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Sample records for depressed baroreflex sensitivity

  1. Spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthel, Petra; Bauer, Axel; Müller, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    Low baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) indicates poor prognosis after acute myocardial infarction. Noninvasive BRS assessment is complicated by nonstationarities and noise in electrocardiogram and pressure signals. Phase-rectified signal averaging is a novel signal processing technology overcoming...

  2. Reduced Baroreflex Sensitivity in Cluster Headache Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads C J; Mehlsen, Jesper; Brinth, Louise

    2015-01-01

    by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in CH patients. METHODS: Twenty-six active CH patients and an equal number of age-, sex-, and BMI-matched controls underwent head-up tilt table test and BRS was determined by the sequence method. RESULTS: Compared with controls, patients exhibited a blunted reactivity of RR...

  3. Baroreflex sensitivity and essential hypertension in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honzíková, N; Fiser, B

    2009-01-01

    It has been known for many years that baroreflex sensitivity is lowered in hypertensive patients. There are several known factors implicating this association, e.g. high blood pressure leads to remodeling of the carotid arterial wall, to its stiffness and to a diminished activation of baroreceptors; leptin released from a fatty tissue activates the sympathetic nervous system etc. On the other hand, low baroreflex sensitivity (BRS, usually quantified in ms/mmHg) can be inborn. Studies on primary hypertension in children and adolescents have brought new information about the role of baroreflex in the development of an early stage of primary hypertension. BRS lower than 3.9 ms/mmHg was found in 5 % of healthy subjects. This value approaches the critical value for the risk of sudden cardiac death in patients after myocardial infarction and corresponds to the value present in hypertensive patients. A decreased BRS and BRSf (baroreflex sensitivity expressed in mHz/mmHg, index independent of the mean cardiac interval), was found not only in children with hypertension, but also in those with white-coat hypertension. This is in accordance with a single interpretation. The decrease of BRS/BRSf precedes a pathological blood pressure increase. The contribution of obesity and BRS/BRSf to the development of hypertension in adolescents was also compared. Both factors reach a sensitivity and a specificity between 60 % and 65 %, but there is no correlation between the values of the body mass index and BRS either in the group of hypertensive patients or in healthy controls. If a receiver operating curve (sensitivity versus specificity) is plotted for both values together using logistic regression analysis, a sensitivity higher than 70 % and a specificity over 80 % are reached. This means that low baroreflex sensitivity is an independent risk factor for the development of primary hypertension. Studies demonstrate that adolescents with increased blood pressure and with BRS under 7 ms

  4. Baroreflex sensitivity differs among same strain Wistar rats from the same laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Ferreira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies evidenced that a portion of normotensive Sprague–Dawley rats spontaneously exhibit lower baroreflex sensitivity, however, it was no yet investigated in Wistar rats. We aimed to compare baroreflex sensitivity among rats from the same strain and the same laboratory. Male Wistar normotensive rats (300-400g were studied. Cannulas were inserted into the abdominal aortic artery through the right femoral artery to measure mean arterial pressure and heart rate. Baroreflex was calculated as the derivative of the variation of heart rate in function of the mean arterial pressure variation (ΔHR/ΔMAP tested with a depressor dose of sodium nitroprusside (50 μg/kg and with a pressor dose of phenylephrine (8μg/kg in the right femoral venous approach through an inserted cannula. We divided the rats into four groups: i high bradycardic baroreflex, baroreflex gain less than -2 tested with phenylephrine; ii low bradycardic baroreflex, baroreflex gain between -1 and -2 tested with phenylephrine; iii high tachycardic baroreflex, baroreflex gain less than -3 tested with sodium nitroprusside; and iv low tachycardic baroreflex, baroreflex gain between -1 and -3 tested with sodium nitroprusside. Approximately 71% of the rats presented a decrease in bradycardic reflex while around half showed an increase in tachycardic reflex. No significant changes in basal mean arterial pressure and heart rate, tachycardic and bradycardic peak and heart rate range were observed. There was a significant change in baroreflex sensitivity among rats from the same strain and the same laboratory.

  5. Determination of Vagal Baroreflex sensitivity in Normal Subjects

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    Wada, Naoki; Singer, Wolfgang; Gehrking, Tonette L.; Sletten, David M.; Schmelzer, James D.; Kihara, Mikihiro; Low, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Valsalva maneuver (VM) is used widely to quantify the sensitivity of the vagal baroreflex loop (vagal baroreflex sensitivity, BRS_v), but most studies have focused on the heart rate (HR) response to blood pressure (BP) decrement (BRS_v↓), even though the subsequent response to an increment in BP following the VM (BRS_v↑) is important and different. Methods We evaluated recordings of HR and BP in 187 normal subjects during the VM and determined both BRS_v↑ determined by relating HR to the BP increase following phase III and BRS_v↓. Results BRS_v↑ was related inversely to age. In addition, BRS_v↓, age, and magnitude of phase IV were independent predictors of BRS_v↑ in a multivariate model, accounting for 47% of the variance of BRS_v↑. Discussion The results indicate that both BRS_v↑ and BRS_v↓ become blunted with increasing age and that these indices relate to each other. PMID:24477673

  6. Biofeedback of baroreflex sensitivity in patients with mild essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overhaus, Sabine; Rüddel, Heinz; Curio, Immo; Mussgay, Lutz; Scholz, O Berndt

    2003-01-01

    An attempt was made to reduce blood pressure by increasing the baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) via biofeedback. Six patients with mild essential hypertension and 5 normotensive participants were studied during 8 biofeedback sessions. Each session consisted of 5 trials, 5 min each. The first and the last trials served as baselines of heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, and BRS. During the 3 middle trials the BRS was calculated online using the sequencing technique. The resulting value was used as a visual analogue feedback signal. Participants were asked to increase BRS. The mean BRS was 8.3 [ms/mmHg] for the hypertensive patients and 12.2 [ms/mmHg] for the normotensive participants. During biofeedback trials as well as across sessions neither the hypertensive nor the normotensive group showed a statistically significant increase of BRS, only heart rate variability increased significantly. Contrary to expectation blood pressure increased in both groups. One hypertensive subject made significant progress during the training by performing valsalva maneuvers. The data show that BRS is reduced in hypertensive subjects. The increase of the heart rate variability could be a sign of the activation of the baroreflex although the BRS itself did not increase. Despite the successful technical and organizational implementation of this biofeedback approach, it was not effective to systematically reduce blood pressure. A further development in the direction of guiding the patient to use the valsalva breathing pattern and/or a prolonged duration of the biofeedback training might be promising.

  7. Effects of peritoneal dialysis fluid biocompatibility on baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, S G; Selby, N M; McIntyre, C W

    2008-04-01

    Conventional low biocompatibility peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluid composition has been driven by manufacturing expediency and cost limitations. PD is associated with significant acute changes in cardiovascular functional parameters, at least in part influenced by fluid composition. Short-term control of blood pressure (BP) is under control of the baroreflex arc. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PD fluid biocompatibility on baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). We studied 10 non-diabetic established continuous ambulatory PD patients, in a randomized crossover trial comparing conventional and biocompatible PD fluids. Systemic hemodynamics were continuously monitored using digital pulse-wave analysis. Plasma glucose and insulin were assessed during treatment with both 1.36% and 3.86% glucose-containing fluids. BRS was calculated offline from continuous BP and interbeat interval data. BRS was significantly higher with conventional PD fluid during both 1.36% (Pinsulin concentrations, and ultrafiltration volumes were significantly higher during the 3.86% dwell than the 1.36% dwell, but there were no differences between standard and biocompatible fluids. We have demonstrated for the first time that PD fluid biocompatibility rapidly affects BRS. These changes occur against a background of cardiovascular variability, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperglycemia. Further research is needed to explore the mechanism and, more importantly, the consequences of these findings.

  8. Baroreflex Sensitivity Decreases During 90-Day Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Arzeno, N. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) decreases during spaceflight and simulated spaceflight (head down bed rest [BR]). However, previous studies have only examined BRS in response to a limited blood pressure (BP) range or to a single sudden change in BP. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine BRS during 90 days of 6deg head-down tilt BR over a broad range of BP perturbations. METHODS: Nineteen normal volunteers (12M, 7F) were tested one day before BR, and then near BR days 30, 60 and 90. BP was pharmacologically altered by continuous infusions of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Electrocardiogram and continuous BP were collected during 10 min of normal saline (NS), followed by increasing concentrations of PE (10 min each of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 micro-g/kg/min). After a 20 min break, NS was infused again for 10 min, followed by increasing concentrations of SNP (10 min each of 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 micro-g/kg/min). Baroreceptor sensitivity was measured as the slope of a sequence of 3 or more beats in which the systolic BP and following R-R interval (RR) both increased or decreased. Spectral heart rate variability (HRV) and mean RR were analyzed using data from only the NS infusions. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed to examine the effects of BR and gender. RESULTS: RR decreased (pdecreased with BR (p=0.027) and was lower (p=0.046) in men (0.39+/-0.02, mean+/-SEM) than women (0.48+/-0.02). The spontaneous baroreflex slope, our measure of BRS, increased with PE and decreased with SNP across BR (pdecrease in BRS from pre- to post-BR appeared to be larger in women (43.6+/-7.0%) than in men (31.3+/-3.9%, p=0.06). CONCLUSION: Parasympathetic activity and baroreflex sensitivity decrease during 90 days of BR, and BRS tends to diminish more in women than in men.

  9. Gender Differences in Baroreflex Sensitivity after Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzeno, Natalia M.; Stenger, M. B.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Lee, S. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    Two potential contributing factors to post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance are decreases in baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and sympathetic nervous system response. The purpose of this study was to examine the shape of the BRS curve and sympathetic response to a wide range of blood pressures (BP) before and during 6 head-down bed rest (BR). METHODS: Normal volunteers were tested one day before BR (20M, 1 0F) and near BR days 30 (20M, 10F), 60 (16M, 8F), and 90 (1 0M, 5F). BP was pharmacologically manipulated by 10-min infusions of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) at 3 increasing concentrations with a 20-min rest between PE and SNP. Electrocardiogram and continuous finger blood pressure were recorded. A blood sample was drawn at the end of each infusion to measure plasma norepinephrine levels. The spontaneous baroreflex slope (SBS), a measure of BRS, was calculated as the slope of a sequence of 3 or more beats in which the systolic BP (SBP) and following R-R interval (RR) both increased or decreased. The data included saturated responses at the upper but not the lower end of the BP range. Mean response curves were constructed using second-order mixed model analysis. Results are based on term significance in the models. RESULTS RR: RR was lower during BR than pre BR (pgenders were modeled by a linear response; compared to males, females had an attenuated (lower slope) RR response to changes in SBP (p=0.031). SBS: SBS vs SBP analysis showed a lower SBS during BR (pgender and BR. Not only do gender and BR baseline differences exist, but gender and BR also influence the slope and saturation of the BRS curves. Attenuated and saturating RR and SBS responses, as well as differences in baseline values, may contribute to the higher rates of orthostatic intolerance in women and after bed rest.

  10. Role of aortic arch vascular mechanics in cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Stephen A; Chirico, Daniele; Dempster, Kylie S; Shoemaker, J Kevin; O'Leary, Deborah D

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (cvBRS) measures the efficiency of the cardiovagal baroreflex to modulate heart rate in response to increases or decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Given that baroreceptors are located in the walls of the carotid sinuses (CS) and aortic arch (AA), the arterial mechanics of these sites are important contributors to cvBRS. However, the relative contribution of CS and AA mechanics to cvBRS remains unclear. This study employed sex differences as a model to test the hypothesis that differences in cvBRS between groups would be explained by the vascular mechanics of the AA but not the CS. Thirty-six young, healthy, normotensive individuals (18 females; 24 ± 2 yr) were recruited. cvBRS was measured using transfer function analysis of the low-frequency region (0.04-0.15 Hz). Ultrasonography was performed at the CS and AA to obtain arterial diameters for the measurement of distensibility. Local pulse pressure (PP) was taken at the CS using a hand-held tonometer, whereas AA PP was estimated using a transfer function of brachial PP. Both cvBRS (25 ± 11 vs. 19 ± 7 ms/mmHg, P = 0.04) and AA distensibility (16.5 ± 6.0 vs. 10.5 ± 3.8 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.02) were greater in females than males. Sex differences in cvBRS were eliminated after controlling for AA distensibility (P = 0.19). There were no sex differences in CS distensibility (5.32 ± 2.3 vs. 4.63 ± 1.3 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.32). The present data demonstrate that AA mechanics are an important contributor to differences in cvBRS.

  11. Baroreflex Sensitivity And Autonomic Nervous System Function In Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise Schouborg; Pors, Kirsten; Theibel, Ann Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Syncope in the elderly may be caused by an apparent hypersensitivity in the high pressure baroreflex control of heart rate and blood pressure - carotid sinus hypersensitivity. Previous studies have found ambiguous results regarding the baroreceptor sensitivity in patients with carotid sinus hyper...... sensitivity may not follow the same neuronal pathways as those responding to the crude external pressures applied during carotid sinus massage...

  12. The Effects of Bupivacaine and Ropivacaine on Baroreflex Sensitivity With or Without Respiratory Acidosis and Alkalosis in Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watanabe, Yukinaga; Dohi, Shuji; Iida, Hiroki; Ishiyama, Tadahiko

    1997-01-01

    ...) depression that could be enhanced in the presence of respiratory acidosis.We examined a potential suppression of baroreflex function with bupivacaine and ropivacaine during hypercapnic acidosis or hypocapnic alkalosis...

  13. Reduced baroreflex sensitivity in alcoholic cirrhosis: relations to hemodynamics and humoral systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Iversen, Jens S; Henriksen, Jens H;

    2007-01-01

    In cirrhosis, arterial vasodilatation leads to central hypovolemia and activation of the sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems. As the liver disease and circulatory dysfunction may affect baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), we assessed BRS in a large group of patients with cirrh...

  14. Baroreflex Sensitivity and its Association with Arrhythmic Events in Chagas Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Meireles Santos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sudden death is the leading cause of death in Chagas disease (CD, even in patients with preserved ejection fraction (EF, suggesting that destabilizing factors of the arrhythmogenic substrate (autonomic modulation contribute to its occurrence. Objective: To determine baroreflex sensitivity (BRS in patients with undetermined CD (GI, arrhythmogenic CD with nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT (GII and CD with spontaneous sustained ventricular tachycardia (STV (GIII, to evaluate its association with the occurrence and complexity of arrhythmias. Method: Forty-two patients with CD underwent ECG and continuous and noninvasive BP monitoring (TASK force monitor. The following were determined: BRS (phenylephrine method; heart rate variability (HRV on 24-h Holter; and EF (echocardiogram. Results: GIII had lower BRS (6.09 ms/mm Hg as compared to GII (11.84 and GI (15.23. The difference was significant between GI and GIII (p = 0.01. Correlating BRS with the density of ventricular extrasystoles (VE, low VE density ( 10/h had preserved BRS (p = 0.003. Patients with depressed BRS had higher VE density (p = 0.01, regardless of the EF. The BRS was the only variable related to the occurrence of SVT (p = 0.028. Conclusion: The BRS is preserved in undetermined CD. The BRS impairment increases as disease progresses, being more severe in patients with more complex ventricular arrhythmias. The degree of autonomic dysfunction did not correlate with EF, but with the density and complexity of ventricular arrhythmias.

  15. Exercise training fails to modify arterial baroreflex sensitivity in ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Naoyoshi; Mori, Nobuyoshi; Nagasaka, Makoto; Ito, Osamu; Ogawa, Mika; Kurosawa, Hajime; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2007-04-01

    In men, exercise training attenuates age-related reduction in baroreflex sensitivity, which is related to cardiovascular health. It is unknown, however, if this holds true for post-menopausal women. We examined the effects of exercise training on baroreceptor-heart rate (HR) reflex sensitivity in ovariectomized (OVX) and sham-operated (SO) Wistar-Kyoto rats. At the age of 8 weeks, OVX and SO rats were assigned to either sedentary or exercise-trained group. Exercise training was performed on a treadmill 5 days per week. At the age of 20 weeks, baroreflex sensitivity in response to increases in blood pressure (BRSinc) and decreases in blood pressure (BRSdec) were evaluated by injections of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Both BRSinc and BRSdec were significantly reduced in sedentary OVX rats compared with sedentary SO rats. Exercise training decreased resting HR and BRSdec, but had no effect on BRSinc in SO rats. In OVX rats, exercise training decreased resting HR but modified neither BRSdec nor BRSinc. We conclude that withdrawal of female sex hormones in normotensive female rats is associated with reduced baroreflex sensitivity in response to both increase and decrease in blood pressure and that exercise training fails to modulate the decline of BRSinc associated with withdrawal of female sex hormones. To maintain high level of BRSinc in post-menopausal women, hormone replacement therapy may be needed.

  16. The effects of bupivacaine and ropivacaine on baroreflex sensitivity with or without respiratory acidosis and alkalosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y; Dohi, S; Iida, H; Ishiyama, T

    1997-02-01

    Systemic toxicity of local anesthetics causes cardiac and central nervous system (CNS) depression that could be enhanced in the presence of respiratory acidosis. We examined a potential suppression of baroreflex function with bupivacaine and ropivacaine during hypercapnic acidosis or hypocapnic alkalosis. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was randomly tested in rats with one of 13 conditions during intravenous administration of saline (control), bupivacaine 1, 2, or 3 mg/kg, or ropivacaine 2, 4, or 6 mg/kg. The effects of bupivacaine (3 mg/kg) or ropivacaine (6 mg/kg) on BRS were also examined during hypercapnic acidosis or hypocapnic alkalosis. The BRS was assessed using a value of delta heart rate/ delta mean arterial pressure after infusion of phenylephrine (3 micrograms/kg). Both bupivacaine and ropivacaine (at the largest dose) significantly suppressed BRS. Acute respiratory acidosis (pHa 7.24 +/- 0.04, Paco2 63 +/- 4 mm Hg) enhanced BRS. The BRS enhanced during acidosis was also suppressed with bupivacaine and ropivacaine, but less so than in the absence of acidosis. The presence of hypocapnic alkalosis (pHa 7.55 +/- 0.03, Paco2 25 +/- 2 mm Hg) did not affect BRS and reversed BRS suppression caused by both drugs. Thus, bupivacaine and ropivacaine affect neuronal control mechanisms for maintaining cardiovascular stability, and acute changes of respiration could significantly modify such suppression.

  17. Baroreflex sensitivity as a determinant of responses to hydralazine in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, H

    1983-01-01

    In order to evaluate the relation between hypotension induced by hydralazine and the resultant reflex tachycardia, as well as the role of baroreflex sensitivity in determining the magnitude of these responses, the drug was administered orally at a dose of 1 mg/kg to a group of trained conscious normotensive and renal hypertensive dogs. Responses were assessed by measuring blood pressure and heart rate for 8 hr after dosing and integrating the changes observed over time in order to obtain a mean value. Baroreflex gain was calculated as the ratio of heart rate to blood pressure responses. Hypotension was greater in hypertensives, whereas tachycardia was not different between groups. Gain was therefore smaller in hypertensives, but not uniformly so, a portion of these animals having values within the normotensive range. This high gain group responded with less hypotension and more tachycardia than did the low gain group. Differences in pressure and rate responses to repeated administration of hydralazine between the two groups were minimal. It is suggested that baroreflex gain, an innate individual characteristic, is an important determinant of acute pressure responses to hydralazine in dogs, hypertensive animals having less gain than normotensives and showing increased hypotensive responses. Gain appears not to be as important in determining the chronic effects of the drug.

  18. Comparison of Baroreflex Sensitivity to Fall and Rise in Blood Pressure Induced by the Valsalva Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Naoki; Singer, Wolfgang; Gehrking, Tonette L.; Sletten, David M.; Schmelzer, James D.; Low, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    The baroreflex plays a key role in human blood pressure (BP) regulation. Its efferent limb consists of a vagal and a sympathetic component. The Valsalva maneuver is widely used to quantify vagal baroreflex function (vagal baroreflex sensitivity, BRS_vagal), but most studies have focused on the R-R interval response to BP decrement, even though the subsequent response to an increment in BP is important and different. We sought to evaluate if BRS_vagal can be determined from the rise in BP during phase III-IV of the Valsalva maneuver (BRSvagalinc), to assess the association between BRSvagalinc and BRS_vagal derived from the preceeding BP decrement (BRSvagaldec), and to validate BRSvagalinc as index of autonomic function. We studied patients with severe autonomic failure (n=49, 25 female), mild autonomic failure (n=25, 11 female), and matched normal controls (n=29, 15 female). BRSvagalinc and BRSvagaldec were calculated as the regression slope of R-R interval and systolic BP during phase III-IV and early phase II of the Valsalva maneuver, respectively, and compared with other autonomic indices across groups. BRSvagalinc could be calculated in all subjects and correlated highly with BRSvagaldec (r=0.72, p<0.001). BRSvagalinc also significantly correlated with BP changes during phase II and IV of the Valsalva maneuver and sympathetic barosensitivity. BRSvagalinc was significantly different between groups, being highest in controls and lowest in patients with severe autonomic failure. Vagal BRS, determined by relating R-R interval to BP increase following phase III, is a valuable autonomic index, provides additional information about vagal baroreflex function, and reflects overall severity of autonomic failure. PMID:24597842

  19. Mental stress-induced increase in blood pressure is not related to baroreflex sensitivity in middle-aged healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvel, J P; Cerutti, C; Quelin, P; Laville, M; Gustin, M P; Paultre, C Z; Ducher, M

    2000-04-01

    The baroreflex that acts to blunt blood pressure (BP) variations through opposite variations in heart rate should limit the BP increase produced by an emotional challenge. However, relations between baroreflex sensitivity and BP reactivity induced by a psychological stress in a large group of adults have never been firmly established. In 280 healthy men, rest (10 minutes) and stress (5 minutes) BP and heart rate were recorded beat to beat by a blood pressure monitor. The mental stress was elicited by a well-standardized computerized version of a word color conflict stress test (Stroop Color Test). Rest and stress baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by the cross-spectral analysis of BP and heart rate and by the sequence method. The stress-induced increase in systolic BP (22.4+/-0.1 mm Hg) was not correlated with resting baroreflex sensitivity but was slightly correlated (r=0.2, P<0.001) with BP variability assessed either by standard deviation or by mid-frequency band spectral power. Our results suggested that a centrally mediated sympathetic stimulation overcame cardiac autonomic regulation and emphasized the role of the sympathetic vasoconstriction in the pressure response at the onset of the stressing stimulation. During the sustained sympathoexcitatory phase, the cardiac baroreflex blunts BP variations but at a lower sensitivity.

  20. 1/f Noise Outperforms White Noise in Sensitizing Baroreflex Function in the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Rika; Nozaki, Daichi; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-08-01

    We show that externally added 1/f noise more effectively sensitizes the baroreflex centers in the human brain than white noise. We examined the compensatory heart rate response to a weak periodic signal introduced via venous blood pressure receptors while adding 1/f or white noise with the same variance to the brain stem through bilateral cutaneous stimulation of the vestibular afferents. In both cases, this noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation optimized covariance between the weak input signals and the heart rate responses. However, the optimal level with 1/f noise was significantly lower than with white noise, suggesting a functional benefit of 1/f noise for neuronal information transfer in the brain.

  1. Reduced baroreflex sensitivity and pulmonary dysfunction in alcoholic cirrhosis: effect of hyperoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Iversen, J.S.; Krag, A.

    2010-01-01

    matched controls underwent hemodynamic and pulmonary investigations. BRS was assessed by cross-spectral analysis of variabilities between blood pressure and heart rate time series. A 100% oxygen test was performed with the assessment of arterial oxygen tensions (Pa(O(2))) and alveolar-arterial oxygen......Patients with cirrhosis exhibit impaired regulation of the arterial blood pressure, reduced baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and prolonged QT interval. In addition, a considerable number of patients have a pulmonary dysfunction with hypoxemia, impaired lung diffusing capacity (Dl(CO)), and presence...

  2. 17beta-estradiol modulates baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic tone of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, T M; Connell, B J

    2000-05-12

    The following experiments examine the role of estrogen as a central modulator of autonomic tone and baroreflex sensitivity in the female rat. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and then supplemented daily for 7 days with a fixed dose of estrogen (5 microg/kg; sc) to produce a stable level of estrogen similar to that present at proestrous (17 pg/ml). The rats were then anaesthetized with sodium thiobutabarbital (100 mg/kg) and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate and both vagal and renal efferent nerve activities. The sensitivity of the cardiac baroreflex was tested using intravenous injection of multiple doses of either phenylephrine hydrochloride or sodium nitroprusside. Estrogen-supplemented female rats exhibited a significantly enhanced BRS as compared to male rats from a previous study (0.78 vs. 0.5). Furthermore, bolus injection of estrogen (1x10(-2) mg/kg; iv) in estrogen-supplemented female rats produced a significant increase in vagal nerve activity and a significant decrease in renal nerve activity which together resulted in a further enhancement of the BRS (0.78 vs. 2.4). Injection of the selective estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, into nucleus ambiguus and the intrathecal space of the spinal cord blocked the respective changes in parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve activities indicating that intravenously administered estrogen modulates baseline autonomic tone via the activation of central estrogen receptors.

  3. Determination of baroreflex sensitivity during the modified Oxford maneuver by trigonometric regressive spectral analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gasch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differences in spontaneous and drug-induced baroreflex sensitivity (BRS have been attributed to its different operating ranges. The current study attempted to compare BRS estimates during cardiovascular steady-state and pharmacologically stimulation using an innovative algorithm for dynamic determination of baroreflex gain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Forty-five volunteers underwent the modified Oxford maneuver in supine and 60° tilted position with blood pressure and heart rate being continuously recorded. Drug-induced BRS-estimates were calculated from data obtained by bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Spontaneous indices were derived from data obtained during rest (stationary and under pharmacological stimulation (non-stationary using the algorithm of trigonometric regressive spectral analysis (TRS. Spontaneous and drug-induced BRS values were significantly correlated and display directionally similar changes under different situations. Using the Bland-Altman method, systematic differences between spontaneous and drug-induced estimates were found and revealed that the discrepancy can be as large as the gain itself. Fixed bias was not evident with ordinary least products regression. The correlation and agreement between the estimates increased significantly when BRS was calculated by TRS in non-stationary mode during the drug injection period. TRS-BRS significantly increased during phenylephrine and decreased under nitroprusside. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The TRS analysis provides a reliable, non-invasive assessment of human BRS not only under static steady state conditions, but also during pharmacological perturbation of the cardiovascular system.

  4. Impaired baroreflex sensitivity and the risks of new-onset ambulatory hypertension, in an elderly population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauphinot, Virginie; Kossovsky, Michel P.; Gueyffier, Francois; Pichot, Vincent; Gosse, Philippe; Roche, Frederic; Barthelemy, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    / Background: Impairment of the autonomic nervous system activity may be involved in the development of hypertension. Yet the prognostic values of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity in the risk of new-onset ambulatory hypertension have not been investigated. We sought to assess the re

  5. Categorization of the hemodynamic response to hemodialysis: the importance of baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterton, Lindsay J; Selby, Nicholas M; Burton, James O; Fialova, Jana; Chan, Cian; McIntyre, Chris W

    2010-01-01

    Intradialytic hypotension (IDH) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The baroreflex arc is under autonomic control and regulates blood pressure. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) to the pathophysiology of IDH. Thirty-four chronic HD (12 IDH-prone, 22 IDH-resistant) patients underwent BRS measurement during HD with relative blood volume monitoring. During analysis, patients were separated into four age-matched groups according to resting BRS>or=4.5 ms/mmHg and hemodynamic stability. Resting BRS was extremely heterogenous (geometric mean BRS 5.78+/-1.41 [range 1.76-41.41] ms/mmHg). Relative blood volume reduction was well matched in all groups (mean reduction in relative blood volume for all patients -6.74%+/-0.86%, P>0.05). Thirty-seven episodes of IDH occurred in the IDH prone, reduced BRS group. Patients with impaired resting BRS and prone to IDH had markedly different responses to HD as compared to the preserved BRS group, but the total peripheral resistance response was significantly lower than in the IDH-resistant patients (15.9%+/-2.1% vs. 42.4%+/-3.0%, respectively, P<0.001). In those patients prone to IDH and with impaired resting BRS, percentage reduction in cardiac output at the end of HD highly correlated with reduction in relative blood volume (r=0.94, P=0.006). Hypotension during dialysis may be an important source of recurrent cardiac injury and early recognition of those patients prone to relative symptomatic and asymptomatic hypotension remains important. Impaired resting BRS and recognition of a suboptimal peripheral pressor response, appear to predict those patients most likely to undergo hemodynamic instability and may assist in the pursuit of this elusive goal.

  6. The Effect of Physical Resistance Training on Baroreflex Sensitivity of Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Felipe Pereira Gomes

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Baroreceptors act as regulators of blood pressure (BP; however, its sensitivity is impaired in hypertensive patients. Among the recommendations for BP reduction, exercise training has become an important adjuvant therapy in this population. However, there are many doubts about the effects of resistance exercise training in this population. Objective: To evaluate the effect of resistance exercise training on BP and baroreceptor sensitivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Method: Rats SHR (n = 16 and Wistar (n = 16 at 8 weeks of age, at the beginning of the experiment, were randomly divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (CS, n = 8; trained control (CT, n = 8; sedentary SHR (HS, n = 8 and trained SHR (HT, n = 8. Resistance exercise training was performed in a stairmaster-type equipment (1.1 × 0.18 m, 2 cm between the steps, 80° incline with weights attached to their tails, (5 days/week, 8 weeks. Baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate (HR was tested by loading/unloading of baroreceptors with phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Results: Resistance exercise training increased the soleus muscle mass in SHR when compared to HS (HS 0.027 ± 0.002 g/mm and HT 0.056 ± 0.003 g/mm. Resistance exercise training did not alter BP. On the other hand, in relation to baroreflex sensitivity, bradycardic response was improved in the TH group when compared to HS (HS -1.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg and HT -2.6 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg although tachycardia response was not altered by resistance exercise (CS -3.3 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg, CT -3.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg, HS -1.47 ± 0.06 bpm/mmHg and HT -1.6 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg. Conclusion: Resistance exercise training was able to promote improvements on baroreflex sensitivity of SHR rats, through the improvement of bradycardic response, despite not having reduced BP.

  7. Baroreflex sensitivity during rest and executive functioning in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The TRAILS study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, A.; Althaus, M.; Hartman, C.A.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Mindera, R.B.; Hoofdakker, B.J. van den; Hoekstra, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often show executive function (EF) problems and neurophysiological hypoarousal. Baroreceptor activation, as part of the baroreflex short-term blood pressure regulatory mechanism, has been linked to cortical inhibition and attenuated cogni

  8. Baroreflex sensitivity during rest and executive functioning in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, A.; Althaus, M.; Hartman, C.A.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Minderaa, R.B.; van den Hoofdakker, B.J.; Hoekstra, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often show executive function (EF) problems and neurophysiological hypoarousal. Baroreceptor activation, as part of the baroreflex short-term blood pressure regulatory mechanism, has been linked to cortical inhibition and attenuated cogni

  9. Influence of fluvastatin on cardiac function and baroreflex sensitivity in diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang XIE; Chao SUN; Li-hua SUN; Jing-yuan LI; Xin CHEN; Hui CHE; Guan-yi LU; Bao-feng YANG; Jing AI

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether fluvastatin is able to ameliorate the impaired cardiac function or baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in rats with type 1 diabetes.Methods: Type 1 diabetic rats were induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) and then administered fluvastatin (1.5,cardiac function and BRS were measured in diabetic rats after fluvastatin treatment for 30 d.Results: The polydipsia, polyphagia and abnormal biochemical indexes of blood were significantly ameliorated by the the 3.0- and 6.0-mg doses of fluvastatin in STZ-induced diabetic rats. FBG was decreased in diabetic rats after fluvastatin treatment for 30 d. The left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and the maximum rate of change of left ventricular pressure in the isovolumic contraction and relaxation period (±dp/dtmax) were elevated, and left ventricular diastolic pressure (LVEDP) was decreased by fluvastatin. The attenuated heart rate responses to arterial blood pressure (ABP) increase induced by phenylephrine (PE) and ABP decrease induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were reversed by the 3.0-mg dose of fluvastatin.Conclusion: Fluvastatin regulates blood lipid levels and decreases the FBG level in diabetic rats. These responses can protect the diabetic heart from complications by improving cardiac function and BRS.

  10. Alterations in the Medullary Endocannabinoid System Contribute to Age-related Impairment of Baroreflex Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaich, Chris L; Shaltout, Hossam A; Grabenauer, Megan; Thomas, Brian F; Gallagher, Patricia E; Howlett, Allyn C; Diz, Debra I

    2015-05-01

    As they age, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats develop elevated systolic blood pressure associated with impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) for control of heart rate. We previously demonstrated in young hypertensive (mRen2)27 rats that impaired BRS is restored by CB1 cannabinoid receptor blockade in the solitary tract nucleus (NTS), consistent with elevated content of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in dorsal medulla relative to normotensive SD rats. There is no effect of CB1 receptor blockade in young SD rats. We now report in older SD rats that dorsal medullary 2-AG levels are 2-fold higher at 70 versus 15 weeks of age (4.22 ± 0.61 vs. 1.93 ± 0.22 ng/mg tissue; P < 0.05). Furthermore, relative expression of CB1 receptor messenger RNA is significantly lower in aged rats, whereas CB2 receptor messenger RNA is significantly higher. In contrast to young adult SD rats, microinjection of the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (36 pmole) into the NTS of older SD rats normalized BRS in animals exhibiting impaired baseline BRS (0.56 ± 0.06 baseline vs. 1.06 ± 0.05 ms/mm Hg after 60 minutes; P < 0.05). Therefore, this study provides evidence for alterations in the endocannabinoid system within the NTS of older SD rats that contribute to age-related impairment of BRS.

  11. Aging process on spectrally determined spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity: a 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvel, Jean-Pierre; Cerutti, Catherine; Mpio, Ignace; Ducher, Michel

    2007-09-01

    The interindividual age-related decrease in baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was reported in many cross-sectional studies. However, the long-term intraindividual decrease in BRS has never been confirmed by longitudinal studies. Data obtained from a 5-year prospective study designed to assess the 5-year stress effects on blood pressure (BP) provided the opportunity to assess longitudinal aging process on spectrally determined BRS (S-BRS) using the cross spectral analysis. This analysis was carried out in 205 men aged between 18 and 50 years who had 2 valid beat to beat BP recordings (Finapress) at a mean 5-year interval. At inclusion and at end of follow-up, S-BRS was significantly correlated with age (r=-0.50, P<0.001, r=-0.33, P<0.001 respectively). Interestingly, the slopes and the intercepts were not significantly different at a 5-year interval. This result is in favor of the good reproducibility of S-BRS. The attenuation with age of S-BRS was calculated at 3.6% a year. This decrease was slightly higher than the one obtained with the baseline data (2.3% per year). This longitudinal study provided, for the first time, an estimate of the slope of the age-related physiological S-BRS decrease in a mid-aged healthy male population. Our findings reinforce the interest of evaluating spontaneous BRS reported to predict hypertension and cardiovascular events in various populations.

  12. Baroreflex sensitivity in children and adolescents: physiology, hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honzíková, N; Závodná, E

    2016-12-13

    The increased prevalence of obesity in children and its complications have led to a greater interest in studying baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in children. This review of BRS in children and adolescents includes subtopics on: 1. Resting values of BRS and their reproducibility, 2. Genetics of BRS, 3. The role of a primarily low BRS and obesity in the development of hypertension, and 4. Association of diabetes mellitus, BRS, and obesity. The conclusions specific to this age follow from this review: 1. The mean heart rate (HR) influences the measurement of BRS. Since the mean HR decreases during adolescence, HR should be taken into account. 2. A genetic dependency of BRS was found. 3. Low BRS values may precede pathological blood-pressure elevation in children with white-coat hypertension. We hypothesize that low BRS plays an active role in the emergence of hypertension in youth. A contribution of obesity to the development of hypertension was also found. We hypothesize that both factors, a primarily low BRS and obesity, are partially independent risk factors for hypertension in youths. 4. In diabetics, a low BRS compared to healthy children can be associated with insulin resistance. A reversibility of the BRS values could be possible after weight loss.

  13. Analysis of baroreflex sensitivity during undulation pump ventricular assist device support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongjian; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Zhang, Xiumin; Song, Hojin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Baba, Atsushi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Abe, Yusuke; Imachi, Kou

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), which involves the autonomic nervous system, in a goat with a chronically implanted undulation pump ventricular assist device (UPVAD). The UPVAD involved transforming the rotation of a brushless DC motor into an undulating motion by a disc attached via a special linking mechanism, and a jellyfish valve in the outflow cannula to prevent diastolic backflow. The pump was implanted into the thoracic cavity of a goat by a left thoracotomy, and the inflow and outflow cannulae were sutured to the apex of the left ventricle and to the descending aorta, respectively. The driving cable was wired percutaneously to an external controller. Electrocardiogram and hemodynamic waveforms were recorded at a sampling frequency of 1 kHz. BRS was determined when awake by the slope of the linear regression of R-R interval against mean arterial pressure changes, which were induced by the administration of methoxamine hydrochloride, both with continuous driving of the UPVAD as well as without assistance. BRS values during the UPVAD support and without assistance were 1.60 +/- 0.30 msec/mm Hg and 0.98 +/- 0.22 msec/mm Hg (n = 5, P < 0.05), respectively. BRS was significantly improved during left ventricular assistance. Therefore, UPVAD support might decrease sympathetic nerve activity and increase parasympathetic nerve activity to improve both microcirculation and organ function.

  14. The low frequency power of heart rate variability is neither a measure of cardiac sympathetic tone nor of baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Davide; Silvani, Alessandro; McAllen, Robin M; May, Clive N; Ramchandra, Rohit

    2014-10-01

    The lack of noninvasive approaches to measure cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) has driven the development of indirect estimates such as the low-frequency (LF) power of heart rate variability (HRV). Recently, it has been suggested that LF HRV can be used to estimate the baroreflex modulation of heart period (HP) rather than cardiac sympathetic tone. To test this hypothesis, we measured CSNA, HP, blood pressure (BP), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) of HP, estimated with the modified Oxford technique, in conscious sheep with pacing-induced heart failure and in healthy control sheep. We found that CSNA was higher and systolic BP and HP were lower in sheep with heart failure than in control sheep. Cross-correlation analysis showed that in each group, the beat-to-beat changes in HP correlated with those in CSNA and in BP, but LF HRV did not correlate significantly with either CSNA or BRS. However, when control sheep and sheep with heart failure were considered together, CSNA correlated negatively with HP and BRS. There was also a negative correlation between CSNA and BRS in control sheep when considered alone. In conclusion, we demonstrate that in conscious sheep, LF HRV is neither a robust index of CSNA nor of BRS and is outperformed by HP and BRS in tracking CSNA. These results do not support the use of LF HRV as a noninvasive estimate of either CSNA or baroreflex function, but they highlight a link between CSNA and BRS.

  15. Modulation of baroreflex sensitivity by walnuts versus cashew nuts in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Aletta E; Van Rooyen, Johannes M; Huisman, Hugo W; Mukuddem-Petersen, Janine; Oosthuizen, Welma; Hanekom, Susanna M; Jerling, Johann C

    2006-06-01

    Impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is associated with cardiovascular diseases and the metabolic syndrome. Because lipid abnormalities have been associated with impaired BRS, this study aimed to determine whether diets known to improve the lipid profile, namely a diet high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (walnuts) or monounsaturated fatty acids (cashew nuts), would improve BRS in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS). A controlled feeding trial with a randomized, controlled, parallel study design was undertaken, which involved 62 subjects with MS. Subjects were stratified according to gender and age and were randomized into three groups receiving a control diet, or a diet high (20% energy) in walnuts or unsalted cashew nuts for 8 weeks while maintaining body weight. The BRS, C-reactive protein (CRP), and MS components were measured before and after the intervention. After the intervention, BRS in the walnut-fed study group decreased (P = .038) and that in the cashew-fed study group increased (P = .036), but the BRS in the control group did not change (P = .56). The percent change of the walnut versus cashew group differed (P = .019). Body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triacylglycerol did not change. The fasting glucose concentrations of the cashew group increased (P = .03). The significant improvements in BRS obtained by a diet rich in cashew nuts underline the beneficial cardiovascular effects of nuts. However, the opposite result was obtained with a diet rich in walnuts. These significant changes observed might indicate that BRS is particularly sensitive and influenced by changes in diet without changes in obesity.

  16. Coconut oil supplementation and physical exercise improves baroreflex sensitivity and oxidative stress in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Naiane F B; Porpino, Suênia K P; Monteiro, Matheus M O; Gomes, Enéas R M; Braga, Valdir A

    2015-04-01

    The hypothesis that oral supplementation with virgin coconut oil (Cocos nucifera L.) and exercise training would improve impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and reduce oxidative stress in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) was tested. Adult male SHR and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) were divided into 5 groups: WKY + saline (n = 8); SHR + saline (n = 8); SHR + coconut oil (2 mL·day(-1), n = 8); SHR + trained (n = 8); and SHR + trained + coconut oil (n = 8). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was recorded and BRS was tested using phenylephrine (8 μg/kg, intravenous) and sodium nitroprusside (25 μg·kg(-1), intravenous). Oxidative stress was measured using dihydroethidium in heart and aorta. SHR + saline, SHR + coconut oil, and SHR + trained group showed higher MAP compared with WKY + saline (175 ± 6, 148 ± 6, 147 ± 7 vs. 113 ± 2 mm Hg; p coconut oil, SHR + trained group, and SHR + trained + coconut oil groups presented lower MAP compared with SHR + saline group (148 ± 6, 147 ± 7, 134 ± 8 vs. 175 ± 6 mm Hg; p Coconut oil combined with exercise training improved BRS in SHR compared with SHR + saline group (-2.47 ± 0.3 vs. -1.39 ± 0.09 beats·min(-1)·mm Hg(-1); p coconut oil group presented reduced oxidative stress compared with SHR + saline in heart (622 ± 16 vs. 774 ± 31 AU, p coconut oil reduced oxidative stress in SHR compared with SHR + saline group (454 ± 33 vs. 689 ± 29 AU, p coconut oil combined with exercise training improved impaired BRS and reduced oxidative stress in SHR.

  17. Rehabilitation: Periodic somatosensory stimulation increases arterial baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gademan, Maaike G J; Sun, Yiping; Han, Liming; Valk, Vanessa J; Schalij, Martin J; van Exel, Henk J; Lucas, Carolien M H B; Maan, Arie C; Verwey, Harriette F; van de Vooren, Hedde; Pinna, Gian D; Maestri, Roberto; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; van der Wall, Ernst E; Swenne, Cees A

    2011-10-20

    One of the beneficial effects of exercise training in chronic heart failure (CHF) is an improvement in baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), a prognostic index in CHF. In our hypothesis-generating study we propose that at least part of this effect is mediated by neural afferent information, and more specifically, by exercise-induced somatosensory nerve traffic. To compare the effects of periodic electrical somatosensory stimulation on BRS in patients with CHF with the effects of exercise training and with usual care. We compared in stable CHF patients the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, N = 23, LVEF 30 ± 9%) with the effects of bicycle exercise training (EXTR, N = 20, LVEF 32 ± 7%). To mimic exercise-associated somatosensory ergoreceptor stimulation, we applied periodic (2/s, marching pace) burst TENS to both feet. TENS and EXTR sessions were held during two successive days. BRS, measured prior to the first intervention session and one day after the second intervention session, increased by 28% from 3.07 ± 2.06 to 4.24 ± 2.61 ms/mmHg in the TENS group, but did not change in the EXTR group (baseline: 3.37 ± 2.53 ms/mmHg; effect: 3.26 ± 2.54 ms/mmHg) (P(TENS vs EXTR) = 0.02). Heart rate and systolic blood pressure did not change in either group. We demonstrated that periodic somatosensory input alone is sufficient and efficient in increasing BRS in CHF patients. This concept constitutes a basis for studies towards more effective exercise training regimens in the diseased/impaired, in whom training aimed at BRS improvement should possibly focus more on the somatosensory aspect. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Comparison of three methods for the estimation of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in normotensive and hypertensive subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducher, M; Siché, J P; Fauvel, J P; Gustin, M P; Pozet, N; Paultre, C; Cerutti, C

    1995-08-01

    This study aimed at comparing estimations of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) obtained with 3 different methods from continuous non-invasive blood pressure recordings in humans. A new method, allowing the quantification of the statistical dependence between values of 2 parameters (Z coefficient), was applied to beat-to-beat systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart period (HP) values. SBP and HP values with positive Z coefficient and corresponding to baroreflex activity (SBP and HP values both lower or higher than the modal values) were submitted to a linear regression and the regression coefficient (Zgain) was taken as an index of BRS. Second, cross-spectral analysis of SBP and HP gave a BRS value (Csgain) computed as the average value of transfer function moduli for frequencies between 0.07 and 0.14 Hz, with coherence between SBP and HP greater than 0.5. The third method relies on the analysis of linear sequences (r > 0.97) containing at least 3 values of SBP and HP varying in the same direction. The average regression coefficient obtained from all selected SBP and HP sequences is the index of BRS (Seqgain). SBP and HR were recorded during 1 hour with a Finapres in 10 healthy male volunteers (NT), 23 to 32 year-old (SBP: 123 +/- 2 mmHg) and 10 recent and untreated hypertensive subjects (HT) (SBP: 152 +/- 6 mmHg). [table: see text] These results show that, in both groups, Zgain and Seqgain correlated with Csgain. No correlation was found between Zgain and Seqgain in healthy volunteers whereas the correlation was strong in hypertensives probably due to more heterogeneous SBP levels and BRS values in these subjects. This suggests that these methods are sensitive to different ways of response of the baroreflex.

  19. Association of exercise training and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activator improves baroreflex sensitivity of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, P R; Moreira, M C S; Marques, S M; Pinto, I S J; Macedo, L M; Silva, C C; Freiria-Oliveira, A H; Rebelo, A C S; Reis, A A S; Rosa, D A; Ferreira-Neto, M L; Castro, C H; Pedrino, G R

    2016-08-01

    The present study sought to determine cardiovascular effects of aerobic training associated with diminazene aceturate (DIZE), an activator of the angiotensin converting enzyme 2, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male SHRs (280-350 g) were either subjected to exercise training or not (sedentary group). The trained group was subjected to 8 weeks of aerobic training on a treadmill (five times a week, lasting 60 min at an intensity of 50-60% of maximum aerobic speed). In the last 15 days of the experimental protocol, these groups were redistributed into four groups: i) sedentary SHRs with daily treatment of 1 mg/kg DIZE (S+D1); ii) trained SHRs with daily treatment of 1 mg/kg DIZE (T+D1); iii) sedentary SHRs with daily treatment of vehicle (S+V); and iv) trained SHRs with daily treatment of vehicle (T+V). After treatment, SHRs were anesthetized and subjected to artery and femoral vein cannulation prior to the implantation of ECG electrode. After 24 h, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded; the baroreflex sensitivity and the effect of double autonomic blockade (DAB) were evaluated in non-anesthetized SHRs. DIZE treatment improved baroreflex sensitivity in the T+D1 group as compared with the T+V and S+D1 groups. The intrinsic heart rate (IHR) and MAP were reduced in T+D1 group as compared with T+V and S+D1 groups. Hence, we conclude that the association of exercise training with DIZE treatment improved baroreflex function and cardiovascular regulation.

