denominada "depressão", explicando 38% da variância total.This study refers to the factor analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory - BDI in a population composed by 208 women with cancer. The extraction method was principal components and the rotation procedure was oblimin. The BDI factorial analysis was done through the oblimin rotation, finding two solutions possibilities. One with two factors solution - the first one with 8 items (a = 0,82, called "negative view of self", explaining 32,4% of the variance and the second factor with 5 items (a = 0,77, called "physical function", explaining 8% of the variance - and other with one factor solution with 13 items, with really satisfactory reliability of 0,86, called "depression" and explaining 38% of the total variance.

  19. The Use and Effectiveness of Mobile Apps for Depression: Results From a Fully Remote Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arean, Patricia A; Hallgren, Kevin A; Jordan, Joshua T; Gazzaley, Adam; Atkins, David C; Heagerty, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile apps for mental health have the potential to overcome access barriers to mental health care, but there is little information on whether patients use the interventions as intended and the impact they have on mental health outcomes. Objective The objective of our study was to document and compare use patterns and clinical outcomes across the United States between 3 different self-guided mobile apps for depression. Methods Participants were recruited through Web-based advertisements and social media and were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 mood apps. Treatment and assessment were conducted remotely on each participant’s smartphone or tablet with minimal contact with study staff. We enrolled 626 English-speaking adults (≥18 years old) with mild to moderate depression as determined by a 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) score ≥5, or if their score on item 10 was ≥2. The apps were (1) Project: EVO, a cognitive training app theorized to mitigate depressive symptoms by improving cognitive control, (2) iPST, an app based on an evidence-based psychotherapy for depression, and (3) Health Tips, a treatment control. Outcomes were scores on the PHQ-9 and the Sheehan Disability Scale. Adherence to treatment was measured as number of times participants opened and used the apps as instructed. Results We randomly assigned 211 participants to iPST, 209 to Project: EVO, and 206 to Health Tips. Among the participants, 77.0% (482/626) had a PHQ-9 score >10 (moderately depressed). Among the participants using the 2 active apps, 57.9% (243/420) did not download their assigned intervention app but did not differ demographically from those who did. Differential treatment effects were present in participants with baseline PHQ-9 score >10, with the cognitive training and problem-solving apps resulting in greater effects on mood than the information control app (χ22=6.46, P=.04). Conclusions Mobile apps for depression appear to have their greatest impact on

  20. The Effects of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy added to Treatment as Usual on suicidal ideation in chronic depression: Results of a randomized-clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkmann, Thomas; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Teismann, Tobias; Schramm, Elisabeth; Michalak, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    Suicidal ideation (SI) is common in chronic depression, but only limited evidence exists for the assumption that psychological treatments for depression are effective for reducing SI. In the present study, the effects of Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT; group version) plus treatment-as-usual (TAU: individual treatment by either a psychiatrist or a licensed psychotherapist, including medication when indicated) and Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP; group version) plus TAU on SI was compared to TAU alone in a prospective, bi-center, randomized controlled trial. The sample consisted of 106 outpatients with chronic depression. Multivariate regression analyses revealed different results, depending on whether SI was assessed via self-report (Beck Depression Inventory suicide item) or via clinician rating (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale suicide item). Whereas significant reduction of SI emerged when assessed via clinician rating in the MBCT and CBASP group, but not in the TAU group while controlling for changes in depression, there was no significant effect of treatment on SI when assessed via self-report. SI was measured with only two single items. Because all effects were of small to medium size and were independent of effects from other depression symptoms, the present results warrant the application of such psychotherapeutical treatment strategies like MBCT and CBASP for SI in patients with chronic depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Adaptation and Latent Structure of the Swahili Version of Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Low Literacy Population in the Context of HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Abubakar

    Full Text Available We set out to adapt the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in Kenya and examine its factorial structure.In the first phase we carried out in-depth interviews involving 29 adult members of the community to elicit their understanding of depression and identify aspects of the BDI-II that required adaptation. In the second phase, a modified version of BDI-II was administered to 221 adults randomly selected from the community to allow for the evaluation of its psychometric properties. In the third phase of the study we evaluated the discriminative validity of BDI-11 by comparing a randomly chosen community sample (n = 29 with caregivers of adolescents affected by HIV (n = 77.A considerable overlap between the BDI symptoms and those generated in the interviews was observed. Relevant idioms and symptoms such as 'thinking too much' and 'Kuchoka moyo (having a tired heart' were identified. The administration of the BDI had to be modified to make it suitable for the low literacy levels of our participants. Fit indices for several models (one factorial, two-factor model and a three factor model were all within acceptable range. Evidence indicated that while multidimensional models could be fitted, the strong correlations between the factors implied that a single factor model may be the best suited solution (alpha [0.89], and a significant correlation with locally identified items [r = 0.51] confirmed the good psychometric properties of the adapted BDI-II. No evidence was found to support the hypothesis that somatization was more prevalent. Lastly, caregivers of HIV affected adolescents had significantly higher scores compared to adults randomly selected from the community F(1, 121 = 23.31, p < .001 indicating the discriminative validity of the adapted BDI = II.With an adapted administration procedure, the BDI-II provides an adequate measure of depressive symptoms which can be used alongside other measures for proper diagnosis in a low literacy population.

  2. The Use and Effectiveness of Mobile Apps for Depression: Results From a Fully Remote Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arean, Patricia A; Hallgren, Kevin A; Jordan, Joshua T; Gazzaley, Adam; Atkins, David C; Heagerty, Patrick J; Anguera, Joaquin A

    2016-12-20

    Mobile apps for mental health have the potential to overcome access barriers to mental health care, but there is little information on whether patients use the interventions as intended and the impact they have on mental health outcomes. The objective of our study was to document and compare use patterns and clinical outcomes across the United States between 3 different self-guided mobile apps for depression. Participants were recruited through Web-based advertisements and social media and were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 mood apps. Treatment and assessment were conducted remotely on each participant's smartphone or tablet with minimal contact with study staff. We enrolled 626 English-speaking adults (≥18 years old) with mild to moderate depression as determined by a 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) score ≥5, or if their score on item 10 was ≥2. The apps were (1) Project: EVO, a cognitive training app theorized to mitigate depressive symptoms by improving cognitive control, (2) iPST, an app based on an evidence-based psychotherapy for depression, and (3) Health Tips, a treatment control. Outcomes were scores on the PHQ-9 and the Sheehan Disability Scale. Adherence to treatment was measured as number of times participants opened and used the apps as instructed. We randomly assigned 211 participants to iPST, 209 to Project: EVO, and 206 to Health Tips. Among the participants, 77.0% (482/626) had a PHQ-9 score >10 (moderately depressed). Among the participants using the 2 active apps, 57.9% (243/420) did not download their assigned intervention app but did not differ demographically from those who did. Differential treatment effects were present in participants with baseline PHQ-9 score >10, with the cognitive training and problem-solving apps resulting in greater effects on mood than the information control app (χ22=6.46, P=.04). Mobile apps for depression appear to have their greatest impact on people with more moderate levels of depression. In

  3. Correlates and Predictors of Depression in College Students: Results from the Spring 2000 National College Health Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leino, E. Victor; Kisch, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    The present analyses used depression-related items and co-factors from the National College Health Assessment (NCHA), Spring 2000. The results indicate 10.3 % of college students (6.2% male and 12.6% female) reported ever having been diagnosed with depression. Of those ever diagnosed with depression, 39% were diagnosed in the last year, 27% were…

  4. Current situation of depression healthcare in Spain: results of a psychiatrists' survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Martín-Águeda

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the current situation of healthcare for depression in Spain, according to psychiatrists opinion, and how it has evolved over the last 20 years, comparativily with the results reported in previous studies of our group. Methods: Throughout 2002, we recorded the opinions of 101 specialists in psychiatry after asking them to fill out structured questionnaires in which they rated care, clinical, therapeutic and care quality. Results: The presence of depressive disorders in healthcare is substantial, despite the high figures for "concealed epidemiology", with an increase in these last 20 years of disorders comorbid with anxiety. Currently, most patients arrive at the psychiatrist having been referred by their general practitioners (GP, as there is now less reluctance in depressive patients to such referral. In the last years there has been an increase in pharmacological treatment, with adverse effects of the drugs representing the major obstacle to non-adherence to such treatment. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs constitute the pharmacological group of choice, and are the drugs most commonly used in the treatment of depression, together with venlafaxine. Areas where there is a need for improvement are time devoted to consultation, coordination between GPs and psychiatrists, waiting lists, and resources available to Mental Health Units. Conclusions: Current situation of depression healthcare in Spain has substantially changed in recent years, improving in some aspects, thanks, in part, to the attitudes of GPs with this disorder and to evolution of pharmacological treatment.

  5. 贝克抑郁量表第2版中文版在大一学生中的试用%Application of Chinese Version of Beck Depression Inventory-Ⅱ to Chinese First-year College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文辉; 吴多进; 彭芳

    2012-01-01

    目的:评估贝克抑郁量表第2版(BDI-Ⅱ)中文版在我国大一学生中的信度和效度.方法:972名大一学生完成BDI-Ⅱ中文版和流调中心用抑郁量表(CES-D)的测试,并随机抽取65名大学生1周后完成BDI-Ⅱ的重测.结果:BDI-Ⅱ中文版的Cronbach α系数为0.85,各条目间的相关系数在0.08~0.39之间,各条目与BDI-Ⅱ总分的相关系数在0.34~0.57之间,重测相关系数为0.73(Ps<0.05);BDI-Ⅱ总分与CES-D总分呈正相关(r=0.70,P<0.01).认知-情感和躯体症状2因子结构模型的验证性因素分析各指标为IFI=0.967 、CFI=0.967、x2/df=3.820、RMSEA=0.054.结论:贝克抑郁量表第2版中文版在大一学生中具有良好的信度和效度,能够作为我国大一学生抑郁症状筛查的自评工具.%Objective: To examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of Beck Depression Inventory-Ⅱ (BDI-Ⅱ) of Chinese first-year college students. Methods: A convenient sample of 972 college students in their first year completed the Chinese version of BDI-Ⅱ and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and 65 students received the retest of the BDI-Ⅱ after 1 week. Results: The Cronb-ch alpha coefficient of BDI-Ⅱ was 0.85. The intercorrelations of 21 items ranged from 0.08 to 0.39, and item-total correlations ranged from 0.34 to 0.57 (Ps<0.05). The test-retest coefficient was 0.73 (P<0.01). BDI-Ⅱ total score was related with the CES-D total score (r=0.70, P<0.01). The goodness-of-fit indices of confirmatory factor analysis were found (IFI=0.967, CFI=0.967, x2/df=3.820, RMSEA=0.054) for the two-factor structure model of cognitive-affective and somatic depressive symptoms. Conclusion: The Chinese version of Beck Depression Inventory-Ⅱ shows good reliability and validity, and could be reliably used as a self-administer inven-tory to assess depressive symptoms for Chinese first-year college students.

  6. Clinical Significance of the Number of Depressive Symptoms in Major Depressive Disorder: Results from the CRESCEND Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Sakong, Jeongkyu; Koo, Bon Hoon; Kim, Jae-Min; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Park, Yong Chon

    2016-04-01

    Our study aimed to establish the relationship between the number of depressive symptoms and the clinical characteristics of major depressive disorder (MDD). This would enable us to predict the clinical significance of the number of depressive symptoms in MDD patients. Using data from the Clinical Research Center for Depression (CRESCEND) study in Korea, 853 patients with DSM-IV MDD were recruited. The baseline and clinical characteristics of groups with different numbers of depressive symptoms were compared using the χ(2) test for discrete variables and covariance (ANCOVA) for continuous variables. In addition, the scores of these groups on the measurement tools were compared by ANCOVA after adjusting the potential effects of confounding variables. After adjusting the effects of monthly income and history of depression, a larger number of depressive symptoms indicated higher overall severity of depression (F [4, 756] = 21.458, P depressive symptoms (F [4, 767] = 19.145, P symptoms (F [4, 765] = 12.890, P depressive symptoms can be used as an index of greater illness burden in clinical psychiatry.

  7. Constructing a Cross-Domain Resource Inventory: Key Components and Results of the EarthCube CINERGI Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, I.; Richard, S. M.; Malik, T.; Hsu, L.; Gupta, A.; Grethe, J. S.; Valentine, D. W., Jr.; Lehnert, K. A.; Bermudez, L. E.; Ozyurt, I. B.; Whitenack, T.; Schachne, A.; Giliarini, A.

    2015-12-01

    While many geoscience-related repositories and data discovery portals exist, finding information about available resources remains a pervasive problem, especially when searching across multiple domains and catalogs. Inconsistent and incomplete metadata descriptions, disparate access protocols and semantic differences across domains, and troves of unstructured or poorly structured information which is hard to discover and use are major hindrances toward discovery, while metadata compilation and curation remain manual and time-consuming. We report on methodology, main results and lessons learned from an ongoing effort to develop a geoscience-wide catalog of information resources, with consistent metadata descriptions, traceable provenance, and automated metadata enhancement. Developing such a catalog is the central goal of CINERGI (Community Inventory of EarthCube Resources for Geoscience Interoperability), an EarthCube building block project (earthcube.org/group/cinergi). The key novel technical contributions of the projects include: a) development of a metadata enhancement pipeline and a set of document enhancers to automatically improve various aspects of metadata descriptions, including keyword assignment and definition of spatial extents; b) Community Resource Viewers: online applications for crowdsourcing community resource registry development, curation and search, and channeling metadata to the unified CINERGI inventory, c) metadata provenance, validation and annotation services, d) user interfaces for advanced resource discovery; and e) geoscience-wide ontology and machine learning to support automated semantic tagging and faceted search across domains. We demonstrate these CINERGI components in three types of user scenarios: (1) improving existing metadata descriptions maintained by government and academic data facilities, (2) supporting work of several EarthCube Research Coordination Network projects in assembling information resources for their domains

  8. Cognitive remediation for depressed inpatients: Results of a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Wolfgang; Engel, Sinha; Hajak, Goeran; Lautenbacher, Stefan; Gallhofer, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive deficits that persist despite antidepressive treatment and affect social and vocational functioning are well documented in major depressive disorder. Cognitive training approaches have proven successful in ameliorating these deficits in other psychiatric groups, but very few studies have been conducted in unipolar depressive patients by now. In contrast to previous studies solely including outpatients, effects of a cognitive remediation intervention on neurocognitive functioning of depressed inpatients were assessed by the present study. A randomized controlled trial was carried out with 46 depressed inpatients of a psychiatric hospital. Patients were randomly assigned to either a control group that received standard drug and non-drug (cognitive behavioural, occupational, sports, relaxation and music therapy) antidepressive treatment or a remediation group that additionally received 12 sessions of cognitive training for a total of 4 weeks (three sessions per week). An intent to treat analysis and a last observation carried forward method was used for data analyses. Patients of the remediation group demonstrated greater improvements in neurocognitive measures of verbal and nonverbal memory, working memory and executive function (Cohen's d effect sizes between .52 and .98). These results provide preliminary evidence that cognitive remediation interventions can be successfully applied also in psychiatric inpatients experiencing an acute depressive episode. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  9. Seasonality in depressive and anxiety symptoms among primary care patients and in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders; results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Winthorst Wim H; Post Wendy J; Meesters Ybe; Penninx Brenda WHJ; Nolen Willem A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about seasonality of specific depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in different patient populations. This study aims to assess seasonal variation of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a primary care population and across participants who were classified in diagnostic groups 1) healthy controls 2) patients with a major depressive disorder, 3) patients with any anxiety disorder and 4) patients with a major depression and any anxiety disorder. Methods Data...

  10. Depression in Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Safaie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is one of the Common psychological disorders. From the cognitive point of view, the unhealthy attitudes increase the severity of the depression. The aim of this study was to investigate depression and unhealthy attitudes in coronary patients hospitalized at Tabriz Shahid Madani Heart Center. Methods: One hundred twenty eight hospitalized patients having myocardial Infarctions were studied regarding unhealthy attitudes, severity of depression and demographic data. Results: The study showed a significant relation between unhealthy attitudes, BDI (Beck Depression Inventory and severe depression. Moreover, a significant relation existed between gender and depression (P=0.0001. In addition, the level of education increased the intensity of unhealthy attitudes (P=0.0001. Several researches in both outside and inside Iran support the idea. Conclusion: Based on present study and more other investigations, it can be suggested to provide the necessary elements and parameters such as antidepressant medication, psychologists, complementary treatment for coping with negative mood and its unwanted consequences.

  11. Prevalence and psychopathological characteristics of depression in consecutive otorhinolaryngologic inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westhofen Martin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High prevalence of depression has been reported in otorhinolaryngologic patients (ORL. However, studies using a semi-structured interview to determine the prevalence of depression in ORL are lacking. Therefore the present study sought to determine the depression prevalence in ORL applying a semi-structured diagnostic interview and to further characterize the pathopsychological and demographic characteristics of depression in these patients. Methods One-hundred inpatients of the otorhinolaryngologic department of a German university hospital participated voluntarily (age M = 38.8 years, SD = 13.9; 38.0% female. Depression was assessed using a clinical interview in which the International Diagnostic Checklist for depression (IDCL was applied. Patients completed the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI which constitutes three composite scores and nine symptom scales and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Multivariate analyses of variance, correlations and effect sizes were conducted. Results A prevalence of depression of 21.0% was determined, 38.0% of the depressed patients were female. Depressed patients showed higher scores on the BSI-scales "interpersonal sensitivity", "depression", "anxiety", "phobic anxiety" and "psychoticism" with medium effect sizes. Conclusions High prevalence of depression was found which is in accordance with results of prior studies. Depressed patients showed higher psychological distress as compared to non-depressed patients. The results call for carrying on in engaging in depression research and routine depression screening in ORL.

  12. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  13. An Integrated, Acceptance-Based Behavioral Approach for Depression With Social Anxiety: Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Kristy L; Morgan, Theresa A; Lipschitz, Jessica M; Martinez, Jennifer H; Tepe, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Depression and social anxiety disorder (SAD) are highly comorbid, resulting in greater severity and functional impairment compared with each disorder alone. Although recently transdiagnostic treatments have been developed, no known treatments have addressed this comorbidity pattern specifically. Preliminary support exists for acceptance-based approaches for depression and SAD separately, and they may be more efficacious for comorbid depression and anxiety compared with traditional cognitive-behavioral approaches. The aim of the current study was to develop and pilot test an integrated acceptance-based behavioral treatment for depression and comorbid SAD. Participants included 38 patients seeking pharmacotherapy at an outpatient psychiatry practice, who received 16 individual sessions of the therapy. Results showed significant improvement in symptoms, functioning, and processes from pre- to post-treatment, as well as high satisfaction with the treatment. These results support the preliminary acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness of this treatment in a typical outpatient psychiatry practice, and suggest that further research on this treatment in larger randomized trials is warranted. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Differentiating burnout from depression: personality matters!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Christoph Melchers

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Stress related affective disorders have been identified as a core health problem of the 21st century. In the endeavor to identify vulnerability factors, personality has been discussed as a major factor explaining and predicting disorders like depression or burnout. An unsolved question is whether there are specific personality factors allowing differentiation of burnout from depression. The present study tested the relation between one of the most prominent, biological personality theories, Cloninger’s Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI, and common measures of burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory General and depression (Beck Depression Inventory 2 in a sample of German employees (N=944 and a sample of inpatients (N = 425. Although the same personality traits (harm avoidance and self-directedness were predominantly associated with burnout and depression, there was a much stronger association to depression than to burnout in both samples. Besides, we observed specific associations between personality traits and subcomponents of burnout. Our results underline differences in the association of burnout vs. depression to personality, which may mirror differences in scope: While symptoms of depression affect all aspects of life, burnout is supposed to be specifically related to the workplace and its requirements. The much stronger association of personality to depression can be important to select appropriate therapy methods and to develop a more specified treatment for burnout in comparison to depression.

  15. Differentiating Burnout from Depression: Personality Matters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchers, Martin Christoph; Plieger, Thomas; Meermann, Rolf; Reuter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Stress-related affective disorders have been identified as a core health problem of the twenty-first century. In the endeavor to identify vulnerability factors, personality has been discussed as a major factor explaining and predicting disorders like depression or burnout. An unsolved question is whether there are specific personality factors allowing differentiation of burnout from depression. The present study tested the relation between one of the most prominent, biological personality theories, Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory, and common measures of burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory General) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory 2) in a sample of German employees (N = 944) and a sample of inpatients (N = 425). Although the same personality traits (harm avoidance and self-directedness) were predominantly associated with burnout and depression, there was a much stronger association to depression than to burnout in both samples. Besides, we observed specific associations between personality traits and subcomponents of burnout. Our results underline differences in the association of burnout vs. depression to personality, which may mirror differences in scope. While symptoms of depression affect all aspects of life, burnout is supposed to be specifically related to the workplace and its requirements. The much stronger association of personality to depression can be important to select appropriate therapy methods and to develop a more specified treatment for burnout in comparison to depression.

  16. Differentiating Burnout from Depression: Personality Matters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchers, Martin Christoph; Plieger, Thomas; Meermann, Rolf; Reuter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Stress-related affective disorders have been identified as a core health problem of the twenty-first century. In the endeavor to identify vulnerability factors, personality has been discussed as a major factor explaining and predicting disorders like depression or burnout. An unsolved question is whether there are specific personality factors allowing differentiation of burnout from depression. The present study tested the relation between one of the most prominent, biological personality theories, Cloninger’s Temperament and Character Inventory, and common measures of burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory General) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory 2) in a sample of German employees (N = 944) and a sample of inpatients (N = 425). Although the same personality traits (harm avoidance and self-directedness) were predominantly associated with burnout and depression, there was a much stronger association to depression than to burnout in both samples. Besides, we observed specific associations between personality traits and subcomponents of burnout. Our results underline differences in the association of burnout vs. depression to personality, which may mirror differences in scope. While symptoms of depression affect all aspects of life, burnout is supposed to be specifically related to the workplace and its requirements. The much stronger association of personality to depression can be important to select appropriate therapy methods and to develop a more specified treatment for burnout in comparison to depression. PMID:26321963

  17. Compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, anxiety, depression and stress in registered nurses in Australia: study 1 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegney, Desley G; Craigie, Mark; Hemsworth, David; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Aoun, Samar; Francis, Karen; Drury, Vicki

    2014-05-01

    To explore compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction with the potential contributing factors of anxiety, depression and stress. To date, no studies have connected the quality of work-life with other contributing and co-existing factors such as depression, anxiety and stress. A self-report exploratory cross sectional survey of 132 nurses working in a tertiary hospital. The reflective assessment risk profile model provides an excellent framework for examining the relationships between the professional quality of work factors and contributing factors within the established risk profiles. The results show a definite pattern of risk progression for the six factors examined for each risk profile. Additionally, burnout and secondary traumatic stress were significantly related to higher anxiety and depression levels. Higher anxiety levels were correlated with nurses who were younger, worked full-time and without a postgraduate qualification. Twenty percent had elevated levels of compassion fatigue: 7.6% having a very distressed profile. At-risk nurses' stress and depression scores were significantly higher than nurses with higher compassion satisfaction scores. The employed nurse workforce would benefit from a psychosocial capacity building intervention that reduces a nurse's risk profile, thus enhancing retention. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Internet use, Facebook intrusion, and depression: Results of a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachnio, A; Przepiórka, A; Pantic, I

    2015-09-01

    Facebook has become a very popular social networking platform today, particularly among adolescents and young adults, profoundly changing the way they communicate and interact. However, some reports have indicated that excessive Facebook use might have detrimental effects on mental health and be associated with certain psychological problems. Because previous findings on the relationship between Facebook addiction and depression were not unambiguous, further investigation was required. The main objective of our study was to examine the potential associations between Internet use, depression, and Facebook intrusion. A total of 672 Facebook users took part in the cross-sectional study. The Facebook Intrusion Questionnaire and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale were used. For collecting the data, the snowball sampling procedure was used. We showed that depression can be a predictor of Facebook intrusion. Our results provides additional evidence that daily Internet use time in minutes, gender, and age are also predictors of Facebook intrusion: that Facebook intrusion can be predicted by being male, young age, and an extensive number of minutes spent online. On the basis of this study, it is possible to conclude that there are certain demographic - variables, such as age, gender, or time spent online - that may help in outlining the profile of a user who may be in danger of becoming addicted to Facebook. This piece of knowledge may serve for prevention purposes.

  19. Computerised cognitive–behavioural therapy for depression in adolescents: feasibility results and 4-month outcomes of a UK randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Barry; Tindall, Lucy; Littlewood, Elizabeth; Allgar, Victoria; Abeles, Paul; Trépel, Dominic; Ali, Shehzad

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Computer-administered cognitive–behavioural therapy (CCBT) may be a promising treatment for adolescents with depression, particularly due to its increased availability and accessibility. The feasibility of delivering a randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing a CCBT program (Stressbusters) with an attention control (self-help websites) for adolescent depression was evaluated. Design Single centre RCT feasibility study. Setting The trial was run within community and clinical settings in York, UK. Participants Adolescents (aged 12–18) with low mood/depression were assessed for eligibility, 91 of whom met the inclusion criteria and were consented and randomised to Stressbusters (n=45) or websites (n=46) using remote computerised single allocation. Those with comorbid physical illness were included but those with psychosis, active suicidality or postnatal depression were not. Interventions An eight-session CCBT program (Stressbusters) designed for use with adolescents with low mood/depression was compared with an attention control (accessing low mood self-help websites). Primary and secondary outcome measures Participants completed mood and quality of life measures and a service Use Questionnaire throughout completion of the trial and 4 months post intervention. Measures included the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) (primary outcome measure), Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ), Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS), the EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire (youth) (EQ-5D-Y) and Health Utility Index Mark 2 (HUI-2). Changes in self-reported measures and completion rates were assessed by treatment group. Results From baseline to 4 months post intervention, BDI scores and MFQ scores decreased for the Stressbusters group but increased in the website group. Quality of life, as measured by the EQ-5D-Y, increased for both groups while costs at 4 months were similar to baseline. Good feasibility outcomes were found, suggesting the trial process to be

  20. Depression in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Borges Gonçalves

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the comorbidity of depressive disorders in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. METHOD: We evaluated 25 consecutive patients with refractory TLE (16 women and 9 men, using semi-structured psychiatric interviews, according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10, and the Beck Depression Inventory. RESULTS: Seventeen of 25 patients (68% had depressive disorder: 6 with dysthymia, three with major depressive episodes and 8 with recurrent depressive disorders. Two (8% were diagnosed with mixed anxiety and depression. Only 5 of 17 patients (29.4% were previously diagnosed with depressive disorder and received prior antidepressant treatment. Duration of epilepsy was significantly higher in patients with depressive disorder (p=0.016, but there was no relationship between depression and seizure frequency. CONCLUSION: This study confirmed that depressive disorders are common and underdiagnosed in patients with TLE refractory to AEDs. Patients with longer duration of epilepsy are at higher risk of having depression.

  1. [Memory processes in endogenous depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziwiłłowicz, W; Radziwiłłowicz, P

    1998-01-01

    The thesis aims to answer the questions about the profile of mental ability in endogenous depression and to decide whether self-estimation of depressive symptoms influences the results achieved by patients in memory tests. Fifty six patients suffering from endogenous depression have been examined. The following methods have been applied: Mini Mental State Examination, Benton Visual Retention Test, Beck Depression Inventory, hold tests: Vocabulary, Information, Comprehension and Digit Span of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure, Auditory Verbal Learning Test, DCS Weidlich. General status of cognitive functions correlates with the profile of specific kinds of memory results, particularly with delayed memory. Self-estimation of depressive symptoms intensity is mostly influenced by memory capacity, visuomotorial factor, functions of perception and lingual factor. High correlation between verbal and non verbal learning shows uniform influence of depression on the process of learning.

  2. Pharmaceutical Market Access: current state of affairs and key challenges – results of the Market Access Launch Excellence Inventory (MALEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus A. Koch

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To take inventory of the current state of affairs of Market Access Launch Excellence in the life sciences industry. To identify key gaps and challenges for Market Access (MA and discuss how they can be addressed. To generate a baseline for benchmarking MA launch excellence. Methodology: An online survey was conducted with pharmaceutical executives primarily working in MA, marketing, or general management. The survey aimed to evaluate MA excellence prerequisites across the product life cycle (rated by importance and level of implementation and to describe MA activity models in the respective companies. Composite scores were calculated from respondents’ ratings and answers. Results: Implementation levels of MA excellence prerequisites generally lagged behind their perceived importance. Item importance and the respective level of implementation correlated well, which can be interpreted as proof of the validity of the questionnaire. The following areas were shown to be particularly underimplemented: 1 early integration of MA and health economic considerations in research and development decision making, 2 developing true partnerships with payers, including the development of services ‘beyond the pill’, and 3 consideration of human resource and talent management. The concept of importance-adjusted implementation levels as a hybrid parameter was introduced and shown to be a viable tool for benchmarking purposes. More than 70% of respondents indicated that their companies will invest broadly in MA in terms of capital and headcount within the next 3 years. Conclusions: MA (launch excellence needs to be further developed in order to close implementation gaps across the entire product life cycle. As MA is a comparatively young pharmaceutical discipline in a complex and dynamic environment, this effort will require strategic focus and dedication. The Market Access Launch Excellence Inventory benchmarking tool may help guide decision

  3. A test of the cognitive content specificity hypothesis in depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberton, Anna; Oei, Tian P S

    2008-03-01

    The present study tested the cognitive content specificity hypothesis (CCSH) to assess whether anxiety and depression can be differentiated on the basis of cognitive disturbance. One hundred and thirty five depressed participants were administered the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI), the automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ) and the anxious self-statements questionnaire (ASSQ). It was hypothesised that depressive cognitions would be specifically related to, and predictive of, depressive (but not anxiety) symptoms in a depressed sample. Conversely, it was predicted that anxiety cognitions would be specifically related to, and predictive of, anxiety (but not depressive) symptoms in a depressed sample. Results revealed that the ATQ was the sole predictor of the BDI and similarly, the ASSQ was the sole predictor of the BAI. These findings support the CCSH in depression and provide an integrative framework for a greater understanding of the relationship between anxiety and depression.

  4. Is duloxetine's effect on painful physical symptoms in depression an indirect result of improvement of depressive symptoms? Pooled analyses of three randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Eiji; Tokuoka, Hirofumi; Fujikoshi, Shinji; Funai, Jumpei; Wohlreich, Madelaine M; Ossipov, Michael H; Iwata, Nakao

    2016-03-01

    In treating Major Depressive Disorder with associated painful physical symptoms (PPS), the effect of duloxetine on PPS has been shown to decompose into a direct effect on PPS and an indirect effect on PPS via depressive symptoms (DS) improvement. To evaluate the changes in relative contributions of the direct and indirect effects over time, we analyzed pooled data from 3 randomized double-blind studies comparing duloxetine 60 mg/d with placebo in patients with major depressive disorder and PPS. Changes from baseline in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total and Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form average pain score were assessed over 8 weeks. Path analysis examined the (1) direct effect of treatment on PPS and/or indirect effect on PPS via DS improvement and (2) direct effect of treatment on DS and/or indirect effect on DS via PPS improvement. At week 1, the direct effect of duloxetine on PPS (75.3%) was greater than the indirect effect through DS improvement (24.7%) but became less (22.6%) than the indirect effect (77.4%) by week 8. Initially, the direct effect of duloxetine on PPS was markedly greater than its indirect effect, whereas later the indirect effect predominated. Conversely, at week 1, the direct effect of treatment on DS (46.4%) was less than the indirect effect (53.6%), and by week 8 it superseded (62.6%) the indirect effect (37.4%). Thus, duloxetine would relieve PPS directly in the initial phase and indirectly via improving DS in the later phase.

  5. Seasonality in depressive and anxiety symptoms among primary care patients and in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders; results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winthorst, Wim H.; Post, Wendy J.; Meesters, Ybe; Penninx, Brenda W. H. J.; Nolen, Willem A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known about seasonality of specific depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in different patient populations. This study aims to assess seasonal variation of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a primary care population and across participants who were classified in diagnostic

  6. The Inventory of Forest Carbon Stocks in the Province of Trento: some remarks on the sampling design and first comments on its results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparini P

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sampling designs are commonly used in forest inventory to combine information collected in very large first-phase samples using remote sensing (satelite or aerial images with the field data collected on smaller sub-samples. In Italy, during the seventies, double sampling designs were used in some regional forest inventories and, later, multiple sampling was adopted for the second National Forest Inventory and for the Inventory of Forest Carbon Stocks (InFoCarb in the Province of Trento (Central-Eastern Alps. In this paper the main aspects of the design adopted for InFoCarb are discussed and the results of this inventory are compared with those obtained from the NFI for the same area. The estimates for the above-ground phytomass and the annual increment produced by the two inventories do not differ significantly, while the forest area estimates are significantly different as a consequence of differences in the dates of orthophotos used for the photointerpretation and in the classification procedure.

  7. Analysis of results of biomass forest inventory in northeastern Amazon for development of REDD+ carbon project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEONEL N.C. MELLO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In Brazil, a significant reduction in deforestation rates occurred during the last decade. In spite of that fact, the average annual rates are still too high, approximately 400.000 ha/year (INPE/Prodes. The projects of emissions reduction through avoided deforestation (REED+ are an important tool to reduce deforestation rates in Brazil. Understanding the amazon forest structure, in terms of biomass stock is key to design avoided deforestation strategies. In this work, we analyze data results from aboveground biomass of 1,019.346,27 hectares in the state of Pará. It was collected data from 16,722 trees in 83 random independent plots. It was tested 4 allometric equations, for DBH > 10cm: Brown et al. (1989, Brown and Lugo (1999, Chambers et al. (2000, Higuchi et al. (1998. It revealed that the biggest carbon stock of above ground biomass is stocked on the interval at DBH between 30cm and 80cm. This biomass compartment stocks 75.70% of total biomass in Higuchi et al. (1998 equation, 75.56% of total biomass in Brown et al. (1989 equation, 78.83% of total biomass in Chambers et al. (2000 equation, and 73.22% in Brown and Lugo (1999 equation.

  8. Depression and physical health in later life : results from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, ATF; Penninx, BWJH; Deeg, DJH; Ormel, J; Braam, AW; van Tilburg, W

    1997-01-01

    Background: In later life, declining physical health is often thought to be one of the most important risk factors for depression. Major depressive disorders are relatively rare, while depressive syndromes which do not fulfil diagnostic criteria (minor depression) are common. Methods: Community-base

  9. Detailed course of depressive symptoms and risk for developing depression in late adolescents with subthreshold depression: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinnin, Ran; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Takagaki, Koki; Nishiyama, Yoshiko; Yamamura, Takanao; Okamoto, Yuri; Miyake, Yoshie; Takebayashi, Yoshitake; Tanaka, Keisuke; Sugiura, Yoshinori; Shimoda, Haruki; Kawakami, Norito; Furukawa, Toshi A; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Despite its clinical importance, adolescent subthreshold depression remains a largely neglected topic. The aims of this study were to accurately identify the natural course of depressive symptoms and the risk for developing major depressive episode (MDE) in late adolescents with subthreshold depression over 1 year. Patients and methods One hundred and seventy-two participants <20 years of age (mean age: 18.32 years, standard deviation: 0.50), who did not meet the full criteria for an MDE, were selected from 2,494 screened freshmen based on the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-II). We conducted a cohort study of three groups (low-, middle-, and high-symptom groups) divided based on BDI-II scores, over a 1 year period with the use of bimonthly assessments. Temporal changes of depressive symptoms were analyzed using linear mixed modeling and growth mixture modeling. Results First, we found that late adolescents with subthreshold depression (high depressive symptoms) were split between the increasing and decreasing depressive symptoms groups, whereas the majority of the less-symptoms group remained stable during 1 year. Second, in comparison with late adolescents with less depressive symptoms, those with subthreshold depression had an elevated risk of later depression. Conclusion Some late adolescents with subthreshold depression had increased depressive symptoms and developed an MDE during 1 year. Therefore, it is necessary for us to rigorously assess the changes in subthreshold depressive symptoms over time in late adolescents. PMID:28053534

  10. [Acoustic and optical perceptual disorders in depressive diseases--an overview of results from experimental studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallert, T W

    1996-01-01

    This literature review concentrates on a disregarded part of depressive disorders' symptomatology (especially concerning present-day classifications of mental disorders) that can be approached with a great number of experimental procedures. From the acoustical field the following findings are demonstrated and discussed: elevated click thresholds in auditory signal detection, changed ear asymmetry in dichotic click detection and differences in dichotic listening asymmetries according to symptomatology. The most important results from the so far investigated optical perceptual disturbances in depressive disorders are: breakdown of perceptual defence in the form of greater access to emotionally unpleasant stimuli referring to the tachistoscopic recognition of neutral/unpleasant words, impairments at near-distance assessments, disturbances in recognition and discrimination of facial emotions-especially concerning the perception of emotional chimeric faces. Interpretational attempts for these acoustical and optical disturbances of perception reach from developmental psychology to biological psychiatry. Changes in hemisphere functions hold the dominating position in this discussion. Up to now it remains open to what extent the reported results correlate with the clinical phenomenology of depressive disorders, of what diagnostic specifity they are and if the can be viewed with sufficient reliability as state marker and indicators for theraopeutical effects.

  11. IRRITABLE MOOD IN ADULT MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER: RESULTS FROM THE WORLD MENTAL HEALTH SURVEYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Alonso, Jordi; Angermeyer, Matthias; Bromet, Evelyn; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Gureje, Oye; Hu, Chiyi; Huang, Yueqin; Karam, Elie G.; Jin, Robert; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Medina-Mora, María E.; O’Neill, Siobhan; Ono, Yutaka; Posada-Villa, José A.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Scott, Kate M.; Shahly, Victoria; Stein, Dan J.; Viana, Maria C.; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although irritability is a core symptom of DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) for youth but not adults, clinical studies find comparable rates of irritability between nonbipolar depressed adults and youth. Including irritability as a core symptom of adult MDD would allow detection of depression-equivalent syndromes with primary irritability hypothesized to be more common among males than females. We carried out a preliminary examination of this issue using cross-national community-based survey data from 21 countries in the World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys (n = 110,729). Methods The assessment of MDD in the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview includes one question about persistent irritability. We examined two expansions of the definition of MDD involving this question: (1) cases with dysphoria and/or anhedonia and exactly four of nine Criterion A symptoms plus irritability; and (2) cases with two or more weeks of irritability plus four or more other Criterion A MDD symptoms in the absence of dysphoria or anhedonia. Results Adding irritability as a tenth Criterion A symptom increased lifetime prevalence by 0.4% (from 11.2 to 11.6%). Adding episodes of persistent irritability increased prevalence by an additional 0.2%. Proportional prevalence increases were significantly higher, but nonetheless small, among males compared to females. Rates of severe role impairment were significantly lower among respondents with this irritable depression who did not meet conventional DSM-IV criteria than those with DSM-IV MDD. Conclusion Although limited by the superficial assessment in this single question on irritability, results do not support expanding adult MDD criteria to include irritable mood. PMID:23364997

  12. Early results of experimental 222Rn flux campaign carried out at a mountain Spanish region and comparison with available radon flux inventories results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofuentes, Manel; Grossi, Claudia; Morguí, Josep Anton; Curcoll, Roger; Cañas, Lidia; Occhipinti, Paola; Borràs, Silvia; Vazquez, Eusebi; Rodó, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric concentrations of components impacting the greenhouse effect (CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, and aerosols) have increased significantly in the last two centuries, leading to a direct impact on our climate. These climatic changes deeply affect the geochemistry and the dynamics of the main reservoirs such as the atmosphere, the ocean, and the biosphere. Therefore, reductions of the emissions are needed for all four of the most important anthropogenic GHGs: CO2, CH4, N2O and SF6. Particularly, the relative contribution of human induced CH4 in the atmosphere to the total human direct greenhouse effect is about 25%. Furthermore, the CH4 has the shortest lifetime in the atmosphere (about 9 years), so that emissions reduction measures for CH4 will lead to changes in concentration growth rates, or even a concentration decline, at relatively shor time scales. All these reasons make the CH4 an attractive compound to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions. Nowadays, the study and attribution of categories for GHGs sources is carried out by using bottom-up inventories and top-down techniques. The atmospheric concentrations and the fluxes of the noble and radioactive 222Rn gas are widely used for retriving indirectly GHGs fluxes, improving top-down techniques and analysing different type of sources. In the frame of the "Methane exchange between soil and atmosphere over the Iberian Peninsula" (MIP) project (Reference: CGL2013-46186-R, Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness) four experimental radon flux campaigns are carried out at mountain as well as at coastal Spanish regions using integrated and continuous monitors. The early results of first radon flux campaign carried out at the Gredos and Iruelas climate station (GIC3) of the Catalan Institute of Climate Science (IC3) are presented and compared with available radon flux inventories maps.

  13. Presence and correlates of apathy in non-demented depressed and non-depressed older persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isis Groeneweg-Koolhoven

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Apathy is a behavioral syndrome that often co-occurs with depression. Nonetheless, the etiology of apathy and depression may be different. We hypothesized that apathy occurs more often in depressed compared to non-depressed older persons; and that independent correlates for apathy will be different in depressed and non-depressed older persons. Methods: In this cross-sectional study of Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons (NESDO, a total of 350 depressed older persons according to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI and 126 non-depressed older persons, aged at least 60 years were recruited in several Medical Centres and general practices. In both depressed and non-depressed older persons, those with and without apathy as assessed with the Apathy Scale (score ≥ 14 were compared with regard to socio-demographic, clinical, and biological characteristics. Results: Apathy was present in 75% of the depressed and 25% of the non- depressed older persons. Independent correlates of apathy in both depressed and non-depressed older persons were male gender and less education. Furthermore, in depressed older persons, higher scores on the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS and, in non-depressed older persons, a higher C-reactive protein (CRP level correlated independently with apathy. Conclusions: Apathy occurred frequently among both depressed and non-depressed older persons. Among depressed older persons, apathy appeared to be a symptom of more serious depression, whereas among non-depressed persons apathy was associated with increased CRP being a marker for immune activation, suggesting a different aetiology for apathy in its own right.

  14. Norbin ablation results in defective adult hippocampal neurogenesis and depressive-like behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Warner-Schmidt, Jennifer; Varela, Santiago; Enikolopov, Grigori; Greengard, Paul; Flajolet, Marc

    2015-08-04

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus subgranular zone is associated with the etiology and treatment efficiency of depression. Factors that affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been shown to contribute to the neuropathology of depression. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, plays a critical role in different aspects of neurogenesis. Of the eight metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), mGluR5 is the most highly expressed in neural stem cells. We previously identified Norbin as a positive regulator of mGluR5 and showed that its expression promotes neurite outgrowth. In this study, we investigated the role of Norbin in adult neurogenesis and depressive-like behaviors using Norbin-deficient mice. We found that Norbin deletion significantly reduced hippocampal neurogenesis; specifically, the loss of Norbin impaired the proliferation and maturation of newborn neurons without affecting cell-fate specification of neural stem cells/neural progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs). Norbin is highly expressed in the granular neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, but it is undetectable in NSCs/NPCs or immature neurons, suggesting that the effect of Norbin on neurogenesis is likely caused by a nonautonomous niche effect. In support of this hypothesis, we found that the expression of a cell-cell contact gene, Desmoplakin, is greatly reduced in Norbin-deletion mice. Moreover, Norbin-KO mice show an increased immobility in the forced-swim test and the tail-suspension test and reduced sucrose preference compared with wild-type controls. Taken together, these results show that Norbin is a regulator of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and that its deletion causes depressive-like behaviors.

  15. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation as an adjuvant method in the treatment of depression: Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Milica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a method of brain stimulation which is increasingly used in both clinical practice and research. Up-to-date studies have pointed out a potential antidepressive effect of rTMS, but definitive superiority over placebo has not yet been confirmed. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of rTMS as an adjuvant treatment with antidepressants during 18 weeks of evaluation starting from the initial application of the protocol. Methods. Four patients with the diagnosis of moderate/severe major depression were included in the study. The protocol involved 2000 stimuli per day (rTMS frequency of 10 Hz, intensity of 120% motor threshold administered over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC for 15 days. Subjective and objective depressive symptoms were measured before the initiation of rTMS and repeatedly evaluated at week 3, 6, 12 and 18 from the beginning of the stimulation. Results. After completion of rTMS protocol two patients demonstrated a reduction of depressive symptoms that was sustained throughout the 15-week follow-up period. One patient showed a tendency of remission during the first 12 weeks of the study, but relapsed in week 18. One patient showed no significant symptom reduction at any point of follow-up. Conclusion. Preliminary findings suggest that rTMS has a good tolerability and can be efficient in accelerating the effect of antidepressants, particularly in individuals with shorter duration of depressive episodes and moderate symptom severity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41029 i br. ON175090

  16. Validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a community sample Validação da versão brasileira em português do Inventário de Depressão de Beck-II numa amostra da comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Henrique Gomes-Oliveira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI is used worldwide for detecting depressive symptoms. This questionnaire has been revised (1996 to match the DSM-IV criteria for a major depressive episode. We assessed the reliability and the validity of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the BDI-II for non-clinical adults. METHODS: The questionnaire was applied to 60 college students on two occasions. Afterwards, 182 community-dwelling adults completed the BDI-II, the Self-Report Questionnaire, and the K10 Scale. Trained psychiatrists performed face-to-face interviews with the respondents using the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-I, the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale, and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Descriptive analysis, signal detection analysis (Receiver Operating Characteristics, correlation analysis, and discriminant function analysis were performed to investigate the psychometric properties of the BDI-II. RESULTS: The intraclass correlation coefficient of the BDI-II was 0.89, and the Cronbach's alpha coefficient of internal consistency was 0.93. Taking the SCID as the gold standard, the cut-off point of 10/11 was the best threshold for detecting depression, yielding a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 87%. The concurrent validity (a correlation of 0.63-0.93 with scales applied simultaneously and the predictive ability of the severity level (over 65% correct classification were acceptable. CONCLUSION: The BDI-II is reliable and valid for measuring depressive symptomatology among Portuguese-speaking Brazilian non-clinical populations.OBJETIVOS: O Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB é utilizado mundialmente para detectar sintomas depressivos. Este questionário foi revisado (1996 para se adequar aos critérios do DSM-IV para episódio depressivo maior. Avaliamos a confiabilidade e validade da versão I em português-brasileiro do IDB-I em uma amostra não clínica de adultos. MÉTODOS: O questionário foi aplicado em duas

  17. Implementation of depression screening in antenatal clinics through tablet computers: results of a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano-Belisario, José S; Gupta, Ajay K; O'Donoghue, John; Ramchandani, Paul; Morrison, Cecily; Car, Josip

    2017-05-10

    Mobile devices may facilitate depression screening in the waiting area of antenatal clinics. This can present implementation challenges, of which we focused on survey layout and technology deployment. We assessed the feasibility of using tablet computers to administer a socio-demographic survey, the Whooley questions and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to 530 pregnant women attending National Health Service (NHS) antenatal clinics across England. We randomised participants to one of two layout versions of these surveys: (i) a scrolling layout where each survey was presented on a single screen; or (ii) a paging layout where only one question appeared on the screen at any given time. Overall, 85.10% of eligible pregnant women agreed to take part. Of these, 90.95% completed the study procedures. Approximately 23% of participants answered Yes to at least one Whooley question, and approximately 13% of them scored 10 points of more on the EPDS. We observed no association between survey layout and the responses given to the Whooley questions, the median EPDS scores, the number of participants at increased risk of self-harm, and the number of participants asking for technical assistance. However, we observed a difference in the number of participants at each EPDS scoring interval (p = 0.008), which provide an indication of a woman's risk of depression. A scrolling layout resulted in faster completion times (median = 4 min 46 s) than a paging layout (median = 5 min 33 s) (p = 0.024). However, the clinical significance of this difference (47.5 s) is yet to be determined. Tablet computers can be used for depression screening in the waiting area of antenatal clinics. This requires the careful consideration of clinical workflows, and technology-related issues such as connectivity and security. An association between survey layout and EPDS scoring intervals needs to be explored further to determine if it corresponds to a survey layout effect

  18. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milgrom Jeannette

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Methods Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26–32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161 also completed questionnaires at 10–12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1. Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2. Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3. Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator

  19. Depression, Diabetes, and Healthcare Utilization: Results from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA)

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun Kyung Lee; Seung Hee Lee

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between diabetes and depression and investigate the effects of comorbid diabetes and depression on healthcare utilization. Methods The study sample included 10,179 Korean adults aged ≥ 45 years. The presence of diabetes was assessed by asking participants if the participants had ever been diagnosed with diabetes. Depression was measured using the 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies—Depression scale. Healthcare ut...

  20. Potential Relationship between Season of Birth and Clinical Characteristics in Major Depressive Disorder in Koreans: Results from the CRESCEND Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Sakong, Jeong-Kyu; Koo, Bon Hoon; Kim, Jae-Min; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Park, Yong Chon

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to examine the potential relationship between season of birth (SOB) and clinical characteristics in Korean patients with unipolar non-psychotic major depressive disorder (MDD). Using data from the Clinical Research Center for Depression (CRESCEND) study in South Korea, 891 MDD patients were divided into two groups, those born in spring/summer (n=457) and those born in autumn/winter (n=434). Measurement tools comprising the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Scale for Suicidal Ideation, Clinical Global Impression of severity, Social and Occupation Functional Assessment Scale, WHO Quality of Life assessment instrument-abbreviated version, Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test, and Temperament and Character Inventory were used to evaluate depression, anxiety, overall symptoms, suicidal ideation, global severity, social function, quality of life, drinking, and temperament and character, respectively. Using independent t-tests for continuous variables and χ² tests for discrete variables, the clinical characteristics of the two groups were compared. MDD patients born in spring/summer were on average younger at onset of first depressive episode (t=2.084, p=0.038), had greater loss of concentration (χ²=4.589, p=0.032), and were more self-directed (t=2.256, p=0.025) than those born in autumn/winter. Clinically, there was a trend for the MDD patients born in spring/summer to display the contradictory characteristics of more severe clinical course and less illness burden; this may have been partly due to a paradoxical effect of the 5-HT system.

  1. Efficacy of physical activity in the adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorders: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velluti Claudio

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No controlled trials have evaluated the long term efficacy of exercise activity to improve the treatment of patients with Major Depressive Disorders. The aim of the present study was to confirm the efficacy of the adjunctive physical activity in the treatment of major depressive disorders, with a long term follow up (8 months. Methods Trial with randomized naturalistic control. Patients selected from the clinical activity registries of the Psychiatric Unit of the University of Cagliari, Italy. Inclusion criteria: female, between 40 and 60 years, diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorders (DSM-IV TR resistant to the ongoing treatment. Exclusion criteria: diagnosis of psychotic disorders; any contraindications to physical activity. 30 patients (71.4% of the eligible participated to the study. Cases: 10 randomized patients undergoing pharmacological treatment plus physical activity. Controls: 20 patients undergoing only pharmacological therapy. The following tools were collected from each patient by two different psychiatric physicians at baseline and 8 month after the beginning of exercise program: SCID-I, HAM-D, CGI (Clinical Global Impression, GAF. Results The patients that made physical activity had their HAM-D, GAF and CGI score improved from T0 to T8, all differences were statistically significant. In the control group HAM-D, GAF and CGI scores do not show any statistically significant differences between T0 and T8. Limits Small sample size limited to female in adult age; control group was not subject to any structured rehabilitation activity or placebo so it was impossible to evaluate if the improvement was due to a non specific therapeutic effect associated with taking part in a social activity. Conclusion Physical activity seems a good adjunctive treatment in the long term management of patients with MDD. Randomized placebo controlled trials are needed to confirm the results.

  2. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Bronwyn; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2008-04-16

    Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26-32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161) also completed questionnaires at 10-12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1). Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2). Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3). Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator for other risk factors. Risk factor profiles for

  3. Relationship Between Self-Concept, Self-esteem, Anxiety, Depression and Academic Achievement in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi-Ashtiani, Ali; Ejei, Javad; Khodapanahi, Mohammad-Karim; Tarkhorani, Hamid

    This study is surveying some of personality characteristics of adolescents and their associations with academic achievement: Accordingly, 1314 randomly allocated students of Tehran`s high schools were assessed by Beck self-concept inventory, Coopersmith self-esteem inventory, Spielberger State-Trait anxiety inventory, Beck depression inventory. Results indicate that self-concept is correlated with self-esteem and these two have positive impacts on augment of academic achievement. Moreover, the increase of self-concept and self-esteem are related to the decrease of anxiety and a negative significant relation exists between self-concept, self-esteem and depression which will ensue decrease in academic achievement.

  4. Sense of identity and depression in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Başaran; Kaynak-Demir, Hadiye; Sönmez, Emel Irmak

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sense of identity and depression in a group of adolescents. Thirty-one depressed adolescents and 31 control subjects were included in the study. They were evaluated using the Sense of Identity Assessment Form (SIAF), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Depressed adolescents were reevaluated during the eighth week of antidepressant treatment. Higher baseline SIAF scores were detected in depressed adolescents as compared with non-depressed subjects. After antidepressant treatment, there was a significant decrease in SIAF scores in the depression group. Correlation analysis indicated that there are significant, positive relationships between SIAF, depression, and anxiety scores. The regression analysis results suggested that the change in SIAF scores can accurately predict 91.6% of the remitters and 42.8% of the non-remitters. Collectively, these findings indicate that there is a close association between depression symptoms and identity confusion-related distress in adolescents.

  5. Effects of a Multicomponent Life-Style Intervention on Weight, Glycemic Control, Depressive Symptoms, and Renal Function in Low-Income, Minority Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Results of the Community Approach to Lifestyle Modification for Diabetes Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrieft, Ashley E.; Llabre, Maria M.; McCalla, Judith Rey; Gutt, Miriam; Mendez, Armando J.; Gellman, Marc D.; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Schneiderman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Few interventions have combined life-style and psychosocial approaches in the context of Type 2 diabetes management. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a multicomponent behavioral intervention on weight, glycemic control, renal function, and depressive symptoms in a sample of overweight/obese adults with Type 2 diabetes and marked depressive symptoms. Methods A sample of 111 adults with Type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to a 1-year intervention (n = 57) or usual care (n = 54) in a parallel groups design. Primary outcomes included weight, glycosylated hemoglobin, and Beck Depression Inventory II score. Estimated glomerular filtration rate served as a secondary outcome. All measures were assessed at baseline and 6 and 12 months after randomization by assessors blind to randomization. Latent growth modeling was used to examine intervention effects on each outcome. Results The intervention resulted in decreased weight (mean [M] = 0.322 kg, standard error [SE] = 0.124 kg, p = .010) and glycosylated hemoglobin (M = 0.066%, SE = 0.028%, p = .017), and Beck Depression Inventory II scores (M = 1.009, SE = 0.226, p < .001), and improved estimated glomerular filtration rate (M = 0.742 ml·min−1·1.73 m−2, SE = 0.318 ml·min−1·1.73 m−2, p = .020) each month during the first 6 months relative to usual care. Conclusions Multicomponent behavioral interventions targeting weight loss and depressive symptoms as well as diet and physical activity are efficacious in the management of Type 2 diabetes. Trial Registration: This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT01739205. PMID:27359176

  6. The association between depression and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gunhild Tidemann; Maartensson, Solvej; Osler, Merete

    2017-01-01

    on depression, use of antidepressants and the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) from a survey in 2004, in which 58.8% (n=6292) of the men participated. Information on mortality and cause of death was retrieved from registers for the period between 2004 and 2011. RESULTS: Depression diagnosis from hospital...... registers as well as self-reported depression, use of antidepressants and having a high MDI-score were significantly associated with mortality from all, natural and unnatural causes. The associations were of a similar magnitude for the register-based measure of depression and for the survey-based measures......BACKGROUND: A number of studies have associated depression with a high mortality risk. However, in surveys, depression is often measured by self-reports in selected sub-samples, while register studies have been based on hospital diagnosis or purchase of antidepressants. We examined how different...

  7. An open pilot study of zonisamide augmentation in major depressive patients not responding to a low dose trial with duloxetine: preliminary results on tolerability and clinical effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benvenuti Marzia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite multiple antidepressant options, major depressive disorder (MDD still faces high non-response rates, eventually requiring anticonvulsant augmentation strategies too. The aim of this study was to explore such a potential role for zonisamide. Methods A total of 40 MDD outpatients diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria entered a 24 week open trial receiving duloxetine 60 mg/day for the first 12 weeks and subsequently (weeks 12 to 24 augmentation with zonisamide 75 mg/day if they did not respond to the initial monotherapy. Efficacy and tolerability were assessed using the Hamilton Scales for Anxiety and Depression (a 12 week score ≥50% vs baseline defined 'non-response', the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, the Patient Rated Inventory of Side Effects and the Young Mania Rating Scale. Results At week 12, 15 patients out of 39 (38.5% were responders, and 1 had dropped out; remarkably, 14 patients out of 24 (58.3% had achieved response by week 24. Poor concentration and general malaise were associated with non-response both at week 12 and 24 (P = 0.001, while loss of libido and reduced energy were prominent among final timepoint non-responders. Patients receiving zonisamide also experienced weight reduction (2.09 ± 12.14 kg; P = 0.001 independently of the outcome. Conclusions Although only a preliminary study due to strong methodological limitations, and thus requiring confirmation by further controlled investigations, the current results indicate zonisamide may be a potential augmentation option for some depressed patients receiving low doses of duloxetine.

  8. Compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, anxiety, depression and stress in registered nurses in Australia: phase 2 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Vicki; Craigie, Mark; Francis, Karen; Aoun, Samar; Hegney, Desley G

    2014-05-01

    This is the first two-phase Australian study to explore the factors impacting upon compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, anxiety, depression and stress and to describe the strategies nurses use to build compassion satisfaction into their working lives. Compassion fatigue has been found to impact on job satisfaction, the quality of patient care and retention within nursing. This study provides new knowledge on the influences of anxiety, stress and depression and how they relate to compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue. In Phase 2 of the study, 10 nurses from Phase 1 of the study participated in individual interviews and a focus group. A semi-structured interview schedule guided the conversations with the participants. Data analysis resulted in seven main themes: social networks and support;infrastructure and support; environment and lifestyle; learning; leadership; stress; and suggestions to build psychological wellness in nurses. Findings suggest that a nurse’s capacity to cope is enhanced through strong social and collegial support, infrastructure that supports the provision of quality nursing care and positive affirmation. These concepts are strongly linked to personal resilience. for nursing management These findings support the need for management to develop appropriate interventions to build resilience in nurses.

  9. Continuum beliefs in the stigma process regarding persons with schizophrenia and depression: results of path analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnich, Eva E.; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with mental illness often experience stigmatization and encounter stereotypes such as being dangerous or unpredictable. To further improve measures against psychiatric stigma, it is of importance to understand its components. In this study, we attend to the step of separation between “us” and “them” in the stigma process as conceptualized by Link and Phelan. In using the belief in continuity of mental illness symptoms as a proxy for separation, we explore its associations with stereotypes, emotional responses and desire for social distance in the stigma process. Methods Analyses are based on a representative survey in Germany. Vignettes with symptoms suggestive of schizophrenia (n = 1,338) or depression (n = 1,316) were presented to the respondents, followed by questions on continuum belief, stereotypes, emotional reactions and desire for social distance. To examine the relationship between these items, path models were computed. Results Respondents who endorsed the continuum belief tended to show greater prosocial reactions (schizophrenia: 0.07; p social distance (schizophrenia: −0.13; p social distance. There were no statistically significant relations between stereotypes and continuum beliefs. Discussion Assumptions regarding continuum beliefs in the stigma process were only partially confirmed. However, there were associations of continuum beliefs with less stigmatizing attitudes toward persons affected by either schizophrenia or depression. Including information on continuity of symptoms, and thus oppose perceived separation, could prove helpful in future anti-stigma campaigns. PMID:27703840

  10. Inventory Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Known as MRO for Maintenance, Repair and Operating supplies, Tropicana Products, Inc.'s automated inventory management system is an adaptation of the Shuttle Inventory Management System (SIMS) developed by NASA to assure adequate supply of every item used in support of the Space Shuttle. The Tropicana version monitors inventory control, purchasing receiving and departmental costs for eight major areas of the company's operation.

  11. Anxiety and Depression in children with overweight and obesity: Results of a Summer’s field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Gerardina Pompa Guajardo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and being overweight in childhood have increased in recent years at world-wide levels. Thus, it is important to promote a healthier life style by means of preventive programs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the multidisciplinary program in the reduction of Body Mass Index (BMI, anxiety and depression in children with overweight and obesity problems. Our research took place in a 5-days summer camp and it continued with biweekly sessions. We show results of our initial evaluation and compare them with an evaluation performed six months following the initial evaluation. According to the results obtained in the present study a signifi cant reduction in the three studied variables was observed.

  12. Cost Effectiveness of Telecare Management for Pain and Depression in Patients with Cancer: Results from a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi Yoo, Sung J.; Nyman, John A.; Cheville, Andrea L.; Kroenke, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pain and depression are prevalent and treatable symptoms among patients with cancer yet they are often undetected and undertreated. The Indiana Cancer Pain and Depression (INCPAD) trial demonstrated that telecare management can improve pain and depression outcomes. This article investigates the incremental cost effectiveness of the INCPAD intervention. Methods The INCPAD trial was conducted in 16 community-based urban and rural oncology practices in Indiana. Of the 405 participants, 202 were randomized to the intervention group and 203 to the usual-care group. Intervention costs were determined and effectiveness outcomes were depression-free days and quality adjusted life years. Results The intervention group was associated with a yearly increase of 60.3 depression-free days (SE=15.4; pmanager, and automated monitoring set-up and maintenance costs. Incremental cost per depression-free day was $19.72, which yields a range of $18,018 to $ 36,035 per quality-adjusted life year when converted to that metric. When measured directly, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year ranged from $10,826 based on the modified EQ-5D to $73,286.92 based on the SF-12. Conclusion Centralized telecare management, coupled with automated symptom monitoring, appears to be a cost effective intervention for managing pain and depression in cancer patients. PMID:25130518

  13. Depressive symptoms and carotid intima-media thickness in South American Hispanics: results from the PREVENCION study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirinos, Diana A; Medina-Lezama, Josefina; Salinas-Najarro, Belissa; Arguelles, William; Llabre, Maria M; Schneiderman, Neil; Paz-Manrique, Roberto; Bolanos, Juan F; Khan, Zubair; Chirinos, Julio A

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to: (1) examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and subclinical atherosclerosis, measured by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT); and, (2) Determine the moderating effect of gender in this relationship among South American Hispanics. We studied 496 adults enrolled in the population-based PREVENCION study. Carotid IMT was measured with high-resolution ultrasonography. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Mean carotid IMT was 0.66 mm. (SD = 0.17) and mean depression score was 5.6 (SD = 3.5). Depressive symptoms were not associated with carotid IMT (β = 0.04, p = 0.222) in multivariate analyses. A significant moderating effect of gender was found (β for interaction = 0.10, p = 0.030), resulting from a significant association between depressive symptoms and carotid IMT in men but not women. Depressive symptoms were associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in South American Hispanic men but not women after controlling for demographic characteristics and traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

  14. Psychosocial factors at work, personality traits and depressive symptoms: Longitudinal results from the GAZEL Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    PATERNITI, S; NIEDHAMMER, I; LANG, T; CONSOLI, S. M

    2002-01-01

    .... This association could be explained by personality traits. To examine the relationship between psychosocial factors at work and changes in depressive symptoms, taking into account personality traits...

  15. Family-focused treatment for childhood-onset depressive disorders: results of an open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompson, Martha C; Pierre, Claudette B; Haber, Fawn McNeil; Fogler, Jason M; Groff, April R; Asarnow, Joan R

    2007-07-01

    Study objectives were to develop a treatment manual for a family-focused intervention for depressed school-aged children, evaluate its feasibility and acceptability, and complete an initial open trial to examine treatment effects. Nine young people meeting criteria for depression (major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, or depression not otherwise specified), completed a 12-week family intervention, and were assessed immediately and at 9 months following treatment completion. The intervention presented an interpersonal model of how depressive symptoms are maintained, and emphasized developing family strategies for altering interpersonal processes, supporting recovery and enhancing resilience. At posttreatment 66% of the young people had recovered from their depressive episodes; by 9 months posttreatment 77% had recovered. Significant improvements in global functioning were noted. There were no relapses in the follow-up period and no instances of suicidal behavior during the intervention or follow-up. Mothers' and fathers' Child Behavior Checklist reports and children's self reports indicated significant symptom reductions. Exploratory analyses suggest particular benefit for young people with parents high in criticism. The family-focused intervention for childhood-onset depression demonstrated gains similar to those seen with empirically supported treatments for depressed adolescents and superior to those seen in naturalistic studies of depression outcomes. This favorable risk/benefit profile supports the value of a randomized controlled trial.

  16. Prevalence of Depression Among Students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Aghakhani, Nader; Sharif Nia, Hamid; Eghtedar, Samereh; Rahbar, Narges; Jasemi, Madineh; Mesgar Zadeh, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A depressive disorder is an illness that involves the body, mood, thoughts and behaviors. This study was performed to identify the presence of depression among medical students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 700 undergraduate medical and basic sciences students. Beck depression inventory (BDI) used for data gathering. Results: Mean score of BDI was 10.4 ± 0.8 and 52.6% of students scored under the depression th...

  17. Remission in major depression: results from a geriatric primary care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Armin R; Chopra, Mohit P; Cho, Lydia Y; Coakley, Eugenie; Rudolph, James L

    2011-01-01

    While a recent task force report recommended that remission from major depression be defined according to DSM criteria, most previous work has used depressive symptom rating scales. The current study sought to identify baseline factors associated with treatment outcome in major depression, diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. Data from the Primary Care Research in Substance Abuse and Mental Health for the Elderly (PRISM-E) study were utilized. This analysis focused on 792 geriatric primary care patients with major depression at baseline, which was randomized to services by a mental health professional in primary care or specialty settings. Major depression was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria based on a structured interview at baseline and 6 months. The primary outcome was the absence of any DSM-IV depressive disorder at six-month follow-up. Association with baseline demographic characteristics, comorbid anxiety disorder, 'at risk' drinking, number of co-occurring medical conditions, and depressive symptom severity was examined using multiple logistic regression modeling. Remission occurred in 228 (29%) patients with completed follow-up assessments, while 564 (71%) did not remit. Factors which increased the odds of non-remission included comorbid anxiety (OR=1.60, 95% CI 1.11-2.31), female sex (OR=1.49, 95% CI 1.04-2.15), general medical comorbidity (OR=1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.24), and increased baseline depressive symptom severity (OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.03-1.06). The findings underscore the importance of using DSM criteria to define remission from major depression, and suggest that concurrent measurement of depression severity, comorbid anxiety, and medical comorbidity are important in identifying patients requiring targeted interventions to optimize remission from major depression. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Rolipram in major depressive disorder: results of a double-blind comparative study with imipramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebenstreit, G F; Fellerer, K; Fichte, K; Fischer, G; Geyer, N; Meya, U; Sastre-y-Hernández, M; Schöny, W; Schratzer, M; Soukop, W

    1989-07-01

    Rolipram improves signal transmission in central noradrenergic neurones at a pre- and postsynaptic level, and is thus a novel approach in antidepressant therapy. In order to prove efficacy, tolerance, and safety, several controlled studies are underway. Results of a randomized double-blind comparative trial versus imipramine involving 64 in-patients with Major Depressive Disorder (DSM III) in six independent centers will be presented and discussed. The chosen biometric model provided evidence that towards the end of the study imipramine was superior to Rolipram. The particular clinical relevance of this difference is discussed. As regards tolerance, nausea emerged as the typical side-effect of Rolipram, whereas imipramine precipitated mainly anticholinergic side-effects.

  19. Clinical Judgments of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Douglas N.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated degree to which judges could simulate Basic Personality Inventory (BPI) responses of a clinically depressed patient group. Judgmental profiles of depressed patients indicated very high reliabilities across information conditions, a high association with actual profiles of clinically depressed patients, and differentiation from other…

  20. Religious versus Conventional Psychotherapy for Major Depression in Patients with Chronic Medical Illness: Rationale, Methods, and Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold G. Koenig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper (1 reviews the physical and religious barriers to CBT that disabled medically ill-depressed patients face, (2 discusses research on the relationship between religion and depression-induced physiological changes, (3 describes an ongoing randomized clinical trial of religious versus secular CBT in chronically ill patients with mild-to-moderate major depression designed to (a overcome physical and religious barriers to CBT and (b compare the efficacy of religious versus secular CBT in relieving depression and improving immune and endocrine functions, and (4 presents preliminary results that illustrate the technical difficulties that have been encountered in implementing this trial. CBT is being delivered remotely via instant messaging, telephone, or Skype, and Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist, and Hindu versions of religious CBT are being developed. The preliminary results described here are particular to the technologies employed in this study and are not results from the CBT clinical trial whose findings will be published in the future after the study ends and data are analyzed. The ultimate goal is to determine if a psychotherapy delivered remotely that integrates patients’ religious resources improves depression more quickly than a therapy that ignores them, and whether religious CBT is more effective than conventional CBT in reversing depression-induced physiological changes.

  1. Psychological traits and the cortisol awakening response : Results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, Aafke; Vreeburg, Sophie A.; van der Does, A. J. Willem; Spinhoven, Philip; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Background: Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation is often seen in major depression, and is thought to represent a trait vulnerability - rather than merely an illness marker - for depressive disorder and possibly anxiety disorder. Vulnerability traits associated with stress-related

  2. Comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression : results of a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, D.C.; van Zelst, W. H.; Schoevers, R. A.; Comijs, H. C.; Oude Voshaar, Richard

    Background: Comorbid anxiety disorders are common in late-life depression and negatively impact treatment outcome. This study aimed to examine personality characteristics as well as early and recent life-events as possible determinants of comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression, taking

  3. Comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression: results of a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, D.C. van der; Zelst, W.H. van; Schoevers, R.A.; Comijs, H.C.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Comorbid anxiety disorders are common in late-life depression and negatively impact treatment outcome. This study aimed to examine personality characteristics as well as early and recent life-events as possible determinants of comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression, taking

  4. The Temporal Relation Between Pain and Depression : Results From the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilderink, Peter H.; Burger, Huibert; Deeg, Dorly J.; Beekman, Aartjan T.; Voshaar, Richard C. Oude

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Pain and depression are both common in old age, but their (long-term) temporal relationship remains unknown. This study is designed to determine whether pain predicts the onset of depression and vice versa. Methods: This is a prospective, population-based cohort study with 12-year follow-

  5. Psychological traits and the cortisol awakening response : Results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, Aafke; Vreeburg, Sophie A.; van der Does, A. J. Willem; Spinhoven, Philip; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation is often seen in major depression, and is thought to represent a trait vulnerability - rather than merely an illness marker - for depressive disorder and possibly anxiety disorder. Vulnerability traits associated with stress-related

  6. Recurrence of major depressive disorder across different treatment settings : Results from the NESDA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardeveld, Florian; Spijker, Jan; De Graaf, Ron; Hendriks, Sanne M.; Licht, Carmilla M. M.; Nolen, Willem A.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Beekman, Aartjan T. F.

    Objective: Examine time to recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) across different treatment settings and assess predictors of time to recurrence of MDD. Methods: Data were from 375 subjects with a MDD diagnosis from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). The study sample

  7. Anemia is associated with depression in older adults: results from the InCHIANTI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onder, G.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Cesari, M.; Bandinelli, S.; Lauretani, F.; Bartali, B.; Gori, A.M.; Pahor, M.; Ferrucci, L.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common disorder among older adults, and it has been associated with adverse outcomes, including increased risk of morbidity and mortality as well as incomplete or delayed recovery from illness and disability. The objective of this study was to examine whether depressive

  8. Comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression : results of a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, D.C.; van Zelst, W. H.; Schoevers, R. A.; Comijs, H. C.; Oude Voshaar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comorbid anxiety disorders are common in late-life depression and negatively impact treatment outcome. This study aimed to examine personality characteristics as well as early and recent life-events as possible determinants of comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression, taking pr

  9. [Treatment of depressive patients in private practice--empirical results, health political and social conditions and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goesmann, Cornelia; Bühren, Astrid; Neuy-Bartmann, Astrid

    2007-09-01

    Although depression and symptoms of depression belong to the most common disorders in private practice, affected patients are not always diagnosed as early as possible in Germany and often not sufficiently treated. In order to improve the care for persons with depression it is necessary that family doctors are prepared to guide these patients with empathy, treat them adequately pharmacologically both in respect to the depression and to all other somatic aspects and to refer them in time to specialists for psychiatry, psychosomatic medicine or psychotherapy. Political and social conditions that have pathogenic effects should be changed and the shortage of psychotherapy needs to be overcome. In future, the integrated care in ambulant and clinical settings will probably be successful, first trials and test setups have shown good results.

  10. Inventory Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Leigh

    2000-11-03

    The purpose of the inventory abstraction as directed by the development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999b) is to: (1) Interpret the results of a series of relative dose calculations (CRWMS M&O 1999c, 1999d). (2) Recommend, including a basis thereof, a set of radionuclides that should be modeled in the Total System Performance Assessment in Support of the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and the Total System Performance Assessment in Support of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (TSPA-FEIS). (3) Provide initial radionuclide inventories for the TSPA-SR and TSPA-FEIS models. (4) Answer the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)'s Issue Resolution Status Report ''Key Technical Issue: Container Life and Source Term'' (CLST IRSR) (NRC 1999) key technical issue (KTI): ''The rate at which radionuclides in SNF [Spent Nuclear Fuel] are released from the EBS [Engineered Barrier System] through the oxidation and dissolution of spent fuel'' (Subissue 3). The scope of the radionuclide screening analysis encompasses the period from 100 years to 10,000 years after the potential repository at Yucca Mountain is sealed for scenarios involving the breach of a waste package and subsequent degradation of the waste form as required for the TSPA-SR calculations. By extending the time period considered to one million years after repository closure, recommendations are made for the TSPA-FEIS. The waste forms included in the inventory abstraction are Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel (CSNF), DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel (DSNF), High-Level Waste (HLW), naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF), and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) plutonium waste. The intended use of this analysis is in TSPA-SR and TSPA-FEIS. Based on the recommendations made here, models for release, transport, and possibly exposure will be developed for the isotopes that would be the highest contributors to the dose given a release to the accessible environment. The inventory abstraction is important in

  11. INVENTORY ABSTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ragan

    2001-12-19

    The purpose of the inventory abstraction, which has been prepared in accordance with a technical work plan (CRWMS M&O 2000e for ICN 02 of the present analysis, and BSC 2001e for ICN 03 of the present analysis), is to: (1) Interpret the results of a series of relative dose calculations (CRWMS M&O 2000c, 2000f). (2) Recommend, including a basis thereof, a set of radionuclides that should be modeled in the Total System Performance Assessment in Support of the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and the Total System Performance Assessment in Support of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (TSPA-FEIS). (3) Provide initial radionuclide inventories for the TSPA-SR and TSPA-FEIS models. (4) Answer the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)'s Issue Resolution Status Report ''Key Technical Issue: Container Life and Source Term'' (CLST IRSR) key technical issue (KTI): ''The rate at which radionuclides in SNF [spent nuclear fuel] are released from the EBS [engineered barrier system] through the oxidation and dissolution of spent fuel'' (NRC 1999, Subissue 3). The scope of the radionuclide screening analysis encompasses the period from 100 years to 10,000 years after the potential repository at Yucca Mountain is sealed for scenarios involving the breach of a waste package and subsequent degradation of the waste form as required for the TSPA-SR calculations. By extending the time period considered to one million years after repository closure, recommendations are made for the TSPA-FEIS. The waste forms included in the inventory abstraction are Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel (CSNF), DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel (DSNF), High-Level Waste (HLW), naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF), and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) plutonium waste. The intended use of this analysis is in TSPA-SR and TSPA-FEIS. Based on the recommendations made here, models for release, transport, and possibly exposure will be developed for the isotopes that would be the highest

  12. The association of major depressive episode and personality traits in patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyella de Melo Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Personality traits have been associated with primary depression. However, it is not known whether this association takes place in the case of depression comorbid with fibromyalgia. OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the association between a current major depressive episode and temperament traits (e.g., harm avoidance. METHOD: A sample of 69 adult female patients with fibromyalgia was assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview severity of depressive symptomatology with the Beck Depression Inventory, and anxiety symptomatology with the IDATE-state and pain intensity with a visual analog scale. RESULTS: A current major depressive episode was diagnosed in 28 (40.5% of the patients. They presented higher levels of harm avoidance and lower levels of cooperativeness and self-directedness compared with non-depressed patients, which is consistent with the Temperament and Character Inventory profile of subjects with primary depression. However, in contrast to previous results in primary depression, no association between a major depressive episode and self-transcendence was found. CONCLUSIONS: The results highlight specific features of depression in fibromyalgia subjects and may prove important for enhancing the diagnosis and prognosis of depression in fibromyalgia patients.

  13. The relation of hopelessness/helplessness versus beck depression inventory (BDI) in healthy individuals and in patients with benign breast disease and breast cancer: a prospective case-control study in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, Matti; Korhonen, Riika; Selander, Tuomas; Ollonen, Paula

    2015-02-01

    The relation between hopelessness/helplessness versus the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in healthy study subjects (HSS) and in patients with benign breast disease (BBD) and breast cancer (BC) has not been compared in a prospective study before. We, therefore, investigated hopelessness and helplessness versus the BDI in 115 patients. In the Kuopio Breast Cancer Study, 115 women with breast symptoms were evaluated for hopelessness and helplessness versus the BDI before any diagnostic procedures were carried out. In the self-rating score (SRS), the hopelessness and the helplessness versus the BDI were highly significantly positively correlated in the HSS, BBD and BC groups. In the SRS, the weighted kappa values for hopelessness and helplessness versus the BDI in the HSS, BBD and BC groups were also statistically significant. There was also a significant positive correlation in the examiner-rating score (ERS) in the hopelessness versus the BDI in the BBD and BC groups and in the ERS in helplessness versus the BDI in the HSS and BBD groups. The unweighted kappa values in the ERS for hopelessness versus the BDI in the HSS and BBD groups were statistically highly significant and the unweighted kappa values in the ERS for helplessness versus the BDI in the BBD and BC groups were statistically significant. The results of this study support a powerful link between hopelessness and helplessness versus BDI in the self-rating and examiner-rating. This finding is of clinical importance since, in the breast cancer diagnostic unit, the patients with hopelessness/helplessness characteristics and high BDI score might be associated with a difficulty and delay in reaching BC diagnosis. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between baseline white-matter changes and development of late-life depressive symptoms: 3-year results from the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorczuk, A; Firbank, M J; Pantoni, L;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Growing evidence suggests that cerebral white-matter changes and depressive symptoms are linked directly along the causal pathway. We investigated whether baseline severity of cerebral white-matter changes predict longer-term future depressive outcomes in a community sample of non.......09) or incident depression (p=0.08). CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the vascular depression hypothesis and strongly implicate white-matter changes in the pathogenesis of late-life depression. Furthermore, the findings indicate that, over time, part of the relationship between white-matter changes and depression...

  15. The longitudinal relationship between control over working hours and depressive symptoms: Results from SLOSH, a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Sophie C; Kecklund, Göran; Rajaleid, Kristiina; Leineweber, Constanze

    2017-06-01

    Psychosocial work factors can affect depressive moods, but research is inconclusive if flexibility to self-determine working hours (work-time control, WTC) is associated with depressive symptoms over time. We investigated if either sub-dimension of WTC, control over daily hours and control over time off, was related to depressive symptoms over time and examined causal, reversed-causal, and reciprocal pathways. The study was based on four waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health which is a follow-up of representative samples of the Swedish working population. WTC was measured using a 5-item index. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a brief subscale of the Symptom Checklist. Latent growth curve models and cross-lagged panel models were tested. Best fit was found for a model with correlated intercepts (control over daily hours) and both correlated intercepts and slopes (control over time off) between WTC and depressive symptoms, with stronger associations for control over time off. Causal models estimating impacts from WTC to subsequent depressive symptoms were best fitting, with a standardised coefficient between -0.023 and -0.048. Results were mainly based on self-report data and mean age in the study sample was relatively high. Higher WTC was related to fewer depressive symptoms over time albeit small effects. Giving workers control over working hours - especially over taking breaks and vacation - may improve working conditions and buffer against developing depression, potentially by enabling workers to recover more easily and promoting work-life balance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The association between hypertension and depression and anxiety disorders: results from a nationally-representative sample of South African adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Grimsrud

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Growing evidence suggests high levels of comorbidity between hypertension and mental illness but there are few data from low- and middle-income countries. We examined the association between hypertension and depression and anxiety in South Africa. METHODS: Data come from a nationally-representative survey of adults (n = 4351. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to measure DSM-IV mental disorders during the previous 12-months. The relationships between self-reported hypertension and anxiety disorders, depressive disorders and comorbid anxiety-depression were assessed after adjustment for participant characteristics including experience of trauma and other chronic physical conditions. RESULTS: Overall 16.7% reported a previous medical diagnosis of hypertension, and 8.1% and 4.9% were found to have a 12-month anxiety or depressive disorder, respectively. In adjusted analyses, hypertension diagnosis was associated with 12-month anxiety disorders [Odds ratio (OR = 1.55, 95% Confidence interval (CI = 1.10-2.18] but not 12-month depressive disorders or 12-month comorbid anxiety-depression. Hypertension in the absence of other chronic physical conditions was not associated with any of the 12-month mental health outcomes (p-values all <0.05, while being diagnosed with both hypertension and another chronic physical condition were associated with 12-month anxiety disorders (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.46-3.45, but not 12-month depressive disorders or comorbid anxiety-depression. CONCLUSIONS: These are the first population-based estimates to demonstrate an association between hypertension and mental disorders in sub-Saharan Africa. Further investigation is needed into role of traumatic life events in the aetiology of hypertension as well as the temporality of the association between hypertension and mental disorders.

  17. Differential associations of depressive symptom dimensions with cardio-vascular disease in the community: results from the Gutenberg health study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Michal

    Full Text Available A current model suggested that the somatic symptom dimension accounts for the adverse effect of depression in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD. In order to test this model we sought to determine in a large population-based sample how symptom dimensions of depression are associated with CHD, biomarkers and traditional risk factors. The associations of cognitive and somatic symptom dimensions of depression with CHD, risk factors, endothelial function, and biomarkers of inflammation and myocardial stress were analyzed cross-sectionally in a sample of n = 5000 Mid-Europeans aged 35-74 years from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS. Only the somatic symptom dimension of depression was associated with CHD, biomarkers (inflammation, vascular function and cardio-vascular risk factors. When multivariable adjustment was applied by demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, the weak associations of the somatic symptom dimension with the biomarkers disappeared. However, the associations of the somatic symptom dimension with CHD, myocardial infarction, obesity, dyslipidemia and family history of myocardial infarction remained. Both dimensions of depression were independently associated with a previous diagnosis of depression and distressed personality (type D. Thus, our results partly confirm current models: Somatic, but not cognitive-affective symptom dimensions are responsible for the association between depression and CHD, inflammation, vascular function and cardiovascular risk factors in the general population. However, our findings challenge the assumptions that somatic depression might be due to inflammation or vascular dysfunction as consequence of progressed atherosclerotic disease. They rather emphasize a close interplay with life-style factors and with a family history of MI.

  18. Uncertainties in emission inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardenne, van J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Emission inventories provide information about the amount of a pollutant that is emitted to the atmosphere as a result of a specific anthropogenic or natural process at a given time or place. Emission inventories can be used for either policy or scientific purposes. For policy purpose

  19. Anhedonia and Pessimism in Hospitalized Depressed Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinoviy Gutkovich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal study investigates whether anhedonia and pessimistic attributional style represent a clinical state or a trait in hospitalized depressed adolescents. 81 consecutive adolescent inpatients were screened with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the clinician-rated Major Depressive Disorder (MDD criteria sheet. 51 patients with BDI score ≥10 and/or ≥4 symptoms on MDD criteria sheet were assessed at Time 1 upon admission, with 39 patients (78% assessed at discharge (Time 2 with the Pleasure Scale for Children and Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire—Revised. Anhedonia and pessimism at admission were associated with BDI scores at admission and discharge as well as number of depressive symptoms and depression severity. MDD diagnosis was associated with anhedonia, but not with pessimism. Pessimism—but not anhedonia—improved significantly by discharge. Results suggest that while some adolescents exhibit enduring anhedonia, pessimistic attributional style appears to be a concomitant feature of an acute depressive state.