  20. The Effect of Physical Resistance Training on Baroreflex Sensitivity of Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Moisés Felipe Pereira; Borges, Mariana Eiras; Rossi, Vitor de Almeida; Moura, Elizabeth de Orleans C de; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Baroreceptors act as regulators of blood pressure (BP); however, its sensitivity is impaired in hypertensive patients. Among the recommendations for BP reduction, exercise training has become an important adjuvant therapy in this population. However, there are many doubts about the effects of resistance exercise training in this population. To evaluate the effect of resistance exercise training on BP and baroreceptor sensitivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Rats SHR (n = 16) and Wistar (n = 16) at 8 weeks of age, at the beginning of the experiment, were randomly divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (CS, n = 8); trained control (CT, n = 8); sedentary SHR (HS, n = 8) and trained SHR (HT, n = 8). Resistance exercise training was performed in a stairmaster-type equipment (1.1 × 0.18 m, 2 cm between the steps, 80° incline) with weights attached to their tails, (5 days/week, 8 weeks). Baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate (HR) was tested by loading/unloading of baroreceptors with phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Resistance exercise training increased the soleus muscle mass in SHR when compared to HS (HS 0.027 ± 0.002 g/mm and HT 0.056 ± 0.003 g/mm). Resistance exercise training did not alter BP. On the other hand, in relation to baroreflex sensitivity, bradycardic response was improved in the TH group when compared to HS (HS -1.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg and HT -2.6 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg) although tachycardia response was not altered by resistance exercise (CS -3.3 ± 0.2 bpm/mmHg, CT -3.3 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg, HS -1.47 ± 0.06 bpm/mmHg and HT -1.6 ± 0.1 bpm/mmHg). Resistance exercise training was able to promote improvements on baroreflex sensitivity of SHR rats, through the improvement of bradycardic response, despite not having reduced BP. Os barorreceptores atuam como reguladores da pressão arterial (PA); no entanto, sua sensibilidade encontra-se prejudicada em pacientes hipertensos. Dentre as recomendações para a redução da PA, o treinamento f

  1. Effects of Kefir on the Cardiac Autonomic Tones and Baroreflex Sensitivity in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klippel, Brunella F; Duemke, Licia B; Leal, Marcos A; Friques, Andreia G F; Dantas, Eduardo M; Dalvi, Rodolfo F; Gava, Agata L; Pereira, Thiago M C; Andrade, Tadeu U; Meyrelles, Silvana S; Campagnaro, Bianca P; Vasquez, Elisardo C

    2016-01-01

    It has been previously shown that the probiotic kefir (a symbiotic matrix containing acid bacteria and yeasts) attenuated the hypertension and the endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In the present study, the effect of chronic administration of kefir on the cardiac autonomic control of heart rate (HR) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in SHR was evaluated. SHR were treated with kefir (0.3 mL/100 g body weight) for 60 days and compared with non-treated SHR and with normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. Cardiac autonomic vagal (VT) and sympathetic (ST) tones were estimated through the blockade of the cardiac muscarinic receptors (methylatropine) and the blockade of β1-adrenoceptor (atenolol). The BRS was evaluated by the tachycardia and bradycardia responses to vasoactive drug-induced decreases and increases in arterial blood pressure (BP), respectively. Additionally, spontaneous BRS was estimated by autoregressive spectral analysis. Kefir-treated SHR exhibited significant attenuation of basal BP, HR, and cardiac hypertrophy compared to non-treated SHR (12, 13, and 21%, respectively). Cardiac VT and ST were significantly altered in the SHR (~40 and ~90 bpm) compared with Wistar rats (~120 and ~30 bpm) and were partially recovered in SHR-kefir (~90 and ~25 bpm). SHR exhibited an impaired bradycardic BRS (~50%) compared with Wistar rats, which was reduced to ~40% in the kefir-treated SHR and abolished by methylatropine in all groups. SHR also exhibited a significant impairment of the tachycardic BRS (~23%) compared with Wistar rats and this difference was reduced to 8% in the SHR-kefir. Under the action of atenolol the residual reflex tachycardia was smaller in SHR than in Wistar rats and kefir attenuated this abnormality. Spectral analysis revealed increased low frequency components of BP (~3.5-fold) and pulse interval (~2-fold) compared with Wistar rats and these differences were reduced by kefir-treatment to ~1.6- and ~1.5-fold, respectively

  2. Does the Menstrual Cycle Influence the Sensitivity of Vagally Mediated Baroreflexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    infusion of vasoactive drugs , sug- gesting that cardiac vagal control is not influenced by elevated sympathetic nervous activity associated with the normal... diuretics or exercise training does not alter the carotid–cardiac baroreflex [23,24]. Blood volume fluctuations of the order of 10–15% have been reported...endothelium-dependent responses in canine coronary arteries. Am. J. Physiol. 261, R1022–R1027 26 Shan, J., Resnick, L., Wu, X. and Pang, P. (1994) Vascular

  3. Trigonometric regressive spectral analysis reliably maps dynamic changes in baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic tone: the effect of gender and age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manja Reimann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The assessment of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS has emerged as prognostic tool in cardiology. Although available computer-assisted methods, measuring spontaneous fluctuations of heart rate and blood pressure in the time and frequency domain are easily applicable, they do not allow for quantification of BRS during cardiovascular adaption processes. This, however, seems an essential criterion for clinical application. We evaluated a novel algorithm based on trigonometric regression regarding its ability to map dynamic changes in BRS and autonomic tone during cardiovascular provocation in relation to gender and age. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We continuously recorded systemic arterial pressure, electrocardiogram and respiration in 23 young subjects (25+/-2 years and 22 middle-aged subjects (56+/-4 years during cardiovascular autonomic testing (metronomic breathing, Valsalva manoeuvre, head-up tilt. Baroreflex- and spectral analysis was performed using the algorithm of trigonometric regressive spectral analysis. There was an age-related decline in spontaneous BRS and high frequency oscillations of RR intervals. Changes in autonomic tone evoked by cardiovascular provocation were observed as shifts in the ratio of low to high frequency oscillations of RR intervals and blood pressure. Respiration at 0.1 Hz elicited an increase in BRS while head-up tilt and Valsalva manoeuvre resulted in a downregulation of BRS. The extent of autonomic adaption was in general more pronounced in young individuals and declined stronger with age in women than in men. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The trigonometric regressive spectral analysis reliably maps age- and gender-related differences in baroreflex- and autonomic function and is able to describe adaption processes of baroreceptor circuit during cardiovascular stimulation. Hence, this novel algorithm may be a useful screening tool to detect abnormalities in cardiovascular adaption processes even when

  4. "Regulation of the intracerebroventricular administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on baroreflex function and insulin sensitivity in rats".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Fu; Chan, Yin-Ching; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Hong, Ling-Zong

    2012-06-30

    "In addition to its well-established neurotrophic effects, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has also been shown to regulate glucose metabolism. The present study was conducted to determine whether BDNF has effects on baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and whole-body insulin sensitivity through modulation of autonomic nervous function in normal rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with intracerebroventricular BDNF (20 μg per rat, 10μl; BDNF) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (10 μl; control) at an infusion rate of 1 μl/min in conscious state. The whole-body insulin sensitivity was determined by the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. BRS in response to phenylephrine (PE-BRS) or sodium nitroprusside (NP-BRS) was assessed using linear regression analysis. The sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on BRS were investigated by pharmacological autonomic blockade. When compared to the control rats, blood glucose levels were slightly but significantly decreased in BDNF-treated rats. However, plasma insulin levels were reduced by about 30%. The whole-body insulin sensitivity was increased in BDNF-treated rats. In addition, blood pressure was increased but heart rate remained unchanged after BDNF treatment. Enhanced PE-BRS was also observed in the BDNF-treated rats, which was attributed to the abnormal parasympathetic activation as revealed by the results of the pharmacological blockade study with methylatropine. Results of the present demonstrate that central BDNF plays an important role in the regulation of whole-body insulin sensitivity and baroreflex function. The data indicate that the alteration of autonomic nervous function may play a role in the effects of BDNF."

  5. The Changes of Baroreflex Sensitivity During Head -up Tilt Test and Its Clinical Significance in the Patients with Vasovagal Syncope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡兆霆; 吕艳青; 杨钧国

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the changes of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) during head -up tilt test (HUT) in patients with vasovagal syncope (VS),and to examine the relationship between baroreflex sensitivity and neurohormonal factors. Furthermore, to investigate the effects of the changes of BRS on VS.Methods Forty- two patients with unexplained syncope (Among the 42 patients, there were 22 patients with positive HUT and 20 patients with negative HUT respectively) and 20 healthy volunteers (with negative HUT) underwent passive head-up tilt testing, Antecubital vein blood samples were taken before and after HUT, or at syncope. The fasting plasma endothelin ,serum nitric oxide (NO), serum NE were measured. The BRS was assessed on the basis of the linear regression slope the RR interval versus systolic arterial blood pressure during the increment in blood pressure after intravenous administration of phenylephrine. Results ( 1 )During the syncope, the BRS significantly reduced in HUT( + ) group than baseline. At the end of tilt, the level of plasma ET, serum NO in patients with positive HUT significantly increased compared with baseline or normal controls, and the plasma concentration of NE also had the trend of increase. ( 2 ) By multiple regression analysis, a significant negative correlation was found between baroreceptor sensitivity and the plasma ET, NO at the end of HUT in patients with positive HUT, but there was no relationship between BRS and NE. Conclusions During the syncope occure, the BRS in patients with VS decreased significantly compared with normal controls. The abnormal plasma ET, NO concentration might contribute to the mechanism of VS.

  6. RESTING SYMPATHETIC BAROREFLEX SENSITIVITY IN SUBJECTS WITH LOW AND HIGH TOLERANCE TO CENTRAL HYPOVOLEMIA INDUCED BY LOWER BODY NEGATIVE PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eHinojosa-Laborde

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central hypovolemia elicited by orthostasis or hemorrhage triggers sympathetically-mediated baroreflex responses to maintain organ perfusion; these reflexes are less sensitive in patients with orthostatic intolerance, and during conditions of severe blood loss, may result in cardiovascular collapse (decompensatory or circulatory shock. The ability to tolerate central hypovolemia is variable and physiological factors contributing to tolerance are emerging. We tested the hypothesis that resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS are attenuated in male and female subjects who have low tolerance (LT to central hypovolemia induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP. MSNA and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP were recorded in 47 human subjects who subsequently underwent LBNP to tolerance (onset of presyncopal symptoms. LT subjects experienced presyncopal symptoms prior to completing LBNP of -60 mm Hg, and subjects with high tolerance (HT experienced presyncopal symptoms after completing LBNP after -60 mmHg. Contrary to our hypothesis, resting MSNA burst incidence was not different between LT and HT subjects, and was not related to time to presyncope. BRS was assessed as the slope of the relationship between spontaneous fluctuations in DAP and MSNA during 5 min of supine rest. MSNA burst incidence/DAP correlations were greater than or equal to 0.5 in 37 subjects (LT: n= 9; HT: n=28, and BRS was not different between LT and HT (-1.8 ± 0.3 vs. -2.2 ± 0.2 bursts•(100 beats-1•mmHg-1, p=0.29. We conclude that tolerance to central hypovolemia is not related to either resting MSNA or sympathetic BRS.

  7. Influence of a multideficient diet from northeastern Brazil on resting blood pressure and baroreflex sensitivity in conscious, freely moving rats

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    F.M.F. Monteiro

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available The "regional basic diet" or RBD is a multideficient diet (providing 8% protein which is known to produce dietary deficiencies in some populations in northeastern Brazil. The present study investigated the effects of RBD-induced malnutrition on resting blood pressure and baroreflex sensitivity in conscious rats. Malnourished rats were obtained by feeding dams the RBD during mating and pregnancy (RBD-1 group or during nursing and a 10-day period after weaning (RBD-2 group. At 90 days of age, only RBD-2 rats weighed significantly (P<0.001 less than control rats born to dams fed a standard commercial diet (23% protein during pregnancy and nursing. Baseline mean arterial pressure and heart rate of both RBD-1 and RBD-2 rats were comparable to those of controls. The slopes for both reflex bradycardia and tachycardia (bpm/mmHg induced by intravenous phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively, were unchanged in either RBD-1 (-2.08 ± 0.11 and -3.10 ± 0.43, respectively or RBD-2 (-2.32 ± 0.30 and -3.73 ± 0.53, respectively rats, when compared to controls (-2.09 ± 0.10 and -3.17 ± 0.33, respectively. This study shows that, after a prolonged period of nutritional recovery, the patterns of resting blood pressure and baroreflex sensitivity of both pre- and postnatally malnourished rats were similar to those of controls. The decreased body weight and the tendency to increased reflex tachycardia in RBD-2 rats may suggest that this type of maternal malnutrition during lactation is more critical than during pregnancy.

  8. Chronic baroreflex activation restores spontaneous baroreflex control and variability of heart rate in obesity-induced hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Irwin, Eric D; Lohmeier, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of baroreflex control of heart rate is depressed in subjects with obesity hypertension, which increases the risk for cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms are not fully known, and there are no therapies to improve this dysfunction. To determine the cardiovascular dynamic effects of progressive increases in body weight leading to obesity and hypertension in dogs fed a high-fat diet, 24-h continuous recordings of spontaneous fluctuations in blood pressure and heart rate were analy...

  9. Influence of menstrual cycle phase on muscle metaboreflex control of cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate and blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwich, Doreen; Aldred, Sarah; Fisher, James P

    2013-01-01

    We sought to determine whether menstrual cycle phase influences muscle metaboreflex control of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS), blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Twenty-three young women not taking oral contraceptives were studied during the early (EF; low oestrogen, low progesterone) and late follicular menstrual phases (LF; high oestrogen, low progesterone). Protocol 1 consisted of leg cycling at low (21 ± 2 W) and moderate workloads (71 ± 3 W) in free-flow conditions and with partial flow restriction (bilateral thigh-cuff inflation at 100 mmHg) to activate the muscle metaboreflex. Protocol 2 consisted of rhythmic hand-grip exercise with incremental upper arm-cuff inflation (0, 80, 100 and 120 mmHg) to elicit graded metaboreflex activation. Both protocols were followed by post-exercise ischaemia. Leg cycling decreased cBRS (EF, 20 ± 5, 6 ± 1 and 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 19 ± 3, 6 ± 0.4, 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1) during rest, low- and moderate-intensity leg cycling, respectively) and increased HR in an intensity-dependent manner, while BP remained unchanged. Partial flow restriction during leg cycling decreased cBRS, and increased HR and BP. During post-exercise ischaemia, HR and BP remained elevated, while cBRS remained suppressed (EF, 4.2 ± 0.6 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 4.7 ± 0.5 ms mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 versus rest). Cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was unchanged during hand-grip with and without partial flow restriction and post-exercise ischaemia. No differences in cBRS, HR or BP responses were observed between EF and LF at any time during either protocol. These data indicate that endogenous fluctuations in oestrogen between the EF and LF phases of the menstrual cycle do not influence muscle metaboreflex control of cBRS, BP or HR in young women.

  10. Medullary Endocannabinoids Contribute to the Differential Resting Baroreflex Sensitivity in Rats with Altered Brain Renin-Angiotensin System Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaich, Chris L; Grabenauer, Megan; Thomas, Brian F; Shaltout, Hossam A; Gallagher, Patricia E; Howlett, Allyn C; Diz, Debra I

    2016-01-01

    CB1 cannabinoid receptors are expressed on vagal afferent fibers and neurons within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS), providing anatomical evidence for their role in arterial baroreflex modulation. To better understand the relationship between the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and endocannabinoid expression within the NTS, we measured dorsal medullary endocannabinoid tissue content and the effects of CB1 receptor blockade at this brain site on cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in ASrAOGEN rats with low glial angiotensinogen, normal Sprague-Dawley rats and (mRen2)27 rats with upregulated brain RAS expression. Mass spectrometry revealed higher levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol in (mRen2)27 compared to ASrAOGEN rats (2.70 ± 0.28 vs. 1.17 ± 0.09 ng/mg tissue; P < 0.01), while Sprague-Dawley rats had intermediate content (1.85 ± 0.27 ng/mg tissue). Microinjection of the CB1receptor antagonist SR141716A (36 pmol) into the NTS did not change cardiac BRS in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats (1.04 ± 0.05 ms/mmHg baseline vs. 1.17 ± 0.11 ms/mmHg after 10 min). However, SR141716A in (mRen2)27 rats dose-dependently improved BRS in this strain: 0.36 pmol of SR141716A increased BRS from 0.43 ± 0.03 to 0.71 ± 0.04 ms/mmHg (P < 0.001), and 36 pmol of SR141716A increased BRS from 0.47 ± 0.02 to 0.94 ± 0.10 ms/mmHg (P < 0.01). In contrast, 0.36 pmol (1.50 ± 0.12 vs. 0.86 ± 0.08 ms/mmHg; P < 0.05) and 36 pmol (1.38 ± 0.16 vs. 0.46 ± 0.003 ms/mmHg; P < 0.01) of SR141716A significantly reduced BRS in ASrAOGEN rats. These observations reveal differential dose-related effects of the brain endocannabinoid system that influence cardiovagal BRS in animals with genetic alterations in the brain RAS.

  11. Proneness to worry is negatively associated with blood pressure and baroreflex sensitivity: further evidence of the blood pressure emotional dampening hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Luis Carlos; Vila, Jaime; Reyes del Paso, Gustavo A

    2014-02-01

    This study analyzes differences in blood pressure (BP) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in relation to trait worry. 36 high worry and 21 low worry females were selected from scores on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Cardiovascular parameters were obtained during rest, a self-induced worry period, and defense reflex to intense auditory stimulation. Low worry participants exhibited greater BP during baseline and greater BRS both during baseline and the self-induced worry period than high worry participants. During the defense reflex, low worries present a greater increase in BP. It is concluded that low proneness to worry is associated with greater BP and BRS. Increases in BP during aversive stimulation activated a negative feedback mechanism to inhibit distress and emotional reactivity to negative stimulation. These results support the BP-emotional dampening hypothesis and suggest that the baroreflex can be a relevant mechanism in mediating this effect.

  12. Blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity are not different in spontaneously hypertensive rats and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-shu ZHAN; Yun-feng GUAN; Ding-feng SU; Chao-yu MIAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate and compare hemodynamic phenotypes of blood pressure (BP), blood pressure variability (BPV) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in genetic hypertensive rats. Methods: BP was recorded continuously in conscious, freely moving rats using a computerized technique. BPV was expressed as the standard deviation of beat-to-beat BP values during a 1-h period. BRS was determined by measuring the heart period prolongation in response to the elevation in BP produced by an intravenous injection of phenylephrine. Results: Body weight and heart period were not different between spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR)and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP) at the age of 15weeks. The BP level was markedly higher in SHR-SP than SHR, whereas there were no significant differences in BPV and BRS. Quantitatively, systolic, diastolic and mean BP were significantly elevated by 36.9%, 42.9% and 39.5%, respectively,in SHR-SP compared with SHR (P<0.01). However, their variabilities were elevated only by 14.0%, 0.4% and 10.1%, respectively, without statistical significance (P>0.05). Conclusion: BPV and BRS were not changed in parallel with the BP alterations in SHR and SHR-SP.

  13. Blood pressure, baroreflex sensitivity, and end organ damage in hybrid offspring of spontaneously hypertensive rats and Sprague-Dawley rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-hui XIE; Fu-ming SHEN; Chao-yu MIAO; Ding-feng SU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the blood pressure (BP), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and organ damage in hybrids of spontaneously hypertensive rats and Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods: Spontaneously hypertensive rats and Sprague-Dawley rats were crossbred, and the F1 hybrids were inbred randomly to produce an F2 generation.At the age of 52 weeks, the F1 and F2 hybrids were tested to determine BP and BRS in a conscious state. Histopathological examinations were carried out after BP recording and BRS studies. Results: BP and BRS were not different in F1 and F2 hybrids. BRS was inversely related to systolic BP (SBP) in male, female, or whole populations of hybrids. Quantitatively, BRS values were one-third determined by SBP level (the determinant coefficient was 0.326). The indexes for left ventricular hypertrophy, aortic hypertrophy, and renal damage were all positively related to BP, and negatively related to BRS. In multiple-regression analysis, left ventricular and aortic hypertrophy and glomerulosclerosis score were all most significantly associated with lower BRS and higher systolic BP. The contribution of BRS to left ventricular and aortic hypertrophy and glomerulosclerosis was greater than that of SBP. Conclusion: The present work with hybrid rats demonstrated quantitatively that the BRS value was one-third determined by SBP level. Both BP level and BRS value contributed greatly to the hypertensive organ damage. However,the contribution of BRS to the hypertensive organ damage was greater than that of BP level in these rats.

  14. Time-dependent effects of training on cardiovascular control in spontaneously hypertensive rats: role for brain oxidative stress and inflammation and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo S Masson

    Full Text Available Baroreflex dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation, important hallmarks of hypertension, are attenuated by exercise training. In this study, we investigated the relationships and time-course changes of cardiovascular parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-oxidant profiles within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Basal values and variability of arterial pressure and heart rate and baroreflex sensitivity were measured in trained (T, low-intensity treadmill training and sedentary (S SHR at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8. Paraventricular nucleus was used to determine reactive oxygen species (dihydroethidium oxidation products, HPLC, NADPH oxidase subunits and pro-inflammatory cytokines expression (Real time PCR, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 expression (Western blotting, NF-κB content (electrophoretic mobility shift assay and cytokines immunofluorescence. SHR-S vs. WKY-S (Wistar Kyoto rats as time control showed increased mean arterial pressure (172±3 mmHg, pressure variability and heart rate (358±7 b/min, decreased baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability, increased p47phox and reactive oxygen species production, elevated NF-κB activity and increased TNF-α and IL-6 expression within the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus. Two weeks of training reversed all hypothalamic changes, reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and normalized baroreflex sensitivity (4.04±0.31 vs. 2.31±0.19 b/min/mmHg in SHR-S. These responses were followed by increased vagal component of heart rate variability (1.9-fold and resting bradycardia (-13% at the 4th week, and, by reduced vasomotor component of pressure variability (-28% and decreased mean arterial pressure (-7% only at the 8th week of training. Our findings indicate that independent of the high pressure levels in SHR, training promptly restores baroreflex function by disrupting the positive feedback between high oxidative stress and increased pro

  15. Decreased baroreflex sensitivity is linked to sympathovagal imbalance, low-grade inflammation, and oxidative stress in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subha, M; Pal, Pravati; Pal, G K; Habeebullah, S; Adithan, C; Sridhar, M G

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) has been reported as a cardiovascular (CV) risk. We assessed the sympathovagal imbalance (SVI) and the association of inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) with CV risks in PIH. A total of 125 pregnant women having a risk factor for PIH were followed till term and the incidence of PIH was observed. Retrospectively, they were divided into two groups: Group I (those who did not develop PIH, n = 82) and Group II (those who developed PIH, n = 43). Blood pressure variability (BPV) parameters including baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), spectral heart rate variability (HRV), autonomic function tests (AFTs), inflammatory markers (interleukin-6, TNF-α, interferon-γ), and OS markers were measured in both the groups. Alterations in parasympathetic and sympathetic components of AFTs were analyzed. Link of various parameters to BRS was assessed by correlation and multiple regression analysis. Parasympathetic components of AFTs were decreased from the early part of pregnancy and sympathetic components were increased toward the later part of pregnancy. Decreased BRS, the marker of CV risk, was more prominent in Group II subjects. Independent contribution of interleukin-6 (β = 0.276, P = 0.020), TNF-α (β = 0.408, P = 0.002), interferon-γ (β = 0.355, P = 0.008), and thiobarbituric-acid reactive substance (β = 0.287, P = 0.015) to BRS was found to be significant. It was concluded that sympathetic overactivity that develops more in the later part (third trimester) of pregnancy contributes to SVI and genesis of PIH. In PIH women, CV risks are present from the beginning of pregnancy that intensifies in the later part of pregnancy. Retrograde inflammation and oxidative stress contribute to the decreased BRS in PIH.

  16. Resting Sympathetic Baroreflex Sensitivity in Subjects with Low and High Tolerance to Central Hypovolemia Induced by Lower Body Negative Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    stress independent of baroreflex control. DISCLAIMER The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors, and are not to be...is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publica - tion in this journal is cited, in accordance with

  17. Bivariate phase-rectified signal averaging for assessment of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity: pilot study of the technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Axel; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Barthel, Petra; Müller, Alexander; Ulm, Kurt; Malik, Marek; Schmidt, Georg

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), an index of autonomic function, poses practical challenges. In this pilot study, we propose a novel technique for assessment of spontaneous BRS based on bivariate phase-rectified signal averaging (PRSA). This is an extension of the monovariate PRSA technology used for calculation of deceleration capacity. A prospective, observational study was conducted in a training cohort of 146 patients with heart failure (New York Heart Association class 2.7 ± 0.8, left ventricular ejection fraction 23.6% ± 9.0%) presenting with sinus rhythm. In all patients, 10-minute recordings of ECG and arterial and blood pressure were obtained in the supine resting position. The algorithm for BRS assessment based on bivariate PRSA (BRS(PRSA)) included (1) identification of heartbeat intervals occurring at the time of systolic pressure increases, (2) selection of heartbeat adjacent interval sections, (3) alignment and (4) averaging of these segments, and (5) quantification of the average heart beat interval change by Haar wavelet analysis. Primary end point was death of any cause. During mean follow-up of 2.7 ± 1.1 years, 42 patients (28.8%) died. BRS(PRSA) was significantly associated with the primary end point (3.7 ± 5.3 ms vs -0.33 ± 6.6 ms in survivors and nonsurvivors, respectively). BRS(PRSA) yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 69.8% (95% confidence interval, 59.9-79.7), which was comparable to the area under the curve of left ventricular ejection fraction (70.4%; 95% confidence interval, 61.3-79.5). Using the optimum dichotomy for BRS(PRSA) of 1.14 milliseconds, 52 (36%) patients had an abnormal BRS(PRSA). The 3-year mortality risk of these patients was 45.3% compared to 19.0% in patients with normal BRS(PRSA). On multivariate analysis, abnormal BRS(PRSA) was an independent risk factor from left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 30% and New York Heart Association class > II. BRS(PRSA) is an

  18. Sex differences in baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate variability, and end organ damage in the TGR(mRen2)27 rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Megan S; DeMarco, Vincent G; Heesch, Cheryl M; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Schneider, Rebecca I; Rehmer, Nathan T; Tilmon, Roger D; Ferrario, Carlos M; Sowers, James R

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate sex differences in baroreflex and heart rate variability (HRV) dysfunction and indexes of end-organ damage in the TG(mRen2)27 (Ren2) rat, a model of renin overexpression and tissue renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system overactivation. Blood pressure (via telemetric monitoring), blood pressure variability [BPV; SD of systolic blood pressure (SBP)], spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity, HRV [HRV Triangular Index (HRV-TI), standard deviation of the average NN interval (SDNN), low and high frequency power (LF and HF, respectively), and Poincaré plot analysis (SD1, SD2)], and cardiovascular function (pressure-volume loop analysis and proteinuria) were evaluated in male and female 10-wk-old Ren2 and Sprague Dawley rats. The severity of hypertension was greater in Ren2 males (R2-M) than in Ren2 females (R2-F). Increased BPV, suppression of baroreflex gain, decreased HRV, and associated end-organ damage manifested as cardiac dysfunction, myocardial remodeling, elevated proteinuria, and tissue oxidative stress were more pronounced in R2-M compared with R2-F. During the dark cycle, HRV-TI and SDNN were negatively correlated with SBP within R2-M and positively correlated within R2-F; within R2-M, these indexes were also negatively correlated with end-organ damage [left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH)]. Furthermore, within R2-M only, LVH was strongly correlated with indexes of HRV representing predominantly vagal (HF, SD1), but not sympathetic (LF, SD2), variability. These data demonstrated relative protection in females from autonomic dysfunction and end-organ damage associated with elevated blood pressure in the Ren2 model of hypertension.

  19. Chronic baroreflex activation restores spontaneous baroreflex control and variability of heart rate in obesity-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Irwin, Eric D; Lohmeier, Thomas E

    2013-10-01

    The sensitivity of baroreflex control of heart rate is depressed in subjects with obesity hypertension, which increases the risk for cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms are not fully known, and there are no therapies to improve this dysfunction. To determine the cardiovascular dynamic effects of progressive increases in body weight leading to obesity and hypertension in dogs fed a high-fat diet, 24-h continuous recordings of spontaneous fluctuations in blood pressure and heart rate were analyzed in the time and frequency domains. Furthermore, we investigated whether autonomic mechanisms stimulated by chronic baroreflex activation and renal denervation-current therapies in patients with resistant hypertension, who are commonly obese-restore cardiovascular dynamic control. Increases in body weight to ∼150% of control led to a gradual increase in mean arterial pressure to 17 ± 3 mmHg above control (100 ± 2 mmHg) after 4 wk on the high-fat diet. In contrast to the gradual increase in arterial pressure, tachycardia, attenuated chronotropic baroreflex responses, and reduced heart rate variability were manifest within 1-4 days on high-fat intake, reaching 130 ± 4 beats per minute (bpm) (control = 86 ± 3 bpm) and ∼45% and therapy may reduce the risk factors for cardiac arrhythmias as well as lower arterial pressure.

  20. Arterial baroreflex function does not influence telomere length in kidney of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-fei ZHANG; Rui-fang YANG; Jin WANG; Lei ZHAO; Ling LI; Fu-ming SHEN; Ding-feng SU

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the relationship between arterial baroreflex (ABR) function and telomere length in kidney of rats.Methods:Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP) and sinoaortic denervated rats (SAD) were used as models with depressed arterial baroreflex.In the first experiments,SHR-SP rats were examined at the age of 24 weeks for both sexes and 40 weeks for female rats. In the second experiments,SAD rats were studied 4 and 35 weeks after SAD operation.Blood pressure was continuously recorded for 4 h in a conscious state. After the determination of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS),the terminal restriction fragment (TRF) of rat kidney was analyzed using Southern blot.Results:The TRF length was found shorter in:a) male SHR-SP compared with age-matched female SHR-SP;b) female SHR-SP 40 weeks of age compared with 24 weeks of age; c) in rats 35 weeks after operation compared with rats 4 weeks post operation in both sham-operated and SAD rats.Conclusion:In SHR-SP,the TRF length did not correlate with BRS.In addition.SAD did not affect TRF length at either 4 or 35 weeks post-surgery.It may be concluded that baroreflex function does not influence the terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length in rats.

  1. Effects of glucose-insulin-potassium on baroreflex sensitivity, left ventricular function and ventricular arrhythmia in the subacute phase of myocardial infarction in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Guo; SHU He; SHEN Fu-Ming; MIAO Chao-Yu; SU Ding-Feng

    2004-01-01

    Objective:Glucose-insulin-potassium(GIK) is clinically used for reducing mortality in acute myocardial infarction(MI). It is known that ventricular arrhythmia, left ventricular dysfunction and impaired baroreflex sensitivity(BRS) are the three major determinants for predicting the mortality after acute MI. The present work was designed to study the effects of GIK on BRS, ventricular arrhythmia, and left ventricular function in rats with coronary artery ligature. Sprague-Dawley rats were used and the myocardial infarction was produced by ligature of the left anterior descending artery. Five weeks after coronary artery ligation, BRS was measured in conscious state with a computerized blood pressure monitoring system and left ventricular function and electrocardiogram were determined in the anaesthetized state in the subacute phase of myocardial infarction. It was found that GIK did not affect the blood pressure and heart period in both conscious and anaesthetized rats. GIK did not enhance BRS, but reduced ventricular arrhythmia and improved left ventricular function by reducing left ventricular end diastolic pressure in anaesthetized rats with MI. It is proposed that reducing ventricular arrhythmia and improving left ventricular function contribute to the effect of GIK on reducing the mortality after MI.

  2. Dose-response relationship of baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability to individually-tailored exercise training in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iellamo, Ferdinando; Manzi, Vincenzo; Caminiti, Giuseppe; Sposato, Barbara; Massaro, Michele; Cerrito, Anna; Rosano, Giuseppe; Volterrani, Maurizio

    2013-06-20

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and Baroreflex Sensitivity (BRS) are impaired in patients with Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and carry negative prognosis. Exercise training improves these parameters. However, the relationship between exercise training with HRV and BRS has been investigated without regard for individual training loads. We tested the hypothesis that in CHF patients changes in HRV and BRS are dose-response related to individual volume/intensity training load (TL). Twenty patients with stable postinfarction CHF under optimal medical treatment were randomized to either aerobic continuous training (ACT) or aerobic interval training (AIT) for 12weeks. Individualized TL was monitored by the Training Impulses (TRIMPi) method, which was determined using the individual HR and lactate profiling determined during a treadmill test at baseline. HRV (standard deviation of mean R-R interval) and BRS were assessed at rest and 3weeks apart, throughout the study. HRV, BRS and R-R interval increased significantly with training, being very highly correlated to the dose of exercise with a second-order regression model (r(2) ranged from 0.75 to 0.96; Pincrease in functional capacity. No significant differences were detected between ACT and AIT in any variable. These results suggest that improvements in HRV and BRS by exercise training in CHF patients are dose related to TL in a non-linear fashion on an individual basis, with optimal results at moderate doses of exercise. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of pioglitazone on arterial baroreflex sensitivity and sympathetic nerve activity in patients with acute myocardial infarction and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Hiroshi; Yuasa, Fumio; Yuyama, Reisuke; Murakawa, Kousuke; Miyasaka, Yoko; Yoshida, Susumu; Tsujimoto, Satoshi; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Iwasaka, Toshiji

    2012-06-01

    Pioglitazone has been shown to reduce the occurrence of fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the mechanisms of such favorable effects remain speculative. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pioglitazone on arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in 30 DM patients with recent MI. Patients were randomly assigned to those taking pioglitazone (n = 15) and those not taking pioglitazone (n = 15) at 4 weeks after the onset of MI. BRS, MSNA, calculated homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), and plasma adiponectin were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks. Pioglitazone increased plasma adiponectin (from 6.9 ± 3.3 μg/dL to 12.2 ± 7.1 μg/dL) and reduced HOMA-IR (from 4.0 ± 2.2 to 2.1 ± 0.9). In the pioglitazone group, MSNA decreased significantly (from 37 ± 7 bursts/min to 25 ± 8 bursts/min) and BRS increased significantly (from 6.7 ± 3.0 to 9.9 ± 3.2 ms/mm Hg) after 12 weeks. Furthermore, a significant relationship was found between the change in MSNA and HOMA-IR (r = 0.6, P = 0.042). Thus, pioglitazone decreased the sympathetic nerve traffic through the improvement of insulin resistance in DM patients with recent MI, which indicate that the sympathoinhibitory effects of pioglitazone may, at least in part, have contributed to the beneficial effects of pioglitazone.

  4. Baroreflex dysfunction promotes the induction of atherosclerosis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-junCAI; Chao-yuMIAO; He-huiXIE; Ding-fengSU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To testify the hypothesis that arterial baroreflex dysfunction promotes the induction of atherosclerosis. METHODSAND RESULTS: Experiment 1 : The baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was measured in 30 SD rats in conscious state with a computerized blood pressure monitoring system. Four weeks later, the rats were fed with a high-cholesterol diet for 8-week duration to induce atherosclerosis. The hearts and aortae were removed for pathological examination and the scores of coronary and aortic

  5. Development of artificial bionic baroreflex system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Kenji; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    The baroreflex system is the fastest mechanism in the body to regulate arterial pressure. Because the neural system (i.e., autonomic nervous system) mediates the baroreflex and the system operates under the closed-loop condition, the quantitative dynamic characteristics of the baroreflex system remained unknown until recently despite the fact that a countless number of observational and qualitative studies had been conducted. In order to develop the artificial baroreflex system, i.e., the bionic baroreflex system, we first anatomically isolated the carotid sinuses to open the baroreflex loop and identified the open-loop transfer function of the baroreflex system using white noise pressure perturbations. We found that the baroreflex system is basically a lowpass filter and remarkably linear. As an actuator to implement the bionic baroreflex system, we then stimulated the sympathetic efferent nerves at various parts of the baroreflex loop and identified the transfer functions from the stimulation sites to systemic arterial pressure. We found that the actuator responses can be described remarkably well with linear transfer functions. Since transfer functions of the native baroreflex and of the actuator were identified, the controller that is required to reproduce the native baroreflex transfer function can be easily derived from those transfer functions. To examine the performance of bionic baroreflex system, we implemented it animal models of baroreflex failure. The bionic baroreflex system restored normal arterial pressure regulation against orthostatic stresses that is indistinguishable from the native baroreflex system.

  6. Sensitivity and specificity of the Major Depression Inventory in outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noteboom Annemieke

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI is a new, brief, self-report measure for depression based on the DSM-system, which allows clinicians to assess the presence of a depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV, but also to assess the severity of the depressive symptoms. Methods We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and psychometric qualities of the MDI in a consecutive sample of 258 psychiatric outpatients. Of these patients, 120 had a mood disorder (70 major depression, 49 dysthymia. A total of 139 subjects had a comorbid axis-I diagnosis, and 91 subjects had a comorbid personality disorder. Results Crohnbach's alpha of the MDI was a satisfactory 0.89, and the correlation between the MDI and the depression subscale of the SCL-90 was 0.79 (p Conclusion The MDI is an attractive, brief depression inventory, which seems to be a reliable tool for assessing depression in psychiatric outpatients.

  7. Inter-individual Relationships between Sympathetic Arterial Baroreflex Function and Cerebral Perfusion Control in Healthy Males

    OpenAIRE

    Trevor Witter; Yu-Chieh Tzeng; Terry O'Donnell; Jessica Kusel; Bridget Walker; Mary Berry; Chloe E. Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion during normal physiological challenges requires integration between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and systemic blood pressure control mechanisms. Previous studies have shown that cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is inversely related to some measures of cerebral autoregulation. However, interactions between the sympathetic arterial baroreflex and cerebral perfusion control mechanisms have not been explored. To determine the nature and magnitude of the...

  8. A single inhalation exposure to acrolein desensitizes baroreflex responsiveness in Wistar-Kyoto and Spontaneously Hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arterial baroreflex is one of the body's homeostatic mechanisms that regulate blood pressure (BP) by changing heart rate (HR) and vasoconstriction. Increases in BP reflexively cause HR to decrease, whereas decreases in BP depress the baroreflex and cause HR to rise. As such, baro...

  9. [Baroreflex failure after chemodectoma resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Esteban, J C; Boyero, S; Fernández, C; Sagasta, A; Pérez, T; Velasco, F; Allue, I; Lezcano, E; Zarranz, J J

    2004-10-01

    Baroreflex failure after chemodectoma resection We present a case of baroreflex failure secondary to a unilateral injury of the glossopharyngeal nerve. The patient was operated for a left-sided chemodectoma in the carotid body. Some months after surgery she started to report presyncopal episodes exacerbated by mental stress and when standing up. During these episodes, the patient presented hypertensive crises and tachycardia. However, blood pressure was below normal ranges at rest. The diagnosis was baroreflex failure secondary to unilateral injury of the glossopharyngeal nerve. The case reported herein illustrates the fact that the presence of a bilateral injury is not essential for the occurrence of this disorder.

  10. Maternal Sensitivity and Communication Styles: Mothers with Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa-Froelich, Deborah A.; Loveland Cook, Cynthia A.; Flick, Louise H.

    2008-01-01

    Women living in poverty are at increased risk for depression, especially during their childbearing years. Whereas poverty has known adverse effects on children's cognitive, social, and communication development, maternal depression may place these children at additional risk of developmental delays. The maternal sensitivity of mothers with and…

  11. Postnatal depression, oxytocin and maternal sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mah, Beth Lynette

    2015-01-01

    Intra nasal oxytocin administered to a population of mothers with a diagnosis of postnatal depression: -lowers their current mood -causes mothers to report that their infants are more difficult but their relationship with them is more positive -increases their protective response towards them in the

  12. Stress sensitivity interacts with depression history to predict depressive symptoms among youth: prospective changes following first depression onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technow, Jessica R; Hazel, Nicholas A; Abela, John R Z; Hankin, Benjamin L

    2015-04-01

    Predictors of depressive symptoms may differ before and after the first onset of major depression due to stress sensitization. Dependent stressors, or those to which characteristics of individuals contribute, have been shown to predict depressive symptoms in youth. The current study sought to clarify how stressors' roles may differ before and after the first depressive episode. Adolescents (N = 382, aged 11 to 15 at baseline) were assessed at baseline and every 3 months over the course of 2 years with measures of stressors and depressive symptoms. Semi-structured interviews were conducted every 6 months to assess for clinically significant depressive episodes. Hierarchical linear modeling showed a significant interaction between history of depression and idiographic fluctuations in dependent stressors to predict prospective elevations of symptoms, such that dependent stressors were more predictive of depressive symptoms after onset of disorder. Independent stressors predicted symptoms, but the strength of the association did not vary by depression history. These results suggest a synthesis of dependent stress and stress sensitization processes that might maintain inter-episode depressive symptoms among youth with a history of clinical depression.

  13. Effects of heat stress on baroreflex function in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Heat stress significantly reduces orthostatic tolerance in humans. The mechanism(s) causing this response remain unknown. The purpose of this review article is to present data pertaining to the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance in heat stressed individuals is a result of heat stress induced alterations in baroflex function. METHODS: In both normothermic and heat stressed conditions baroreflex responsiveness was assessed via pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. In addition, the effects of heat stress on post-synaptic vasoconstrictor responsiveness were assessed. RESULTS: Generally, whole body heating did not alter baroreflex sensitivity defined as the gain of the linear portion of the baroreflex curve around the operating point. However, whole body heating shifted the baroreflex curve to the prevailing (i.e. elevated) heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Finally, the heat stress impaired vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous administration of adrenergic agonists. CONCLUSION: Current data do not support the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance associated with heat stress in humans is due to impaired baroreflex responsiveness. This phenomenon may be partially due to the effects of heat stress on reducing vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  14. Baroreflex control of sympathetic activity in experimental hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C.C. Irigoyen

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The arterial baroreceptor reflex system is one of the most powerful and rapidly acting mechanisms for controlling arterial pressure. The purpose of the present review is to discuss data relating sympathetic activity to the baroreflex control of arterial pressure in two different experimental models: neurogenic hypertension by sinoaortic denervation (SAD and high-renin hypertension by total aortic ligation between the renal arteries in the rat. SAD depresses baroreflex regulation of renal sympathetic activity in both the acute and chronic phases. However, increased sympathetic activity (100% was found only in the acute phase of sinoaortic denervation. In the chronic phase of SAD average discharge normalized but the pattern of discharges was different from that found in controls. High-renin hypertensive rats showed overactivity of the renin angiotensin system and a great depression of the baroreflexes, comparable to the depression observed in chronic sinoaortic denervated rats. However, there were no differences in the average tonic sympathetic activity or changes in the pattern of discharges in high-renin rats. We suggest that the difference in the pattern of discharges may contribute to the increase in arterial pressure lability observed in chronic sinoaortic denervated rats.

  15. The relationship between interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety disorders and major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Kay; Boyce, Philip; Brownhill, Suzanne

    2004-04-01

    While interpersonal sensitivity, as rated by the Interpersonal Sensitivity Measure (IPSM) has previously been found to be an efficient predictor of depression, there has been less interest in the relationship between the IPSM and anxiety disorders. This study examines the performance of the IPSM in discriminating between cases and non-cases of the various anxiety disorders. The contribution of depression and the perception of parental environment, to any relationships found, are also examined. A cohort of 156 men and women has been assessed at 5-yearly intervals since baseline in 1978, in their last year of teacher training. In this fourth wave of follow-up, subjects completed a series of self-report questionnaires, including the IPSM, and scales measuring neuroticism and trait depression. Perceived parental environment, measured at baseline, was also included. DSM-III-R major depression and anxiety disorders were generated using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The IPSM subscales were moderately stable over time. 'Timidity' was associated with agoraphobia and simple phobia, and 'separation anxiety' with agoraphobia, panic disorder and generalised anxiety disorder. 'Separation anxiety' and 'timidity' showed differential gender effects for simple phobia. 'Fragile inner self' and 'separation anxiety' were associated with subjects with a history of repeated episodes of major depression, and the former, with perception of poor parental care. The IPSM was not available for inclusion prior to the 1988 wave. While the IPSM subscales were consistently correlated with neuroticism, they displayed differential associations with specific anxiety disorders, episodes of major depression and early parental environment. These findings offer greater understanding of mechanisms concerning the relationship of vulnerability to anxiety disorders and depression.

  16. Changes in plasma volume and baroreflex function following resistance exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz, L. L.; Tatro, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.; Convertino, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamics of change in plasma volume (PV) and baroreflex responses have been reported over 24 h immediately following maximal cycle exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine if PV and baroreflex showed similar changes for 24 h after resistance exercise. Eight men were studied on 2 test days, 1 week apart. On 1 day, per cent change (% delta) in PV was estimated at 0,3, and 6 h after resistance exercise using haematocrit and haemoglobin. Baseline PV was measured 24 h after exercise using Evans blue dye. The carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex response was measured before, and 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h post-exercise. Each subject performed six sets of the bench press and leg press with 10 repetitions per set with a load that induced failure within each set. On a control day, the protocol was used without exercise. Plasma volume did not change during the control day. There was a 20% decrease in PV immediately post-exercise; the recovery of the PV was rapid and complete within 3 h. PV was 20% greater 24 h post-exercise than on the control day. There were no differences in any of the baroreflex measurements. Therefore, it is suggested that PV shifts may occur without altering baroreflex sensitivity.

  17. Leptin impairs cardiovagal baroreflex function at the level of the solitary tract nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Amy C; Shaltout, Hossam A; Gallagher, Patricia E; Diz, Debra I

    2009-11-01

    Circulating leptin is elevated in some forms of obesity-related hypertension, associated with impaired baroreflex function. Leptin receptors are present on vagal afferent fibers and neurons within the solitary tract nucleus, providing an anatomic distribution consistent with baroreflex modulation. Although solitary tract nucleus microinjection of 144 fmol/60 nL of leptin had no significant effect on baroreflex sensitivity for control of the heart rate in urethane/chloralose-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, 500 fmol of leptin impaired baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia in response to increases in pressure (1.15+/-0.04 versus 0.52+/-0.12 ms/mm Hg; P<0.01). Transgenic ASrAOGEN rats with low brain angiotensinogen have an upregulation of the leptin receptor and p85 alpha mRNA in the dorsal medulla relative to Sprague-Dawley rats. Consistent with these observations, the response to leptin was enhanced in ASrAOGEN rats, because both the 144-fmol (1.46+/-0.08 versus 0.75+/-0.10 ms/mm Hg; P<0.001) and 500-fmol (1.36+/-0.32 versus 0.44+/-0.06 ms/mm Hg; P<0.05) leptin microinjections impaired baroreflex sensitivity. At these doses, leptin microinjection had no effect on resting pressure, heart rate, or the tachycardic response to decreases in pressure in Sprague-Dawley or ASrAOGEN rats. Thus, exogenous leptin at sites within the solitary tract nucleus impairs the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia induced by increases in arterial pressure, consistent with a permissive role in mediating increases in arterial pressure. Baroreflex inhibition was enhanced in animals with evidence of increased leptin receptor and relevant signaling pathway mRNA.

  18. Sensitivity to criticism differentially mediates the relationship between interpersonal problems and state and trait depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Adam P; Nelson, Sharon M; Lengu, Ketrin J; Huprich, Steven K

    2016-11-01

    Both state- and trait-like manifestations of depression have been associated with poor interpersonal functioning. One mechanism by which this could occur is through individuals' sensitivity to criticism. In the present study, 414 undergraduates were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (Beck et al. 1996) and Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory (Huprich et al. 1996) as representative measures of state and trait depression respectively. They also were assessed with self-report measures of sensitivity to criticism and interpersonal problems. Sensitivity to criticism significantly mediated the relationship between state and trait depression within five dimensions of interpersonal problems. However, sensitivity to criticism was more strongly related to the trait depression-interpersonal problems relationship than the state depression-interpersonal problems relationship, when controlling for state depression and trait depression respectively. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Effects of fentanyl and sufentanil on baroreflex sensitivity in preoperative patients%常用剂量芬太尼与舒芬太尼对术前压力反射敏感性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜唯佳; 陈杰; 王祥瑞

    2011-01-01

    研究临床常用剂量的芬太尼和舒芬太尼对患者术前压力反射敏感性(BRS)的影响.方法 择期全麻剖胸手术患者60例,年龄18~65岁,ASA Ⅰ或Ⅱ级,随机均分为芬太尼组(F组)和舒芬太尼组(S组),组内按照不同用药剂量再分为三个亚组:F1组、F2组、F3组分别输注芬太尼2、4、6 μg/kg,S1组、S2组、S3组分别输注舒芬太尼0.2、0.4、0.6μg/kg.记录入室后和给药后BRS.结果 给药后F3、S2、S3组BRS均显著降低,分别下降(34.1±11.0)%、(33.5±13.0)%、(45.0±15.0)%(P<0.05).结论 临床常用剂量芬太尼和舒芬太尼均能降低BRS,尤以芬太尼>6 μg/kg、舒芬太尼>0.4 μg/kg最明显.等效剂量舒芬太尼较芬太尼对压力反射的抑制作用更显著.%Objective To investigate the effects of fentanyl and sufentanil on baroreflex sensitivity in pre-operative patients. Methods Sixty patients ASA I or Ⅱ , aged 18-65 years, scheduled for elective thoracic surgery under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive fentanyl (group F) or sufentanil (group S). Each group was divided into three subgroups by different doses: group F1 fentanyl 2 μg/kg, group F2 fentanyl 4 μg/kg, group F3 fentanyl 6 μg/kg; group S1 sufentanil 0. 2 μg/kg, group S2 sufentanil 0. 4 μg/kg; group S3 sufentanil 0. 6 fig/kg. Baroreflex response was triggered by bolus intravenous injection of phenylephrine. The quantitative relationship between systolic arterial pressure and subsequent cardiac cycle lengths was evaluated as an index of reflex performance. BRS values were measured before and after fentanyl or sufentanil infusion. Results The BRS in group F3, group S2 and group S3 decreased by (34.1 ± 11. 0)%, (33. 5 ± 13. 0)%, (45. 0±15. 0)%, respectively(P6 μg/kg) or sufentanil 00. 4 μg/kg) can decrease BRS in preoperative patients, and equipotent dose of sufentanil has a greater effect on BRS than that of fentanyl.

  20. Mechanisms of spontaneous baroreflex impairment in lyon hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantelme, P; Cerutti, C; Lo, M; Paultre, C Z; Ducher, M

    1998-09-01

    This experiment aimed at 1) comparing the spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (SBRS) in Lyon genetically hypertensive (LH), normotensive (LN), and low blood pressure (LL) rats and 2) assessing some aspects of the mechanisms of its impairment in LH rats. Baroreflex was studied in control animals after an early chronic converting enzyme inhibition with perindopril and after a 4-wk infusion of ANG II in perindopril-treated rats. The SBRS was determined with a previously validated method, using statistical dependence between blood pressure (BP) and heart rate values recorded in freely moving animals. LH rats exhibited high BP, cardiac hypertrophy, and decreased SBRS (LH, 1.3 +/- 0.2; LN, 2.5 +/- 0.4; LL, 2.2 +/- 0.4 beats . min-1 . mmHg-1). Perindopril prevented the development of hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy and normalized SBRS. BP rose in LH and LL rats after ANG II infusion, but only LH rats, which developed a cardiac hypertrophy, had an impaired SBRS (LH, 1.1 +/- 0.2; LN, 2.5 +/- 0.2; LL, 2.8 +/- 0.3 beats . min-1 . mmHg-1). This impairment was partially reversed by an acute ANG II blockade with losartan. These results demonstrate that high BP does not account for the decreased SBRS in LH rats. SBRS impairment could result either from cardiac hypertrophy or from the direct effect of ANG II on the baroreflex loop.

  1. Neuronal modelling of baroreflex response to orthostatic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Azfar

    The accelerations experienced in aerial combat can cause pilot loss of consciousness (GLOC) due to a critical reduction in cerebral blood circulation. The development of smart protective equipment requires understanding of how the brain processes blood pressure (BP) information in response to acceleration. We present a biologically plausible model of the Baroreflex to investigate the neural correlates of short-term BP control under acceleration or orthostatic stress. The neuronal network model, which employs an integrate-and-fire representation of a biological neuron, comprises the sensory, motor, and the central neural processing areas that form the Baroreflex. Our modelling strategy is to test hypotheses relating to the encoding mechanisms of multiple sensory inputs to the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the site of central neural processing. The goal is to run simulations and reproduce model responses that are consistent with the variety of available experimental data. Model construction and connectivity are inspired by the available anatomical and neurophysiological evidence that points to a barotopic organization in the NTS, and the presence of frequency-dependent synaptic depression, which provides a mechanism for generating non-linear local responses in NTS neurons that result in quantifiable dynamic global baroreflex responses. The entire physiological range of BP and rate of change of BP variables is encoded in a palisade of NTS neurons in that the spike responses approximate Gaussian 'tuning' curves. An adapting weighted-average decoding scheme computes the motor responses and a compensatory signal regulates the heart rate (HR). Model simulations suggest that: (1) the NTS neurons can encode the hydrostatic pressure difference between two vertically separated sensory receptor regions at +Gz, and use changes in that difference for the regulation of HR; (2) even though NTS neurons do not fire with a cardiac rhythm seen in the afferents, pulse

  2. Baroreceptor sensitivity and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowaiye, Olumide Olatubosun; Jankowska, Ewa Anita; Ponikowska, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a disease of increasing incidence and prevalence. Arterial baroreceptors are stretch-sensitive receptors, which in a reflex manner are involved in the homeostatic control of arterial blood pressure. Diabetic subjects have depressed baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), although the exact pathomechanisms are unclear. In this review, we discuss the features, clinicaland prognostic implications of reduced BRS for diabetic patients and the potential involvement of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy and atherosclerosis. Finally, we demonstrate evidence on interventions (e.g. pioglitazone, alpha-lipoic acid, leptin, fluvastatin, physicaltraining etc.) which could improve BRS and ameliorate cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in diabetic patients.