  20. Baseline depression severity as a predictor of single and combination antidepressant treatment outcome: Results from the CO-MED Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Edward S.; Davis, Lori L.; Zisook, Sidney; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Fava, Maurizio; Rush, A. John

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to report associations between baseline depressive severity and (1) baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, (2) treatment outcomes, and (3) differential outcomes for three treatment groups. Six hundred and sixty-five outpatients with nonpsychotic, major depressive disorder were prospectively randomized to treatment with either a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) monotherapy (escitalopram plus placebo) or one of two antidepressant medication combinations (bupropion-sustained release plus escitalopram, or venlafaxine-extended release plus mirtazapine). For purposes of these analyses, participants were divided into four groups based on baseline severity by the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology - Self-Report (QIDS-SR16) total score: mild (0–10) [N=81], moderate (11–15) [N=238], severe (16–20) [N=260] and very severe (21–27) [N=67]. Treatment outcomes at 12 and 28 weeks were compared among the four severity groups. A history of childhood neglect and/or abuse was strongly associated with the severity of adult depression (1/2 of participants in the very severy group versus 1/5–1/4 of those in the mild group reported abuse and/or neglect). The degree of suicidality (e.g., 15/.4% of the very severe group ever attempted suicide versus none in the mild group), the number of suicide attempts (e.g., mean of .41 +/− 1.99 suicide attempts in the severe group versus o.o +/−0.0 in the mild group) and severity of suicidality (e.g., 9.2% of participants in very severe group had a plan or made a gesture versus 5.6% in moderate group and none in the mild group) were increased in more severe groups. Participants with a greater baseline depressive severity reported significantly more psychiatric comorbitities (e..g. [at p < 0.05] increased rates of agoraphobia, bulimia, generalized anxiety, hypocondriasis, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, social phobia and somatoform disorder

  1. China Forest Aboveground Biomass Estimation by Fusion of Inventory and Remote Sensing Data: 1st results from Heilongjiang Province and Yunnan Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Y.; Li, Z.; Huang, G.; Sun, G.; Cheng, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, G.

    2013-12-01

    Forests play an irreplaceable role in maintaining regional ecological environment, global carbon balance and mitigating global climate change. Forest aboveground biomass (AGB) is an important indicator of forest carbon stocks. Estimating forest aboveground biomass accurately could significantly reduce the uncertainties in terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. LIDAR provides accurate information on the vertical structure of forests (Lefsky et al., 2007; Naesset et al., 2004; Pang et al., 2008). Combining airborne LiDAR and spaceborne LiDAR for regional forest biomass retrieval could provide a more reliable and accurate quantitative information in regional forest biomass estimate (Boudreau et al., 2008; Nelson et al., 2009; Pang et al., 2011; Saatchi et al., 2011). The Heilongjiang Province and Yunnan Province are rich in forest resources and suffers intensive forest management activities for timber products. The Heilongjiang Province is typical in temperate forest and the Yunnan Province contains multiple forest types including tropical forest. These two provinces also have good ground inventory system with thousands of permanent field plots. Two campaign consists of in-situ measurement, airborne Lidar data and spaceborne data fusion were designed and implemented. First results show that i). Both spaceborne lidar and forest inventory data are useful for AGB mapping at province level. ii). The combination of spaceborne lidar and forest inventory data gave better biomass estimation with less bias. iii). A pixel level bias mapping was also proposed and gave spatial explicit map of estimation uncertainties. This method will be investigated further with more reference data and tested in other area.

  2. Is the beck anxiety inventory a good tool to assess the severity of anxiety? A primary care study in The Netherlands study of depression and anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntingh, Anna D. T.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Appropriate management of anxiety disorders in primary care requires clinical assessment and monitoring of the severity of the anxiety. This study focuses on the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) as a severity indicator for anxiety in primary care patients with different anxiety disorders (so

  3. Is the beck anxiety inventory a good tool to assess the severity of anxiety? A primary care study in The Netherlands study of depression and anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntingh, Anna D. T.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Appropriate management of anxiety disorders in primary care requires clinical assessment and monitoring of the severity of the anxiety. This study focuses on the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) as a severity indicator for anxiety in primary care patients with different anxiety disorders (so

  4. Examining the relationship between anxiety and depression and exacerbations of COPD which result in hospital admission: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooler A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alison Pooler,1,2 Roger Beech21School of Nursing and Midwifery, Clinical Education Centre, University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Stoke-on-Trent, UK; 2Health Services Research, Research Institute of Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, UK Objectives: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are the third largest cause of emergency hospital admissions in the UK. This systematic literature review explored the relationship between the hospitalization rates and the COPD comorbidities, anxiety, and depression.Methods: The Centre for Research Dissemination's framework for systematic reviews was followed using search terms relating to COPD, anxiety, depression, and hospital admission. Papers identified were assessed for relevance and quality, using a suitable Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool and Mixed Methods Assessment Tool.Results: Twenty quantitative studies indicated that anxiety and depression led to a statistically significant increase in the likelihood of COPD patients being hospitalized. These comorbidities also led to an increased length of stay and a greater risk of mortality postdischarge. Other significant factors included lower Body-Mass Index, Airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise scores, female gender, lower socioeconomic status, poorer patient perceived quality of life, increased severity of lung function, and less improvement in dyspnea from admission to discharge. It was also highlighted that only 27%–33% of those with depression were being treated for it. Four qualitative studies revealed that patients saw anxiety and depression as a major factor that affected their ability to cope with and self-manage their condition.Implications: Findings from the systematic review have highlighted a need for better recognition and treatment of anxiety and depression amongst individuals with COPD. Ongoing research will develop and test strategies for promoting better management

  5. Hippocampal Atrophy and Subsequent Depressive Symptoms in Older Men and Women: Results From a 10-Year Prospective Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbejjani, Martine; Fuhrer, Rebecca; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Mazoyer, Bernard; Crivello, Fabrice; Tzourio, Christophe; Dufouil, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have reported smaller hippocampal volume in patients with depression. However, the temporality of the association is undetermined. One hypothesis is that hippocampal atrophy might be a susceptibility factor for depression. In the present study, we assessed whether hippocampal atrophy was associated with subsequent depressive symptoms in a cohort of older French adults (n = 1,309) who were 65–80 years of age and enrolled into the study in 1999–2001 in Dijon, France. Subjects were followed for more than 10 years. Participants underwent 2 cerebral magnetic resonance imaging scans, one at baseline and one at the 4-year follow-up. We used linear mixed models to estimate the associations of hippocampal atrophy with 1) the average depressive symptom scores over follow-up (using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale) measured biennially over the subsequent 6 years and 2) changes in symptom scores over follow-up. In women, a 2-standard-deviation increase in annual hippocampal atrophy was associated with a 1.67-point (95% confidence interval: 0.59, 2.77) increase in the average depressive symptom score over follow-up and with a 1.97-point (95% confidence interval: 0.68, 3.24) increase in scores over the 2 subsequent years but not with later changes in symptoms. No association was detected in men. Accounting for potential selective attrition (using inverse probability weights) did not alter results. Hippocampal atrophy was associated with more subsequent depressive symptoms and with shorter-term worsening of symptoms in women. PMID:25086051

  6. Inventory parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a detailed overview of various parameters/factors involved in inventory analysis. It especially focuses on the assessment and modeling of basic inventory parameters, namely demand, procurement cost, cycle time, ordering cost, inventory carrying cost, inventory stock, stock out level, and stock out cost. In the context of economic lot size, it provides equations related to the optimum values. It also discusses why the optimum lot size and optimum total relevant cost are considered to be key decision variables, and uses numerous examples to explain each of these inventory parameters separately. Lastly, it provides detailed information on parameter estimation for different sectors/products. Written in a simple and lucid style, it offers a valuable resource for a broad readership, especially Master of Business Administration (MBA) students.

  7. The association between depressive disorders and health care utilization: results from the São Paulo ageing and health study (SPAH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiang; Menezes, Paulo R; da Silva, Simone A; Tabb, Karen; Barkil-Oteo, Andres; Scazufca, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Although depressive disorders are associated with increased health care utilization in the elderly living in high-income countries, few studies have examined this relationship in Latin America. The present study is part of the São Paulo Ageing and Health Study, a population-based epidemiological study of mental disorders in 2072 low-income adults ≥ 65 years old living in São Paulo, Brazil. Depressive disorders defined as major depressive disorder (MDD) and clinically relevant depressive symptoms (CRDS) were assessed with the Geriatric Mental State and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. We examined the association between depressive disorders/symptoms and health care utilization (outpatient visits, hospital admissions and medication use in the past 3 months) using count models. The prevalence of MDD and CRDS was 4.9% and 21.4%, respectively. In the fully adjusted model, older adults with MDD were 36% more likely to have one more outpatient visit (RM: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.11-1.67), while older adults with CRDS were 14% more likely to have one more outpatient visit (RM: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.02-1.28). Elderly individuals with MDD had a prevalence of hospital admissions in the previous 3 months that was twice that of those without depression (PR=2.02, 95% CI: 1.09-3.75). Significant differences were not found for medication use. Among low-income older adults living in Brazil, those with MDD are more likely to have a recent hospital admission and outpatient service use than those without depression. Future studies are needed to examine the effectiveness of depression treatments for this population in order to both decrease the burden of illness as well as to minimize health care utilization related to depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effectiveness of problem-solving therapy for older, primary care patients with depression: results from the IMPACT project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arean, Patricia; Hegel, Mark; Vannoy, Steven; Fan, Ming-Yu; Unuzter, Jurgen

    2008-06-01

    We compared a primary-care-based psychotherapy, that is, problem-solving therapy for primary care (PST-PC), to community-based psychotherapy in treating late-life major depression and dysthymia. The data here are from the IMPACT study, which compared collaborative care within a primary care clinic to care as usual in the treatment of 1,801 primary care patients, 60 years of age or older, with major depression or dysthymia. This study is a secondary data analysis (n = 433) of participants who received either PST-PC (by means of collaborative care) or community-based psychotherapy (by means of usual care). Older adults who received PST-PC had more depression-free days at both 12 and between 12 and 24 months (beta = 47.5, p <.001; beta = 47.0, p <.001), and they had fewer depressive symptoms and better functioning at 12 months (beta(dep) = -0.36, p <.001; beta(func) = -0.94, p <.001), than those who received community-based psychotherapy. We found no differences at 24 months. Results suggest that PST-PC as delivered in primary care settings is an effective method for treating late-life depression.

  9. The influence of comorbid personality disorder on the effects of behavioural activation vs. antidepressant medication for major depressive disorder: results from a randomized trial in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradveisi, Latif; Huibers, Marcus J H; Renner, Fritz; Arasteh, Modabber; Arntz, Arnoud

    2013-08-01

    There is a disagreement about the impact of personality disorder (PD) on treatment outcome for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). 100 out-patients with MDD were randomized to 16 sessions of behavioural activation (BA) (n = 50) or antidepressant medication (ADM) (n = 50) in Iran. Main outcome was depression severity, measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), and assessed at 0, 4, 13 and 49 weeks. Participants with comorbid PDs had higher scores on BDI and HRSD at baseline and throughout the study than participants without comorbid PD. Patients with and without comorbid personality pathology responded equally to treatment on the short-and the long-term. Overall, BA was better in reducing symptoms in patients but this effect was not influenced by comorbid PD. Similar effects were found for a dimensional PD-measure. Only cluster-C PD-traits turned out to be associated with overall depression severity. Cluster-A PD-traits predicted poorer long-term treatment response to ADM and BA, but only on the BDI, not on the HRSD. No effects of cluster-B PD-traits were found. However, PD was associated with higher dropout. The general conclusion is that comorbid PD pathology, especially from cluster-C, is associated with higher depression severity, but not with less response to treatment. Comorbid PD did predict increased chance of dropout.

  10. Cognitive Functions and Depression in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per G. Farup

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is associated with depression and depression with impaired cognitive functions. The primary aim was to study associations between depression and cognitive functions in patients with IBS. Methods. IBS (according to the Rome III criteria, cognitive functions (evaluated with a set of neuropsychological tests, and depression (measured with Beck Depression Inventory II and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale were analysed in patients with idiopathic depression and in patients with unspecified neurological symptoms. Results. 18 and 48 patients with a mean age of 47 and 45 years were included in the “Depression” and “Neurological” group, respectively. In the “Depression” group, the degree of depression was significantly higher in patients with IBS than in those without. Depression was associated with impaired cognitive function in 6 out of 17 neuropsychological tests indicating reduced set shifting, verbal fluency, attention, and psychomotor speed. IBS was statistically significantly associated with depression but not with any of the tests for cognitive functions. Conclusions. IBS was associated with depression but not with impaired cognitive functions. Since the idiopathic depression was associated with cognitive deficits, the findings could indicate that the depression in patients with IBS differs from an idiopathic depression.

  11. Measuring depression in children: a multimethod assessment investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, W M; Anderson, G; Bartell, N

    1985-12-01

    The present investigation examined measures for the assessment of depressive symptomatology in children, as well as two related constructs (self-esteem and anxiety). The sample consisted of 166 elementary school children from grades 3 through 6. Two self-report depression measures, the Children's Depression Inventory (Kovacs, 1979) and the Child Depression Scale (Reynolds, in press), as well as anxiety and self-esteem scales, were completed by the children. Parents (mothers and fathers) evaluated their children on the depression and anxiety scales from the Personality Inventory for Children (Wirt, Lachar, Klinedinst, & Seat, 1977), and teachers provided global ratings of depression and academic performance. The results support the reliability and validity of both self-report children depression measures. Data obtained on the parent report measure do not recommend its use at this time for assessing depression in children, while results on teachers' global ratings of depression provide some evidence that teachers may be a good source of information regarding depression in children.

  12. Poststroke depression and its multifactorial nature : Results from a prospective longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ryck, A.; Fransen, E.; Brouns, R.; Geurden, M.; Peij, D.; Marien, P.; De Deyn, P. P.; Engelborghs, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Poststroke depression (PSD) is commonly observed in stroke patients and has a negative impact on functional outcome and quality of life. Therefore, a prospective, longitudinal epidemiological study was conducted aiming to determine prevalence and risk factors for PSD at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 18

  13. Impact of loneliness and depression on mortality : results from the Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Tjalling J; van Tilburg, Theo G; Deeg, Dorly J H; Schutter, Natasja; Van, Rien; Dekker, Jack; Stek, Max L; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Schoevers, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loneliness is highly prevalent among older people, has serious health consequences and is an important predictor of mortality. Loneliness and depression may unfavourably interact with each other over time but data on this topic are scarce. AIMS: To determine whether loneliness is associa

  14. Desvenlafaxine for the prevention of relapse in major depressive disorder: results of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickels, Karl; Montgomery, Stuart A; Tourian, Karen A; Guelfi, Julien D; Pitrosky, Bruno; Padmanabhan, Sudharshan Krishna; Germain, Jean-Michael; Leurent, Claire; Brisard, Claudine

    2010-02-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of desvenlafaxine (administered as desvenlafaxine succinate) with placebo in reducing relapse rate in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This phase 3, multicenter, randomized trial included a 12-week, open-label (OL) treatment phase (intent-to-treat population, n = 575) followed by a 6-month, double-blind (DB) relapse prevention phase. Patients who responded to the OL treatment (17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression total score desvenlafaxine (200-400 mg/d) were eligible to enter the DB phase. The primary efficacy end point was time until relapse (17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression total score >or= 16 at any visit, Clinical Global Impression-Improvement score >or= 6 at any visit, or discontinuation due to unsatisfactory response). Patients receiving desvenlafaxine (n = 189) experienced significantly longer times to relapse of MDD versus patients receiving placebo (n = 185) during the DB period (log-rank test, P desvenlafaxine, respectively (P desvenlafaxine-treated patients (31%). The most frequent adverse event reported as reason for treatment discontinuation in the DB period was depression, reported by 14 placebo- (8%) and 7 desvenlafaxine-treated patients (4%). Desvenlafaxine effectively prevented relapse of MDD during 6 months of DB treatment in patients who had responded to 12 weeks of OL desvenlafaxine therapy.

  15. Poststroke depression and its multifactorial nature : Results from a prospective longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ryck, A.; Fransen, E.; Brouns, R.; Geurden, M.; Peij, D.; Marien, P.; De Deyn, P. P.; Engelborghs, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Poststroke depression (PSD) is commonly observed in stroke patients and has a negative impact on functional outcome and quality of life. Therefore, a prospective, longitudinal epidemiological study was conducted aiming to determine prevalence and risk factors for PSD at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 18

  16. An Evaluation of Depressed Mood in Two Classes of Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Ruth E.; Litwins, Stephanie D.; Frye, Ann W.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess depression rates in contemporary medical students. Method: The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered anonymously to two medical school classes at matriculation, the end of first year, and the end of second year. Results: Median scores for both classes were low at all points. The proportion of students scoring in the…

  17. Early Detection of Depression and Associated Risk Factors in Adults with Mild/Moderate Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, Jane A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presentation and risk factors for depression in adults with mild/moderate intellectual disability (ID). A sample of 151 adults (83 males and 68 females) participated in a semi-structured interview. According to results on the Beck Depression Inventory II, 39.1% of participants evinced symptoms of…

  18. Riparian Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset is a digital representation of the 1:24,000 Land Use Riparian Areas Inventory for the state of Kansas. The dataset includes a 100 foot buffer around all...

  19. Raccoon abundance inventory report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a raccoon abundance inventory on Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge in 2012. Determining raccoon abundance allows for...

  20. Social representations and psychological distress in adolescents with depressive symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research paper was to understand social representations of depression in high school adolescents in the city of João Pessoa, Paraíba. The study included 11 subjects aged between 14 and 17 years with depressive symptons, selected from a group of 296 adolescents. Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and the Semi-Structured Interview were two of the instruments used in the research, allowing results to indicate that depression is associated with feelings of sadness, such as ...

  1. Depression and resilience mediate the relationship between traumatic life events and ill physical health: results from a population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatzias, Thanos; Jowett, Sally; Yan, Elsie; Raeside, Robert; Howard, Ruth

    2016-11-10

    We set out to investigate the mediating roles of depression, resilience, smoking, and alcohol use, in the relationship between potentially traumatic life events and objective and subjective, physical and mental health in a single study. A face-to-face, population-based survey was conducted in Hong Kong (N = 1147). Information on health conditions and traumatic life events was obtained, and participants completed measures of subjective physical and mental health, depression, and resilience. Smoking and drinking were not significant mediators of the relationship between life events and both objective and subjective health. Depressive symptomatology was found to mediate the relationship between life threatening illness and subjective physical health, the relationship between abuse (physical and sexual) and subjective mental health, and the relationship between the death of a parent/partner and subjective mental health. Resilience was found to mediate the relationships between multiple traumatic life events and subjective physical and mental health. Our results indicate that psychological factors rather than biological are important mediators of the relationship between life events exposure and health. Our findings provide evidence that depressive symptomatology has a mediating role only in the case of specific potentially traumatic life events and that resilience is only a critical factor in the face of exposure to multiple traumatic events, rather than single events. Our results also indicate that behavioural factors, such as smoking and drinking, are not significant mediators of the relationship between life events and health.

  2. The symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with diabetic foot treated with hyperbaric oxygen - preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koźmin-Burzyńska Agnieszka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the level of anxiety and depressiveness in patients who had qualified for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT for the treatment of ulcerative lesions in the lower limbs, occurring as a result of diabetic foot syndrome (DFS,. A total of 50 patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic foot syndrome were enrolled to the study. All patients have received 30 sessions of HBOT. During the therapy blood glucose was measured and photographic documentation was carried out. All patients underwent the following procedures: medical history and socioeconomic interview, psychiatric examination, self-report and objective psychometric tests to measure anxiety and depressiveness. Based on the obtained results, we reported that patients with a greater degree of tissue damage had higher levels of depressive symptoms in the self-report tests as well as in the objective evaluation of the investigator. In terms of location of ulcerative lesions - the level of depressiveness was greater when the affected area included toes, and the level of anxiety was increased when it concerned the heel. Regarding other parameters, statistically significant correlations were not observed.

  3. Inpatients with major depressive disorder: Psychometric properties of the new Multidimensional Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darharaj, Mohammad; Habibi, Mojtaba; Power, Michael J; Farzadian, Farzaneh; Rahimi, Maesoumeh; Kholghi, Habibeh; Kazemitabar, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    The New Multi-dimensional Depression Scale (NMDS) is one of the most comprehensive scales that measures depression symptoms in four domains, including emotional, cognitive, somatic, and interpersonal. This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the NMDS in a group of Iranian inpatients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). At first, the scale was translated into Persian and used as part of a battery consisting of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). The battery was administered to 271 inpatients with MDD (90 men and 181 women) aged from 18 to 60 who had been referred to psychiatric hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Persian version of the NMDS upheld its original four-factor structure. Moreover, the results showed its good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient ranging from 0.70 for the emotional subscale to 0.83 for the interpersonal subscale). In addition, the NMDS scores were correlated with other constructs in empirically and theoretically expected ways, which provides evidence for the convergent (positive significant relationships with anxiety and cognitive and somatic-affective symptoms of depression) and divergent (negative significant relationships with happiness and mental health and physical health) validity of the scale. These findings supported the Persian version of the NMDS as a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of depression symptoms in patients with MDD.

  4. Ovariectomy results in variable changes in nociception, mood and depression in adult female rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hong Li

    Full Text Available Decline in the ovarian hormones with menopause may influence somatosensory, cognitive, and affective processing. The present study investigated whether hormonal depletion alters the nociceptive, depressive-like and learning behaviors in experimental rats after ovariectomy (OVX, a common method to deplete animals of their gonadal hormones. OVX rats developed thermal hyperalgesia in proximal and distal tail that was established 2 weeks after OVX and lasted the 7 weeks of the experiment. A robust mechanical allodynia was also occurred at 5 weeks after OVX. In the 5th week after OVX, dilute formalin (5%-induced nociceptive responses (such as elevating and licking or biting during the second phase were significantly increased as compared to intact and sham-OVX females. However, chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve-induced mechanical allodynia did not differ as hormonal status (e.g. OVX and ovarian intact. Using formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance (F-CPA, which is believed to reflect the pain-related negative emotion, we further found that OVX significantly attenuated F-CPA scores but did not alter electric foot-shock-induced CPA (S-CPA. In the open field and forced swimming test, there was an increase in depressive-like behaviors in OVX rats. There was no detectable impairment of spatial performance by Morris water maze task in OVX rats up to 5 weeks after surgery. Estrogen replacement retrieved OVX-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity and depressive-like behaviors. This is the first study to investigate the impacts of ovarian removal on nociceptive perception, negative emotion, depressive-like behaviors and spatial learning in adult female rats in a uniform and standard way.

  5. Gender Differences in the Clinical Characteristics of Psychotic Depression: Results from the CRESCEND Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Kim, Jae-Min; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Park, Yong Chon

    2015-12-31

    To test whether there are gender differences in the clinical characteristics of patients with psychotic depression (PD). Using data from the Clinical Research Center for Depression (CRESCEND) study in South Korea, we tested for potential gender differences in clinical characteristics among 53 patients with PD. The Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS) and other psychometric scales were used to evaluate various clinical features of the study subjects. Independent t-tests were performed for normally distributed variables, Mann-Whitney U-tests for non-normally distributed variables, and χ(2)tests for discrete variables. In addition, to exclude the effects of confounding variables, we carried out an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) for the normally distributed variables and binary logistic regression analyses for discrete variables, after adjusting the effects of marital status. We identified more prevalent suicidal ideation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=10.316, p=0.036) and hallucinatory behavior (aOR=8.332, p=0.016), as well as more severe anxiety symptoms (degrees of freedom [df]=1, F=6.123, p=0.017), and poorer social and occupational functioning (df=1, F=6.265, p=0.016) in the male patients compared to the female patients. Our findings suggest that in South Korean patients with PD, suicidal ideation, hallucinatory behavior, and anxiety is more pronounced among males than females. This should be taken into consideration in clinical practice.

  6. Increased body mass and depressive symptomatology are associated with hypercholesterolemia, among elderly individuals; results from the MEDIS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makri Kornilia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypercholesterolemia is one of the most important factors causing cardiovascular disease (CVD. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the relationships between socio-demographic, clinical, lifestyle and depression status and the presence of hypercholesterolemia, among elderly individuals without known CVD. Methods During 2005–2007, 1190 elderly (aged 65 to 100 years men and women (from Cyprus, Mitilini, Samothraki, Cephalonia, Crete, Lemnos, Corfu and Zakynthos were enrolled. Socio-demographic, clinical and lifestyle factors were assessed through standard procedures. Symptoms of depression were evaluated using the short-form of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, range 0–15. Dietary habits were assessed through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Hypercholesterolemia was defined as total serum cholesterol > 200 mg/dL or use of lipids lowering medication. Results 44.6% of males and 61.9% of females had hypercholesterolemia (p Conclusion A considerable proportion of our elderly sample had hypercholesterolemia, while 1/3 of them were untreated. Furthermore, presence of hypercholesterolemia was correlated with depressive symptomatology and increased BMI.

  7. Association between Depressive Symptoms and Metabolic Syndrome in Police Officers: Results from Two Cross-Sectional Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Tara A.; Knox, Sarah S.; Fekedulegn, Desta; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Violanti, John M.; Andrew, Michael E.; Burchfiel, Cecil M.

    2012-01-01

    Policing is one of the most dangerous and stressful occupations and such stress can have deleterious effects on health. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between depressive symptoms and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) in male and female police officers from two study populations, Buffalo, NY and Spokane, WA. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale. MetSyn was defined using the 2005 AHA/NHBLI guidelines. Analysis of covariance was used to describe differences in number of MetSyn components across depressive symptom categories. The number of MetSyn components increased significantly across categories of CES-D for Spokane men only (p-trend = 0.003). For each 5-unit increase in CES-D score, odds increased by 47.6% for having hypertriglyceridemia, by 51.8% for having hypertension, and by 56.7% for having glucose intolerance. Exploring this association is important since both are predictors of future chronic health problems and the results could be helpful in developing future gender-specific prevention and intervention efforts among police officers. PMID:22315628

  8. Association between Depressive Symptoms and Metabolic Syndrome in Police Officers: Results from Two Cross-Sectional Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara A. Hartley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Policing is one of the most dangerous and stressful occupations and such stress can have deleterious effects on health. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between depressive symptoms and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn in male and female police officers from two study populations, Buffalo, NY and Spokane, WA. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D scale. MetSyn was defined using the 2005 AHA/NHBLI guidelines. Analysis of covariance was used to describe differences in number of MetSyn components across depressive symptom categories. The number of MetSyn components increased significantly across categories of CES-D for Spokane men only (p-trend = 0.003. For each 5-unit increase in CES-D score, odds increased by 47.6% for having hypertriglyceridemia, by 51.8% for having hypertension, and by 56.7% for having glucose intolerance. Exploring this association is important since both are predictors of future chronic health problems and the results could be helpful in developing future gender-specific prevention and intervention efforts among police officers.

  9. The relationship between personality, social functioning, and depression: a structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Wai S; Rochelle, Tina L; Cheung, Jacky C K

    2011-06-01

    The relationship between personality, social functioning, and depression remains unclear. The present study employs structural equation modeling to examine the mediating role of social functioning between harm avoidance (HA), self-directedness (SD), and depression. A sample of 902 individuals completed a self-report questionnaire consisting of the following scales: HA and SD subscales of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Social Adaptation Self-Evaluation Scale (SASS). Structural equation modeling via analysis of moment structure was used to estimate the fit of nine related models. Results indicated that social functioning is a mediator between harm avoidance or self-directness and depression. Self-directedness was also shown to have direct effects on depression. The results support the social reinforcement theory of depression and provide a theoretical account of how the variables are related based on correlation methods. Suggestions are offered for future experimental and longitudinal research.

  10. Depressive symptomatology among Namibian adolescent refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shisana, O; Celentano, D D

    1985-01-01

    Symptoms of depression have been considered rare in sub-Saharan populations. Using a standard assessment measure of depressive symptomatology, the Beck Depression Inventory, the prevalence of symptoms of depression was obtained from a group (N = 56) of Namibian refugees residing in a sub-Saharan host country. Contrary to expectations, the rates of self-reported symptoms were quite frequent, with many symptoms reported as moderate or severe by a large proportion of these youths. Using a stress model to explore these data, it was demonstrated that social support ameliorated the effects of chronic stress, as represented by the length of time in exile. It is argued that adaptation, acculturation, and adolescent developmental demands result in self-reports of depressive symptoms. These demands, however, are lessened in intensity by a strong social support system that is especially helpful early in the exile period.

  11. Emotional recognition in depressed epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Jesse G; Burton, Leslie A; Schaffer, Sarah G; Alper, Kenneth R; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William B

    2009-07-01

    The current study examined the relationship between emotional recognition and depression using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Second Edition (MMPI-2), in a population with epilepsy. Participants were a mixture of surgical candidates in addition to those receiving neuropsychological testing as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Results suggested that patients with epilepsy reporting increased levels of depression (Scale D) performed better than those patients reporting low levels of depression on an index of simple facial recognition, and depression was associated with poor prosody discrimination. Further, it is notable that more than half of the present sample had significantly elevated Scale D scores. The potential effects of a mood-congruent bias and implications for social functioning in depressed patients with epilepsy are discussed.

  12. Association of Baseline Depressive Symptoms with Prevalent and Incident Pre-Hypertension and Hypertension in Postmenopausal Hispanic Women: Results from the Women's Health Initiative.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth E Zambrana

    Full Text Available Depression and depressive symptoms are risk factors for hypertension (HTN and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Hispanic women have higher rates of depressive symptoms compared to other racial/ethnic groups yet few studies have investigated its association with incident prehypertension and hypertension among postmenopausal Hispanic women. This study aims to assess if an association exists between baseline depression and incident hypertension at 3 years follow-up among postmenopausal Hispanic women.Prospective cohort study, Women's Health Initiative (WHI, included 4,680 Hispanic women who participated in the observational and clinical trial studies at baseline and at third-year follow-up. Baseline current depressive symptoms and past depression history were measured as well as important correlates of depression-social support, optimism, life events and caregiving. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate prevalent and incident prehypertension and hypertension in relation to depressive symptoms.Prevalence of current baseline depression ranged from 26% to 28% by hypertension category and education moderated these rates. In age-adjusted models, women with depression were more likely to be hypertensive (OR = 1.25; 95% CI 1.04-1.51, although results were attenuated when adjusting for covariates. Depression at baseline in normotensive Hispanic women was associated with incident hypertension at year 3 follow-up (OR = 1.74; 95% CI 1.10-2.74 after adjustment for insurance and behavioral factors. However, further adjustment for clinical covariates attenuated the association. Analyses of psychosocial variables correlated with depression but did not alter findings. Low rates of antidepressant medication usage were also reported.In the largest longitudinal study to date of older Hispanic women which included physiologic, behavioral and psychosocial moderators of depression, there was no association between baseline depressive symptoms and prevalent nor

  13. Changes in depression in a cohort of Danish HIV-positive individuals: time for routine screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjaer, Lotte; Laursen, Tinne; Christensen, Nils B

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to follow a cohort of HIV-positive individuals for 3 years in order to assess changes in depression, adherence, unsafe sex and emotional strains from living with HIV. Methods: Participants were assessed for depression, adherence, emotional strain and unsafe sex...... via a questionnaire. The Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI) was used to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI score of 20 or above (moderate to major depression) were offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Results: In 2005, 205 HIV......-positive individuals participated in the study. Symptoms of depression (BDI >14) were observed in 77 (38%) and major depression (BDI ≥20) in 53 (26%) individuals. In 2008, 148 participants were retested (72% of original sample). Depression (BDI >14) was observed in 38 (26%) and symptoms of major depression (BDI ≥20...

  14. [Saving motives in young, middle-aged, and older adults. Preliminary results of a new inventory for exploring lifespan saving motives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rager, B; Lang, F R; Wagner, G G

    2012-12-01

    There is some research on personal reasons for saving money in the economic sciences. However, not much is known about the age differences of saving motives. In this vein, the future time perspective (FTP) is known to play a critical role for motivation across the life span. In this study, we introduce a new Saving Motive Inventory (SMI), which also covers saving goals after retirement. Furthermore, it is argued that additional saving motives that are not based on economic models of life-cycle saving also exist. In accordance with the socio-emotional selectivity theory, we explored age differences in an online survey with 496 participants from young (19-44 years), middle-aged (45-64 years), and older (65-86 years) adulthood, who completed a questionnaire on saving motives, personality, and future-related thinking (e.g., Future Time Perspective Scale, Life Orientation Test). Results of the explorative Factor Analysis (EFA) are consistent with the theoretical expectations. The factors are generativity, educational investment, consumption, indifference, and provision for death and dying. Together these five factors account for 67% of the variance. In general, the inventory is reliable and valid with respect to the expected internal and external criteria. It contributes to better understanding of saving motives over the lifespan, especially with respect to effects of the future time perspective.

  15. The effect of Omega3 on depression disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mandana saki

    2011-06-01

    Results: The findings indicated that the average grade obtained from Beck inventory in the both groups treated with Omega3 and Nortriptyline during a 3- month period was decreased remarkably . Also the patients 'performances improved during this period . Statistical Analysis showed a significant relationship among average grade in Beck inventory and performance level gained by the patients. Conclusion: Based on the research findings and the proved effects of Omega3 on the treatment of depression , it is recommended that these should be prescribed for non psychotic depression as the first stage of treatment .

  16. Insufficient treatment of severe depression in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarro, Velina S.; Mealy, Maureen A.; Simpson, Alexandra; Lacheta, Anna; Pache, Florence; Ruprecht, Klemens; Gold, Stefan M.; Brandt, Alexander Ulrich; Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate depression frequency, severity, current treatment, and interactions with somatic symptoms among patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). Methods: In this dual-center observational study, we included 71 patients diagnosed with NMOSD according to the International Panel for NMO Diagnosis 2015 criteria. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was classified into severe, moderate, or minimal/no depressive state category. We used the Fatigue Severity Scale to evaluate fatigue. Scores from the Brief Pain Inventory and the PainDETECT Questionnaire were normalized to estimate neuropathic pain. Psychotropic, pain, and immunosuppressant medications were tabulated by established classes. Results: Twenty-eight percent of patients with NMOSD (n = 20) had BDI scores indicative of moderate or severe depression; 48% of patients (n = 34) endorsed significant levels of neuropathic pain. Severity of depression was moderately associated with neuropathic pain (r = 0.341, p < 0.004) but this relationship was confounded by levels of fatigue. Furthermore, only 40% of patients with moderate or severe depressive symptoms received antidepressant medical treatment. Fifty percent of those treated reported persistent moderate to severe depressive symptoms under treatment. Conclusions: Moderate and severe depression in patients with NMOSD is associated with neuropathic pain and fatigue and is insufficiently treated. These results are consistent across 2 research centers and continents. Future research needs to address how depression can be effectively managed and treated in NMOSD. PMID:27800532

  17. Hopelessness, Depression, Suicidal Ideation, and Clinical Diagnosis of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined relevance of clinical diagnosis of depression for explaining discrepant relationships of hopelessness and depression with suicidal ideation. Administered Beck Depression Inventory, Hopelessness Scale, and Scale for Suicide Ideation to 1,306 patients with mood disorder and 488 patients without mood disorder. Found that hopelessness was 1.3…

  18. Feeling labeled, judged, lectured, and rejected by family and friends over depression: Cautionary results for primary care clinicians from a multi-centered, qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y-Garcia Erik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family and friends may help patients seek out and engage in depression care. However, patients’ social networks can also undermine depression treatment and recovery. In an effort to improve depression care in primary care settings, we sought to identify, categorize, and alert primary care clinicians to depression-related messages that patients hear from friends and family that patients perceive as unhelpful or detrimental. Methods We conducted 15 focus groups in 3 cities. Participants (n = 116 with a personal history or knowledge of depression responded to open-ended questions about depression, including self-perceived barriers to care-seeking. Focus group conversations were audio-recorded and analyzed using iterative qualitative analysis. Results Four themes emerged related to negatively-received depression messages delivered by family and friends. Specifically, participants perceived these messages as making them feel labeled, judged, lectured to, and rejected by family and friends when discussing depression. Some participants also expressed their interpretation of their families’ motivations for delivering the messages and described how hearing these messages affected depression care. Conclusions The richness of our results reflects the complexity of communication within depression sufferers’ social networks around this stigmatized issue. To leverage patients’ social support networks effectively in depression care, primary care clinicians should be aware of both the potentially beneficial and detrimental aspects of social support. Specifically, clinicians should consider using open-ended queries into patients’ experiences with discussing depression with family and friends as an initial step in the process. An open-ended approach may avoid future emotional trauma or stigmatization and assist patients in overcoming self-imposed barriers to depression discussion, symptom disclosure, treatment adherence and

  19. 27 CFR 19.981 - Inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inventories. 19.981... Spirits § 19.981 Inventories. Proprietors shall take actual physical inventory of all spirits (including... § 19.988. The results of the inventory shall be posted in the applicable records required by §...

  20. Validation of Six Short and Ultra-short Screening Instruments for Depression for People Living with HIV in Ontario: Results from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Stephanie KY; Boyle, Eleanor; Burchell, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objective Major depression affects up to half of people living with HIV. However, among HIV-positive patients, depression goes unrecognized 60–70% of the time in non-psychiatric settings. We sought to evaluate three screening instruments and their short forms to facilitate the recognition...... of current depression in HIV-positive patients attending HIV specialty care clinics in Ontario. Methods A multi-centre validation study was conducted in Ontario to examine the validity and accuracy of three instruments (the Center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale [CESD20], the Kessler Psychological...... Distress Scale [K10], and the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale [PHQ9]) and their short forms (CESD10, K6, and PHQ2) in diagnosing current major depression among 190 HIV-positive patients in Ontario. Results from the three instruments and their short forms were compared to results from the gold...

  1. The Relationship Between Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms in Healthy Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdorf, Virginia; Kollia, Betty; Makarec, Katherine; Alleva Szeles, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Depression and inactivity in the elderly are major health problems with significant ramifications for healthy aging. Research shows an inverse relationship between depression and physical activity levels. The purpose of the current investigation is to examine the relationship between physical activity and depressive symptoms in healthy older women, first within the framework of exercise programs, and second via the impact of an intervention. Method: Two experiments were conducted. In the first, 65 women, all above the age of 60, participated. Measures of physical activity were gained by self-report using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire while the measure of depressive symptomatology was the Beck Depression Inventory. In the second, 11 women participated in a line dancing intervention, and their self-reported depressive symptomatology was measured prior to and just after the 6-week exercise intervention using the Beck Depression Inventory. In addition, during the second experiment, pedometer data were gathered during the fourth week. Results and Conclusion: The data of the first study revealed a relationship between the total amount of physical activity and scores on the Beck Depression Inventory; that is, the more active a person is, the lower her self-reported depressive symptoms. Significant correlations were found between the Beck Depression Inventory and the reports of vigorous and moderate exercise levels, but not with walking. Participants who were part of an organized exercise group exercised significantly more than those who exercised on their own. In the second study, those who participated in a line dancing intervention had significantly lower Beck Depression Inventory scores post intervention. The implications of these findings for public health are discussed.

  2. The Relationship Between Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms in Healthy Older Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Overdorf EdD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Depression and inactivity in the elderly are major health problems with significant ramifications for healthy aging. Research shows an inverse relationship between depression and physical activity levels. The purpose of the current investigation is to examine the relationship between physical activity and depressive symptoms in healthy older women, first within the framework of exercise programs, and second via the impact of an intervention. Method: Two experiments were conducted. In the first, 65 women, all above the age of 60, participated. Measures of physical activity were gained by self-report using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire while the measure of depressive symptomatology was the Beck Depression Inventory. In the second, 11 women participated in a line dancing intervention, and their self-reported depressive symptomatology was measured prior to and just after the 6-week exercise intervention using the Beck Depression Inventory. In addition, during the second experiment, pedometer data were gathered during the fourth week. Results and Conclusion: The data of the first study revealed a relationship between the total amount of physical activity and scores on the Beck Depression Inventory; that is, the more active a person is, the lower her self-reported depressive symptoms. Significant correlations were found between the Beck Depression Inventory and the reports of vigorous and moderate exercise levels, but not with walking. Participants who were part of an organized exercise group exercised significantly more than those who exercised on their own. In the second study, those who participated in a line dancing intervention had significantly lower Beck Depression Inventory scores post intervention. The implications of these findings for public health are discussed.

  3. Relationship between depression, stress and stressors in pregnant teenagers under different marital status conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Del Carmen Quezada Berumen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on depression and stress has become important because of its high relevance especially in teenage pregnancy. This study aimed to identify the relationship between depression and stress levels and number of stressors faced by 82 first-time pregnant teenagers, who responded to the assessment instruments: Beck Depression Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale and Life Events Questionnaire. According to the results, adolescents who live with their own family are those with the highest means of stress and depression. Therefore, it can be concluded that adolescents who live with their own family are more prone to develop depression and stress during pregnancy, since this could be a contributing factor.

  4. Factors associated with risk of depression and relevant predictors of screening for depression in clinical practice: a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected individuals in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, Maria; Sodemann, Morten; Gabel, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors associated with risk of depression. RESULTS: Symptoms of depression (BDI-II score ≥ 14) were observed in 75 patients (35%), and symptoms of moderate to major depression (BDI-II score ≥ 20......OBJECTIVES: Depression and psychiatric disorders are frequent among HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of depression and describe the psychiatric history of HIV-infected individuals in an out-patient clinic in Denmark and to identify factors of clinical...... importance that may be used to identify patients at risk of depression. METHODS: In 2013, 212 HIV-infected patients were included in a questionnaire study. We used the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI-II score ≥ 20 were...

  5. Depression in Nursing Students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Rafati

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: University students are important parts of all educational systems. They are susceptible to different psychiatric disturbances, which in turn may cause considerable problems with their course programs. Depression is among the most important indices for investigation on human mental health status. This research was planed to study the prevalence and characteristics of depression and its consequences (suicidality, hopelessness, etc. in nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: All undergraduate nursing students at Fatemeh College of Nursing and Midwifery were tested with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: This research revealed that 60% of students were depressed, 34% of them had mild depression, 18.4% moderate, 6% relatively severe and 1.6% severe depression. Mean score of BDI was not significantly different between female and male subjects (13.8 ± 9 in females vs. 15.2 ± 10 in males; total 14.1 ± 11 Conclusions: This research shows that there is still a high proportion of University students having depression, which necessitates considerable attention to their problems. Keywords: Nursing Students, Beck Depression Inventory, Depression.

  6. The Effect of Psychological Resilience in Postpartum Depressing Symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markella Salioni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The postpartum period requires from the new mother high Psychological Resilience, particularly when is expressed postpartum depressing symptomatology. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between psychological resilience and postpartum depression. Material – Method: 104 participants completed the Panas-X scale, the CD-RISK (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and the BDI (Beck Depression Inventory. Results: Results showed that 42% of the participants were prone to experience postpartum depression according to the BDI. Moreover it was shown that psychological resilience remains unaffected during pregnancy, while it relates to low postpartum depression levels. Finally the study provides support that partner and environment support as well as positive affectivity affect psychological resilience levels. Conclusion: The Psychological Resilience and the support from companion and family can protect new mothers from depressing symptoms.