  3. The Sensitivity and Specificity of Depression Screening Tools among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailey, Sarah H.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the validity and the sensitivity and specificity of depression screening tools among adults with intellectual and disabilities (ID). Subjects (N = 75) were interviewed with the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and the Glasgow Depression Scale for People with a Learning Disability (GDS-LD) and also completed a clinical…

  4. Which preventive interventions effectively enhance depressed mothers' sensitivity? A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, L.E.; Hosman, C.M.H.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.; Doesum, K.T.M. van; Hoefnagels, C.C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Improving depressed mothers' sensitivity is assumed to be a key element in preventing adverse outcomes for children of such mothers. This meta-analysis examines the short-term effectiveness of preventive interventions in terms of enhancing depressed mothers' sensitivity toward their child and

  5. Rejection Sensitivity and College Student Depression: Findings and Implications for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellin, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined whether rejection sensitivity, or the fear of interpersonal rejection, was related to depression among college students. The regression model that resulted from the study indicated that level of rejection sensitivity accounted for approximately 11% of variance in depression among students in the research. Implications for…

  6. Which preventive interventions effectively enhance depressed mothers' sensitivity? A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, L.E.; Hosman, C.M.H.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.; Doesum, K.T.M. van; Hoefnagels, C.C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Improving depressed mothers' sensitivity is assumed to be a key element in preventing adverse outcomes for children of such mothers. This meta-analysis examines the short-term effectiveness of preventive interventions in terms of enhancing depressed mothers' sensitivity toward their child and invest

  7. The scars of childhood adversity: minor stress sensitivity and depressive symptoms in remitted recurrently depressed adult patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Kok

    Full Text Available Childhood adversity may lead to depressive relapse through its long-lasting influence on stress sensitivity. In line with the stress sensitization hypothesis, minor (daily stress is associated with depressive relapse. Therefore, we examine the impact of childhood adversity on daily stress and its predictive value on prospectively assessed depressive symptoms in recurrently depressed patients.Daily stress was assessed in recurrently depressed adult patients, enrolled into two randomized trials while remitted. The reported intensity and frequency of dependent and independent daily stress was assessed at baseline. Independent stress is externally generated, for example an accident happening to a friend, while dependent stress is internally generated, for example getting into a fight with a neighbor. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed with childhood adversity, independent and dependent daily stress as predictor variables of prospectively measured depressive symptoms after three months of follow-up (n = 138.We found that childhood adversity was not significantly associated with a higher frequency and intensity of daily stress. The intensity of both independent and dependent daily stress was predictive of depressive symptom levels at follow-up (unadjusted models respectively: B = 0.47, t = 2.05, p = 0.041, 95% CI = 0.02-0.92; B = 0.29, t = 2.20, p = 0.028, 95% CI = 0.03-0.55. No associations were found between childhood adversity and depressive symptoms at follow-up.No evidence was found supporting stress sensitization due to the experience of childhood adversity in this recurrently depressed but remitted patient group. Nevertheless, our research indicates that daily stress might be a target for preventive treatment.Trial A: Nederlands Trial Register NTR1907 Trial B: Nederlands Trial Register NTR2503.

  8. Sensitivity to depression or anxiety and subclinical cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldenrijk, Adrie; van Hout, Hein P. J.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; de Groot, Eric; Gort, Johan; Rustemeijer, Cees; Diamant, Michaela; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depressive and anxiety disorders are highly overlapping, heterogeneous conditions that both have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Cognitive vulnerability traits for these disorders could help to specify what exactly drives CVD risk in depressed and

  9. Baroreflex control of heart rate in man awake and during enflurane and enflurane--nitrous oxide anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, M; Duke, P C; Ong, B

    1980-03-01

    Baroreflex control of heart rate was assessed by means of a pressor test in two groups of subjects while awake and at two levels of anesthesia with enflurane (Group I) and enflurane-nitrous oxide (Group II). In the awake control situation, calculated mean slopes (+/- SD) were 23 +/- 8 (Group I) and 25 +/- 11 (Group II). There was no significant difference between the groups. During enflurane anesthesia (Group I) mean slopes were significantly depressed to 5 +/- 5 at 1 MAC and 6 +/- 6 at 0.8 MAC. During enflurane-nitrous oxide anesthesia (Group II), slopes were significantly depressed to 5 +/- 3 at 1 MAC and 6 +/- 4 at 0.9 MAC. There was no significant difference between the extents of depression in the two groups. It is concluded that both enflurane anesthesia and enflurane-nitrous oxide anesthesia at 1 MAC produce significant depression of baroreflex control of heart rate in man.

  10. Sensitivity and specificity of the Distress Thermometer for depression in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Mark T; Collins, E Dale; Kearing, Stephen; Gillock, Karen L; Moore, Caroline P; Ahles, Tim A

    2008-06-01

    Receiving a new diagnosis of breast cancer is a distressing experience that may precipitate an episode of major depressive disorder. Efficient screening methods for detecting depression in the oncology setting are needed. This study evaluated the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) of the single-item Distress Thermometer (DT) for detecting depression in women newly diagnosed with Stage I-III breast cancer. We assessed 321 patients (of 345 consecutive patients) at the time of their pre-surgical consultation at a Comprehensive Breast Cancer Program. Patients were administered the DT along with the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-Item Depression Module (PHQ-9) as a gold standard diagnostic assessment of depression status. Mean DT scores (11-point scale, 0-10) were significantly higher for depressed versus non-depressed patients (8.1 versus 4.4). In ROC analyses the DT showed strong discriminatory power relative to the PHQ-9-derived diagnosis of depression, with an area under the curve of 0.87. Patient age, education, marital status and stage of disease resulted in similar operating characteristics. A score of 7 represented the optimal trade-off between sensitivity (0.81) and specificity (0.85) characteristics for detecting depression. The single-item DT performs satisfactorily relative to the PHQ-9 for detecting depression in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. A cutoff score of 7 on the DT possesses the optimal sensitivity and specificity characteristics. The strength of these findings suggests that a careful psychosocial evaluation should follow a positive screen.

  11. The Men's Stress Workshop: A Gender-Sensitive Treatment for Depressed Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Jennifer M.; Addis, Michael E.; Syzdek, Matthew; Miller, Ivan W.

    2010-01-01

    Over 10% of men will meet lifetime criteria for major depressive disorder, yet men often are unwilling to enter treatment, and have more negative attitudes toward therapy than do depressed women. The Men's Stress Workshop was developed as a gender-sensitive group therapy protocol for men that explicitly addresses the role of masculine norms in the…

  12. Ovarian hormone deprivation reduces oxytocin expression in Paraventricular Nucleus preautonomic neurons and correlates with baroreflex impairment in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Ulisses De Melo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension increases dramatically in women after menopause, however the mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. Oxytocinergic (OTergic neurons are largely present within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN. Several studies have shown that OTergic drive from PVN to brainstem increases baroreflex sensitivity and improves autonomic control of the circulation. Since preautonomic PVN neurons express different types of estrogen receptors, we hypothesize that ovarian hormone deprivation causes baroreflex impairment, autonomic imbalance and hypertension by negatively impacting OTergic drive and oxytocin levels in pre-autonomic neurons. Here, we assessed oxytocin gene and protein expression (qPCR and immunohistochemistry within PVN subnuclei in sham-operated and ovariectomized Wistar rats. Conscious hemodynamic recordings were used to assess resting blood pressure and heart rate and the autonomic modulation of heart and vessels was estimated by power spectral analysis. We observed that the ovarian hormone deprivation in ovariectomized rats decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased sympathetic and reduced vagal outflows to the heart and augmented the resting blood pressure. Of note, ovariectomized rats had reduced PVN oxytocin mRNA and protein expression in all pre-autonomic PVN subnuclei. Furthermore, reduced PVN oxytocin protein levels were positively correlated with decreased baroreflex sensitivity and negatively correlated with increased LF/HF ratio. These findings suggest that reduced oxytocin expression in OTergic neurons of the PVN contributes to the baroreflex dysfunction and autonomic dysregulation observed with ovarian hormone deprivation.

  13. Ovarian Hormone Deprivation Reduces Oxytocin Expression in Paraventricular Nucleus Preautonomic Neurons and Correlates with Baroreflex Impairment in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Melo, Vitor U.; Saldanha, Rayssa R. M.; Dos Santos, Carla R.; De Campos Cruz, Josiane; Lira, Vitor A.; Santana-Filho, Valter J.; Michelini, Lisete C.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension increases dramatically in women after menopause, however the mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. Oxytocinergic (OTergic) neurons are largely present within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Several studies have shown that OTergic drive from PVN to brainstem increases baroreflex sensitivity and improves autonomic control of the circulation. Since preautonomic PVN neurons express different types of estrogen receptors, we hypothesize that ovarian hormone deprivation causes baroreflex impairment, autonomic imbalance and hypertension by negatively impacting OTergic drive and oxytocin levels in pre-autonomic neurons. Here, we assessed oxytocin gene and protein expression (qPCR and immunohistochemistry) within PVN subnuclei in sham-operated and ovariectomized Wistar rats. Conscious hemodynamic recordings were used to assess resting blood pressure and heart rate and the autonomic modulation of heart and vessels was estimated by power spectral analysis. We observed that the ovarian hormone deprivation in ovariectomized rats decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased sympathetic and reduced vagal outflows to the heart and augmented the resting blood pressure. Of note, ovariectomized rats had reduced PVN oxytocin mRNA and protein expression in all pre-autonomic PVN subnuclei. Furthermore, reduced PVN oxytocin protein levels were positively correlated with decreased baroreflex sensitivity and negatively correlated with increased LF/HF ratio. These findings suggest that reduced oxytocin expression in OTergic neurons of the PVN contributes to the baroreflex dysfunction and autonomic dysregulation observed with ovarian hormone deprivation.

  14. Decreased hydrocortisone sensitivity of T cell function in multiple sclerosis-associated major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anja; Otte, Christian; Krieger, Thorsten; Nicholls, Robert A; Krüger, Schulamith; Ziegler, Kristin J; Schulz, Karl-Heinz; Heesen, Christoph; Gold, Stefan M

    2012-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS with a high prevalence of depression. Both MS and depression have been linked to elevated cortisol levels and inflammation, indicating disturbed endocrine-immune regulation. An imbalance in mineralocorticoid versus glucocorticoid signaling in the CNS has been proposed as a pathogenetic mechanism of depression. Intriguingly, both receptors are also expressed in lymphocytes, but their role for 'escape' of the immune system from endocrine control is unknown. Using steroid sensitivity of T cell function as a read-out system, we here investigate a potential role of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) versus glucocorticoid receptor (GR) regulation in the immune system as a biological mechanism underlying MS-associated major depression. Twelve female MS patients meeting diagnostic criteria for current major depressive disorder (MDD) were compared to twelve carefully matched MS patients without depression. We performed lymphocyte phenotyping by flow cytometry. In addition, steroid sensitivity of T cell proliferation was tested using hydrocortisone as well as MR (aldosterone) and GR (dexamethasone) agonists. Sensitivity to hydrocortisone was decreased in T cells from depressed MS patients. Experiments with agonists suggested disturbed MR regulation, but intact GR function. Importantly, there were no differences in lymphocyte composition and frequency of T cell subsets, indicating that the differences in steroid sensitivity are unlikely to be secondary to shifts in the immune compartment. To our knowledge, this study provides first evidence for altered steroid sensitivity of T cells from MS patients with comorbid MDD possibly due to MR dysregulation.

  15. Postpartum depressive symptoms and maternal sensitivity: an exploration of possible social media-based measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dáu, Ana Luísa B T; Callinan, Laura S; Mayes, Linda C; Smith, Megan V

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between self-reported depressive symptoms, directly observed maternal sensitivity, and the content and themes of pictures posted on a mobile application. Data on 20 participants were analyzed. Results suggested that mothers' scoring as more intrusive on the maternal sensitivity scale tended to post a higher proportion of photos of themselves interacting with their babies. An association between higher levels of maternal depressive symptoms and a lower proportion of posts of baby smiling photos was also suggested.

  16. Baroreflex Function in Rats after Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasser, Eileen M.

    1997-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans to decreased gravitational forces during spaceflight results in a number of adverse cardiovascular consequences, often referred to as cardiovascular deconditioning. Prominent among these negative cardiovascular effects are orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity. Rat hindlimb unweighting is an animal model which simulates weightlessness, and results in similar cardiovascular consequences. Cardiovascular reflexes, including arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes, are required for normal adjustment to both orthostatic challenges and exercise. Therefore, the orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity associated with exposure to microgravity may be due to cardiovascular reflex dysfunction. The proposed studies will test the general hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting in rats results in impaired autonomic reflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. Specifically, we hypothesize that the ability to reflexly increase sympathetic nerve activity in response to decreases in arterial pressure or blood volume will be blunted due to hindlimb unweighting. There are 3 specific aims: (1) To evaluate arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in conscious rats subjected to 14 days of hindlimb unweighting; (2) To examine the interaction between arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in conscious hindlimb unweighted rats; (3) to evaluate changes in afferent and/or central nervous system mechanisms in baroreflex regulation of the sympathetic nervous system. These experiments will provide information related to potential mechanisms for orthostatic and exercise intolerance due to microgravity.

  17. Hippocampal volume and sensitivity to maternal aggressive behavior: a prospective study of adolescent depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Sarah; Yap, Marie B H; Sheeber, Lisa; Dudgeon, Paul; Yücel, Murat; Pantelis, Christos; Simmons, Julian G; Allen, Nicholas B

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that biological factors confer increased sensitivity to environmental influences on depressive symptoms during adolescence, a crucial time for the onset of depressive disorders. Given the critical role of the hippocampus in sensitivity to stress and processing of contextual aspects of the environment, investigation of its role in determining sensitivity to environmental context seems warranted. This study prospectively examined hippocampal volume as a measure of sensitivity to the influence of aggressive maternal behavior on change in depressive symptoms from early to midadolescence. The interaction between aggressive maternal behavior and hippocampal volume was found to predict change in depressive symptoms. Significant sex differences also emerged, whereby only for girls were larger bilateral hippocampal volumes more sensitive to the effects of maternal aggressive behavior, particularly with respect to experiencing the protective effects of low levels of maternal aggressiveness. These findings help elucidate the complex relationships between brain structure, environmental factors such as maternal parenting style, and sensitivity to (i.e., risk for, and protection from) the emergence of depression during this life stage. Given that family context risk factors are modifiable, our findings suggest the potential utility of targeted parenting interventions for the prevention and treatment of adolescent depressive disorder.

  18. Human vagal baroreflex mechanisms in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, Dwain L; Halliwill, John R; Beightol, Larry A; Brown, Troy E; Taylor, J Andrew; Goble, Ross

    2010-04-01

    Although astronauts' cardiovascular function is normal while they are in space, many have altered haemodynamic responses to standing after they return to Earth, including inordinate tachycardia, orthostatic hypotension, and uncommonly, syncope. Simulated microgravity impairs vagal baroreceptor-cardiac reflex function and causes orthostatic hypotension. Actual microgravity, however, has been shown to either increase, or not change vagal baroreflex gain. In this study, we tested the null hypothesis that spaceflight does not impair human baroreflex mechanisms. We studied 11 American and two German astronauts before, during (flight days 2-8), and after two, 9- and 10-day space shuttle missions, with graded neck pressure and suction, to elicit sigmoid, vagally mediated carotid baroreflex R-R interval responses. Baseline systolic pressures tended to be higher in space than on Earth (P = 0.015, repeated measures analysis of variance), and baseline R-R intervals tended to be lower (P = 0.049). Baroreceptor-cardiac reflex relations were displaced downward on the R-R interval axis in space. The average range of R-R interval responses to neck pressure changes declined from preflight levels by 37% on flight day 8 (P = 0.051), maximum R-R intervals declined by 14% (P = 0.003), and vagal baroreflex gain by 9% (P = 0.009). These measures returned to preflight levels by 7-10 days after astronauts returned to Earth. This study documents significant increases of arterial pressure and impairment of vagal baroreflex function in space. These results and results published earlier indicate that microgravity exposure augments sympathetic, and diminishes vagal cardiovascular influences.

  19. Rejection sensitivity and depressive symptoms: Longitudinal actor-partner effects in adolescent romantic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norona, Jerika C; Roberson, Patricia N E; Welsh, Deborah P

    2016-08-01

    The present study utilizes the actor-partner interdependence model to examine the longitudinal relationship between rejection sensitivity and one's own and one's partner's depressive symptoms. The sample included adolescent romantic couples from the U.S. (N = 198 adolescents; 50% girls; 90.2% Caucasian) whose rejection sensitivity at Time 1 and depressive symptoms approximately one year later (Time 2) were assessed. Additionally, aggressive behaviors and maintenance behaviors that commonly associated with rejection sensitivity (e.g., self-silencing) are explored as mediators. Results indicate that boyfriends' rejection sensitivity at Time 1 predicted girlfriends' depressive symptoms at Time 2. Additionally, girls' rejection sensitivity predicted their own and their boyfriends' self-silencing. Developmental and clinical implications are discussed.

  20. Depressive symptoms, insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in the RISC cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bot, M; Pouwer, F; De Jonge, P

    2013-01-01

    AIM: This study explored the association of depressive symptoms with indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in a cohort of non-diabetic men and women aged 30 to 64 years. METHODS: The study population was derived from the 3-year follow-up of the Relationship between Insulin Sensitiv......AIM: This study explored the association of depressive symptoms with indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in a cohort of non-diabetic men and women aged 30 to 64 years. METHODS: The study population was derived from the 3-year follow-up of the Relationship between Insulin....... highest quartile of beta-cell rate sensitivity was 2.04; P=0.01). Also, significant depressive symptoms were associated with a statistically significant decrease in the potentiation factor ratio in unadjusted models, but not in the fully adjusted model. CONCLUSION: Depressive symptoms were not related...

  1. Depressive symptoms, insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in the RISC cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, M.; Pouwer, F.; De Jonge, P.; Nolan, J. J.; Mari, A.; Hojlund, K.; Golay, A.; Balkau, B.; Dekker, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim. This study explored the association of depressive symptoms with indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in a cohort of non-diabetic men and women aged 30 to 64 years. Methods. The study population was derived from the 3-year follow-up of the Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity

  2. Depressive symptoms, insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in the RISC cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, M.; Pouwer, F.; De Jonge, P.; Nolan, J. J.; Mari, A.; Hojlund, K.; Golay, A.; Balkau, B.; Dekker, J. M.

    Aim. This study explored the association of depressive symptoms with indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in a cohort of non-diabetic men and women aged 30 to 64 years. Methods. The study population was derived from the 3-year follow-up of the Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity

  3. Relationships among depression, anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and perceived social support in adolescents with conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Savaş; Bilgiç, Ayhan; Akça, Ömer Faruk; Türkoğlu, Serhat; Hergüner, Sabri

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationships of depression, anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and perceived social support with conversion symptoms in adolescents with conversion disorder (CD). Fifty outpatients, aged 8-18 years, who had been diagnosed with CD and members of a control group were assessed using the psychological questionnaires. Compared with controls, adolescents with CD scored higher on the Child Depression Inventory (CDI), Screen for Child Anxiety-related Emotional Disorders (SCARED), Childhood Anxiety Sensitivity Index (CASI) total, CASI physical and cognitive subscales, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support family subscale. Multiple regression analysis showed that CDI, CASI total, and CASI cognitive scores predicted the Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ) scores and that CDI and CASI total scores predicted the Children's Somatization Inventory (CSI) scores of subjects. This study suggest that adolescents with CD had poor psychosocial well-being, and depression, global anxiety sensitivity and anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns are related to conversion symptoms.

  4. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Depressants KidsHealth > For Teens > Depressants A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Depressants What Are Depressants? Depressants are drugs that calm nerves and relax ...

  5. Arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity under orthostatic stress in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi eIchinose

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which blood pressure is maintained against the orthostatic stress caused by gravity’s effect on the fluid distribution within the body are important issues in physiology, especially in humans who usually adopt an upright posture. Peripheral vasoconstriction and increased heart rate are major cardiovascular adjustments to orthostatic stress and comprise part of the reflex response elicited via the carotid sinus and aortic baroreceptors (arterial baroreflex: ABR and cardiopulmonary stretch receptors (cardiopulmonary baroreflex. In a series of studies, we have been characterizing the ABR-mediated regulation of cardiovascular hemodynamics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA while applying orthostatic stress in humans. We have found that under orthostatic stress, dynamic carotid baroreflex responses are modulated as exemplified by the increases in the MSNA, blood pressure and heart rate responses elicited by carotid baroreflex unloading and the shorter period of MSNA suppression, comparable reduction and faster recovery of MAP and greater heart rate response to carotid baroreflex stimulation. Our results also show that ABR-mediated beat-to-beat control over burst incidence, burst strength and total MSNA is progressively modulated as orthostatic stress is increased until induction of syncope, and that the sensitivity of ABR control over the aforementioned MSNA variables is substantially reduced during the development of syncope. We suggest that in humans, the modulation of ABR function under orthostatic stress may be one of the mechanisms by which blood pressure is maintained and orthostatic hypotension limited, and impairment of ABR control over sympathetic vasomotor activity leads to the severe hypotension associated with orthostatic syncope.

  6. Marked sympathetic activation and baroreflex dysfunction in true resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Guido; Seravalle, Gino; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Pini, Claudio; Alimento, Marina; Facchetti, Rita; Spaziani, Domenico; Cuspidi, Cesare; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2014-12-20

    An increase in sympathetic drive to the heart and the peripheral circulation characterizes mild and severe essential hypertension. However, it remains unsettled whether sympathetic cardiovascular influences are potentiated in true resistant hypertension (RHT). In 32 RHT patients treated with 4.6 ± 0.3 drugs (mean ± SEM) and aged 58.6 ± 2.1 years, 35 non-resistant treated hypertensives (HT) and 19 normotensive controls (NT), all age-matched with RHT, we measured clinic, 24-hour ambulatory and beat-to-beat blood pressures (BP), heart rate (HR, EKG), muscle sympathetic nerve traffic (MSNA, microneurography) and spontaneous baroreflex MSNA-sensitivity. BP values were markedly greater in RHT patients than in NT and HT (172.2 ± 1.7/100.7 ± 1.2 vs 132.1 ± 1.3/82.1 ± 0.9 and 135.5 ± 1.2/83.6 ± 0.9 mmHg, P < 0.01). This was paralleled by a significant and marked increase in MSNA (87.8 ± 2.0 vs 46.8 ± 2.6 and 59.3 ± 1.7 and bursts/100 heartbeats, P < 0.01). In multiple regression analysis the MSNA increase observed in RHT was significantly related to hemodynamic, hormonal and metabolic variables. It was also significantly related to plasma aldosterone values as well as spontaneous baroreflex MSNA-sensitivity, which were the variables that at the multivariate analysis were more closely related to the adrenergic activation of RHT after adjustment for confounders, including antihypertensive treatment (r(2)partial=0.04405 and r(2)partial=0.00878, P<0.05 for both). These data represent the first evidence that RHT is a state of marked adrenergic overdrive, greater for magnitude than that detectable in HT. They also suggest that impaired baroreflex mechanisms, along with hemodynamic and neurohumoral factors, may be responsible for the phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Interpersonal Sensitivity, Romantic Stress, and the Prediction of Depression: A Study of Inner-City, Minority Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Christie J.; Daley, Shannon E.; Gunderson, Brent H.

    2006-01-01

    The role of interpersonal sensitivity in the relation between romantic stress and depression was examined in 55 adolescent girls from an inner-city high school. Depression, interpersonal sensitivity, and chronic and episodic romantic stress were measured at two time points, 6 months apart. Interpersonal sensitivity was found to moderate the…

  8. A new non-invasive statistical method to assess the spontaneous cardiac baroreflex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducher, M; Fauvel, J P; Gustin, M P; Cerutti, C; Najem, R; Cuisinaud, G; Laville, M; Pozet, N; Paultre, C Z

    1995-06-01

    1. A new method was developed to evaluate cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. The association of a high systolic blood pressure with a low heart rate or the converse is considered to be under the influence of cardiac baroreflex activity. This method is based on the determination of the statistical dependence between systolic blood pressure and heart rate values obtained non-invasively by a Finapres device. Our computerized analysis selects the associations with the highest statistical dependence. A 'Z-coefficient' quantifies the strength of the statistical dependence. The slope of the linear regression, computed on these selected associations, is used to estimate baroreflex sensitivity. 2. The present study was carried out in 11 healthy resting male subjects. The results obtained by the 'Z-coefficient' method were compared with those obtained by cross-spectrum analysis, which has already been validated in humans. Furthermore, the reproducibility of both methods was checked after 1 week. 3. The results obtained by the two methods were significantly correlated (r = 0.78 for the first and r = 0.76 for the second experiment, P < 0.01). When repeated after 1 week, the average results were not significantly different. Considering individual results, test-retest correlation coefficients were higher with the Z-analysis (r = 0.79, P < 0.01) than with the cross-spectrum analysis (r = 0.61, P < 0.05). 4. In conclusion, as the Z-method gives results similar to but more reproducible than the cross-spectrum method, it might be a powerful and reliable tool to assess baroreflex sensitivity in humans.

  9. Cool dialysate reduces asymptomatic intradialytic hypotension and increases baroreflex variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterton, Lindsay J; Selby, Nicholas M; Burton, James O; McIntyre, Chris W

    2009-04-01

    Intradialytic hypotension (IDH) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients and can be ameliorated by cool temperature HD. The baroreflex arc is under autonomic control and is essential in the short-term regulation of blood pressure (BP). This study aimed to investigate if the baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) response to HD differed between standard and cool-temperature dialysate. Ten patients (mean age 67+/-2 years) prone to IDH were recruited into a randomized, crossover study to compare BRS variation at dialysate temperatures of 37 degrees C (HD(37)) and 35 degrees C (HD(35)). Each patient underwent continuous beat-to-beat BP monitoring during a dialysis session of HD(37) and HD(35). During HD(37) 2 patients developed symptomatic IDH, as opposed to 1 with HD(35). However, asymptomatic IDH occurred with a frequency of 0.4 episodes per session with HD(35) and 6.2 episodes per session during HD(37) (odds ratio15.5; 95%CI 5.6-14.2). Although absolute BRS measurements did not differ between the 2 modalities, BRS variability increased during HD(35). Our study has demonstrated that in IDH-prone patients, cool HD resulted in a reduction in heart rate and a greater reduction in cardiac output and stroke volume. Mean arterial pressure was maintained through a significantly greater increase in total peripheral resistance. Furthermore, although absolute BRS values during HD were not significantly altered by a reduction in dialysate temperature, there was a greater percentage increase in BRS values during cool HD. Understanding the varied causes of, and categorizing impaired hemodynamic responses to HD will enable further individualization of HD prescriptions according to patient need.

  10. Group cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression in Spanish: culture-sensitive manualized treatment in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Adrian; Garza, Monica J; Muñoz, Ricardo F

    2010-08-01

    The authors applied cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression using the Healthy Management of Reality treatment manual. This 16-week group treatment comprised four 4-week modules: thoughts (cognitive restructuring), activities (behavioral activation), people (interpersonal skills training), and health (addresses physical health and depression). They illustrated the use of the culture-sensitive treatment manuals by way of the member characteristics and clinical process of a Spanish-language CBT group for depression. They highlighted the challenges and satisfactions of working with a Spanish-speaking population in the public sector, and focused on how culture and socioeconomic status influence patients, and how to adapt treatment to these factors. Last, they demonstrated how technological advances integrate with culture-sensitive, evidence-based treatments to better serve this population and reduce disparities.

  11. Rejection sensitivity relates to hypocortisolism and depressed mood state in young women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, Mattie; Riese, Harriette; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Rijsdijk, Fruehling V.; Ormel, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Rejection sensitivity and the associated fear of negative social evaluation (FNSE) trait are characteristics of hypocortisolemic syndromes such as atypical depression. However, a meta-analysis showed that acute FNSE evokes strong cortisol responses in humans. This is consistent with suggestions that

  12. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during posthandgrip muscle ischemia in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Wilson, T. E.; Shibasaki, M.; Hodges, N. A.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    To identify whether muscle metaboreceptor stimulation alters baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), MSNA, beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure (Finapres), and electrocardiogram were recorded in 11 healthy subjects in the supine position. Subjects performed 2 min of isometric handgrip exercise at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2.5 min of posthandgrip muscle ischemia. During muscle ischemia, blood pressure was lowered and then raised by intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was more negative (P ischemia (-201.9 +/- 20.4 units. beat(-1). mmHg(-1)) when compared with control conditions (-142.7 +/- 17.3 units. beat(-1). mmHg(-1)). No significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. However, both curves shifted during postexercise ischemia to accommodate the elevation in blood pressure and MSNA that occurs with this condition. These data suggest that the sensitivity of baroreflex modulation of MSNA is elevated by muscle metaboreceptor stimulation, whereas the sensitivity of baroreflex of modulate heart rate is unchanged during posthandgrip muscle ischemia.

  13. Baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate in near-term fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Lindsea C; Gunn, Alistair J; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J; Davidson, Joanne O; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Bennet, Laura

    2011-08-01

    Late preterm infants, born between 34 and 36 weeks gestation, have significantly higher morbidity than neonates born at full term, which may be partly related to reduced sensitivity of the arterial baroreflex. The present study assessed baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in near-term fetal sheep at 123 ± 1 days gestation. At this age, although fetuses are not fully mature in some respects (term is 147 days), sleep-state cycling is established [between high-voltage, low-frequency (HV) and low-voltage, high-frequency (LV) sleep], and neural myelination is similar to the term human infant. Fetal sheep were instrumented to record blood pressure (BP), HR (n = 15) and RSNA (n = 5). Blood pressure was manipulated using vasoactive drugs, phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. In both HV and LV sleep, phenylephrine was associated with increased arterial BP and decreased HR. In HV sleep, phenylephrine was associated with a fall in RSNA, from 124 ± 14 to 58 ± 11% (P fall in BP after sodium nitroprusside was associated with a significant increase in HR during LV but not HV sleep, and there was no significant effect of hypotension on RSNA. These data demonstrate that in near-term fetal sheep baroreflex activity is only partly active and is highly modulated by sleep state. Critically, there was no RSNA response to marked hypotension; this finding has implications for the ability of the late preterm fetus to adapt to low BP.

  14. Baroreflex deficit blunts exercise training-induced cardiovascular and autonomic adaptations in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Silva, I C; De La Fuente, R N; Mostarda, C; Rosa, K; Flues, K; Damaceno-Rodrigues, N R; Caldini, E G; De Angelis, K; Krieger, E M; Irigoyen, M C

    2010-03-01

    1. Baroreceptors regulate moment-to-moment blood pressure (BP) variations, but their long-term effect on the cardiovascular system remains unclear. Baroreceptor deficit accompanying hypertension contributes to increased BP variability (BPV) and sympathetic activity, whereas exercise training has been associated with an improvement in these baroreflex-mediated changes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the autonomic, haemodynamic and cardiac morphofunctional effects of long-term sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation (SAD) in trained and sedentary spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). 2. Rats were subjected to SAD or sham surgery and were then further divided into sedentary and trained groups. Exercise training was performed on a treadmill (five times per week, 50-70% maximal running speed). All groups were studied after 10 weeks. 3. Sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation in SHR had no effect on basal heart rate (HR) or BP, but did augment BPV, impairing the cardiac function associated with increased cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition. Exercise training reduced BP and HR, re-established baroreflex sensitivity and improved both HR variability and BPV. However, SAD in trained SHR blunted all these improvements. Moreover, the systolic and diastolic hypertensive dysfunction, reduced left ventricular chamber diameter and increased cardiac collagen deposition seen in SHR were improved after the training protocol. These benefits were attenuated in trained SAD SHR. 4. In conclusion, the present study has demonstrated that the arterial baroreflex mediates cardiac disturbances associated with hypertension and is crucial for the beneficial cardiovascular morphofunctional and autonomic adaptations induced by chronic exercise in hypertension.

  15. Baroreflex function: determinants in healthy subjects and disturbances in diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrapari, Ioanna; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Katsilambros, Nicholas

    2006-08-01

    Arterial baroreceptors play an important role in the short-term regulation of arterial pressure, by reflex chronotropic effect on the heart and by reflex regulation of sympathetic outflow. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) represents an index of arterial baroreceptors function. Several methods of measuring BRS are available nowadays. Different factors influence BRS in the healthy population, including sex, age, blood pressure, heart rate, body fatness, arterial stiffness, blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as physical activity. Baroreceptors dysfunction is evident in diseases such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obesity. The underlying mechanism of BRS attenuation in diabetes or obesity is not yet well known; however, there is increasing evidence that it is at least partly related to autonomic nervous system dysfunction and particularly to sympathetic overactivity that accompanies these diseases. Blunted BRS provides prognostic information for cardiovascular diseases and possibly for diabetes, while its' prognostic information for obesity is not yet established. This review deals with the mechanisms affecting baroreflex function, the newer techniques of BRS estimation and the most recent insights of baroreflex function in the healthy population and in various diseases with emphasis on diabetes and obesity. In addition, the clinical implication of a reduced BRS in these disorders is discussed.

  16. Blood pressure reduction combining baroreflex restoration for stroke prevention in hypertension in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wei Song

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure reduction is an important and effective strategy in stroke prevention in hypertensives. Recently, we found that baroreflex restoration was also crucial in stroke prevention. The present work was designed to test the hypothesis that a combination of blood pressure reduction and baroreflex restoration may be a new strategy for stroke prevention. In Experiment 1, the effects of ketanserin (0.3, 1, 3, 10 mg/kg, amlodipine (0.3, 1, 2, 3 mg/kg and their combination (1+0.3, 1+1, 1+2, 1+3 mg/kg on blood pressure and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP were determined under conscious state. It was found that both amlodipine and ketanserin decreased blood pressure dose-dependently. Ketanserin enfanced BRS from a very small dose but amlodipine enfanced BRS only at largest dose used. At the dose of 1 + 2 mg/kg (ketanserin + amlodipine, the combination possessed the largest synergism on blood pressure reduction. In Experiments 2 and 3, SHR-SP and two-kidney, two-clip (2K2C renovascular hypertensive rats received life-long treatments with ketanserin (1 mg/kg and amlodipine (2 mg/kg or their combination (0.5+1, 1+2, 2+4 mg/kg. The survival time was recorded and the brain lesion was examined. It was found that all kinds of treatments prolonged the survival time of SHR-SP and 2K2C rats. The combination possessed a significantly better effect on stroke prevention than mono-therapies. In conclusion, combination of blood pressure reduction and baroreflex restoration may be a new strategy for the prevention of stroke in hypertension.

  17. Baroreflex mechanisms and response to exercise in patients with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Nagaharu; Kato, Kazuyo; Munakata, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroko; Kato, Yuko; Aisu, Noriko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Mabuchi, Kousuke; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2012-07-01

    Past reports showed that the baroreflex continuously regulates hemodynamics during exercise. However, it is still clinically unclear. If baroreflex mechanism is able to influence actually exercise cardiovascular control, baroreflex sympathetic and/or parasympathetic function relates to response to exercise. Therefore, we examined the relationship of heat rate changes to both blood pressure increment and decrement with tolerance and chronotropic response to peak exercise in patients with heart disease. In 25 male heart disease patients (60 ± 9 years) without decompensated heart failure, baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS ms mmHg(-1) ) was measured by reflex heart rate responses to changes in blood pressure after phenylephrine (P-BRS) and nitroglycerin (N-BRS) injection, respectively. Symptom-limited treadmill exercise test was performed according to Bruce's protocol. (i) The absolute values of blood pressure change after the administrations were similar between the agents because the dosages of nitroglycerin and phenylephrine were set to equalize absolute changes in blood pressure. (ii) In this study population, the ratio of N-BRS to P-BRS was not significantly correlated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. (iii) Exercise capacity (METs) (r= -0.626) and heart rate response to exercise per METs (r=0.670) was significantly related to N-BRS but not to P-BRS. We found that the abnormality of baroreflex function in the presence of blood pressure decrements can lead to insufficient capacity and easy sympathetic activation during exercise. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2012 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  18. Shortening baroreflex delay in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients – an unknown effect of β-blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katarzynska-Szymanska, Agnieszka; Ochotny, Romuald; Oko-Sarnowska, Zofia; Wachowiak-Baszynska, Hanna; Krauze, Tomasz; Piskorski, Jaroslaw; Gwizdala, Adrian; Mitkowski, Przemyslaw; Guzik, Przemyslaw

    2013-01-01

    Aims Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired diastolic and systolic function. Abnormal sympathetic–parasympathetic balance is a potential stimulus for left ventricular hypertrophy in HCM patients. β-Blockers are routinely used in HCM for their strong negative inotropic effect; however, these drugs also influence the sympathetic–parasympathetic balance. This study aimed to determine the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system and the autonomic effects of β-blockers in HCM patients treated or untreated with β-blockers. Methods Among 51 HCM outpatients (18–70 years old; 29 men) there were 19 individuals with no medication and 32 subjects treated with a β-blocker. Fourteen age- and gender-matched (23–70 years old; nine men) healthy volunteers were enrolled in the control group. Continuous, non-invasive finger blood pressure was recorded during supine rest for 30 min. Autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system was measured by heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex function (cross-correlation sequence method). Results The mean pulse interval, time domain and spectral measures of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity were comparable between HCM patients, treated or not with β-blockers, and the control group. However, the delay of the baroreflex was significantly longer in HCM patients who were not treated with β-blockers [2.0 (1.6–2.3) s] in comparison with HCM patients receiving β-blockers [1.4 (1.1–1.8) s; P = 0.0072] or control subjects [1.2 (0.8–1.8) s; P = 0.0025]. This delay did not differ between HCM patients treated with β-blockers and the control group. Conclusions Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy not treated with β-blockers is accompanied by prolonged baroreflex delay. The use of β-blockers normalizes this delay. PMID:23126403

  19. A major QTL affects temperature sensitive adult lethality and inbreeding depression in life span in Drosophila melanogaster.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Corneel J.; Bijlsma, R.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Background The study of inbreeding depression has major relevance for many disciplines, including conservation genetics and evolutionary biology. Still, the molecular genetic basis of this phenomenon remains poorly characterised, as knowledge on the mechanistic causes of inbreeding depression...... and the molecular properties of genes that give rise to or modulate its deleterious effects is lacking. These questions warrant the detailed study of genetic loci giving rise to inbreeding depression. However, the complex and polygenic nature of general inbreeding depression makes this a daunting task. Study...... This demonstrates that analysis of large conditional lethal effects is a viable strategy for delineating genes which are sensitive to inbreeding depression....

  20. Psychometric validation of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-90) subscales for depression, anxiety, and interpersonal sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P; Bille, J; Møller, S B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The psychometric validity of many subscales of the 90-item Hopkins Symptom Checklist (SCL-90) remains largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the "Hamilton-subscales" for depression (SCL-D16), anxiety (SCL-A14), their 6......-item core-measures (SCL-D6 and SCL-A6), the anxiety symptom scale (SCL-ASS8) and the interpersonal sensitivity scale (IPS5). METHODS: The psychometric properties of the SCL-D16, SCL-A14, SCL-D6, SCL-A6, SCL-ASS8, and the IPS5 were evaluated based on SCL-90 ratings from 850 day patients from a Danish...... SCL-90 subscales were identified. Using these scales it is possible to perform a psychometrically valid evaluation of psychiatric patients regarding the severity of depression (HAM-D6), specific anxiety (SCL-ASS8) and interpersonal sensitivity (IPS5)....

  1. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003213.htm Depression - overview To use the sharing features on this ... older adults Major depression Persistent depressive disorder Postpartum depression Premenstrual ... Review Date 1/4/2016 Updated by: Timothy Rogge, ...

  2. Baroreflex failure: a neglected type of secondary hypertension.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Wieling, W.; Karemaker, J.M.; Lenders, J.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    The arterial baroreflex buffers abrupt transients of blood pressure and prevents pressure from rising or falling excessively. In experimental animals, baroreceptor denervation results in temporary or permanent increases in blood pressure level and variability, depending on the extent of denervation.

  3. Links between maternal postpartum depressive symptoms, maternal distress, infant gender and sensitivity in a high-risk population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eickhorst Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal postpartum depression has an impact on mother-infant interaction. Mothers with depression display less positive affect and sensitivity in interaction with their infants compared to non-depressed mothers. Depressed women also show more signs of distress and difficulties adjusting to their role as mothers than non-depressed women. In addition, depressive mothers are reported to be affectively more negative with their sons than with daughters. Methods A non-clinical sample of 106 mother-infant dyads at psychosocial risk (poverty, alcohol or drug abuse, lack of social support, teenage mothers and maternal psychic disorder was investigated with EPDS (maternal postpartum depressive symptoms, the CARE-Index (maternal sensitivity in a dyadic context and PSI-SF (maternal distress. The baseline data were collected when the babies had reached 19 weeks of age. Results A hierarchical regression analysis yielded a highly significant relation between the PSI-SF subscale "parental distress" and the EPDS total score, accounting for 55% of the variance in the EPDS. The other variables did not significantly predict the severity of depressive symptoms. A two-way ANOVA with "infant gender" and "maternal postpartum depressive symptoms" showed no interaction effect on maternal sensitivity. Conclusions Depressive symptoms and maternal sensitivity were not linked. It is likely that we could not find any relation between both variables due to different measuring methods (self-reporting and observation. Maternal distress was strongly related to maternal depressive symptoms, probably due to the generally increased burden in the sample, and contributed to 55% of the variance of postpartum depressive symptoms.

  4. Carotid Baroreflex Function During Prolonged Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, P. B.

    1999-01-01

    Astronauts are often required to work (exercise) at moderate to high intensities for extended periods while performing extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Although the physiologic responses associated with prolonged exercise have been documented, the mechanisms involved in blood pressure regulation under these conditions have not yet been fully elucidated. An understanding of this issue is pertinent to the ability of humans to perform work in microgravity and complies with the emphasis of NASA's Space Physiology and Countermeasures Program. Prolonged exercise at a constant workload is know to result in a progressive decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) concomitant with a decrease in stroke volume and a compensatory increase in heart rate. The continuous decrease in MAP during the exercise, which is related to the thermoregulatory redistribution of circulating blood volume to the cutaneous circulation, raises the question as to whether there is a loss of baroreflex regulation of arterial blood pressure. We propose that with prolongation of the exercise to 60 minutes, progressive increases on central command reflect a progressive upward resetting of the carotid baroreflex (CBR) such that the operating point of the CBR is shifted to a pressure below the threshold of the reflex rendering it ineffectual in correcting the downward drift in MAP. In order to test this hypothesis, experiments have been designed to uncouple the global hemodynamic response to prolonged exercise from the central command mediated response via: (1) continuous maintenance of cardiac filling volume by intravenous infusion of a dextran solution; and (2) whole body surface cooling to counteract thermoregulatory cutaneous vasodialation. As the type of work (exercise) performed by astronauts is inherently arm and upper body dependent, we will also examine the physiologic responses to prolonged leg cycling and arm ergometry exercise in the supine positions with and without level lower body negative

  5. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  6. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    , that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression......The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued...

  7. Aversive startle potentiation and fear pathology: Mediating role of threat sensitivity and moderating impact of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, James R; Vaidyanathan, Uma; Patrick, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Enhanced startle reactivity during exposure to unpleasant cues (aversive startle potentiation; ASP) appears in the RDoC matrix as a physiological index of acute threat response. Increased ASP has been linked to focal fear disorders and to scale measures of dispositional fearfulness (i.e., threat sensitivity; THT+). However, some studies have reported reduced ASP for fear pathology accompanied by major depressive disorder (MDD) or pervasive distress. The current study evaluated whether (a) THT+ as indexed by reported dispositional fearfulness mediates the relationship between fear disorders (when unaccompanied by depression) and ASP, and (b) depression moderates relations of THT+ and fear disorders with ASP. Fear disorder participants without MDD showed enhanced ASP whereas those with MDD (or other distress conditions) showed evidence of reduced ASP. Continuous THT+ scores also predicted ASP, and this association: (a) was likewise moderated by depression/distress, and (b) accounted for the relationship between ASP and fear pathology without MDD. These findings point to a role for the RDoC construct of acute threat, operationalized dispositionally, in enhanced ASP shown by individuals with fear pathology unaccompanied by distress pathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  9. HAM-D17 and HAM-D6 sensitivity to change in relation to desvenlafaxine dose and baseline depression severity in major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P; Boyer, P; Germain, J-M;

    2010-01-01

    -blind, placebo-controlled, 8-week trials of fixed-dose desvenlafaxine (50, 100, 200 or 400 mg/d) for major depressive disorder. HAM-D (17) and HAM-D (6) effect sizes were assessed. RESULTS: HAM-D (17) effect sizes were negative (favoured placebo) for higher desvenlafaxine doses (200-400 mg/d) at week 1, but were......INTRODUCTION: This retrospective analysis compared sensitivity to change on the 17-item and 6-item Hamilton Rating Scales For Depression (HAM-D (17) and HAM-D (6), respectively) in relation to antidepressant dose and baseline depression severity. METHODS: Data were derived from 6 randomized, double...

  10. Anhedonia is associated with blunted reward sensitivity in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-hua; Roiser, Jonathan P.; Wang, Ling-zhi; Zhu, Yu-hua; Huang, Jia; Neumann, David L.; Shum, David H. K.; Cheung, Eric F.C.; Chan, Raymond C. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Anhedonia is a cardinal feature of major depression and is hypothesized to be driven by low motivation, in particular blunted reward sensitivity. It has been suggested to be a marker that represents a genetic predisposition to this disorder. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heightened risk in unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with major depression. We previously demonstrated abnormal reward biases in acutely depressed patients. The present study aimed to examine the development of reward bias in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression. Methods Forty-seven first-degree relatives of patients with major depression (26 females, age 18-52) and 60 healthy controls with no family history of depression (34 females, age 21-48) were recruited. A probabilistically rewarded difficult visual discrimination task, in which participants were instructed about the contingencies, was used to assess blunted reward sensitivity. A response bias towards the more frequently rewarded stimulus (termed “reward bias”) was the primary outcome variable in this study. Participants also completed self-reported measures of anhedonia and depressive symptoms. Results Compared with the control group, relatives of patients with major depression with sub-clinical depressive symptoms displayed a blunted reward bias. Relatives without symptoms displayed largely intact motivational processing on both self-report and experimental measures. The degree of anhedonia was associated with attenuated reward bias in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression, especially in those with sub-clinical symptoms. Limitations The study did not include a depressed patient group, which restricted our ability to interpret the observed group differences. Conclusions Blunted reward sensitivity may be largely manifested in a subgroup of relatives with high levels of depressive symptoms. PMID:26590511

  11. Dynamic aerobic exercise induces baroreflex improvement in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Luciana; da Pureza, Demilto Y; da Silva Dias, Danielle; Conti, Filipe Fernandes; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of an acute aerobic exercise on arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control (n = 8) and diabetic (n = 8) groups. AP, HR, and BRS, which were measured by tachycardic and bradycardic (BR) responses to AP changes, were evaluated at rest (R) and postexercise session (PE) on a treadmill. At rest, STZ diabetes induced AP and HR reductions, associated with BR impairment. Attenuation in resting diabetes-induced AP (R: 103 ± 2 versus PE: 111 ± 3 mmHg) and HR (R: 290 ± 7 versus PE: 328 ± 10 bpm) reductions and BR dysfunction (R: -0.70 ± 0.06 versus PE: -1.21 ± 0.09 bpm/mmHg) was observed in the postexercise period. In conclusion, the hemodynamic and arterial baro-mediated control of circulation improvement in the postexercise period reinforces the role of exercise in the management of cardiovascular risk in diabetes.

  12. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  13. Mothers' depressive symptoms predict both increased and reduced negative reactivity: aversion sensitivity and the regulation of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Theodore; Moed, Anat; Anderson, Edward R

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether, as mothers' depressive symptoms increase, their expressions of negative emotion to children increasingly reflect aversion sensitivity and motivation to minimize ongoing stress or discomfort. In multiple interactions over 2 years, negative affect expressed by 319 mothers and their children was observed across variations in mothers' depressive symptoms, the aversiveness of children's immediate behavior, and observed differences in children's general negative reactivity. As expected, depressive symptoms predicted reduced maternal negative reactivity when child behavior was low in aversiveness, particularly with children who were high in negative reactivity. Depressive symptoms predicted high negative reactivity and steep increases in negative reactivity as the aversiveness of child behavior increased, particularly when high and continued aversiveness from the child was expected (i.e., children were high in negative reactivity). The findings are consistent with the proposal that deficits in parenting competence as depressive symptoms increase reflect aversion sensitivity and motivation to avoid conflict and suppress children's aversive behavior.

  14. Oxytocin and Social Sensitivity: Gene Polymorphisms in Relation to Depressive Symptoms and Suicidal Ideation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Robyn J.; McInnis, Opal A.; Matheson, Kimberly; Anisman, Hymie

    2016-01-01

    Although the neuropeptide oxytocin has been associated with enhanced prosocial behaviors, it has also been linked to aggression and mental health disorders. Thus, it was suggested that oxytocin might act by increasing the salience of social stimuli, irrespective of whether these are positive or negative, thus increasing vulnerability to negative mental health outcomes. The current study (N = 243), conducted among white university students, examined the relation of trauma, depressive symptoms including suicidal ideation in relation to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR), rs53576, and a SNP on the CD38 gene that controls oxytocin release, rs3796863. Individuals with the polymorphism on both alleles (AA genotype) of the CD38 SNP had previously been linked to elevated plasma oxytocin levels. Consistent with the social sensitivity perspective, however, in the current study, individuals carrying the AA genotype displayed elevated feelings of alienation from parents and peers as well as increased levels of suicidal ideation. Moreover, they tended to report elevated depressive symptoms compared to CC homozygotes. It was also observed that the CD38 genotype moderated the relation between trauma and suicidal ideation scores, such that high levels of trauma were associated with elevated suicidal ideation among all CD38 genotypes, but this relationship was stronger among individuals with the AA genotype. In contrast, there was no relationship between the OXTR SNP, rs53576, depression or suicidal ideation. These findings support a social sensitivity hypothesis of oxytocin, wherein the AA genotype of the CD38 SNP, which has been considered the “protective allele” was associated with increased sensitivity and susceptibility to disturbed social relations and suicidal ideation. PMID:27486392

  15. Oxytocin and Social Sensitivity: Gene Polymorphisms in Relation to Depressive Symptoms and Suicidal Ideation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Jane McQuaid

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the neuropeptide oxytocin has been associated with enhanced prosocial behaviors, it has also been linked to aggression and mental health disorders. Thus, it was suggested that oxytocin might act by increasing the salience of social stimuli, irrespective of whether these are positive or negative, thus increasing vulnerability to negative mental health outcomes. The current study (N = 243, conducted among White university students, examined the relation of trauma, depressive symptoms including suicidal ideation in relation to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP within the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR, rs53576, and a SNP on the CD38 gene that controls oxytocin release, rs3796863. Individuals with the polymorphism on both alleles (AA genotype of the CD38 SNP had previously been linked to elevated plasma oxytocin levels. Consistent with the social sensitivity perspective, however, in the current study, individuals carrying the AA genotype displayed elevated feelings of alienation from parents and peers as well as increased levels of suicidal ideation. Moreover, they tended to report elevated depressive symptoms compared to CC homozygotes. It was also observed that the CD38 genotype moderated the relation between trauma and suicidal ideation scores, such that high levels of trauma were associated with elevated suicidal ideation among all CD38 genotypes, but this relationship was stronger among individuals with the AA genotype. In contrast, there was no relationship between the OXTR SNP, rs53576, depression or suicidal ideation. These findings support a social sensitivity hypothesis of oxytocin, wherein the AA genotype of the CD38 SNP, which has been considered the ‘protective allele’ was associated with increased sensitivity and susceptibility to disturbed social relations and suicidal ideation.