  7. Which increases depressive symptoms in obese patients, hypertension or diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakir Özgür Keskek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression and obesity are common disorders. Obesity is also predictive of several chronic diseases like hypertension and diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare depression frequency of obese patients with hypertension or diabetes. Methods: Weight, height and body mass index (BMI were measured. The definition of obesity was a body mass index (weight (kg/height (m2 ≥30 kg/m2. Obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were documented. All participants had a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI evaluation. Results: A total of 389 subjects were included, of whom 100, 101, 92, 96 participants were healthy, obese, obese with hypertension, obese with diabetes, respectively. Beck Depression Inventory scores of obese patients, obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were higher compared to the control group. BDI scores of obese patients with diabetes were higher compared to obese and obese with hypertension subjects.

  8. The relationship between psoriasis and depression: A multiple mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łakuta, Patryk; Marcinkiewicz, Kamil; Bergler-Czop, Beata; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between psoriasis and depression, proposing a multiple mediation model to analyse the relationship. A total of 193 patients with psoriasis aged 20-67 years completed the Beck Depression Inventory, the Stigmatization Scale, the Appearance Schemas Inventory-Revised, and the Body Emotions Scale. The Body Surface Area index was used to assess severity of psoriasis. Serial multiple mediation analysis revealed that experiences of stigmatization, maladaptive beliefs about appearance and its salience to one's self-evaluation, and negative emotional attitudes towards the body, jointly, sequentially mediated the relationship between the presence of skin lesions of psoriasis and depressive symptoms. These results highlight the importance of the associations between stigmatization and cognitive and affective aspects of body image in relation to depression in patients with psoriasis. We suggest that prevention and intervention programs for psoriasis patients that target body image enhancement would be worthy of further research.

  9. Hope, anger, and depression as mediators for forgiveness and social behavior in Turkish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taysi, Ebru; Curun, Ferzan; Orcan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the mediating effects of hope, anger, and depression in the associations between forgiveness and social behavior, in fourth grade students in Turkey. The 352 fourth grade primary school students were involved in the study. The average age was 9.98 and 56.3% were boys. The Enright Forgiveness Inventory for Children (EFI-C), the Beck Anger Inventory for Youth (BANI-Y), the Children Hope Scale (CHS), the Social Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ), and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) were used. Results showed that depression mediates the relationship between anger and antisocial behavior and between hope and antisocial behavior. Anger mediates the relationship between hope and depression and between hope and antisocial behavior. Forgiveness was related to anger and hope directly. Implications of this study for child counseling were discussed.

  10. Narcolepsy and depression Narcolepsia e depressão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Adda

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy main symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Its chronic course is accompanied by psychosocial impairment added to the difficulties and side effects of stimulants and tricyclics long term use. Depressive complaints are occasionally reported. The aim of this paper was to evaluate objectively the possibility of depression in a sample of 12 narcoleptics (7F;5 M, with mean age of 53 years (12 years SD, using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D. The results showed absence of depressive disorder in 75.0% of the cases according to BDI (or 58.3% according to HAM-D. The remaining patients had mild depression (only one patient presented major depression. The findings showed no correlation between narcolepsy and major depression.Narcolepsia é um distúrbio do sono caracterizado por sonolência diurna excessiva e ataques de cataplexia. Sendo crônico, traz uma série de dificuldades psicossociais às quais se aliam aquelas geradas pelos efeitos colaterais dos estimulantes e tricíclicos utilizados. Queixas depressivas são encontradas ocasionalmente. Esta pesquisa buscou verificar objetivamente a ocorrência de depressão em narcolépticos. Foi avaliado um grupo de 12 pacientes narcolépticos (7F; 5M com média de idade de 53 anos (DP 12 usando-se como instrumentos o Inventário de Beck para Depressão (BDI e a Escala Hamilton de Depressão (HAM-D. Os resultados demonstraram ausência de distúrbio depressivo em 75.0% dos pacientes avaliados pelo BDI e em 58.3% pela HAM-D. Os demais escores evidenciaram depressão leve ou disforia; depressão maior foi encontrada em apenas um caso. Tais achados não sugerem correlação entre narcolepsia e depressão.

  11. Implementing an outreaching, preference-led stepped care intervention programme to reduce late life depressive symptoms: results of a mixed-methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beljouw, I.M. van; Laurant, M.G.; Heerings, M.; Stek, M.L.; Marwijk, H.W. van; Exel, E. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depressive symptoms are highly prevalent in old age, but they remain mostly untreated. Several clinical trials have shown promising results in preventing or reducing depressive symptoms. However, it is not clear how robust these effects are in the real world of day-to-day care. Therefore

  12. Implementing an outreaching, preference-led stepped care intervention programme to reduce late life depressive symptoms : results of a mixed-methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beljouw, Ilse M J; Laurant, Miranda G H; Heerings, Marjolijn; Stek, Max L; van Marwijk, Harm W J; van Exel, Eric; Heerings, M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depressive symptoms are highly prevalent in old age, but they remain mostly untreated. Several clinical trials have shown promising results in preventing or reducing depressive symptoms. However, it is not clear how robust these effects are in the real world of day-to-day care. Therefore

  13. Association of Ambient Air Pollution with Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms in Older Adults: Results from the NSHAP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Vivian C; Manjourides, Justin; Suh, Helen

    2017-03-01

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is among the most prevalent sources of environmentally induced inflammation and oxidative stress, both of which are implicated in the pathogenesis of most mental disorders. Evidence, however, concerning the impact of PM2.5 on mental health is just emerging. We examined the association between PM2.5 and current level of depressive and anxiety symptoms using a nationally representative probability sample (n = 4,008) of older, community-dwelling individuals living across the United States (the National Social Life, Health and Aging project). Mental health was evaluated using validated, standardized questionnaires and clinically relevant cases were identified using well-established cutoffs; daily PM2.5 estimates were obtained using spatiotemporal models. We used generalized linear mixed models, adjusting for potential confounders, and explored effect modification. An increase in PM2.5 was significantly associated with anxiety symptoms, with the largest increase for 180-days moving average (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.35, 1.92) after adjusting for socioeconomic measures (SES); PM2.5 was positively associated with depressive symptoms, and significantly for 30-day moving average (OR = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.29) upon SES adjustment. The observed associations were enhanced among individuals who had low SES and history of comorbidity. When considering mental health as chronic conditions, PM2.5 was significantly associated with incident depressive symptoms for all exposure windows examined, but with incident anxiety symptoms only for shorter exposure windows, which may be due to a drop in power resulting from the decreased between-subject variability in chronic PM2.5 exposure. PM2.5 was associated with depressive and anxiety symptoms, with associations the strongest among individuals with lower SES or among those with certain health-related characteristics. Citation: Pun VC, Manjourides J, Suh H. 2017. Association of ambient air pollution with

  14. Discovery of serum biomarkers predicting development of a subsequent depressive episode in social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, M G; Cooper, J D; Chan, M K; Bot, M; Penninx, B W J H; Bahn, S

    2015-08-01

    Although social anxiety disorder (SAD) is strongly associated with the subsequent development of a depressive disorder (major depressive disorder or dysthymia), no underlying biological risk factors are known. We aimed to identify biomarkers which predict depressive episodes in SAD patients over a 2-year follow-up period. One hundred sixty-five multiplexed immunoassay analytes were investigated in blood serum of 143 SAD patients without co-morbid depressive disorders, recruited within the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Predictive performance of identified biomarkers, clinical variables and self-report inventories was assessed using receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC) and represented by the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Stepwise logistic regression resulted in the selection of four serum analytes (AXL receptor tyrosine kinase, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, vitronectin, collagen IV) and four additional variables (Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, Beck Anxiety Inventory somatic subscale, depressive disorder lifetime diagnosis, BMI) as optimal set of patient parameters. When combined, an AUC of 0.86 was achieved for the identification of SAD individuals who later developed a depressive disorder. Throughout our analyses, biomarkers yielded superior discriminative performance compared to clinical variables and self-report inventories alone. We report the discovery of a serum marker panel with good predictive performance to identify SAD individuals prone to develop subsequent depressive episodes in a naturalistic cohort design. Furthermore, we emphasise the importance to combine biological markers, clinical variables and self-report inventories for disease course predictions in psychiatry. Following replication in independent cohorts, validated biomarkers could help to identify SAD patients at risk of developing a depressive disorder, thus facilitating early intervention.

  15. A Survey on the Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Level of Depression and Anxiety among Women with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirifard, Nasrin; Payandeh, Mehrdad; Aeinfar, Mehrnoush; Sadeghi, Masoud; Sadeghi, Edris; Ghafarpor, Somaye

    2017-01-01

    Background: Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is positively associated with mental health and it can have a crucial role in mental disorder therapy by suitable coping mechanisms. The present study aimed to evaluate the relationship of EQ with anxiety and depression among the women with breast cancer. Subjects and Methods: During 2013 and in a cross-sectional study, 98 breast cancer patients (14 to 21 years old) entered into the study. For data collection, the following instruments were the Bar-On EQ inventory, Beck Depression Inventory and Cattle Anxiety Inventory. Results: There was an inverse relationship between anxiety with intrapersonal (pbreast cancer. PMID:28286616

  16. Analysis Results for Sub-Samples of SRS Tanks 30, 32, and 39 to Support Evaluations of the I-129 Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-11

    In order to appropriately model and predict the chemical integrity and performance of cementitious materials used for waste immobilization at the Savannah River Site (SRS), it is critical to understand the I-129 solubility and distribution within the tank farm. Iodine in radioactive waste and in environmental media is typically highly mobile and long lived. Iodine is ubiquitous in SRS tank waste and waste forms. The iodine is assumed to be soluble and present at low levels in Performance Assessments (PAs) for SRS Tank Farms, and is one of the dose drivers in the PAs for both the SRS Salt Disposal Facility (SDF) and the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF). Analysis of tank waste samples is critical to understanding the Tank Farm iodine inventory and reducing disposal uncertainty. Higher than expected iodine levels have recently been observed in residual solids isolated from some SRS tanks prior to closure, indicating uncertainty regarding the chemical species involved. If the iodine inventory uncertainty is larger than anticipated, future work may be necessary to reduce the uncertainty. This memorandum satisfies a portion of the work scope identified in Task Plan SRNL-RP-2016-00651. A separate memorandum issued previously, reported historical unpublished I-129 data, a significant portion of which was below detectable analytical limits. This memorandum includes iodine and general chemical analysis results for six archived SRNL samples which were previously reported to have I-129 concentrations below detectable limits. Lower sample dilution factors were used for the current analyses in order to obtain concentrations above detection. The samples analyzed included surface and depth samples from SRS tanks 30, 32, and 39.

  17. Women and vulnerability to depression: some personality and clinical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Jesús M; Rojo, Nieves; Staats, Arthur W

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the role of sex differences and personality in vulnerability to depression. Sex differences in personality and some clinical variables are described. We also assess the value of the variables that revealed significant sex differences as predictors of vulnerability to depression. In a group of adult participants (N = 112), 50% males and 50% females (mean age = 41.30; SD = 15.09; range 17-67), we studied sex differences in the three-factor personality model, using the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, Form A (EPQ-A; Eysenck & Eysenck, 1975), and in the Five-Factor Personality Model, with the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI; Costa & McCrae, 1985). The following clinical scales were used: the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979), the Schizotypy Questionnaire (STQ; Claridge & Broks, 1984; Spanish version, Carrillo & Rojo, 1999), the THARL Scales (Dua, 1989, 1990; Spanish version, Dua & Carrillo, 1994) and the Adjustment Inventory (Bell, 1937; Spanish version, Cerdá, 1980). Subsequently, simple linear regression analysis, with BDI scores as criterion, were performed to estimate the value of the variables as predictors of vulnerability to depression. The results indicate that a series of personality variables cause women to be more vulnerable to depression than men and that these variables could be explained by a negative emotion main factor. Results are discussed within the framework of the psychological behaviorism theory of depression.

  18. Depressive symptoms and associated factors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karol, David E; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa G; Lin, Min; Clowse, Megan E B

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms affect anywhere from 11% to 71% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which may be related to SLE disease activity, other clinical variables, or sociodemographic factors. We aimed to measure the rate of depressive symptoms in our cohort of patients with SLE and to identify modifiable factors associated with depressive symptoms. Patients in our university-based SLE registry completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), pain scores, and demographic information. Disease activity was measured using the physician's global assessment (PGA) and Selena-SLE disease activity index (Selena-systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI)). Patients were identified as having moderate or severe depressive symptoms (BDI-II ≥ 18) or not (BDI-II lupus arthritis (P lupus arthritis, may result in alleviation of depressive symptoms in patients with SLE. Copyright © 2013 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Depression and hopelessness in Turkish patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Sevban; Celebioglu, Ayda; Tezel, Ayfer

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the levels of depression and hopelessness of patients receiving chemotherapy. Through knowledge of the levels of hopelessness and depression in such patients, this study could contribute to the planning of nursing interventions. The study involved 101 patients with cancer who presented to the outpatient unit of a medical oncology clinic to receive outpatient chemotherapy between January and March 2006. Data on the patients' sociodemographic features, as well as their scores on the Beck Hopelessness Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory, were obtained. The patients' mean total depression score was 16.0 +/- 8.3 and their mean hopelessness score was 6.9 +/- 3.4. There was a statistically significant positive relationship between depression and hopelessness. The results indicated that depression and hopelessness were strongly and positively correlated.

  20. Detecting Depression in Elderly Medical Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Stephen R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Used Research Diagnostic Criteria to assess base rate of detection of depression in 150 elderly medical inpatients by nonpsychiatric physicians, and evaluated psychometric properties of screening instruments to assess depression. Found detection of depression by house staff extremely low (8.7 percent). Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), BDI…

  1. Prevalence, Recurrence, and Incidence of Current Depressive Symptoms among People Living with HIV in Ontario, Canada: Results from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Stephanie K. Y.; Boyle, Eleanor; Cairney, John; Collins, Evan J.; Gardner, Sandra; Bacon, Jean; Rourke, Sean B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Current studies of depression among people living with HIV focus on describing its point prevalence. Given the fluctuating nature of depression and its profound impacts on clinical and quality-of-life outcomes, this study aimed to examine the prevalence, recurrence and incidence of current depressive symptoms and its underlying catalysts longitudinally and systematically among these individuals. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study between October 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 using longitudinal linked data sources. Current depressive symptoms was identified using the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale or the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, first at baseline and again during follow-up interviews. Multivariable regressions were used to characterize the three outcomes. Results Of the 3,816 HIV-positive participants, the point prevalence of depressive symptoms was estimated at 28%. Of the 957 participants who were identified with depressive symptoms at baseline and who had at least two years of follow-up, 43% had a recurrent episode. The cumulative incidence among 1,745 previously depressive symptoms free participants (at or prior to baseline) was 14%. During the five-year follow-up, our multivariable models showed that participants with greater risk of recurrent cases were more likely to feel worried about their housing situation. Participants at risk of developing incident cases were also likely to be younger, gay or bisexual, and unable to afford housing-related expenses. Conclusions Depressive symptoms are prevalent and likely to recur among people living with HIV. Our results support the direction of Ontario’s HIV/AIDS Strategy to 2026, which addresses medical concerns associated with HIV (such as depression) and the social drivers of health in order to enhance the overall well-being of people living with or at risk of HIV. Our findings reinforce the importance of providing effective mental health care and

  2. Serotonin transporter gene moderates childhood maltreatment’s effects on persistent but not single-episode depression: Replications and implications for resolving inconsistent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Rudolf; Caspi, Avshalom; Houts, Renate; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic and environmental factors shape life-long vulnerability to depression, but most gene–environment interaction (G×E) research has focused on cross-sectional assessments rather than life-course phenotypes. This study tests the hypothesis that the G×E involving the length polymorphism in the serotonin-transporter-gene-linked-promoter-region (5-HTTLPR) and childhood maltreatment is specific to depression that runs a persistent course in adulthood. Methods The hypothesis is tested in two cohorts. Men and women in the Dunedin Study (N=847), New Zealand, followed to age 32 years with 96% retention and women in the E-Risk Study (N=930), England, followed to age 40 years with 96% retention. Diagnoses of past-year major depressive episode were established at four separate assessments. Depression diagnosed on two or more occasions was considered persistent. Results In both cohorts, statistical tests of gene–environment interactions showed positive results for persistent depression but not single-episode depression. Individuals with two short 5-HTTLPR alleles and childhood maltreatment had elevated risk of persistent but not single-episode depression. Limitations Some cases of recurrent depression may have been misclassified as single-episode due to non-contiguous assessment windows, but this would have a conservative effect on the findings. Chronic and recurrent depression could not be reliably distinguished due to non-contiguous periods of assessment. Therefore, the term persistent depression is used to describe either chronic or recurrent course. Conclusions The specific effect on persistent depression increases the significance of this G×E for public health. Research that does not distinguish persistent course may underestimate G×E effects and account for some replication failures in G×E research. PMID:21439648

  3. Cost-effectiveness of family psychoeducation to prevent relapse in major depression: Results from a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimodera Shinji

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family psychoeducation is a relatively simple and straightforward intervention whose prophylactic effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is well-established for schizophrenia. We have recently demonstrated its effectiveness for unipolar depression, but its cost-effectiveness has never been examined. We hereby report a cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a randomized controlled trial in order to assess its cost-effectiveness for preventing relapse/recurrence in depression. Methods Fifty-seven patients diagnosed with major depression and undergoing its maintenance treatment, and their primary family members were randomized to treatment as usual (TAU only or to TAU plus family psychoeducation, which consisted of four 2-hour multiple-family sessions consisting of didactic lectures about depression (30 minutes and group discussion and problem solving (60–90 minutes. The economic analyses were undertaken from the perspective of the National Health Insurance (NHI, assuming the most reasonable price of US$50 per psychoeducation session per patient. The main outcome measures included relapse-free days and direct costs to the NHI. Results The intervention group enjoyed 272 (SD: 7.1 relapse-free days, while the control group spent 214 (SD: 90.8 relapse-free days (Cox proportional hazard ratio = 0.17, 95%CI: 0.04 to 0.75, p = 0.002. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves suggested that the family psychoeducation has 90% or more chances of being cost-effective if the decision-maker is prepared to pay US$20 for one additional relapse-free day. This cost-effectiveness finding was robust when the price for family psychoeducation ranged between 50% to 150% of the baseline scenario in sensitivity analyses. If a relapse-free day is considered to be worth $30 or more, all the pricing scenarios have a close to 100% probability of being cost-effective. Conclusion Family psychoeducation is effective in the relapse prevention of

  4. Depression symptomatology and the neural correlates of infant face and cry perception during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Helena J V; Graber, Kelsey M; Mayes, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    Depression symptoms during pregnancy may affect emerging maternal sensitivity and have lasting consequences for the dyadic relationship. Here, we examined whether depression was associated with the neural correlates of infant face and cry perception during pregnancy. In 36 women between 34 and 38 weeks gestation, we examined the P300 elicited by infant emotional (happy, distressed, and neutral) faces and cries (high- and low-distress cries and a neutral tone). The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory-II were employed to measure current depression symptomatology. Higher depression symptoms were associated with an attenuated P300 to distressed infant faces, but not with happy or neutral infant faces. There was no association between depression symptoms and the P300 elicited by infant cries. These results suggest that depression symptoms during pregnancy may affect neural processing of infant faces, especially when the infant face is expressing distress.

  5. Neighborhood income and major depressive disorder in a large Dutch population : results from the LifeLines Cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijs, Bart; Kibele, Eva; Ellwardt, Lea; Zuidersma, Marij; Stolk, Ronald; Wittek, Rafael; de Leon, Carlos F. Mendes; Smidt, Nynke

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies are inconclusive on whether poor socioeconomic conditions in the neighborhood are associated with major depressive disorder. Furthermore, conceptual models that relate neighborhood conditions to depressive disorder have not been evaluated using empirical data. In this stu

  6. [Influence between early maladaptive schemas and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, A; Jourda, B; Laros, C; Walburg, V; Callahan, S

    2011-09-01

    Early maladaptive schemas developed during childhood are relatively stable. Once activated, these early maladaptive schemas could influence reality perceptions and create cognitive distortions. Previous studies showed that early maladaptive schemas are linked to depression: early maladaptive schemas could be a risk factor for depression (Young, 2001) and a vulnerability marker for depression (Dozoïs, 2007). The main objective of the present study was to explore the influence of early maladaptive schemas on depression severity among a French adult population. One hundred and sixty-two participants (mean age 29 years; SD=13.86) were enrolled, 66 men (mean age 29 years; SD=13.65) and 106 women (mean age 30; SD=14.07). Participants were invited to complete the Young Schema Questionnaire, short version (YSQ-S1-Young 1994) and the Beck depression Inventory, 2nd version (BDI-II-Beck 1994). Fifty-six participants were randomly selected to complete a paper version of the scales, and 95 participants completed an online electronic version. Fifty-two percent of the participants were not depressed, 15% slightly depressed, 17% moderately depressed and 16% met criteria of severe depression. All 15 schemas scores were positively correlated to depression scores. Comparing schema scores and depression severity it can be noted that for severely depressed participants all schema scores were significantly higher, and six of 15 schemas were significantly higher in the case of moderate depression. In addition, three schemas (imperfection, vulnerability, fusional relation) are significantly and positively linked to depression scores, whereas one schema (everything is owed to me) appears to be a significantly negative predictor of associated depression. This study confirms results of previous research concerning the link between early maladaptive schemas and depression. What is more, the results show that the importance of these schemas increases with depression severity. The most

  7. Management of inventory in a company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Kontuš

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Firstly, the purpose of the empirical part of the study is to analyze the inventory balances of surveyed companies and secondly, to explore the dependence between companies’ level of inventory and profitability expressed in terms of return on assets. Thirdly, the aim of the theoretical research is to explore the cost and benefits from changes in the inventory level as well as to define variables that determine net savings from changes in inventory level. An optimal inventory level should be based on consideration of incremental profitability resulting from increased merchandise with the opportunity cost of carrying higher inventory balances. The results will provide a model equation for calculating net savings from changes in inventory level as well as a new mathematical optimization model. With this model a company can consider net earnings from changes in inventory level and establish the optimal inventory level as well as improve profitability.

  8. Depression in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onderdijk, A J; van der Zee, H H; Esmann, S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic recurrent inflammatory skin disease with abscess formation and scarring predominantly in the inverse areas. The disease is often difficult to treat and patients experience a decreased quality of life (QoL). It is hypothesized that depression...... is more common in HS patients than among other dermatological patients. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of depression in patients with HS. METHODS: In total 211 HS patients were included in the study and 233 were dermatological control patients. Their QoL and depression scores were assessed using...... the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) questionnaires. HS severity was recorded with a questionnaire and Hurley stages were extracted from the case records. RESULTS: The DLQI was significantly higher for HS patients than for the control patients, 8.4 ± 7.5 vs. 4.3 ± 5...

  9. Potential link between caffeine consumption and pediatric depression: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farias Lucilene G

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early-onset depressive disorders can have severe consequences both from developmental and functional aspects. The etiology of depressive disorders is complex and multi-factorial, with an intricate interaction among environmental factors and genetic predisposition. While data from studies on adults suggest that caffeine is fairly safe, effects of caffeine in children, who are in period of rapid brain development, are currently unknown. Furthermore, systematic research addressing the relationship between depressive symptoms in children and caffeine consumption is lacking. The present study examined the effects of caffeine consumption on depressed mood in children with depression and non-depressed participants. Methods Children and adolescents (n = 51 already enrolled in an ongoing longitudinal study, aged 9-12 years, were assessed for depressive symptoms with the Children Depressive Inventory (CDI. Psychopathological symptoms were assessed with the Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL and eating habits were assessed with the Nutrition-Behavior Inventory (NBI 1. The children were compared to control children without psychopathology attending public schools in a Southern Brazilian city. Results Participants with CDI scores ≥ 15 (mean = 19; S.D. = 4 also had high NBI scores (mean = 52; S.D. = 19, p Conclusions These findings indicate that depressed children consume more caffeinated drinks than non-depressed children. Nonetheless while a strong association between depressive symptoms and caffeine consumption among children was found, further research should investigate whether or not this association is due to a cause and effect relationship.

  10. Prevalence of Depression among Older Adults-Results from the Well-being of the Singapore Elderly Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Sambasivam, Rajeswari; Vaingankar, Janhavi A; Picco, Louisa; Pang, Shirlene; Seow, Esmond; Chua, Boon Yiang; Magadi, Harish; Mahendran, Rathi; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-04-01

    Depression is a significant public health issue across all sociodemographic groups and is identified as a common and serious mental health problem particularly among the older adult population. The aims of the current study were to determine the prevalence of depression and subsyndromal depression among older adults in Singapore. The Well-being of the Singapore Elderly (WiSE) study was a comprehensive single phase, cross-sectional survey. Stage 1 Geriatric Mental State-Automated Geriatric Examination for Computer Assisted Taxonomy (GMS-AGECAT) depression syndrome was used for this analysis. Association of depression and subsyndromal depression with sociodemographic characteristics, social support as well as comorbidity with chronic physical illnesses and quality of life was assessed. The prevalence of GMS-AGECAT depression and subsyndromal depression was 3.7% and 13.4%, respectively. The odds of depression were significantly higher among those aged 75 to 84 (2.1) as compared to those aged 60 to 74 years and in those who had a history of depression diagnosis by a doctor (4.1). The odds of depression were higher among those of Indian and Malay ethnicities (5.2 and 3.2 times, respectively) as compared to those of Chinese ethnicity. Those with depression and subsyndromal depression were associated with more disability, poorer life satisfaction, and medical comorbidities. Our study suggests that the prevalence of depression seems to have decreased as compared to a decade ago wherein the prevalence of depression was estimated to be 5.5%. This positive trend can be ascribed to concerted efforts across various disciplines and sectors, which need to be continually strengthened, monitored and evaluated.

  11. The Survey of Depression Frequency in Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Araghchian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Despite the high prevalence of depression and hypertension, the relationship between these disorders has received little attention. Some prospective studies indicate that depression poses a risk factor for hypertension. Depression has been found to be associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. The present study was conducted to examine the prevalence of depression in hypertensive patients' refering to medical and health centers in Hamadan city.Materials & Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional study 525 hypertensive patients who referred to the medical and health centers of Hamadan city in 2008 were studied. Depression status was evaluated by Beck depression inventory. Obtaining a score higher than 18 indicated depression. The data were analyzed with SPSS software(version 10 , chi-square and parson regression coefficient tests Results: Depression prevalence in the hypertensive patients was 48.6%. Positive correlation was detected between age and score of depression(r=0.56 P.V=0.000. The rate of depression was significantly higher in the females than the males (2=34 P.V=<0.5. Depression prevalence in the lower socioeconomic classes and the widows were higher than in the married and high class patients (P.V<0.05.Conclusion: Hypertensive patients are prone to depression. The lifetime co- morbidity of two diseases is significantly higher in females than males. The presence of a positive correlation between hypertension and depression indicates that hypertension is a risk factor for developing depression .High prevalence of depression suggests the need for depression screening and neurological consultation in hypertensive patients.

  12. [Intensity of depression in pedagogy students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Tadeusz; Witusik, Andrzej; Panek, Michał; Zielińska-Wyderkiewicz, Ewa; Kuna, Piotr; Górski, Paweł

    2012-03-01

    The teacher's profession is regarded to be susceptible to professional burnout. Its early markers include high neuroticism and tendency to depressive reactions. The aim of the study was to assess the depression intensity and the occurrence of mood disorders in the population of full-time and extramural course students of pedagogy aged 19-30, as well as the difference in intensity of the measured constructs between men and women. The study was carried out on the group of 223 women and 162 men aged 19-30 studying pedagogy at Piotrków Trybunalski Division of Jan Kochanowski Memorial University in Kielce in the years 2008-2011. The control group consisted of 76 women and 88 men studying economics. Students of full-time and extramural courses were included. All the participants were assessed with Beck Depression Inventory. Depression as a syndrome was diagnosed if the score of 10 of more was obtained. Among female students of pedagogy, 21 out of 223 obtained Beck Depression Inventory scores equal to, or above 10; whereas among female students of economics 1 out of 76 obtained such a result. The relative risk of developing depression (understood as Beck Depression Inventory result of 10 or more) was found to be significantly higher among female pedagogues (OR 7.797; CI 1.0306 to 58.9856) than among female economists. Among male pedagogy students, 2 out of 162 obtained 10 points, or more. It means that the risk of depression in female pedagogues was as much as over eight-fold higher than in male pedagogues (OR 8.3168; CI 1.9215 - 35.9979). The risk of depression in men studying pedagogy was not higher than in men studying economics, who obtained the Beck Depression Inventory scores of 10 or more in 1 case out of 88 (OR 1.1; CI 0.0983 to 12.3032). Considering all pedagogues irrespectively of gender versus all economists, the risk of depression in the group of pedagogues is over five-fold higher than among economists (OR 5.1464; CI 1.1991 to 22.0885). In the whole group of

  13. Association Between Perceived Social Support and Depression in Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayon Najafabadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The most common symptom in early menopausal women is depression. Depression is a type of chronic disease that impacts on postmenopausal women’s life. Social support plays a protective role for women and enables them to solve their life problems and thus, feel less depressed. Objectives We assessed depression as a chronic disease and evaluated the association between perceived social support and depression in postmenopausal women. Patients and Methods This correlation-analytic study was conducted on 321 postmenopausal women using 2-stage cluster sampling in Ahvaz in 2014. Data collecting instruments were comprised of a demographic questionnaire, a depression scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, and a social support questionnaire (PRQ 85-Part 2. Data analysis was done using SPSS, version 20. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the relationship between perceived social support and depression, and the χ2 test was employed to assess the relationship between perceived social support and demographic characteristics. Results The Spearman correlation test revealed a significant reverse relationship between perceived social support and depression (r = -0.468; P = 0.001. There were significant relationships between perceived social support and some personal variables such as marital status, education level, and job status (P 0.05. Conclusions We found a reverse relationship between perceived social support and depression in postmenopausal women. Raising awareness in society apropos the relationship between social support and depression in postmenopausal women can enhance their quality of life.

  14. Exercise for Adolescents with Depressive Disorders: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Dopp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Adolescence is associated with increased depressive symptoms and decreased aerobic exercise, yet the relationship between exercise and clinical depression among adolescents requires further examination. This study assessed the feasibility of a 12-week intervention designed to increase exercise for adolescents with depressive disorders: Will a teenager with depression exercise? Methods. Participants were 13 adolescents with depression reporting low levels of aerobic exercise. They completed a 12-week intervention (15 supervised exercise sessions and 21 independent sessions. Exercise was measured through the aerobic exercise Questionnaire, actigraphy, and heart-rate monitoring. Depression was measured with the Children’s Depression Rating Scale, Revised, and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, Self-Report. Results. All participants who started the intervention completed the protocol, attending all supervised exercise sessions. Actigraphy verified 81% adherence to the protocol’s independent sessions. Analysis of secondary outcomes showed a significant increase in exercise levels and a significant decrease in depression severity. Initially, ten participants were overweight or obese, and three were healthy weight. After 12 weeks of exercise, the number of participants in the healthy-weight category doubled. Conclusions. Adolescents suffering from depression can complete a rigorous protocol requiring structured increases in aerobic exercise. Participants showed significant increases in exercise, and significant decreases in depressive symptoms.

  15. Most Antidepressant Use in Primary Care Is Justified; Results of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piek, Ellen; van der Meer, Klaas; Hoogendijk, Witte J. G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Nolen, Willem A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression is a common illness, often treated in primary care. Many studies have reported undertreatment with antidepressants in primary care. Recently, some studies also reported overtreatment with antidepressants. The present study was designed to assess whether treatment with antidepressants in primary care is in accordance with current guidelines, with a special focus on overtreatment. Methodology We used baseline data of primary care respondents from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) (n = 1610). Seventy-nine patients with treatment in secondary care were excluded. We assessed justification for treatment with antidepressant according to the Dutch primary care guidelines for depression and for anxiety disorders. Use of antidepressants was based on drug-container inspection or, if unavailable, on self-report. Results were recalculated to the original population of primary care patients from which the participants in NESDA were selected (n = 10,677). Principal Findings Of 1531 included primary care patients, 199 (13%) used an antidepressant, of whom 188 (94.5%) (possibly) justified. After recalculating these numbers to the original population (n = 10,677), we found 908 (95% CI 823 to 994) antidepressant users. Forty-nine (95% CI 20 to 78) of them (5.4%) had no current justification for an antidepressant, but 27 of them (54.5%) had a justified reason for an antidepressant at some earlier point in their life. Conclusions We found that overtreatment with antidepressants in primary care is not a frequent problem. Too long continuation of treatment seems to explain the largest proportion of overtreatment as opposed to inappropriate initiation of treatment. PMID:21479264

  16. Most antidepressant use in primary care is justified; results of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Piek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is a common illness, often treated in primary care. Many studies have reported undertreatment with antidepressants in primary care. Recently, some studies also reported overtreatment with antidepressants. The present study was designed to assess whether treatment with antidepressants in primary care is in accordance with current guidelines, with a special focus on overtreatment. METHODOLOGY: We used baseline data of primary care respondents from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA (n = 1610. Seventy-nine patients with treatment in secondary care were excluded. We assessed justification for treatment with antidepressant according to the Dutch primary care guidelines for depression and for anxiety disorders. Use of antidepressants was based on drug-container inspection or, if unavailable, on self-report. Results were recalculated to the original population of primary care patients from which the participants in NESDA were selected (n = 10,677. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of 1531 included primary care patients, 199 (13% used an antidepressant, of whom 188 (94.5% (possibly justified. After recalculating these numbers to the original population (n = 10,677, we found 908 (95% CI 823 to 994 antidepressant users. Forty-nine (95% CI 20 to 78 of them (5.4% had no current justification for an antidepressant, but 27 of them (54.5% had a justified reason for an antidepressant at some earlier point in their life. CONCLUSIONS: We found that overtreatment with antidepressants in primary care is not a frequent problem. Too long continuation of treatment seems to explain the largest proportion of overtreatment as opposed to inappropriate initiation of treatment.

  17. Predictors of depressive disorder following acute coronary syndrome: Results from K-DEPACS and EsDEPACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee-Ju; Stewart, Robert; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Jin-Sang; Kim, Jae-Min

    2015-08-01

    Depression is common and associated with poor prognosis in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). There are few reports on the predictors of incident and persistent post-discharge depressive disorders in ACS. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and persistence of depressive disorder over a one year follow-up, and predictors of these outcomes. 1152 patients with recently developed ACS were recruited at baseline, and 828 were followed one year thereafter. Depressive disorder (major and minor) was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, and analyzed according to baseline prevalence, and follow up incidence and persistence. Of 446 baseline participants with depressive disorders, 300 were randomized to a 24-week double blind trial of escitalopram or placebo, while the remaining 146 received medical treatment as usual. Associations of baseline socio-demographic and clinical characteristics with depressive disorder were investigated using logistic regression models. Two-week prevalence, and one-year incidence and persistence of depressive disorder were 38.7%, 13.1%, and 46.3%, respectively. Baseline depressive disorder was independently associated with female, lower educational level, previous ACS and higher heart rate. Incident depressive disorder was independently predicted by current unemployment, family history of depression, higher baseline Hamilton Depression Rating Scale(HAMD) score and lower left ventricular ejection fraction, and persistent depressive disorder by higher baseline HAMD score and the placebo or medical treatment as usual group in the 24-week trial. The generalizability should be considered since this study conducted in a single center. Depressive disorder in ACS patients is common and often persistent, and is associated with baseline characteristics and insufficient treatment. Appropriate detection and treatment of depressive disorder are clearly important in ACS patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Three-year follow-up of bibliotherapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N M; Floyd, M R; Scogin, F; Jamison, C S

    1997-04-01

    This study examined the durability of cognitive bibliotherapy for mild to moderately depressed adults by conducting a 3-year follow-up of participants from a previous study (C. Jamison & F. Scogin, 1995). The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Beck Depression Inventory, and questions relating to participants' perceptions of the program were administered. Results indicated that treatment gains were maintained over the 3-year follow-up period and support the usefulness of cognitive bibliotherapy as an adjunct to traditional treatment modalities in a general adult population.

  19. Shortening the Xerostomia Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, William Murray; van der Putten, Gert-Jan; de Baat, Cees; Ikebe, Kazunori; Matsuda, Ken-ichi; Enoki, Kaori; Hopcraft, Matthew; Ling, Guo Y

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the validity and properties of the Summated Xerostomia Inventory-Dutch Version in samples from Australia, The Netherlands, Japan and New Zealand. Study design Six cross-sectional samples of older people from The Netherlands (N = 50), Australia (N = 637 and N = 245), Japan (N = 401) and New Zealand (N = 167 and N = 86). Data were analysed using the Summated Xerostomia Inventory-Dutch Version. Results Almost all data-sets revealed a single extracted factor which explained about half of the variance, with Cronbach’s alpha values of at least 0.70. When mean scale scores were plotted against a “gold standard” xerostomia question, statistically significant gradients were observed, with the highest score seen in those who always had dry mouth, and the lowest in those who never had it. Conclusion The Summated Xerostomia Inventory-Dutch Version is valid for measuring xerostomia symptoms in clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:21684773

  20. 老年心血管疾病住院患者抑郁症状的现况调查%Inventory Survey of Depression for Elderly in-patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仲玲; 李萍; 廖锋

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨心内科住院的老年心血管疾病患者的抑郁症状及相关的影响因素。方法对2012年12月至2013年6月在青岛市第九人民医院心内科住院的60岁及以上的128例患者进行汉密尔顿抑郁量表(HRSD)评估。结果87例(68.0%)的老年心血管疾病住院患者存在抑郁症状,抑郁组患者的平均年龄、生活不能自理的比例比无抑郁组均大,与抑郁状态有关的相关因素分析显示年龄越大、无经济来源、生活不能自理的老年心血管疾病住院患者的抑郁发生率越高。结论老年心血管疾病住院患者常常伴有抑郁症状的发生,临床治疗中应重视对抑郁状态的相关治疗。%Objective To explore depression symptoms and related factors of elderly in- patients with cardiovascular disease.Methods From December 2012 to June 2013, 128 patients aged 60 and above in the ninth people's hospital cardiology of Qingdao were carried on the Hamilton depression rating scale (HRSD) to assess.Results 87 cases (68.0%) have depressive symptoms in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease in the hospital, the average age and the proportion of the life disability of the patients were larger than no depression group, analysis of relevant factors indicated that aged, no economic sources, the life disability, depressive incidence of elderly in-patients with cardiovascular disease was higher.Conclusion Elderly in-patients with cardiovascular disease often associated with the occurrence of depressive symptoms, we should pay attention to related clinical treatment of depression.

  1. The thyroid function of Graves' disease patients is aggravated by depressive personality during antithyroid drug treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyauchi Akira

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that depressive personality (the scores of hypochondriasis, depression and psychasthenia determined by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI and daily hassles of Graves' disease (GD patients treated long trem with antithyroid drug (ATD were significantly higher in a relapsed group than in a remitted group, even in the euthyroid state. The present study aims to examine the relationship among depressive personality, emotional stresses, thyroid function and the prognosis of hyperthyroidism in newly diagnosed GD patients. Methods Sixty-four untreated GD patients responded to the MMPI for personality traits, the Natsume's Stress Inventory for major life events, and the Hayashi's Daily Life Stress Inventory for daily life stresses before and during ATD treatment. Results In the untreated thyrotoxic state, depressive personality (T-scores of hypochondriasis, depression or psychasthenia greater than 60 points in MMPI were found for 44 patients (69%. For 15 (23% of these patients, the scores decreased to the normal range after treatment. However, depressive personality persisted after treatment in the remaining 29 patients (46%. Normal scores before treatment were found for 20 patients (31%, and the scores were persistently normal for 15 patients (23%. The remaining 5 patients (8% had higher depressive personality after treatment. Such depressive personality was not associated with the severity of hyperthyroidism. Serum TSH receptor antibody activity at three years after treatment was significantly (p = 0.0351 greater in the depression group than in the non- depression group. The remission rate at four years after treatment was significantly (p = 0.0305 lower in the depression group than in the non- depression group (22% vs 52%. Conclusion The data indicate that in GD patients treated with ATD, depressive personality during treatment reflects the effect of emotional stress more than that of

  2. Detailed course of depressive symptoms and risk for developing depression in late adolescents with subthreshold depression: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinnin R

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ran Jinnin,1 Yasumasa Okamoto,1 Koki Takagaki,1 Yoshiko Nishiyama,1 Takanao Yamamura,1 Yuri Okamoto,2 Yoshie Miyake,2 Yoshitake Takebayashi,3 Keisuke Tanaka,4 Yoshinori Sugiura,5 Haruki Shimoda,6 Norito Kawakami,6 Toshi A Furukawa,7 Shigeto Yamawaki1 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, 2Health Service Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; 3Risk Analysis Research Center, The Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo, Japan; 4Graduated School of Education, Joetsu University of Education, Niigata, Japan; 5Graduated School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; 6Department of Mental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 7Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Purpose: Despite its clinical importance, adolescent subthreshold depression remains a largely neglected topic. The aims of this study were to accurately identify the natural course of depressive symptoms and the risk for developing major depressive episode (MDE in late adolescents with subthreshold depression over 1 year.Patients and methods: One hundred and seventy-two participants <20 years of age (mean age: 18.32 years, standard deviation: 0.50, who did not meet the full criteria for an MDE, were selected from 2,494 screened freshmen based on the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-II. We conducted a cohort study of three groups (low-, middle-, and high-symptom groups divided based on BDI-II scores, over a 1 year period with the use of bimonthly assessments. Temporal changes of depressive symptoms were analyzed using linear mixed modeling and growth mixture modeling.Results: First, we found that late adolescents with subthreshold depression (high depressive symptoms were split between the increasing and decreasing depressive symptoms groups, whereas the majority of the less-symptoms group remained

  3. Depression and codependency in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Hammer, C; Martsolf, D S; Zeller, R A

    1998-12-01

    Seven million American women are depressed, and 40 million Americans, primarily women, have been labeled as codependent. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of codependency in women undergoing treatment for depression, examine the relationship between codependency and depression, and determine which of the symptoms of codependency are most highly predictive of depression scores. Depression and codependency were measured in a sample of 105 depressed women by using the Beck Depression Inventory and the Codependency Assessment Tool. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's Product Moment Correlation, and multiple regression were used for analysis. Of these depressed women, 36% were moderately to severely codependent. Depression and codependency were strongly related, with the significant gamma = .92 (P codependency subscales, Low Self-Worth and Hiding Self correlate most strongly with depression; Other Focus/Self-Neglect added the least-independent--explanatory power. Thus, future research should be directed toward the relationship of codependency to power, alienation of self, and personality disorders.