  16. Sensitivity to changes during antidepressant treatment: a comparison of unidimensional subscales of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) in patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Isabella; Wagner, Stefanie; Mergl, Roland; Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Hautzinger, Martin; Henkel, Verena; Hegerl, Ulrich; Tadić, André

    2012-06-01

    In the efficacy evaluation of antidepressant treatments, the total score of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) is still regarded as the 'gold standard'. We previously had shown that the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) was more sensitive to detect depressive symptom changes than the HAMD17 (Helmreich et al. 2011). Furthermore, studies suggest that the unidimensional subscales of the HAMD, which capture the core depressive symptoms, outperform the full HAMD regarding the detection of antidepressant treatment effects. The aim of the present study was to compare several unidimensional subscales of the HAMD and the IDS regarding their sensitivity to changes in depression symptoms in a sample of patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression (MIND). Biweekly IDS-C28 and HAMD17 data from 287 patients of a 10-week randomised, placebo-controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of sertraline and cognitive-behavioural group therapy in patients with MIND were converted to subscale scores and analysed during the antidepressant treatment course. We investigated sensitivity to depressive change for all scales from assessment-to-assessment, in relation to depression severity level and placebo-verum differences. The subscales performed similarly during the treatment course, with slight advantages for some subscales in detecting treatment effects depending on the treatment modality and on the items included. Most changes in depressive symptomatology were detected by the IDS short scale, but regarding the effect sizes, it performed worse than most subscales. Unidimensional subscales are a time- and cost-saving option in judging drug therapy outcomes, especially in antidepressant treatment efficacy studies. However, subscales do not cover all facets of depression (e.g. atypical symptoms, sleep disturbances), which might be important for comprehensively understanding the nature of the disease depression. Therefore, the cost-to-benefit ratio must be

  17. GABA modulates baroreflex in the ventral tegmental area in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Masoumeh; Rasoulpanah, Minoo; Nasimi, Ali

    2015-12-01

    There are some reports demonstrating the cardiovascular functions of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). About 20-30% of the VTA neurons are GABAergic, which might play a role in baroreflex modulation. This study was performed to find the effects of GABA(A), GABA(B) receptors and reversible synaptic blockade of the VTA on baroreflex. Drugs were microinjected into the VTA of urethane anesthetized rats, and the maximum change of blood pressure and the gain of the reflex bradycardia in response to intravenous phenylephrine (Phe) injection were compared with the preinjection and the control values. Microinjection of bicuculline methiodide (BMI, 100 pmol/100 nl), a GABA(A) antagonist, into the VTA strongly decreased the Phe-induced hypertension, indicating that GABA itself attenuated the baroreflex. Muscimol, a GABA(A) agonist (30 mM, 100 nl), produced no significant changes. Baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist (1000 pmole/100 nl), moderately attenuated the baroreflex, however phaclofen, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist (1000 pmole/100 nl), had no significant effect. In conclusion, for the first time, we demonstrated that GABA(A) receptors of the VTA strongly attenuate and GABA(B) receptors of the VTA moderately attenuate baroreflex in rat. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Capsaicin facilitates carotid sinus baroreflex in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Yi-Xian; Wu, Yu-Ming; Wang, Sheng; He, Rui-Rong

    2004-04-25

    The effects of capsaicin (CAP) on the carotid sinus baroreflex were studied in 30 anaesthetized rats with perfused isolated carotid sinus. The results are as follows. (1) By perfusing the isolated carotid sinus with CAP (1 micromol/L), the functional curve of the baroreflex was shifted to the left and downward, with a peak slope (PS) increasing from 0.34+/-0.01 to 0.42+/-0.01 (PPS and RD induced by capsaicin were dose-dependent. (2) By pretreatment with ruthenium red (RR, 100 micromol/L), an antagonist of vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (VR(1)), the above effects of CAP on carotid baroreflex were abolished. (3) The CAP-induced change in the baroreflex was also eliminated by pretreatment with glibenclamide (20 microm ol/L), a K(ATP) channel blocker. On the basis of the results, it is concluded that CAP facilitates the carotid baroreflex, an effect of which may be resulted from the opening of K(ATP) channels mediated by VR(1).

  19. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that depression is000  a common comorbid health issue in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Reviews have also concluded that depression in diabetes is associated with higher HbA1c levels, less optimal self-care behaviours, lower quality of life, incident vascular...... complications and higher mortality rates. However, longitudinal studies into the course of depression in people with type 1 diabetes remain scarce. In this issue of Diabetologia, Kampling and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4123-0 ) report the 5 year trajectories of depression in adults with newly diagnosed...... type 1 diabetes (mean age, 28 years). Their baseline results showed that shortly after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes a major depressive episode was diagnosed in approximately 6% of participants, while 8% suffered from an anxiety disorder. The longitudinal depression data showed that, in a 5 year...

  20. Arterial baroreflex function and left ventricular hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Chao-Yu; SU Ding-Feng

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the arterial baroreflex(ABR)plays a key role in the regulation of heart rate and stabilization of blood pressure.Currently,it appears that ABR dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease states.Since the mid-1990s,a number of studies have been carried out in our laboratory to explore the pathological significance of ABR function in cardiovascular damage.This minireview summarizes our research work on the topic of ABR and left ventricular hypertrophy(LVH).On the basis of discussion concerning the importance of ABR dysfunction in hypertensive LVH and sinoaortic denervation-induced LVH,we advance a new strategy for reversal of LVH,that is,restoration of impaired ABR function.We tested this hypothesis in animal models with ABR deficiency.It was found that improvement of impaird ABR function with long-term treatment of ketanserin or candesartan was accompanied by reversal of LVH.The preliminary results indicate that it is feasible to target ABR for treatment of LVH.

  1. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  2. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  3. Antihypertensive effect of Carica papaya via a reduction in ACE activity and improved baroreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil, Girlandia Alexandre; Ronchi, Silas Nascimento; do Nascimento, Andrews Marques; de Lima, Ewelyne Miranda; Romão, Wanderson; da Costa, Helber Barcellos; Scherer, Rodrigo; Ventura, José Aires; Lenz, Dominik; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza; Endringer, Denise Coutinho; de Andrade, Tadeu Uggere

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the antihypertensive effects of the standardised methanolic extract of Carica papaya, its angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory effects in vivo, its effect on the baroreflex and serum angiotensin converting enzyme activity, and its chemical composition. The chemical composition of the methanolic extract of C. papaya was evaluated by liquid chromatography-mass/mass and mass/mass spectrometry. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory effect was evaluated in vivo by Ang I administration. The antihypertensive assay was performed in spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar rats that were treated with enalapril (10 mg/kg), the methanolic extract of C. papaya (100 mg/kg; twice a day), or vehicle for 30 days. The baroreflex was evaluated through the use of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Angiotensin converting enzyme activity was measured by ELISA, and cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by morphometric analysis. The methanolic extract of C. papaya was standardised in ferulic acid (203.41 ± 0.02 µg/g), caffeic acid (172.60 ± 0.02 µg/g), gallic acid (145.70 ± 0.02 µg/g), and quercetin (47.11 ± 0.03 µg/g). The flavonoids quercetin, rutin, nicotiflorin, clitorin, and manghaslin were identified in a fraction of the extract. The methanolic extract of C. papaya elicited angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory activity. The antihypertensive effects elicited by the methanolic extract of C. papaya were similar to those of enalapril, and the baroreflex sensitivity was normalised in treated spontaneously hypertensive rats. Plasma angiotensin converting enzyme activity and cardiac hypertrophy were also reduced to levels comparable to the enalapril-treated group. These results may be associated with the chemical composition of the methanolic extract of C. papaya, and are the first step into the development of a new phytotherapic product which could be used in the treatment of hypertension.

  4. Neuropeptide s alters anxiety but not depression-like behaviors in the flinders sensitive line rats, a genetic animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, A.; Wegener, Gregers; Finger, B.

    2010-01-01

    of cannula, 0.25 or 1.0 nmol NPS, or vehicle/5 ml were infused into the lateral ventricle. 45 min after NPS infusion animals were tested on elevated plus maze (EPM). Five days later the animals were subjected to the two-day forced swim test (FST); NPS or vehicle were injected 45 min before the second day FST...... the effects of centrally administered NPS on depression- and anxiety-related behaviors, using a well validated animal model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats and their controls the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). Methods: Male and female were tested. Seven days following insertion...... while no difference in the anxiety-like behavior was observed. These findings confirm the utility of the FSL as a model of depression useful in exploration of neurobiological correlates both of depression and those discriminating between depression and anxiety endophenotypes. NPS had marked anxiolytic...

  5. Association between depression, pressure pain sensitivity, stress and autonomous nervous system function in stable ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Søren; Bergmann, Natasha; Karpatschof, Benny

    2016-01-01

    Background: Depression and ischemic heart disease (IHD) are associated with persistent stress and autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction. The former can be measured by pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) of the sternum, and the latter by the PPS and systolic blood pressure (SBP) response to a tilt...... table test (TTT). Beta-blocker treatment reduces the efferent beta-adrenergic ANS function, and thus, the physiological stress response. Objective: To test the effect of beta-blockers on changes in depression score in patients with IHD, as well as the influence on persistent stress and ANS dysfunction....... Methods: Three months of non-pharmacological intervention aiming at reducing PPS and depression score in patients with stable IHD. Beta-blocker users (N = 102) were compared with non-users (N = 75), with respect to signs of depression measured by the Major Depressive Inventory questionnaire (MDI), resting...

  6. Reductions in carotid chemoreceptor activity with low-dose dopamine improves baroreflex control of heart rate during hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, Michael T; Holbein, Walter W; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the contribution of the carotid body chemoreceptors to changes in baroreflex control of heart rate with exposure to hypoxia. We hypothesized spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (scBRS) would be reduced with hypoxia and this effect would be blunted when carotid chemoreceptor activity was reduced with low-dose dopamine. Fifteen healthy adults (11 M/4 F) completed two visits randomized to intravenous dopamine or placebo (saline). On each visit, subjects were exposed to 5-min normoxia (~99% SpO2), followed by 5-min hypoxia (~84% SpO2). Blood pressure (intra-arterial catheter) and heart rate (ECG) were measured continuously and scBRS was assessed by spectrum and sequence methodologies. scBRS was reduced with hypoxia (P dopamine (P dopamine (P dopamine did not attenuate the decrease in baroreflex sensitivity to falling pressures (scBRS "down-down"; P > 0.05). Present findings are consistent with a reduction in scBRS with systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, we show this effect is partially mediated by the carotid body chemoreceptors, given the fall in scBRS is attenuated when activity of the chemoreceptors is reduced with low-dose dopamine. However, the improvement in scBRS with dopamine appears to be specific to rising blood pressures. These results may have important implications for impairments in baroreflex function common in disease states of acute and/or chronic hypoxemia, as well as the experimental use of dopamine to assess such changes.

  7. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during cold pressor test in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that baroreceptor modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and heart rate is altered during the cold pressor test. Ten subjects were exposed to a cold pressor test by immersing a hand in ice water for 3 min while arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and MSNA were recorded. During the second and third minute of the cold pressor test, blood pressure was lowered and then raised by intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was more negative (P cold pressor test (-244.9 +/- 26.3 units x beat(-1) x mmHg(-1)) when compared with control conditions (-138.8 +/- 18.6 units x beat(-1) x mmHg(-1)), whereas no significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. These data suggest that baroreceptors remain capable of modulating MSNA and heart rate during a cold pressor test; however, the sensitivity of baroreflex modulation of MSNA is elevated without altering the sensitivity of baroreflex control of heart rate.

  8. System identification of baroreflex response to mild lower body negative pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletti, Federico; Ferrario, Manuela; Xu, Da; Greaves, Danielle K; Shoemaker, Kevin J; Arbeille, Philippe; Cerutti, Sergio; Hughson, Richard L; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The effect of mild lower body negative pressure (LBNP) on baroreflex control of arterial blood pressure (ABP) has long been thought to affect cardiopulmonary baroreflex only, although recent studies have pointed out that arterial baroreceptors may be transiently unloaded too after the rapid onset of mild LBNP. This paper presents a spectral decomposition method for the black box identification of the contribution of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes to beat-by-beat variability of ABP in response to mild LBNP levels. The significant decrease of mean and diastolic arterial pressure and of the arterial baroreflex mediated contribution to overall variability of ABP which was found, suggested that the unloading of arterial baroreceptors may be reflected by an altered dynamic response of arterial baroreflex, too. In addition, arterial baroreflex mediated modulations were found to be the main player in the modulation of beat-by-beat fluctuations of ABP, while the role of cardiopulmonary baroreflex mediated responses appeared to contribute very little.

  9. Frequency-specific alterations in functional connectivity in treatment-resistant and -sensitive major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zongling; Cui, Qian; Zheng, Junjie; Duan, Xujun; Pang, Yajing; Gao, Qing; Han, Shaoqiang; Long, Zhiliang; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Jiao; Wang, Xiao; Zhao, Jingping; Chen, Huafu

    2016-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) may involve alterations in brain functional connectivity in multiple neural circuits and present large-scale network dysfunction. Patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and treatment-sensitive depression (TSD) show different responses to antidepressants and aberrant brain functions. This study aims to investigate functional connectivity patterns of TRD and TSD at the whole brain resting state. Seventeen patients with TRD, 17 patients with TSD, and 17 healthy controls matched with age, gender, and years of education were recruited in this study. The brain was divided using an automated anatomical labeling atlas into 90 regions of interest, which were used to construct the entire brain functional networks. An analysis method called network-based statistic was used to explore the dysconnected subnetworks of TRD and TSD at different frequency bands. At resting state, TSD and TRD present characteristic patterns of network dysfunction at special frequency bands. The dysconnected subnetwork of TSD mainly lies in the fronto-parietal top-down control network. Moreover, the abnormal neural circuits of TRD are extensive and complex. These circuits not only depend on the abnormal affective network but also involve other networks, including salience network, auditory network, visual network, and language processing cortex. Our findings reflect that the pathological mechanism of TSD may refer to impairment in cognitive control, whereas TRD mainly triggers the dysfunction of emotion processing and affective cognition. This study reveals that differences in brain functional connectivity at resting state reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms in TSD and TRD. These findings may be helpful in differentiating two types of MDD and predicting treatment responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Different people have different symptoms. Some symptoms of depression include: Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness ...

  11. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty may trigger depression in some people. Medical illness – ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary ...

  12. In vivo expression of angiotensin-(1-7) lowers blood pressure and improves baroreflex function in transgenic (mRen2)27 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Espinosa, Maria A; Shaltout, Hossam A; Gallagher, Patricia E; Chappell, Mark C; Diz, Debra I

    2012-08-01

    Transgenic (mRen2)27 rats are hypertensive with impaired baroreflex sensitivity for control of heart rate compared with Hannover Sprague-Dawley rats. We assessed blood pressure and baroreflex function in male hemizygous (mRen2)27 rats (30-40 weeks of age) instrumented for arterial pressure recordings and receiving into the cisterna magna either an Ang-(1-7) fusion protein or a control fusion protein (CTL-FP). The maximum reduction in mean arterial pressure achieved was -38 ± 7 mm Hg on day 3, accompanied by a 55% enhancement in baroreflex sensitivity in Ang-(1-7) fusion protein-treated rats. Both the high-frequency alpha index (HF-α) and heart rate variability increased, suggesting increased parasympathetic tone for cardiac control. The mRNA levels of several components of the renin-angiotensin system in the dorsal medulla were markedly reduced including renin (-80%), neprilysin (-40%), and the AT1a receptor (-40%). However, there was a 2-fold to 3-fold increase in the mRNA levels of the phosphatases PTP-1b and dual-specificity phosphatase 1 in the medulla of Ang-(1-7) fusion protein-treated rats. Our finding that replacement of Ang-(1-7) in the brain of (mRen2)27 rats reverses in part the hypertension and baroreflex impairment is consistent with a functional deficit of Ang-(1-7) in this hypertensive strain. We conclude that the increased mRNA expression of phosphatases known to counteract the phosphoinositol 3 kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases, and the reduction of renin and AT1a receptor mRNA levels may contribute to the reduction in arterial pressure and improvement in baroreflex sensitivity in response to Ang-(1-7).

  13. Sensitivity and specificity of a two-question screening tool for depression in a specialist palliative care unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Payne, Ann

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: The primary objective in this study is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of a two-item screening interview for depression versus the formal psychiatric interview, in the setting of a specialist palliative in-patient unit so that we may identify those individuals suffering from depressive disorder and therefore optimise their management in this often-complex population. METHODS: A prospective sample of consecutive admissions (n = 167) consented to partake in the study, and the screening interview was asked separately to the formal psychiatric interview. RESULTS: The two-item questionnaire, achieved a sensitivity of 90.7% (95% CI 76.9-97.0) but a lower specificity of 67.7% (95% CI 58.7-75.7). The false positive rate was 32.3% (95% CI 24.3-41.3), but the false negative rate was found to be a low 9.3% (95% CI 3.0-23.1). A subgroup analysis of individuals with a past experience of depressive illness, (n = 95), revealed that a significant number screened positive for depression by the screening test, 55.2% (16\\/29) compared to those with no background history of depression, 33.3% (22\\/66) (P = 0.045). CONCLUSION: The high sensitivity and low false negative rate of the two-question screening tool will aid health professionals in identifying depression in the in-patient specialist palliative care unit. Individuals, who admit to a previous experience of depressive illness, are more likely to respond positively to the two-item questionnaire than those who report no prior history of depressive illness (P = 0.045).

  14. Hydrogen sulfide facilitates carotid sinus baroreflex in anesthetized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin XIAO; Yu-ming WU; Hao ZHANG; Yi-xian LIU; Rui-rong HE

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To study effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S)on the carotid sinus baroreflex (CSB).Methods:The functional curve of the carotid sinus baroreflex was measured by recording changes in arterial pressure in anesthetized male rats with perfused carotid sinus.Results:H2S(derived from sodium hydrosulfide)at concentrations of 25,50,and 100 μmol/L facilitated the CSB,shifting the functional curve of the baroreflex downward and to the left.There was a marked increase in peak slope(PS)and reflex decrease in blood pressure(RD).Effects were concentration-dependent.Pretreatment with glibenclamide(20 μmol/L),a KATP channel blocker,abolished the above effects of H2S on CSB.Pretreatment with Bay K8644 (an agonist of calcium channels;500 nmol/L)eliminated the effect of H2S on CSB.An inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase(CSE),DL-propargylglycine(PPG;200 μmol/L),inhibited CSB in male rats and shifted the functional curve of the baroreflex upward and to the right.Conclusion:These data suggest that exogenous H2S exerts a facilitatory role on isolated CSB through opening KATP channels and further closing the calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle.Endogenous H2S may activate the activity of the CSB in vivo.

  15. The carotid baroreflex is reset following prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hart, E. C.; Rasmussen, P.; Secher, N. H.

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in the carotid baroreflex (CBR) control of arterial pressure may explain the reduction in arterial pressure and left ventricular (LV) function after prolonged exercise. We examined the CBR control of heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), in addition to changes in LV function......, pre- to post-exercise....

  16. Clonidine, moxonidine, folic acid, and mecobalamin improve baroreflex function in stroke-prone, spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-juan MA; Fu-ming SHEN; Ai-jun LIU; Ke-yong SHI; Ying-liang WU; Ding-feng SU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of clonidine, moxonidine, folic acid, and mecobalamin on arterial baroreflex (ABR) function in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP) and the possible mechanisms involved.Methods: Eighty-one SHR-SP were divided into 7 groups. Four groups weredesignated for the intragastric (ig) administration of clonidine (1.0 and 10.0 μg/kg), moxonidine (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg), folic acid (1.0 mg/kg), and mecobalamin(1.0 mg/kg). Three groups were for the intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of clonidine (4 μg/4 μL), moxonidine (5 μg/4 μL), and mecobalamin (20 μg/4 μL).Blood pressure (BP) was recorded in the conscious state for 30 min and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was determined respectively before and after drug administration. Results: Clonidine and moxonidine significantly decreased BP,prolonged the heart period (HP), and increased BRS when administered as either ig or icv injections. Both BP and HP were unchanged by ig folic acid or mecobalamin injection. However, BRS was significantly increased by both.Conclusion: Clonidine, moxonidine, folic acid, and mecobalamin improved impaired ABR function in SHR-SP. The central mechanism was involved in this effect of either clonidine or moxonidine. Mecobalamin improved ABR function through the peripheral mechanism.

  17. Antenatal interpersonal sensitivity is more strongly associated than perinatal depressive symptoms with postnatal mother-infant interaction quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Karen; Cockshaw, Wendell; Boyce, Philip; Thorpe, Karen

    2016-10-01

    Maternal mental health has enduring effects on children's life chances and is a substantial cost driver for child health, education and social services. A key linking mechanism is the quality of mother-infant interaction. A body of work associates maternal depressive symptoms across the antenatal and postnatal (perinatal) period with less-than-optimal mother-infant interaction. Our study aims to build on previous research in the field through exploring the association of a maternal personality trait, interpersonal sensitivity, measured in early pregnancy, with subsequent mother-infant interaction quality. We analysed data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) to examine the association between antenatal interpersonal sensitivity and postnatal mother-infant interaction quality in the context of perinatal depressive symptoms. Interpersonal sensitivity was measured during early pregnancy and depressive symptoms in the antenatal year and across the first 21 months of the postnatal period. In a subsample of the ALSPAC, mother-infant interaction was measured at 12 months postnatal through a standard observation. For the subsample that had complete data at all time points (n = 706), hierarchical regression examined the contribution of interpersonal sensitivity to variance in mother-infant interaction quality. Perinatal depressive symptoms predicted little variance in mother-infant interaction. Antenatal interpersonal sensitivity explained a greater proportion of variance in mother-infant interaction quality. The personality trait, interpersonal sensitivity, measured in early pregnancy, is a more robust indicator of subsequent mother-infant-interaction quality than perinatal depressive symptoms, thus affording enhanced opportunity to identify vulnerable mother-infant relationships for targeted early intervention.

  18. Different Fear-Regulation Behaviors in Toddlerhood: Relations to Preceding Infant Negative Emotionality, Maternal Depression, and Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloggler, Bettina; Pauli-Pott, Ursula

    2008-01-01

    In the study presented, the development of different fear regulation behaviors and their associations with preceding maternal sensitivity and depression is addressed. A sample of 64 mother-child pairs was examined at the children's ages of 4, 12, and 30 months. Four-month negative reactivity and 12- and 30- month behavioral inhibition and fear…

  19. Perfectionism, Anxiety, and Depressive Distress: Evidence for the Mediating Role of Negative Automatic Thoughts and Anxiety Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirbaglou, Meysam; Cribbie, Robert; Irvine, Jane; Radhu, Natasha; Vora, Khushboo; Ritvo, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed a mediational model in which negative automatic thoughts and anxiety sensitivity were hypothesized to mediate the relationship between perfectionism cognitions and depressive and anxiety symptoms. Participants: Participants were undergraduate students from an urban Canadian university. The data were collected from…

  20. Anxiety sensitivity and subjective social status in relation to anxiety and depressive symptoms and disorders among Latinos in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Bakhshaie, Jafar; Garza, Monica; Valdivieso, Jeanette; Ortiz, Mayra; Bogiaizian, Daniel; Robles, Zuzuky; Vujanovic, Anka

    2015-05-01

    The present investigation examined the interactive effects of anxiety sensitivity and subjective social status in relation to anxiety and depressive symptoms and psychopathology among 143 Latinos (85.7% female; Mage=39.0, SD=10.9; 97.2% used Spanish as their first language) who attended a community-based primary healthcare clinic. Results indicated that the interaction between anxiety sensitivity and subjective social status was significantly associated with number of mood and anxiety disorders, panic, social anxiety, and depressive symptoms. The form of the significant interactions indicated that individuals reporting co-occurring higher levels of anxiety sensitivity and lower levels of subjective social status evidenced the greatest levels of psychopathology and panic, social anxiety, and depressive symptoms. The present findings suggest that there is merit in focusing further scientific attention on the interplay between anxiety sensitivity and subjective social status in regard to understanding, and thus, better intervening to reduce anxiety/depressive vulnerability among Latinos in primary care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Abnormal Neural Sensitivity to Monetary Gains versus Losses among Adolescents at Risk for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Dan; Kotov, Roman; Klein, Daniel N.; Hajcak, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder aggregates within families, although the mechanisms of transfer across generations are not well understood. In light of converging biological and behavioral evidence that depressive symptoms are associated with impaired reward processing, we examined whether adolescent girls with a parental history of depression would…

  2. Nonverbal interpersonal sensitivity and persistence of depression : Perception of emotions in schematic faces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouhuys, AL; Geerts, E; Mersch, PPA; Jenner, JA

    1996-01-01

    Deficits ill the decoding of facial emotional expressions may play a role in the persistence of depression. In a prospective longitudinal study, 33 depressed outpatients (30 major depression, 2 dysthymia, and 1 cyclothymic disorder) judged schematic faces with respect to the emotions they expressed

  3. Hepatic drug metabolizing profile of Flinders Sensitive Line rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsovolou, Olga; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lang, Matti A; Marselos, Marios; Overstreet, David H; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zoi; Johanson, Inger; Fotopoulos, Andrew; Konstandi, Maria

    2010-08-16

    The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat model of depression exhibits some behavioral, neurochemical, and pharmacological features that have been reported in depressed patients and has been very effective in screening antidepressants. Major factor that determines the effectiveness and toxicity of a drug is the drug metabolizing capacity of the liver. Therefore, in order to discriminate possible differentiation in the hepatic drug metabolism between FSL rats and Sprague-Dawley (SD) controls, their hepatic metabolic profile was investigated in this study. The data showed decreased glutathione (GSH) content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lower expression of certain major CYP enzymes, including the CYP2B1, CYP2C11 and CYP2D1 in FSL rats compared to SD controls. In contrast, p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (PNP), 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) and 16alpha-testosterone hydroxylase activities were higher in FSL rats. Interestingly, the wide spread environmental pollutant benzo(alpha)pyrene (B(alpha)P) induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1/2 and ALDH3c at a lesser extend in FSL than in SD rats, whereas the antidepressant mirtazapine (MIRT) up-regulated CYP1A1/2, CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2, mainly, in FSL rats. The drug also further increased ALDH3c whereas suppressed GSH content in B(alpha)P-exposed FSL rats. In conclusion, several key enzymes of the hepatic biotransformation machinery are differentially expressed in FSL than in SD rats, a condition that may influence the outcome of drug therapy. The MIRT-induced up-regulation of several drug-metabolizing enzymes indicates the critical role of antidepressant treatment that should be always taken into account in the designing of treatment and interpretation of insufficient pharmacotherapy or drug toxicity.

  4. Neuropeptide S alters anxiety, but not depression-like behaviour in Flinders Sensitive Line rats: a genetic animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Gregers; Finger, Beate C; Elfving, Betina; Keller, Kirsten; Liebenberg, Nico; Fischer, Christina W; Singewald, Nicolas; Slattery, David A; Neumann, Inga D; Mathé, Aleksander A

    2012-04-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor (NPSR) have been implicated in the mediation of anxiolytic-like behaviour in rodents. However, little knowledge is available regarding the NPS system in depression-related behaviours, and whether NPS also exerts anxiolytic effects in an animal model of psychopathology. Therefore, the aim of this work was to characterize the effects of NPS on depression- and anxiety-related parameters, using male and female rats in a well-validated animal model of depression: the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL), their controls, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL), and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. We found that FSL showed greater immobility in the forced swim test (FST) than FRL, confirming their phenotype. However, NPS did not affect depression-related behaviour in any rat line. No significant differences in baseline anxiety levels between the FSL and FRL strains were observed, but FSL and FRL rats displayed less anxiety-like behaviour compared to SD rats. NPS decreased anxiety-like behaviour on the elevated plus-maze in all strains. The expression of the NPSR in the amygdala, periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and hippocampus was equal in all male strains, although a trend towards reduced expression within the amygdala was observed in FSL rats compared to SD rats. In conclusion, NPS had a marked anxiolytic effect in FSL, FRL and SD rats, but did not modify the depression-related behaviour in any strain, in spite of the significant differences in innate level between the strains. These findings suggest that NPS specifically modifies anxiety behaviour but cannot overcome/reverse a genetically mediated depression phenotype.

  5. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  6. The repeated sit-to-stand maneuver is a superior method for cardiac baroreflex assessment: a comparison with the modified Oxford method and Valsalva maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, H M; Tzeng, Y C; Galletly, D C; Peebles, K C

    2014-12-01

    Baroreflex assessment has diagnostic and prognostic utility in the clinical and research environments, and there is a need for a reliable, simple, noninvasive method of assessment. The repeated sit-to-stand method induces oscillatory changes in blood pressure (BP) at a desired frequency and is suitable for assessing dynamic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). However, little is known about the reliability of this method and its ability to discern fundamental properties of the baroreflex. In this study we sought to: 1) evaluate the reliability of the sit-to-stand method for assessing BRS and compare its performance against two established methods (Oxford method and Valsalva maneuver), and 2) examine whether the frequency of the sit-to-stand method influences hysteresis. Sixteen healthy participants underwent three trials of each method. For the sit-to-stand method, which was performed at 0.1 and 0.05 Hz, BRS was quantified as an integrated response (BRSINT) and in response to falling and rising BP (BRSDOWN and BRSUP, respectively). Test retest reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Irrespective of frequency, the ICC for BRSINT during the sit-to-stand method was ≥0.88. The ICC for a rising BP evoked by phenylephrine (PEGAIN) in the Oxford method was 0.78 and ≤0.5 for the remaining measures. During the sit-to-stand method, hysteresis was apparent in all participants at 0.1 Hz but was absent at 0.05 Hz. These findings indicate the sit-to-stand method is a statistically reliable BRS assessment tool and suitable for the examination of baroreflex hysteresis. Using this approach we showed that baroreflex hysteresis is a frequency-dependent phenomenon.

  7. Four faces of baroreflex failure: hypertensive crisis, volatile hypertension, orthostatic tachycardia, and malignant vagotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketch, Terry; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, RoseMarie; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The baroreflex normally serves to buffer blood pressure against excessive rise or fall. Baroreflex failure occurs when afferent baroreceptive nerves or their central connections become impaired. In baroreflex failure, there is loss of buffering ability, and wide excursions of pressure and heart rate occur. Such excursions may derive from endogenous factors such as stress or drowsiness, which result in quite high and quite low pressures, respectively. They may also derive from exogenous factors such as drugs or environmental influences. METHODS AND RESULTS: Impairment of the baroreflex may produce an unusually broad spectrum of clinical presentations; with acute baroreflex failure, a hypertensive crisis is the most common presentation. Over succeeding days to weeks, or in the absence of an acute event, volatile hypertension with periods of hypotension occurs and may continue for many years, usually with some attenuation of pressor surges and greater prominence of depressor valleys during long-term follow-up. With incomplete loss of baroreflex afferents, a mild syndrome of orthostatic tachycardia or orthostatic intolerance may appear. Finally, if the baroreflex failure occurs without concomitant destruction of the parasympathetic efferent vagal fibers, a resting state may lead to malignant vagotonia with severe bradycardia and hypotension and episodes of sinus arrest. CONCLUSIONS: Although baroreflex failure is not the most common cause of the above conditions, correct differentiation from other cardiovascular disorders is important, because therapy of baroreflex failure requires specific strategies, which may lead to successful control.

  8. The effects of an anxiety sensitivity intervention on anxiety, depression, and worry: mediation through affect tolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norr, Aaron M; Allan, Nicholas P; Macatee, Richard J; Keough, Meghan E; Schmidt, Norman B

    2014-08-01

    Recently there has been increased interest in emotional and physical tolerance risk factors for mood and anxiety disorders. Three tolerance risk factors that have been shown to be related are anxiety sensitivity (AS), distress tolerance (DT), and discomfort intolerance (DI). Although previous research has demonstrated these constructs are malleable, no research has investigated the effects of an AS intervention on DT or DI. Further, no studies have investigated whether changes in DT or DI play a role in mood and anxiety symptom amelioration due to an AS intervention. Participants (N = 104), who were selected for elevated levels of AS, completed a single-session computer-assisted AS intervention or a control intervention and follow-up assessments at 1-week and 1-month post intervention. Results revealed that the intervention reduced AS and increased DT, but did not affect DI at the 1-week follow-up. Mediation analyses revealed that changes in AS and DT both mediated changes in symptoms (depression, anxiety, worry) due to the intervention at 1-month follow-up, however, when AS and DT were considered in the same model only the effect via AS remained significant. These results have important implications for the nature of the relationships between AS, DT, and DI as well as the specific mechanistic pathways through which an AS intervention ameliorates symptoms.

  9. Urotensin Ⅱ inhibits carotid sinus baroreflex in anesthetized male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-ming WU; Hong-mei XUE; Lin XIAO; Rui-rong HE

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study the effects of urotensin Ⅱ (UV) on the carotid sinus baroreflex (CSB). Methods: The functional curve of carotid sinus baroreflex was measured by recording changes in arterial pressure in anesthetized male rats with perfused isolated carotid sinus. Results: UⅡ at the concentration of 3 nmol/L had no effect on the CSB, while at the concentration of 30, 300 and 3000 nmol/L inhibited the CSB, shifting the functional curve of the baroreflex upward and to the right. There was a marked decrease in peak slope and reflex decrease in blood pressure. These effects of UⅡ were concentration-dependent. Pretreatment with verapamil (an antagonist of the L-type calcium channel, 10 μmol/L) partially eliminated the above effects of UⅡ (300 nmol/L) on the CSB. Pretreatment with BIM-23127 (3 μmol/L),an antagonist of human and rat UⅡ receptors, abolished the actions of UⅡ on the CSB. Pretreatment with, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) 100 μmol/L did not affect the inhibitory effects of UⅡ (300 nmol/L) on the CSB. Conclusion: These data suggest that UⅡ exerts an inhibitory action on the isolated CSB. Such an action of UV is predominantly mediated by the UⅡ receptors in vascular smooth muscles, resulting in the opening of L-type calcium channels.

  10. Functional stochastic resonance in human baroreflex induced by 1/f-type noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Rika; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    We hypothesized that 1/f noise is more beneficial than the conventional white noise in optimizing the brain's response to a weak input signal, and showed that externally added 1/f noise outperforms white noise in sensitizing human baroreflex centers in the brain. We examined the compensatory heart rate response to weak periodic signal introduced at the venous blood pressure receptor, while adding either 1/f or white noise with the same variance to the brain stem by electrically stimulating the bilateral vestibular afferents cutaneously. This stochastic galvanic vestibular stimulation, activating the vestibulo-sympathetic pathway in the brain stem, optimized covariance between weak input signals and the heart rate responses both with 1/f and white noise. Further, the optimal noise level with 1/f noise was significantly lower than that with white noise, suggesting the functional benefit of 1/f noise for the neuronal information transfer in the brain.

  11. The effects of Valeriana officinalis L. hydro-alcoholic extract on depression like behavior in ovalbumin sensitized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Neamati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuroimmune factors have been considered as contributors to the pathogenesis of depression. Beside other therapeutic effects, Valeriana officinalis L., have been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, the effects of V. officinalis L. hydro alcoholic extract was investigated on depression like behavior in ovalbumin sensitized rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 Wistar rats were divided into five groups: Group 1 (control group received saline instead of Valeriana officinalis L. extract. The animals in group 2 (sensitized were treated by saline instead of the extract and were sensitized using the ovalbumin. Groups 3-5 (Sent - Ext 50, (Sent - Ext 100 and (Sent - Ext 200 were treated by 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg of V. officinalis L. hydro-alcoholic extract respectively, during the sensitization protocol. Forced swimming test was performed for all groups and immobility time was recorded. Finally, the animals were placed in the open-field apparatus and the crossing number on peripheral and central areas was observed. Results: The immobility time in the sensitized group was higher than that in the control group (P < 0.01. The animals in Sent-Ext 100 and Sent-Ext 200 groups had lower immobility times in comparison with sensitized group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01. In the open field test, the crossed number in peripheral by the sensitized group was higher than that of the control one (P < 0.01 while, the animals of Sent-Ext 50, Sent-Ext 100 and Sent-Ext 200 groups had lower crossing number in peripheral compared with the sensitized group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 respectively. Furthermore, in the sensitized group, the central crossing number was lower than that of the control group (P < 0.001. In the animals treated by 200 mg/kg of the extract, the central crossing number was higher than that of the sensitized group (P < 0. 05. Conclusions: The results of the present study showed that the hydro-alcoholic extract of V

  12. Central estrogenic pathways protect against the depressant action of acute nicotine on reflex tachycardia in female rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M., E-mail: mahelm@hotmail.com; Fouda, Mohamed A.; El-gowilly, Sahar M.; Saad, Evan I.

    2012-02-01

    We have previously shown that acute exposure of male rats to nicotine preferentially attenuates baroreceptor-mediated control of reflex tachycardia in contrast to no effect on reflex bradycardia. Here, we investigated whether female rats are as sensitive as their male counterparts to the baroreflex depressant effect of nicotine and whether this interaction is modulated by estrogen. Baroreflex curves relating reflex chronotropic responses evoked by i.v. doses (1–16 μg/kg) of phenylephrine (PE) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were constructed in conscious freely moving proestrus, ovariectomized (OVX), and estrogen (50 μg/kg/day s.c., 5 days)-replaced OVX (OVXE{sub 2}) rats. Slopes of the curves were taken as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS{sub PE} and BRS{sub SNP}). Nicotine (100 μg/kg i.v.) reduced BRS{sub SNP} in OVX rats but not in proestrus or OVXE{sub 2} rats. The attenuation of reflex tachycardia by nicotine was also evident in diestrus rats, which exhibited plasma estrogen levels similar to those of OVX rats. BRS{sub PE} was not affected by nicotine in all rat preparations. Experiments were then extended to determine whether central estrogenic receptors modulate the nicotine–BRS{sub SNP} interaction. Intracisteral (i.c.) treatment of OVX rats with estrogen sulfate (0.2 μg/rat) abolished the BRS{sub SNP} attenuating effect of i.v. nicotine. This protective effect of estrogen disappeared when OVX rats were pretreated with i.c. ICI 182,780 (50 μg/rat, selective estrogen receptor antagonist). Together, these findings suggest that central neural pools of estrogen receptors underlie the protection offered by E{sub 2} against nicotine-induced baroreceptor dysfunction in female rats. -- Highlights: ► Estrogen protects against the depressant effect of nicotine on reflex tachycardia. ► The baroreflex response and estrogen status affect the nicotine–BRS interaction. ► The protection offered by estrogen is mediated via central estrogen receptors.

  13. Effects of prolonged bed rest on the total peripheral resistance baroreflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X.; Mukkamala, R.; Sheynberg, N.; Williams, G. H.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance following prolonged exposure to microgravity continues to be a primary concern of the human space program. Reduced autonomic tone has been demonstrated to contribute to this phenomenon, and the heart rate baroreflex, in particular, has been repeatedly shown to be impaired. However, only the works of Yelle et al. have attempted to address the role of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) baroreflex, a potentially more significant contributor to blood pressure regulation. We applied a previously developed method for estimating the static gains of both the arterial and cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflexes to data obtained before and after 16-day bed rest. Reductions in the estimated static gains of the arterial (statistically significant) and cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflexes were found after bed rest. This study supports the works of Yelle et al, which imply that the TPR baroreflex is reduced after spaceflight.

  14. SOD1 Overexpression Preserves Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate with an Increase of Aortic Depressor Nerve Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Jeffrey; Gu, He; Cheng, Zixi (Jack)

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical (O2∙−), is associated with diseases which compromise cardiac autonomic function. Overexpression of SOD1 may offer protection against ROS damage to the cardiac autonomic nervous system, but reductions of O2∙− may interfere with normal cellular functions. We have selected the C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse as a model to determine whether SOD1 overexpression alters cardiac autonomic function, as measured by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and aortic depressor nerve (ADN) recordings, as well as evaluation of baseline heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Under isoflurane anesthesia, C57 wild-type and SOD1 mice were catheterized with an arterial pressure transducer and measurements of HR and MAP were taken. After establishing a baseline, hypotension and hypertension were induced by injection of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and phenylephrine (PE), respectively, and ΔHR versus ΔMAP were recorded as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). SNP and PE treatment were administered sequentially after a recovery period to measure arterial baroreceptor activation by recording aortic depressor nerve activity. Our findings show that overexpression of SOD1 in C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse preserved the normal HR, MAP, and BRS but enhanced aortic depressor nerve function. PMID:26823951

  15. The role of anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns in suicidal ideation: A test of the Depression-Distress Amplification Model in clinical outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norr, Aaron M; Allan, Nicholas P; Macatee, Richard J; Capron, Daniel W; Schmidt, Norman B

    2016-04-30

    Suicide constitutes a significant public health burden as global suicide rates continue to increase. Thus, it is crucial to identify malleable suicide risk factors to develop prevention protocols. Anxiety sensitivity, or a fear of anxiety-related sensations, is a potential malleable risk factor for the development of suicidal ideation. The Depression-Distress Amplification Model (DDAM) posits that the anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns (ASCC) subfactor interacts with depressive symptoms to amplify the effects of depression and lead to suicidal ideation. The current study tested the DDAM across the two most widely-replicated factors of depressive symptoms (cognitive and affective/somatic) in comparison to a risk factor mediation model where ASCC are related to suicidal ideation via depressive symptoms. Participants included 295 clinical outpatients from a community clinic. The interaction between ASCC and depressive symptoms in the prediction of suicidal ideation was not significant for either cognitive or affective/somatic symptoms of depression. However, results revealed a significant indirect effect of ASCC through cognitive symptoms of depression in the prediction of suicidal ideation. These cross sectional findings are not consistent with the DDAM. Rather, the relationship may be better conceptualized with a model in which ASCC is related to suicidal ideation via cognitive symptoms of depression.

  16. Beneficial effects of physical activity on baroreflex control in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Pinna, Gian Domenico

    2014-07-01

    The baroreflex mechanisms, by controlling autonomic outflow to the heart and circulation, contribute importantly to neural circulatory control. The main function of the baroreflex is to prevent wide fluctuations in arterial blood pressure and to maintain the physiological homeostasis under basal resting conditions and in response to acute stress. Baroreflex-mediated changes in autonomic outflow affect heart rate, myocardial contractility, and peripheral vascular resistance. The baroreflex control of heart rate is of particular interest in pathological conditions, since it has been associated with increased propensity for cardiac mortality and sudden death. Aging is associated with significant cardiovascular modifications. The changes in baroreflex function that occur with age have been systematically studied by several methodological approaches. The available evidence indicates a reduced arterial baroreflex control of heart rate favoring an increase in sympathetic and a decrease in parasympathetic drive to the heart as well as an impairment in the baroreceptor control of blood pressure. Both kinds of changes have resultant clinical implications. Exercise training can modulate the age-related decline in baroreflex function and the attending abnormalities in autonomic control, thus accounting for some of the beneficial effects of physical activity in reducing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  17. The Contributions of Maternal Sensitivity and Maternal Depressive Symptoms to Epigenetic Processes and Neuroendocrine Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradt, Elisabeth; Hawes, Katheleen; Guerin, Dylan; Armstrong, David A.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Tronick, Edward; Lester, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether maternal responsiveness may buffer the child to the effects of maternal depressive symptoms on DNA methylation of "NR3C1," "11ß-HSD2," and neuroendocrine functioning. DNA was derived from buccal epithelial cells and prestress cortisol was obtained from the saliva of 128 infants. Mothers with depressive…

  18. Depressive-like behavior, its sensitization, social buffering, and altered cytokine responses in rhesus macaques moved from outdoor social groups to indoor housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Michael B; Chun, Katie; Capitanio, John P

    2017-02-01

    Psychosocial stressors appear to promote the onset of depressive illness through activation and sensitization of inflammatory mechanisms. Here, adult male rhesus monkeys brought from large outdoor social groups to indoor housing for 8 days reliably exhibited a hunched, depressive-like posture. When rehoused indoors a second 8 days about 2 weeks later, monkeys housed alone, but not those with an affiliative partner, showed sensitization of the depressive-like hunched posture. Housing indoors also affected circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1β showed increased responsiveness to immune challenge, and IL-1β and TNF-α showed reduced suppression by dexamethasone. Sensitivity of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 to immune challenge exhibited a relative increase from the first to the second round of indoor housing in animals housed in pairs, and a relative decrease in animals housed alone. Cytokine levels during indoor housing were positively correlated with duration of depressive-like behavior. Plasma cortisol levels increased but did not differentiate housing conditions or rounds. Results demonstrate a rapid induction and sensitization of depressive-like behavior to indoor individual housing, social buffering of sensitization, and associated inflammatory responses. This paradigm may provide a practical nonhuman primate model for examining inflammatory-mediated consequences of psychosocial stressors on depression and possible social buffering of these effects.

  19. The Brain Renin-Angiotensin System and Mitochondrial Function: Influence on Blood Pressure and Baroreflex in Transgenic Rat Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Nautiyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, and may be associated with an overactive renin-angiotensin system (RAS. Angiotensin (Ang II, a potent vasoconstrictor hormone of the RAS, also impairs baroreflex and mitochondrial function. Most deleterious cardiovascular actions of Ang II are thought to be mediated by NADPH-oxidase- (NOX- derived reactive oxygen species (ROS that may also stimulate mitochondrial oxidant release and alter redox-sensitive signaling pathways in the brain. Within the RAS, the actions of Ang II are counterbalanced by Ang-(1–7, a vasodilatory peptide known to mitigate against increased oxidant stress. A balance between Ang II and Ang-(1–7 within the brain dorsal medulla contributes to maintenance of normal blood pressure and proper functioning of the arterial baroreceptor reflex for control of heart rate. We propose that Ang-(1–7 may negatively regulate the redox signaling pathways activated by Ang II to maintain normal blood pressure, baroreflex, and mitochondrial function through attenuating ROS (NOX-generated and/or mitochondrial.

  20. Heart rate variability biofeedback as a method for assessing baroreflex function: a preliminary study of resonance in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaschillo, Evgeny; Lehrer, Paul; Rishe, Naphtali; Konstantinov, Mikhail

    2002-03-01

    This study describes the use of a biofeedback method for the noninvasive study of baroreflex mechanisms. Five previously untrained healthy male participants learned to control oscillations in heart rate using biofeedback training to modify their heart rate variability at specific frequencies. They were instructed to match computer-generated sinusoidal oscillations with oscillations in heart rate at seven frequencies within the range of 0.01-0.14 Hz. All participants successfully produced high-amplitude target-frequency oscillations in both heart rate and blood pressure. Stable and predictable transfer functions between heart rate and blood pressure were obtained in all participants. The highest oscillation amplitudes were produced in the range of 0.055-0.11 Hz for heart rate and 0.02-0.055 Hz for blood pressure. Transfer functions were calculated among sinusoidal oscillations in the target stimuli, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration for frequencies at which subjects received training. High and low target-frequency oscillation amplitudes at specific frequencies could be explained by resonance among various oscillatory processes in the cardiovascular system. The exact resonant frequencies differed among individuals. Changes in heart rate oscillations could not be completely explained by changes in breathing. The biofeedback method also allowed us to quantity characteristics of inertia, delay, and speed sensitivity in baroreflex system. We discuss the implications of these findings for using heart rate variability biofeedback as an aid in diagnosing various autonomic and cardiovascular system disorders and as a method for treating these disorders.

  1. Depression and risk of hospitalisations and rehospitalisations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davydow, Dimitry S; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Ribe, Anette Riisgaard;

    2015-01-01

    , at risikoen for indlæggelse var 2,35 gange højere hos danskere med depression. Forskerne har set på de såkaldte preventable hospitalizations – altså indlæggelser, som måske kunne være undgået, hvis forebyggelse og behandling havde fungeret optimalt, herunder at patienten havde fulgt lægens anvisninger......Dette studie viser, at danskere med depression oftere end andre bliver hospitalsindlagt for kroniske sygdomme, som måske godt kunne være behandlet i det nære sundhedsvæsen uden indlæggelse. Den samme gruppe har også en højere risiko for at blive genindlagt inden for 30 dage. Resultaterne viser...

  2. Ablation of NK1 Receptors in Rat Nucleus Tractus Solitarii Blocks Baroreflexes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riley, Jeffrey; Lin, Li-Hsien; Chianca, Jr, Deoclecio A; Talman, William T

    2002-01-01

    .... The neurokinin-1 receptors at which SP may act have been identified in the nucleus tractus solitarii, but there remains uncertainty if the neurons at which SP acts are critical to baroreflex transmission...

  3. Cardiac baroreflex function and dynamic cerebral autoregulation in elderly Masters athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aengevaeren, V.L.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Levine, B.D.; Zhang, R.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is stably maintained through the combined effects of blood pressure (BP) regulation and cerebral autoregulation. Previous studies suggest that aerobic exercise training improves cardiac baroreflex function and beneficially affects BP regulation, but may negatively affect ce

  4. Variations in the relationship between maternal depression, maternal sensitivity, and child attachment by race/ethnicity and nativity: findings from a nationally representative cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhihuan Jennifer; Lewin, Amy; Mitchell, Stephanie J; Zhang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    This study uses data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort to examine the relationship between maternal depression, maternal sensitivity, and child attachment, specifically among Hispanic and Asian American mothers and their young children, and to explore the role of cultural variation and nativity in the associations between these variables. Data used in this study were collected from biological mothers on two occasions, when their children were approximately 9 and 24 months of age. Trained observers completed a direct assessment of child attachment security and an observational measure of maternal sensitivity, data on maternal depression was obtained via maternal report. Hierarchical logistic regression models were used to predict odds of child insecure attachment. The risk of child insecure attachment associated with chronic maternal depression was found to be much higher for Hispanic mothers than for Asians. In contrast, mothers' foreign-born status was a stronger risk factor than depression for insecure child attachment among Asian Americans. Maternal sensitivity significantly reduced the odds of Asian American children being insecurely attached by more than half. Among the full sample of mothers, which included U.S.-born non-Hispanic White mothers and U.S.-born non-Hispanic Black mothers, decreased maternal sensitivity mediated the association between chronic depression and child insecure attachment. However, this mediation was not found in stratified analyses of Hispanic and Asian mothers. Finally, mothers' nativity did not influence the extent to which maternal depression or sensitivity was associated with child attachment. These findings suggest that the associations between maternal depression, sensitivity, and child attachment are culturally specific, and that mothers' immigrant status may be a risk factor in some racial/ethnic groups but protective in others.

  5. Estrogen receptor-alpha mediates estrogen facilitation of baroreflex heart rate responses in conscious mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamidimukkala, Jaya; Xue, Baojian; Newton, Leslie G; Lubahn, Dennis B; Hay, Meredith

    2005-03-01

    Estrogen facilitates baroreflex heart rate responses evoked by intravenous infusion of ANG II and phenylephrine (PE) in ovariectomized female mice. The present study aims to identify the estrogen receptor subtype involved in mediating these effects of estrogen. Baroreflex responses to PE, ANG II, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were tested in intact and ovariectomized estrogen receptor-alpha knockout (ERalphaKO) with (OvxE+) or without (OvxE-) estrogen replacement. Wild-type (WT) females homozygous for the ERalpha(+/+) were used as controls. Basal mean arterial pressures (MAP) and heart rates were comparable in all the groups except the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ mice. This group had significantly smaller resting MAP, suggesting an effect of estrogen on resting vascular tone possibly mediated by the ERbeta subtype. Unlike the WT females, estrogen did not facilitate baroreflex heart rate responses to either PE or ANG II in the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ mice. The slope of the line relating baroreflex heart rate decreases with increases in MAP evoked by PE was comparable in ERalphaKO-OvxE- (-6.97 +/- 1.4 beats.min(-1).mmHg(-1)) and ERalphaKO-OvxE+ (-6.18 +/- 1.3) mice. Likewise, the slope of the baroreflex bradycardic responses to ANG II was similar in ERalphaKO-OvxE- (-3.87 +/- 0.5) and ERalphaKO-OvxE+(-2.60 +/- 0.5) females. Data suggest that estrogen facilitation of baroreflex responses to PE and ANG II is predominantly mediated by ERalpha subtype. A second important observation in the present study is that the slope of ANG II-induced baroreflex bradycardia is significantly blunted compared with PE in the intact as well as the ERalphaKO-OvxE+ females. We have previously reported that this ANG II-mediated blunting of cardiac baroreflexes is observed only in WT males and not in ovariectomized WT females independent of their estrogen replacement status. The present data suggest that in females lacking ERalpha, ANG II causes blunting of cardiac baroreflexes similar to males and may be

  6. The Effect of Daily Self-Measurement of Pressure Pain Sensitivity Followed by Acupressure on Depression and Quality of Life versus Treatment as Usual in Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Bech, Per

    2014-01-01

    -measurement of PPS twice daily followed by acupressure as mandatory action, aiming at a reduction in PPS. Primary endpoint: change in depressive symptoms as measured by Major depression inventory (MDI). Other endpoints: changes in PPS, Well-being (WHO-5) and mental and physical QOL (SF-36). RESULTS: At 3 months PPS......BACKGROUND: Depressive symptoms and reduced quality of life (QOL) are parts of the chronic stress syndrome and predictive of adverse outcome in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). Chronic stress is associated with increased sensitivity for pain, which can be measured by algometry...... as Pressure Pain Sensitivity (PPS) on the sternum. AIM: To evaluate if stress focus by self-measurement of PPS, followed by stress reducing actions including acupressure, can decrease depressive symptoms and increase psychological well-being in people with stable IHD. DESIGN: Observer blinded randomized...

  7. Effects of repeated Valsalva maneuver straining on cardiac and vasoconstrictive baroreflex responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A; Ratliff, Duane A; Doerr, Donald F; Ludwig, David A; Muniz, Gary W; Benedetti, Erik; Chavarria, Jose; Koreen, Susan; Nguyen, Claude; Wang, Jeff

    2003-03-01

    We hypothesized that repeated respiratory straining maneuvers (repeated SM) designed to elevate arterial BPs (arterial baroreceptor loading) would acutely increase baroreflex responses. We tested this hypothesis by measuring cardiac baroreflex responses to carotid baroreceptor stimulation (neck pressures), and changes in heart rate and diastolic BP after reductions in BP induced by a 15-s Valsalva maneuver in 10 female and 10 male subjects at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after performing repeated SM. Baroreflex responses were also measured in each subject at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h at the same time on a separate day without repeated SM (control) in a randomized, counter-balanced cross-over experimental design. There was no statistical difference in carotid-cardiac and peripheral vascular baroreflex responses measured across time following repeated SM compared with the control condition. Integrated cardiac baroreflex response (deltaHR/ deltaSBP) measured during performance of a Valsalva maneuver was increased by approximately 50% to 1.1 +/- 0.2 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at 1 h and 1.0 +/- 0.1 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at 3 h following repeated SM compared with the control condition (0.7 +/- 0.1 bpm x mm Hg(-1) at both 1 and 3 h, respectively). However, integrated cardiac baroreflex response after repeated SM returned to control levels at 6 and 24 h after training. These responses did not differ between men and women. Our results are consistent with the notion that arterial baroreceptor loading induced by repeated SM increased aortic, but not carotid, cardiac baroreflex responses for as long as 3 h after repeated SM. We conclude that repeated SM increases cardiac baroreflex responsiveness which may provide patients, astronauts, and high-performance aircraft pilots with protection from development of orthostatic hypotension.

  8. Maternal depression and the learning-promoting effects of infant-directed speech: Roles of maternal sensitivity, depression diagnosis, and speech acoustic cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Peter S; Danko, Christina M; Cejka, Anna M; Everhart, Kevin D

    2015-11-01

    The hypothesis that the associative learning-promoting effects of infant-directed speech (IDS) depend on infants' social experience was tested in a conditioned-attention paradigm with a cumulative sample of 4- to 14-month-old infants. Following six forward pairings of a brief IDS segment and a photographic slide of a smiling female face, infants of clinically depressed mothers exhibited evidence of having acquired significantly weaker voice-face associations than infants of non-depressed mothers. Regression analyses revealed that maternal depression was significantly related to infant learning even after demographic correlates of depression, antidepressant medication use, and extent of pitch modulation in maternal IDS had been taken into account. However, after maternal depression had been accounted for, maternal emotional availability, coded by blind raters from separate play interactions, accounted for significant further increments in the proportion of variance accounted for in infant learning scores. Both maternal depression and maternal insensitivity negatively, and additively, predicted poor learning.

  9. The Temporal Course of Anxiety Sensitivity in Outpatients with Anxiety and Mood Disorders: Relationships with Behavioral Inhibition and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosellini, Anthony J.; Fairholme, Christopher P.; Brown, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the temporal course of three dimensions of anxiety sensitivity (AS; concerns over physical symptoms, mental incapacitation, and social embarrassment) and their relationships with behavioral inhibition (BI) and depression (DEP) in 606 outpatients with anxiety and mood disorders. A semi-structured interview and self-report questionnaires were administered on three occasions over a two-year period. All three constructs decreased over the study period and AS temporally functioned more similar to DEP than BI. Cross-sectional and temporal correlations supported the discriminant validity of AS from BI. As expected, initial levels of BI predicted less improvement in all AS dimensions. In contrast, higher initial levels of mental incapacitation AS were associated with greater improvement in DEP. Our results are discussed in regard to the measurement of AS in clinical samples, conceptualizations of AS as a lower-order vulnerability, and prognostic implications of directional paths between BI and AS and AS and DEP. PMID:21377316

  10. Pacientes com depressão maior têm menor sensibilidade a contraste visual que indivíduos saudáveis Patients with major depression have visual contrast sensitivity less than healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Maria Toscano Barreto Lyra Nogueira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo foi medir a sensibilidade ao contraste, SC, visual de grades senoidais circulares concêntricas com frequências espaciais de 0,25; 4 e 8 cpg, ciclos por grau de ângulo visual, em adultos saudáveis e com depressão maior. Foram estimadas a SC de 20 participantes, 10 saudáveis e 10 participantes com depressão maior, utilizando o método psicofísico da escolha forçada e luminância média de 0,7 cd/m². Todos os participantes apresentavam acuidade visual normal ou corrigida e estavam livres de doenças identificáveis. Os resultados mostraram que a SC visual máxima ocorreu na faixa de 0,25 cpg para os dois grupos. Os resultados demonstraram ainda que a SC visual dos participantes com depressão maior foi mais baixa do que a dos participantes saudáveis (p The aim of this study was to measure visual contrast sensitivity, CS, for concentric circular sine-wave gratings with spatial frequencies of 0.25, 4 and 8 cpd, cycles per degree of visual angle, in adults without and with major depression disorder. We measured the visual CS for 20 participants, ten without and ten with major depression disorder medicated, using a temporal two-alternative forced-choice psychophysical method with mean luminance of 0.7 cd/m². All volunteers were free from identifiable ocular disease and had normal acuity. The results showed maximum contrast sensitivity to spatial frequency occurred in the range of 0.25 cpd for both groups. The results also showed that the visual CS for major depression was lower than those of adults without depression (p < 0.05. These results showed alterations in the visual perception related the major depression.

  11. Randomised clinical trial: gluten may cause depression in subjects with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity - an exploratory clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S L; Biesiekierski, J R; Yelland, G W; Muir, J G; Gibson, P R

    2014-05-01

    Current evidence suggests that many patients with self-reported non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) retain gastrointestinal symptoms on a gluten-free diet (GFD) but continue to restrict gluten as they report 'feeling better'. To investigate the notion that a major effect of gluten in those with NCGS is on mental state and not necessarily on gastrointestinal symptoms. Twenty-two subjects (24-62 years, five male) with irritable bowel syndrome who had coeliac disease excluded but were symptomatically controlled on a GFD, undertook a double-blind cross-over study. Participants randomly received one of three dietary challenges for 3 days, followed by a minimum 3-day washout before crossing over to the next diet. Challenge gluten-free food was supplemented with gluten (16 g/day), whey (16 g/day) or not supplemented (placebo). End-points included mental state as assessed by the Spielberger State Trait Personality Inventory (STPI), cortisol secretion and gastrointestinal symptoms. Gluten ingestion was associated with higher overall STPI state depression scores compared to placebo [M = 2.03, 95% CI (0.55-3.51), P = 0.010] but not whey [M = 1.48, 95% CI (-0.14 to 3.10), P = 0.07]. No differences were found for other STPI state indices or for any STPI trait measures. No difference in cortisol secretion was identified between challenges. Gastrointestinal symptoms were induced similarly across all dietary challenges. Short-term exposure to gluten specifically induced current feelings of depression with no effect on other indices or on emotional disposition. Gluten-specific induction of gastrointestinal symptoms was not identified. Such findings might explain why patients with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity feel better on a gluten-free diet despite the continuation of gastrointestinal symptoms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Inhibition of cortisol production with metyrapone prevents mental stress-induced endothelial dysfunction and baroreflex impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadley, Andrew J M; Korszun, Ania; Abdelaal, Eltigani; Moskvina, Valentina; Jones, Christopher J H; Nash, Gerard B; Ray, Clare; Deanfield, John; Frenneaux, Michael P

    2005-07-19

    This study was designed to investigate the role of cortisol in stress-induced endothelial dysfunction and impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) by blocking cortisol production with metyrapone before subjecting healthy volunteers to mental stress. Mental stress raises cortisol levels and is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality, especially from sudden cardiac death. It also causes endothelial dysfunction and impaired BRS. We measured brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of endothelial function, and BRS in 36 subjects without CHD risk factors who were then randomized in a double-blind fashion to oral metyrapone 750 mg x 2 or placebo. Five hours later we subjected subjects to mental stress and then remeasured endothelial function and BRS. Prestress cortisol levels were significantly higher in the placebo group at 270.5 (30.9) nmol/l versus 89.1 (11.8) nmol/l (p = 0.01), and the increase with stress was higher at 57.9 (17.9) nmol/l versus 11.2 (2.2) nmol/l (p Analysis of covariation showed a significant effect of metyrapone on change in both FMD (p = 0.009) and BRS (p = 0.024). Stress-related endothelial dysfunction and BRS impairment can be prevented by blocking cortisol production with metyrapone, demonstrating a direct or facilitative role for cortisol in these phenomena and suggesting mechanisms by which stress contributes to CHD and sudden cardiac death.

  13. Uptake blockade of endocannabinoids in the NTS modulates baroreflex-evoked sympathoinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozoski, Daniel T; Dean, Caron; Hopp, Francis A; Seagard, Jeanne L

    2005-10-19

    Previous studies supporting a possible physiological role for an endogenous cannabinoid, arachidonylethanolamide (AEA, anandamide), showed a significant increase in AEA content in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) after an increase in blood pressure (BP) and prolonged baroreflex inhibition of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) after exogenous AEA microinjections into the NTS. These results, along with other studies, support the hypothesis that endogenous AEA can modulate the baroreflex through cannabinoid CB(1) receptor activation within the NTS. This study was performed to characterize the physiological role of endogenously released cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) in regulating baroreflex control of RSNA through actions in the NTS. Endocannabinoid effects were assessed by measuring the RSNA baroreflex response to increased pressure after bilateral microinjections of AM404, an endocannabinoid transport inhibitor, into the NTS of adult male Sprague Dawley rats. AM404 blocks uptake of endocannabinoids and enhances the effects of any endocannabinoids released [M. Beltramo, et al., Functional role of high-affinity anandamide transport, as revealed by selective inhibition, Science 277 (5329) (1997) 1094-1097.] into the NTS. Therefore, it was hypothesized that microinjections of AM404 should exhibit effects similar to microinjections of exogenous AEA. In this study, AM404 microinjections into the NTS were found to significantly prolong baroreflex inhibition of RSNA compared to control, similar to effects of exogenous AEA. This effect is thought to result from an increased endocannabinoid presence in the NTS, leading to prolonged CB(1) receptor activation. These results indicate that endocannabinoids released in the NTS have the potential to modulate baroreflex control at this site in the central baroreflex pathway.

  14. Activation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors differentially resets baroreflex control of renal vs. adrenal sympathetic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Tomoko K; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2009-04-01

    The role of nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex mechanisms is controversial. Stimulation of these receptors releases glutamate within the NTS and elicits baroreflex-like decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas inhibition of these receptors attenuates HR baroreflex responses. In contrast, stimulation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors increases preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA), and the depressor and sympathoinhibitory responses are not markedly affected by sinoaortic denervation and blockade of NTS glutamatergic transmission. To elucidate the role of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex function, we compared full baroreflex stimulus-response curves for HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA (intravenous nitroprusside/phenylephrine) before and after bilateral NTS microinjections of selective adenosine A(2a) receptor agonist (CGS-21680; 2.0, 20 pmol/50 nl), selective A(2a) receptor antagonist (ZM-241385; 40 pmol/100 nl), and nonselective A(1) + A(2a) receptor antagonist (8-SPT; 1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats. Activation of A(2a) receptors decreased the range, upper plateau, and gain of baroreflex-response curves for RSNA, whereas these parameters all increased for pre-ASNA, consistent with direct effects of the agonist on regional sympathetic activity. However, no resetting of baroreflex-response curves along the MAP axis occurred despite the marked decreases in baseline MAP. The antagonists had no marked effects on baseline variables or baroreflex-response functions. We conclude that the activation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors differentially alters baroreflex control of HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA mostly via non-baroreflex mechanism(s), and these receptors have virtually no tonic action on baroreflex control of these sympathetic outputs.

  15. Baroreflex gain and vasomotor sympathetic modulation in resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Isabelle Magalhães Guedes; de Almeida, Leonardo Barbosa; Pereira, Natália Portela; Mira, Pedro Augusto de Carvalho; de Paula, Rogério Baumgratz; Martinez, Daniel Godoy; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Laterza, Mateus Camaroti

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the gain and latency of arterial baroreflex control of heart rate in patients with resistant hypertension compared to patients with essential hypertension and normotensive subjects. Eighteen patients with resistant hypertension (56 ± 10 years, mean of four antihypertensive drugs), 17 patients with essential hypertension (56 ± 11 years, mean of two antihypertensive drugs), and 17 untreated normotensive controls (50 ± 15 years) were evaluated by spectral analysis of the spontaneous fluctuations of arterial pressure (beat-to-beat) and heart rate (ECG). This analysis estimated vasomotor and cardiac autonomic modulations, respectively. The transfer function analysis quantified the gain and latency of the response of output signal (RR interval) per unit of spontaneous change of input signal (systolic arterial pressure). The gain was similarly lower in patients with resistant hypertension and patients with essential hypertension in relation to normotensive subjects (4.67 ± 2.96 vs. 6.60 ± 3.30 vs. 12.56 ± 8.81 ms/mmHg; P resistant hypertension when compared to patients with essential hypertension and normotensive subjects (-4.01 ± 3.19 vs. -2.91 ± 2.10 vs. -1.82 ± 1.09 s; P = 0.04, respectively). In addition, the index of vasomotor sympathetic modulation was significantly increased only in patients with resistant hypertension when compared to patients with essential hypertension and normotensive subjects (4.04 ± 2.86 vs. 2.65 ± 1.88 vs. 2.06 ± 1.70 mmHg(2); P resistant hypertension have reduced gain and increased latency of arterial baroreflex control of heart rate. These patients also have increased vasomotor sympathetic modulation.

  16. Perfectionism and interpersonal orientations in depression: an analysis of validation seeking and rejection sensitivity in a community sample of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flett, Gordon L; Besser, Avi; Hewitt, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    The current study was conducted to uniquely investigate the associations among trait perfectionism, perfectionistic self-presentation, validation seeking, rejection sensitivity, and depression in a community sample. The authors' primary purpose was to focus on interpersonal orientations as sources of vulnerability that could potentially account for when perfectionism is dysfunctional. A sample of 183 young adults from a community sample completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Perfectionistic Self-Presentation Scale, and measures of growth seeking, validation seeking, rejection sensitivity, and depressive symptoms. Analyses confirmed that validation seeking was associated positively with all of the perfectionism measures with particularly strong associations between validation seeking and perfectionistic self-presentation. As expected, socially prescribed perfectionism and perfectionistic self-presentation had positive associations with rejection sensitivity. Further analyses established that the associations between interpersonal perfectionism and depressive symptoms were mediated by validation seeking, and socially prescribed perfectionism interacted with high rejection sensitivity to predict higher depressive symptoms. Overall, findings indicate that perfectionists are ego-involved individuals who strive for perfection as a means of proving themselves, and they are hypersensitive to interpersonal cues indicating failure and lack of acceptance from others.

  17. Augmented baroreflex heart rate gain after moderate-intensity, dynamic exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwill, J. R.; Taylor, J. A.; Hartwig, T. D.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    The occurrence of a sustained vasodilation and hypotension after acute, dynamic exercise suggests that exercise may alter arterial baroreflex mechanisms. Therefore, we assessed systemic hemodynamics, baroreflex regulation of heart rate, and cardiac vagal tone after 60 min of cycling at 60% peak oxygen consumption in 12 healthy, untrained men and women (ages 21-28 yr). We derived sigmoidal carotid-cardiac baroreflex relations by measurement of R-R interval changes induced by ramped, stepwise, R-wave-triggered changes in external neck pressure from 40 to -65 mmHg. We estimated tonic cardiac vagal control with power spectral analysis of R-R interval variability in the respiratory frequency band (0.2-0.3 Hz) during frequency- and tidal volume-controlled breathing. Both mean arterial pressure and total peripheral resistance were reduced postexercise [pressure: from 86 +/- 2 (mean +/- SE) to 81 +/- 2 mmHg; resistance: from 23 +/- 2 to 16 +/- 1 units; both P exercise, whereas heart rate and plasma norepinephrine levels were elevated. Thus moderate-intensity, dynamic exercise increases heart rate and cardiac output, reduces peripheral vascular resistance, and augments baroreflex responsiveness. Our data suggest that augmented baroreflex heart rate gain restrains rather than contributes to postexercise hypotension, which appears to be mediated predominately by vasodilation.

  18. Impaired baroreflex function in mice overexpressing alpha-synuclein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila eFleming

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, such as orthostatic hypotension consequent to baroreflex failure and cardiac sympathetic denervation, is frequently observed in the synucleinopathy Parkinson’s disease (PD. In the present study, the baroreceptor reflex was assessed in mice overexpressing human wildtype alpha-synuclein (Thy1-aSyn, a genetic mouse model of synucleinopathy. The beat-to-beat change in heart rate, computed from R-R interval, in relation to blood pressure was measured in anesthetized and conscious mice equipped with arterial blood pressure telemetry transducers during transient bouts of hypertension and hypotension. Compared to wildtype, tachycardia following nitroprusside-induced hypotension was significantly reduced in Thy1-aSyn mice. Thy1-aSyn mice also showed an abnormal cardiovascular response (i.e., diminished tachycardia to muscarinic blockade with atropine. We conclude that Thy1-aSyn mice have impaired basal and dynamic range of sympathetic and parasympathetic-mediated changes in heart rate and will be a useful model for long-term study of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction associated with PD.

  19. Anxiety, depression and autonomic nervous system dysfunction in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajkó, Zoltán; Szekeres, Csilla-Cecília; Kovács, Katalin Réka; Csapó, Krisztina; Molnár, Sándor; Soltész, Pál; Nyitrai, Erika; Magyar, Mária Tünde; Oláh, László; Bereczki, Dániel; Csiba, László

    2012-06-15

    This study examined the relationship between autonomic nervous system dysfunction, anxiety and depression in untreated hypertension. 86 newly diagnosed hypertensive patients and 98 healthy volunteers were included in the study. The psychological parameters were assessed with Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory by a skilled psychologist. Autonomic parameters were examined during tilt table examination (10min lying position, 10min passive tilt). Heart rate variability (HRV) was calculated by autoregressive methods. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was calculated by non-invasive sequence method from the recorded beat to beat blood pressure values and RR intervals. Significantly higher state (42.6±9.3 vs. 39.6±10.7 p=0.05) and trait (40.1±8.9 vs. 35.1±8.6, p<0.0001) anxiety scores were found in the hypertension group. There was no statistically significant difference in the depression level. LF-RRI (Low Frequency-RR interval) of HRV in passive tilt (377.3±430.6 vs. 494.1±547, p=0.049) and mean BRS slope (11.4±5.5 vs. 13.2±6.4, p=0.07) in lying position were lower in hypertensives. Trait anxiety score correlates significantly with sympatho/vagal balance (LF/HF-RRI) in passive tilt position (Spearman R=-0.286, p=0.01). Anxiety could play a more important role than depression in the development of hypertension. Altered autonomic control of the heart could be one of the pathophysiological links between hypertension and psychological factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Stimulation of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex enhances ventricular contractility in awake dogs: a mathematical analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Moslehpour, Mohsen; Hammond, Robert L; Ichinose, Masashi; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Evan, Sell; O'Leary, Donal S; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2014-08-15

    The cardiopulmonary baroreflex responds to an increase in central venous pressure (CVP) by decreasing total peripheral resistance and increasing heart rate (HR) in dogs. However, the direction of ventricular contractility change is not well understood. The aim was to elucidate the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility during normal physiological conditions via a mathematical analysis. Spontaneous beat-to-beat fluctuations in maximal ventricular elastance (Emax), which is perhaps the best available index of ventricular contractility, CVP, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and HR were measured from awake dogs at rest before and after β-adrenergic receptor blockade. An autoregressive exogenous input model was employed to jointly identify the three causal transfer functions relating beat-to-beat fluctuations in CVP to Emax (CVP → Emax), which characterizes the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility, ABP to Emax, which characterizes the arterial baroreflex control of ventricular contractility, and HR to Emax, which characterizes the force-frequency relation. The CVP → Emax transfer function showed a static gain of 0.037 ± 0.010 ml(-1) (different from zero; P < 0.05) and an overall time constant of 3.2 ± 1.2 s. Hence, Emax would increase and reach steady state in ∼16 s in response to a step increase in CVP, without any change to ABP or HR, due to the cardiopulmonary baroreflex. Following β-adrenergic receptor blockade, the CVP → Emax transfer function showed a static gain of 0.0007 ± 0.0113 ml(-1) (different from control; P < 0.10). Hence, Emax would change little in steady state in response to a step increase in CVP. Stimulation of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex increases ventricular contractility through β-adrenergic receptor system mediation.

  1. Noninvasive transcutaneous bionic baroreflex system prevents severe orthostatic hypotension in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masayoshi; Murayama, Yoshinori; Chishaki, Akiko; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Central baroreflex failure in patients with spinal cord injury results in serious orthostatic hypotension. We examined if transcutaneous electrical stimulation regulates arterial pressure in those patients. We identified skin regions capable of increasing arterial pressure and determined respective transfer function. Using the transfer function, we designed the feedback regulator (i.e., bionic baroreflex system) to control arterial pressure. Orthostatic stress decreased arterial pressure profoundly. Activation of bionic regulator restored and maintained arterial pressure at pre-specified levels. We conclude that the transcutaneous bionic system is noninvasive and capable of stabilizing arterial pressure in patients with spinal cord injury.

  2. The Neural Baroreflex Pathway in Subjects With Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoli, Luca; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Estrugo, Nicolas; Escriou, Guillaume; Ketthab, Hakim; Pruny, Jean-Francois; Castellino, Pietro; Laude, Dominique; Thomas, Frederique; Pannier, Bruno; Jouven, Xavier; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Laurent, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms that link metabolic syndrome (MetS) to increased cardiovascular risk are incompletely understood. We examined whether MetS is associated with the neural baroreflex pathway (NBP) and whether any such associations are independent of blood pressure values. This study involved the cross-sectional analysis of data on 2835 subjects aged 50 to 75 years from the Paris Prospective Study 3. The prevalence of MetS was defined according to the American Heart Association/National Heart Blood and Lung Institute definition. NBP values were calculated from the fluctuation of the common carotid distension rate and heart rate using fast Fourier transformation and cross-spectral analysis. The prevalence of MetS was 20.1% in men and 10.4% in women. Compared with controls, subjects with MetS (≥3 components), and those at risk for MetS (1–2 components) had lower NBP (−5.3% and −2.3%, respectively) and higher carotid stiffness (+13.5% and +6.8%, respectively). The negative association between MetS components and NBP was confirmed, even after adjustment for age, sex, and carotid stiffness. After stratification for blood pressure (BP) levels, NBP was reduced only in MetS subjects and those at risk with high BP. The NBP was positively associated with carotid stiffness in controls and subjects at risk for MetS. This association was lost in subjects with MetS, regardless of BP levels. Subjects with MetS had reduced NBP values. The role of BP is fundamental in the reduction of NBP. The mechanisms that link carotid stiffness and NBP are inactive in subjects with MetS, independent of BP levels. PMID:26765449

  3. Influence of heat stress on arterial baroreflex control of heart rate in the baboon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, A J; Proppe, D W

    1982-07-01

    The influence of environmental heat stress on the arterial baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) was studied in eight conscious, chronically instrumented baboons. Inflations of balloon occluders around the inferior vena cava (IVC) and thoracic descending aorta (DA) were used to produce acute, graded changes in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in 5 mm Hg intervals ranging from +/- 5 to +/- 25 mm Hg. After determination of the HR responses to changes in MABP in the normothermic baboon (blood temperature less than or equal to 37.6 degrees C), the animal was subjected to environmental heating to produce hyperthermia. When blood temperature reached approximately 39.5 degrees C, HR responses to graded DA and IVC occlusions were again determined. During hyperthermia, the HR sensitivity (delta HR/ delta MABP) to MABP changes was markedly diminished for reductions in MABP and significantly enhanced for increases in MABP. To determine whether these alterations in the HR response to changes in MABP were due to an alteration of the baroreflex control of HR, full, sigmoid-shaped HR-MABP curves for both the normothermic and hyperthermic states were constructed and characterized by total HR range, estimated slope of the steep portion of the curve, and MABP at the midpoint of the HR range (BP50). During hyperthermia (1) the whole HR-MABP curve shifted significantly upward by 35-40 beats/min, (2) total HR range, the estimated slope, and BP50 did not change, and (3) the control point (pre-occlusion HR-MABP value) curves were also constructed during either beta-adrenergic blockade or cholinergic (Ch)-receptor blockade in the normothermic and hyperthermic state. Similar to that seen for the unblocked heart, the whole HR-MABP curves were also shifted upward during hyperthermia in this group of baboons with no alteration in the total HR range, the estimated slope, or BP50. The upward shift in the HR-MABP curve during Ch-receptor blockade, unlike during beta-receptor blockade, was

  4. Modeling the afferent dynamics of the baroreflex control system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Mahdi

    Full Text Available In this study we develop a modeling framework for predicting baroreceptor firing rate as a function of blood pressure. We test models within this framework both quantitatively and qualitatively using data from rats. The models describe three components: arterial wall deformation, stimulation of mechanoreceptors located in the BR nerve-endings, and modulation of the action potential frequency. The three sub-systems are modeled individually following well-established biological principles. The first submodel, predicting arterial wall deformation, uses blood pressure as an input and outputs circumferential strain. The mechanoreceptor stimulation model, uses circumferential strain as an input, predicting receptor deformation as an output. Finally, the neural model takes receptor deformation as an input predicting the BR firing rate as an output. Our results show that nonlinear dependence of firing rate on pressure can be accounted for by taking into account the nonlinear elastic properties of the artery wall. This was observed when testing the models using multiple experiments with a single set of parameters. We find that to model the response to a square pressure stimulus, giving rise to post-excitatory depression, it is necessary to include an integrate-and-fire model, which allows the firing rate to cease when the stimulus falls below a given threshold. We show that our modeling framework in combination with sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation can be used to test and compare models. Finally, we demonstrate that our preferred model can exhibit all known dynamics and that it is advantageous to combine qualitative and quantitative analysis methods.

  5. Additive Effects of Heating and Exercise on Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate in Healthy Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peçanha, Tiago; Forjaz, Claudia Lucia de Moraes; Low, David Andrew

    2017-08-31

    This study assessed the additive effects of passive heating and exercise on cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS) and heart rate variability (HRV). Twelve healthy young men (25±1 yrs, 23.8±0.5 kg/m(2)) randomly underwent two experimental sessions: heat stress (HS; whole-body heat stress using a tube-lined suit to increase core temperature by ~1°C) and normothermia (NT). Each session was composed of a: pre-intervention rest (REST1); HS or NT interventions; post-intervention rest (REST2); and 14 min of cycling exercise [7 min at 40%HRreserve (EX1) and 7 min at 60%HRreserve (EX2)]. Heart rate and finger blood pressure were continuously recorded. cBRS was assessed using the sequence (cBRSSEQ) and transfer function (cBRSTF) methods. HRV was assessed using the indices SDNN (standard deviation of RR intervals) and RMSSD (root mean square of successive RR intervals). cBRS and HRV were not different between sessions during EX1 and EX2 (i.e. matched heart rate conditions: EX1=116±3 vs. 114±3, EX2=143±4 vs. 142±3 bpm; but different workloads: EX1=50±9 vs. 114±8, EX2=106±10 vs. 165±8 Watts; for HS and NT, respectively; Pheart rates), cBRS and HRV were significantly reduced in HS (cBRSSEQ = 1.6±0.3 vs. 0.6±0.1 ms/mmHg, Pexercise does not affect cBRS and HRV. Alternatively, in workload-matched conditions, the addition of heat to exercise results in reduced cBRS and HRV compared to exercise in normothermia. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  6. The brain 5-HT4 receptor binding is down-regulated in the Flinders Sensitive Line depression model and in response to paroxetine administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Cecilie Löe; Marcussen, Anders Bue; Wegener, Gregers

    2009-01-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT(4)) receptor may be implicated in depression and is a new potential target for antidepressant treatment. We have investigated the brain 5-HT(4) receptor [(3)H]SB207145 binding in the Flinders Sensitive Line rat depression model by quantitative receptor autoradiography......, and related this to 5-HT transporter (S)-[N-methyl-(3)H]citalopram binding. We also determined the regulation of 5-HT(4) receptor binding by 1, 14, and 21 days of paroxetine administration and subchronic 5-HT depletion, and compared this with changes in 5-HT(2A) receptor [(3)H]MDL100907 binding....... In the Flinders Sensitive Line, the 5-HT(4) receptor and 5-HT transporter binding were decreased in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, and the changes in binding were directly correlated within the dorsal hippocampus. Chronic but not acute paroxetine administration caused a 16-47% down-regulation of 5-HT(4...

  7. Estimation of arterial and cardiopulmonary total peripheral resistance baroreflex gain values: validation by chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Kim, Jong-Kyung; Li, Ying; Sala-Mercado, Javier; Hammond, Robert L; Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Feedback control of total peripheral resistance (TPR) by the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex systems is an important mechanism for short-term blood pressure regulation. Existing methods for measuring this TPR baroreflex mechanism typically aim to quantify only the gain value of one baroreflex system as it operates in open-loop conditions. As a result, the normal, integrated functioning of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of TPR remains to be fully elucidated. To this end, the laboratory of Mukkamala et al. (Mukkamala R, Toska K, and Cohen RJ. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 284: H947-H959, 2003) previously proposed a potentially noninvasive technique for estimating the closed-loop (dimensionless) gain values of the arterial TPR baroreflex (GA) and the cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflex (GC) by mathematical analysis of the subtle, beat-to-beat fluctuations in arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, and stroke volume. Here, we review the technique with additional details and describe its experimental evaluation with respect to spontaneous hemodynamic variability measured from seven conscious dogs, before and after chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation. The technique was able to correctly predict the group-average changes in GA and GC that have previously been shown to occur following chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation. That is, reflex control by the arterial TPR baroreflex was virtually abolished (GA = -2.1 +/- 0.6 to 0.3 +/- 0.2; P TPR baroreflex more than doubled (GC = -0.7 +/- 0.4 to -1.8 +/- 0.2; P TPR baroreflex functioning in both humans and animals in health and disease.

  8. Cardiac baroreflex gain is frequency dependent: insights from repeated sit-to-stand maneuvers and the modified Oxford method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, Helen M; Peebles, Karen C; Galletly, Duncan C; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac baroreflex gain is usually quantified as the reflex alteration in heart rate during changes in blood pressure without considering the effect of the rate of change in blood pressure on the estimated gain. This study sought to (i) characterize baroreflex gain as a function of blood pressure oscillation frequencies using a repeat sit-to-stand method and (ii) compare baroreflex gain values obtained using the sit-to-stand method against the modified Oxford method. Fifteen healthy individuals underwent the repeated sit-to-stand method in which blood pressure oscillations were driven at 0.03, 0.05, 0.07, and 0.1 Hz. Sixteen healthy participants underwent the sit-to-stand and modified Oxford methods to examine their agreement. Sit-to-stand baroreflex gain was highest at 0.05 Hz (8.8 ± 3.2 ms·mm Hg(-1)) and lowest at 0.1 Hz (5.8 ± 3.0 ms·mm Hg(-1)). Baroreflex gains at 0.03 Hz (7.7 ± 3.0 ms·mm Hg(-1)) and 0.07 Hz (7.5 ± 3.3 ms·mm Hg(-1)) were not different from the baroreflex gain at 0.05 Hz. There was moderate correlation between phenylephrine gain and sit-to-stand gain (r values ranged from 0.52 to 0.75; all frequencies, p sit-to-stand gain (r values ranged from -0.07 to 0.22; all p sit-to-stand gain showed poor agreement and a positive proportional bias. These results show that baroreflex gains derived from these 2 methods cannot be used interchangeably. Furthermore, cardiac baroreflex gain is frequency dependent between 0.03 Hz and 0.1 Hz, which challenges the conventional practice of summarizing baroreflex gain as a single number.

  9. Effects of whole body heating on dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, C. G.; Zhang, R.; Levine, B. D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify whether dynamic baroreflex regulation of heart rate (HR) is altered during whole body heating. In 14 subjects, dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR was assessed using transfer function analysis. In normothermic and heat-stressed conditions, each subject breathed at a fixed rate (0. 25 Hz) while beat-by-beat HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were obtained. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature, HR, and forearm skin blood flow. Spectral analysis of HR and SBP revealed that the heat stress significantly reduced HR and SBP variability within the high-frequency range (0.2-0.3 Hz), reduced SBP variability within the low-frequency range (0.03-0.15 Hz), and increased the ratio of low- to high-frequency HR variability (all P regulation of HR within the high-frequency range (from 1.04 +/- 0.06 to 0.54 +/- 0.6 beats. min(-1). mmHg(-1); P body heating reduced high-frequency dynamic baroreflex regulation of HR associated with spontaneous changes in blood pressure. Reduced vagal baroreflex regulation of HR may contribute to reduced orthostatic tolerance known to occur in humans during heat stress.

  10. Important GABAergic mechanism within the NTS and the control of sympathetic baroreflex in SHR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Thiago S; Takakura, Ana C; Colombari, Eduardo

    2011-01-20

    Inhibitory neurotransmission has an important role in the processing of sensory afferent signals in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), particularly in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediated neurotransmission within the NTS produces an inhibition of the baroreflex response of splanchnic sympathetic nerve discharge (sSND). In urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated and vagotomized male SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats we compared baroreflex-response curves evoked after bilateral injections into the NTS of the GABA-A antagonist bicuculline (25pmol/50nl) or the GABA-B antagonist CGP 35348 (5nmol/50nl). Baseline MAP in SHR was higher than the WKY rats (SHR: 153±5, vs. WKY: 112±6mm Hg, pNTS induced a transient (5min) reduction in MAP (∆=-26±4 and -41±6mm Hg, respectively vs. saline ∆=+4±3mmHg, pNTS in WKY rats did not change MAP, sSND and sympathetic baroreflex gain. These data indicate that GABAergic mechanisms within the NTS act tonically reducing sympathetic baroreflex gain in SHR.

  11. Stimulation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors differentially resets baroreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; Ichinose, Tomoko K; O'Leary, Donal S

    2008-01-01

    Previously we showed that pressor and differential regional sympathoexcitatory responses (adrenal > renal >/= lumbar) evoked by stimulation of A(1) adenosine receptors located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) were attenuated/abolished by baroreceptor denervation or blockade of glutamatergic transmission in the NTS, suggesting A(1) receptor-elicited inhibition of glutamatergic transmission in baroreflex pathways. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that stimulation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors differentially inhibits/resets baroreflex responses of preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), renal (RSNA), and lumbar (LSNA) sympathetic nerve activity. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 65) we compared baroreflex-response curves (iv nitroprusside and phenylephrine) evoked before and after bilateral microinjections into the NTS of A(1) adenosine receptor agonist (N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine, CPA; 0.033-330 pmol/50 nl). CPA evoked typical dose-dependent pressor and differential sympathoexcitatory responses and similarly shifted baroreflex curves for pre-ASNA, RSNA, and LSNA toward higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) in a dose-dependent manner; the maximal shifts were 52.6 +/- 2.8, 48.0 +/- 3.6, and 56.8 +/- 6.7 mmHg for pre-ASNA, RSNA, and LSNA, respectively. These shifts were not a result of simple baroreceptor resetting because they were two to three times greater than respective increases in baseline MAP evoked by CPA. Baroreflex curves for pre-ASNA were additionally shifted upward: the maximal increases of upper and lower plateaus were 41.8 +/- 16.4% and 45.3 +/- 8.7%, respectively. Maximal gain (%/mmHg) measured before vs. after CPA increased for pre-ASNA (3.0 +/- 0.6 vs. 4.9 +/- 1.3), decreased for RSNA (4.1 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.3 +/- 0.3), and remained unaltered for LSNA (2.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.1). Vehicle control did not alter the baroreflex curves. We conclude that the activation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors differentially inhibits

  12. Prolonged Baroreflex Activation Abolishes Salt-Induced Hypertension After Reductions in Kidney Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Drew A; Irwin, Eric D; Lohmeier, Thomas E

    2016-12-01

    Chronic electric activation of the carotid baroreflex produces sustained reductions in sympathetic activity and arterial pressure and is currently being evaluated for therapy in patients with resistant hypertension. However, patients with significant impairment of renal function have been largely excluded from clinical trials. Thus, there is little information on blood pressure and renal responses to baroreflex activation in subjects with advanced chronic kidney disease, which is common in resistant hypertension. Changes in arterial pressure and glomerular filtration rate were determined in 5 dogs after combined unilateral nephrectomy and surgical excision of the poles of the remaining kidney to produce ≈70% reduction in renal mass. After control measurements, sodium intake was increased from ≈45 to 450 mol/d. While maintained on high salt, animals experienced increases in mean arterial pressure from 102±4 to 121±6 mm Hg and glomerular filtration rate from 40±2 to 45±2 mL/min. During 7 days of baroreflex activation, the hypertension induced by high salt was abolished (103±6 mm Hg) along with striking suppression of plasma norepinephrine concentration from 139±21 to 81±9 pg/mL, but despite pronounced blood pressure lowering, there were no significant changes in glomerular filtration rate (43±2 mL/min). All variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. These findings indicate that after appreciable nephron loss, chronic suppression of central sympathetic outflow by baroreflex activation abolishes hypertension induced by high salt intake. The sustained antihypertensive effects of baroreflex activation occur without significantly compromising glomerular filtration rate in remnant nephrons. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Protein malnutrition modifies medullary neuronal recruitment in response to intermittent stimulation of the baroreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Barbosa, Míriam Carmo; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; de Oliveira, Lisandra Brandino; Silva, Fernanda Cacilda Santos; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Gonçalves Fernandes, Luciano; Chianca, Deoclécio Alves

    2012-11-05

    Protein malnutrition after weaning changes the neurotransmission in neural pathways that organize cardiovascular reflexes in rats. The present study evaluates whether protein malnutrition alters the expression of c-fos protein (immediate-early gene expression) in central areas involved in the control of cardiovascular reflexes after intermittent stimulation of the baroreflex. The main nuclei we focused were paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH); nucleus tract solitarii (NTS); rostral ventromedial medulla (RVMM); rostral (RVLM) and caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM). Male Fisher rats at 28 days were submitted to two different isocaloric diets during the subsequent 35 days: control (CT) (15% protein) and malnourished (MN) (6% protein). thirtymin of intermittent (every 3 min) baroreflex stimulation was performed by infusing phenylephrine (Phe-0.25 mM) or, as control, 0.9% NaCl (Sal). Following ninety minutes, animals were anesthetized and perfused. The removed brains were sectioned (35 μm) and used for c-fos immunohistochemistry. Images were analyzed using the software Leica Q Win. Despite not altering the baseline MAP, malnutrition increased baseline HR and expression of c-fos in RVMM. Increases in c-fos expression after intermittent stimulation of baroreflex were evident in the PVH, medial NTS and CVLM in both dietary protocols. Current data further revealed a differential neuronal recruitment to stimulation of baroreflex in the caudal commissural and rostral NTS and RVLM of MN. We conclude that protein malnutrition modifies the cardiovascular control and the pattern of central response to baroreflex stimulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Psychometric Properties of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale in Chinese Primary Care Patients: Factor Structure, Construct Validity, Reliability, Sensitivity and Responsiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Yee Chin

    Full Text Available The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D is a commonly used instrument to measure depressive symptomatology. Despite this, the evidence for its psychometric properties remains poorly established in Chinese populations. The aim of this study was to validate the use of the CES-D in Chinese primary care patients by examining factor structure, construct validity, reliability, sensitivity and responsiveness.The psychometric properties were assessed amongst a sample of 3686 Chinese adult primary care patients in Hong Kong. Three competing factor structure models were examined using confirmatory factor analysis. The original CES-D four-structure model had adequate fit, however the data was better fit into a bi-factor model. For the internal construct validity, corrected item-total correlations were 0.4 for most items. The convergent validity was assessed by examining the correlations between the CES-D, the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9 and the Short Form-12 Health Survey (version 2 Mental Component Summary (SF-12 v2 MCS. The CES-D had a strong correlation with the PHQ-9 (coefficient: 0.78 and SF-12 v2 MCS (coefficient: -0.75. Internal consistency was assessed by McDonald's omega hierarchical (ωH. The ωH value for the general depression factor was 0.855. The ωH values for "somatic", "depressed affect", "positive affect" and "interpersonal problems" were 0.434, 0.038, 0.738 and 0.730, respectively. For the two-week test-retest reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.91. The CES-D was sensitive in detecting differences between known groups, with the AUC >0.7. Internal responsiveness of the CES-D to detect positive and negative changes was satisfactory (with p value 0.2. The CES-D was externally responsive, with the AUC>0.7.The CES-D appears to be a valid, reliable, sensitive and responsive instrument for screening and monitoring depressive symptoms in adult Chinese primary care patients. In its original

  15. Insulin acts in the arcuate nucleus to increase lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and baroreflex function in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Hermes, Sam M; Aicher, Sue A; Brooks, Virginia L

    2011-01-01

    Non‐technical summary  Though the pancreatic hormone insulin is known to act in the brain to increase sympathetic nerve activity and baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity, its specific site of action had yet to be identified...

  16. Baroreflex-mediated heart rate and vascular resistance responses 24 h after maximal exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Plasma volume, heart rate (HR) variability, and stimulus-response relationships for baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and HR were studied in eight healthy men after and without performing a bout of maximal exercise to test the hypotheses that acute expansion of plasma volume is associated with 1) reduction in baroreflex-mediated HR response, and 2) altered operational range for central venous pressure (CVP). METHODS: The relationship between stimulus (DeltaCVP) and vasoconstrictive reflex response (DeltaFVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors was assessed with lower-body negative pressure (LBNP, 0, -5, -10, -15, -20 mm Hg). The relationship between stimulus (Deltamean arterial pressure (MAP)) and cardiac reflex response (DeltaHR) during loading of arterial baroreceptors was assessed with steady-state infusion of phenylephrine (PE) designed to increase MAP by 15 mm Hg alone and during application of LBNP (PE+LBNP) and neck pressure (PE+LBNP+NP). Measurements of vascular volume and autonomic baroreflex responses were conducted on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested 24 h after graded cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, measurement of baroreflex response was repeated with no exercise (control). The order of exercise and control treatments was counterbalanced. RESULTS: Baseline CVP was elevated (P = 0.04) from a control value of 10.5 +/- 0.4 to 12.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg 24 h after exercise. Average DeltaFVR/DeltaCVP during LBNP was not different (P = 0.942) between the exercise (-1.35 +/- 0.32 pru x mm Hg-1) and control (-1.32 +/- 0.36 pru x mm Hg-1) conditions. However, maximal exercise caused a shift along the reflex response relationship to a higher CVP and lower FVR. HR baroreflex response (DeltaHR/DeltaMAP) to PE+LBNP+NP was lower (P = 0.015) after maximal exercise (-0.43 +/- 0.15 beats x min-1 x mm Hg-1) compared with the control

  17. Neuropeptide s alters anxiety but not depression-like behaviors in the flinders sensitive line rats, a genetic animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, A.; Wegener, Gregers; Finger, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor (NPSR) have been implicated in the mediation of anxiolytic-like behavior in rodents. However, little knowledge is available to what extent the NPS system is involved in depression-related behaviors. The aim of the present work was to characterize ...

  18. Predominant role of neural arc in sympathetic baroreflex resetting of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Yusuke; Kawada, Toru; Shimizu, Shuji; Kamiya, Atsunori; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    There is ongoing controversy over whether neural or peripheral factors are the predominant cause of hypertension. The closed-loop negative feedback operation of the arterial baroreflex hampers understanding of how arterial pressure (AP) is determined through the interaction between neural and peripheral factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: A novel analysis of an isolated open-loop baroreceptor preparation to examine sympathetic nervous activity (SNA) and AP responses to changes in carotid sinus pressure (CSP) in adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) was conducted. In the neural arc (CSP-SNA relationship), the midpoint pressure (128.9±3.8 vs. 157.9±8.1 mmHg, P<0.001) and the response range of SNA to CSP (90.5±3.7 vs. 115.4±7.6%/mmHg, P=0.011) were higher in SHR. In the peripheral arc (SNA-AP relationship), slope and intercept did not differ. A baroreflex equilibrium diagram was obtained by depicting neural and peripheral arcs in a pressure-SNA plane with rescaled SNA (% in WKY). The operating-point AP (111.3±4.4 vs. 145.9±5.2 mmHg, P<0.001) and SNA (90.8±3.2 vs. 125.1±6.9% in WKY, P<0.001) were shifted towards a higher level in SHR. The shift of the neural arc towards a higher SNA range indicated a predominant contribution to baroreflex resetting in SHR. Notwithstanding the resetting, the carotid sinus baroreflex in SHR preserved an ability to reduce AP if activated with a high enough pressure.

  19. Effects of Interaction Between Ventricular Assist Device Assistance and Autoregulated Mock Circulation Including Frank-Starling Mechanism and Baroreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen-Park, So-Hyun; Mahmood, Mohammad Nauzef; Müller, Indra; Turnhoff, Lisa Kathrin; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Sonntag, Simon Johannes

    2016-10-01

    A mock heart circulation loop (MHCL) is a hydraulic model simulating the human circulatory system. It allows in vitro investigations of the interaction between cardiac assist devices and the human circulatory system. In this study, a preload sensitive MHCL, the MHCLAUTO , was developed to investigate the interaction between the left ventricle and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). The Frank-Starling mechanism was modeled by regulating the stroke volume (SV) based on the measured mean diastolic left atrial pressure (MLAPdiast ). The baroreflex autoregulation mechanism was implemented to maintain a constant mean aortic pressure (MAP) by varying ventricular contractility (Emax ), heart rate (HR), afterload/systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and unstressed venous volume (UVV). The DP3 blood pump (Medos Medizintechnik GmbH) was used to simulate the LVAD. Characteristic parameters were measured in pathological conditions both with and without LVAD to assess the hemodynamic effect of LVAD on the MHCLAUTO . The results obtained from the MHCLAUTO show a high correlation to literature data. The study demonstrates the possibility of using the MHCLAUTO as a research tool to better understand the physiological interactions between cardiac implants and human circulation.

  20. Is baroreflex control of sympathetic activity and heart rate active in the preterm fetal sheep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Lindsea C; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Gunn, Alistair J; Bennet, Laura

    2009-03-01

    The arterial baroreflex is a fundamental reflex that buffers rapid changes in arterial blood pressure (BP) via regulation of the heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity to the vasculature. In adults a sigmoidal relationship between BP and both heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity is well documented. Its role in blood pressure control before birth is unclear. Preterm babies have a high incidence of low BP, especially in the first few days of life, which could be related, in part, to immaturity of the baroreflex. In the present study, we investigated the baroreflex control of fetal heart rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in preterm fetal sheep in utero (102 +/- 1 days of gestation; term 140 days). Phenylephrine was associated with a significant increase in BP from 38 +/- 2 to 58 +/- 3 mmHg and a decrease in heart rate (HR) from 177 +/- 4 to 116 +/- 8 beats per minute (bpm). Sodium nitroprusside was associated with a significant fall in BP from 38 +/- 2 to 26 +/- 1 mmHg and an increase in HR from 182 +/- 4 to 274 +/- 8 bpm. However, the time between the 50% changes in BP and HR was significantly greater after hypotension than hypertension (31 +/- 8 s vs. 14 +/- 5 s, P < 0.05). No significant changes in RSNA occurred with either stimulus. This suggests that there are different maturational tempos for the components of the central autonomic response to altered blood pressure.

  1. Influence of baroreflex on volume elasticity of heart and aorta in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronski, T; Seeliger, E; Persson, P B; Harnath, A; Flemming, B

    2002-03-01

    Optimal ventriculoaortic coupling includes tuning of elastic properties. The ratio of effective arterial elastance and left ventricular endsystolic elastance is often taken as a measure for mechanical and energetical efficiency. The present study determined the time course of ventricular and aortic volume elasticity (VE = dp/dV) throughout a complete heartbeat. This was achieved by using changes of eigenfrequency of two catheter-transducer systems under closed chest conditions in rabbits. Short-term VE modulation was studied by a baroreflex response, as induced by pressure changes applied to the carotid sinus. Long-term changes were studied in atherosclerotic rabbits (12 wk of high-cholesterol feeding). The time course and mean values of ventricular and aortic VE were changed by the baroreflex stimulus. Cholesterol feeding diminished the response. The degree of ventriculoaortic coupling, as quantified by VE(Aorta)/VE(Ventricle) ratio, varied during a single ejection period. The large span allows either maximal energetical efficiency or maximal stroke work. Although normal rabbits adjusted their ventriculoaortic coupling during baroreflex input, the cholesterol-fed rabbits failed to do so.