  4. Using a Concept Inventory to Assess the Reasoning Component of Citizen-Level Science Literacy: Results from a 17,000-Student Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward B. Nuhfer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available After articulating 12 concepts for the reasoning component of citizen-level science literacy and restating these as assessable student learning outcomes (SLOs, we developed a valid and reliable assessment instrument for addressing the outcomes with a brief 25-item science literacy concept inventory (SLCI. In this paper, we report the results that we obtained from assessing the citizen-level science literacy of 17,382 undergraduate students, 149 graduate students, and 181 professors. We address only findings at or above the 99.9% confidence level. We found that general education (GE science courses do not significantly advance understanding of science as a way of knowing. However, the understanding of science’s way of knowing does increase through academic ranks, indicating that the extended overall academic experience better accounts for increasing such thinking capacity than do science courses alone. Higher mean institutional SLCI scores correlate closely with increased institutional selectivity, as measured by the institutions’ higher mean SAT and ACT scores. Socioeconomic factors of a first-generation student, b English as a native language, and c interest in commitment to a science major are unequally distributed across ethnic groups. These factors proved powerful in accounting for the variations in SLCI scores across ethnicities and genders.

  5. Social Networking of Depressed and Non-Depressed Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Sarwat; Hussain, Irshad

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed at examining the interpersonal aspects of depression among female college students. A sample of 60 undergraduate female college students (50 pairs: 25 depressed and 25 non-depressed subjects along with their best friends) was drawn from Government Degree College for Women, Multan. Beck Depression Inventory (Beck et al.,…

  6. Continuity, Comorbidity and Longitudinal Associations between Depression and Antisocial Behaviour in Middle Adolescence: A 2-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritakallio, Minna; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; von der Pahlen, Bettina; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Marttunen, Mauri; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated continuity, comorbidity and longitudinal associations between depression Beck depression inventory (RBDI) and antisocial behaviour Youth self-report (YSR) in middle adolescence. Data were used from a community sample of 2070 adolescents who participated in a 2-year prospective follow-up study. The results indicate that both…

  7. Continuity, Comorbidity and Longitudinal Associations between Depression and Antisocial Behaviour in Middle Adolescence: A 2-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritakallio, Minna; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; von der Pahlen, Bettina; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Marttunen, Mauri; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated continuity, comorbidity and longitudinal associations between depression Beck depression inventory (RBDI) and antisocial behaviour Youth self-report (YSR) in middle adolescence. Data were used from a community sample of 2070 adolescents who participated in a 2-year prospective follow-up study. The results indicate that both…

  8. Inventory Control and Purchasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mason

    1981-01-01

    An inventory control system stimulates competitive bidding, resulting in the best price for an item. Other cost savings can be achieved by specifying prepayment of freight charges by the successful bidder, seeking standardization of products, and purchasing jointly with nearby municipalities and school districts. (Author/MLF)

  9. Inventory-driven costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callioni, Gianpaolo; de Montgros, Xavier; Slagmulder, Regine; Van Wassenhove, Luk N; Wright, Linda

    2005-03-01

    In the 199os, Hewlett-Packard's PC business was struggling to turn a dollar, despite the company's success in winning market share. By 1997, margins on its PCs were as thin as a silicon wafer, and some product lines hadn't turned a profit since 1993. The problem had everything to do with the PC industry's notoriously short product cycles and brutal product and component price deflation. A common rule of thumb was that the value of a fully assembled PC decreased 1% a week. In such an environment, inventory costs become critical. But not just the inventory costs companies traditionally track, HP found, after a thorough review of the problem. The standard "holding cost of inventory"--the capital and physical costs of inventory--accounted for only about 10% of HP's inventory costs. The greater risks, it turned out, resided in four other, essentially hidden costs, which stemmed from mismatches between demand and supply: Component devaluation costs for components still held in production; Price protection costs incurred when product prices drop on the goods distributors still have on their shelves; Product return costs that have to be absorbed when distributors return and receive refunds on overstock items, and; Obsolescence costs for products still unsold when new models are introduced. By developing metrics to track those costs in a consistent way throughout the PC division, HP has found it can manage its supply chains with much more sophistication. Gone are the days of across-the-board measures such as,"Everyone must cut inventories by 20% by the end of the year," which usually resulted in a flurry of cookie-cutter lean production and just-in-time initiatives. Now, each product group is free to choose the supply chain configuration that best suits its needs. Other companies can follow HP's example.

  10. Prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with cystic fibrosis and parent caregivers: results of The International Depression Epidemiological Study across nine countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quittner, A.L.; Goldbeck, L.; Abbott, J.; Duff, A.; Lambrecht, P.; Sole, A.; Tibosch, M.M.; Bergsten Brucefors, A.; Yuksel, H.; Catastini, P.; Blackwell, L.; Barker, D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individuals with chronic diseases and parent caregivers are at increased risk for symptoms of depression and anxiety. Prevalence of psychological symptoms was evaluated in adolescents and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) and parent caregivers across nine countries. METHODS: Patients with

  11. [Patients on chemotherapy: depression and adherence to treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Bianca Fresche; Pires, Flavia Helena; Dewulf, Nathalie de Lourdes Souza; Inocenti, Aline; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti

    2013-02-01

    This analytical, cross-sectional study applied a quantitative approach to verify the presence of depression and the adherence to a chemotherapy treatment in patients with cancer at the central chemotherapy pharmacy of a university hospital. The sample consisted of 102 patients, and data were collected from October 2010 to May 2011. A structured interview was used to obtain sociodemographic, clinical and therapeutic data; the Morisky Test and Beck Depression Inventory were also applied. The results revealed that 10.8% and 1.9% of participants had moderate and severe depression, respectively. The presence of depression was significantly associated with variables such as income per capita, the number of surgeries, and disease duration. A lack of treatment adherence was identified in 48% of participants. These results indicate the need for health staff training to detect depressive disorders and chemotherapy treatment attrition among patients with cancer.

  12. STUDY OF DEPRESSION AMONG INDIAN COLLEGE YOUTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression, the most common disorder in psychiatry, affects about 121 million people worldwide. World Health Organization states that depression is the leading cause of disability as measured by Years Lived with Disability and the fourth leading contribut or to the global burden of disease. Today, depression already is the second cause of disability adjusted life years in the age category 15 - 44 years. There is paucity of studies done in undergraduate students in our country. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : To find out the prevalence of depression among undergraduate students and finding correlation between various demographic variables and depression. Cross sectional study carried on 1066 under graduate students of medical, dental, engineering and basic science branches . METHODS AND MATERIAL: CRF (containing demographic details & Beck Depression Inventory Scale - II were given. Students’ ≥18years of all academic years were included in the study. Statistical Analysis used were multiple ANOVA test and student t test. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of depression was found to be 26.54%. More males (29.75% than females (23.36% (P value=.0001. Highest depression was found in basic Science undergraduate students (34.53% followed by engineering undergraduate students (22. 82% followed by MBBS students (18.99% and least in dental undergraduate students (17.54% (P value=.00003. Students living at hostel (24.10% showed least depression and maximum depression was found in students living at private rooms (31.54% (P value= .0002.There is a need to diagnose and treat undergraduate students with depression at an early stage. This will help them to overcome their difficulties and lead a healthier life.

  13. Cognitive Functioning in Adolescents with Self-Reported ADHD and Depression: Results from a Population-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Arunima; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Hartman, Catharina A.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to assess cognitive functioning differences among adolescents with retrospectively self-reported: ADHD and an onset of depression, only ADHD, only depression, and neither ADHD nor depression. Data from the Tracking Adolescents? Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) cohort was used in this study. Neuropsychological functioning was assessed in 1549 adolescents, at baseline and follow-up (mean ages 11 and 19?years). The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to classify...

  14. Simulation Tool for Inventory Models: SIMIN

    OpenAIRE

    Pratiksha Saxen; Tulsi Kushwaha

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an integrated simulation optimization model for the inventory system is developed. An effective algorithm is developed to evaluate and analyze the back-end stored simulation results. This paper proposes simulation tool SIMIN (Inventory Simulation) to simulate inventory models. SIMIN is a tool which simulates and compares the results of different inventory models. To overcome various practical restrictive assumptions, SIMIN provides values for a number of performance measurement...

  15. Depression, alcohol abuse, and generational differences in Mazahua women in a rural Mexican village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Douglas C

    2004-01-01

    This first study of depression and alcohol abuse in indigenous women in Mexico focuses on Mazahua women in a rural village. Women between the ages of 15 and 55 were interviewed using the Beck Depression Inventory, an Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse survey, and a socioeconomic survey. Unexpected results showed that although alcohol abuse was absent, these women experience depression a generation earlier than the international and national averages for women, with an overall incidence about twice as great. Depression was associated with spouse's emigration, infidelity, or alcoholism. Sharp intergenerational differences were found in identity and socioeconomic status.

  16. Effectiveness of Compassionate Mind Training on Depression, Anxiety, and Self-Criticism in a Group of Iranian Depressed Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Noorbala

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of compassionate mind training (CMT on symptoms of depression and anxiety in Iranian depressed sufferers .Method:Nineteen depressed patients aged 20 to 40 (Beck Depression Inventory value≥20 were randomly assigned into two groups. The experimental group participated in 12 sessions of group therapy based on Paul Gilbert’s manual of CMT. The control group was given no intervention. The participants were assessed by Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, Anxiety Scale (AS, and Levels of Self-Criticism (LSCS questionnaires at the beginning and immediately after the intervention. To follow-up the therapeutic effect of CMT, the three questionnaires were answered again by participants two months after the end of the intervention. Data were analyzed by independent samples ttest. Results:The results revealed that CMT significantly decreases depression (P<0.05 and anxiety score (P<0.05 in the follow-up study, but not immediately after the intervention. Although CMT decreased selfcriticism, this effect was marginally insignificant.Conclusion:The findings indicated that CMT could alleviatedepression and anxiety in a group of Iranian depressed patients.

  17. Validation of Six Short and Ultra-short Screening Instruments for Depression for People Living with HIV in Ontario: Results from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Stephanie KY; Boyle, Eleanor; Burchell, Ann;

    2015-01-01

    of current depression in HIV-positive patients attending HIV specialty care clinics in Ontario. Methods A multi-centre validation study was conducted in Ontario to examine the validity and accuracy of three instruments (the Center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale [CESD20], the Kessler Psychological...... Distress Scale [K10], and the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale [PHQ9]) and their short forms (CESD10, K6, and PHQ2) in diagnosing current major depression among 190 HIV-positive patients in Ontario. Results from the three instruments and their short forms were compared to results from the gold...... positive predictive value (0.49–0.58) at their optimal cut-points. Conclusion Among people in HIV care in Ontario, Canada, the three instruments and their short forms performed equally well and accurately. When further in-depth assessments become available, shorter instruments might find greater clinical...

  18. Alexithymia and personality dimensions in relation to depression and anxiety in male alcohol-dependent inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evren, Cuneyt; Evren, Bilge; Dalbudak, Ercan

    2009-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship of alexithymia and temperament and character model of personality with depression and anxiety symptoms in detoxified male alcohol-dependent inpatients. Method. The subjects consisted of 176 male alcohol-dependent inpatients according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition. Patients were investigated with the Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST), Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Results. MAST score and scores of all three factors of the TAS-20 significantly predicted depression scale and anxiety scales. Difficulty in identifying feelings and difficulty in describing feelings factors were particularly effective, relative to the externally orientated thinking factor of the TAS-20 for prediction depression and anxiety. The TCI dimensions emerged as distinct and conceptually meaningful predictors for the depression scale and anxiety scales. Conclusion. Depression and anxiety symptoms among detoxified male alcohol dependents are associated with alexithymia, a broad range of personality dimensions and higher severity of alcohol-related problems, which make these related factors highly relevant for clinical practice.

  19. Pain intensity influences the relationship between anger management style and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estlander, Ann-Mari; Knaster, Peter; Karlsson, Hasse; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kalso, Eija

    2008-11-30

    There is an abundance of studies concerning depression and pain, while the mechanisms and the relationships of anger expression and pain are less well known. The validity of commonly used depression questionnaires as measures of depression in pain patients has been questioned, as they include items which can be related to the pain problem as well as to signs of depression. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between pain severity, various signs of depression, and anger management style. Subjects were 100 consecutive patients referred to the Helsinki University Pain Clinic. Demographic data and pain intensity (VAS) were collected by a questionnaire. Two subscales (negative view and physical function) from the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Anger Expression Scales (Anger-in and Anger-out) from the Spielberg State Trait Anger Expression Inventory 2 were used to assess depression and anger expression, respectively. The results showed that pain severity modulates the relationship between anger expression and physical signs of depression. In patients with more severe pain, the relationships between anger management style, specifically, inhibition of anger and depression were strong, while no such relationships were found in the group of patients with less severe pain. No correlations were found between pain intensity and depression as measured by the sum score of the BDI. However, analysing separately the two subscales of the BDI, negative view and physical function, significant positive relationships between pain intensity and both subscales appeared.

  20. Early Maladaptive Schemas in Depressed Women and Its Relationship with Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Bolat KONUKÇU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective: Schemas are deep enduring cognitive structures that are the source of dysfunctional cognitions, emotions and behaviors, activate after critical incidents in depression. A subset of schemas called Early Maladaptive Schemas (EMS which are hyphotised to arise from early traumatic and adverse life events are also claimed to be related with not only personality disorders but also mood disorders. In this study we aimed to investigate the relationship between early maladaptive schemas and depression and relationship between schema scores and depression severity in depressed women and compare it with non-depressed controls.Methods: 40 women attending to an outpatient psychiatry clinic and 30 healthy controls participated. All participants were assessed with SCID-1. Data were obtained by using a Sociodemographic Questionnaires, Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Form 3 (YSQ and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI.Results: All except one (enmeshment/undeveloped self maladaptive schema scores of depressed women were higher than controls. BDI was correlated to some schema and schema domain scores in both depressed and control groups but the correlations were stronger in control group. Mean emotional deprivation, negativism, abandonment and instability, failure EMS scores showed the highest difference between two groups. The schema domains most related to depression symptom severity were disconnection and rejection, impaired autonomy and performance.Conclusions: Almost all early maladaptive schemas are related to depression, and some schemas are related to depression symptom severity but these correlations are weaker in control group. This may mean that EMS are stable and mood independent structures. Although other schemas are related to depression, mostly related EMS in women might be emotional deprivation schema. These schemas may also overlap with Beck’s unlovability core belief or sociotropy dimension

  1. Quality of life and depression in multiple sclerosis patients: longitudinal results of the BetaPlus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzilli, Carlo; Schweikert, Bernd; Ecari, Ugo; Oentrich, Wolfgang; Bugge, Jörg-Peter

    2012-11-01

    Enhancing quality of life (QoL) is an important objective of disease-modifying therapies in multiple sclerosis (MS). Strategies to substantiate the effect on QoL and depression have been suggested, including injection devices and nursing support. This study assesses QoL and depression in MS patients treated with interferon beta-1b (IFNB-1b) and evaluates the impact of different elements of a patient support programme and of coping strategies on QoL and depression. A prospective, observational, 2-year cohort study was conducted. MS patients were eligible if they had previously switched to IFNB-1b. Data were collected every 6 months. For the measurement of QoL the Functional Assessment of MS (FAMS) was used. Depression symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D); coping strategies were assessed using the 66-item version of Ways of Coping Questionnaire. A total of 1,077 patients were recruited into the study. Seven hundred (65 %) patients completed the study. Within the subgroup completing questionnaires on QoL (N = 472) and depression (N = 363), QoL increased (110.4 vs. 115.8, p QoL and depressions, the use of the autoinjector Betaject(®) over time showed a positive association with QoL (p = 0.049). The support from a nurse was positively associated with lower depressive symptoms (p = 0.039). The coping strategies 'planful problem-solving' and 'positive reappraisal' were associated with higher QoL and lower depressive symptoms. Patients on IFNB-1b treatment who were included in the patient support programme and completed the study showed an improvement in QoL. Moreover, compared to baseline the proportion of depressive patients decreased. Coping strategies as well as supportive elements such as autoinjectors and nurses had a significant impact on QoL and depression. However, the study had the general limitations of a non-controlled design.

  2. Study of Association of Psychological Stress and Depression among Undergraduate Medical Students in Pondicherry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Kittu, Rohan Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical education across the globe is perceived as being inherently stressful. Studies on psychological problems such as stress, depression and anxiety among medical students have found that these disorders are under diagnosed and under treated. In this background the present study was undertaken with the objectives to assess the magni-tude of depression and its association with stress among medical students. Methods: A Cross sectional study was undertaken among 235 medical students in a private medical college, Pondicherry. Tools similar to General Health Questionaire (GHQ-12 and Beck depression Inventory (BDI was used to screen psychological stress and depression respectively. Results: The prevalence of depression was 71% among medical students. Psychological stress was associated with depression. Conclusion: Emphasize should be laid on the importance of screening for depression of medical students on a regular basis for early detection and rendering appropriate intervention like group counseling, stress management training etc. to protect the future professionals.

  3. Depression storage and infiltration effects on overland flow depth-velocity-friction at desert conditions: field plot results and model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Rossi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Water infiltration and overland flow are relevant in considering water partition among plant life forms, the sustainability of vegetation and the design of sustainable hydrological models and management. In arid and semi-arid regions, these processes present characteristic trends imposed by the prevailing physical conditions of the upper soil as evolved under water-limited climate. A set of plot-scale field experiments at the semi-arid Patagonian Monte (Argentina were performed in order to estimate the effect of depression storage areas and infiltration rates on depths, velocities and friction of overland flows. The micro-relief of undisturbed field plots was characterized at z-scale 1 mm through close-range stereo-photogrammetry and geo-statistical tools. The overland flow areas produced by controlled water inflows were video-recorded and the flow velocities were measured with image processing software. Antecedent and post-inflow moisture were measured, and texture, bulk density and physical properties of the upper soil were estimated based on soil core analyses. Field data were used to calibrate a physically-based, mass balanced, time explicit model of infiltration and overland flows. Modelling results reproduced the time series of observed flow areas, velocities and infiltration depths. Estimates of hydrodynamic parameters of overland flow (Reynolds-Froude numbers are informed. To our knowledge, the study here presented is novel in combining several aspects that previous studies do not address simultaneously: (1 overland flow and infiltration parameters were obtained in undisturbed field conditions; (2 field measurements of overland flow movement were coupled to a detailed analysis of soil microtopography at 1 mm depth scale; (3 the effect of depression storage areas in infiltration rates and depth-velocity friction of overland flows is addressed. Relevance of the results to other similar desert areas is justified by the accompanying

  4. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor on treating tinnitus in patients stratified for presence of depression or anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Naoki; Kanzaki, Sho; Shinden, Seiichi; Saito, Hideyuki; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, paroxetine, on treating tinnitus.Tinnitus patients stratified for the presence of depression and anxiety were studied retrospectively. Fifty-six patients were observed for more than 6 months. They were initially treated with paroxetine only at a dose of 10 mg/day for 2-4 weeks; thereafter, the dose was increased to 20 mg/day. Tinnitus distress was evaluated with the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and with visual analog scales (VASs) for tinnitus loudness and annoyance. Depression and anxiety were measured with the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and the trait section of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The patients were grouped according to their SDS and STAI scores, and each variable was compared at baseline and the 6-month follow-up. Changes among these variables were also examined to determine whether reduced tinnitus distress was related to the improvement of depression or anxiety. Patients with both depression and anxiety showed better results (decrease in THI, VASs, SDS and STAI scores) than patients with anxiety alone, or patients without depression and anxiety. In patients with depression and anxiety, changes in tinnitus variables and changes in depression and anxiety scores were strongly correlated. In other patients, however, changes in tinnitus variables and changes in depression and anxiety scores were not correlated. These results suggest that paroxetine is effective in treating distressed tinnitus patients with depression and anxiety by reducing their tinnitus severity as well as their depression and anxiety.

  5. ANALYSIS MODEL FOR INVENTORY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAMELIA BURJA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The inventory represents an essential component for the assets of the enterprise and the economic analysis gives them special importance because their accurate management determines the achievement of the activity object and the financial results. The efficient management of inventory requires ensuring an optimum level for them, which will guarantee the normal functioning of the activity with minimum inventory expenses and funds which are immobilised. The paper presents an analysis model for inventory management based on their rotation speed and the correlation with the sales volume illustrated in an adequate study. The highlighting of the influence factors on the efficient inventory management ensures the useful information needed to justify managerial decisions, which will lead to a balancedfinancial position and to increased company performance.

  6. Depression (Major Depressive Disorder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... generally miserable or unhappy without really knowing why. Depression symptoms in children and teens Common signs and ... in normal activities, and avoidance of social interaction. Depression symptoms in older adults Depression is not a ...

  7. Symptom Dimensions of Depression and 3-Year Incidence of Dementia : Results From the Amsterdam Study of the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtenburg, Astrid; Zuidersma, Marij; Oude Voshaar, Richard C; Schoevers, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between depressive symptom dimensions and incident dementia in a community sample of older persons. METHODS: Depressive symptoms at baseline and incident dementia at 3-year follow-up were assessed with the Geriatric Mental State (GMS)-Automated Geriatric Examin

  8. Prevalent and incident depression in community-dwelling elderly persons with diabetes mellitus : results from the ZARADEMP project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, P.; Roy, J. F.; Saz, P.; Marcos, G.; Lobo, A.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Although several studies have reported on the association between diabetes and depression, none have used both formal psychiatric criteria and a prospective, population-based design. Therefore, it remains unclear whether diabetes is a risk factor for the development of depression.

  9. Duration of major depressive episodes in the general population : results from The Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, J; De Graaf, R; Bijl, RV; Beekman, ATF; Ormel, J; Nolen, WA

    2002-01-01

    Background Data on the duration of major depressive episodes (MDE) in the general population are sparse. Aims To assess the duration of MDE and its clinical and socio-demographic determinants in a study group drawn from the general population with newly originated episodes of major depression. Metho

  10. Duration of major depressive episodes in the general population: results from The Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, J.J.A.; de Graaf, R.; Bijl, R.V.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Ormel, J.; Nolen, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    Background Data on the duration of major depressive episodes (MDE) in the general population are sparse. Aims To assess the duration of MDE and its clinical and socio-demographic determinants in a study group drawn from the general population with newly originated episodes of major depression. Metho

  11. Prevalent and incident depression in community-dwelling elderly persons with diabetes mellitus : results from the ZARADEMP project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, P.; Roy, J. F.; Saz, P.; Marcos, G.; Lobo, A.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Although several studies have reported on the association between diabetes and depression, none have used both formal psychiatric criteria and a prospective, population-based design. Therefore, it remains unclear whether diabetes is a risk factor for the development of depression. Mo

  12. Screening for Depression In Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Reza ESMAEELI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract How to Cite This Article: Esmaeeli M, Erfani Sayar R, Saghebi A, Elmi Saghi, Rahmani Sh, Elmi S, Rabbani Javadi A. Screening for Depression in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:47-51. Objective In chronically ill children who are hospitalized, many mood changes occur. For example, in children with cancer or renal failure, prolonged hospitalization and chemotherapy can lead to depression. With the improved survival of childhood malignancies, the effect of treatment on child’s psychosocial well-being becomes increasingly relevant. In this study, we examined the prevalence of depression in hospitalized children with chronic and acute conditions in Dr Sheikh Pediatrics Hospital in Mashhad. Materials & Methods After receiving the approval from the Ethics Committee of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, we did this cross-sectional descriptive study, from April to June 2012 in Dr Sheikh Pediatric Hospital in Mashhad. Ninety children, aged between 8 to 16 years, were screened for depression. The sampling method was census. Children with a history of depressive or other mental disorders were excluded. Three groups of children (children with chronic renal disease, malignancy, and acute disease were evaluated for depression using standard Children Depression Inventory Questionnaire (CDI. Two specifically trained nurses with the supervision of a psychiatrist filled out the questionnaires at patients’ bedside. Depression scores were then analyzed by SPSS software. Results Of 90 children, 43(47.7% were male and 47(52.2% were female. The Children’s mean age was 11±2.3 years, and the mean length of hospitalization was 8±5.3 days. Depression was detected in various degrees in 63% of patients (N=57, and 36.6% of children (N=32 had no symptoms of depression. Severe depression was not seen in any of the patients with acute illness. More than half of patients with cancer and chronic kidney disease had

  13. Relation between exercise, depression and body mass index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vasconcelos-Raposo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between physical exercise, depression, and body mass index (BMI. The sample of the study consisted of 175 participants (43 male and 132 female with ages between the 18 and 27 years. The used instruments were: an adapted and validated Portuguese version of the Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI and an adaptation of the physical exercise scale developed by Prochaska, Sallis and Long (2001. The results suggested a negative correlation between the physical exercise and depression, with statistical significance. The group that does not reach the recommended level of physical exercise presents higher scores of depression in comparison with the group that reaches. This study corroborates previous studies that suggested positive effects of physical exercise on depression.

  14. Relation between exercise, depression and body mass index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vasconcelos-Raposo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between physical exercise, depression, and body mass index (BMI. The sample of the study consisted of 175 participants (43 male and 132 female with ages between the 18 and 27 years. The used instruments were: an adapted and validated Portuguese version of the Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI and an adaptation of the physical exercise scale developed by Prochaska, Sallis and Long (2001. The results suggested a negative correlation between the physical exercise and depression, with statistical significance. The group that does not reach the recommended level of physical exercise presents higher scores of depression in comparison with the group that reaches. This study corroborates previous studies that suggested positive effects of physical exercise on depression.

  15. Social Skills and Perceived Maternal Acceptance-Rejection in Relation to Depression in Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Yazdkhasti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study examines the relationship between infertile women’s social skills andtheir perception of their own mothers’ acceptance or rejection, and the role this relationship playsin predicting self-reported depression.Materials and Methods: This was a correlational study. 60 infertile women aged 25 to 35 yearsparticipated in a self-evaluation. A Social Skills Inventory, Parental Acceptance and RejectionQuestionnaire and Beck Depression Inventory were used to measure social skills, acceptancerejection and depression. Data was analyzed by SPSS software, using independent two-sample ttest, logistic regression, and ANOVA.Results: Findings showed that there are significant differences between depressed and not depressedinfertile women in their perceptions of acceptance and rejection by their mothers. Further, women'sperceptions of rejection are a more significant predictor of depression among less socially skilledinfertile women than among those who are more socially skilled. Less socially skilled women didnot show symptoms of depression when they experienced their mothers as accepting. In generalthe results of this study revealed that poorer social skills were more predictive of depression whilegood social skills moderate the effect of infertile women’s perceptions of their mothers' rejection.At the same time, the findings showed that infertile women's perceptions of acceptance moderatedthe effects of poorer social skills in predicting depression.Conclusion: Results suggest that the perception of mothers’ rejection and poor social skills are thekey factors that make infertile women prone to depression.

  16. The Street Level Built Environment and Physical Activity and Walking: Results of a Predictive Validity Study for the Irvine Minnesota Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarnet, Marlon G.; Forsyth, Ann; Day, Kristen; Oakes, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    The Irvine Minnesota Inventory (IMI) was designed to measure environmental features that may be associated with physical activity and particularly walking. This study assesses how well the IMI predicts physical activity and walking behavior and develops shortened, validated audit tools. A version of the IMI was used in the Twin Cities Walking…

  17. Keeping Confidence in Data over Time: Testing the Tenor of Results from Repeat Administrations of a Question Inventory. Professional File. Number 121, Summer 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The following describes research supported by the Teagle Foundation for the development and testing of an instrument for measuring college student perceptions of institutional mission in the learning environment. Findings from reliability and validity testing of a set of questions called the Mission Perception Inventory (MPI) are discussed. The…

  18. Estimulação Magnética Transcraniana na depressão: resultados obtidos com duas aplicações semanais Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in depression: results of bi-weekly treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Boechat-Barros

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A Estimulação Magnética Transcraniana (EMT tem se mostrado útil como forma terapêutica para a depressão. Este artigo avalia os resultados da aplicação da EMT de baixa freqüência, duas vezes por semana, durante quatro semanas, em 10 pacientes com depressão, não responsivos ou intolerantes à utilização de antidepressivos. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo descritivo, ou não controlado, do tipo série de casos. Para diagnosticar a depressão, foram utilizados os critérios do DSM-IV. Com o intuito de avaliar uma possível melhora, utilizamos a escala de Hamilton-17 itens em três momentos: no início, meio e final do tratamento. Para análise estatística dos resultados, utilizamos o teste x², de Friedman. RESULTADOS: Foi observada melhora > 50% na escala em cinco pacientes e > 75% em três destes ao longo de todo o tratamento. CONCLUSÕES: O emprego da EMT de baixa freqüência, aplicada duas vezes por semana, pode ser seguro, prático e eficaz no tratamento da depressão, como um coadjuvante ao antidepressivo. Porém, não podemos afirmar se o efeito clínico apresentado se deve a uma potencialização dos antidepressivos ou a um efeito direto da EMT, já que esta não foi testada isoladamente.OBJECTIVE: Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS has been shown to be a useful therapy for depression. This paper evaluates the results of bi-weekly low-frequency TMS of 4 weeks duration, in 10 patients with depression who do not respond or are intolerant to antidepressive medication. METHODS: This is a case series study. DMS-IV criteria were used to diagnose depression. In order to disclose possible improvements in depressive symptoms, the 17 items Hamilton scale was used at three different moments: at the beginning, middle and end of the treatment period. Results were analysed using Friedman's x² test. RESULTS: Hamilton's scale score improvement was > 50% in five patients and > 75% in 3 of these. CONCLUSIONS: TMS may be

  19. Antepartum depression and anxiety associated with disability in African women: cross-sectional results from the CDS study in Ghana and Cote d'Ivoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Bindt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Common mental disorders, particularly unipolar depressive disorders, rank among the top 5 with respect to the global burden of disease. As a major public health concern, antepartum depression and anxiety not only affects the individual woman, but also her offspring. Data on the prevalence of common mental disorders in pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa are scarce. We provide results from Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire. METHODS: We subsequently recruited and screened n = 1030 women in the third trimester of their pregnancy for depressed mood, general anxiety, and perceived disability using the Patient Health Questionnaire depression module (PHQ-9, the 7-item Anxiety Scale (GAD-7, and the World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS 2.0, 12-item version. In addition to estimates of means and prevalence, a hierarchical linear regression model was calculated to determine the influence of antepartum depression and anxiety on disability. RESULTS: In Ghana, 26.6% of women showed substantially depressed mood. In Côte d'Ivoire, this figure was even higher (32.9%. Clear indications for a generalized anxiety disorder were observed in 11.4% and 17.4% of pregnant women, respectively. Comorbidity of both conditions was common, affecting about 7.7% of Ghanaian and 12.6% of Ivorian participants. Pregnant women in both countries reported a high degree of disability regarding everyday activity limitations and participation restrictions. Controlled for country and age, depression and anxiety accounted for 33% of variance in the disability score. CONCLUSIONS: Antepartum depression and anxiety were highly prevalent in our sample and contributed substantially to perceived disability. These serious threats to health must be further investigated and more data are needed to comprehensively quantify the problem in sub-Saharan Africa.

  20. Duloxetine and care management treatment of older adults with comorbid major depressive disorder and chronic low back pain: results of an open-label pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Jordan F.; Weiner, Debra K.; Dew, Mary A.; Begley, Amy; Miller, Mark D.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In older adults, major depressive disorder (MDD) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) are common and mutually exacerbating. We predicted that duloxetine pharmacotherapy and Depression and Pain Care Management (DPCM) would result in (1) significant improvement in MDD and CLBP and (2) significant improvements in health-related quality of life, anxiety, disability, self-efficacy, and sleep quality. Design and Intervention: Twelve week open-label study using duloxetine up to 120 mg/day + DPCM. Setting: Outpatient late-life depression research clinic. Patients: Thirty community-dwelling adults >60 years old. Outcome Measures: Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF). Results: 46.7% (n = 14) of the sample had a depression remission. All subjects who met criteria for the depression remission also had a pain response. 93.3% (n = 28) had a significant pain response. Of the subjects who met criteria for a low back pain response, 50% (n = 14) also met criteria for the depression remission. The mean time to depression remission was 7.6 (SE = 0.6) weeks. The mean time to pain response was 2.8 (SE = 0.5) weeks. There were significant improvements in mental health-related quality of life, anxiety, sleep quality, somatic complaints, and both self-efficacy for pain management and for coping with symptoms. Physical health-related quality of life, back pain-related disability, and self-efficacy for physical functioning did not improve. Conclusions: Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors like duloxetine delivered with DPCM may be a good choice to treat these linked conditions in older adults. Treatments that target low self-efficacy for physical function and improving disability may further increase response rates. PMID:19750557

  1. Gender Differences in Self-Reported Symptoms of Depression among Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Frazier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the prevalence of self-reported depressive symptoms and the self reported somatic depressive symptoms as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II among patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (ACS, and explored the impact of gender on both. A convenience sample of 789 adults (248 women and 541 men was recruited for the study during hospital admission for ACS and participants were screened for self-reported depressive symptoms. BDI-II scores of ≥14 indicate a moderate level of depressive symptoms and this cut-off score was used to categorize patients into depressed and non-depressed groups. Pearson chi-square tests for independence (categorical variables and t tests for independent samples (continuous variables were used for gender comparisons. Results showed that depressive symptoms during ACS episodes were different between women and men. Women reported greater overall depressive symptoms (BDI-II mean = 11.89, S.D. = 9.68 than men (BDI-II mean = 9.00, S.D. = 7.93 (P<0.000. Significantly more women (7.66% were identified positive for somatic depressive symptoms (sleep and appetite disturbances and fatigue than men (2.22% (P=0.0003. Findings support that there are gender differences in depressive symptoms experienced by patients hospitalized for ACS. Somatic symptoms of depression may be important indicators of depression especially among female ACS patients.

  2. Self-statements, locus of control, and depression in predicting self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpot, V D; Holliman, W B; Madonna, S

    1995-06-01

    The contributions of frequency of positive and negative self-statements and their ratio, locus of control, and depression in prediction of self-esteem were examined. Volunteers were 145 college students (100 women and 45 men) who were administered the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory-Adult Form, Automatic Thought Questionnaire-Revised, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Rotter Internal-External Locus of Control Scale. Intercorrelations suggested significant relationships among variables. The magnitude of the relationship was strongest between the frequency of negative self-statements and self-esteem. These results are consistent with and lend further support to prior studies of Kendall, et al. and Schwartz and Michaelson.

  3. Cost effectiveness of telecare management for pain and depression in patients with cancer: results from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi Yoo, Sung J; Nyman, John A; Cheville, Andrea L; Kroenke, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Pain and depression are prevalent and treatable symptoms among patients with cancer, yet they are often undetected and undertreated. The Indiana Cancer Pain and Depression (INCPAD) trial demonstrated that telecare management can improve pain and depression outcomes. This article investigates the incremental cost effectiveness of the INCPAD intervention. The INCPAD trial was conducted in 16 community-based urban and rural oncology practices in Indiana. Of the 405 participants, 202 were randomized to the intervention group and 203 to the usual-care group. Intervention costs were determined, and effectiveness outcomes were depression-free days and quality-adjusted life years. The intervention group was associated with a yearly increase of 60.3 depression-free days (S.E. = 15.4; P intervention per patient was US$1189, which included physician, nurse care manager and automated monitoring set-up and maintenance costs. Incremental cost per depression-free day was US$19.72, which yields a range of US$18,018 to US$36,035 per quality-adjusted life year when converted to that metric. When measured directly, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year ranged from US$10,826 based on the modified EQ-5D to US$73,286.92 based on the SF-12. Centralized telecare management, coupled with automated symptom monitoring, appears to be a cost effective intervention for managing pain and depression in cancer patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. The role of socio-economic status in depression: results from the COURAGE (aging survey in Europe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Aislinne; Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Koyanagi, Ai; Chatterji, Somnath; Leonardi, Matilde; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Koskinen, Seppo; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Haro, Josep Maria

    2016-10-19

    Low socio-economic status (SES) has been found to be associated with a higher prevalence of depression. However, studies that have investigated this association have been limited in their national scope, have analyzed different components of SES separately, and have not used standardized definitions or measurements across populations. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the association between SES and depression across three European countries that represent different regions across Europe, using standardized procedures and measurements and a composite score for SES. Nationally-representative data on 10,800 individuals aged ≥18 from the Collaborative Research on Ageing in Europe (COURAGE) survey conducted in Finland, Poland and Spain were analyzed in this cross-sectional study. An adapted version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to identify the presence of depression, and SES was computed by using the combined scores of the total number of years educated (0-22) and the quintiles of the country-specific income level of the household (1-5). Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between SES and depression. Findings reveal a significant association between depression and SES across all countries (p ≤ 0.001). After adjusting for confounders, the odds of depression were significantly decreased for every unit increase in the SES index for Finland, Poland and Spain. Additionally, higher education significantly decreased the odds for depression in each country, but income did not. The SES index seems to predict depression symptomatology across European countries. Taking SES into account may be an important factor in the development of depression prevention strategies across Europe.

  5. Objective Methods for Reliable Detection of Concealed Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia eSolomon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that it is possible to automatically detect clinical depression from audio-visual recordings. Before considering integration in a clinical pathway, a key question that must be asked is whether such systems can be easily fooled. This work explores the potential of acoustic features to detect clinical depression in adults both when acting normally and when asked to conceal their depression. Nine adults diagnosed with mild to moderate depression as per the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 were asked a series of questions and to read a excerpt from a novel aloud under two different experimental conditions. In one, participants were asked to act naturally and in the other, to suppress anything that they felt would be indicative of their depression. Acoustic features were then extracted from this data and analysed using paired t-tests to determine any statistically significant differences between healthy and depressed participants. Most features that were found to be significantly different during normal behaviour remained so during concealed behaviour. In leave-one-subject-out automatic classification studies of the 9 depressed subjects and 8 matched healthy controls, an 88% classification accuracy and 89% sensitivity was achieved. Results remained relatively robust during concealed behaviour, with classifiers trained on only non-concealed data achieving 81% detection accuracy and 75% sensitivity when tested on concealed data. These results indicate there is good potential to build deception-proof automatic depression monitoring systems.

  6. Prevalence of major depressive disorder and minor depressive disorder in an elderly Korean population: results from the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging (KLoSHA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon Hyuk; Lee, Jung Jae; Lee, Seok Bum; Huh, Yoonseok; Choi, Eun Ae; Youn, Jong Choul; Jhoo, Jin Hyeong; Kim, Jin Sun; Woo, Jong Inn; Kim, Ki Woong

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the prevalence, risk factors and impact of major depressive disorder (MDD) and minor depressive disorder (MnDD) in a randomly selected community-dwelling Korean elderly population. This study was conducted as a part of the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging (KLoSHA). A study population of 1118 Korean elders was randomly sampled from residents of Seongnam, Korea aged 65 years or older. Standardized face-to-face interviews and neurological and physical examinations were conducted on 714 respondents using the Korean version of Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. MDD was diagnosed according to the DSM-IV criteria, and MnDD according to research criteria proposed in Appendix B of the DSM-IV criteria. Age-, gender- and education-standardized prevalence rates in Korean elders aged 65 years or older were estimated as 5.37% (95% CI=3.72-7.03) for MDD, 5.52% (95% CI=3.84-7.19) for MnDD, and 10.89% (95% CI=8.60-13.17) for overall late-life depression (LLD). A prior MDD episode (OR=3.07, 95% CI=1.38-6.82 in MDD, OR=3.44, 95% CI=1.49-7.94 in MnDD), female gender (OR=3.55, 95% CI=1.53-8.24 in MDD, OR=2.68, 95% CI=1.19-6.04 in MnDD) and history of stroke or TIA (OR=3.45, 95% CI=1.62-7.35 in MDD, OR=2.95, 95% CI=1.34-6.52 in MnDD) were associated with the risks of both MDD and MnDD. Lack of formal education (OR=2.75, 95% CI=1.30-5.85) and low income (OR=2.83, 95% CI=1.02-7.88) were associated with the risk of MDD only. Quality of life (QOL) of the MDD and MnDD patients was worse than that of non-depressed elders (Pelders and impacted QOL as MDD did. MnDD patients may increase in the future with accelerated population aging and westernization of lifestyle in Korea. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Psychological gender in clinical depression. Preliminary study [Płeć psychologiczna osób z depresją kliniczną. Doniesienia wstępne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szpitalak, Malwina

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Psychosocial and social theories of mood disorders indicate that factors connected with women’s gender roles could create a higher risk of depression. The fact that social role is an important factor associated with depressive disorders suggests that not only a biological but also a psychological gender influences the vulnerability to depression. Method. Gender schema theory was applied to investigate a role of femininity in depressive disorders. It was predicted that patients who identify themselves with the traditional feminine gender role will be more depressed than androgynous and undifferentiated patients or individuals with high level of masculinity. Sixty one patients suffering from affective disorder participated in this research. The Polish adaptation of Bem Sex – Role Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory were used to investigate the association between psychological gender and symptoms of depression. Results. The results indicated that there is a significant connection between the type of psychological gender and the level of depression. The highest level of depression was shown by undifferentiated patients, femininity was also found to be associated with a great number of depressive symptoms. These findings also suggest that androgynous individuals and patients with a high level of masculinity tend to be less depressed. Conclusions. Psychological gender is an important factor which interacts to create a higher depression risk in men and women.

  8. Study of proportion and determinants of depression among college students in Mangalore city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Naushad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Onset of depression is occurring earlier in life today than in past decades. Adolescence being transitional period from childhood to adulthood is a stage of emotional instability resulting from demand for separation and independence. Evidence suggests that early intervention for depression in children can improve long-term outcomes. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in January 2010 to find out the prevalence of depression among pre university students in Mangalore city. Prevalence of depression was assessed using Beck′s Depression Inventory II. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Out of 308 participants, depression was seen among 79.2% students. A majority (41.2% were found to be suffering from moderate followed by mild (26.6% depression. Prevalence of depression (P = 0.027 and severity of depression (P = 0.0357 was found to significantly increase with age of the participants. Students of commerce were found to be significantly more depressed than students of science stream (P = 0.002. No association of depression with gender of participants or with the type of college they were studying in was observed. Conclusion: There is a need for college students to be educated about depression in order to improve recognition and diagnosis. Also student counselling service offering mental health assistance needs to be established at colleges.

  9. Prevalence of depressive disorders in Rasht, Iran: A community based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirazi Maryam

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Depression is a well known health problem worldwide. Prevalence of depressive disorders varies in different societies. Aim to determine the prevalence of depressive disorders and some associated factors in Rasht City (Northern part of Iran. Materials and methods 4020 subjects were selected among 394925 residents of Rasht aged between 18–70 during 2003 – 2004. In the first phase, subjects were screened by Beck's Depression Inventory. In the second phase, those who scored more than 15 were assessed through semi-structured psychiatric interview (DSMIV-TR. Socio-demographic characteristics including age, gender, marital status, educational level, and socio-economic class were recorded as well. Results 9.5% of samples (63% female and 37% male were diagnosed by depressive disorders. The prevalence of minor depressive disorder, dysthymia and major depressive disorder was 5%, 2/5%, and 1% respectively. Socio-economic class was significantly associated with both depressive symptoms based on BDI score (p Conclusion Comparing to other studies, this study revealed that prevalence of dysthymic and minor depressive disorder were more than major depressive disorder, and low socio-economic class was the most significant risk factor associated with depression. Regarding our study limitations, researchers and policy makers should not consider our findings as conclusive results. Findings of this study could be applied by researchers using analytical methodology to assess relationship between depressive disorders and associated factors.