  2. Depression (Major Depressive Disorder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... generally miserable or unhappy without really knowing why. Depression symptoms in children and teens Common signs and ... in normal activities, and avoidance of social interaction. Depression symptoms in older adults Depression is not a ...

  3. Ca++-sensitizing mutations in troponin, P(i), and 2-deoxyATP alter the depressive effect of acidosis on regulated thin-filament velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longyear, Thomas J; Turner, Matthew A; Davis, Jonathan P; Lopez, Joseph; Biesiadecki, Brandon; Debold, Edward P

    2014-05-01

    Repeated, intense contractile activity compromises the ability of skeletal muscle to generate force and velocity, resulting in fatigue. The decrease in velocity is thought to be due, in part, to the intracellular build-up of acidosis inhibiting the function of the contractile proteins myosin and troponin; however, the underlying molecular basis of this process remains poorly understood. We sought to gain novel insight into the decrease in velocity by determining whether the depressive effect of acidosis could be altered by 1) introducing Ca(++)-sensitizing mutations into troponin (Tn) or 2) by agents that directly affect myosin function, including inorganic phosphate (Pi) and 2-deoxy-ATP (dATP) in an in vitro motility assay. Acidosis reduced regulated thin-filament velocity (VRTF) at both maximal and submaximal Ca(++) levels in a pH-dependent manner. A truncated construct of the inhibitory subunit of Tn (TnI) and a Ca(++)-sensitizing mutation in the Ca(++)-binding subunit of Tn (TnC) increased VRTF at submaximal Ca(++) under acidic conditions but had no effect on VRTF at maximal Ca(++) levels. In contrast, both Pi and replacement of ATP with dATP reversed much of the acidosis-induced depression of VRTF at saturating Ca(++). Interestingly, despite producing similar magnitude increases in VRTF, the combined effects of Pi and dATP were additive, suggesting different underlying mechanisms of action. These findings suggest that acidosis depresses velocity by slowing the detachment rate from actin but also by possibly slowing the attachment rate.

  4. Cognitive function, health-related quality of life and symptoms of depression and anxiety sensitivity are impaired in patients with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake W Anderson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS is a condition in which heart rate increases abnormally when the individual assumes an upright position. In addition to the marked tachycardia, presyncope and syncope, patients with POTS often complain of light-headedness, fatigue and difficulty in concentrating. The present study assessed individuals with POTS for psychiatric comorbidity, anxiety sensitivity and health related quality of life and examined general cognitive ability. Data was obtained from patients with POTS (n=15, 12 female, aged 30±3 years and age matched healthy subjects (n=30, 21 female, aged 32±2 years. Patients with POTS commonly presented with symptoms of depression, elevated anxiety and increased anxiety sensitivity, particularly with regards to cardiac symptoms, and had a poorer health related quality of life in both the physical and mental health domains. While patients with POTS performed worse in tests of current intellectual functioning (verbal and non-verbal IQ and in measures of focused attention (digits forward and short term memory (digits back, test results were influenced largely by years of education and the underlying level of depression and anxiety. Acute changes in cognitive performance in response to head up tilt were evident in the POTS patients. From results obtained, it was concluded that participants with POTS have an increased prevalence of depression and higher levels of anxiety. These underlying symptoms impact on cognition in patients with POTS, particularly in the cognitive domains of attention and short-term memory. Our results indicate that psychological interventions may aid in recovery and facilitate uptake and adherence of other treatment modalities in patients with POTS.

  5. Ca++-sensitizing mutations in troponin, Pi, and 2-deoxyATP alter the depressive effect of acidosis on regulated thin-filament velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longyear, Thomas J.; Turner, Matthew A.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Lopez, Joseph; Biesiadecki, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Repeated, intense contractile activity compromises the ability of skeletal muscle to generate force and velocity, resulting in fatigue. The decrease in velocity is thought to be due, in part, to the intracellular build-up of acidosis inhibiting the function of the contractile proteins myosin and troponin; however, the underlying molecular basis of this process remains poorly understood. We sought to gain novel insight into the decrease in velocity by determining whether the depressive effect of acidosis could be altered by 1) introducing Ca++-sensitizing mutations into troponin (Tn) or 2) by agents that directly affect myosin function, including inorganic phosphate (Pi) and 2-deoxy-ATP (dATP) in an in vitro motility assay. Acidosis reduced regulated thin-filament velocity (VRTF) at both maximal and submaximal Ca++ levels in a pH-dependent manner. A truncated construct of the inhibitory subunit of Tn (TnI) and a Ca++-sensitizing mutation in the Ca++-binding subunit of Tn (TnC) increased VRTF at submaximal Ca++ under acidic conditions but had no effect on VRTF at maximal Ca++ levels. In contrast, both Pi and replacement of ATP with dATP reversed much of the acidosis-induced depression of VRTF at saturating Ca++. Interestingly, despite producing similar magnitude increases in VRTF, the combined effects of Pi and dATP were additive, suggesting different underlying mechanisms of action. These findings suggest that acidosis depresses velocity by slowing the detachment rate from actin but also by possibly slowing the attachment rate. PMID:24651988

  6. Synergistic effects of pain intensity and anxiety sensitivity in relation to anxiety and depressive symptoms and disorders among economically disadvantaged latinos in a community-based primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Ricardo Valdés; Bakhshaie, Jafar; Walker, Rheeda L; Viana, Andres G; Garza, Monica; Ochoa-Perez, Melissa; Paulus, Daniel J; Robles, Zuzuky; Valdivieso, Jeanette; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    The present investigation examined the interactive effects of anxiety sensitivity and pain intensity in relation to anxious arousal, social anxiety, and depressive symptoms and disorders among 203 Latino adults with an annual income of less than $30,000 (84.4% female; Mage=38.9, SD=11.3 and 98.6% used Spanish as their first language) who attended a community-based primary healthcare clinic. As expected, the interaction between anxiety sensitivity and pain intensity was significantly related to increased anxious arousal, social anxiety, and depressive symptoms as well as number of depressive/anxiety disorder diagnoses. The form of the significant interactions indicated that participants reporting co-occurring higher levels of anxiety sensitivity and pain intensity evinced the greatest levels of anxious arousal, social anxiety, and depressive symptoms as well as higher levels of depressive and anxiety disorders. These data provide novel empirical evidence suggesting that there is clinically-relevant interplay between anxiety sensitivity and pain intensity in regard to a relatively wide array of anxiety and depressive variables among Latinos in a primary care medical setting.

  7. 清醒大鼠动脉压力感受性反射的功能研究%Arterial baroreflex function in conscious rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏定冯; 缪朝玉

    2002-01-01

    Arterial baroreflex (ABR) is a very important mechanism in the regulation of cardiovascular activities. As ABR function is largely inhibited by anesthesia, its measurement in conscious animal becomes important. The present review summarizes the works concerning ABR function in conscious rats completed in our department in the last 10 years. Firstly, a new method was established to measure arterial baroreflex-blood pressure control (ABR-BP).ABR-BP and baroreflex sensitivity measured with classic method are two different parts of the ABR function.Secondly, it was proposed that ABR function predicted the end-organ damage in hypertension. Thirdly, interrup tion of ABR induced severe end-organ damages. Increased blood pressure variability (BPV) and activation ofrenin angiotensin system were involved in the mechanisms underlying organ damages in sinoaortic denervation (SAD)rats. Fourthly, we propose that amelioration of ABR function may serve as a new strategy for improving the prognosis of cardiovascular diseases. Ketanserin improved the impaired ABR function in SHR. Finally, the possi bility to develop a strain of rats with spontaneous deficiency on ABR function is mentioned.%本文综述本室近10年来对清醒自由活动大鼠动脉压力感受性反射(ABR)的功能性研究.首先,建立了ABR对血压的控制(ABR-BP)的测量方法.ABR-BP是与用经典方法测量的ABR功能(ABR-HP)不同的成份.其次,我们的研究表明ABR功能与高血压的器官损伤有关.损毁ABR功能可导致严重的器官损伤.该损伤的机制与血压波动性增高、肾素血管紧张素系统激活有关.酮色林能改善ABR功能.基于对酮色林研究的结果,我们提出改善ABR功能可作为改善某些心血管疾病预后的新策略.最后,提到了我们正在进行中的自发性ABR功能缺陷大鼠的培育.

  8. Method of treating depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henn, Fritz

    2013-04-09

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  9. Method of treating depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Fritz [East Patchogue, NY

    2012-01-24

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  10. Reduced baroreflex sensitivity and pulmonary dysfunction in alcoholic cirrhosis: effect of hyperoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Iversen, Jens S; Krag, Aleksander

    2010-01-01

    of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS). BRS is reduced at exposure to chronic hypoxia such as during sojourn in high altitudes. In this study, we assessed the relation of BRS to pulmonary dysfunction and cardiovascular characteristics and the effects of hyperoxia. Forty-three patients with cirrhosis and 12 healthy...... to presence of HPS, Pa(O(2)), Dl(CO), or Child-Turcotte score, but BRS correlated with metabolic and hemodynamic characteristics. After 100% oxygen inhalation, BRS and the QT interval remained unchanged in the cirrhotic patients. In conclusion, BRS is significantly reduced in patients with cirrhosis compared...

  11. Baroreflex Sensitivity in Relation to Clinical Characteristics in Subject Aged 40 to 80 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise Schouborg; Pors, Kirsten; Latif, Tabassam;

    2014-01-01

    in our population comprising one component reflecting the sympathetic activity, the parasympathetic system, and the integrated spontaneous BRS, respectively. The parasympathetic component was the only one correlating with clinical characteristics of declining age, smoking habits, systolic blood pressure...... on the Framingham score. BRS was found to decline with age, but this change disappeared when correcting for the age related increase in systolic blood pressure. We found that the VM-derived indices of sympathetic vascular control declined with age as did the vagally controlled heart rate changes in response to deep...... breathing and VM. We could not demonstrate any correlation between BRS, smoking status, and body size when adjusting for age and gender, whereas spontaneous BRS was reduced with increasing Framingham risk score. Principal component analysis revealed three component explaining 69% of the total variance...

  12. Baroreflex Sensitivity Is Reduced in Adolescents with Probable Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverdale, Nicole S.; O'Leary, Deborah D.; Faught, Brent E.; Chirico, Daniele; Hay, John; Cairney, John

    2012-01-01

    Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by poor motor skills leading to a significant impairment in activities of daily living. Compared to typically developing children, those with DCD are less fit and physically active, and have increased body fat. This is an important consequence as both…

  13. Chronically Restricted Sleep Leads to Depression-Like Changes in Neurotransmitter Receptor Sensitivity and Neuroendocrine Stress Reactivity in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novati, Arianna; Roman, Viktor; Cetin, Timur; Hagewoud, Roelina; den Boer, Johan A.; Luiten, Paul G.M.; Meerlo, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Frequently disrupted and restricted sleep is a common problem for many people in our Western society. In the long run, insufficient sleep may have repercussions for health and may sensitize individuals to psychiatric diseases. In this context, we applied an animal model of chronic

  14. Chronically Restricted Sleep Leads to Depression-Like Changes in Neurotransmitter Receptor Sensitivity and Neuroendocrine Stress Reactivity in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novati, Arianna; Roman, Viktor; Cetin, Timur; Hagewoud, Roelina; den Boer, Johan A.; Luiten, Paul G.M.; Meerlo, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Frequently disrupted and restricted sleep is a common problem for many people in our Western society. In the long run, insufficient sleep may have repercussions for health and may sensitize individuals to psychiatric diseases. In this context, we applied an animal model of chronic

  15. Depression - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  16. Helioseismology of sunspots: how sensitive are travel times to the Wilson depression and to the subsurface magnetic field?

    CERN Document Server

    Schunker, Hannah; Cameron, Robert H; Birch, Aaron C

    2013-01-01

    In order to assess the ability of helioseismology to probe the subsurface structure and magnetic field of sunspots, we need to determine how helioseismic travel times depend on perturbations to sunspot models. Here we numerically simulate the propagation of f, p1, and p2 wave packets through magnetic sunspot models. Among the models we considered, a ~50 km change in the height of the Wilson depression and a change in the subsurface magnetic field geometry can both be detected above the observational noise level. We also find that the travel-time shifts due to changes in a sunspot model must be modeled by computing the effects of changing the reference sunspot model, and not by computing the effects of changing the subsurface structure in the quiet-Sun model. For p1 modes the latter is wrong by a factor of four. In conclusion, numerical modeling of MHD wave propagation is an essential tool for the interpretation of the effects of sunspots on seismic waveforms.

  17. Evaluating Emotional and Biological Sensitivity to Maternal Behavior Among Self-Injuring and Depressed Adolescent Girls Using Nonlinear Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crowe, Sheila E; Butner, Jonathan E.; Wiltshire, Travis

    2017-01-01

    High sensitivity and reactivity to behaviors of family members characterize several forms of psychopathology, including self-inflicted injury (SII). We examined mother-daughter behavioral and psychophysiological reactivity during a conflict discussion using nonlinear dynamics to assess asymmetrical...... would not evoke mothers’ behavioral or physiological reactivity, and (c) control teens and mothers would be less reactive, with no dynamic associations in either direction. Convergent cross-mapping with dewdrop regression, which identifies directional associations, indicated that mothers’ behaviors...

  18. ANG-(1–7) DEFICIENCY AND BAROREFLEX IMPAIRMENT PRECEDE THE ANTENATAL BETAMETHASONE EXPOSURE-INDUCED ELEVATION IN BLOOD PRESSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Hossam A.; Rose, James C.; Chappell, Mark C.; Diz, Debra I.

    2014-01-01

    Betamethasone is administered to accelerate lung development and improve survival of premature infants, but may be associated with hypertension later in life. In a sheep model of fetal programming resulting from exposure at 80th day of gestation to Betamethasone (Betaexposed), adult sheep at 6–9 months or 1.8 yrs of age have elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP), and attenuated spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (sBRS) for control of heart rate compared to age-matched controls, associated with imbalances in angiotensin (Ang) II versus Ang-(1–7) tone. At 6 weeks of age, evoked BRS is already low in the Beta-exposed animals. In this study we assessed the potential contribution of the renin-angiotensin system to the impaired sBRS. Female lambs (6 weeks old) with Beta-exposure in utero had similar MAP to control lambs (78±2 vs 77±2 mm Hg, n = 4–5 per group), but lower sBRS (8±1 vs 16±3 ms/mm Hg; p < 0.05) and impaired heart rate variability (HRV). Peripheral AT1 receptor blockade using candesartan lowered MAP in both groups (~10 mm Hg) and improved sBRS and HRV in Beta-exposed lambs to a level similar to control. AT7 receptor blockade by infusion of D-ala Ang-(1–7) (700 ng/kg/min for 45 min) reduced sBRS 46±10 % in Beta-exposed vs in control lambs (p<0.15) and increased MAP in both groups (~6±2 mm Hg). Our data reveal that Beta-exposure impairs sBRS and HRV at a time point preceding the elevation in MAP via mechanisms involving an imbalance in the Ang II/Ang-(1–7) ratio consistent with a progressive loss in Ang-(1–7) function. PMID:22215705

  19. Angiotensin-(1-7) deficiency and baroreflex impairment precede the antenatal Betamethasone exposure-induced elevation in blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Hossam A; Rose, James C; Chappell, Mark C; Diz, Debra I

    2012-02-01

    Betamethasone is administered to accelerate lung development and improve survival of premature infants but may be associated with hypertension later in life. In a sheep model of fetal programming resulting from exposure at day 80 of gestation to Betamethasone (Beta-exposed), adult sheep at 6 to 9 months or 1.8 years of age have elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP) and attenuated spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (sBRS) for control of heart rate compared to age-matched controls associated with imbalances in angiotensin (Ang) II vs Ang-(1-7) tone. At 6 weeks of age, evoked BRS is already low in the Beta-exposed animals. In this study, we assessed the potential contribution of the renin-angiotensin system to the impaired sBRS. Female lambs (6 weeks old) with Beta exposure in utero had similar MAP to control lambs (78±2 vs 77±2 mm Hg, n=4-5 per group), but lower sBRS (8±1 vs 16±3 ms/mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired heart rate variability. Peripheral AT1 receptor blockade using candesartan lowered MAP in both groups (≈10 mm Hg) and improved sBRS and heart rate variability in Beta-exposed lambs to a level similar to control. AT7 receptor blockade by infusion of D-ala Ang-(1-7) (700 ng/kg/min for 45 minutes) reduced sBRS 46%±10% in Beta-exposed vs in control lambs (P<0.15) and increased MAP in both groups (≈6±2 mm Hg). Our data reveal that Beta exposure impairs sBRS and heart rate variability at a time point preceding the elevation in MAP via mechanisms involving an imbalance in the Ang II/Ang-(1-7) ratio consistent with a progressive loss in Ang-(1-7) function.

  20. The gain of the baroreflex bradycardia is reduced by microinjection of NMDA receptor antagonists into the nucleus tractus solitarii of awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigero, M; Bonagamba, L G; Machado, B H

    2000-02-14

    The baroreflex activation with phenylephrine infusion produces a bradycardic response. In the present study, the role of NMDA receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) in the processing of the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex was evaluated using acid phosphonivaleric (AP-5), a selective NMDA receptor antagonist. Baroreflex activation was performed before and after bilateral microinjection of AP-5 into the intermediate commissural NTS (0.5 mm lateral to the midline). Microinjection of the vehicle (saline, 0.9%) or a dose of 2 nmol/50 nl of AP-5 into the NTS produced no effect on the gain of the baroreflex while a dose of 10 nmol/50 nl of AP-5 produced a significant reduction in the gain of the baroreflex 2 min after microinjection [-1.43+/-0.22 vs. -0. 43+/-0.03 bpm/mmHg, (n=6)], with a return to control levels 10 min after the microinjections. The dose of 10 nmol/50 nl was selective for NMDA receptors considering that the cardiovascular responses to microinjection of AMPA (0.05 pmol/50 nl), a non-NMDA receptor agonist, were not affected by this dose of AP-5 and the responses to microinjection of NMDA (2 nmol/50 nl) were blocked. The data show that the bradycardic response to baroreflex activation was blocked by AP-5 microinjected into the NTS, indicating that the neurotransmission of the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex is mediated by NMDA receptors in the NTS.

  1. Baroreflex Activation Therapy in Congestive Heart Failure: Novel Findings and Future Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Guido; Brambilla, GianMaria; Pizzalla, Daniela Prata; Seravalle, Gino

    2016-08-01

    Congestive heart failure is characterized by hemodynamic and non-hemodynamic abnormalities, the latter including an activation of the sympathetic influences to the heart and peripheral circulation coupled with an impairment of baroreceptor control of autonomic function. Evidence has been provided that both these alterations are hallmark features of the disease with a specific relevance for the disease progression as well as for the development of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. In addition, a number of studies have documented in heart failure the adverse prognostic role of the sympathetic and baroreflex alterations, which both are regarded as major independent determinants of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This represents the pathophysiological and clinical background for the use of carotid baroreceptor activation therapy in the treatment of congestive heart failure. Promising data collected in experimental animal models of heart failure have supported the recent performance of pilot small-scale clinical studies, aimed at providing initial information in this area. The results of these studies demonstrated the clinical safety and efficacy of the intervention which has been tested in large-scale clinical studies. The present paper will critically review the background and main results of the published studies designed at defining the clinical impact of baroreflex activation therapy in congestive heart failure patients. Emphasis will be given to the strengths and limitations of such studies, which represent the background for the ongoing clinical trials testing the long-term effects of the device in heart failure patients.

  2. On the integration of the baroreflex control mechanism in a heterogeneous model of the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, P J; Trenhago, P R; Fernandes, L G; Feijóo, R A

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present work is to describe the integration of a mathematical model for the baroreceptor reflex mechanism to provide regulatory action into a dimensionally heterogeneous (3D-1D-0D) closed-loop model of the cardiovascular system. Such heterogeneous model comprises a 1D description of the arterial tree, a 0D network for the venous, cardiac and pulmonary circulations and 3D patient-specific geometries for vascular districts of interest. Thus, the detailed topological description of the arterial network allows us to perform vasomotor control actions in a differentiated way, while gaining insight about the effects of the baroreflex regulation over hemodynamic quantities of interest throughout the entire network. Two examples of application are presented. Firstly, we simulate the hemorrhage in the abdominal aorta artery and analyze the action of the baroreflex over the system. Secondly, the self-regulated closed-loop model is applied to study the influence of the control action in the hemodynamic environment that determines the blood flow pattern in a cerebral aneurism in the presence of a regurgitating aortic valve.

  3. Renal responses to long-term carotid baroreflex activation therapy in patients with drug-resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnima, Teba; de Leeuw, Peter W; Tan, Frans E S; Kroon, Abraham A

    2013-06-01

    Carotid baroreflex activation has been demonstrated to provide enduring reductions in arterial blood pressure. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term therapy on renal function. A total of 322 patients were enrolled in the Rheos Pivotal Trial. Group 1 consisted of 236 patients who started baroreflex activation therapy 1 month after device implantation, whereas in the 86 patients from group 2 the device was activated 6 months later. Serum creatinine and urine albumin/creatinine ratio were collected at screening (before device activation), and at months 6 and 12. Multilevel statistical analyses were adjusted for various covariables. Serum creatinine increased from 78 to 84 μmol/L, and glomerular filtration rate decreased from 92 to 87 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) in group 1 at month 6 (Pblood pressure reduction seemed to be significantly related to the change in glomerular filtration rate in both groups. Albumin/creatinine ratio did not change in both groups during follow-up. In conclusion, baroreflex activation therapy in hypertensive patients is associated with an initial mild decrease in glomerular filtration rate, which may be considered as a normal hemodynamic response to the drop in blood pressure. Long-term treatment does not result in further decrease in renal function, indicating baroreflex activation as a safe and effective therapy.

  4. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel by iptakalim normalizes stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behaviour by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Jie; Zhao, Zhan; Yang, Dan-Dan; Cao, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Ling; Ji, Juan; Gu, Jun; Huang, Ji-Ye; Sun, Xiu-Lan

    2017-02-01

    Stress-induced disturbance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is strongly implicated in incidence of mood disorders. A heightened neuroinflammatory response and oxidative stress play a fundamental role in the dysfunction of the HPA axis. We have previously demonstrated that iptakalim (Ipt), a new ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channel opener, could prevent oxidative injury and neuroinflammation against multiple stimuli-induced brain injury. The present study was to demonstrate the impacts of Ipt in stress-induced HPA axis disorder and depressive behavior. We employed 2 stress paradigms: 8 weeks of continuous restraint stress (chronic restraint stress, CRS) and 2h of restraint stress (acute restraint stress, ARS), to mimic both chronic stress and severe acute stress. Prolonged (4 weeks) and short-term (a single injection) Ipt treatment was administered 30min before each stress paradigm. We found that HPA axis was altered after stress, with different responses to CRS (lower ACTH and CORT, higher AVP, but normal CRH) and ARS (higher CRH, ACTH and CORT, but normal AVP). Both prolonged and short-term Ipt treatment normalized stress-induced HPA axis disorders and abnormal behaviors in mice. CRS and ARS up-regulated mRNA levels of inflammation-related molecules (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and TLR4) and oxidative stress molecules (gp91phox, iNOS and Nrf2) in the mouse hypothalamus. Double immunofluorescence showed CRS and ARS increased microglia activation (CD11b and TNFα) and oxidative stress in neurons (NeuN and gp91phox), which were alleviated by Ipt. Therefore, the present study reveals that Ipt could prevent against stress-induced HPA axis disorders and depressive behavior by alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress in the hypothalamus.

  5. Gene expression related to serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission is altered in the flinders sensitive line rat model of depression: Effect of ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Sanchez, Connie; Wegener, Gregers; Elfving, Betina

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with dysfunctional serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, and the genetic animal model of depression Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats display alterations in these systems relatively to their control strain Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). However, changes on transcript level related to serotonergic and glutamatergic signaling have only been sparsely studied in this model. The non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine has fast-onset antidepressant properties, and recent data implicate serotonergic neurotransmission in ketamine's antidepressant-like activities in rodents. Here, we investigated the transcript levels of 40 genes involved in serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in FSL and FRL rats in response to a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg; 90 min prior to euthanization). Using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we studied the effect of ketamine in the hippocampus, whereas strain differences were investigated in both hippocampus and frontal cortex. The expression of genes involved in serotonergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission were unaffected by a single dose of ketamine in the hippocampus. Relative to FRL rats, FSL rats displayed enhanced hippocampal transcript levels of 5-ht2c , and P11, whereas the expression was reduced for 5-ht2a , Nr2a, and Mglur2. In the frontal cortex, we found higher transcript levels of 5-ht2c and Mglur2, whereas the expression of 5-ht2a was reduced in FSL rats. Thus, ketamine is not associated with hippocampal alterations in serotonergic or glutamatergic genes at 90 min after an antidepressant dose. Furthermore, FSL rats display serotonergic and glutamatergic abnormalities on gene expression level that partly may resemble findings in MDD patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Dynamic control of maximal ventricular elastance via the baroreflex and force-frequency relation in awake dogs before and after pacing-induced heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Sala-Mercado, Javier A.; Hammond, Robert L.; Ichinose, Masashi; Soltani, Soroor; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    We investigated to what extent maximal ventricular elastance (Emax) is dynamically controlled by the arterial baroreflex and force-frequency relation in conscious dogs and to what extent these mechanisms are attenuated after the induction of heart failure (HF). We mathematically analyzed spontaneous beat-to-beat hemodynamic variability. First, we estimated Emax for each beat during a baseline period using the ventricular unstressed volume determined with the traditional multiple beat method during vena cava occlusion. We then jointly identified the transfer functions (system gain value and time delay per frequency) relating beat-to-beat fluctuations in arterial blood pressure (ABP) to Emax (ABP→Emax) and beat-to-beat fluctuations in heart rate (HR) to Emax (HR→Emax) to characterize the dynamic properties of the arterial baroreflex and force-frequency relation, respectively. During the control condition, the ABP→Emax transfer function revealed that ABP perturbations caused opposite direction Emax changes with a gain value of −0.023 ± 0.012 ml−1, whereas the HR→Emax transfer function indicated that HR alterations caused same direction Emax changes with a gain value of 0.013 ± 0.005 mmHg·ml−1·(beats/min)−1. Both transfer functions behaved as low-pass filters. However, the ABP→Emax transfer function was more sluggish than the HR→Emax transfer function with overall time constants (indicator of full system response time to a sudden input change) of 11.2 ± 2.8 and 1.7 ± 0.5 s (P < 0.05), respectively. During the HF condition, the ABP→Emax and HR→Emax transfer functions were markedly depressed with gain values reduced to −0.0002 ± 0.007 ml−1 and −0.001 ± 0.004 mmHg·ml−1·(beats/min)−1 (P < 0.1). Emax is rapidly and significantly controlled at rest, but this modulation is virtually abolished in HF. PMID:20435845

  7. Sympathetic activation and baroreflex function during intradialytic hypertensive episodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvora Rubinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanisms of intradialytic increases in blood pressure are not well defined. The present study was undertaken to assess the role of autonomic nervous system activation during intradialytic hypertensive episodes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Continuous interbeat intervals (IBI and systolic blood pressure (SBP were monitored during hemodialysis in 108 chronic patients. Intradialytic hypertensive episodes defined as a period of at least 10 mmHg increase in SBP between the beginning and the end of a dialysis session or hypertension resistant to ultrafiltration occurring during or immediately after the dialysis procedure, were detected in 62 out of 113 hemodialysis sessions. SBP variability, IBI variability and baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS in the low (LF and high (HF frequency ranges were assessed using the complex demodulation technique (CDM. Intradialytic hypertensive episodes were associated with an increased (n = 45 or decreased (n = 17 heart rate. The maximal blood pressure was similar in both groups. In patients with increased heart rate the increase in blood pressure was associated with marked increases in SBP and IBI variability, with suppressed BRS indices and enhanced sympatho-vagal balance. In contrast, in those with decreased heart rate, there were no significant changes in the above parameters. End-of-dialysis blood pressure in all sessions associated with hypertensive episode was significantly higher than in those without such episodes. In logistic regression analysis, predialysis BRS in the low frequency range was found to be the main predictor of intradialytic hypertension. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data point to sympathetic overactivity with feed-forward blood pressure enhancement as an important mechanism of intradialytic hypertension in a significant proportion of patients. The triggers of increased sympathetic activity during hemodialysis remain to be determined. Intradialytic hypertensive episodes

  8. Postpartum depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - postpartum; Postnatal depression; Postpartum psychological reactions ... behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT) are types of talk therapy that often help postpartum depression. ...

  9. KCa1.1 is potential marker for distinguishing Ah-type baroreceptor neurons in NTS and contributes to sex-specific presynaptic neurotransmission in baroreflex afferent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Yao; Yan, Zhen-Yu; Qu, Mei-Yu; Guo, Xin-Jing; Li, Guo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yang; Ban, Tao; Sun, Hong-Li; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-09-14

    Sexual-dimorphic neurocontrol of circulation has been described in baroreflex due largely to the function of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs, 1st-order) in nodose. However, it remains unclear if sex- and afferent-specific neurotransmission could also be observed in the central synapses within nucleus of solitary track (NTS, 2nd-order). According to the principle of no mixed neurotransmission among afferents and differentiation of Ah- and A-types to iberiotoxin (IbTX) observed in nodose, the 2nd-order Ah-type BRNs are highly expected. To test this hypothesis, the excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded in identified 2nd-order BRNs before and after IbTX using brain slice and whole-cell patch. These results showed that, in male rats, the dynamics of EPSCs in capsaicin-sensitive C-types were dramatically altered by IbTX, but not in capsaicin-insensitive A-types. Interestingly, near 50% capsaicin-insensitive neurons in females showed similar effects to C-types, suggesting the existence of Ah-types in NTS, which may be the likely reason why the females had lower blood pressure and higher sensitivity to aortic depressor nerve stimulation via KCa1.1-mediated presynaptic glutamate release from Ah-type afferent terminals.

  10. Endogenous mechanisms underlying the activation and sensitization of meningeal nociceptors: the role of immuno-vascular interactions and cortical spreading depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Dan

    2012-06-01

    Migraine is considered one of the most prevalent neurological disorders but its underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Over the past two decades, it became widely accepted that activation of primary afferent nociceptive neurons that innervate the intracranial meninges serves as a key process that mediates the throbbing head pain of migraine. Knowledge about the endogenous factors that play a role in promoting this neural process during a migraine attack slowly begins to increase, and a better understanding remains one of the holy grails in migraine research. One endogenous process, which has been invoked as a major player in the genesis of migraine pain, is cortical spreading depression (CSD). Until recently, however, this notion was only supported by indirect evidence. Recently, electrophysiological data provided the first direct evidence that CSD is indeed a powerful endogenous process that can lead to persistent activation of meningeal nociceptors and the migraine pain pathway. CSD has been suggested to promote persistent sensitization and ensuing activation of meningeal nociceptors through a mechanism involving local neurogenic inflammation including the activation of mast cells and macrophages and subsequent release of inflammatory mediators. Local action of such nociceptive mediators can increase the responsiveness of meningeal nociceptors. Recent studies provided key experimental data implicating complex meningeal immuno-vascular interactions, in particular, the interplay between proinflammatory cytokines, the meningeal vasculature and immune cells, in enhancing the responses of meningeal nociceptors.

  11. Vision in depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubl, E.; Tebartz Van Elst, L.; Ebert, D.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Reduced dopaminergic transmission has been implicated in the pathophysiology of major depression. Furthermore, dopaminergic neurotransmission plays an important role in the physiology of visual contrast sensitivity (CS). To test the hypothesis that altered dopaminergic neurotransmissi...

  12. Effects of Baroreflex Activation Therapy on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Patients With Resistant Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallbach, Manuel; Lehnig, Luca-Yves; Schroer, Charlotte; Lüders, Stephan; Böhning, Enrico; Müller, Gerhard A; Wachter, Rolf; Koziolek, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) has been demonstrated to decrease office blood pressure (BP) in the randomized, double-blind Rheos trial. There are limited data on 24-hour BP changes measured by ambulatory BP measurements (ABPMs) using the first generation rheos BAT system suggesting a significant reduction but there are no information about the effect of the currently used, unilateral BAT neo device on ABPM. Patients treated with the BAT neo device for uncontrolled resistant hypertension were prospectively included into this study. ABPM was performed before BAT implantation and 6 months after initiation of BAT. A total of 51 patients were included into this study, 7 dropped out from analysis because of missing or insufficient follow-up. After 6 months, 24-hour ambulatory systolic (from 148 ± 17 mm Hg to 140 ± 23 mm Hg, Phypertension. Randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate BAT effects on ABPM in patients with resistant hypertension accurately.

  13. Haemodynamic instability during thyroid surgery: a baroreflex-mediated neurogenic phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouraei, S A R; Davies, M R; Obholzer, R; Sandhu, G S; Porter, F

    2006-03-01

    We present a case of marked intra-operative blood pressure instability in a euthyroid, fit 33-year-old female undergoing elective hemithyroidectomy. This led to significant haemodynamic compromise, cardiac failure and end-organ damage. There was no evidence of a vasoactive endocrine cause, and the nature and timing of the event strongly pointed towards baroreflex-mediated neurogenic sympathetic dysfunction. This can occur during carotid surgery and neck dissection. Although haemodynamic fluctuations may happen during thyroid surgery, their severity in this case was unusual. We believe this could have been a rebound phenomenon in response to acute decompression of the carotid artery which had been compressed by an enlarging cyst. We suggest that in similar cases blockade of the carotid sinus could attenuate such responses.

  14. Left ventricular, systemic arterial, and baroreflex responses to ketamine and TEE in chronically instrumented monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S. C.; Ludwig, D. A.; Reister, C.; Fanton, J. W.; Ewert, D.; Convertino, V. A.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of prescribed doses of ketamine five minutes after application and influences of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) on left ventricular, systemic arterial, and baroreflex responses were investigated to test the hypothesis that ketamine and/or TEE probe insertion alter cardiovascular function. Seven rhesus monkeys were tested under each of four randomly selected experimental conditions: (1) intravenous bolus dose of ketamine (0.5 ml), (2) continuous infusion of ketamine (500 mg/kg/min), (3) continuous infusion of ketamine (500 mg/kg/min) with TEE, and (4) control (no ketamine or TEE). Monkeys were chronically instrumented with a high fidelity, dual-sensor micromanometer to measure left ventricular and aortic pressure and a transit-time ultrasound probe to measure aortic flow. These measures were used to calculate left ventricular function. A 4-element Windkessel lumped-parameter model was used to estimate total peripheral resistance and systemic arterial compliance. Baroreflex response was calculated as the change in R-R interval divided by the change in mean aortic pressure measured during administration of graded concentrations of nitroprusside. The results indicated that five minutes after ketamine application heart rate and left ventricular diastolic compliance decreased while TEE increased aortic systolic and diastolic pressure. We conclude that ketamine may be administered as either a bolus or continuous infusion without affecting cardiovascular function 5 minutes after application while the insertion of a TEE probe will increase aortic pressure. The results for both ketamine and TEE illustrate the classic "Hawthorne Effect," where the observed values are partly a function of the measurement process. Measures of aortic pressure, heart rate, and left ventricular diastolic pressure should be viewed as relative, as opposed to absolute, when organisms are sedated with ketamine or instrumented with a TEE probe.

  15. Aortic depressor nerve stimulation does not impede dynamic characteristics of the carotid sinus baroreflex in normotensive or spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Toru; Turner, Michael J; Shimizu, Shuji; Fukumitsu, Masafumi; Kamiya, Atsunori; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2017-03-08

    Recent clinical trials in patients with drug-resistant hypertension indicate that electrical activation of the carotid sinus baroreflex (baroreflex activation therapy) can reduce arterial pressure (AP) for more than a year. To examine whether the electrical stimulation from one baroreflex system impedes normal short-term AP regulation via another unstimulated baroreflex system, we electrically stimulated the left aortic depressor nerve (ADN) while estimating the dynamic characteristics of the carotid sinus baroreflex in anesthetized normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY, n=8) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, n=7). Isolated carotid sinus regions were perturbed for 20 min using a Gaussian white noise signal with a mean of 120 mmHg for WKY and 160 mmHg for SHR. Tonic ADN stimulation (2 Hz, 10 V, 0.1-ms pulse width) decreased mean sympathetic nerve activity (73.4±14.0 vs. 51.6±11.3 arbitrary units in WKY, P = 0.012; and 248.7±33.9 vs. 181.1±16.6 arbitrary units in SHR, P = 0.018) and mean AP (90.8±6.6 vs. 81.2±5.4 mmHg in WKY, P=0.004; and 128.6±9.8 vs. 114.7±10.3 mmHg in SHR, P = 0.009). The slope of dynamic gain in the neural arc transfer function from carotid sinus pressure to sympathetic nerve activity was not different between trials with and without the ADN stimulation (12.55±0.93 vs. 13.03±1.28 dB/decade in WKY, P = 0.542; and 17.37±1.01 vs. 17.47±1.64 dB/decade in SHR, P = 0.946). These results indicate that the tonic ADN stimulation does not significantly modify the dynamic characteristics of the carotid sinus baroreflex.

  16. Short-term effects of a manual therapy protocol on pain, physical function, quality of sleep, depressive symptoms, and pressure sensitivity in women and men with fibromyalgia syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida M; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María E; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Sánchez-Joya, María Del Mar; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effects of a manual therapy protocol for improving pain, function, pressure pain thresholds (PPT), quality of sleep, and depressive symptoms in women and men with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Eighty-nine patients were randomly assigned to experimental or control group. The experimental group (24 female, 21 male) received 5 sessions of manual therapy and the control group (24 female, 21 male) did not receive any intervention. PPT, pain, impact of FMS symptoms, quality of sleep, and depressive symptoms were assessed in both groups at baseline and after 48 hours of the last intervention in the experimental group. The analysis of covariance found significant Group×Time×Sex interactions for McGill PPI and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depressive Symptoms Scale (PManual therapy protocol was effective for improving pain intensity, widespread pressure pain sensitivity, impact of FMS symptoms, sleep quality, and depressive symptoms. In addition, sex differences were observed in response to treatment: women and men get similar improvements in quality of sleep and tender point count, whereas women showed a greater reduction in pain and impact of FMS symptoms than men, but men reported higher decreases in depressive symptoms and pressure hypersensitivity than women.

  17. Postpartum Blues and Postpartum Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Ö et al.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum blues which is seen during the postpartum period is a transient psychological state. Most of the mothers experience maternity blues in postpartum period. It remains usually unrecognized by the others. Some sensitive families can misattribute these feelings as depression. In this article, we tried to review the characteristics of maternity blues and its differences from depression. We defined depression and presented the incidence and diagnostic criteria, of major depression as well as the risk factors and clinic findings of postpartum depression. Thus, especially at primary care we aimed to prevent misdiagnosis of both maternity blues and depression

  18. Acute AT(1)-receptor blockade reverses the hemodynamic and baroreflex impairment in adult sheep exposed to antenatal betamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Hossam A; Rose, James C; Figueroa, Jorge P; Chappell, Mark C; Diz, Debra I; Averill, David B

    2010-08-01

    To accelerate lung development and protect neonates from other early developmental problems, synthetic steroids are administered maternally in the third trimester, exposing fetuses that are candidates for premature delivery to them. However, steroid exposure at this point of gestation may lead to elevated blood pressure [mean arterial pressure (MAP)] during adolescence. We hypothesize that fetal exposure to steroids activates the renin-angiotensin system, inducing an elevation in blood pressure and attenuation of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) that is angiotensin II dependent in early adulthood. To test this hypothesis, fetal sheep were exposed to betamethasone (Beta) or vehicle (control) administered to ewes at day 80 of gestation and delivered at full term. At 1.8 yr of age, male offspring were instrumented for conscious recording of MAP, heart rate, and measurement of BRS [as low-frequency-alpha, high-frequency-alpha, sequence (seq) UP, seq DOWN, and seq TOTAL]. Beta-exposed sheep (n = 6) had higher MAP than control sheep (n = 5) (93 + or - 2 vs. 84 + or - 2 mmHg, P < 0.01). Acute blockade of angiotensin type 1 receptors with candesartan (0.3 mg/kg iv) normalized MAP in Beta-exposed sheep (85 + or - 4 mmHg), with no effect in control sheep (82 + or - 3 mmHg). Before angiotensin type 1 blockade, BRS maximum gain was significantly lower in Beta-exposed vs. control sheep (11 + or - 3 vs. 26 + or - 3 ms/mmHg, P < 0.0.01). However, 45 min after candesartan injection, BRS was increased in Beta-exposed (21 + or - 5 ms/mmHg) and control (35 + or - 4 ms/mmHg) sheep. Heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) revealed lower HRV (SD of beat-to-beat interval and root mean square of successive beat-to-beat differences in R-R interval duration) and higher BPV (SD of MAP, systolic arterial pressure in low-frequency range) in Beta-exposed sheep. Candesartan partially restored HRV in Beta-exposed sheep and fully corrected BPV. Thus, in utero exposure to

  19. The effect of daily self-measurement of pressure pain sensitivity followed by acupressure on depression and quality of life versus treatment as usual in ischemic heart disease: a randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Bergmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depressive symptoms and reduced quality of life (QOL are parts of the chronic stress syndrome and predictive of adverse outcome in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD. Chronic stress is associated with increased sensitivity for pain, which can be measured by algometry as Pressure Pain Sensitivity (PPS on the sternum. AIM: To evaluate if stress focus by self-measurement of PPS, followed by stress reducing actions including acupressure, can decrease depressive symptoms and increase psychological well-being in people with stable IHD. DESIGN: Observer blinded randomized clinical trial over 3 months of either intervention or treatment as usual (TAU. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Intention to treat. METHODS: Two hundred and thirteen participants with IHD were included: 106 to active treatment and 107 to TAU. Drop-out: 20 and 12, respectively. The active intervention included self-measurement of PPS twice daily followed by acupressure as mandatory action, aiming at a reduction in PPS. Primary endpoint: change in depressive symptoms as measured by Major depression inventory (MDI. Other endpoints: changes in PPS, Well-being (WHO-5 and mental and physical QOL (SF-36. RESULTS: At 3 months PPS decreased 28%, to 58, in active and 11%, to 72, in TAU, p<0.001. MDI decreased 22%, to 6.5, in active group vs. 12%, to 8.3 in TAU, p = 0.040. WHO-5 increased to 71.0 and 64.8, active group and TAU, p = 0.015. SF-36 mental score sum increased to 55.3 and 53.3, active and TAU, p = 0.08. CONCLUSIONS: PPS measurements followed by acupressure reduce PPS, depressive symptoms and increase QOL in patients with stable IHD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01513824.

  20. Dicholine succinate, the neuronal insulin sensitizer, normalizes behavior, REM sleep, hippocampal pGSK3 beta and mRNAs of NMDA receptor subunits in mouse models of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon H. Cline

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Central insulin receptor-mediated signalling is attracting the growing attention of researchers because of rapidly accumulating evidence implicating it in the mechanisms of plasticity, stress response and neuropsychiatric disorders including depression. Dicholine succinate (DS, a mitochondrial complex II substrate, was shown to enhance insulin-receptor mediated signaling in neurons and is regarded as a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor. Compounds enhancing neuronal insulin receptor-mediated transmission exert an antidepressant-like effect in several pre-clinical paradigms of depression; similarly, such properties for DS were found with a stress-induced anhedonia model. Here, we additionally studied the effects of DS on several variables which were ameliorated by other insulin receptor sensitizers in mice. Pre-treatment with DS of chronically stressed C57BL6 mice rescued normal contextual fear conditioning, hippocampal gene expression of NMDA receptor subunit NR2A, the NR2A/NR2B ratio and increased REM sleep rebound after acute predation. In 18-month-old C57BL6 mice, a model of elderly depression, DS restored normal sucrose preference and activated the expression of neural plasticity factors in the hippocampus as shown by Illumina microarray. Finally, young naïve DS-treated C57BL6 mice had reduced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviours and, similarly to imipramine-treated mice, preserved hippocampal levels of the phosphorylated (inactive form of GSK3 beta that was lowered by forced swimming in pharmacologically naïve animals. Thus, DS can ameliorate behavioural and molecular outcomes under a variety of stress- and depression-related conditions. This further highlights neuronal insulin signalling as a new factor of pathogenesis and a potential pharmacotherapy of affective pathologies.

  1. Poststroke depression: Diagnosis of depression, phenomenology and specificity of depressive symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi-Žikić Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of depression. Depressive disorder is nowadays diagnosed by the two widely used diagnostic systems - International Classification of Diseases of the World Health Organization, 10th revision and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Criteria of the American Psychiatric Organisation, 4th edition. The criteria for depressive disorder used in these two systems are almost identical. Poststroke depression. The diagnosis of depression may be difficult to establish in stroke patients, especially in patients with aphasia/dysphasia, anosognosia and other cognitive dysfunction. Major vs. minor poststroke depression, specificity and sensitivity of depressive symptoms: The phenomenology of major poststroke depression has been found to be similar to that of primary depression, and it appears that minor and major are not stages of the same continuum, but rather separate entities. Contrary to common opinion, non specific somatic symptoms do not hinder the diagnosis of poststroke depression and can be highly discriminative and crucial in the evaluation of poststroke depression. Validity of the poststroke depression diagnosis Studies have shown that a valid diagnosis of poststroke depression may be established successfully using structured or semi-structured neuropsychiatric interviews, according to the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Criteria. Conclusion. It appears that no new diagnostic tools specific for major depression in stroke patients are necessary. The existing diagnostic procedures will fail to diagnose or misdiagnose depression only in few stroke patients.

  2. Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... starts about 1–3 weeks after childbirth. What causes postpartum depression? Postpartum depression probably is caused by a combination ... better. Can antidepressants cause side effects? Antidepressants can ... If your depression worsens soon after starting medication or if you ...

  3. Caregiver Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not sell or share your name. Caregiver Depression Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print Many caregivers ... depression See your doctor Treatment Coping Symptoms of depression Caregiving is hard — and can lead to feelings ...

  4. Baroreflexes of the rat. IV. ADN-evoked responses at the NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaorui; Dworkin, Barry R

    2007-12-01

    In a long-term (7-21 days) neuromuscular blocked (NMB) rat preparation, using precise single-pulse aortic depressor nerve (ADN) stimulation and stable chronic evoked response (ER) recordings from the dorsal-medial solitary nucleus (dmNTS), two different response patterns were observed: continuous and discrete. For the continuous pattern, activity began approximately 3 ms after the stimulus and persisted for 45 ms; for the discrete pattern, two complexes were separated by a gap from approximately 17 to 25 ms. The early complex was probably transmitted via A-fibers: it had a low stimulus current threshold and an average conduction velocity (CV) of 0.58-5.5 m/s; the high threshold late (HTL) complex had a CV = 0.26-0.58 m/s. The average stimulus amplitude-ER magnitude transduction curves for the A and HTL complexes were sigmoidal. For individual rats, in the linear range, mean r2 = 0.96 +/- 0.03 for both complexes. The average stimulus amplitude vs. the systolic blood pressure change (delta sBP) transduction curve was also approximately linear; however, for individual rats, the relationship was not consistently reliable: mean r2 = 0.48 +/- 0.19. Approximately 90% of recording sites had respiratory, and 50% had cardiac synchronism. The NMB preparation is useful for studying central baroreflex mechanisms that operate on time scales of days or weeks, such as adaptation and other kinds of neural plasticity.

  5. Dynamic baroreflex control of blood pressure: influence of the heart vs. peripheral resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huang-Ku; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Ringwood, John V; Barrett, Carolyn J; Leonard, Bridget L; Nguang, Sing-Kiong; Navakatikyan, Michael A; Malpas, Simon C

    2002-08-01

    The aim in the present experiments was to assess the dynamic baroreflex control of blood pressure, to develop an accurate mathematical model that represented this relationship, and to assess the role of dynamic changes in heart rate and stroke volume in giving rise to components of this response. Patterned electrical stimulation [pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS)] was applied to the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) to produce changes in blood pressure under open-loop conditions in anesthetized rabbits. The stimulus provided constant power over the frequency range 0-0.5 Hz and revealed that the composite systems represented by the central nervous system, sympathetic activity, and vascular resistance responded as a second-order low-pass filter (corner frequency approximately 0.047 Hz) with a time delay (1.01 s). The gain between ADN and mean arterial pressure was reasonably constant before the corner frequency and then decreased with increasing frequency of stimulus. Although the heart rate was altered in response to the PRBS stimuli, we found that removal of the heart's ability to contribute to blood pressure variability by vagotomy and beta(1)-receptor blockade did not significantly alter the frequency response. We conclude that the contribution of the heart to the dynamic regulation of blood pressure is negligible in the rabbit. The consequences of this finding are examined with respect to low-frequency oscillations in blood pressure.

  6. Neural blockade during exercise augments central command's contribution to carotid baroreflex resetting

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    Querry, R. G.; Smith, S. A.; Stromstad, M.; Ide, K.; Raven, P. B.; Secher, N. H.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine central command's role on carotid baroreflex (CBR) resetting during exercise. Nine volunteer subjects performed static and rhythmic handgrip exercise at 30 and 40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), respectively, before and after partial axillary neural blockade. Stimulus-response curves were developed using the neck pressure-neck suction technique and a rapid pulse train protocol (+40 to -80 Torr). Regional anesthesia resulted in a significant reduction in MVC. Heart rate (HR) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were used as indexes of central command and were elevated during exercise at control force intensity after induced muscle weakness. The CBR function curves were reset vertically with a minimal lateral shift during control exercise and exhibited a further parallel resetting during exercise with neural blockade. The operating point was progressively reset to coincide with the centering point of the CBR curve. These data suggest that central command was a primary mechanism in the resetting of the CBR during exercise. However, it appeared that central command modulated the carotid-cardiac reflex proportionately more than the carotid-vasomotor reflex.

  7. Assessing the strength of cardiac and sympathetic baroreflex controls via transfer entropy during orthostatic challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Alberto; Marchi, Andrea; Bari, Vlasta; De Maria, Beatrice; Esler, Murray; Lambert, Elisabeth; Baumert, Mathias

    2017-05-01

    The study assesses the strength of the causal relation along baroreflex (BR) in humans during an incremental postural challenge soliciting the BR. Both cardiac BR (cBR) and sympathetic BR (sBR) were characterized via BR sequence approaches from spontaneous fluctuations of heart period (HP), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). A model-based transfer entropy method was applied to quantify the strength of the coupling from SAP to HP and from DAP to MSNA. The confounding influences of respiration were accounted for. Twelve young healthy subjects (20-36 years, nine females) were sequentially tilted at 0°, 20°, 30° and 40°. We found that (i) the strength of the causal relation along the cBR increases with tilt table inclination, while that along the sBR is unrelated to it; (ii) the strength of the causal coupling is unrelated to the gain of the relation; (iii) transfer entropy indexes are significantly and positively associated with simplified causality indexes derived from BR sequence analysis. The study proves that causality indexes are complementary to traditional characterization of the BR and suggests that simple markers derived from BR sequence analysis might be fruitfully exploited to estimate causality along the BR. This article is part of the themed issue `Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'.

  8. AGN-2979, an inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase activation, does not affect serotonin synthesis in Flinders Sensitive Line rats, a rat model of depression, but produces a significant effect in Flinders Resistant Line rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemaru, Kazuya; Nishi, Kyoko; Diksic, Mirko

    2009-12-01

    The neurotransmitter, serotonin, is involved in several brain functions, including both normal, physiological functions, and pathophysiological functions. Alterations in any of the normal parameters of serotonergic neurotransmission can produce several different psychiatric disorders, including major depression. In many instances, brain neurochemical variables are not able to be studied properly in humans, thus making the use of good animal models extremely valuable. One of these animal models is the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) of rats, which has face, predictive and constructive validities in relation to human depression. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activation inhibitor, AGN-2979, on the FSL rats (rats with depression-like behaviour), and compare it to the effect on the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) of rats used as the control rats. The effect was evaluated by measuring changes in regional serotonin synthesis in the vehicle treated rats (FSL-VEH and FRL-VEH) relative to those measured in the AGN-2979 treated rats (FSL-AGN and FRL-AGN). Regional serotonin synthesis was measured autoradiographically in more than 30 brain regions. The measurements were performed using alpha-[(14)C]methyl-l-tryptophan as the tracer. The results indicate that AGN-2979 did not produce a significant reduction of TPH activity in the AGN-2979 group relative to the vehicle group (a reduction would have been observed if there had been an activation of TPH by the experimental setup) in the FSL rats. On the other hand, there was a highly significant reduction of synthesis in the FRL rats treated by AGN-2979, relative to the vehicle group. Together, the results demonstrate that in the FSL rats, AGN-2979 does not affect serotonin synthesis. This suggests that there was no activation of TPH in the FSL rats during the experimental procedure, but such activation did occur in the FRL rats. Because of this finding, it could be

  9. The role of the cholinergic system of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis on the cardiovascular responses and the baroreflex modulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasimi, Ali; Hatam, Masoumeh

    2011-04-22

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is a limbic structure involved in cardiovascular regulation and modulation of responses to stress. The BST contains high levels of muscarinic receptors. This study was performed to find the effects of cholinergic system of the BST on the cardiovascular regulation and the baroreflex modulation in rats. Drugs (50-100nl) were microinjected into the BST of 53 urethane anesthetized male rats. The mean arterial pressure and heart rate changes were measured. The baroreflex gain was evaluated by finding the slope of the reflex bradycardia in response to increases in mean arterial pressure due to phenylephrine injection (i.v.). We found that microinjection of acetylcholine (3 and 6nmol/50nl) into the BST increased mean arterial pressure and had no effect on heart rate. Local microinjection of homatropine abolished the effect of Ach on the cardiovascular responses indicating involvement of muscarinic receptors. Local injection of homatropine did not affect the reflexive bradycardia. Local injection of acetylcholine decreased the slope of the reflexive bradycardia indicating that Ach system of the BST inhibits the baroreflex. Acute ablation of the BST by cobalt chloride also significantly decreased the slope, indicating the excitatory action of the BST on the baroreflex parasympathetic component. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that microinjection of acetylcholine into the BST evokes a pressor response by activating the local muscarinic receptors. Release of Ach into the BST, probably during stress, inhibits the baroreflex, but with no stress, the BST facilitates the baroreflex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve in conscious rats overcomes the attenuation of the baroreflex in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Tomás O C Teixeira; Lataro, Renata M; Castania, Jaci A; Durand, Marina T; Silva, Carlos A A; Patel, Kaushik P; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C

    2016-04-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is characterized by autonomic dysfunction combined with baroreflex attenuation. The hypotensive and bradycardic responses produced by electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) were examined in conscious CHF and control male Wistar rats (12-13 wk old). Furthermore, the role of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system in mediating the cardiovascular responses to baroreflex activation was evaluated by selective β1-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor antagonists. CHF was induced by myocardial infarction. After 6 wk, the subjects were implanted with electrodes for ADN stimulation. Twenty-four hours later, electrical stimulation of the ADN was applied for 20 s using five different frequencies (5, 15, 30, 60, and 90 Hz), while the arterial pressure was recorded by a catheter implanted into the femoral artery. Electrical stimulation of the ADN elicited progressive and similar hypotensive and bradycardic responses in control (n = 12) and CHF (n = 11) rats, while the hypotensive response was not affected by methylatropine. Nevertheless, the reflex bradycardia was attenuated by methylatropine in control, but not in CHF rats. Atenolol did not affect the hypotensive or bradycardic response in either group. The ADN function was examined under anesthesia through electroneurographic recordings. The arterial pressure-ADN activity relationship was attenuated in CHF rats. In conclusion, despite the attenuation of baroreceptor function in CHF rats, the electrical stimulation of the ADN elicited a stimulus-dependent hypotension and bradycardia of similar magnitude as observed in control rats. Therefore, electrical activation of the aortic baroreflex overcomes both the attenuation of parasympathetic function and the sympathetic overdrive.

  11. Development and testing of culturally sensitive patient information material for Turkish, Polish, Russian and Italian migrants with depression or chronic low back pain (KULTINFO): study protocol for a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzel, Lars P; Ries, Zivile; Zill, Jördis M; Kriston, Levente; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Bermejo, Isaac

    2014-07-04

    Many of the approximately 15 million people with a migration background living in Germany (19% of the population) are inadequately reached by existing healthcare provision. In the literature, the necessity for cultural adaptation of information material for patients with a migration background is often cited as a measure for improving healthcare.In this study, culturally sensitive information material will be developed and evaluated for patients with a migration background and depression or chronic low back pain. In this respect, it will be examined whether culturally sensitive information material is judged as more useful by the patients than standard translated patient information without cultural adaptation. The implementation and evaluation of culturally sensitive patient information material will occur in the framework of a double-blind randomized controlled parallel-group study in four study centres in Germany. Primary care patients with a Turkish, Polish, Russian or Italian migration background with a diagnosis of depressive disorder or chronic low back pain will be included and randomly allocated to the intervention group or the control group. In the intervention group, culturally sensitive patient information will be handed to the patient at the end of the physician consultation, while in the control group, standard translated patient information material will be provided. The patients will be surveyed by means of questionnaires following the consultation as well as after 8 weeks and 6 months. In addition to the primary outcome (subjective usefulness), several patient- and physician-rated secondary outcomes will be considered. The study will provide an empirical answer to the question of whether persons with a migration background perceive culturally sensitive patient information material as more useful than translated information material without cultural adaptation. Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien (DRKS-ID) DRKS00004241 and Universal Trial Number

  12. Impairment of the baroreflex control of human respiratory resistance with age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tafil-Klawe M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism responsible for the central baroreflex resetting with age are an area of limited knowledge. We previously demonstrated that in subjects aged above 50 the airway resistance did not change in response to baroreceptor activation, whereas in younger volunteers the airway resistance significantly decreased. Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of carotid baroreceptor inactivation on the reflex change of respiratory resistance, in the course of aging. Materials and methods 80 healthy men, divided in four groups: aged 20-30 (Group I, 31-40 (Group II, 41-50 (Group III, and 51-60 (Group IV were included in the study. The selective inactivation of carotid baroreceptors was induced by generating a positive pressure of 40 mmHg for 5 s in two capsules placed bilaterally on the neck over the bifurcation of the carotid arteries. The oscillatory method (Siregnost FD5, Siemens was used to measure continuously respiratory resistance. Results Inactivation of carotid baroreceptors produced a short increase in respiratory resistance by 0.38 ± 0.01SE mbar/l/s, i.e., 21.7% above the resting level in Group I and by 0.25 ± 0.01 mbar/l/s in Group II. In the two older groups (III and IV respiratory resistance did not change in response to baroreceptors inactivation. Conclusions In humans aged above 40, carotid baroreceptors do not contribute to bronchodilator tone, which causes imbalance between the activities of upper airway and chest wall inspiratory muscles leading to a collapsing effect on the upper airway.

  13. [Recited depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucci, M; Cossio, M

    1984-01-01

    Several subjects who tell their depression and play a part of it in front of the doctor without being really depressed are reported. Some of them try to hide the symptoms (irritability or erethism, ceremonials of obsessive neurosis, shunning of phobia) which, in their opinion, might be detrimental to their reputation. Others neglect to describe some of the symptoms of their polymorphous clinical picture only underlining the depressive signs. Some others play a part of depression because they have believed to recognize themselves in persons presented by mass media, because it seems to them a duty to show an adequate depression in case of mournful event, or because they "convert" their problem into a depression. Some others use depression as a blackmail, or to obtain an advantage from doctor's conviction about their illness. The reason for the high frequency of similar cases in the present time are examined: the scientific divulgation and the acceptance of depression by the modern society are among the most important ones. The peculiar semantic vicissitudes of the word depression are also reviewed. A widening of the boundaries of depression has contributed to an increase in the number of the cases. Finally, in addition to patients who are depressed without being aware of it, the authors focus the inverse possibility: patients who believed or try to make their doctor believe (playing the part of depression in front of them) that they are depressed.

  14. Stuttering Thoughts: Negative Self-Referent Thinking Is Less Sensitive to Aversive Outcomes in People with Higher Levels of Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yudai; Takano, Keisuke; Boddez, Yannick; Raes, Filip; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Learning theories of depression have proposed that depressive cognitions, such as negative thoughts with reference to oneself, can develop through a reinforcement learning mechanism. This negative self-reference is considered to be positively reinforced by rewarding experiences such as genuine support from others after negative self-disclosure, and negatively reinforced by avoidance of potential aversive situations. The learning account additionally predicts that negative self-reference would be maintained by an inability to adjust one’s behavior when negative self-reference no longer leads to such reward. To test this prediction, we designed an adapted version of the reversal-learning task. In this task, participants were reinforced to choose and engage in either negative or positive self-reference by probabilistic economic reward and punishment. Although participants were initially trained to choose negative self-reference, the stimulus-reward contingencies were reversed to prompt a shift toward positive self-reference (Study 1) and a further shift toward negative self-reference (Study 2). Model-based computational analyses showed that depressive symptoms were associated with a low learning rate of negative self-reference, indicating a high level of reward expectancy for negative self-reference even after the contingency reversal. Furthermore, the difficulty in updating outcome predictions of negative self-reference was significantly associated with the extent to which one possesses negative self-images. These results suggest that difficulty in adjusting action-outcome estimates for negative self-reference increases the chance to be faced with negative aspects of self, which may result in depressive symptoms. PMID:28824511

  15. Stuttering Thoughts: Negative Self-Referent Thinking Is Less Sensitive to Aversive Outcomes in People with Higher Levels of Depressive Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudai Iijima

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning theories of depression have proposed that depressive cognitions, such as negative thoughts with reference to oneself, can develop through a reinforcement learning mechanism. This negative self-reference is considered to be positively reinforced by rewarding experiences such as genuine support from others after negative self-disclosure, and negatively reinforced by avoidance of potential aversive situations. The learning account additionally predicts that negative self-reference would be maintained by an inability to adjust one’s behavior when negative self-reference no longer leads to such reward. To test this prediction, we designed an adapted version of the reversal-learning task. In this task, participants were reinforced to choose and engage in either negative or positive self-reference by probabilistic economic reward and punishment. Although participants were initially trained to choose negative self-reference, the stimulus-reward contingencies were reversed to prompt a shift toward positive self-reference (Study 1 and a further shift toward negative self-reference (Study 2. Model-based computational analyses showed that depressive symptoms were associated with a low learning rate of negative self-reference, indicating a high level of reward expectancy for negative self-reference even after the contingency reversal. Furthermore, the difficulty in updating outcome predictions of negative self-reference was significantly associated with the extent to which one possesses negative self-images. These results suggest that difficulty in adjusting action-outcome estimates for negative self-reference increases the chance to be faced with negative aspects of self, which may result in depressive symptoms.

  16. Stuttering Thoughts: Negative Self-Referent Thinking Is Less Sensitive to Aversive Outcomes in People with Higher Levels of Depressive Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yudai; Takano, Keisuke; Boddez, Yannick; Raes, Filip; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Learning theories of depression have proposed that depressive cognitions, such as negative thoughts with reference to oneself, can develop through a reinforcement learning mechanism. This negative self-reference is considered to be positively reinforced by rewarding experiences such as genuine support from others after negative self-disclosure, and negatively reinforced by avoidance of potential aversive situations. The learning account additionally predicts that negative self-reference would be maintained by an inability to adjust one's behavior when negative self-reference no longer leads to such reward. To test this prediction, we designed an adapted version of the reversal-learning task. In this task, participants were reinforced to choose and engage in either negative or positive self-reference by probabilistic economic reward and punishment. Although participants were initially trained to choose negative self-reference, the stimulus-reward contingencies were reversed to prompt a shift toward positive self-reference (Study 1) and a further shift toward negative self-reference (Study 2). Model-based computational analyses showed that depressive symptoms were associated with a low learning rate of negative self-reference, indicating a high level of reward expectancy for negative self-reference even after the contingency reversal. Furthermore, the difficulty in updating outcome predictions of negative self-reference was significantly associated with the extent to which one possesses negative self-images. These results suggest that difficulty in adjusting action-outcome estimates for negative self-reference increases the chance to be faced with negative aspects of self, which may result in depressive symptoms.

  17. Atypical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... satisfaction and control in your life Help ease depression symptoms such as hopelessness and anger As part of your treatment, it's important to also address other conditions that often accompany atypical depression, in particular anxiety and drug or alcohol use, ...

  18. Teen Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression is a real, treatable brain illness, or health problem. Depression can be caused by big transitions in life, stress, or changes in your body’s chemicals that affect your thoughts and moods. Even if you feel ...

  19. Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not need treatment. The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. You may ... treatment right away, often in the hospital. Postpartum depression can begin anytime within the first year after ...

  20. Depression Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3286 After hours (404) 639-2888 Contact Media Depression Treatment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... How Do I Know if I Am Experiencing Depression? The following questions may help you determine if ...

  1. Depression Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Diseases + Condition Centers Mental Health Medical Library Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  2. Dull to Social Acceptance Rather than Sensitivity to Social Ostracism in Interpersonal Interaction for Depression: Behavioral and Electrophysiological Evidence from Cyberball Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Li, Xiaosi; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Dong, Yi; Zhang, Lei; Xie, Wen; Mu, Jingjing; Li, Hongchen; Zhu, Chunyan; Yu, Fengqiong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Impairments in interpersonal relationships in depression present as irritability, pessimism, and withdrawal, and play an important role in the onset and maintenance of the disorder. However, we know little about the neurological causes of this impaired interpersonal function. This study used the event-related brain potential (ERP) version of the Cyberball paradigm to investigate the emotions and neural activities in depressive patients during social inclusion and exclusion simultaneously to explore neuropsychological mechanisms. Methods: Electrophysiological data were recorded when 27 depressed patients and 23 healthy controls (HCs) performed a virtual ball tossing game (Cyberball) during which the participants believed they were playing with two other co-players over the internet. The Cyberball paradigm included two other conditions; inclusion during which participants received the ball with the same probability as the other players to experience a feeling of acceptance, and exclusion during which the participants experienced a feeling of ostracism when the other two players threw the ball with each other. The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) was used as a baseline and after each block during the Cyberball to assess positive and negative effects. In addition, a brief Need-Threat Scale (NTS) was used to assess the fulfillment of basic needs of subjects after each block and 10 min after ostracism. Moreover, the relationship between the ERP data of depression and clinical symptoms was analyzed. Results: Exclusion compared to inclusion Cyberball caused a decrease in positive affect and an increase in negative affect. The group differences were only found in the positive affect. Moreover, patients reported a lower level of basic needs than did HCs after social inclusion, but a similar level of basic needs after social exclusion. At the electrophysiological level, patients showed decreased P3 amplitudes compared to HCs in social inclusion, and P

  3. Spreading depression induces expression of calcium-independent protein kinase C subspecies in ischaemia-sensitive cortical layers: regulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, S; Keinänen, R; Roivainen, R; Hirvonen, T; Närhi, M; Chan, P H; Koistinaho, J

    1999-01-01

    Spreading depression is a wave of sustained depolarization challenging the energy metabolism of the cells without causing irreversible damage. In the ischaemic brain, sreading depression-like depolarization contributes to the evolution of ischaemia to infarction. The depolarization is propagated by activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but changes in signal transduction downstream of the receptors are not known. Because protein phosphorylation is a general mechanism whereby most cellular processes are regulated, and inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors or protein kinase C is neuroprotective, the expression of protein kinase C subspecies in spreading depression was examined. Cortical treatment with KCl induced an upregulation of protein kinase Cdelta and zeta messenger RNA at 4 and 8 h, whereas protein kinase Calpha, beta, gamma and epsilon did not show significant changes. The gene induction was the strongest in layers 2 and 3, and was followed by an increased number of protein kinase Cdelta-immunoreactive neurons. Protein kinase Cdelta and zeta inductions were inhibited by pretreatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, dizocilpine maleate, which also blocked spreading depression propagation, and with dexamethasone, which acted without blocking the propagation. Quinacrine, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor, reduced only protein kinase C5 induction. In addition, N(G)(-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, did not influence protein kinase Cdelta or zeta induction, whereas 6-nitro-7-sulphamoylbenzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione, an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate/kainate receptor antagonist, and the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and diclophenac tended to increase gene expression. The data show that cortical spreading depression induces Ca2(+)-independent protein kinase C subspecies delta and zeta, but not Ca(2+)-dependent subspecies, through activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and

  4. Nitrosative Stress-Induced Disruption of Baroreflex Neural Circuits in a Rat Model of Hepatic Encephalopathy: A DTI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ching-Yi; Su, Chia-Hao; Chan, Julie Y. H.; Chan, Samuel H. H.

    2017-01-01

    The onset of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in liver failure is associated with high mortality; the underlying mechanism is undecided. Here we report that in an acute liver failure model employing intraperitoneal administration of thioacetamide in Sprague-Dawley rats, diffusion weighted imaging revealed a progressive reduction in apparent diffusion coefficient in the brain stem. Diffusion tensor imaging further showed that the connectivity between nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), the terminal site of baroreceptor afferents in brain stem and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the origin of sympathetic innervation of blood vessels, was progressively disrupted until its disappearance, coincidental with the irreversible cessation of baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone signifying clinically the occurrence of brain death. In addition, superoxide, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite and ammonia levels in the NTS or RVLM were elevated, alongside swelling of astroctytes. A scavenger of peroxynitrite, but not an antioxidant, delivered intracisternally reversed all these events. We conclude that nitrosative stress because of augmented peroxynitrite related to accumulation of ammonia and swelling of astrocytes in the NTS or RVLM, leading to cytotoxic edema in the brain stem and severance of the NTS-RVLM connectivity, underpins the defunct baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone that accounts for the high mortality associated with HE. PMID:28079146

  5. Activation of presynaptic and postsynaptic ryanodine-sensitive calcium stores is required for the induction of long-term depression at GABAergic synapses in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillard, O; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaïarsa, J L

    2000-09-01

    The role of internal calcium stores in the induction of long-term depression at GABAergic synapses was investigated in the neonatal rat hippocampus. Whole-cell recordings of CA3 pyramidal neurons were performed on hippocampal slices from neonatal (2-4 d old) rats. In control conditions, tetanic stimulation (TS) evoked an NMDA-dependent long-term depression of GABA(A) receptor-mediated postsynaptic responses (LTD(GABA-A)). LTD(GABA-A) was prevented when the cells were loaded with ruthenium red, a blocker of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) stores, whereas loading the cells with heparin, a blocker of IP3-induced Ca2+ release stores, had no effect. The effects of ryanodine, another compound that interferes with CICR stores, were also investigated. Intracellular injection of ryanodine prevented the induction of LTD(GABA-A) only when the TS was preceded by depolarizing pulses that increase intracellular Ca2+ concentration. When applied in the bath, ryanodine prevented the induction of LTD(GABA-A). Altogether, these results suggest that ryanodine acts as a Ca2+-dependent blocker of CICR stores and that the induction of LTD(GABA-A) required the activation of both presynaptic and postsynaptic CICR stores.

  6. Diminished baroreflex control of heart rate responses in otoconia-deficient C57BL/6JEi head tilt mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Baojian; Skala, Karl; Jones, Timothy A; Hay, Meredith

    2004-08-01

    The maintenance of stable blood pressure during postural changes is known to involve integration of vestibular and cardiovascular central regulatory mechanisms. Sensory activity in the vestibular system plays an important role in cardiovascular regulation. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of vestibular gravity receptors in normal baroreflex function. Baroreflex heart rate (HR) responses to changes in blood pressure (BP) in otoconia-deficient head tilt (het) mice (n = 8) were compared with their wild-type littermates (n = 12). The study was carried out in conscious male mice chronically implanted with arterial and venous catheters for recording BP and HR and for the infusion of vasoactive drugs. Resting HR was higher in the het mice (661 +/- 13 beats/min) than in the wild-type mice (579 +/- 20 beats/min). BP was comparable in the het (113 +/- 4 mmHg) and wild-type mice (104 +/- 4 mmHg). The slopes of reflex decreases in HR in response to phenylephrine (PE) were blunted in the het mice (-5.5 +/- 1.5 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)) compared with the wild-type mice (-8.5 +/- 0.9 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)). Likewise, reflex tachycardic responses to decreases in BP with sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were significantly blunted in the het mice (-0.8 +/- 0.3 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)) versus the wild-type mice (-2.2 +/- 0.6 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1)). Frequency-domain analysis of the HR variability suggests that under resting conditions, parasympathetic contribution was lower in the het versus wild-type mice. Mapping of the expression of immediate-early gene product, c-Fos, in forebrain and brain stem nuclei in response to a BP challenge showed no differences between the wild-type and het mice. These results suggest that tonic activity of gravity receptors modulates and is required for normal function of the cardiac baroreflexes.

  7. Closed-loop spontaneous baroreflex transfer function is inappropriate for system identification of neural arc but partly accurate for peripheral arc: predictability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Atsunori; Kawada, Toru; Shimizu, Shuji; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2011-04-01

    Although the dynamic characteristics of the baroreflex system have been described by baroreflex transfer functions obtained from open-loop analysis, the predictability of time-series output dynamics from input signals, which should confirm the accuracy of system identification, remains to be elucidated. Moreover, despite theoretical concerns over closed-loop system identification, the accuracy and the predictability of the closed-loop spontaneous baroreflex transfer function have not been evaluated compared with the open-loop transfer function. Using urethane and α-chloralose anaesthetized, vagotomized and aortic-denervated rabbits (n = 10), we identified open-loop baroreflex transfer functions by recording renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) while varying the vascularly isolated intracarotid sinus pressure (CSP) according to a binary random (white-noise) sequence (operating pressure ± 20 mmHg), and using a simplified equation to calculate closed-loop-spontaneous baroreflex transfer function while matching CSP with systemic arterial pressure (AP). Our results showed that the open-loop baroreflex transfer functions for the neural and peripheral arcs predicted the time-series SNA and AP outputs from measured CSP and SNA inputs, with r2 of 0.8 ± 0.1 and 0.8 ± 0.1, respectively. In contrast, the closed-loop-spontaneous baroreflex transfer function for the neural arc was markedly different from the open-loop transfer function (enhanced gain increase and a phase lead), and did not predict the time-series SNA dynamics (r2; 0.1 ± 0.1). However, the closed-loop-spontaneous baroreflex transfer function of the peripheral arc partially matched the open-loop transfer function in gain and phase functions, and had limited but reasonable predictability of the time-series AP dynamics (r2, 0.7 ± 0.1). A numerical simulation suggested that a noise predominantly in the neural arc under resting conditions might be a possible mechanism responsible for our findings. Furthermore

  8. Reproduction of continuous flow left ventricular assist device experimental data by means of a hybrid cardiovascular model with baroreflex control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresiello, Libera; Zieliński, Krzysztof; Jacobs, Steven; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Pałko, Krzysztof Jakub; Bernini, Fabio; Martin, Michael; Claus, Piet; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; Górczyńska, Krystyna; Darowski, Marek; Meyns, Bart; Kozarski, Maciej

    2014-06-01

    Long-term mechanical circulatory assistance opened new problems in ventricular assist device-patient interaction, especially in relation to autonomic controls. Modeling studies, based on adequate models, could be a feasible approach of investigation. The aim of this work is the exploitation of a hybrid (hydronumerical) cardiovascular simulator to reproduce and analyze in vivo experimental data acquired during a continuous flow left ventricular assistance. The hybrid cardiovascular simulator embeds three submodels: a computational cardiovascular submodel, a computational baroreflex submodel, and a hydronumerical interface submodel. The last one comprises two impedance transformers playing the role of physical interfaces able to provide a hydraulic connection with specific cardiovascular sites (in this article, the left atrium and the ascending/descending aorta). The impedance transformers are used to connect a continuous flow pump for partial left ventricular support (Synergy Micropump, CircuLite, Inc., Saddlebrooke, NJ, USA) to the hybrid cardiovascular simulator. Data collected from five animals in physiological, pathological, and assisted conditions were reproduced using the hybrid cardiovascular simulator. All parameters useful to characterize and tune the hybrid cardiovascular simulator to a specific hemodynamic condition were extracted from experimental data. Results show that the simulator is able to reproduce animal-specific hemodynamic status both in physiological and pathological conditions, to reproduce cardiovascular left ventricular assist device (LVAD) interaction and the progressive unloading of the left ventricle for different pump speeds, and to investigate the effects of the LVAD on baroreflex activity. Results in chronic heart failure conditions show that an increment of LVAD speed from 20 000 to 22 000 rpm provokes a decrement of left ventricular flow of 35% (from 2 to 1.3 L/min). Thanks to its flexibility and modular structure, the

  9. Central exogenous nitric oxide decreases cardiac sympathetic drive and improves baroreflex control of heart rate in ovine heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchandra, Rohit; Hood, Sally G; May, Clive N

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with increased cardiac and renal sympathetic drive, which are both independent predictors of poor prognosis. A candidate mechanism for the centrally mediated sympathoexcitation in HF is reduced synthesis of the inhibitory neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO), resulting from downregulation of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). Therefore, we investigated the effects of increasing the levels of NO in the brain, or selectively in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and baroreflex control of CSNA and heart rate in ovine pacing-induced HF. The resting level of CSNA was significantly higher in the HF than in the normal group, but the resting level of RSNA was unchanged. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 500 μg · ml(-1)· h(-1)) in conscious normal sheep and sheep in HF inhibited CSNA and restored baroreflex control of heart rate, but there was no change in RSNA. Microinjection of SNP into the PVN did not cause a similar cardiac sympathoinhibition in either group, although the number of nNOS-positive cells was decreased in the PVN of sheep in HF. Reduction of endogenous NO with intracerebroventricular infusion of N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester decreased CSNA in normal but not in HF sheep and caused no change in RSNA in either group. These findings indicate that endogenous NO in the brain provides tonic excitatory drive to increase resting CSNA in the normal state, but not in HF. In contrast, exogenously administered NO inhibited CSNA in both the normal and HF groups via an action on sites other than the PVN. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Motor learning in common marmosets: vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation and its sensitivity to inhibitors of Purkinje cell long-term depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Mari; Nagao, Soich

    2014-06-01

    Adaptation of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (HVOR) provides an experimental model for cerebellum-dependent motor learning. We developed an eye movement measuring system and a paradigm for induction of HVOR adaptation for the common marmoset. The HVOR gain in dark measured by 10° (peak-to-peak amplitude) and 0.11-0.5Hz turntable oscillation was around unity. The gain-up and gain-down HVOR adaptation was induced by 1h of sustained out-of-phase and in-phase 10°-0.33Hz combined turntable-screen oscillation in the light, respectively. To examine the role of long-term depression (LTD) of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, we intraperitonially applied T-588 or nimesulide, which block the induction of LTD in vitro or in vivo preparations, 1h before the test of HVOR adaptation. T-588 (3 and 5mg/kg body weight) did not affect nonadapted HVOR gains, and impaired both gain-up and gain-down HVOR adaptation. Nimesulide (3 and 6mg/kg) did not affect nonadapted HVOR gains, and impaired gain-up HVOR adaptation dose-dependently; however, it very little affected gain-down HVOR adaptation. These findings are consistent with the results of our study of nimesulide on the adaptation of horizontal optokinetic response in mice (Le et al., 2010), and support the view that LTD underlies HVOR adaptation.

  11. Appropriate control time constant in relation to characteristics of the baroreflex vascular system in 1/R control of the total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Sora; Saito, Itsuro; Isoyama, Takashi; Hara, Shintaro; Yurimoto, Terumi; Li, Xinyang; Murakami, Haruka; Ono, Toshiya; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Abe, Yusuke

    2017-05-17

    1/R control is a physiological control method of the total artificial heart (TAH) with which long-term survival was obtained with animal experiments. However, 1/R control occasionally diverged in the undulation pump TAH (UPTAH) animal experiment. To improve the control stability of the 1/R control, appropriate control time constant in relation to characteristics of the baroreflex vascular system was investigated with frequency analysis and numerical simulation. In the frequency analysis, data of five goats in which the UPTAH was implanted were analyzed with first Fourier transform technique to examine the vasomotion frequency. The numerical simulation was carried out repeatedly changing baroreflex parameters and control time constant using the elements-expanded Windkessel model. Results of the frequency analysis showed that the 1/R control tended to diverge when very low frequency band that was an indication of the vasomotion frequency was relative high. In numerical simulation, divergence of the 1/R control could be reproduced and the boundary curves between the divergence and convergence of the 1/R control varied depending on the control time constant. These results suggested that the 1/R control tended to be unstable when the TAH recipient had high reflex speed in the baroreflex vascular system. Therefore, the control time constant should be adjusted appropriately with the individual vasomotion frequency.

  12. Adolescence depressions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matot, J P

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the depressive problematics emerging during adolescence in the frame of the transformations that characterize this period of life, with a focus on the interference of socio-cultural dimensions...

  13. Postpartum Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne

    Background: In three academic articles, this PhD thesis investigates maternal postpartum depression (PPD) as a risk factor for the infant-mother attachment and infant development. Previous studies have been contradictory with respect to the question of whether PPD can have long term effects...... on offspring. This may be due to not differing between when PPD is only occurring in the postpartum period and when effects are also due to ongoing or recurrent depression. However, it may also be due to viewing maternal depression as a unitary construct, and not considering underlying maternal psychological...... difficulties which may moderate potential adverse effects. The present thesis investigates two potential maternal moderators of risk:. Comorbid personality disorder and adult attachment insecurity. Moreover, the question of early environmental effects of PPD versus effects of later or ongoing depression...

  14. State depression: Mood or syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novović Zdenka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A State Depression Scale was developed in order to register variations of depressive mood. The Scale has satisfactory reliability, as shown by its internal homogeneity and temporal stability. Concurrent validity of the Scale indicated that the Scale correlates with a POMS-D scale (r = 0.41; p < 0.00, and with the Depressive Personality Scale (r = 0.36; p < 0.00. Divergent validity of the Scale was tested by Scale's correlation with the two measures of state anxiety (STAI-S and POMS-A and was shown to be unsatisfactory since it was as high as the Scale's correlation with scales of depressive affect. Principal Component Analysis extracted four factors: two broader factors, which included depressive-affective contents combined with anxious and depressive-cognitive symptoms, respectively; and another two factors which related to motivational and behavioral characteristics. Sensitivity of the Scale was tested in an experimental setting involving induction of depressive and euphoric mood. The Scale showed high ability to register changes following induction of depressive mood. .

  15. β-Adrenoceptor activation depresses brain inflammation and is neuroprotective in lipopolysaccharide-induced sensitization to oxygen-glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cilio Corrado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation acting in synergy with brain ischemia aggravates perinatal ischemic brain damage. The sensitizing effect of pro-inflammatory exposure prior to hypoxia is dependent on signaling by TNF-α through TNF receptor (TNFR 1. Adrenoceptor (AR activation is known to modulate the immune response and synaptic transmission. The possible protective effect of α˜ and β˜AR activation against neuronal damage caused by tissue ischemia and inflammation, acting in concert, was evaluated in murine hippocampal organotypic slices treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and subsequently subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. Method Hippocampal slices from mice were obtained at P6, and were grown in vitro for 9 days on nitrocellulose membranes. Slices were treated with β1(dobutamine-, β2(terbutaline-, α1(phenylephrine- and α2(clonidine-AR agonists (5 and 50 μM, respectively during LPS (1 μg/mL, 24 h -exposure followed by exposure to OGD (15 min in a hypoxic chamber. Cell death in the slice CA1 region was assessed by propidium iodide staining of dead cells. Results Exposure to LPS + OGD caused extensive cell death from 4 up to 48 h after reoxygenation. Co-incubation with β1-agonist (50 μM during LPS exposure before OGD conferred complete protection from cell death (P -/- and TNFR2-/- slices exposed to LPS followed by OGD. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that activation of both β1- and β2-receptors is neuroprotective and may offer mechanistic insights valuable for development of neuro-protective strategies in neonates.

  16. Baroreflexes of the rat. V. Tetanus-induced potentiation of ADN A-fiber responses at the NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaorui; Dworkin, Barry R

    2007-12-01

    In a long-term neuromuscular blocked (NMB) rat preparation, tetanic stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) enhanced the A-fiber evoked responses (ERs) in the cardiovascular region, the nucleus of the solitary tract (dmNTS). The potentiation persisted for at least several hours and may be a mechanism for adaptive adjustment of the gain of the baroreflex, with functional implications for blood pressure regulation. Using a capacitance electrode, we selectively stimulated A-fibers and acquired a stable 10-h "A-fiber only" ER baseline at the dmNTS. Following baseline, an A+C-fiber activating tetanus was applied to the ADN. The tetanus consisted of 1,000 "high current" pulses (10 trains; 300 mus, 100 Hz, 1 s), with intertrain interval of 9 s. A 10-h A-fiber only posttetanic test phase repeated the stimulus pattern of the baseline. Fourteen tetanus experiments were done in 12 rats. Compared with the baseline before tetanus, the A-fiber ER magnitudes of posttetanus hours were larger [F(13, 247) = 3.407, P ADN A+C fiber-activating tetanus produced increases in the magnitude of the A-fiber ERs in the dmNTS that persisted for several hours. In an additional rat, application of an NMDA receptor antagonist, prior to the tetanus, blocked the potentiation effect. The stimulus protocols, magnitude and duration of the effect, and pharmacology resemble associative long-term potentiation (LTP).

  17. Teaching baroreflex physiology to medical students: a comparison of quiz-based and conventional teaching strategies in a laboratory exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Damgaard, Morten

    2012-06-01

    Quiz-based and collaborative teaching strategies have previously been found to be efficient for the improving meaningful learning of physiology during lectures. These approaches have, however, not been investigated during laboratory exercises. In the present study, we compared the impact of solving quizzes individually and in groups with conventional teaching on the immediate learning during a laboratory exercise. We implemented two quizzes in a mandatory 4-h laboratory exercise on baroreflex physiology. A total of 155 second-year medical students were randomized to solve quizzes individually (intervention group I, n = 57), in groups of three to four students (intervention group II, n = 56), or not to perform any quizzes (control; intervention group III, n = 42). After the laboratory exercise, all students completed an individual test, which encompassed two recall questions, two intermediate questions, and two integrated questions. The integrated questions were of moderate and advanced difficulty, respectively. Finally, students completed an evaluation form. Intervention group I reached the highest total test scores and proved best at answering the integrated question of advanced difficulty. Moreover, there was an overall difference between groups for student evaluations of the quality of the teaching, which was highest for intervention group II. In conclusion, solving quizzes individually during a laboratory exercise may enhance learning, whereas solving quizzes in groups is associated with higher student satisfaction.

  18. Can Lupus Cause Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lupus Living well with lupus Can lupus cause depression? Life with lupus can be challenging. With symptoms ... treatable illness called clinical depression. Symptoms of Clinical Depression People are considered clinically depressed when they have ...

  19. Older Adults and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find more information? Reprints Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... depression need treatment to feel better. Types of Depression There are several types of depression. The most ...

  20. Depression and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptoms Depression Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Depression Depression Fatigue Walking (Gait) Difficulties Numbness or Tingling ... away from addictive substances such as alcohol. Clinical depression It’s important to distinguish between mild, everyday “blues” — ...

  1. Functional MRI of emotional memory in adolescent depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary J. Holt

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that during adolescence neurophysiological activity associated with emotional memory differs in those with depression compared to controls and may be age sensitive.

  2. [Olfaction in depressive disorders: Issues and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, G; Schaal, B

    2017-04-01

    Research on sensorial interactions with psychiatric diseases and particularly with the depressive syndrome has mainly focused on visual or auditory processes and much less on olfaction. The depressive illness is one of the most frequent psychiatric diagnoses in the community, with approximately one in five women and one in eight men experiencing a major depressive episode during their lifetime. Although genetic, epigenetic, neuroanatomical, neurochemical, neuroendocrinological and neuroimmunological changes can be detected during depression, the etiology of depression remains partly unclear. The current explanatory models are based on two main factors, i.e. pharmacological dysfunctions and stress effects. In this way and because of strong connections between olfactory pathways and cerebral areas implied in mood regulation and emotions (i.e. the limbic system and prefrontal areas), the interactions between olfaction and depression could constitute a relevant way of research at three different levels. First, olfactory dysfunction observed in depression could serve the diagnosis and contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms implied in thymic pathologies. Published papers show a decrease of olfactory sensitivity in major depression which does not occur in bipolar or saisonal depression. Second, it has been shown that olfactory deficits could induce depressive symptoms. In this context, an animal model (olfactory bulbectomized rat) reinforces the hypothesis of the important role of olfaction in depression based on neuroanatomical and neurochemical observations. Third, several publications have demonstrated that odors can positively impact the depressive mood. Thus, a remediation by odors in depression appears to be a promising way. From several decades, the olfaction/depression interactions have been covered by a broad literature. Thus, the present review will not propose an exhaustive examination but aims to point out the most recently published papers and

  3. Efeitos da exposição à fumaça lateral do cigarro sobre o barorreflexo em ratos adultos Efectos de la exposición al humo lateral del cigarrillo sobre el barorreflejo en ratones adultos Sidestream cigarette smoke exposure effects on baroreflex in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor E. Valenti

    2011-02-01

    N: Nuestros datos sugieren que tres semanas de exposición a la HLC no son suficientes para causar daño significativo a los parámetros cardiovasculares y sensibilidad barorreflexa en ratones Wistar normotensos.BACKGROUND: It has been evidenced in the literature that exposure to cigarette smoke causes hypertension in rats; however, it has not been demonstrated if the baroreflex function is impaired before the animal becomes hypertensive. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated short-term effects of sidestream cigarette smoke (SSCS exposure on baroreflex function in Wistar normotensive rats. METHODS: Rats were exposed to SSCS during three weeks, 180 minutes, five days per week, at a concentration of monoxide carbon between 100-300 ppm. Mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR were evaluated through cannulation of the femoral vein and artery. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between control and SSCS groups regarding basal mean arterial pressure and heart rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic components of the baroreflex function. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that three weeks of exposure to SSCS is not enough to significantly impair cardiovascular parameters and baroreflex sensitivity in normotensive Wistar rats.

  4. Pressure pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    to induce hyperalgesia.The aim of the present study was to evaluate hyperalgesia by pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) in patients with IHD, and compare PPS to questionnaires measuring depressive symptoms, reduced psychological wellbeing, and QOL as markers of stress. Design. A cross-sectional study of 361...

  5. Prevalence and psychopathological characteristics of depression in consecutive otorhinolaryngologic inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westhofen Martin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High prevalence of depression has been reported in otorhinolaryngologic patients (ORL. However, studies using a semi-structured interview to determine the prevalence of depression in ORL are lacking. Therefore the present study sought to determine the depression prevalence in ORL applying a semi-structured diagnostic interview and to further characterize the pathopsychological and demographic characteristics of depression in these patients. Methods One-hundred inpatients of the otorhinolaryngologic department of a German university hospital participated voluntarily (age M = 38.8 years, SD = 13.9; 38.0% female. Depression was assessed using a clinical interview in which the International Diagnostic Checklist for depression (IDCL was applied. Patients completed the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI which constitutes three composite scores and nine symptom scales and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Multivariate analyses of variance, correlations and effect sizes were conducted. Results A prevalence of depression of 21.0% was determined, 38.0% of the depressed patients were female. Depressed patients showed higher scores on the BSI-scales "interpersonal sensitivity", "depression", "anxiety", "phobic anxiety" and "psychoticism" with medium effect sizes. Conclusions High prevalence of depression was found which is in accordance with results of prior studies. Depressed patients showed higher psychological distress as compared to non-depressed patients. The results call for carrying on in engaging in depression research and routine depression screening in ORL.

  6. Investigating Environmental Links between Parent Depression and Child Depressive/Anxiety Symptoms Using an Assisted Conception Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gemma; Rice, Frances; Harold, Gordon T.; Collishaw, Stephan; Thapar, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Links between maternal and offspring depression symptoms could arise from inherited factors, direct environmental exposure, or shared adversity. A novel genetically sensitive design was used to test the extent of environmental links between maternal depression symptoms and child depression/anxiety symptoms, accounting for inherited…

  7. A Cross-Cultural Understanding of Depression Among Abused Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Janet Y H; Tiwari, Agnes; Fong, Daniel Y T; Bullock, Linda

    2016-10-01

    Little research has addressed depression in abused women across cultures. This review examines depression and intimate partner violence (IPV) by comparing and contrasting the IPV definitions, family dynamics, coping, and expressions of depression of women in China, Japan, India, and the United States. Findings reveal that depression is expressed differently across cultures. Somatization is commonly found in Asian countries, but it is not properly assessed by existing Westernized depression assessment tools. In addition, cultural factors were shown to shape abused women's ways of adaptive coping. Cultural awareness and sensitivity are fundamental for successful assessment and intervention for abused women with depression.

  8. The functional role of PI3K in maintenance of blood pressure and baroreflex suppression in (mRen2)27 and mRen2.Lewis rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Exazevia M; Aileru, Azeez A; Shaltout, Hossam A; Averill, David B; Diz, Debra I

    2011-10-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent signaling pathway in brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats, but not Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, contributes to elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP). The role of PI3K in the regulation of blood pressure or autonomic function in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) is yet to be established in other Ang II-dependent models of hypertension. Thus, we microinjected PI3K inhibitors, wortmannin or LY294002, into the NTS, and measured MAP, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) for heart rate (HR) control, and HR variability (HRV) in mRen2.Lewis congenic and (mRen2)27 transgenic rats. Bilateral NTS microinjections of wortmannin (100 nmol/L; 50 nL) reduced MAP in (mRen2)27 and mRen2.Lewis rats (33 ± 5 mm Hg, n = 7, and 32 ± 6 mm Hg, n = 9, respectively) for approximately 90 minutes. Spectral and sequence analysis showed improvements in spontaneous BRS and HRV (50%-100%) after treatment in both hypertensive strains. Injections of wortmannin into NTS of Hannover Sprague-Dawley or Lewis control rats failed to alter MAP, BRS, or HRV. In mRen2.Lewis, but not in control Lewis rats, LY294002 (50 μmole/L) reduced MAP and increased BRS and HRV similar to wortmannin. Thus, the pharmacologic blockade of the PI3K signaling pathway in NTS reveals an important contribution to resting MAP and BRS in rats with overexpression of the Ren2 gene.

  9. Helping your teen with depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teen depression - helping; Teen depression - talk therapy; Teen depression - medicine ... teen the most. The most effective treatments for depression are: Talk therapy Antidepressant medicines If your teen ...

  10. Gluten Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catassi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a syndrome characterized by intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food in subjects who are not affected by either celiac disease (CD) or wheat allergy (WA). The prevalence of NCGS is not clearly defined yet. Indirect evidence suggests that NCGS is slightly more common than CD, the latter affecting around 1% of the general population. NCGS has been mostly described in adults, particularly in females in the age group of 30-50 years; however, pediatric case series have also been reported. Since NCGS may be transient, gluten tolerance needs to be reassessed over time in patients with NCGS. NCGS is characterized by symptoms that usually occur soon after gluten ingestion, disappear with gluten withdrawal, and relapse following gluten challenge within hours/days. The 'classical' presentation of NCGS is a combination of irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms, including abdominal pain, bloating, bowel habit abnormalities (either diarrhea or constipation), and systemic manifestations such as 'foggy mind', headache, fatigue, joint and muscle pain, leg or arm numbness, dermatitis (eczema or skin rash), depression, and anemia. In recent years, several studies explored the relationship between the ingestion of gluten-containing food and the appearance of neurological and psychiatric disorders/symptoms like ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, schizophrenia, autism, depression, anxiety, and hallucinations (so-called gluten psychosis). The diagnosis of NCGS should be considered in patients with persistent intestinal and/or extraintestinal complaints showing a normal result of the CD and WA serological markers on a gluten-containing diet, usually reporting worsening of symptoms after eating gluten-rich food. NCGS should not be an exclusion diagnosis only. Unfortunately, no biomarker is sensitive and specific enough for diagnostic purposes; therefore, the diagnosis of NCGS is currently based on

  11. What is depression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Fosgerau, Christina Fogtmann

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of depression is defined by psychiatrists, and guidelines for treatment of patients with depression are created in psychiatry. However, most patients with depression are treated exclusively in general practice. Psychiatrists point out that general practitioners' (GPs') treatment of ...

  12. Sadness and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Sadness and Depression KidsHealth > For Kids > Sadness and Depression A A ... big difference in your life. When Sadness Is Depression When you're in a sad mood, it ...

  13. Depression Strikes…Anyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Depression Depression Strikes… Anyone Winter 2017 Table of Contents Anyone can suffer from depression. And almost everyone has a friend or family ...

  14. Depression and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depression and other mental health issues? Reference Share Depression and College Students Download PDF Download ePub Order ... Answers to college students’ frequently asked questions about depression Feeling moody, sad, or grouchy? Who doesn’t ...

  15. Sadness and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Sadness and Depression KidsHealth > For Kids > Sadness and Depression Print A ... big difference in your life. When Sadness Is Depression When you're in a sad mood, it ...

  16. Postpartum Depression Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Where can I find more information? Share Postpartum Depression Facts Download PDF Download ePub Download Mobi Order ... for herself or her family. What is postpartum depression? Postpartum depression is a mood disorder that can ...

  17. Recognizing teen depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000648.htm Recognizing teen depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... life. Be Aware of the Risk for Teen Depression Your teen is more at risk for depression ...

  18. Men and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in crisis? For more information Share Men and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone feels sad or irritable sometimes, or has ...

  19. Various forms of depression

    OpenAIRE

    BENAZZI, FRANCO

    2006-01-01

    The current subtyping of depression is based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) categorical division of bipolar and depressive disorders. Current evidence, however, supports a dimensional approach to depression, as a continuum/spectrum of overlapping disorders, ranging from bipolar I depression to major depressive disorder. Types of depression which have recently been the focus of most research will be reviewed ; bipolar II depressi...

  20. [Depressive symptoms and sexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The mutually reinforcing dyad of depressive symptoms and erectile dysfunction is scientifically established. The cure of depression improves sexual dysfunction (SD) and the treatment of SD induces improvement of depression. Most of anti-depressants induce negative sexual side effects that lead to non-compliance of these treatments. The knowledge of interrelation between depression, anti-depressants and sexuality is of great importance in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. 'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayalon, Liat; Goldfracht, Margalit; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    evaluated against a depression diagnosis made by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. RESULTS: Overall, 3.9% of the sample was diagnosed with depression. The most notable finding was that the single-item question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?' had as good or better sensitivity (83......: An easy way to detect depression in older primary care patients would be asking the single question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?'...

  2. 青少年抑郁情绪的行为遗传学研究%The Genetic and Environmental Influence on Adolescent Depressive Symptoms:A Genetic Sensitive Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯金芹; 陈祉妍; 李新影; 杨小冬; 张建新

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological and developmental studies showed that one of the obvious phenomena during adolescence is a marked increase in depressive symptoms. Behavioral genetic studies found that shared environmental influences account for the majority of the variance for children's symptoms while genetic factors are substantial for adolescent depressive symptoms. However, whether the results of behavioral genetic studies from Westerncountries can be generalized to adolescents in China with a collectivism culture remains unexplored. First, prevalence of depression varies dramatically across cultures with a lower rate in China than in other countries. Second, factors that are associated with depressive symptoms and the extent to which these factors are consequential for adolescents' mood are also different across cultures. Existing evidences showed that the quality of family relationships and grades in school had significantly stronger associations with depressive symptoms among Chinese youths than among U.S. youths. Third, genes that contribute to depressive symptoms have different frequencies in different races. Moreover, culture may moderate the expression of genes. Therefore, the first objective of the study was to examine the heritability of adolescent depressive symptoms for boys and girls in China, respectively.Results from the family study, the adoption study and the twin study suggest that adolescent depressive symptoms are heritable (range 15-80%). Moreover, empirical work showed that the relative contributions of genetic and environmental influences to depressive symptoms vary as a function of age. The second objective of the study was to extend previous ones by examining whether the heritability of depressive symptoms in early-adolescence was different from that in mid-adolescence. We hypothesized that the heritability of depressive symptoms in early adolescence was higher than that in middle adolescence according to the theory and empirical work. Depressive

  3. The Bipolar II Depression Questionnaire: A Self-Report Tool for Detecting Bipolar II Depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Ming Leung

    Full Text Available Bipolar II (BP-II depression is often misdiagnosed as unipolar (UP depression, resulting in suboptimal treatment. Tools for differentiating between these two types of depression are lacking. This study aimed to develop a simple, self-report screening instrument to help distinguish BP-II depression from UP depressive disorder. A prototype BP-II depression questionnaire (BPIIDQ-P was constructed following a literature review, panel discussions and a field trial. Consecutively assessed patients with a diagnosis of depressive disorder or BP with depressive episodes completed the BPIIDQ-P at a psychiatric outpatient clinic in Hong Kong between October and December 2013. Data were analyzed using discriminant analysis and logistic regression. Of the 298 subjects recruited, 65 (21.8% were males and 233 (78.2% females. There were 112 (37.6% subjects with BP depression [BP-I = 42 (14.1%, BP-II = 70 (23.5%] and 182 (62.4% with UP depression. Based on family history, age at onset, postpartum depression, episodic course, attacks of anxiety, hypersomnia, social phobia and agoraphobia, the 8-item BPIIDQ-8 was constructed. The BPIIDQ-8 differentiated subjects with BP-II from those with UP depression with a sensitivity/specificity of 0.75/0.63 for the whole sample and 0.77/0.72 for a female subgroup with a history of childbirth. The BPIIDQ-8 can differentiate BP-II from UP depression at the secondary care level with satisfactory to good reliability and validity. It has good potential as a screening tool for BP-II depression in primary care settings. Recall bias, the relatively small sample size, and the high proportion of females in the BP-II sample limit the generalization of the results.