  10. The Effects of Cognitive Therapy Versus ‘Treatment as Usual’ in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Lindschou Hansen, Jane; Storebø, Ole Jakob; Simonsen, Erik; Gluud, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Cognitive therapy may be an effective treatment option for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews. Methods/Principal Findings Cochrane systematic review methodology, with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomized trials, are comparing the effects of cognitive therapy versus ‘treatment as usual’ for major depressive disorder. To be included the participants had to be older than 17 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Altogether, we included eight trials randomizing a total of 719 participants. All eight trials had high risk of bias. Four trials reported data on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and four trials reported data on the Beck Depression Inventory. Meta-analysis on the data from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression showed that cognitive therapy compared with ‘treatment as usual’ significantly reduced depressive symptoms (mean difference −2.15 (95% confidence interval −3.70 to −0.60; PDepression Inventory (mean difference with both models −1.57 (95% CL −4.30 to 1.16; P = 0.26, I2 = 0) could not confirm the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression results. Furthermore, trial sequential analysis on both the data from Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Becks Depression Inventory showed that insufficient data have been obtained. Discussion Cognitive therapy might not be an effective treatment for major depressive disorder compared with ‘treatment as usual’. The possible treatment effect measured on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression is relatively small. More randomized trials with low risk of bias, increased sample sizes, and broader more clinically relevant outcomes are needed. PMID:21829664

  11. Integrative deficits in depression and in negative mood states as a result of fronto-parietal network dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezicka, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a disorder characterized not only by persistent negative mood, lack of motivation and a "ruminative" style of thinking, but also by specific deficits in cognitive functioning. These deficits are especially pronounced when integration of information is required. Previous research on linear syllogisms points to a clear pattern of cognitive disturbances present in people suffering from depressive disorders, as well as in people with elevated negative mood. Such disturbances are characterized by deficits in the integration of piecemeal information into coherent mental representations. In this review, I present evidence which suggests that the dysfunction of specific brain areas plays a crucial role in creating reasoning and information integration problems among people with depression and with heightened negative mood. As the increasingly prevalent systems neuroscience approach is spreading into the study of mental disorders, it is important to understand how and which brain networks are involved in creating certain symptoms of depression. Two large brain networks are of particular interest when considering depression: the default mode network (DMN) and the fronto-parietal (executive) network (FNP). The DMN network shows abnormally high activity in the depressed population, whereas FNP circuit activity is diminished. Disturbances within the FNP network seem to be strongly associated with cognitive problems in depression, especially those concerning executive functions. The dysfunctions within the fronto-parietal network are most probably connected to ineffective transmission of information between prefrontal and parietal regions, and also to an imbalance between FNP and DMN circuits. Inefficiency of this crucial circuits functioning may be a more general mechanism leading to problems with flexible cognition and executive functions, and could be the cause of more typical symptoms of depression like persistent rumination.

  12. Psychological distress, anxiety and depression among nursing students in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapountzi-Krepia D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is usually observed that nursing students undergo tremendous stress during various stages oftheir course but the knowledge about the stress process and depressive symptoms in this population is limited. TheAim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of psychological distress, anxiety and depression amongnursing students in Greece. For that purpose 170 nursing students (34 males, 136 females of the Department of Nursingof the Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki completed 3 self-report questionnaires, the General HealthQuestionnaire (GHQ, the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. The mean agewas 21.5 years. No difference in stress and depression on the basis of gender was observed. Our results showed that thescores on the GHQ, BDI and STAI tend to increase in the year 2 and 3. The majority of students reported relatively highscores on the GHQ suggesting increased psychiatric morbidity. 52.4% of students experienced depressive symptoms(34.7% mild, 12.9% moderate and 4.7% severe. The scores on the state scale were higher in the years 2 and 3, whilethe majority of students who had no or mild stress was observed in the first and the last year. Low stress personalitytraits were also observed in the first and the last year. However, no significant differences between the four years wereobserved. Our results suggest that nursing students experience different levels of stress and depression and that thesefactors are positively correlated.

  13. Permissive attitude toward suicide and future intent in individuals with and without depression: results from a nationwide survey in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hong Jin; Park, Jae-Hyun; Shim, Eun-Jung

    2013-04-01

    Many previous studies have revealed that individuals with depression have higher thought of suicide, although not always exhibiting intent. We investigated the associated factors with respect to intent for suicide in the future. A total of 1584 adults were selected through a nationwide multistage probability sampling, randomly one person per household, and through face-to-face interviews (response rate was 63.4%) using the suicidality module of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The group with depression (n = 152) revealed a significantly higher level of future suicide intent (t = 4.65, p suicide as free from life suffering, a personal right, and a solution to a difficult situation. After adjusting for all variables in the multiple logistic regression models, permissive attitude (adjusted odds ratio, 3.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.97-6.89) was the only factor significantly associated with future suicide intent, whereas age; sex; education years; monthly income; financial, job, and family stress; physical illness; lifetime suicide attempt; and depression showed no statistical significance. The group with depression showed significantly higher levels of future suicide intent than did the group without depression in those who had a higher permissive attitude (t = 4.18, p suicide was associated with intent for suicide in the future in individuals with depression. Permissive attitude could be evaluated and corrected to prevent suicide.

  14. Low DHEAS levels are associated with depressive symptoms in elderly Chinese men: results from a large study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel YS Wong; Jason C Leung; Timothy Kwok; Claes Ohlsson; Liesbeth Vandenput; Ping C Leung; Jean Woo

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the association between depressive symptoms in elderly Chinese men and the total testosterone,dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA),DHEA sulphate (DHEAS),oestradiol and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels,and the free androgen index.Cross-sectional data from 1147 community-dwelling elderly men,aged 65 and older,were used.Depressive symptoms were measured using the Chinese Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS).Total testosterone,free testosterone,DHEA,DHEAS,total oestradiol,the free androgen index and SHBG levels were assessed.DH EA was significantly associated with GDS score,and there was a trend towards DHEAS association,but this was not significant (β=0.110,P=0.015;β=0.074,P=0.055).However,no association was seen between depressive symptoms and total testosterone levels,free testosterone levels,oestradiol levels or SHBG levels.In terms of the presence of clinically relevant depressive symptoms,there were no statistically significant differences between patients in the lowest quartile of sex steroid hormone levels and those in other quartiles of sex steroid hormone levels.Similarly to Western studies,our study shows that DHEA and DHEAS levels are associated with depressive symptoms.

  15. Detection, Management Approach of Depression and Antidepressant Utilization in Adult Patients: Results of a Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newale, Sanket; Bachani, Deepak S

    2016-10-01

    The study was conducted to understand the demographics, prevalence of co-morbid conditions and treatment modalities of depression. A cross-sectional, nationwide observational study was conducted to understand the management pattern of depression in India. Depression was majorly diagnosed with DSM-IV TR criteria. The data of 2276 Indian patients across 18 states were collected through 135 mental health professionals. The study population was predominantly from urban (81.2%) area. The prevalence of uneducated and employed patients in the study was 7.2% and 54.6% respectively. The main co-morbidities observed were diabetes, hypertension, anxiety and insomnia. Overall, escitalopram monotherapy was used in 67.2% patients. Escitalopram was found to be the preferred antidepressant in patients with co-morbid conditions including hypertension and diabetes. Counseling was the most common non-pharmacological therapy practiced. This large cross sectional study in real life settings demonstrates high prevalence of depression among employed and educated adult Indian patients. Hypertension and diabetes are the two most common co-morbidites in patients with depression. Escitalopram is commonly used and preferred antidepressant in all studied age groups and even in co-morbid depression.

  16. Improvement in Depressive Symptoms Is Associated with Reduced Oxidative Damage and Inflammatory Response in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Subsyndromal Depression: The Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Psychoeducation, Physical Exercise, and Enhanced Treatment as Usual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučić Lovrenčić, Marijana; Pibernik-Okanović, Mirjana; Šekerija, Mario; Prašek, Manja; Ajduković, Dea; Kos, Jadranka; Hermanns, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To examine one-year changes in oxidative damage and inflammation level in type 2 diabetic patients undergoing behavioral treatment for subsyndromal depression. Materials and Methods. A randomized controlled comparison of psychoeducation (A), physical exercise (B), and enhanced treatment as usual (C) was performed in 209 eligible subjects in a tertiary diabetes care setting. Depressive symptoms (primary outcome) and selected biomarkers of oxidative damage and inflammation (secondary outcomes) were assessed at baseline and six- and twelve-month follow-up. Results. Out of the 74, 67, and 68 patients randomised into groups A, B, and C, respectively, 201 completed the interventions, and 179 were analysed. Participants in all three groups equally improved in depressive symptoms from baseline to one-year follow-up (repeated measures ANOVA; F = 12.51, p < 0.0001, η2 = 0.07). Urinary 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (u-8-oxodG) decreased (F = 10.66, p < 0.0001, η2 = 0.06), as did sialic acid and leukocytes (F = 84.57, η2 = 0.32 and F = 12.61, η2 = 0.07, resp.; p < 0.0001), while uric acid increased (F = 12.53, p < 0.0001, η2 = 0.07) in all subjects during one year. Improvement of depressive symptoms at 6 months significantly predicted one-year reduction in u-8-oxodG (β = 0.15, p = 0.044). Conclusion. Simple behavioral interventions are capable not only of alleviating depressive symptoms, but also of reducing the intensity of damaging oxidative/inflammatory processes in type 2 diabetic patients with subsyndromal depression. This trial is registered with ISRCTN05673017. PMID:26347775

  17. Improvement in Depressive Symptoms Is Associated with Reduced Oxidative Damage and Inflammatory Response in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Subsyndromal Depression: The Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Psychoeducation, Physical Exercise, and Enhanced Treatment as Usual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Vučić Lovrenčić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To examine one-year changes in oxidative damage and inflammation level in type 2 diabetic patients undergoing behavioral treatment for subsyndromal depression. Materials and Methods. A randomized controlled comparison of psychoeducation (A, physical exercise (B, and enhanced treatment as usual (C was performed in 209 eligible subjects in a tertiary diabetes care setting. Depressive symptoms (primary outcome and selected biomarkers of oxidative damage and inflammation (secondary outcomes were assessed at baseline and six- and twelve-month follow-up. Results. Out of the 74, 67, and 68 patients randomised into groups A, B, and C, respectively, 201 completed the interventions, and 179 were analysed. Participants in all three groups equally improved in depressive symptoms from baseline to one-year follow-up (repeated measures ANOVA; F=12.51, p<0.0001, η2=0.07. Urinary 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (u-8-oxodG decreased (F=10.66, p<0.0001, η2=0.06, as did sialic acid and leukocytes (F=84.57, η2=0.32 and F=12.61, η2=0.07, resp.; p<0.0001, while uric acid increased (F=12.53, p<0.0001, η2=0.07 in all subjects during one year. Improvement of depressive symptoms at 6 months significantly predicted one-year reduction in u-8-oxodG (β=0.15, p=0.044. Conclusion. Simple behavioral interventions are capable not only of alleviating depressive symptoms, but also of reducing the intensity of damaging oxidative/inflammatory processes in type 2 diabetic patients with subsyndromal depression. This trial is registered with ISRCTN05673017.

  18. “Love Hurts”: Romantic Attachment and Depressive Symptoms in Pregnant Adolescent and Young Adult Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Alethea; Sipsma, Heather; Callands, Tamora; Hansen, Nathan; Divney, Anna; Magriples, Urania; Kershaw, Trace

    2014-01-01

    Objective The current study investigates the relationship between romantic attachment style and depressive symptoms between both members of pregnant adolescent and young adult couples. Method Participants were 296 pregnant young females (mean age = 18.7) and their male partners (mean age = 21.3; 592 total participants) who were recruited from obstetrics and gynecology clinics in Connecticut. The dimensions of avoidant and anxious romantic attachment were assessed using the Experiences in Close Relationships Inventory. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale. Results Results showed that avoidant attachment and anxious attachment were significantly positively related to depressive symptoms. Multilevel modeling for partner effects revealed that anxious attachment and depressive symptoms in partners were significantly positively associated with depressive symptoms Conclusion Findings underscore the importance of considering couples-based approaches to supporting the transition to parenthood and developing the necessary self and relationship skills to manage attachment needs and relationship challenges. PMID:23794358

  19. Assessing Depression in Cardiac Patients: What Measures Should Be Considered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ceccarini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is highly recommended to promptly assess depression in heart disease patients as it represents a crucial risk factor which may result in premature deaths following acute cardiac events and a more severe psychopathology, even in cases of subsequent nonfatal cardiac events. Patients and professionals often underestimate or misjudge depressive symptomatology as cardiac symptoms; hence, quick, reliable, and early mood changes assessments are warranted. Failing to detect depressive signals may have detrimental effects on these patients’ wellbeing and full recovery. Choosing gold-standard depression investigations in cardiac patients that fit a hospitalised cardiac setting well is fundamental. This paper will examine eight well established tools following Italian and international guidelines on mood disorders diagnosis in cardiac patients: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, the Cognitive Behavioural Assessment Hospital Form (CBA-H, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the two and nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2, PHQ-9, the Depression Interview and Structured Hamilton (DISH, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D/HRSD, and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. Though their strengths and weaknesses may appear to be homogeneous, the BDI-II and the PHQ are more efficient towards an early depression assessment within cardiac hospitalised patients.

  20. Computerized adaptive measurement of depression: A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mammen Oommen

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient, accurate instruments for measuring depression are increasingly important in clinical practice. We developed a computerized adaptive version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We examined its efficiency and its usefulness in identifying Major Depressive Episodes (MDE and in measuring depression severity. Methods Subjects were 744 participants in research studies in which each subject completed both the BDI and the SCID. In addition, 285 patients completed the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Results The adaptive BDI had an AUC as an indicator of a SCID diagnosis of MDE of 88%, equivalent to the full BDI. The adaptive BDI asked fewer questions than the full BDI (5.6 versus 21 items. The adaptive latent depression score correlated r = .92 with the BDI total score and the latent depression score correlated more highly with the Hamilton (r = .74 than the BDI total score did (r = .70. Conclusions Adaptive testing for depression may provide greatly increased efficiency without loss of accuracy in identifying MDE or in measuring depression severity.

  1. Mother-Infant Attachment Style as a Predictor of Depression among Female Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Amani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: There are an increasing number of studies showing an association of adult attachment styles to psychopathology. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the relation between attachment style and depression among students of Bu-Ali Sina University in Iran. Methods: This descriptive correlational study was conducted on 157 girl students who were randomly selected. They were evaluated by demographic questionnaire, Adult Attachment Inventory (AAI (Hazan and Shaver, and theBeck Depression Inventory (BDI-II. The data was analysis by using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis in SPSS 16 statistical package. Results: Findings indicated that secure attachment style had no significant correlation with depression and insecure attachment styles had a significant positive correlation with depression (p

  2. Depression-Burnout Overlap in Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, Walter; Vogel, Katrin; Holl, Anna; Ebner, Christoph; Bayer, Dietmar; Mörkl, Sabrina; Szilagyi, Istvan-Szilard; Hotter, Erich; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Hofmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether burnout is a distinct phenomenon rather than a type of depression and whether it is a syndrome, limited to three “core” components (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment) are subjects of current debate. We investigated the depression-burnout overlap, and the pertinence of these three components in a large, representative sample of physicians. Methods In a cross-sectional study, all Austrian physicians were invited to answer a questionnaire that included the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), the Hamburg Burnout Inventory (HBI), as well as demographic and job-related parameters. Of the 40093 physicians who received an invitation, a total of 6351 (15.8%) participated. The data of 5897 participants were suitable for analysis. Results Of the participants, 10.3% were affected by major depression. Our study results suggest that potentially 50.7% of the participants were affected by symptoms of burnout. Compared to physicians unaffected by burnout, the odds ratio of suffering from major depression was 2.99 (95% CI 2.21–4.06) for physicians with mild, 10.14 (95% CI 7.58–13.59) for physicians with moderate, 46.84 (95% CI 35.25–62.24) for physicians with severe burnout and 92.78 (95% CI 62.96–136.74) for the 3% of participants with the highest HBI_sum (sum score of all ten HBI components). The HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Personal Accomplishment and Detachment (representing depersonalization) tend to correlate more highly with the main symptoms of major depression (sadness, lack of interest and lack of energy) than with each other. A combination of the HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium (adj.R2 = 0.92) explained more HBI_sum variance than the three “core” components (adj.R2 = 0.85) of burnout combined. Cronbach’s alpha for Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium combined was 0.90 compared to α = 0.54 for the combination of the three

  3. Danish emission inventory for particular matter (PM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, M.; Winther, M.; Illerup, J.B.; Hjort Mikkelsen, M.

    2003-11-01

    The first Danish emission inventory that was reported in 2002 was a provisional-estimate based on data presently available. This report documents methodology, emission factors and references used for an improved Danish emission inventory for particulate matter. Further results of the improved emission inventory for the year 2000 are shown. The particulate matter emission inventory includes TSP, PM,, and PM, The report covers emission inventories for transport and stationary combustion. An appendix covering emissions from agriculture is also included. For the transport sector, both exhaust and non-exhaust emission such as tyre and break wear and road abrasion are included. (au)

  4. A Survey on the Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Level of Depression and Anxiety among Women with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirifard, Nasrin; Payandeh, Mehrdad; Aeinfar, Mehrnoush; Sadeghi, Masoud; Sadeghi, Edris; Ghafarpor, Somaye

    2017-01-01

    Background: Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is positively associated with mental health and it can have a crucial role in mental disorder therapy by suitable coping mechanisms. The present study aimed to evaluate the relationship of EQ with anxiety and depression among the women with breast cancer. Subjects and Methods: During 2013 and in a cross-sectional study, 98 breast cancer patients (14 to 21 years old) entered into the study. For data collection, the following instruments were the Bar-On EQ inventory, Beck Depression Inventory and Cattle Anxiety Inventory. Results: There was an inverse relationship between anxiety with intrapersonal (pEQ (pEQ (pEQ. Also, the results can be an inspiration for the future studies regarding the training of EQ skills in the treatment of mental disorder (anxiety and depression) among patients with breast cancer.

  5. Psychiatry: life events and social support in late life depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clóvis Alexandrino-Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the association of life events and social support in the broadly defined category of depression in late life. INTRODUCTION: Negative life events and lack of social support are associated with depression in the elderly. Currently, there are limited studies examining the association between life events, social support and late-life depression in Brazil. METHODS: We estimated the frequency of late-life depression within a household community sample of 367 subjects aged 60 years or greater with associated factors. ''Old age symptomatic depression'' was defined using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 1.1 tool. This diagnostic category included only late-life symptoms and consisted of the diagnoses of depression and dysthymia as well as a subsyndromal definition of depression, termed ''late subthreshold depression''. Social support and life events were assessed using the Comprehensive Assessment and Referral Evaluation (SHORT-CARE inventory. RESULTS: ''Old age symptomatic depression'' occurred in 18.8% of the patients in the tested sample. In univariate analyses, this condition was associated with female gender, lifetime anxiety disorder and living alone. In multivariate models, ''old age symptomatic depression'' was associated with a perceived lack of social support in men and life events in women. DISCUSSION: Social support and life events were determined to be associated with late-life depression, but it is important to keep in mind the differences between genders. Also, further exploration of the role of lifetime anxiety disorder in late-life depression may be of future importance. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that this study helps to provide insight into the role of psychosocial factors in late-life depression.

  6. Risk for High Depressive Symptoms in Diagnosed and Previously Undetected Diabetes: 5-Year Follow-Up Results of the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icks, Andrea; Albers, Bernd; Haastert, Burkhard; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Pundt, Noreen; Slomiany, Uta; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kruse, Johannes; Kulzer, Bernd; Nowotny, Bettina; Herder, Christian; Giani, Guido; Moebus, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the risk for the development of high depressive symptoms in study participants with diagnosed and previously undetected diabetes mellitus compared to those without diabetes in a prospective population-based cohort study in Germany. Methods We estimated the 5-year cumulative incidence of high depressive symptoms in participants without high depressive symptoms at baseline (n = 3,633, 51.4% men, mean age (SD) 59.1 (7.6) years, 7.0% diagnosed diabetes, 5.3% previously undetected diabetes) from the population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall study. Diabetes was assessed by self-report, medication, and blood glucose. High depressive symptoms were assessed using CES-D. We calculated odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence interval, using multiple logistic regression analyses. Result Cumulative 5-year incidences (95% CI) of high depressive symptoms in participants with diagnosed, undetected, and without diabetes were 7.1 (4.2–10.9), 4.1 (1.8–8.0), and 6.5 (5.6–7.4), respectively. The age-sex-adjusted OR for developing high depressive symptoms was 1.22 (0.74–2.03) in participants with diagnosed compared to those without diabetes, and 1.00 (0.59–1.68) after adjustment for BMI, physical activity, education, stroke, and myocardial infarction. The age-sex adjusted OR for developing high depressive symptoms in participants with previously undetected diabetes compared to those without diabetes was 0.72; 0.35–1.48; and fully adjusted 0.62; 0.30–1.30. Conclusion We found no significant associations, maybe due to low power. However, our results are in line with a recent meta-analysis suggesting that risk of developing high depressive symptoms in patients with diagnosed diabetes may be moderately higher than in those without diabetes, and that comorbidity may explain in part this association. In participants with previously undetected diabetes, this first longitudinal study indicates that the risk is not

  7. Risk for high depressive symptoms in diagnosed and previously undetected diabetes: 5-year follow-up results of the Heinz Nixdorf Recall study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Icks

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the risk for the development of high depressive symptoms in study participants with diagnosed and previously undetected diabetes mellitus compared to those without diabetes in a prospective population-based cohort study in Germany. METHODS: We estimated the 5-year cumulative incidence of high depressive symptoms in participants without high depressive symptoms at baseline (n = 3,633, 51.4% men, mean age (SD 59.1 (7.6 years, 7.0% diagnosed diabetes, 5.3% previously undetected diabetes from the population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall study. Diabetes was assessed by self-report, medication, and blood glucose. High depressive symptoms were assessed using CES-D. We calculated odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence interval, using multiple logistic regression analyses. RESULT: Cumulative 5-year incidences (95% CI of high depressive symptoms in participants with diagnosed, undetected, and without diabetes were 7.1 (4.2-10.9, 4.1 (1.8-8.0, and 6.5 (5.6-7.4, respectively. The age-sex-adjusted OR for developing high depressive symptoms was 1.22 (0.74-2.03 in participants with diagnosed compared to those without diabetes, and 1.00 (0.59-1.68 after adjustment for BMI, physical activity, education, stroke, and myocardial infarction. The age-sex adjusted OR for developing high depressive symptoms in participants with previously undetected diabetes compared to those without diabetes was 0.72; 0.35-1.48; and fully adjusted 0.62; 0.30-1.30. CONCLUSION: We found no significant associations, maybe due to low power. However, our results are in line with a recent meta-analysis suggesting that risk of developing high depressive symptoms in patients with diagnosed diabetes may be moderately higher than in those without diabetes, and that comorbidity may explain in part this association. In participants with previously undetected diabetes, this first longitudinal study indicates that the risk is not

  8. The relationship of body image with symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with anorexia nervosa during outpatient psychotherapy: Results of the ANTOP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junne, Florian; Zipfel, Stephan; Wild, Beate; Martus, Peter; Giel, Katrin; Resmark, Gaby; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Teufel, Martin; de Zwaan, Martina; Dinkel, Andreas; Herpertz, Stephan; Burgmer, Markus; Tagay, Sefik; Rothermund, Eva; Zeeck, Almut; Ziser, Katrin; Herzog, Wolfgang; Löwe, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    Body image disturbance represents a central characteristic of anorexia nervosa (AN). Depression and anxiety are the most common mental comorbidities in patients with AN. This study aims to investigate the relationship of body image with symptoms of depression and anxiety during outpatient psychotherapy in AN. Analyses were conducted using the data set of the Anorexia Nervosa Treatment Outpatient Study (ANTOP) randomized controlled trial. The ANTOP study included N = 242 females with AN between 18 and 56 years of age. The trial was designed to compare enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-E) and focal psychodynamic therapy (FPT) with optimized treatment as usual (TAU-O) for patients with AN. The analyses on body image dimensions were conducted using measures of correlations and multiple linear regression analyses to assess the relationship and longitudinal prediction of symptoms of depression and anxiety by body image dimensions. Results showed that body image perceptions were significantly associated with symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with AN at all treatment stages. In addition, body image dimensions at early treatment stages predict depression and anxiety in follow-up measurements. The correlation of symptoms of depression and anxiety by body image perceptions increased along treatment course. The persistence of body image disturbance, while body mass index increases under treatment (persistency effect), may constitute a relevant factor contributing to the course of the most common affective comorbidities of depression and anxiety in patients with AN. Body image disturbances in patients with AN should therefore be explicitly targeted within the specialized psychotherapy of affected patients. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Enhanced Depression Care for Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome and Persistent Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Karina W.; Rieckmann, Nina; Clemow, Lynn; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Shimbo, Daichi; Medina, Vivian; Albanese, Gabrielle; Kronish, Ian; Hegel, Mark; Burg, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms are an established predictor of mortality and major adverse cardiac events (defined as nonfatal myocardial infarction or hospitalization for unstable angina or urgent/emergency revascularizations) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This study was conducted to determine the acceptability and efficacy of enhanced depression treatment in patients with ACS. Methods A 3-month observation period to identify patients with ACS and persistent depressive symptoms was followed by a 6-month randomized controlled trial. From January 1, 2005, through February 29, 2008, 237 patients with ACS from 5 hospitals were enrolled, including 157 persistently depressed patients randomized to intervention (initial patient preference for problem-solving therapy and/or pharmacotherapy, then a stepped-care approach; 80 patients) or usual care (77 patients) and 80 nondepressed patients who underwent observational evaluation. The primary outcome was patient satisfaction with depression care. Secondary outcomes were depressive symptom changes (assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory), major adverse cardiac events, and death. Results At the end of the trial, the proportion of patients who were satisfied with their depression care was higher in the intervention group (54% of 80) than in the usual care group (19% of 77) (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2–12.9 [P<.001]). The Beck Depression Inventory score decreased significantly more (t155=2.85 [P=.005]) for intervention patients (change, −5.7; 95% CI, −7.6 to −3.8; df=155) than for usual care patients (change, −1.9; 95% CI, −3.8 to −0.1; df=155); the depression effect size was 0.59 of the standard deviation. At the end of the trial, 3 intervention patients and 10 usual care patients had experienced major adverse cardiac events (4% and 13%, respectively; log-rank test, χ12=3.93 [P=.047]), as well as 5 nondepressed patients (6%) (for the intervention vs nondepressed

  10. Depression and heart rate variability in firefighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Mei Liao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression has been found to increase the risk of mortality in patients with coronary artery disease through a mechanism of changing cardiac autonomic tone which is reflected by alteration of heart rate variability indices. This study investigated whether such mechanism existed in firefighters who were at high risk of depression and sudden cardiac death. Methods and results: In total, 107 firefighters were recruited. All completed Beck Depression Inventory and underwent 24-h ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. The root-mean-square of successive differences, standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals index, and the percentage of differences between adjacent normal-to-normal intervals >50 ms were significantly lower in depressed than in non-depressed firefighters after controlling for hypertension, age, and body mass index (40.1 ± 18.8 vs 62.5 ± 77.4, p < 0.01; 63.0 ± 19.2 vs 72.1 ± 34.8, p < 0.01; 8.4 ± 7.2 vs 12.7 ± 10.9, p < 0.01, respectively. Conclusion: Decreased vagal tone is a possible mechanism linking depression and sudden cardiac death in firefighters.

  11. Depression and conservative surgery for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauriceia C. L. de Medeiros

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is prevalent among women and associated with reduced quality of life, and therefore it is important to determine its incidence in adult women, especially in those with breast cancer. OBJECTIVE: To determine the occurrence of depression in women who underwent conservative surgery for breast cancer with or without breast reconstruction. METHODS: Seventy-five women aged between 18 and 65 years were enrolled. Patients had undergone conservative surgery for breast cancer with immediate breast reconstruction (n = 25 or without breast reconstruction (n = 25 at least one year before the study. The control group consisted of 25 women without cancer, but of similar age and educational level distribution as the other two groups. The Beck Depression Inventory was used to measure depression. The collected data were assessed using analysis of variance and the χ2 test. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between groups in age (p = 0.72 or educational level (p = 0.20. A smaller number of patients had undergone the menopause (p = 0.02 in the control group than in other groups. There were no significant differences in occurrence of depression between groups (χ2=9.97; p = 0.126. CONCLUSÍON: Conservative surgery for breast cancer did not affect the occurrence of depression in women, regardless of whether breast reconstruction was performed.

  12. Depression-Burnout Overlap in Physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Wurm

    Full Text Available Whether burnout is a distinct phenomenon rather than a type of depression and whether it is a syndrome, limited to three "core" components (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment are subjects of current debate. We investigated the depression-burnout overlap, and the pertinence of these three components in a large, representative sample of physicians.In a cross-sectional study, all Austrian physicians were invited to answer a questionnaire that included the Major Depression Inventory (MDI, the Hamburg Burnout Inventory (HBI, as well as demographic and job-related parameters. Of the 40093 physicians who received an invitation, a total of 6351 (15.8% participated. The data of 5897 participants were suitable for analysis.Of the participants, 10.3% were affected by major depression. Our study results suggest that potentially 50.7% of the participants were affected by symptoms of burnout. Compared to physicians unaffected by burnout, the odds ratio of suffering from major depression was 2.99 (95% CI 2.21-4.06 for physicians with mild, 10.14 (95% CI 7.58-13.59 for physicians with moderate, 46.84 (95% CI 35.25-62.24 for physicians with severe burnout and 92.78 (95% CI 62.96-136.74 for the 3% of participants with the highest HBI_sum (sum score of all ten HBI components. The HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Personal Accomplishment and Detachment (representing depersonalization tend to correlate more highly with the main symptoms of major depression (sadness, lack of interest and lack of energy than with each other. A combination of the HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium (adj.R2 = 0.92 explained more HBI_sum variance than the three "core" components (adj.R2 = 0.85 of burnout combined. Cronbach's alpha for Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium combined was 0.90 compared to α = 0.54 for the combination of the three "core" components.This study demonstrates the

  13. Depression in people, that live with HIV in Lima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoshka Fasce Cayo

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the depression in a group 55 adults (14 women and 41 men who live with VJH, between 18 and 58 years, oflow and medium low socioeconomic leve! which attend public health centers, NGO and mutual support groups (MSG of Lima. The Beck Depression Inventory was used to study the level of depression, as well as the five factors found in this population.The descriptive results were correlated with the following demographic variables: age,sex, time of diagnosis, the presence or absence of symptoms associated to VIH, the participationor not in a MSG, sexual orientation and sex. Results indicated that depression varies depending on whether the person belongs or not to a MSG, sex and sexual orientation.

  14. Efficacy and safety of duloxetine for treatment of fibromyalgia in patients with or without major depressive disorder: Results from a 6-month, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, I Jon; Mease, Philip J; Smith, Timothy R; Kajdasz, Daniel K; Wohlreich, Madelaine M; Detke, Michael J; Walker, Daniel J; Chappell, Amy S; Arnold, Lesley M

    2008-06-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy and safety of duloxetine for reducing pain severity in fibromyalgia patients with or without current major depressive disorder. This was a 6-month, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. In total, 520 patients meeting American College of Rheumatology criteria for fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to duloxetine (20 mg/day, 60 mg/day, or 120 mg/day) or placebo, administered once daily, for 6 months (after 3 months, the duloxetine 20-mg/day group titrated to 60 mg/day). The co-primary outcome measures were the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) average pain severity score and Patient Global Impressions of Improvement (PGI-I) score. Safety was assessed via treatment-emergent adverse events, and changes in vital sign, laboratory, and ECG measures. Compared with placebo-treated patients, those patients treated with duloxetine 120 mg/day improved significantly more on the co-primary outcome measures at 3 months (change in BPI score [-2.31 vs -1.39, Ptreatment with duloxetine 60 mg/day also significantly improved the co-primary measures at 3 months and BPI at 6 months. Duloxetine was efficacious in patients both with and without major depressive disorder. There were no clinically significant differences between treatment groups in changes in vital signs, laboratory measures, or ECG measures. Study results demonstrated that duloxetine at doses of 60 mg/day and 120 mg/day appears to be safe and efficacious in patients with fibromyalgia.

  15. Depression - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  16. Consensually defined facets of personality as prospective predictors of change in depression symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naragon-Gainey, Kristin; Watson, David

    2014-08-01

    Depression has robust associations with personality, showing a strong relation with neuroticism and more moderate associations with extraversion and conscientiousness. In addition, each Big Five domain can be decomposed into narrower facets. However, we currently lack consensus as to the contents of Big Five facets, with idiosyncrasies across instruments; moreover, few studies have examined associations with depression. In the current study, community participants completed six omnibus personality inventories; self-reported depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and 5 years later. Exploratory factor analyses suggested three to five facets in each domain, and these facets served as prospective predictors of depression in hierarchical regressions, after accounting for baseline and trait depression. In these analyses, high anger (from neuroticism), low positive emotionality (extraversion), low conventionality (conscientiousness), and low culture (openness to experiences) were significant prospective predictors of depression. Results are discussed in regard to personality structure and assessment, as well as personality-psychopathology associations.

  17. Effect of an aerobic training program as complementary therapy in patients with moderate depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cerda, Pablo; Cervelló, Eduardo; Cocca, Armando; Viciana, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of an aerobic training program as complementary therapy in patients suffering from moderate depression. 82 female patients weredivided into a group that received traditional pharmacotherapy (Fluoxetine 20 mg) and a group that received pharmacotherapy plus an aerobic training program. This program was carried out for eight consecutive weeks, three days per week, and included gymnastics, dancing, and walking. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory and the ICD-10 Guide for Depression Diagnosis, both administered before and after treatments. The results confirm the effectiveness of the aerobic training program as a complementary therapy to diminish depressive symptoms in patients suffering from moderate depression.

  18. "Love hurts": romantic attachment and depressive symptoms in pregnant adolescent and young adult couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Alethea; Sipsma, Heather; Callands, Tamora; Hansen, Nathan; Divney, Anna; Magriples, Urania; Kershaw, Trace

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigates the relationship between romantic attachment style and depressive symptoms between both members of pregnant adolescent and young adult couples. Participants were 296 pregnant young females (mean age = 18.7) and their male partners (mean age = 21.3; 592 total participants) who were recruited from obstetrics and gynecology clinics in Connecticut. The dimensions of avoidant and anxious romantic attachment were assessed using the Experiences in Close Relationships Inventory. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale. Results showed that avoidant attachment and anxious attachment were significantly positively related to depressive symptoms. Multilevel modeling for partner effects revealed that anxious attachment and depressive symptoms in partners were significantly positively associated with depressive symptoms Findings underscore the importance of considering couples-based approaches to supporting the transition to parenthood and developing the necessary self and relationship skills to manage attachment needs and relationship challenges. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Lack of Correlation Between Depression and Coronary Artery Calcification in a Non-Selected Danish Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devantier, Torben Albert; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Sand, Niels Peter;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is associated with coronary artery disease, and atherosclerosis seems to play a central role in this relation. In several studies, multislice computed tomography (CT) has been applied for detection and quantification of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in relation...... to depression. To our knowledge, only one previous study has investigated the relation between CAC and depression in an unselected population. METHODS: A total of 617 persons were randomly selected from the background population. The participants underwent CT of the heart and were screened for depression by use...... of the Major Depression Inventory questionnaire. Quantification of CAC was performed using the Agatston method. The Mann-Whitney U test, Spearman's correlational analysis, and logistic regression were used to assess the association between depression and CAC. RESULTS: The median Agatston score...

  20. Risk and protective factors for the development of depressive symptoms in children and adolescents: results of the longitudinal BELLA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Fionna; Otto, Christiane; Kriston, Levente; Patalay, Praveetha; Schlack, Robert; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike

    2015-06-01

    Mental health problems in children and adolescents are frequent, with a high risk of persistence into adulthood. Therefore, the investigation of determinants of onset and course of mental health problems is of high importance. The present paper investigates the impact of protective and risk factors on the development of depressive symptoms in children and adolescents. The BELLA study is the mental health module of the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey for children and adolescents (KIGGS). Based on the first three measurement points of the BELLA study (covering a period of 2 years), the present analysis focused on children and adolescents aged 11-17 years at baseline (n = 1,643; 50.6 % female). A longitudinal growth modelling approach was used. Mental health problems in parents (parent-reports) predicted depressive symptoms in children and adolescents (self-reports) as well as the development of these symptoms over time. Further, child-reported protective factors of self-efficacy, positive family climate and social support were associated with less depressive symptoms at baseline. Additionally, positive changes in protective factors were associated with the development of less depressive symptoms over time. Finally, family climate and social support moderated the detrimental influence of parental psychopathology on child's depressive symptoms. The addressed determinants for the development of depressive symptoms in children and adolescents are highly relevant for prevention and intervention strategies. Future research should investigate specific risk and protective factors focusing in detail on further mental health disorders and their development in children and adolescents.

  1. Study of prevalence of depression and impact of depression in patients following acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby Hmar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression has been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases in various studies done in different parts of the world. Whether depression really develops after an attack of acute myocardial infarction (AMI in hospitalised patients was not evaluated in this region of our country prior to the current work. Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of depression and impact of depression in AMI patients during the period of hospitalisation. Materials and method: Patients were recruited for the study after fulfilling the selection criteria and who had documented AMI within four to five days of hospitalisation. Informed consent of the patient and ethical committee clearance was obtained. To collect data semi-structured interview schedule was used. Assamese versions of 21 self-report items Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and observer-rated 17 items Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D were administered to 50 AMI patients. Data were analysed with chi-square test, Pearson coefficient of correlation, and student t test wherever applicable. p-value<0.05 was considered test of significance in this study. Result: Fifty cases of AMI were evaluated from August 2007 to July 2008. Thirty six per cent of AMI patients and 34% of AMI patients were found to have depression as per BDI and HAM-D scales respectively. Depression has an impact on duration of hospital stay significantly (p<0.019 but not on gender difference (p=0.089. Correlation of mean scores of both HAM-D and BDI scales was done by Pearson coefficient of correlation and was found to be significant at .01 level. Conclusion: Depression was found to be high in AMI patients during the period of hospitalisation in both the depression rating scales and it has an impact on prognosis of the patients.

  2. Estimating dead wood during national forest inventories: a review of inventory methodologies and suggestions for harmonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Christopher W; Rondeux, Jacques; Verkerk, Pieter J; Ståhl, Göran

    2009-10-01

    Efforts to assess forest ecosystem carbon stocks, biodiversity, and fire hazards have spurred the need for comprehensive assessments of forest ecosystem dead wood (DW) components around the world. Currently, information regarding the prevalence, status, and methods of DW inventories occurring in the world's forested landscapes is scattered. The goal of this study is to describe the status, DW components measured, sample methods employed, and DW component thresholds used by national forest inventories that currently inventory DW around the world. Study results indicate that most countries do not inventory forest DW. Globally, we estimate that about 13% of countries inventory DW using a diversity of sample methods and DW component definitions. A common feature among DW inventories was that most countries had only just begun DW inventories and employ very low sample intensities. There are major hurdles to harmonizing national forest inventories of DW: differences in population definitions, lack of clarity on sample protocols/estimation procedures, and sparse availability of inventory data/reports. Increasing database/estimation flexibility, developing common dimensional thresholds of DW components, publishing inventory procedures/protocols, releasing inventory data/reports to international peer review, and increasing communication (e.g., workshops) among countries inventorying DW are suggestions forwarded by this study to increase DW inventory harmonization.

  3. Inventories in motion : a new approach to inventories over the business cycle

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    I propose an inventories-in-motion concept which represents a new approach to inventories over the business cycle. This channel has previously been ignored by macroeconomists. I build a general equilibrium business cycle model in which inventories arise naturally as a result of gaps between production of goods and their consumption as goods are distributed. These inventories are actively managed and adjusted to meet consumption and investment needs in the economy. Although conceptually very s...

  4. Interaction of FKBP5 Gene Variants and Adverse Life Events in Predicting Depression Onset: Results From a 10-Year Prospective Community Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Petra; Brückl, Tanja; Nocon, Agnes; Pfister, Hildegard; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Uhr, Manfred; Lieb, Roselind; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom; Holsboer, Florian; Ising, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Objective The binding protein FKBP5 is an important modulator of the function of the glucocorticoid receptor, the main receptor of the stress horm one system. This turns the FKBP5 gene into a key candidate for gene-environment interactions, which are considered critical for pathogenesis of stress-related disorders. The authors explored gene-environment interactions between FKBP5 gene variants and adverse life events in predicting the first occurrence of a major depressive episode. Method The analyses were based on 884 Caucasians in a 10-year prospective community study. At baseline, they were 14–24 years old and did not fulfill criteria for a major depressive episode. The DSM-IV-based Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to assess adverse life events preceding baseline and major depressive episodes during follow-up. On the basis of previous findings, five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the FKBP5 gene were selected for genotyping. Results While the authors did not observe genetic main effects, they found interactions between the five SNPs and traumatic (but not separation) events, with the strongest effect for severe trauma. The effect of trauma on incident major depressive episodes was evident among subjects homozygous for the minor alleles but not subjects with other genotypes. The findings were replicated in the U.K. Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study. Conclusions These hypothesis-driven results suggest that an interaction between FKBP5 genotype and trauma is involved in the onset of depression. Subjects homozygous for the minor alleles of the investigated FKBP5 SNPs seem to be particularly sensitive to effects of trauma exposure in terms of triggering depression onset. PMID:21865530

  5. Depression, desperation, and suicidal ideation in college students: results from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention College Screening Project at Emory University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlow, Steven J; Rosenberg, Jill; Moore, J David; Haas, Ann P; Koestner, Bethany; Hendin, Herbert; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to examine suicidal ideation and depression in undergraduate college students who participated in the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention-sponsored College Screening Project at Emory University. The principal measure of depressive symptoms was the nine-item depression module from the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Additional questions were focused on current suicidal ideation, past suicide attempts, and episodes of deliberate self-harm and on symptoms of anxiety and distress. Seven hundred and twenty-nine students participated over a 3-school-year interval (2002-2005). Most notably, 11.1% of the students endorsed current (past 4 weeks) suicidal ideation and 16.5% had a lifetime suicide attempt or self-injurious episode. Students with current suicidal ideation had significantly higher depression symptom severity than those without suicidal ideation (t = -9.34, df = 706, Pstudents with PHQ-9 scores of 15 or higher reported suicidal ideation compared to 5.7% of those with lower scores (chi(2) = 56.29, df = 1, Pstudents with moderately severe to severe depression (85%) or current suicidal ideation (84%) were not receiving any psychiatric treatment at the time of assessment. These results suggest that there is a strong relationship between severity of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in college students, and that suicidal feelings and actions are relatively common in this group. This underscores the need to provide effective mental health outreach and treatment services to this vulnerable population. As this analysis was based on data collected at a single institution, the results may not be representative of all college students or young adults.

  6. Association between primary headaches and depression in young adults in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify the association between depression and headache in young adults, as well as to identify the features of headache associated with depression and the influence of this mood disorder on headache-related disability. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires about headache and depression was conducted at the Universidade de Caxias do Sul. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS were used to evaluate depressive symptoms and headache-related disability, respectively. Depression was considered if BDI > 15. RESULTS: A thousand and thirteen young adults were included in the study. A clear relationship was observed between headache and depression among the participants. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that nausea or vomiting related to headache and higher headacherelated disability scores were independent factors associated with depression. Migraine was more associated with depression than the other types of headache. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate an association between headache and depression. Depressive symptoms are more likely to be found in young adults with more disabling headaches.

  7. Validation of Six Short and Ultra-short Screening Instruments for Depression for People Living with HIV in Ontario: Results from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Stephanie KY; Boyle, Eleanor; Burchell, Ann;

    2015-01-01

    standard measured by Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (the “M.I.N.I.”). Results Overall, the three instruments identified depression with excellent accuracy and validity (area under the curve [AUC]>0.9) and good reliability (Kappa statistics: 0.71–0.79; Cronbach’s alpha: 0.87–0.93). We did...

  8. Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression Are Associated With Satisfaction With Information Provision and Internet Use Among 3080 Cancer Survivors: Results of the PROFILES Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekers, N.; Husson, O.; Mols, F.; Eenbergen, M. van; Poll-Franse, L.V. van de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dissatisfaction with information provided by healthcare providers may be a reason for cancer survivors to seek health information on the Internet and may also result in more symptoms of anxiety and depression among this population. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whet

  9. Effectiveness of Problem-Solving Therapy for Older, Primary Care Patients with Depression: Results from the IMPACT Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arean, Patricia; Hegel, Mark; Vannoy, Steven; Fan, Ming-Yu; Unuzter, Jurgen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We compared a primary-care-based psychotherapy, that is, problem-solving therapy for primary care (PST-PC), to community-based psychotherapy in treating late-life major depression and dysthymia. Design and Methods: The data here are from the IMPACT study, which compared collaborative care within a primary care clinic to care as usual in…

  10. The association between lower educational attainment and depression owing to shared genetic effects? Results in ∼25 000 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Peyrot (Wouter ); S.U. Lee (Seung); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); M. Abdellaoui (Mohammed); E.M. Byrne (Enda); T. Esko (Tõnu); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); G. Hemani; J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); S. Kloiber (Stefan); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); S. Lucae (Susanne); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); A. Metspalu (Andres); L. Milani (Lili); M.M. Noethen; J.B. Potash (James B); M. Rietschel (Marcella); C.A. Rietveld (Niels); S. Ripke (Stephan); J. Shi (Jianxin); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); Z. Zhu; D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); N.R. Wray (Naomi); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C.M. Lewis (Cathryn); S.P. Hamilton (Steven P); M.M. Weissman; G. Breen (Gerome); S. Cichon (Sven); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); F. Holsboer; P.A. Madden; P. McGuffin (Peter); J. Barrett (Jeffrey); M.L. Pergadia (Michele); D. Lin; B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); S. Steinberg; H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); P. Lichtenstein (Paul); P.K.E. Magnusson (Patrik K. E.); R.H. Perlis (Roy H); M. Preisig; J.W. Smoller; J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); R. Uher; Z. Kutalik; K.E. Tansey; A. Teumer (Alexander); A. Viktorin (Alexander); M. Barnes (Michael); T. Bettecken (Thomas); E.B. Binder (Elisabeth); R. Breuer; V.M. Castro; S.E. Churchill; W.H. Coryell (William H); N. Craddock; I.W. Craig (Ian); D. Czamara (Darina); F. Degenhardt; A.E. Farmer (Anne E); M. Fava; J. Frank; V.S. Gainer; P. Gallagher (Patience); S.D. Gordon (Scott D.); S. Goryachev; M. Gross; M. Guipponi; A.K. Henders (Anjali); S. Herms (Stefan); I.B. Hickie (Ian); S. Hoefels (Susanne); W.J.G. Hoogendijk (Witte); D.V. Iosifescu; M. Ising (Marcus); I. Jones; L. Jones (Louisa); J.-Y. Tzeng (Jung-Ying); J.A. Knowles (James A); I.S. Kohane; M.A. Kohli (Martin); A. Korszun (Ania); M. Landén (Mikael); W.B. Lawson (William B); G. Lewis; D.J. Macintyre (Donald J); W. Maier (Wolfgang); M. Mattheisen (Manuel); P.J. McGrath; A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); W.H.I. Mclean (Irwin); C.M. Middeldorp (Christel); L. Middleton (Lefkos); G.M. Montgomery; S.N. Murphy; M. Nauck (Matthias); W.A. Nolen (Willem); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); M.C. O'donovan (Michael); H. Oskarsson (Hogni); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); W.A. Scheftner (William A); A. Schulz (Ansgar); T.G. Schulze; S.I. Shyn (Stanley I); E. Sigurdsson (Engilbert); S. Slager (Susan); J.H. Smit (Johannes); M. Kallela (Mikko); M. Steffens (Michael); T.E. Thorgeirsson (Thorgeir); P. Muglia (Pierandrea); J. Treutlein (Jens); M. Uhr; E.J.C.G. van den Oord (Edwin); G. van Grootheest (Gerard); H. Völzke (Henry); J.B. Weilburg; G. Willemsen; F.G. Zitman (Frans); B. Neale; M.J. Daly (Mark); P. Sullivan (Patrick); A. Agrawal (Arpana); E. Albrecht (Eva); B. Z Alizadeh (Behrooz); J. Allik; N. Amin (Najaf); J. Attia (John); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); J. Barnard (John); F. Bastardot (Francois); S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); J.P. Beauchamp (Jonathan); D.J. Benjamin (Daniel J.); P.J. Benke (Paul); D.A. Bennett (David); K. Berger (Klaus); L.F. Bielak (Lawrence F.); L.J. Bierut (Laura); J.A. Boatman (Jeffrey); P.A. Boyle (Patricia); U. Bültmann (Ute); H. Campbell (Harry); D. Cesarini (David); C.F. Chabris (Christopher F.); L. Cherkas (Lynn); M.K. Chung (Mina); D. Conley (Dalton); F. Cucca (Francesco); G.D. Smith; G. Davies (Gail); M. de Andrade (Mariza); P.L. de Jager (Philip); C. de Leeuw (Christiaan); J.E. de Neve (Jan-Emmanuel); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); G.V. Dedoussis (George V.); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); J. Derringer; M. Dimitriou (Maria); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); N. Eklund (Niina); M.F. Elderson (Martin); K. Hagen (Knut); D.S. Evans (Daniel); D.M. Evans (David M.); J.D. Faul (Jessica D.); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); K. Fischer (Krista); L. Franke (Lude); M. Garcia (Melissa); C. Gieger (Christian); H.K. Gjessing (Hkon K.); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); H. Grönberg (Henrik); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); S. Hägg (Sara); P. Hall (Per); J.R. Harris (Jennifer); J.M. Harris (Juliette); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); N. Hastie (Nick); C. Hayward (Caroline); A.C. Heath (Andrew); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); W.H.A. Hofman (Adriaan); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Holle (Rolf); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); C. Holzapfel (Christina); W.G. Iacono (William); C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); T. Illig (Thomas); E. Ingelsson (Erik); B. Jacobsson (Bo); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); M.A. Jhun (Min A.); M. Johannesson (Magnus); P.K. Joshi (Peter); A. Juqessur (Astanand); M. Kaakinen (Marika); M. Kähönen (Mika); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); J. Kaprio (Jaakkko); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); J. Karjalainen (Juha); R.M. Kirkpatrick (Robert); Ph.D. Koellinger (Philipp); I. Kolcic (Ivana); M. Kowgier (Matthew); K. Kristiansson (Kati); R.F. Krueger; Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); J. Lahti (Jari); D. Laibson (David); A. Latvala (Antti); L.J. Launer (Lenore); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); T. Lethimäki (Terho); J. Li (Jingmei); P. Lichtenstein (Paul); P. Lichtner (Peter); D.C. Liewald (David C.); P. Lin (Peng); P.A. Lind (Penelope); Y. Liu (Yongmei); K. Lohman (Kurt); M. Loitfelder (Marisa); P.A. Madden (Pamela); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); T. Mäkinen (Tuukka); P.M. Vidal (Pedro Marques); N.W. Martin (Nicolas); G. Masala (Giovanna); M. McGue (Matt); G. Mcmahon (George); O. Meirelles; M.N. Meyer (Michelle N.); A. Mielck (Andreas); L. Milani (Lili); M. Miller (Mike); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); S. Mukherjee (Sutapa); R. Myhre (Ronny); M.-L. Nuotio (Marja-Liisa); D.R. Nyholt (Dale R.); C. J Oldmeadow (Christopher); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C. Palmer (Cameron); A. Palotie (Aarno); M. Perola (Markus); K. Petrovic (Katja); P.A. Peyser (Patricia A.); O. Polasek (Ozren); D. Posthuma (Danielle); M. Preisig (Martin); L. Quaye (Lydia); K. Räikkönen (Katri); O.T. Raitakari (Olli T.); A. Realo; E. Reinmaa (Eva); J.P. Rice (John); S.M. Ring (Susan); S. Ripatti (Samuli); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); T.S. Rizzi (Thais); I. Rudan (Igor); A. Rustichini (Aldo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); A.-P. Sarin; D. Schlessinger (David); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); R.J. Scott (Rodney); K. Shakhbazov (Konstantin); A.V. Smith; J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); H. Snieder (Harold); B. St Pourcain (Beate); J.M. Starr (John); J.H. Sul (Jae Hoon); I. Surakka (Ida); R. Svento (Rauli); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); A. Terracciano; A. Teumer (Alexander); A.R. Thurik (Roy); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); N. Timpson (Nicholas); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M.J.H.M. van der Loos (Matthijs); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); D.R. van Wagoner (David); E. Vartiainen (Erkki); J. Viikari (Jorma); P.M. Visscher (Peter); V. Vitart (Veronique); P.K. Vollenweider (Peter K.); H. Völzke (Henry); J.M. Vonk (Judith); G. Waeber (Gérard); D.R. Weir (David R.); J. Wellmann (Jürgen); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); E. Widen (Elisabeth); J.F. Wilson (James F); A. Wright (Alan); J. Yang (Joanna); L. Yu (Lei); W. Zhao (Wei)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAn association between lower educational attainment (EA) and an increased risk for depression has been confirmed in various western countries. This study examines whether pleiotropic genetic effects contribute to this association. Therefore, data were analyzed from a total of 9662 major

  11. The association between lower educational attainment and depression owing to shared genetic effects? Results in ∼25 000 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Peyrot (Wouter ); S.U. Lee (Seung); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); M. Abdellaoui (Mohammed); E.M. Byrne (Enda); T. Esko (Tõnu); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); G. Hemani; J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); S. Kloiber (Stefan); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); S. Lucae (Susanne); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); A. Metspalu (Andres); L. Milani (Lili); M.M. Noethen; J.B. Potash (James B); M. Rietschel (Marcella); C.A. Rietveld (Niels); S. Ripke (Stephan); J. Shi (Jianxin); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); Z. Zhu; D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); N.R. Wray (Naomi); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C.M. Lewis (Cathryn); S.P. Hamilton (Steven P); M.M. Weissman; G. Breen (Gerome); S. Cichon (Sven); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); F. Holsboer; P.A. Madden; P. McGuffin (Peter); J. Barrett (Jeffrey); M.L. Pergadia (Michele); D. Lin; B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); S. Steinberg; H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); P. Lichtenstein (Paul); P.K.E. Magnusson (Patrik K. E.); R.H. Perlis (Roy H); M. Preisig; J.W. Smoller; J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); R. Uher; Z. Kutalik; K.E. Tansey; A. Teumer (Alexander); A. Viktorin (Alexander); M. Barnes (Michael); T. Bettecken (Thomas); E.B. Binder (Elisabeth); R. Breuer; V.M. Castro; S.E. Churchill; W.H. Coryell (William H); N. Craddock; I.W. Craig (Ian); D. Czamara (Darina); F. Degenhardt; A.E. Farmer (Anne E); M. Fava; J. Frank; V.S. Gainer; P. Gallagher (Patience); S.D. Gordon (Scott D.); S. Goryachev; M. Gross; M. Guipponi; A.K. Henders (Anjali); S. Herms (Stefan); I.B. Hickie (Ian); S. Hoefels (Susanne); W.J.G. Hoogendijk (Witte); D.V. Iosifescu; M. Ising (Marcus); I. Jones; L. Jones (Louisa); J.-Y. Tzeng (Jung-Ying); J.A. Knowles (James A); I.S. Kohane; M.A. Kohli (Martin); A. Korszun (Ania); M. Landén (Mikael); W.B. Lawson (William B); G. Lewis; D.J. Macintyre (Donald J); W. Maier (Wolfgang); M. Mattheisen (Manuel); P.J. McGrath; A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); W.H.I. Mclean (Irwin); C.M. Middeldorp (Christel); L. Middleton (Lefkos); G.M. Montgomery; S.N. Murphy; M. Nauck (Matthias); W.A. Nolen (Willem); A.S. Dimas (Antigone); M.C. O'donovan (Michael); H. Oskarsson (Hogni); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); W.A. Scheftner (William A); A. Schulz (Ansgar); T.G. Schulze; S.I. Shyn (Stanley I); E. Sigurdsson (Engilbert); S. Slager (Susan); J.H. Smit (Johannes); M. Kallela (Mikko); M. Steffens (Michael); T.E. Thorgeirsson (Thorgeir); P. Muglia (Pierandrea); J. Treutlein (Jens); M. Uhr; E.J.C.G. van den Oord (Edwin); G. van Grootheest (Gerard); H. Völzke (Henry); J.B. Weilburg; G. Willemsen; F.G. Zitman (Frans); B. Neale; M.J. Daly (Mark); P. Sullivan (Patrick); A. Agrawal (Arpana); E. Albrecht (Eva); B. Z Alizadeh (Behrooz); J. Allik; N. Amin (Najaf); J. Attia (John); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); J. Barnard (John); F. Bastardot (Francois); S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); J.P. Beauchamp (Jonathan); D.J. Benjamin (Daniel J.); P.J. Benke (Paul); D.A. Bennett (David); K. Berger (Klaus); L.F. Bielak (Lawrence F.); L.J. Bierut (Laura); J.A. Boatman (Jeffrey); P.A. Boyle (Patricia); U. Bültmann (Ute); H. Campbell (Harry); D. Cesarini (David); C.F. Chabris (Christopher F.); L. Cherkas (Lynn); M.K. Chung (Mina); D. Conley (Dalton); F. Cucca (Francesco); G.D. Smith; G. Davies (Gail); M. de Andrade (Mariza); P.L. de Jager (Philip); C. de Leeuw (Christiaan); J.E. de Neve (Jan-Emmanuel); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); G.V. Dedoussis (George V.); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); J. Derringer; M. Dimitriou (Maria); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); N. Eklund (Niina); M.F. Elderson (Martin); K. Hagen (Knut); D.S. Evans (Daniel); D.M. Evans (David M.); J.D. Faul (Jessica D.); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); K. Fischer (Krista); L. Franke (Lude); M. Garcia (Melissa); C. Gieger (Christian); H.K. Gjessing (Hkon K.); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); H. Grönberg (Henrik); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); S. Hägg (Sara); P. Hall (Per); J.R. Harris (Jennifer); J.M. Harris (Juliette); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); N. Hastie (Nick); C. Hayward (Caroline); A.C. Heath (Andrew); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); W.H.A. Hofman (Adriaan); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Holle (Rolf); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); C. Holzapfel (Christina); W.G. Iacono (William); C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); T. Illig (Thomas); E. Ingelsson (Erik); B. Jacobsson (Bo); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); M.A. Jhun (Min A.); M. Johannesson (Magnus); P.K. Joshi (Peter); A. Juqessur (Astanand); M. Kaakinen (Marika); M. Kähönen (Mika); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); J. Kaprio (Jaakkko); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); J. Karjalainen (Juha); R.M. Kirkpatrick (Robert); Ph.D. Koellinger (Philipp)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAn association between lower educational attainment (EA) and an increased risk for depression has been confirmed in various western countries. This study examines whether pleiotropic genetic effects contribute to this association. Therefore, data were analyzed from a total of 9662 major

  12. Maternal Depressive Symptoms in Relation to Perinatal Mortality and Morbidity: Results From a Large Multiethnic Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Goedhart; A.C. Snijders; A.E. Hesselink; M.N. van Poppel; G.J. Bonsel; T.G.M. Vrijkotte

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore whether 1) maternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy are associated with preterm birth (PTB), small for gestational age (SGA), a low Apgar score and child loss; 2) maternal smoking mediates the associations; and 3) the associations differ by ethnic background. Methods: Preg

  13. Relative Cost-Effectiveness of Treatments for Adolescent Depression: 36-Week Results from the TADS Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Marisa Elena; Foster, E. Michael; Vitiello, Benedetto; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Burns, Barbara J.; Silva, Susan G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials that involve 327 participants aged 12 to 18 who were diagnosed with major depression were given either fluoxetine alone, cognitive-behavioral therapy, or a combination of both. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves suggest that combination treatment is highly likely to be the most cost-effective treatment than…

  14. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in Japanese Parkinson’s disease patients: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmei, Issei; Kobayashi, Kei; Oe, Yuki; Takagishi, Yuriko; Kanie, Ayako; Ito, Masaya; Takebayashi, Yoshitake; Murata, Miho; Horikoshi, Masaru; Dobkin, Roseanne D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the feasibility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for Japanese Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with depression. To increase cultural acceptability, we developed the CBT program using manga, a type of Japanese comic novel. Methods Participants included 19 non-demented PD patients who had depressive symptoms (GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score ≥8). A CBT program comprising six sessions was individually administered. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of the CBT program in terms of the dropout rate and occurrence of adverse events. The primary outcome was depressive symptom reduction in the GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression upon completion of CBT. Secondary outcomes included changes in the self-report measures of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression), anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale), functional impairment, and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey). Results Of the 19 participants (mean age =63.8 years, standard deviation [SD] =9.9 years; mean Hohen–Yahr score =1.7, SD =0.8), one patient (5%) withdrew. No severe adverse event was observed. The patients reported significant improvements in depression (Hedges’ g =−1.02, 95% confidence interval =−1.62 to −0.39). The effects were maintained over a 3-month follow-up period. Most of the secondary outcome measurements showed a small-to-moderate but nonsignificant effect size from baseline to post-intervention. Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence that CBT is feasible among Japanese PD patients with depression. Similar approaches may be effective for people with PD from other cultural backgrounds. The results warrant replication in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:27354802

  15. Effectiveness of Emotional Schema Therapy on Severity of Depression and Rumination in People with Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M rezaee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The emotional schema model emphasises on mind rumination and other emotional schemas in depression. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of Emotional Schema Therapy (EST on severity of depression and rumination in people with major depression disorder. Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial study using pre-test and post-test-follow up with the control group. Among all patients with major depressive disorder visited in Imam Hossein hospital and Rahyar clinic of Tehran, 32 patients were selected through inclusion or exclusion criteria and convenience sampling then they were randomly assigned into two equal groups; experimental (16 persons and control (16 persons. Experimental group experienced 14 weeks of emotional schema therapy, while the control grouprecieved no treatment intervention. Revised Beck depression inventory (BDI-II and ruminative response scale (RRS were used in base lines, post-test and follow up as the assessment instruments. Data were analyzed by mixed analysis of variance via SPSS19 software. Results: The results of this research showed that the means of depression and rumination in the experimental group were reduced significantly in comparison with the control group in post-test and follow up (P<0.05. Conclusion: The study findings proposed that Emotional Schema Therapy can be used as an effective intervention in order to reduce the depression and mind rumination in people with major depressive disorder.

  16. Validation of Six Short and Ultra-short Screening Instruments for Depression for People Living with HIV in Ontario: Results from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie K Y Choi

    Full Text Available Major depression affects up to half of people living with HIV. However, among HIV-positive patients, depression goes unrecognized 60-70% of the time in non-psychiatric settings. We sought to evaluate three screening instruments and their short forms to facilitate the recognition of current depression in HIV-positive patients attending HIV specialty care clinics in Ontario.A multi-centre validation study was conducted in Ontario to examine the validity and accuracy of three instruments (the Center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale [CESD20], the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale [K10], and the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale [PHQ9] and their short forms (CESD10, K6, and PHQ2 in diagnosing current major depression among 190 HIV-positive patients in Ontario. Results from the three instruments and their short forms were compared to results from the gold standard measured by Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (the "M.I.N.I.".Overall, the three instruments identified depression with excellent accuracy and validity (area under the curve [AUC]>0.9 and good reliability (Kappa statistics: 0.71-0.79; Cronbach's alpha: 0.87-0.93. We did not find that the AUCs differed in instrument pairs (p-value>0.09, or between the instruments and their short forms (p-value>0.3. Except for the PHQ2, the instruments showed good-to-excellent sensitivity (0.86-1.0 and specificity (0.81-0.87, excellent negative predictive value (>0.90, and moderate positive predictive value (0.49-0.58 at their optimal cut-points.Among people in HIV care in Ontario, Canada, the three instruments and their short forms performed equally well and accurately. When further in-depth assessments become available, shorter instruments might find greater clinical acceptance. This could lead to clinical benefits in fast-paced speciality HIV care settings and better management of depression in HIV-positive patients.

  17. Contribution of Self-Esteem and Collective Self-Esteem in Predicting Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha Sharma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted with the purpose to examine the relationship among self-esteem, collective self-esteem and depression. Anotherobjective was to study the contribution of self-esteem and collective self-esteem in predicting depression. Beck Depression Inventory (1996,Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory (1985 and Collective Self-Esteem Inventory by Luhtanen and Crocker (1992 were used to measuredepression, self-esteem and collective self-esteem respectively. Study was carried out on 200 subjects in the age range of 17-23 years,selected from Agra city. The results of the research showed that there was significant positive relationship between self-esteem and collectiveself-esteem (p < .01, significant negative relationship between self-esteem and depression (p < .01. It was also found that collective self-esteemwas a significant predictor of depression. This research implies that an optimum level of self-esteem and high collective self-esteem not onlyprevents depression but also enhances the positive aspects of personality.

  18. Depression and intimate relationships of adolescents from divorced families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadžikapetanović, Halima; Babić, Tajib; Bjelošević, Edin

    2017-02-01

    Aim To determine an impact of parental divorce to depression and intimate relationships of young people during adolescence, and prevalence of symptoms of depression and the level of intimacy in relations to adolescents living in intact families and those from divorced families. Methods This prospective descriptive research was conducted on a sample of 168 examinees of which 64 (38.1%) were students of the University Zenica, and 104 (61.9%) high students schools from Zenica and Maglaj cities during May and June 2011. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) II, Miller Social Intimacy Scale and sociodemographic questionnaire were used. Results Adolescents from divorced families had statistically significantly higher level of depression (pintimate relationships, with a legislative introduction of premarital and marriage counseling for parents in the conflict. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  19. Gender differences in depression in an employment setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeo, P A; Ford, T W; Lavin, P F

    1990-01-01

    This study extends the literature on sex differences in depression to an employment setting, using Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI; T and raw scores) and Depression (D) 30 measures. In contrast to previous findings, no gender differences remained on any of the measures after the effects of salary, age, education, and job classification had been taken into account. Findings replicated earlier results showing depressed males to have greater difficulty with concentration and motivation than depressed females. Data suggest that MMPI sex-based T-scores may overcorrect for sex differences in raw scores. Possible explanations for the findings are discussed, including a general improvement in women's well-being associated with changes in social conditions such as employment, or the possibility of a self-selection bias in our sample.

  20. Study of Relationship Between Depression and Quality of Life in Patients With Chronic Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi Shargh, Najme; Rostami, Bahareh; Kosari, Bahareh; Toosi, Zakiye; Majelan, Ghazaleh Ashrafzadeh

    2015-08-06

    Depression is among the personality traits of schizophrenic patients, which results from psychotic features or is a consequence of a period of psychosis. Depression in schizophrenic patients is one of the important factors affecting their quality of life. The study population of this descriptive and analytic study consists of patients with chronic schizophrenia in Zahedan in 2014. The sample included 60 patients who simultaneously suffered from depression and were selected using random sampling (30 males and 30 females). The research instruments included the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale (SQLS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (the inventory was filled out by the tester). In order to form a statistics analysis, we used Pearson correlation and regression multivariate. Investigating the study hypotheses showed that there was a negative correlation between the high level of depression and low quality of life. the relationship between depression and the quality of life subscales showed that in women, the variable of symptoms and complications was a significant predictor; however, the other two variables (energy and motivation and psychosocial) were not significant predictors. In case of men, psychosocial variable was a significant predictor; however, the other two variables (energy and motivation and symptoms and complications) were not significant predictors. In general, depression on these patients makes discontent of life on them; therefore, elimination of their depression on their treatment is necessary.

  1. Spirituality and Its Relationship with Personality in Depressed People: Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaljević, Sanea; Aukst-Margetić, Branka; Vuksan-Ćusa, Bjanka; Karničnik, Snježana; Jakovljević, Miro

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between spirituality and personality in patients with depression is complex and not much explored. The aim of our study is to examine the interconnection between the spiritual quality of life (QoL) and Cloninger's psychobiological model of personality in patients with depression. The sample consisted of 85 consecutive outpatients treated for depression. The measurements used were: Beck Depression Inventory, WHO-Quality of Life-Spiritual, Religious, Personal Beliefs, and Temperament and Character Inventory. The results have shown that higher harm avoidance, lower self-directedness and lower cooperativeness are personality dimensions associated with depression. The spiritual QoL has showed to play a significant role in depression, just as it has proved to be a unique predictor of lower depressive symptoms, adjusted for personality dimensions. The spiritual QoL itself is predicted by personality dimensions, self-directedness and self-transcendence implying that spirituality is a broader construct than the character dimension. Our findings may contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of depression, spirituality and personality.

  2. Waist circumference and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in late-life depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijnissen, Radboud M; Naudé, Petrus J W; Comijs, Hannie C; Schoevers, Robert A; Oude Voshaar, Richard C

    2014-03-01

    Both visceral obesity and depression are associated with impaired health and excess mortality, possibly through overlapping pathophysiological mechanisms like adipose tissue derived inflammatory markers. These results, however, are primarily based on population-based surveys, often restricted to a young population and depression severity scales instead of patients with established diagnosis of depressive disorder. We examined the relation between waist circumference and late-life depression using the baseline data of The Netherlands Study of Depression in Older people (NESDO). Psychopathology has been assessed with Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 2.1. Adjusted for age, sex, education, lifestyle (smoking, alcohol, physical activity), drug use, cognition and chronic diseases as well as adjusted for body mass index (BMI), analysis of covariance showed that depressed older patients (n=376) had a significantly lower waist circumference (WC) compared to their non-depressed comparisons (n=130): estimated marginal mean (SE)=93.9 (0.5) versus 97.8 (0.8) cm (F=15.9; df=1467; p<.001). Multiple linear regression analyses within the depressed group showed that both, depression severity (Inventory of Depressive Symptoms) as well as duration-related depression characteristics (age of onset, duration of illness, life-time comorbid dysthymia), were associated with the WC. Only the severity of depressive symptoms remained significant after further adjusted for the BMI. Interestingly, a recently discovered adipokine, Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL), was associated with late-life depression, but only in the subgroup of patients with a pathologically increased WC. Population-based findings on the positive association between obesity and depressive symptoms can thus not be generalised to a clinical sample of depressed older patients. The impact of the WC on course and treatment outcome of late-life depression should be examined in clinical samples

  3. World Glacier Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The World Glacier Inventory (WGI) contains information for over 130,000 glaciers. Inventory parameters include geographic location, area, length, orientation,...

  4. National Wetlands Inventory Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland area features mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National Wetlands Inventory is a national program sponsored by the US Fish and...

  5. Science Inventory | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Science Inventory is a searchable database of research products primarily from EPA's Office of Research and Development. Science Inventory records provide descriptions of the product, contact information, and links to available printed material or websites.

  6. Housing Inventory Count

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the data communities reported to HUD about the nature of their dedicated homeless inventory, referred to as their Housing Inventory Count (HIC)....

  7. HHS Enterprise Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Enterprise Data Inventory (EDI) is the comprehensive inventory listing of agency data resources including public, restricted public, and non-public datasets.

  8. Integrated inventory information system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarupria, J.S.; Kunte, P.D.

    The nature of oceanographic data and the management of inventory level information are described in Integrated Inventory Information System (IIIS). It is shown how a ROSCOPO (report on observations/samples collected during oceanographic programme...

  9. From National Forest Inventory to National Forest GHG Inventories

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, Ben; PANDEY Devendra; Achard, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Chapter 3.3 presents two national case studies for forest inventories in tropical countries: the Indian and Mexican national forest inventories. These national forest inventories have been use to report GHG inventories to the UNFCC

  10. Childhood trauma and dimensions of depression: a specific association with the cognitive domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar A. Vares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate associations between a history of childhood trauma and dimensions of depression in a sample of clinically depressed patients. Methods: A sample of 217 patients from a mood-disorder outpatient unit was investigated with the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the CORE Assessment of Psychomotor Change, and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. A previous latent model identifying six depressive dimensions was used for analysis. Path analysis and Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC models were used to investigate associations between general childhood trauma and childhood maltreatment modalities (emotional, sexual, and physical abuse; emotional and physical neglect with dimensions of depression (sexual, cognition, insomnia, appetite, non-interactiveness/retardation, and agitation. Results: The overall childhood trauma index was uniquely associated with cognitive aspects of depression, but not with any other depressive dimension. An investigation of childhood maltreatment modalities revealed that emotional abuse was consistently associated with depression severity in the cognitive dimension. Conclusion: Childhood trauma, and specifically emotional abuse, could be significant risk factors for the subsequent development of cognitive symptoms of major depression. These influences might be specific to this depressive dimension and not found in any other dimension, which might have conceptual and therapeutic implications for clinicians and researchers alike.

  11. Primary care physician satisfaction with patients diagnosed with depression: International Depression Project results from Colombia Satisfação do médico de cuidados primários com pacientes diagnosticados com depressão: resultados colombianos do Projeto Internacional de Depressão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gómez-Restrepo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize physician satisfaction with doctor-patient encounters, distinguishing between those involving patients diagnosed with depression and those involving patients without depression, as well as to determine the impact of an educational intervention aimed at improving the recognition and management of depression in primary care practice, in Bogotá, Columbia. METHOD: Physician satisfaction when treating outpatients in primary care centers was assesed by means of a questionnaire applied before and after the intervention. RESULTS: The intervention was given to 18 physicians and 5 nurses. A total of 1650 questionnaires related to visits were collected in the first phase, and 1832 were collected in the second one. The percentage of patients diagnosed with depression increased from 5.9% (95% CI: 4.8-7.1% before the intervention to 10.6% (95% CI: 9.2-12.06% after. The total duration of the clinical encounter did not change significantly. The percentage of time spent on the physical problems/concerns of the patients decreased in both types of visits. CONCLUSIONS: Health professional satisfaction was the greatest when dealing with the physical problems of the patient. However, in both types of visits, the degree of satisfaction when dealing with the psychological aspects increased after the intervention.OBJETIVO: Caracterizar a satisfação dos clínicos com os encontros médico-paciente, distinguindo entre aqueles que envolvem pacientes diagnosticados com depressão e aqueles que envolvem pacientes sem depressão, bem como determinar o impacto de uma intervenção educacional visando a melhorar o reconhecimento e o gerenciamento da depressão na prática de atendimento primário em Bogotá, Colômbia. MÉTODO: A satisfação dos clínicos ao tratarem de pacientes ambulatoriais em centros de atendimento primário foi avaliada por meio de um questionário aplicado antes e depois da intervenção. RESULTADOS: A intervenção foi

  12. An analysis of the optimal multiobjective inventory clustering decision with small quantity and great variety inventory by applying a DPSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shen-Tsu; Li, Meng-Hua

    2014-01-01

    When an enterprise has thousands of varieties in its inventory, the use of a single management method could not be a feasible approach. A better way to manage this problem would be to categorise inventory items into several clusters according to inventory decisions and to use different management methods for managing different clusters. The present study applies DPSO (dynamic particle swarm optimisation) to a problem of clustering of inventory items. Without the requirement of prior inventory knowledge, inventory items are automatically clustered into near optimal clustering number. The obtained clustering results should satisfy the inventory objective equation, which consists of different objectives such as total cost, backorder rate, demand relevance, and inventory turnover rate. This study integrates the above four objectives into a multiobjective equation, and inputs the actual inventory items of the enterprise into DPSO. In comparison with other clustering methods, the proposed method can consider different objectives and obtain an overall better solution to obtain better convergence results and inventory decisions.

  13. LINGUISTIC INVENTORY PROBLEMS

    OpenAIRE

    CHIH HSUN HSIEH

    2011-01-01

    The work presented in this paper has been motivated primarily by Zadeh's idea of linguistic variables intended to provide rigorous mathematical modeling of natural language and CWW, Computing With Words. This paper reports some modeling of the linguistic inventory problems where CWW have been implemented: linguistic production inventory, linguistic inventory models under linguistic demand and linguistic lead time, linguistic production inventory models based on the preference of a decision ma...

  14. Further validation of the Psychological Maltreatment Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, E E; Gayton, W F

    1996-05-01

    This study attempted to provide further validation of the Psychological Maltreatment Inventory (PMI). The PMI was found to be correlated with scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for females but not males. Four separate ANOVAs were run with parent gender and respondent gender as independent variables and the total PMI score along with three factor subscale scores as separate dependent variables to determine the effects of both parent and respondent gender on PMI scores. Fathers were found to have significantly higher PMI scores than mothers, and post hoc tests indicated that male respondents view their fathers as more hostile rejecting than their mothers.

  15. Hopelessness depression as a distinct dimension of depressive symptoms among clinical and non-clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, T E; Steer, R A; Abramson, L Y; Alloy, L B; Metalsky, G I; Schmidt, N B

    2001-05-01

    Subtyping depression has been an interest of theorists and clinicians for at least four centuries. In this paper, we examined the validity of the symptom cluster component of the hopelessness theory of depression. We used structural equation modeling analyses on large samples of psychiatric outpatients (N=1604, 844, and 680) and Air Force cadets (N=1404) who completed the items of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Findings were supportive of the hopelessness depression cluster as a distinct depressive syndrome. Implications for the nosology of depression and for depression theory were discussed.

  16. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Instruction to Control Urinary Incontinence and its Resulting Stress, Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary disorders are common problems in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Urinary incontinence largely affects the physical, social and emotional characteristics and activities of such patients. Objectives The current study aimed to identify the effect of pelvic floor muscle training on urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in patients with MS. Methods The present clinical trial with a pre-post design was conducted on 50 patients with MS referring to the MS clinic of Imam Khomeini hospital in Tehran, Iran, selected by convenience sampling method. Participants received instructions on pelvic floor muscle exercises and then practiced for three consecutive months. The international consultation on incontinence questionnaire-urinary incontinence short form (ICIQ-UI-SF was used to measure participants' urinary incontinence, and the 21-item depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS-21 to measure their depression, anxiety and stress, both before the intervention and at the end of the third month of exercising. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS16 using descriptive statistics and the dependent t test. Results About 45 (90% participants practiced pelvic floor muscle exercises until the end of the third month. The frequency and amount of urine leakage and the effect of urinary incontinence on the quality of life differed significantly in the patients after the instructions compared to the status before the intervention (P < 0.001. The mean score of stress (P < 0.001, anxiety (P = 0.04 and depression (P = 0.003 decreased significantly after the intervention. Conclusions According to the findings, instructing pelvic floor muscle exercises was effective in reducing urinary incontinence and its resulting stress, anxiety and depression in patients with MS. These exercises were recommended as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive and cost-effective method to control urinary incontinence in patients with MS.

  17. Preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial carried out with a fixed combination of S-adenosyl-L-methionine and betaine versus amitriptyline in patients with mild depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Settembre, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Background S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe), a safe, endogenous, pleiotropic methyl donor well known for its antidepressant role, has been assumed to have a possible role in increasing plasma levels of compounds known to be able to raise cardiovascular risk. Although the issue is still being debated, betaine (trimethylglycine), a specific methyl donor involved in the homocysteine circuit, may be able to reduce such a risk and/or, by determining a sparing effect on endogenous SAMe, may be able to improve the clinical efficiency of SAMe itself. Indeed, preliminary results have shown clinical improvement determined by an add-on therapy with betaine administered along with SAMe, versus SAMe alone, to patients affected by mild/moderate depression. Aim To evaluate the safety and antidepressant role played by the association of SAMe plus betaine versus amitriptyline administered in untreated individuals with a recent diagnosis of mild depression. Methods This small, open-label, randomized, observational study enrolled 64 individuals with a diagnosis of mild depression according to the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale. After randomization, they were treated with either Laroxyl® (amitriptyline, 75 mg/day) or DDM Metile® (enteric-coated SAMe, 500 mg/day, plus betaine, 250 mg/day) for 12 months. Assessment of clinical scores and tolerability was performed at T=0 and after 3, 6, and 12 months. Results After 3 months, both treatments showed a small and not statistically significant improvement. After 6 and 12 months, both treated groups demonstrated a more noticeable improved response, although the group treated with SAMe plus betaine showed better results in terms of score, number of individuals in remission, and side effects. Compliance was overlapping in both treatments. Conclusion The association of SAMe plus betaine seems to be a safe and effective tool to counteract mild depression and also when used as monotherapy in subjects with a recent diagnosis. PMID:25678811

  18. Patterns of self-reported depressive symptoms in relation to morningness-eveningness in inpatients with a depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias Johannes; Olschinski, Christiane; Kundermann, Bernd; Cabanel, Nicole

    2016-05-30

    The stable and persisting preference for activities in the late evening (i.e. eveningness) is associated with a higher risk for depression, suicidality, and non-remission in major depression. The present study investigated symptom patterns in hospitalized patients with depressive syndromes in relation to morningness-eveningness (chronotypes). Depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI-II]) and chronotype (German version of the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire [D-MEQ]) were assessed after admission and before discharge in inpatients with mainly major depression. Group differences of BDI-II single items and three BDI-II factors (cognitive, affective, somatic) between patients divided at the D-MEQ sample median into "morning preference" (MP) and "evening preference" (EP) were calculated. Data from 64 consecutively admitted patients (31MP/33EP) were analyzed. Both groups (MP/EP) were comparable regarding age, sex, diagnosis, length of stay, and subjective sleep quality, BDI-II scores were significantly higher in EP than in MP at admission. At admission and discharge, cognitive symptoms were significantly more pronounced in EP vs. MP; non-significant differences between EP and MP were found for affective and somatic symptoms. The results underline the importance of the trait-like chronotype for severity and symptomatology in patients with depressive disorders. The patients' chronotype should be taken into account in diagnostics and treatment of depressive disorders.

  19. The effect of optimism on depression: the mediating and moderating role of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk Yan Sing; Wong, Wing S

    2011-11-01

    This article aims to clarify if insomnia exerts a mediating or moderating effect on the optimism-depression association in Chinese college students. 529 Chinese college students completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Revised Life Orientation Test (LOT-R) and the Multidimensional Scale of Social Support (MSPSS). The results failed to show any moderating effect but after adjustment for age, gender and social support, a mediating effect was observed. In conclusion, insomnia qualifies as a mediator, suggesting considerable variance in depressive symptoms of college students could be due to change in their sleep status.

  20. Postpartum depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - postpartum; Postnatal depression; Postpartum psychological reactions ... behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT) are types of talk therapy that often help postpartum depression. ...

  1. A Cross-Cultural Study of the Cognitive Model of Depression: Cognitive Experiences Converge between Egypt and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshai, Shadi; Dobson, Keith S; Adel, Ashraf; Hanna, Niveen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Models of depression that arise in the West need to be examined in other regions of the world. This study examined a set of foundational hypotheses generated by Beck’s cognitive model of depression among depressed individuals in Egypt and Canada. Method We recruited 29 depressed and 29 non-depressed Egyptians and compared their results with those of 35 depressed and 38 non-depressed Canadians. Depression status was ascertained using a structured interview, scores on the Beck Depression Inventory, and scores on the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire. Participants completed questionnaires designed to measure the frequency of negative and positive automatic thoughts (ATQ–N, BHS, and ATQ–P), and dysfunctional attitudes (DAS). Results Depressed individuals in both countries had significantly more negative thoughts about self and future, greater frequency of dysfunctional attitudes, and diminished positive self-thoughts in comparison to non-depressed individuals. Egyptians generally showed significantly more dysfunctional attitudes than their Canadian counterparts. Discussion The four hypotheses that were tested were supported among the depressed Egyptian sample, which is consistent with the cognitive model. Implications for the cognitive-behavioral model and treatment for this group of sufferers are discussed. PMID:27010706

  2. Can Tongue Acupuncture Enhance Body Acupuncture? First Results from Heart Rate Variability and Clinical Scores in Patients with Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tongue acupuncture (TA is a method which is not used in western medicine and even in China it is applied very rarely in clinical practice. This study aimed at investigating whether additional TA can improve the efficacy of body acupuncture (BA in patients with depression. Twenty patients with a mean age of ± SD of 42.9±11.2 years were randomly divided into two groups (n=10 patients each, one group receiving BA (Zusanli, Sanyinjiao, Neiguan, Shenting, Yintang, and Baihui and the other receiving BA and TA (Liver, Heart, and Brain. The quantitative and qualitative outcome measures were heart rate (HR, heart rate variability (HRV, and different clinical scores. We found that in both groups all scores and HR improved significantly, whereas HRV increased partly significantly. It seems that TA can enhance acute and treatment effects of BA in patients with depression. The investigation of de qi sensation in TA needs further attention.

  3. Comorbid personality disorders among patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongpakaran N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nahathai Wongpakaran, Tinakon Wongpakaran, Vudhichai Boonyanaruthee, Manee Pinyopornpanish, Suthi Intaprasert Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Purpose: To investigate the personality disorders (PDs diagnosed in patients with depressive disorders.Material and methods: This study included a cross-sectional analysis, and was an extension of the Thai Study of Affective Disorder (THAISAD project. Eighty-five outpatients with depressive disorders were interviewed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Inventory to assess for depression, in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision and using the Thai version of the Structured Clinical Interview for PDs to assess for PD.Results: Seventy-seven percent of the patients had at least one PD, 40% had one PD and 60% had two or more PDs (mixed cluster. The most common PDs found were borderline PD (20% and obsessive–compulsive PD (10.6%, while the occurrence of avoidant PD was low when compared to the findings of previous, related studies. Among the mixed cluster, cluster A combined with cluster C was the common mix. Both dysthymic disorder and double depression were found to have a higher proportion of PDs than major depressive disorder (85.7% versus 76.1%. Dependent PD was found to be less common in this study than in previous studies, including those carried out in Asia.Conclusion: The prevalence of PDs among those with depressive disorder varied, and only borderline PD seems to be consistently high within and across cultures. Mixed cluster plays a prominent role in depression, so more attention should be paid to patients in this category. Keywords: personality disorders, depressive disorder, prevalence, Asian, mixed cluster, SCID-II

  4. [Burned-out or depressive? An empirical study regarding the construct validity of burnout in contrast to depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reime, B; Steiner, I

    2001-08-01

    Our study tested the discriminant validity of burnout in contrast to depression using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, Maslach u. Jackson 1986) and the Allgemeine Depressionsskala (ADS, Hautzinger u. Bailer 1993). Furthermore the relationships between burnout and depression to social support, occupational and health variables were examined. Pre-school teachers (n = 101), physician-assistants (n = 81) and their intimates were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire. Spearman-correlations and factor analysis were conducted with SPSS. The results indicate validity for the burnout construct.

  5. Sexual dysfunction during treatment of major depressive disorder with vilazodone, citalopram, or placebo: results from a phase IV clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Clayton, Anita H.; Gommoll, Carl; Chen, Dalei; Nunez, Rene; Mathews, Maju

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction commonly occurs with major depressive disorder (MDD). Vilazodone, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist antidepressant approved for the treatment of MDD in adults, was evaluated to determine its effects on sexual function. The primary study was a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial comparing vilazodone 20 and 40 mg/day with placebo; citalopram 40 mg/day was an active control (NCT01473381; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov). Post-hoc...

  6. Efficacy of dignity therapy for depression and anxiety in terminally-ill patients: early results of a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Julião, M.; Barbosa, A.; De Oliveira, F.; Nunes, Baltazar; Vaz Carneiro, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dignity therapy (DT) is a short-term psychotherapy developed for patients living with a life-limiting illness. Our aim was to determine the influence of DT on symptoms of depression and anxiety in people with a life-threatening disease with high level of distress, referred to an inpatient palliative care unit. Method: This was an open-label randomized controlled trial. Sixty terminally ill patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: intervention group (DT+ standard pal...

  7. The acute response of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a result of exercise in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Gunnar; Lira, Claudia Mallea; Johansson, Jon; Wisén, Anita; Wohlfart, Björn; Ekman, Rolf; Westrin, Asa

    2009-10-30

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other neurotrophins are believed to play an important role in affective disorders. In this study we investigated plasma-BDNF response during an incremental exercise test in 18 patients suffering from moderate major depressive disorder (MDD) and 18 controls. The patients were not treated with antidepressants or neuroleptics. Possible associations between plasma plasma-BDNF levels, dexamethasone suppression test cortisol levels and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores were also tested. No difference in basal BDNF levels between patients and controls was found. BDNF increased significantly during exercise in both male and female patients as well as in male controls, with no significant differences between the groups. BDNF levels declined after exercise, but after 60 min of rest BDNF levels showed tendencies to increase again in male patients. No correlation between BDNF and cortisol or MADRS scores was found. We conclude that unmedicated patients with moderate depression and normal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis do not have a disturbed peripheral BDNF release during exercise. The BDNF increase 60 min after interruption of exercise in male patients might indicate up-regulated BDNF synthesis, but this needs to be further investigated in future studies.

  8. Yes: The Symptoms of OCD and Depression Are Discrete and Not Exclusively Negative Affectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A. Moore

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD and Depression are classified as separate disorders, the high incidence of co-morbidity and the strong correlations between measures of each has led to debate about the nature of their relationship. Some authors have proposed that OCD is in fact a mood disorder while others have suggested that the two disorders are grounded in negative affectivity. A third proposition is that depression is an essential part of OCD but that OCD is a separate disorder from depression. The aim in this study was to investigate these diverse propositions in a non-clinical sample and also to determine whether factors implicated in each, that is anxious and depressive cognitions, hopelessness, and self-criticism, would demonstrate commonality as predictors of the symptoms of OCD and of depression. Two hundred participants (59% female (M age = 34 years, SD = 16 completed the Padua Inventory, Carroll Rating Scale, Cognitions Checklist, Self-Criticism Scale, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory-Revised and a Negative Affectivity Schedule. Results indicated a strong correlation between OCD and depression, depression, and negative affectivity but a weaker relationship between OCD and negative affectivity. Path analyses revealed that both anxious and depressive cognitions, as well as hostility predicted both disorders but the Beta-weights were stronger on OCD. Self-criticism predicted only depression while hopelessness failed to predict either disorder but was itself predicted by depressive cognitions. Depression was a stronger indicator of negative affect than OCD and while OCD positively predicted depression, depression was a negative indicator of OCD. These results support the hypothesis that OCD and depression are discrete disorders and indicate that while depression is implicated in OCD, the reverse does not hold. While both disorders are related to negative affectivity, this relationship is much stronger

  9. Life Cycle Inventory Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Moltesen, Andreas; Laurent, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    The inventory analysis is the third and often most time-consuming part of an LCA. The analysis is guided by the goal and scope definition, and its core activity is the collection and compilation of data on elementary flows from all processes in the studied product system(s) drawing on a combination...... and collecting data; (3) constructing and quality checking unit processes; (4) constructing LCI model and calculating LCI results; (5) preparing the basis for uncertainty management and sensitivity analysis; and (6) reporting....

  10. Thurstone's Scaling Model Applied to the Assessment of Self-Reported Depressive Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Joan

    1994-01-01

    Thurstone's scaling based on judgments of 527 students and 37 clinical faculty members was applied to the Beck Depression Inventory, the Zung Depression Scale, and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and fitted the observed data well. A psychological continuum was derived for severity of depression. (SLD)

  11. The effects of cognitive therapy versus 'no intervention' for major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus Christian Jakobsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Cognitive therapy may be an effective treatment option for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used The Cochrane systematic review methodology with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomized trials comparing the effects of cognitive therapy versus 'no intervention' for major depressive disorder. Participants had to be older than 17 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder to be eligible. Altogether, we included 12 trials randomizing a total of 669 participants. All 12 trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression showed that cognitive therapy significantly reduced depressive symptoms (four trials; mean difference -3.05 (95% confidence interval (Cl, -5.23 to -0.87; P<0.006 compared with 'no intervention'. Trial sequential analysis could not confirm this result. Meta-analysis on the Beck Depression Inventory showed that cognitive therapy significantly reduced depressive symptoms (eight trials; mean difference on -4.86 (95% CI -6.44 to -3.28; P = 0.00001. Trial sequential analysis on these data confirmed the result. Only a few trials reported on 'no remission', suicide inclination, suicide attempts, suicides, and adverse events without significant differences between the compared intervention groups. DISCUSSION: Cognitive therapy might be an effective treatment for depression measured on Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Beck Depression Inventory, but these outcomes may be overestimated due to risks of systematic errors (bias and random errors (play of chance. Furthermore, the effects of cognitive therapy on no remission, suicidality, adverse events, and quality of life are unclear. There is a need for randomized trials with low risk of

  12. Evaluation of Depression and its Relationship to Exercise in Women Over 20 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Zarepoor

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is one of the most common mental disorders, which imposes a large burden on the health care system. Due to increasing frequency of depression, present research was performed to evaluate the frequency of depression and its relationship to exercise in women in Yazd. Methods: This was a descriptive study. In this study, 200 women over 20 years old entered the study. One hundred subjects were athletes and100 were non-athletes. They were selected by stratified random sampling. Beck Depression Inventory was used to determine the frequency of depression in women. T-test was used for data analysis. Results: Results showed that the frequency of depression was different between athletic and non-athletic women. Mean depression scores for athletic women were lower than non-athletes. There was a significant difference regarding the frequency of depression between women in individual and team sports. Athletic women with higher duration of exercising showed less depression than other athletes. Conclusion: It can be concluded from the study that exercise in everyday life can be effective in reducing the frequency of depression in women.

  13. Medical Students’ Experience of and Reaction to Stress: The Role of Depression and Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coumaravelou Saravanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Medical school is recognized as a stressful environment that often has a negative effect on students’ academic performance, physical health, and psychosocial well-being. Previous studies have not identified differences between depressed and nondepressed and anxious and nonanxious medical students’ experiences of stress or their reactions to stressors. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of depression and anxiety among a sample of 358 medical students attending a private university in Malaysia and to examine differences according to participants’ gender, year of study, and stage of training (preclinical and clinical. Additionally, this study examined the extent to which stress predicts depression and anxiety, differences between depressed and nondepressed medical students’ experiences of and reactions to stressors, and differences between anxious and nonanxious medical students’ experiences of and reactions to stressors. Methods. The Student Life Stress Inventory was used to measure stress and reaction to stressors and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale was used to measure depression and anxiety. Results. The results showed that 44% (n=158 of the students were anxious and 34.9% (n=125 were depressed. More female students exhibited anxiety compared to male students. Stress is a predictor for depression and anxiety. A significant difference was found between depressed and nondepressed and anxious and nonanxious students’ experience of stressors due to frustration, change, and their emotional reaction to stressors. Conclusion. Overall, depressed and anxious students were found to experience more stress and react differently to stressors compared to nondepressed and nonanxious students.

  14. Age differences in the prevalence and comorbidity of DSM-IV major depressive episodes: Results from the WHO World Mental Health Survey Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Birnbaum, Howard; Shahly, Victoria; Bromet, Evelyn; Hwang, Irving; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Sampson, Nancy; Andrade, Laura Helena; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Demyttenaere, Koen; Haro, Josep Maria; Karam, Aimee N.; Kostyuchenko, Stanislav; Kovess, Viviane; Lara, Carmen; Levinson, Daphna; Matschinger, Herbert; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Browne, Mark Oakley; Ormel, Johan; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sagar, Rajesh; Stein, Dan J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although depression appears to decrease in late life, this could be due to misattribution of depressive symptoms to physical disorders that increase in late life. Methods We investigated this issue by studying age differences in comorbidity of DSM-IV major depressive episodes (MDE) with chronic physical conditions in the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) surveys, a series of community epidemiological surveys carried out in 10 developed countries (n = 51,771) and 8 developing countries (n = 37,265). MDE and other mental disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Organic exclusion rules were not used to avoid inappropriate exclusion of cases with physical comorbidity. Physical conditions were assessed with a standard chronic conditions checklist. Results Twelve-month DSM-IV/CIDI MDE was significantly less prevalent among respondents ages 65+ than younger respondents in developed but not developing countries. Prevalence of comorbid mental disorders generally either decreased or remained stable with age, while comorbidity of MDE with mental disorders generally increased with age. Prevalence of physical conditions, in comparison, generally increased with age, while comorbidity of MDE with physical conditions generally decreased with age. Depression treatment was lowest among the elderly in developed and developing countries. Conclusions The weakening associations between MDE and physical conditions with increasing age argue against the suggestion that the low estimated prevalence of MDE among the elderly is due to increased confounding with physical disorders. Future study is needed to investigate processes that might lead to a decreasing impact of physical illness on depression among the elderly. PMID:20037917

  15. Personality Characteristics as Predictive Factors for the Occurrence of Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajraktarov, Stojan; Gudeva-Nikovska, Dance; Manuševa, Nensi; Arsova, Slavica

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The depressive disorder is one of the most frequent mental disorders, which is often associated with severe dysfunctionality. Personality traits are considered as important factors for the occurrence of depressive disorder. AIM: To determine the specificity of personality dimensions as predictive factors of depressive disorder. METHODS: This research was conducted at the University Psychiatric Clinic Skopje as a “case-control” study. TCI-R (temperament and character inventory – revised) was used as the main research instrument. RESULTS: There are specific personality traits expressed through high scores of Harm Avoidance and low scores of Self –Directedness traits as predictive factors related to an incidence of the depressive disorder. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show that certain personal traits, and more specific HA and SD, are with a specific predictability of the depressive disorder. PMID:28293316

  16. The relationship between depression, anxiety and medication adherence among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Adriaan; Kagee, Ashraf

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, a small but growing body of literature on the associations between common mental disorders and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has emerged. The present study builds on the growing body of research by investigating associations between symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and adherence to ART. We studied a convenience sample of 101 South African ART users to determine the severity of symptoms of depression and anxiety and their association with self-reported adherence to ART. Based on the standardised cut-off scores recorded using the Beck Depression Inventory - Second Edition (BDI II), 40.4% of participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of depression. Moreover, results from the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) indicated that 28.7% of the study participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety. Biserial correlations and logistic regression analysis demonstrated a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and adherence. The results indicate that patients reporting non-perfect adherence were approximately three times more likely (OR=2.73; CI=1.09-6.82) to have moderate to severe symptoms of depression than those reporting perfect adherence. The present findings are in keeping with those of previous studies, suggesting that depression may act as a barrier to ART adherence.

  17. Relationship of smartphone use severity with sleep quality, depression, and anxiety in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Kadir; Akgönül, Mehmet; Akpinar, Abdullah

    2015-06-01

    The usage of smartphones has increased rapidly in recent years, and this has brought about addiction. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between smartphone use severity and sleep quality, depression, and anxiety in university students. In total, 319 university students (203 females and 116 males; mean age = 20.5 ± 2.45) were included in the study. Participants were divided into the following three groups: a smartphone non-user group (n = 71, 22.3%), a low smartphone use group (n = 121, 37.9%), and a high smartphone use group (n = 127, 39.8%). All participants were evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory; moreover, participants other than those in the smartphone non-user group were also assessed with the Smartphone Addiction Scale. The findings revealed that the Smartphone Addiction Scale scores of females were significantly higher than those of males. Depression, anxiety, and daytime dysfunction scores were higher in the high smartphone use group than in the low smartphone use group. Positive correlations were found between the Smartphone Addiction Scale scores and depression levels, anxiety levels, and some sleep quality scores. The results indicate that depression, anxiety, and sleep quality may be associated with smartphone overuse. Such overuse may lead to depression and/or anxiety, which can in turn result in sleep problems. University students with high depression and anxiety scores should be carefully monitored for smartphone addiction.

  18. Selective neurocognitive deficits and poor life functioning are associated with significant depressive symptoms in alcoholism-HIV infection comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, Stephanie A; Rosenbloom, Margaret J; Fama, Rosemary; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2012-09-30

    Alcoholism, HIV, and depressive symptoms frequently co-occur and are associated with impairment in cognition and life function. We administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), measures of life function, and neurocognitive tests to 67 alcoholics, 56 HIV+ patients, 63 HIV+ alcoholics, and 64 controls to examine whether current depressive symptom level (significant, BDI-II>14 vs. minimal, BDI-IIalcoholism-HIV comorbidity. Participants with significant depressive symptoms demonstrated slower manual motor speed and poorer visuospatial memory than those with minimal depressive symptoms. HIV patients with depressive symptoms showed impaired manual motor speed. Alcoholics with depressive symptoms showed impaired visuospatial memory. HIV+ alcoholics with depressive symptoms reported the poorest quality of life; alcoholics with depressive symptoms, irrespective of HIV status, had poorest life functioning. Thus, significant depressive symptoms were associated with poorer selective cognitive and life functioning in alcoholism and in HIV infection, even though depressive symptoms had neither synergistic nor additive effects on cognition in alcoholism-HIV comorbidity. The results suggest the relevance of assessing and treating current depressive symptoms to reduce cognitive compromise and functional disability in HIV infection, alcoholism, and their comorbidity.

  19. The English Version of the Multidimensional Inventory for Religious/Spiritual Well-Being (MI-RSWB-E: First Results from British College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Human-Friedrich Unterrainer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been a steadily growing interest of religious/spiritual issues in several areas of psychology; a variety of reliable and valid means of assessing the different facets of religiosity/spirituality have been developed. However, there is still some need for multidimensional approaches. With respect to the positive experience with the German version of the Multidimensional Inventory for Religious/Spiritual Well-Being, we developed an English version of this scale (MI-RSWB-E in order to facilitate research in this budding field. The MI-RSWB-E was tested and validated on a sample of British college-students (n = 400. First, the factor structure and psychometric properties of the MI-RSWB-E were analysed. As a second step, MI-RSWB-E dimensions were related to a variety of indicators of personality and mental health. An in-depth analysis provided evidence in support of the psychometric quality of the MI-RSWB-E, and the ability of its proposed six-factor structure. The MI-RSWB-E dimensions were also found to be substantially related to personality factors as well as with indicators of subjective well-being and mental illness. In light of these findings the MI-RSWB-E could be considered as a suitable tool in the assessment of different facets of religiosity/spirituality.

  20. Prevalence of depression and its relationship with work characteristics in a sample of public workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maria Luca,1 Salvatore Bellia,2 Marcello Bellia,3 Antonina Luca,4 Carmela Calandra11Department of Medical and Surgery Specialties, Psychiatry Unit, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, General Pathology Unit, University Hospital Policlinico-Vittorio Emanuele, 3B Ramazzini Institute, 4Department GF Ingrassia, Section of Neuroscience, University Hospital Policlinico-Vittorio Emanuele, Catania, Sicily, ItalyAbstract: Occupation is a fundamental right, enabling social interaction and financial support for the individual. However, it is an undeniable source of stress, with consequences for physical and mental health. The prevalence of depression and somatic complaints were assessed in 1,013 public workers using the Beck Depression Inventory and a questionnaire investigating for the presence of somatic problems designed by the research team. The results were related to demographic characteristics, history of previous depressive episodes, work schedule (day work, night and day rotating shift work, day rotating shift work, and duration of current work schedule. There were more cases of moderate depression in the day rotating shift workers (84% than in those working at night (83%. More women had mild or moderate depression than men (22% and 4% versus 10% and 3%, respectively. Severe depression was found only in men. Nearly 10% of depressed individuals reported previous depressive episodes. A link between depression and somatic complaints was also found. In particular, 59% of depressed subjects reported gastrointestinal complaints and 41% did not (P<0.001. In conclusion, the occurrence of depressive symptoms could be facilitated by occupation. A history of depressive symptoms should not be neglected, given the risk of recurrence. Somatic complaints could represent a “wake-up call” regarding depression. Global assessment and effective support are fundamental for promotion of a better quality of life in the at-risk category of workers

  1. Depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and in non-neurological medical illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assogna, Francesca; Fagioli, Sabrina; Cravello, Luca; Meco, Giuseppe; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Stefani, Alessandro; Imperiale, Francesca; Caltagirone, Carlo; Pontieri, Francesco E; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with neurological and non-neurological medical illnesses very often complain of depressive symptoms that are associated with cognitive and functional impairments. We compared the profile of depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with that of control subjects (CS) suffering from non-neurological medical illnesses. Methods One-hundred PD patients and 100 CS were submitted to a structured clinical interview for identification of major depressive disorder (MDD) and minor depressive disorder (MIND), according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR), criteria. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were also administered to measure depression severity. Results When considering the whole groups, there were no differences in depressive symptom frequency between PD and CS apart from worthlessness/guilt, and changes in appetite reduced rates in PD. Further, total scores and psychic and somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI did not differ between PD and CS. After we separated PD and CS in those with MDD, MIND, and no depression (NODEP), comparing total scores and psychic/somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI, we found increased total depression severity in NODEP PD and reduced severity of the psychic symptoms of depression in MDD PD, with no differences in MIND. However, the severity of individual symptom frequency of depression was not different between PD and CS in MDD, MIND, and NODEP groups. Conclusion Although MDD and MIND phenomenology in PD may be very similar to that of CS with non-neurological medical illnesses, neurological symptoms of PD may worsen (or confound) depression severity in patients with no formal/structured DSM-IV-TR, diagnosis of depressive mood disorders. Thus, a thorough assessment of depression in PD should take into consideration the different impacts of neurological manifestations on MDD, MIND, and NODEP. PMID

  2. Understanding Pain and Depression in Back Pain: the Role of Catastrophizing, Help-/Hopelessness, and Thought Suppression as Potential Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsebusch, Janina; Hasenbring, Monika I; Rusu, Adina C

    2016-06-01

    The cognitive mediation hypothesis describes the influence of psychological factors on the relationship between pain and depression such as cognitions of catastrophizing and help-/hopelessness. More recent research also emphasizes the role of suppression of negative thoughts and experiences such as pain. However, there is little research investigating direct and indirect effects of these contrasting cognitions. A total of 164 acute and sub-acute non-specific back pain patients participated in this study. Pain intensity, depression, and pain-related cognitions were measured using questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory and the Kiel Pain Inventory. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The results of the path analysis support the hypothesis that cognitive coping strategies have a mediating effect on pain and depression. Consistent with previous research, we found that pain had no direct relation with depression. Help-/hopelessness had a direct path to depression, whereas catastrophizing had an indirect effect via increased help-/hopelessness. The current results also indicate that thought suppression mediated the relationship between pain and depression via both direct and indirect effects. Cognitive mediators, such as help-/hopelessness, catastrophizing, and thought suppression, have a significant impact on depression in patients with acute and sub-acute back pain. The current results may aid in the optimization of treatments for these patients by focusing attention toward the modification of dysfunctional cognitive pain-coping strategies.

  3. Effect of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ranjbar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is the most prevalent psychotic disorder. In order to cure and prevent the recurrence of this disease, it is necessary to gain more information about remedial methods like Group Cognitive- Behavior Therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of group cognitive-behavioral therapy on the amount of depression on the patients. Methods: This study was experimental and it included both experimental and control group with a pre test. The subjects were selected from patients with mild depression. Their Beck inventory score ranged between 17-20. Patients were randomly divided in two groups. The subjects of experimental group received eight sessions of group cognitive-behavioral therapy. The Beck depression test was completed by the subjects in three phases before the intervention, after the intervention and one month after that. The data was transferred to SPSS program and analyzed. Results: The results indicated a significant difference between the experimental and control group after the intervention at Beck tests (P=0.043. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the experimental group between the depression score in patients before and after the intervention (p=0.033 and the score of patients before and one month after the intervention (p=0.492. Conclusion: Group Cognitive-Behavioral therapy decreases depression in patients who suffer from mild depression.

  4. Depression, anxiety and influencing factors in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-ping; LI Xiao-mei; CHEN Hang-wei; CUI Jun-yu; NIU Li-li; HE Yu-bin; TIAN Xin-li

    2011-01-01

    Background Psychological distress has been widely studied in many cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, but the condition in acute pulmonary embolism (APE) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate levels of depression and anxiety and their influencing factors in APE patients.Methods Sixty consecutive patients with APE were subjected to investigation of depression and anxiety by the Beck Depression Inventory and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and 60 community-based subjects were enrolled as controls.APE patients were stratified as high-risk, intermediate-risk and low-risk according to the disease severity. Scores of depression and anxiety were compared by statistical analysis using paired t tests between APE patients and controls,and by analysis of variance within the APE patients with the three risk stratification. Factors influencing depression and anxiety were evaluated.Results The mean age of the patients (38 males and 22 females) was (52+12) years. APE patients displayed higher scores of depression (P=0.04) and anxiety (P=0.001) compared with controls. Patients in the high-risk group displayed higher scores of depression (P=0.004) and anxiety (P=0.001) compared with those in the intermediate- and low-risk groups. Depression scores were highly correlated with anxiety scores (r=0.60, P <0.001). Both depression and anxiety inversely related to risk stratification (P <0.01), age (P <0.05), and arterial blood oxygen pressure (PaO2) (P <0.05).Linear regression analysis showed that PaO2 was independently inversely related to both depression (P <0.01) and anxiety (P <0.05); risk stratification and age were independently inversely related to anxiety (P <0.05).Conclusions Patients of APE suffered high levels of depression and anxiety, which were negatively influenced by PaO2,risk stratification and age.

  5. Changes in beliefs and attitudes toward people with depression and schizophrenia - results of a public campaign in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Anna C; Mnich, Eva E; Ludwig, Julia; Daubmann, Anne; Bock, Thomas; Lambert, Martin; Härter, Martin; Dirmaier, Jörg; Tlach, Lisa; Liebherz, Sarah; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

    2016-03-30

    We examined the impact of a mental health awareness campaign on public attitudes. The campaign was embedded in the project psychenet - Hamburg Network for Mental Health. Beliefs and attitudes were examined before and after specific awareness measures in Hamburg (intervention region) and Munich (control region). Analyses were based on representative surveys (2011: N=2014; 2014: N=2006). Vignettes with symptoms suggestive of depression respectively schizophrenia were presented, followed by questions on social distance, beliefs and emotional reactions. Analyses of variance tested variations between regions over time and differences between those aware of the campaign and those not aware. In 2014, 7.3% (n=74) of the Hamburg respondents were aware of the psychenet campaign. Regarding the total sample, there were minor changes in attitudes. Differentiated according to campaign awareness among Hamburg respondents, those who were aware showed less desire for social distance toward a person with depression. Moreover, respondents aware of the campaign stated less often that a person with schizophrenia is in need of help. The campaign had small impact on attitudes. A substantial change in ingrained attitudes toward persons with mental health problems is difficult to achieve with interventions targeting the general public.

  6. Forest soil survey and mapping of the nutrient status of the vegetation on Olkiluoto island. Results from the first inventory on the FEH plots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamminen, P.; Aro, A.; Salemaa, M. (Finnish Forest Research Institute, Helsinki (Finland))

    2007-09-15

    The aim of the inventory was to determine the status of the forest soils and to map the current nutrient status of forest vegetation on Olkiluoto Island in order to create a basis for monitoring future changes in the forests and to provide data for a biospheric description of the island. The study was carried out on 94 FEH plots, which were selected from the forest extensive monitoring network (FET plots) on the basis of the forest site type distribution and tree stand characteristics measured on the island during 2002 - 2004. Forest soils on Olkiluoto are very young and typical of soils along the Finnish coast, i.e. stony or shallow soils overlying bedrock, but with more nutrients than the forest soils inland. In addition to nutrients, the heavy metal concentrations are clearly higher on Olkiluoto than the average values for Finnish forest soils. The soil in the alder stands growing along the seashore is different from the other soils on Olkiluoto and the control soils inland. These soils are less acidic and have large reserves of sodium, magnesium and nitrogen. Macronutrient concentrations in vascular plant species were relatively similar to those reported for Southern Finland. However, it is obvious that the accumulation of particulate material on the vegetation, especially on forest floor bryophytes, has increased due to emissions derived from the construction of roads, drilling and rock crushing, as well as the other industrial activities on Olkiluoto Island. Leaf and needle analysis indicated that the tree stands had, in the main, a good nutrient status on Olkiluoto Island. The surveying methods used on Olkiluoto are better suited to detect systematic changes over a larger area or within a group of sample plots than the changes on individual plots. (orig.)

  7. Recognition of depression in children in general hospital-based paediatric units in Kenya: practice and policy implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutiso Victoria N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical disorders are commonly comorbid with depression in children attending general medical facilities. However, the depression component is rarely recognised. Methods A questionnaire on sociodemographics and history of presenting medical conditions was administered together with the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI to all 11-year-old to 17-year-old children attending at nine medical facilities. Results In all, 408 children were recruited from 9 health facilities. Whereas the clinicians diagnosed a mental disorder in only 2.5% of the sample studied, 41.3% had CDI scores that suggested mild to moderate depression. The highest proportion of children with depressive symptomatology was found at the Kenyatta National and Teaching Referral Hospital. Conclusion Although prevalence rate for depression among children is high, detection rates remain low. This finding has clinical practice and policy implications within and outside Kenya.

  8. Eating and Psychological Profiles of Women with Higher Depressive Symptoms Who Are Trying to Lose Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bégin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether women with higher depressive symptoms differed from women with lower depressive symptoms on early weight-loss, eating behaviors and psychological profiles. Among a sample of 45 overweight/obese women who had undertaken a self-initiated weight-loss attempt, two groups were formed based on scores from the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, one with lower depressive symptoms (BDI-II < 10; n=21 and one with higher depressive symptoms (BDI ≥ 10; n=24. Even if some women in the higher depressive symptom group did not reach the clinical cut-off for depression (BDI = 14, this group tended to lose less weight in the first two months of their weight-loss attempt and to show a more disturbed eating and psychological profile compared to the group with lower depressive symptoms. In addition, among women with higher depressive symptoms, eating and psychological variables were systematically related to one another whereas these variables were not related among the other group. Results highlight the relevance of considering the presence of depressive symptoms as a marker of clinical severity among the overweight/obese population, and suggest that the BDI-II could be an interesting screening instrument to identify this particular subgroup.

  9. Relation Between Emotional Intelligence, Socio-Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Depressive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Sayeda Ahmed; Hussien, El-Sayed Saleh; Hamed, Warda Elshahat; Zoromba, Mohamed Ali

    2017-02-01

    The present study aims to assess the emotional intelligence in relation to socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with depressive disorders. A descriptive correlational study was utilized with a sample of (106) depressed patients who were diagnosed by a psychiatrist with depressive disorders at psychiatric outpatient clinics in Mansoura University Hospital. Data were collected through assessing socio demographic and clinical characteristics, assessing level of depression using Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II, and assessing emotional intelligence using Barchard emotional intelligence scales. Results revealed that emotional intelligence not related significantly to socio demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with depressive disorders, there is a highly significant relationship between emotional intelligence in relation to level of depression and other practices used to alleviate depression. Therefore, it is recommended to conduct a periodical workshops and training programs for adolescents and young in the universities, schools, social clubs, camps and youth organizations to enhance their emotional intelligence in order to prevent depression. In addition, assessing the effect of emotional intelligence programs on preventing and managing depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Medical students' experience of and reaction to stress: the role of depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Coumaravelou; Wilks, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Medical school is recognized as a stressful environment that often has a negative effect on students' academic performance, physical health, and psychosocial well-being. Previous studies have not identified differences between depressed and nondepressed and anxious and nonanxious medical students' experiences of stress or their reactions to stressors. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of depression and anxiety among a sample of 358 medical students attending a private university in Malaysia and to examine differences according to participants' gender, year of study, and stage of training (preclinical and clinical). Additionally, this study examined the extent to which stress predicts depression and anxiety, differences between depressed and nondepressed medical students' experiences of and reactions to stressors, and differences between anxious and nonanxious medical students' experiences of and reactions to stressors. The Student Life Stress Inventory was used to measure stress and reaction to stressors and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale was used to measure depression and anxiety. The results showed that 44% (n = 158) of the students were anxious and 34.9% (n = 125) were depressed. More female students exhibited anxiety compared to male students. Stress is a predictor for depression and anxiety. A significant difference was found between depressed and nondepressed and anxious and nonanxious students' experience of stressors due to frustration, change, and their emotional reaction to stressors. Overall, depressed and anxious students were found to experience more stress and react differently to stressors compared to nondepressed and nonanxious students.

  11. An epidemiological study of depression among college students in district Faridkot, Punjab, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Padda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is one of the most under diagnosed and under reported in primary health settings. Depression is highly common and according to WHO by 2020, it would be the second-most prevalent condition worldwide. Physical illnesses and bio-psychosocial factors are common determinants of depression. Aims & Objectives: 1. To estimate prevalence of depression, 2. To determine associated factors among college going students. Material & Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among college going students. Half of the colleges were selected randomly and sample size was distributed on the basis of probability proportional to size (PPS. Assigned number of students from each college was selected by simple random sampling. Sample size of 1300 was calculated using formula (n = ( Z1-α 2 P (100 - P / ε2. General Health Questionnaire (12 items was used to diagnose psychiatric morbidity and those with this were administered Becks Depression Inventory II (21 items scale for assessing the prevalence and level of depression. Both the scales were translated in local language and self-administered. The data was compiled and analyzed using Epi InfoTM. Results: A total of 1300 students were enrolled, psychiatric morbidity was present in 35% and prevalence of depression was 33%. Mild depression was found in 87% of the students with depression. Depression was higher among those aged >25 years, females, residing in nuclear families and studying science stream. Conclusion: Family support and adequate treatment are most important pillars of management.

  12. Efficacy of behavioral intervention in reducing anxiety and depression among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Velayudhan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Now a days, college students frequently have more complex problems than they used to have over a decade ago - greater difficulties in relationships; and more severe problems, such as depression, anxiety and thoughts of suicide. Counseling helps students to understand themselves and the world around them, and to adjust themselves more efficiently and appropriately to other fellow beings. Aim: To determine as to what extent the medical students were able to cope up with their anxiety and depression with the help of counseling. Materials and Methods: In the experimental design ′Before-and -after with control design′, Beck Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory were administered to 120 medical students who were randomly selected from a private medical college, comprising of 30 males and 30 females in each of the two groups, viz., the experimental group and the control group. Statistical analysis: Means, standard deviations, t test and one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: Anxiety and depression among the students were found to be reduced after counseling. Male and female students in the experimental group showed decrease in the levels of anxiety and depression; whereas the control group, which did not get the benefit of counseling, continued to have the same levels of anxiety and depression. Conclusion: Counseling is helpful in building self-confidence and the capacity to adjust, by reducing anxiety and depression among medical college students.

  13. Alexithymia and its association with burnout, depression and family support among Greek nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giotakis Konstantinos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have examined the relation between alexithymia (i.e. the inability to recognize and verbalize emotions and professional burnout. Considering the absence of relevant studies in the Greek scientific literature, the aim of this work was to examine the associations of alexithymia with the three facets of professional burnout, the perception of family support and depression in nursing personnel. Methods The study was performed in one of the largest hospitals in Greece and included 95 nurses. Assessments of alexithymia, burnout, depression and family support were made by means of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Julkunen Family Support Scale, respectively. Student's t-test, Pearson's correlation and stepwise linear regression were used for the evaluation of data. Results Alexithymia was correlated positively with depression, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and negatively with sense of family support and personal achievement. Additionally, family support was correlated positively with personal achievement and negatively with depression. Conclusion In the scientific literature there is a debate as to whether alexithymia is a stable personality characteristic or if it is dependent on symptoms of mental disorders. We tried to interpret the associations of alexithymia with professional burnout, depressive symptoms and family support. From this study it appears very likely that alexithymia is directly associated with depression and personal achievement, but also – indirectly – with the sense of family support.

  14. The effects of the gender-culture interaction on self-reports of depressive symptoms: cross-cultural study among Egyptians and Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Research in depression has revealed differences in the way depressed individuals across cultures report their symptoms. This literature also points to possible differences in symptom reporting patterns between men and women. Using data from a larger dataset (Beshai et al. 2016, the current study examined whether non-depressed and depressed Egyptian and Canadian men and women differed in their self-report of the various domains of the Beck Depression Inventory –II (BDI-II. Method We recruited a total of 131 depressed and non-depressed participants from both Egypt (n = 29 depressed; n = 29 non-depressed and Canada (n = 35 depressed; n = 38 non-depressed. Depression status was ascertained using a structured interview. All participants were asked to complete the BDI-II along with other self-report measures of depression. BDI-II items were divided into two subscales in accordance with Dozois, Dobson & Ahnberg (1998 factor analysis: cognitive-affective and somatic-vegetative subscales. Results We found a significant three-way interaction effect on the cognitive-affective (F(1,121 = 9.51, p = .003 and main effect of depression status on somatic-vegetative subscales (F(1,121 = 42.80, p < .001. Post hoc analyses revealed that depressed Egyptian men reported lower scores on the cognitive-affective subscale of the BDI-II compared to their depressed Canadian male counterparts. Conclusions These results suggest that males across cultures may differentially report cognitive symptoms of depression. These results also suggest that clinicians and clinical scientists need to further examine the interaction effect of culture and gender when investigating self-reported symptoms of depression.

  15. Effectiveness of meta-cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapy in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Ahmad; Atef Vahid, Mohammad Kazem; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Rasoulian, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effectiveness of metacognitive therapy (MCT) and cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) in treating Iranian patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Thirty three outpatients meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for MDD without any other axis I and II disorders were randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions, i.e. MCT, CBT and pharmacotherapy. The Beck Depression Inventory-II-Second Edition (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Ruminative Response Scale (RRS) and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) were administered for pre-treatment, post-treatment and follow-up. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Based on repeated measures ANOVA, all the participants demonstrated improvement in depression, anxiety, dysfunctional attitude and ruminative response. Based on percentage results, all the patients in MCT and CBT groups showed significant improvement at post-treatment phase. MCT and CBT were more effective than pharmacotherapy alone In treatment of MDD. None.

  16. Compulsive buying and hoarding as identity substitutes: The role of materialistic value endorsement and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Müller, Astrid; Luyckx, Koen

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether the relationship between identity confusion and compulsive buying (offline/online) and hoarding is mediated by materialistic value endorsement and depression. The community sample consisted of 254 Flemish adults who completed self-report questionnaires to assess identity confusion (Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory), compulsive buying tendencies (Compulsive Buying Scale/short-Internet Addiction Scale, adapted for shopping), hoarding tendencies (Saving-Inventory Revised), materialistic value endorsement (Materialistic Value Scale), and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9). We found significant positive associations between identity confusion, compulsive buying, and hoarding. The association between identity confusion and compulsive buying was fully mediated by materialistic value endorsement; whereas depression mediated the association between identity confusion and hoarding. The results suggest that the collection or buying of material goods can be considered as identity substitutes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Poverty and adolescent depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Amy C

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal data on non-Hispanic White children from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (N = 1,056) were used to examine whether the relationship between poverty (early childhood poverty, poverty persistence, and current poverty) and adolescent depressive symptoms (measured by the Children's Depression Inventory and the Internalizing Index) can be explained by the mother's own childhood depression and family characteristics measured during the child's first year of life. Associations between poverty and depressive symptoms among adolescents were explained by mother's childhood depression and whether the adolescent had lived with both parents during the first year of life. The findings highlight the need for appropriate treatment of childhood depression so as to reduce the adverse consequences in adulthood and for the next generation.

  18. Depression and type D personality among undergraduate medical students

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Context: Academic pressure, though established, is an unavoidable cause of depression in medical students. Role of Type D personality as determinant of depression is a new approach to the problem. Aim: Determination of relationship between Type D personality and Depression among medical students. Setting and Design: Undergraduate students (both male and female, total 150) of Midnapore Medical College. Materials and Methods: Beck Depression Inventory for depression and DS 14 for type D persona...

  19. Continuous Auricular Electroacupuncture Can Significantly Improve Heart Rate Variability and Clinical Scores in Patients with Depression: First Results from a Transcontinental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Shi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to investigate the impact and acceptability of providing continuous auricular electroacupuncture as an adjunct to conventional medications for patients with depression. Ten patients with a mean age ± SD of 43.3 ± 10.4 years were able to provide informed consent. The quantitative and qualitative outcome measures were heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV, and different clinical scores. The study documented that a special kind of auricular electro acupuncture, applied over a period of three days, can improve various aspects of quality of life significantly but also highlighted the significant increase of HRV whilst having acupuncture treatment. In conclusion, our study shows stimulation-related and quantifiable clinical and physiological alterations in parameters after continuous auricular acupoint stimulation in patients with depression. Improved access to electro acupuncture treatment would be of major benefit for these patients. Further studies are necessary in order to verify the gained results.

  20. A prospective study of screen time in adolescence and depression symptoms in young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Anders; Singhammer, John; Froberg, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between screen time in adolescence and depressive symptoms in young adulthood in a population-based cohort study of Danish adolescents. METHODS: Data were from a cohort of adolescents who were followed-up in young adulthood...... for a period of up to 12years (1997-2010, mean 8.8years, n=435). Information on television viewing, computer use, total screen time and other determinants of depression were obtained in adolescence. Depressive symptoms were obtained in young adulthood using the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and classified...... as mild, moderate or severe depression. Mixed regression models were used to examine the associations, with adjustment for major confounders. RESULTS: In multivariable adjusted analyses, each additional hour/day spent watching television or screen viewing in adolescence was associated with 1.36 (95% CI 0...

  1. Personality styles in patients with fibromyalgia, major depression and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stiles Tore C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is suggested to be a manifestation of depression or affective spectrum disorder. We measured the cognitive style of patients with FMS to assess personality styles in 44 patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS by comparing them with 43 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD and 41 healthy controls (HC. Methods Personality styles were measured by the Sociotropy and Autonomy Scale (SAS and the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS. The Structured Clinical interview for DSM Axis I was applied to Axis I disorders, while the Beck Depression Inventory was used to measure depression severity. Results Patients with FMS in general have a sociotropic personality style similar to patients with MDD, and different from HC, but FMS patients without a lifetime history of MDD had a cognitive personality style different from patients with MDD and similar to HC. Conclusion These findings suggest that a depressotypic personality style is related to depressive disorder, but not to FMS.

  2. Loneliness, depression and sociability in old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Singh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The elderly population is large in general and growing due to advancement of health care education. These people are faced with numerous physical, psychological and social role changes that challenge their sense of self and capacity to live happily. Many people experience loneliness and depression in old age, either as a result of living alone or due to lack of close family ties and reduced connections with their culture of origin, which results in an inability to actively participate in the community activities. With advancing age, it is inevitable that people lose connection with their friendship networks and that they find it more difficult to initiate new friendships and to belong to new networks. The present study was conducted to investigate the relationships among depression, loneliness and sociability in elderly people. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 55 elderly people (both men and women. The tools used were Beck Depression Inventory, UCLA Loneliness Scale and Sociability Scale by Eysenck. Results: Results revealed a significant relationship between depression and loneliness. Conclusion: Most of the elderly people were found to be average in the dimension of sociability and preferred remaining engaged in social interactions. The implications of the study are discussed in the article.

  3. Cognitive Distortions in Depressed Women: Trait, or State Dependent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat BATMAZ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: According to the cognitive theory developed by Beck, cognitive distortions are important mediators for the onset and maintenance of depressive disorders. It has not been researched if these cognitive distortions are more frequently encountered during the depressive episode, or if they are trait-like features. This study aims to investigate this. The hypothesis of the study is that cognitive distortions are state dependent. Method: Three groups of outpatients (n=178 patients in acute major depressive episode, n=168 depressive patients in remission, n=177 healthy controls presenting to the psychiatry clinics of three different state hospitals were recruited for the study. The participants were diagnostically interviewed by the MINI according to the DSM-IV criteria. The participants were asked to complete the Cognitive Distortions Scale and the severity of their depression was measured by the Inventory for Depressive Symptomatology. Results: According