  4. [Causes of depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Francisco Alonso

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes four nosological categories of depressive disorder according to the fundamental or prime cause: endogen depression, situative depression, psychogen depression and somatogen (also pharmacogen or addictive) depression. Recent advances in neurobiology provide the commun pathogenic mechanism distribuited in neurochemical, neuroendocrine and neuroinmune factors, with at the end a cellular and molecular sequence beyond the synapse. There is an increased risk of depression multiplied by three or four in the elderly, obese, unemployed and inmigrant and it is very frequent in terminally ill patients with a pervasive desire for death. Finally, eight personalized preventive guidelines enable to decrease the individual risk of depression in more than a fifty per cent.

  5. Therapieresistente Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holsboer-Trachsler E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In der Behandlung einer Depression wird ein Nichtansprechen auf zwei adäquate Antidepressivatherapien während je 6–8 Wochen als Therapieresistenz bezeichnet. Da häufig zu geringe Dosierungen oder eine zu kurze Behandlungsdauer die Ursache für ein Nichtansprechen sind, sollte in einem ersten Schritt die medikamentöse Therapie hinsichtlich Dauer und Dosierung, eventuell unter Einbezug von Plasmaspiegelbestimmungen, überprüft und optimiert werden. Als pharmakologische Maßnahmen werden zunächst ein Wechsel des Antidepressivums und danach eine Kombination von verschiedenen Antidepressiva mit unterschiedlichem biochemischem Wirkungsansatz empfohlen. Zeigen beide nicht den gewünschten Erfolg, so sollte zusätzlich zur bestehenden Antidepressivabehandlung eine Augmentationstherapie, primär mit Lithium und/oder dem Schilddrüsenhormon T3, durchgeführt werden. Ein neuer, vielversprechender Behandlungsansatz ist eine Augmentationstherapie mit atypischen Neuroleptika. Als akut wirkende nichtpharmakologische Zusatzmaßnahme hat sich der partielle Schlafentzug bewährt. Weitere nichtpharmakologische Strategien umfassen Psychotherapie, Elektrokrampftherapie und Vagusnervstimulationsbehandlung.

  6. Is postpartum depression a homogenous disorder: time of onset, severity, symptoms and hopelessness in relation to the course of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Pirjo; Koistinen, Eeva; Hintikka, Jukka

    2014-12-10

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common illness, but due to the underlying processes and the diversity of symptoms, some variability is exhibited. The risk of postpartum depression is great if the mother has previously suffered from depression, but there is some evidence that a certain subgroup of women only experience depression during the postpartum period. The study group consisted of 104 mothers with postpartum major depression and a control group of 104 postpartum mothers without depression. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) was used for data collection. The severity of depression and other mental symptoms were assessed using several validated rating scales. A history of past depression (82%), including depression during pregnancy (42%) and during the postpartum period (53%), was very common in those with current PPD. Eighteen per cent of mothers with current PPD had previously not had any depressive episodes and four per cent had experienced depression only during the postpartum period. Therefore, pure PPD was rare. The onset of PPD was usually (84%) within six weeks of childbirth. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, depressed mood, diminished pleasure/interest, decreased energy, and psychomotor agitation/retardation were common with all kinds of depression histories. Pure PPD was the most similar to the first depressive episode. Nevertheless, the severity of depression, the level of hopelessness, somatisation, interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, hostility, psychoticism, sleep disturbance, and suicidal ideation were lower, appetite changed less, and concentration was better than in other recurrent depressions. According to this study, PPD is not a homogenous disorder. The time of onset, severity, symptoms, level of hopelessness, and the course of depression vary. Recurrent depression is common. All mothers must be screened during the sixth week postpartum at the latest. Screening alone is not

  7. Longitudinal Genetic Analysis of Anxiety Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavos, Helena M. S.; Gregory, Alice M.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity is associated with both anxiety and depression and has been shown to be heritable. Little, however, is known about the role of genetic influence on continuity and change of symptoms over time. The authors' aim was to examine the stability of anxiety sensitivity during adolescence. By using a genetically sensitive design, the…

  8. THE VALIDITY OF THE HAMILTON DEPRESSION RATING SCALE AS A SCREENING AND DIAGNOSTIC INSTRUMENT FOR DEPRESSION IN PATIENTS WITH EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koraliya S. Todorova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the concurrent validity of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17 against ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder and its performance as a screening and diagnostic tool for depression in patients with epilepsy (PWE.Subjects and Methods: One hundred and six PWE underwent clinical psychiatric examination followed by evaluation on HAMD-17. ICD-10 criteria for comorbid depressive disorder were applied. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach’s α. A “receiver operating characteristics” (ROC curve was obtained and the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV were calculated for different cut-off points of the HAMD-17.Results: Internal consistency measured by Cronbach’s α was 0.74. Maximal discrimination between depressed and non depressed was obtained at a cut-off score of 8/9 (sensitivity 0.93, specificity 0.98. High sensitivity and NPV at the same cut-off score (sensitivity 0.93, NPV 1.0 show the screening properties, and high specificity and PPV at cut-offs 9/10, the diagnostic properties of the instrument. The area under the ROC curve (AUC=0.746 indicates the concurrent validity of the HAMD-17 score with the ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder.Conclusion: The validity of the HAMD-17 against ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder in PWE in our study is fair. The concurrent administration of diagnostic criteria can ascertain the presence of core symptoms of depression.

  9. The effect of insulin sensitivity of anxiety depression mood disorders in type 2 diabetes patients%焦虑抑郁情绪障碍对2型糖尿病患者胰岛素敏感性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      目的观察焦虑抑郁情绪对2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者的胰岛素敏感性。方法对本院2010年5月-2011年7月98例糖尿病患者行汉密尔顿焦虑抑郁量表评分,并其分为焦虑抑郁合并T2DM组(试验组)和T2DM组(对照组),分别检测其空腹血糖、空腹胰岛素,计算胰岛素抵抗指数(HOMA-IR)、胰岛素敏感指数(HOMA-IS)和胰岛分泌指数(HOMA-β)。结果试验组HOMA-IR、HOMA-β高于对照组,HOMA-IS低于对照组,差异均有统计学意义(P <0.01)。结论焦虑抑郁情绪障碍可导致T2DM患者的胰岛素敏感性下降。%Objective To observe the emotional anxiety depression in patients with type 2 diabetes insulin sensitivity. Methods Our analysis in May 2010-July 2011 98 cases of patients with diabetes, and on the anxiety Hamilton depression rating scale, which is divided into two groups: the anxiety depression combination and type 2 diabetes group(experimental group) and type 2 diabetes group(control group) were detected the fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin, the calculation of insulin resistance index(HOMA-IR), insulin sensitivity index(HOMA-IS) and islet secretion index(HOMA-beta). Results The experimental group of HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, than the control group, the difference was statistically significant; experimental group of HOMA-IS below control group, the difference was statistically significant(P <0.01). Conclusion Anxiety depression mood disorders can result in patients with type 2 diabetes insulin sensitivity decline.

  10. [Depression in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, A S

    1991-03-01

    Depressive symptoms are frequent during schizophrenia. Depression occurs in the course of a schizo affective psychose or in the course of a schizophrenia (either with acute psychotic symptoms, either without acute psychotic symptoms). Differentiating depression from negative symptoms of schizophrenia or from antipsychotic drug induced side effects can be difficult. The question to know whether depression is intrinsic to the disease process itself whether it is secondary to the schizophrenic process is still a matter of inquiry. Efficacy of antidepressive drugs during depression in schizophrenia remains a matter of controversy. Depression increases the risk for pejorative evolution and for suicide in schizophrenia.

  11. Etiology and Diagnosis of Major Depression - A Novel Quantitative Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Classical psychiatric opinions are relative uncertain and treatment results are not impressive when dealing with major depression. Depression is related to the endocrine system, but despite much effort a good quantitative measure for characterizing depression has not yet emerged...... we compare the O-index with opinions reach by classical psychiatric diagnostic procedure (sensitivity 83%, specificity 59%, likelihood ratio positive 2.0, and likelihood ratio negative 0.29). The O-index nicely refines the etiology of depression: Combined with clinical data for 29 subjects earlier...... reported three categories emerge (p = 4.4 × 10-13): hypocortisolemic depressed, non-depressed, and hypercotisolemic depressed. The O-index also reveals why it has been difficult to obtain good markers earlier. It explains that healthy subjects may have an elevated (suppressed) level of cortisol or ACTH...

  12. The association between depressive symptoms, cognitive function, and inflammation in major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Benros, Michael E; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the association between IL-6 and CRP with depressive items and cognitive function. We included 112 outpatients with major depression from an exercise trial and 57 healthy controls. IL-6, high sensitive CRP (hsCRP), and cognitive function were assessed in all...... subjects. After baseline assessment, patients were randomised to either a 3months exercise intervention or an exercise control group. Post-intervention IL-6, hsCRP, depressive symptoms, and cognitive function were reassessed in the patient group. IL-6 and hsCRP were significantly increased in depressed...... patients compared to healthy controls (p=0.02 and 0.04). These differences were no longer significant after adjustment for lifestyle associated variables. We found no association between immune markers and specific depressive symptoms at baseline or as change over time. Regarding the cognitive tests, IL-6...

  13. Development and Validation of a Screening Scale for Depression in Korea: The Lee and Rhee Depression Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Seon Hee; Rhee, Min Kyu; Kang, Rhee Hun; Lee, Hwa Young; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Young Sun; Lee, Min Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop a culturally sensitive instrument that addressed how individuals express and experience depression to detect this disorder in Koreans. We also assessed the validity, reliability, and diagnostic utility of this scale (Lee and Rhee Depression Scale; LRDS). Methods The sample consisted of 3,697 normal adults selected from 12 administrative districts (Do) and 448 Korean patients diagnosed with depression using the Structured Clinical Interview for DS...

  14. Memory training in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, E.S.; Vanderhasselt, M.A.; Vrijsen, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Memory biases, that is, general memory impairments as well as specific mood-congruent memory biases, are important vulnerability factors in depression. Recently, computerized memory trainings have been developed to target these biases, reducing rumination and lightening depressive symptoms. This

  15. Depression and Suicide Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression and Suicide Risk (2014) Definition: A mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and ... i Prevalence: 1. Ranges of lifetime risk for depression: from 6.7% overall to 40% in men, ...

  16. Depression and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Depression Thursday, 01 September 2016 In every pregnancy, a ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to depression may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  17. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  18. Learning about depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000325.htm Learning about depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... trigger or reason. What are the Signs of Depression? You may notice some or all of the ...

  19. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  20. Depression and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Depression Thursday, 01 September 2016 In every pregnancy, a ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to depression may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  1. Depression Disturbs Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The suicide of Robert Enke,the goalkeeper of the Germany national football team who had battled depression for years,stunned the country and cast depression into the national spotlight as a disturbing disease.

  2. The Techniques for Overcoming Depression Questionnaire: Mokken Scale Analysis, Reliability, and Concurrent Validity in Depressed Cardiac Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Lemos, Mariantonia; Doyle, Frank; Steinmeyer, Brian C; Csik, Iris; Carney, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    The Techniques for Overcoming Depression (TOD) questionnaire assesses the frequency with which patients being treated for depression use cognitive-behavioral techniques in daily life. This study examined its latent structure, reliability and concurrent validity in depressed cardiac patients. The TOD was administered at the initial and final treatment sessions in three trials of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) (n = 260) for depression in cardiac patients. Mokken scaling was used to determine its dimensionality. The TOD is unidimensional in depressed cardiac patients, both at the initial evaluation (H = .46) and the end of treatment (H = .47). It is sensitive to change and the total score correlates with therapist ratings of the patient's socialization to CBT (r=.40, povercoming depression in cardiac patients. Studies of the TOD in other depressed patient populations are needed.

  3. Preventing Depression in Adults With Subthreshold Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buntrock, Claudia; Berking, Matthias; Smit, Filip

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychological interventions for the prevention of depression might be a cost-effective way to reduce the burden associated with depressive disorders. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a Web-based guided self-help intervention to prevent major depressive disorder (MDD......) in people with subthreshold depression (sD). METHODS: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial was conducted with follow-up at 12 months. Participants were recruited from the general population via a large statutory health insurance company and an open access website. Participants were randomized to a Web......-based guided self-help intervention (ie, cognitive-behavioral therapy and problem-solving therapy assisted by supervised graduate students or health care professionals) in addition to usual care or to usual care supplemented with Web-based psycho-education (enhanced usual care). Depression-free years (DFYs...

  4. Depression in cerebrovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Voskresenskaya, Tatyana

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses the topical problem of depression in cerebrovascular diseases. It shows its possible causes, mechanisms of occurrence, clinical picture and negative impact on the course of cerebrovascular disease and recovery of neurological functions. There is a bilateral association between stroke and depression: on the one hand, stroke is a risk factor for the development of depression and, on the other, depression is a both direct and indirect risk factor for the development of stroke...

  5. [Multiple mechanisms of depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Lin; Ruan, Ke-Feng; Gao, Jun-Wei; Wu, Fei; Zhang, Ji-Quan

    2013-08-01

    Depression is a grievous mental disease with an increasing high morbidity year by year and a serious social harm. The pathogenesises of depression is complicated and involves with multi-mechanisms and multi-organs. Recent studies demondtrate that in the nerval system and endocrine system there are many types of neurotransmitters and hormones, as well as their receptors, involved in depression. This paper reviews the research progress of depression in recent years.

  6. A REVIEW ON ANIMAL MODELS OF DEPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu Devi* and Ramica Sharma

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available As described by the world health organization (WHO, depression is the most common and serious disorder leading to suicide. Numbers of synthetic drugs are available for the treatment of this fatal disease, but are associated with serious complications. A wide diversity of animal models has been used to examine antidepressant activity. These range from relatively simple models sensitive to acute treatment, to highly sophisticated models. The number of validated animal models for affective disorders is large and still growing. A basic understanding of the underlying disease processes in depression is lacking, and therefore, recreating the disease in animal models is not possible. For the animal model of depression, the relevance, reliability and reproducibility in laboratories need to be focused, currently used models of depression attempt to produce quantifiable correlates of human symptoms in experimental animals and the animal modeling remains a potentially important approach towards understanding neurochemical and neurobiological mechanisms in depression. Animal models of depression attempt to represent some aspect of the etiology, symptomatology and treatment of the disorders, in order to facilitate their scientific study. Hence, this review deals with animal models that are beneficial for evaluating the potential of antidepressants. The present review further discusses the ability of currently available animal models for depression to investigate the novel hypothesis.

  7. Clinical Judgments of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Douglas N.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated degree to which judges could simulate Basic Personality Inventory (BPI) responses of a clinically depressed patient group. Judgmental profiles of depressed patients indicated very high reliabilities across information conditions, a high association with actual profiles of clinically depressed patients, and differentiation from other…

  8. Depression (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Depression KidsHealth > For Parents > Depression A A A What's ... to Help en español Comprender la depresión About Depression It's normal for kids to feel sad, down, ...

  9. Handling Depression | Smokefree 60+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everyone feels blue now and then. It's a part of life. But if your feelings last more than few days and interfere with your normal daily activities, you may be suffering from depression. On this page: Symptoms of depression Who gets depressed and why?

  10. Depression and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Marshall, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains four articles related to depression and aging. Compares normal adults with those having a major depressive disorder. Focuses on life satisfaction in the elderly, describing an individualized measure of life satisfaction. Describes similarities and differences between grief and depression. Contains a psychometric analysis of the Zung…

  11. Depression (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Depression KidsHealth > For Parents > Depression Print A A A ... to Help en español Comprender la depresión About Depression It's normal for kids to feel sad, down, ...

  12. Measuring psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Meyers, B S; Flint, A J

    Psychotic depression (PD) is a highly debilitating condition, which needs intensive monitoring. However, there is no established rating scale for evaluating the severity of PD. The aim of this analysis was to assess the psychometric properties of established depression rating scales and a number...... of new composite rating scales, covering both depressive and psychotic symptoms, in relation to PD....

  13. Measuring psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Meyers, B S; Flint, A J

    Psychotic depression (PD) is a highly debilitating condition, which needs intensive monitoring. However, there is no established rating scale for evaluating the severity of PD. The aim of this analysis was to assess the psychometric properties of established depression rating scales and a number...... of new composite rating scales, covering both depressive and psychotic symptoms, in relation to PD....

  14. Therapeutics of postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Michael; Sharma, Verinder

    2017-05-01

    Postpartum depression is a prevalent disorder affecting many women of reproductive age. Despite increasing public awareness, it is frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated leading to significant maternal morbidity and adverse child outcomes. When identified, postpartum depression is usually treated as major depressive disorder. Many studies have identified the postpartum as a period of high risk for first presentations and relapses of bipolar disorder. Areas covered: This article reviews the acute and prophylactic treatment of postpartum major depressive disorder, bipolar depression and major depressive disorder with mixed features. The safety of antidepressant and mood stabilizing medications in pregnancy and breastfeeding will also be reviewed. Expert commentary: Differentiating postpartum major depressive disorder and postpartum bipolar depression can be difficult given their clinical similarities but accurate identification is vital for initiating proper treatment. Antidepressants are the mainstay of drug treatment for postpartum major depressive disorder, yet randomized controlled trials have shown conflicting results. A paucity of evidence exists for the effectiveness of antidepressant prophylaxis in the prevention of recurrences of major depressive disorder. Mood stabilizing medications reduce the risk of postpartum bipolar depression relapse but no randomized controlled trials have examined their use in the acute or prophylactic treatment of postpartum bipolar depression.

  15. Lifetime socio-economic position and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the influence of lifetime socio-economic position (SEP) on adult depression. We examined the association of SEP during the life course with depressive mood in late midlife and explored whether cognitive function at age 20, health-related behaviour and inflammatory...... biomarkers explained any associations. Methods: A cohort of 2482 Danish men born in 1953 with information from birth, and conscript board examinations was followed-up with assessment of depressive mood and blood sampling in 2010. Simple and multiple linear regression were used to investigate associations...... among variables. Results: Social circumstances during the life course were associated with depressive mood. Further, low lifetime SEP was associated with lower cognitive score, smoking, alcohol use, high body mass index (BMI) and increased level of high sensitive ProReactive Protein and Interleukin-6...

  16. Importance of Depression in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustman, Patrick J.; Clouse, Ray E.; Anderson, Ryan J.

    Depression doubles the likelihood of comorbid depression, which presents as major depression in 11% and subsyndromal depression in 31% of patients with the medical illness. The course of depression is chronic, and afflicted patients suffer an average of one episode annually. Depression has unique importance in diabetes because of its association…

  17. Understanding childhood depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Savita; Das, Partha Pratim

    2007-02-01

    Major depressive disorder in children is a severe and a chronically disabling disorder. This population appears to be a special group in terms of consequences of poor psychosocial and academic outcome and increased risk of substance abuse, and suicide. Studies have revealed several major findings in genetic, familial, psychological, and biological aspects of such depression, some of which have explored into the issue of its relationship with adult depression. Considerable advances have been made now in the area of childhood depression providing a better understanding of its nature. We review literature available on historical aspect, epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and aetiology of childhood depression.

  18. Depression in geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Asghar-Ali, A; Braun, U K

    2009-02-01

    While the most serious of depressive illnesses in the elderly is major depressive disorder, patients' quality of life can be significantly impacted by dysthmic disorder, sub-threshold depression (minor depression), or a depressive disorder due to a general medical condition, all of which have been shown to be more prevalent than major depression in the community dwelling population of older adults. Older adults are also more likely to develop grief reaction and frequently deal with issues of bereavement. This review will discuss the diagnoses of all relevant depressive diagnoses that primary care physicians are likely to encounter. Among the many different assessment tools that screen for depression the briefest instruments are a two-question screening tool recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and, specifically developed for older adults, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is available in a short 15- Yes/No-question version. Many medical illnesses are associated with depressive symptoms. The focus in this review is on dementing illnesses/cerebrovascular disease, dementia of the Alzheimer's type, and Parkinson disease. First-line pharmacological therapy of depression includes selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs), and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Side effects of particular drugs can often be geared towards achieving additional benefits, e.g. weight gain associated with the use of some SSRISs may be helpful for patients with dementia.

  19. Depression in adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapar, Anita; Collishaw, Stephan; Pine, Daniel S; Thapar, Ajay K

    2012-01-01

    Unipolar depressive disorder in adolescence is common worldwide but often unrecognised. The incidence, notably in girls, rises sharply after puberty and, by the end of adolescence, the 1 year prevalence rate exceeds 4%. The burden is highest in low-income and middle-income countries. Depression is associated with sub stantial present and future morbidity, and heightens suicide risk. The strongest risk factors for depression in adolescents are a family history of depression and exposure to psychosocial stress. Inherited risks, developmental factors, sex hormones, and psychosocial adversity interact to increase risk through hormonal factors and associated perturbed neural pathways. Although many similarities between depression in adolescence and depression in adulthood exist, in adolescents the use of antidepressants is of concern and opinions about clinical management are divided. Effective treatments are available, but choices are dependent on depression severity and available resources. Prevention strategies targeted at high-risk groups are promising. PMID:22305766

  20. [Depression and neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piber, D; Hinkelmann, K; Gold, S M; Heesen, C; Spitzer, C; Endres, M; Otte, C

    2012-11-01

    In many neurological diseases a depressive syndrome is a characteristic sign of the primary disease or is an important comorbidity. Post-stroke depression, for example, is a common and relevant complication following ischemic brain infarction. Approximately 4 out of every 10 stroke patients develop depressive disorders in the course of the disease which have a disadvantageous effect on the course and the prognosis. On the other hand depression is also a risk factor for certain neurological diseases as was recently demonstrated in a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies which revealed a much higher stroke risk for depressive patients. Furthermore, depression plays an important role in other neurological diseases with respect to the course and quality of life, such as Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. This article gives a review of the most important epidemiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of depressive disorders as a comorbidity of neurological diseases and as a risk factor for neurological diseases.

  1. Test of the depression distress amplification model in young adults with elevated risk of current suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capron, Daniel W; Lamis, Dorian A; Schmidt, Norman B

    2014-11-30

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among young adults and the rate of suicide has been increasing for decades. A depression distress amplification model posits that young adults with comorbid depression and anxiety have elevated suicide rates due to the intensification of their depressive symptoms by anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns. The current study tested the effects of anxiety sensitivity subfactors as well as the depression distress amplification model in a very large sample of college students with elevated suicide risk. Participants were 721 college students who were at elevated risk of suicidality (scored>0 on the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation). Consistent with prior work, anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns, but not physical or social concerns, were associated with suicidal ideation. Consistent with the depression distress amplification model, in individuals high in depression, anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns predicted elevated suicidal ideation but not among those with low depression. The results of this study corroborate the role of anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns and the depression distress amplification model in suicidal ideation among a large potentially high-risk group of college students. The depression distress amplification model suggests a specific mechanism, anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns, that may be responsible for increased suicide rates among those with comorbid anxiety and depression.

  2. Objective Methods for Reliable Detection of Concealed Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia eSolomon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that it is possible to automatically detect clinical depression from audio-visual recordings. Before considering integration in a clinical pathway, a key question that must be asked is whether such systems can be easily fooled. This work explores the potential of acoustic features to detect clinical depression in adults both when acting normally and when asked to conceal their depression. Nine adults diagnosed with mild to moderate depression as per the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 were asked a series of questions and to read a excerpt from a novel aloud under two different experimental conditions. In one, participants were asked to act naturally and in the other, to suppress anything that they felt would be indicative of their depression. Acoustic features were then extracted from this data and analysed using paired t-tests to determine any statistically significant differences between healthy and depressed participants. Most features that were found to be significantly different during normal behaviour remained so during concealed behaviour. In leave-one-subject-out automatic classification studies of the 9 depressed subjects and 8 matched healthy controls, an 88% classification accuracy and 89% sensitivity was achieved. Results remained relatively robust during concealed behaviour, with classifiers trained on only non-concealed data achieving 81% detection accuracy and 75% sensitivity when tested on concealed data. These results indicate there is good potential to build deception-proof automatic depression monitoring systems.

  3. Standardization of depression measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Inka; Löwe, Bernd; Bjørner, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    comparisons among included measures. Large differences were found in their measurement precision and range, providing a rationale for instrument selection. Published scale-specific threshold scores of depression severity showed remarkable consistencies across different questionnaires. CONCLUSION: An IRT-based......OBJECTIVES: To provide a standardized metric for the assessment of depression severity to enable comparability among results of established depression measures. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A common metric for 11 depression questionnaires was developed applying item response theory (IRT) methods. Data...... instrument-independent metric for depression severity enables direct comparisons among established measures. The "common ruler" simplifies the interpretation of depression assessment by identifying key thresholds for clinical and epidemiologic decision making and facilitates integrative psychometric research...

  4. Sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003741.htm Sensitivity analysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sensitivity analysis determines the effectiveness of antibiotics against microorganisms (germs) ...

  5. Depression and attachment problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Pettem, O; M. West; Mahoney, A; Keller, A.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics related to attachment of 42 depressed psychiatric patients and 42 non-depressed psychiatric controls. The depressed subjects demonstrated an anxious pattern of attachment, characterized by either intense care-seeking in relation to their attachment figure or angry withdrawal from their attachment figure when their desire for security was frustrated. The results are discussed in terms of Bowlby's attachment construct.

  6. DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS IN EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koralia Todorova

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Depressive disorders are the most frequent psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy but very often remain unrecognized and untreated. We examined 103 epileptic patients, aged 18-60 years, 40 males and 63 females, for the presence of interictal depressive disorder. All subjects underwent clinical psychiatric examination, including evaluation on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D-17. A questionnaire for demographic and seizure-related variables was also completed. Concurrent depressive disorder (clinically presented according to ICD-10 diagnostic criteria affected 28.3% of all evaluated patients. Based on HAM-D-17 scores depression was defined as mild - 80% of all depressed patients, moderate - 17% and severe - 3%. Atypical presentation of interictal depressive disorder was frequent. Depression has a tremendous effect on one’s family, social and psychological functioning, even more than the actual seizure frequency and severity. Diagnostic difficulties come through the atypical mode of presentation of depressive disorders in epilepsy. Proper neuropsychiatric evaluation is essential for improving treatment and quality of life for patients with epilepsy.

  7. Depression after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegelstein, R C

    2001-01-01

    Depression is an independent risk factor for increased postmyocardial infarction morbidity and mortality, even after controlling for the extent of coronary artery disease, infarct size, and the severity of left ventricular dysfunction. This risk factor takes on added significance when one considers that almost half of patients recovering from a myocardial infarction have major or minor depression and that major depression alone occurs in about one in five of these individuals. Despite the well-documented risk of depression, questions remain about the mechanism of the relationship between mood disturbance and adverse outcome. The link may be explained by an association with lower levels of social support, poor adherence to recommended medical therapy and lifestyle changes intended to reduce the risk of subsequent cardiac events, disturbances in autonomic tone, enhanced platelet activation and aggregation, and systemic immune activation. Unfortunately, questions about the pathophysiologic mechanism of depression in this setting are paralleled by uncertainties about the optimal treatment of depression for patients recovering from a myocardial infarction and by a lack of knowledge about whether treating depression lowers the associated increased mortality risk. Ongoing research studies will help to determine the benefits of psychosocial interventions and of antidepressant therapy for patients soon after myocardial infarction. Although the identification of depression as a risk factor may by itself be a reason to incorporate a comprehensive psychological evaluation into the routine care of patients with myocardial infarction, this practice should certainly become standard if studies show that treating depression reduces the increased mortality risk of these patients.

  8. Cognitive reactivity to sad mood: The importance of the first depressive episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Zorica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive reactivity to sad mood refers to the degree to which a mild dysphoric state reactivates negative thinking patterns. In this research, the contribution of the history of depression, the length of the current depressive episode and the intensity of the depressive symptoms were assessed in explaining the cognitive reactivity to sad mood measured with the Leiden Index of Depression Sensitivity (LEIDS. The sample consisted of 123 depressed outpatients. The results of principal components analysis suggested a three-factor solution of the LEIDS. The intensity of depressive symptoms, the history of depression and the length of the current depressive episode were all significant in explaining cognitive reactivity to sad mood. We have also found out a significant effect of interaction of the history of depression and the length of the current depressive episode, which demonstrated that a prolonged depression does not induce a stronger cognitive reactivity to sad mood during the relapse of a depressive episode, while during the first depressive episode a longer duration of depression does induce a stronger cognitive reactivity. Such a result demonstrates that the length of the first depressive episode, regardless of its intensity, is crucially important for the formation of cognitive reactivity.

  9. Oxytocin receptor gene and depressive symptoms associated with physiological reactivity to infant crying

    OpenAIRE

    Riem, Madelon M. E.; Pieper, Suzanne; Out, Dorothée; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2010-01-01

    Both the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene and depressive symptoms have been associated with parenting behaviour. The OXTR GG genotype has been suggested to be related to more sensitive parenting, whereas depressive symptoms may affect sensitivity negatively. We examined the role of OXTR and the influence of depressive symptoms in explaining differences in physiological reactivity to infant crying. Heart rate responses of 40 healthy females without children (age 19–47 years, randomly selected hal...

  10. Phenylthiocarbamide tasting and family history of depression, revisited: low rates of depression in families of supertasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Thomas E; Perez, Marisol

    2004-04-15

    Past studies suggest that phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taste status is related to vulnerability to depression, such that those sensitive to PTC are more vulnerable. We questioned this, reasoning that those insensitive to PTC may be more vulnerable (because they may have lower hedonic tone and higher risk for alcohol abuse). Forty-two volunteers responded to questionnaires regarding family history of depression, and were assigned to supertaster, taster, or non-taster categories based on taste reactions to a 3.80 x 1.43 cm piece of commercially prepared paper treated with PTC. Supertasters were significantly less likely to report first-degree relatives with a history of depression than were tasters and non-tasters. Supertasters may be afforded some protection from depression; elucidating the mechanisms of this protection is a potentially interesting avenue for future research.

  11. Nutritional Aspects of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Undine E. Lang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Several nutrition, food and dietary compounds have been suggested to be involved in the onset and maintenance of depressive disorders and in the severity of depressive symptoms. Nutritional compounds might modulate depression associated biomarkers and parallel the development of depression, obesity and diabetes. In this context, recent studies revealed new mediators of both energy homeostasis and mood changes (i.e. IGF-1, NPY, BDNF, ghrelin, leptin, CCK, GLP-1, AGE, glucose metabolism and microbiota acting in gut brain circuits. In this context several healthy foods such as olive oil, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, poultry, dairy and unprocessed meat have been inversely associated with depression risk and even have been postulated to improve depressive symptoms. In contrast, unhealthy western dietary patterns including the consumption of sweetened beverage, refined food, fried food, processed meat, refined grain, and high fat diary, biscuits, snacking and pastries have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of depression in longitudinal studies. However, it is always difficult to conclude a real prospective causal relationship from these mostly retrospective studies as depressed individuals might also change their eating habits secondarily to their depression. Additionally specific selected nutritional compounds, e.g. calcium, chromium, folate, PUFAs, vitamin D, B12, zinc, magnesium and D-serine have been postulated to be used as ad-on strategies in antidepressant treatment. In this context, dietary and lifestyle interventions may be a desirable, effective, pragmatical and non-stigmatizing prevention and treatment strategy for depression. At last, several medications (pioglitazone, metformin, exenatide, atorvastatin, gram-negative antibiotics, which have traditionally been used to treat metabolic disorders showed a certain potential to treat depression in first randomized controlled clinical trials.

  12. Nutritional aspects of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Undine E; Beglinger, Christoph; Schweinfurth, Nina; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Several nutrition, food and dietary compounds have been suggested to be involved in the onset and maintenance of depressive disorders and in the severity of depressive symptoms. Nutritional compounds might modulate depression associated biomarkers and parallel the development of depression, obesity and diabetes. In this context, recent studies revealed new mediators of both energy homeostasis and mood changes (i.e. IGF-1, NPY, BDNF, ghrelin, leptin, CCK, GLP-1, AGE, glucose metabolism and microbiota) acting in gut brain circuits. In this context several healthy foods such as olive oil, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, poultry, dairy and unprocessed meat have been inversely associated with depression risk and even have been postulated to improve depressive symptoms. In contrast, unhealthy western dietary patterns including the consumption of sweetened beverage, refined food, fried food, processed meat, refined grain, and high fat diary, biscuits, snacking and pastries have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of depression in longitudinal studies. However, it is always difficult to conclude a real prospective causal relationship from these mostly retrospective studies as depressed individuals might also change their eating habits secondarily to their depression. Additionally specific selected nutritional compounds, e.g. calcium, chromium, folate, PUFAs, vitamin D, B12, zinc, magnesium and D-serine have been postulated to be used as ad-on strategies in antidepressant treatment. In this context, dietary and lifestyle interventions may be a desirable, effective, pragmatical and non-stigmatizing prevention and treatment strategy for depression. At last, several medications (pioglitazone, metformin, exenatide, atorvastatin, gram-negative antibiotics), which have traditionally been used to treat metabolic disorders showed a certain potential to treat depression in first randomized controlled clinical trials.

  13. Negative attributional style, hopelessness depression and endogenous depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, T E

    2001-02-01

    The hopelessness theory of depression [Abramson, L. Y., Metalsky, G. I. & Alloy, L. B. (1989). Hopelessness depression: a theory-based subtype of depression. Psychological Review, 96, 358-372.] postulates that a negative attributional style represents a risk factor for a particular constellation of depressive symptoms, termed 'hopelessness depression'. Four studies tested the relation of negative attributional style to hopelessness depression symptoms versus endogenous depression symptoms. Despite the considerable overlap of hopelessness and endogenous depression symptoms, negative attributional style was more related to the former than the latter, consistent with hopelessness theory.

  14. Depression During and After Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depression during and after pregnancy fact sheet ePublications Depression during and after pregnancy fact sheet This information in Spanish (en español) Print this fact sheet Depression during and after pregnancy fact sheet (PDF, 260 ...

  15. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 3 items) Institute Announcements (24 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression ... why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression do work. One type of effective ...

  16. St. John's Wort and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... W X Y Z St. John's Wort and Depression: In Depth Share: On This Page Introduction Key ... will help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Depression Depression is a medical condition that affects about ...

  17. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 3 items) Institute Announcements (24 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression ... why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression do work. One type of effective ...

  18. Testosterone and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükrü Kartalcı

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgens have various effects on human body and mood. Testosterone, a hormone mainly secreted from testes and adrenals, is one of the most potent androgens. Multiple studies have found that testosterone plays a role in regulating sexual activity, libido, social behaviors, aggression, cognitive functions, sleep control and well-being in men and women. Testosterone deficiency in hypogonadic or elderly men leads to neuropsychiatric problems, such as fatigue, loss of libido, irritability, insomnia and depressive mood. Testosterone replacement therapy consistently reverses these sequel in men. On the other hand, hyperandrogenic states in women are related to aggression and antisocial behavior, which might lead to depressive mood. Low testosterone levels may also result in depression among oophorectomized women. Because of such effects, a relationship between testosterone and depression has long been an issue of speculation, but yet very few studies have addressed this relation. Along with clinical studies, experimental and epidemiological studies show that testosterone is related to depression in men and women. But studies of testosterone concentrations in depression have yielded inconsistent results reporting low as well as high testosterone levels associated with depression. In this article, the physiological and psychological effects of testosterone and evidence regarding its relationship to depressive disorders and possible gender differences have been reviewed.

  19. Depression in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Amy; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Gatz, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults, but it can have serious consequences. More than half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and are more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are depressed younger adults. Risk factors leading to the development of late-life depression likely comprise complex interactions among genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive diathesis, age-associated neurobiological changes, and stressful events. Insomnia is an often overlooked risk factor for late-life depression. We suggest that a common pathway to depression in older adults, regardless of which predisposing risks are most prominent, may be curtailment of daily activities. Accompanying self-critical thinking may exacerbate and maintain a depressed state. Offsetting the increasing prevalence of certain risk factors in late life are age-related increases in psychological resilience. Other protective factors include higher education and socioeconomic status, engagement in valued activities, and religious or spiritual involvement. Treatments including behavioral therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, cognitive bibliotherapy, problem-solving therapy, brief psychodynamic therapy, and life review/reminiscence therapy are effective but are too infrequently used with older adults. Preventive interventions including education for individuals with chronic illness, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving skills training, group support, and life review have also received support.

  20. Depression Begets Depression: Comparing the Predictive Utility of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms to Later Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Feng, Xin; Hipwell, Alison; Klostermann, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background: The high comorbidity between depressive and anxiety disorders, especially among females, has called into question the independence of these two symptom groups. It is possible that childhood anxiety typically precedes depression in girls. Comparing of the predictive utility of symptoms of anxiety with the predictive utility of symptoms…

  1. [Hashimoto encephalitis and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltman, E M; Rhebergen, D; van Exel, E; Stek, M L

    2015-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalitis (he) is an auto-immune disease, with 40-50% of patients developing psychopathology. This could require targeted treatment. HE and prednison could both cloud the identification of a concurrent depressive disorder. We saw a 78-year-old woman with he and a severe depression, and treated her succesfully with ect.

  2. Depression (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these simple actions. They can have a powerful effect on mood and help with depression: eat healthy foods get the right amount of ... dance, and find creative self-expression through art, music, or journaling. ... and well-being. Depression can be treated if you take the right ...

  3. Sleep deprivation and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenga, Simon

    1992-01-01

    The association between depression and sleep disturbances is perhaps as old as makind. In view of the longstanding experience with this association it is amazing that only some 20 years ago, a few depressed patients attracted attention to the fact that Total Sleep Deprivation (TSD) had

  4. Sleep deprivation and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenga, Simon

    1992-01-01

    The association between depression and sleep disturbances is perhaps as old as makind. In view of the longstanding experience with this association it is amazing that only some 20 years ago, a few depressed patients attracted attention to the fact that Total Sleep Deprivation (TSD) had antidepressan

  5. CIRCADIAN RHYTMICITY AND DEPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pregelj

    2008-11-01

    There is a grooving evidence that dysfunction in circadian rhythm regulation andmelatonergic system function is involved in depression pathogenesis. It is known thatclinically used antidepressants have influence on melatonergic system, probably throughchanged ratio between melatonergic type 1 and 2 receptors. With the clinical use of newcompounds like agomelatine that directly regulates melatonergic system new opportunities in depression treatment emerged

  6. Depression - older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slowly than in younger adults. To better manage depression at home: Exercise regularly, if the provider says it is OK. Surround yourself with caring, positive people and do fun activities. ... signs of depression, and know how to react if these occur. ...

  7. Depression and ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganovsky, K N; Vasilenko, Z L

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this at issue paper is the analysis of published data in correlation with the results of own research on the potential role of ionizing radiation in the genesis of depressive disorders. Depression is one of the most significant and long-term effect of the atomic bombings, nuclear testing and radiation emergences. The participants of the accident at the Chornobyl nuclear power plant increased prevalence of depression (18.0% and 13.1% in controls) and suicide rates. Depression is mainly observed in the structure of an organic mental disorder against cerebrovascular disease. The clinical pattern is dominated by asthenoadynamic and asthenoapathetic depression. Depressive disorders in radiation emergencies are multifactorial, that is the result of exposure to the complex psychogenic and radiological accident's factors, impact of traditional risk factors, somatic and neurological diseases, genetic predisposition, predisposition, etc. At the same time, exposure to ionizing radiation is a factor in the genesis of depression. This impact can be direct (to the Central Nervous System), and indirectly through the somatic and neurological abnormalities (multiorgan dysfunction) as well as by a variety of pathogenic mechanisms of ionizing radiation on the brain that have been discovered recently. It is strongly necessary analytical clinical and epidemiological studies with verification of depression and evidence-based establishment of the role of radiation and non-radiation risk factors. Loganovskyj K. N., Vasylenko Z. L., 2013.

  8. Cooperation and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendan Clark, C; Thorne, Christopher B; Hardy, Sonya; Cropsey, Karen L

    2013-09-25

    Deficits in pro-social cooperation are common in many individuals with mental illnesses such as depression. For decades, researchers have used economic game paradigms to compare cross-cultural cooperative behavior. However, research using economic games to assess cooperative behavior in clinical populations is in the early stages. We hypothesized that individuals with greater depressive symptoms would struggle to maintain reciprocity in iterative games, but not in single-iteration games measuring personal values. Participants (n=41) played four computer-based economic games (prisoner's dilemma, the public goods game, the ultimatum game, and the trust game) measuring different aspects of cooperation. Participants completed the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) and other measures of personality and demographics. Analyses assessed the relationships between game performance and psychological distress as measured by the DASS. Significant correlations were found between game performance and depressive symptoms, but not symptoms of anxiety or stress. Performance in the prisoner's dilemma and public goods game was significantly related to depression in a linear regression even when known associations with depressive affect such as age, gender, race, education, marital status, and neuroticism were controlled for. Depressive symptoms were associated with an inability to sustain reciprocal cooperation. Participants showed the predicted deficits in cooperation in these economic games. Economic games show the potential for assessing the social deficits associated with depressive symptoms. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Baroreflex activation therapy provides new chances for resistant hypertension%顽固性高血压新疗法:激活动脉压力感受性反射

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽丽; 程磊; 苏定冯; 刘爱军

    2013-01-01

    顽固性高血压约占高血压患病总人群的20%~30%,是影响公众健康的一大难题.压力感受性反射激活疗法(BAT)通过电刺激颈动脉窦压力感受器激活压力感受性反射,可明显降低血压、心率等.据此,美国CVRx研发出"Rheos",植入到颈动脉窦附近,可以慢性激活压力感受性反射,用于治疗顽固性高血压和重症心衰.其治疗机制可总结为:通过抑制交感神经和兴奋迷走神经,减少肾素的分泌,缓慢地增加肾脏的排泄功能,同时降低心率,扩张血管减少外周阻力,进而降低了动脉压同时促进钠平衡.%Resistant hypertension is a severe public health problem and about 20% ~ 30% of all hypertensive patients belong to resistant hypertension. Baroreflex activation therapy ( BAT ) can reduce blood pressure and heart rate by electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus barorecepters. Rheos Baroreflex Hypertension Therapy System ( Rheos, by CRVx. Inc, USA ) could be applied to treat resistant hypertension and severe heart failure by chronically activating baroreflex. Its mechanism can be concluded that BAT lowers arterial pressure and reduces heart rate by inhibiting sympathetic nerve and exciting vagus nerve.

  10. Adolescent depression: a metasynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundon, Edith Emma

    2006-01-01

    Concerns about the adequate assessment and treatment of adolescent depression have been in the forefront of pediatric mental health literature in the recent past. While quantitative studies have provided valuable information, the voice of the adolescent has been lacking in the development of theory and treatment of this prevalent disorder. Using approach, a metasynthesis of six qualitative studies was conducted. This process revealed six themes that outline the course of adolescents who struggle with depression: (a) beyond the blues, (b) spiraling down and within, (c) breaking points, (d) seeing and being seen, (e) seeking solutions, and (f) taking control. Knowledge of the experience of adolescent depression will aid practitioners in recognition and early intervention for the increasing number of adolescents suffering with depression, as well as guide educational initiatives to provide needed information on the symptoms of depression and available resources for getting help.

  11. [Depression and suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2007-09-01

    Suicide is a major public health problem and the number of suicide victims has exceeded 30,000 a year since 1998 in Japan. The rates of depression are extremely high in suicide victims. Social and environmental factors, such as the slow recovery of Japanese economy, could have a strong effect on depression and suicide, especially in middle-aged men. To reduce the number of suicide victims, we need to use both population-based and high-risk approaches, targeting individuals with high psychological and socioeconomic risks of suicide, especially depressed patients. On the other hand, the role of antidepressants in suicide prevention is a major question given the high prevalence of both depression and depression-related suicidality. Because treatment and prevention of suicide are complex and encompass many factors, success will need multi-sector collaboration.

  12. Depression following myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjær

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe life event that is accompanied by an increased risk of depression. Mounting evidence suggests that post-MI depression is associated with adverse outcomes, but the underlying mechanisms of this association remain unclear, and no previous studies have examined...... whether the mental burden of MI is so heavy that it increases the risk of suicide. Although post-MI depression is common and burdensome, the condition remains under-recognised and under-treated. The development of new strategies to improve the quality of care for people with post-MI depression requires...... thorough understanding of the mechanisms that influence the prognosis as well as knowledge of the present care provided. The purpose of this PhD thesis is accordingly subdivided into four specific aims: 1. To estimate the prevalence of depression in people with MI after three months, and to estimate...

  13. Measuring psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Meyers, B S; Flint, A J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Psychotic depression (PD) is a highly debilitating condition, which needs intensive monitoring. However, there is no established rating scale for evaluating the severity of PD. The aim of this analysis was to assess the psychometric properties of established depression rating scales...... and a number of new composite rating scales, covering both depressive and psychotic symptoms, in relation to PD. METHOD: The psychometric properties of the rating scales were evaluated based on data from the Study of Pharmacotherapy of Psychotic Depression. RESULTS: A rating scale consisting of the 6-item......'s correlation coefficient between change in HAMD-BPRS11 and Clinical Global Impression - Improvement (CGI-I) scores = -0.74--0.78) and unidimensionality (Loevinger's coefficient of homogeneity = 0.41) in the evaluation of PD. The HAM-D6 fulfilled the same criteria, whereas the full 17-item Hamilton Depression...

  14. Depression and Political Participation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument—whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group. PMID:26924857

  15. Depression and Political Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument-whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group.

  16. [Severe depression : psychoanalysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet de la Maisonneuve, O

    2009-12-01

    The indication for psychoanalysis in severe depression is not clear. And yet, demands for this type of intervention are increasing, despite the absence of any form of consensus on the subject. Freud considered depression as a failure of analytical efforts and, based on this observation, revised his theory, in particular to include the notions of narcissism and the death drive. Many analysts have been reluctant to follow his teachings on this last point and provide depressed patients with analytical-type therapies aimed at restoring narcissism. Melanie Klein pushed Freud's ideas about depression even further and brought such therapies back to the heart of analytical practice. Jacques Lacan took the debate to another level by proposing an overhaul of the principles on which analysis has been based. Today, while following certain precautionary rules, true psychoanalyses can be proposed to patients with severe depression, whether of the bipolar, recurring or even neurotic type that can reach this level of severity.

  17. Men's depression and suicide literacy: a nationally representative Canadian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliffe, John L; Hannan-Leith, Madeline N; Ogrodniczuk, John S; Black, Nick; Mackenzie, Corey S; Lohan, Maria; Creighton, Genevieve

    2016-12-01

    Male suicide prevention strategies include diagnosis and effective management of men's depression. Fundamental to suicide prevention efforts is public awareness, which in turn, is influenced by literacy levels about men's depression and suicide. The aim of this study is to examine sex differences in mental health literacy with respect to men's depression and suicide among a cohort of Canadian respondents. About 901 English-speaking Canadian men and women completed online survey questionnaires to evaluate mental health literacy levels using 10-item D-Lit and 8-item LOSS questionnaires, which assess factual knowledge concerning men's depression and suicide. Statistical tests (Chi-square, z-test) were used to identify significant differences between sex sub-groups at 95% confidence. Overall, respondents correctly identified 67% of questions measuring literacy levels about male depression. Respondents' male suicide literacy was significantly poorer at 53.7%. Misperceptions were especially evident in terms of differentiating men's depressive symptoms from other mental illnesses, estimating prevalence and identifying factors linked to male suicide. Significant sex differences highlighted that females had higher literacy levels than men in regard to male depression. Implementing gender sensitive and specific programs to target and advance literacy levels about men's depression may be key to ultimately reducing depression and suicide among men in Canada.

  18. A prospective study to compare three depression screening tools in patients who are terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Dennis, Mick; Taylor, Fiona

    2004-01-01

    Depression is a significant symptom for approximately one in four palliative care patients. This study investigates the performance of three screening tools. Patients were asked to verbally rate their mood on a scale of 0-10; to respond "yes" or "no" to the question "Are you depressed?," and to complete the Edinburgh depression scale. They were also interviewed using a semi-structured clinical interview according to DSM-IV criteria. Complete data was available for 74 patients. For the single question, a "yes" answer had a sensitivity of 55% and specificity 74%. The Edinburgh depression scale at a cut-off point of > or =13 had a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 80%. The verbal mood item with a cut-off point of > or =3 had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 43%. The Edinburgh depression scale proved to be the most reliable instrument for detecting clinical depression in palliative care patients.

  19. Management of bipolar depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Seung Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with bipolar disorder spend more time in a depressed than manic state, even with individualized treatment. To date, bipolar depression is often misdiagnosed and ineffectively managed both for acute episodes and residual symptoms. This review attempts to summarize the current status of available treatment strategies in the treatment of bipolar depression. For acute and prophylactic treatment, a substantial body of evidence supports the antidepressive efficacy of lithium for bipolar disorders and its antisuicidal effects. Among numerous anticonvulsants with mood-stabilizing properties, valproate and lamotrigine could be first-line options for bipolar depression. Due to receptor profile, mood-stabilizing properties of second-generation antipsychotics have been explored, and up to date, quetiapine and olanzapine appear to be a reasonable option for bipolar depression. The usefulness of antidepressants in bipolar depression is still controversial. Current guidelines generally recommend the cautious antidepressant use in combination with mood stabilizers to reduce the risk of mood elevation or cycle acceleration. Results from clinical trials on psychosocial intervention are promising, especially when integrated with pharmacotherapy. Most patients with bipolar depression need individualized and combined treatment, although the published evidence on this type of treatment strategy is limited. Future studies on the utility of currently available agents and modalities including psychosocial intervention are required.

  20. Behandlingsresistent depression kan behandles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2011-01-01

    Depression is considered resistant when two treatment attempts with antidepressants from different classes fail to produce significant clinical improvement. In cases of treatment-resistant depression, it is recommended to reevaluate the diagnosis, clarify comorbidity, substance abuse and lack...... of compliance. Regarding treatment, evidence is sparse, but switching to a different antidepressant, and combination or augmentation with another agent, admission and treatment with ECT are the options. The choice of treatment must be based on the characteristics of the depression, the severity of treatment...

  1. Depression and erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlouf, Antoine; Kparker, Ashay; Niederberger, Craig S

    2007-11-01

    Depression and erectile dysfunction (ED) clearly are associated. Although urologists and psychiatrists have long recognized that antidepressant medications affect erectile function negatively, the interplay between the two conditions remains underappreciated. Psychiatrists may be reluctant to question a patient in detail about ED, and urologists seldom perform a formal assessment of the presence of depression in patients who have ED. This article gives a quick overview of the relationship between these two conditions and provides the clinician with the knowledge required to effectively manage ED with comorbid depression.

  2. Executive functioning moderates the relationship between motivation and adolescent depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Lopez, Chrystal; Lopez-Vergara, Hector I; Colder, Craig R

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the association between adolescent depressive symptoms and components of executive functioning (EF), including planning (Tower of London), set-shifting (Wisconsin Card Sorting Task), and inhibition (Stop Signal Task) in a community sample of 12-14 year olds. Further, EF was tested as a moderator of motivation (as operationalized by revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory) effects on depressive symptoms. Results suggested that planning ability was associated with depressive symptoms. Furthermore, planning ability moderated the relationship between motivation (fight-flight- freeze system; FFFS) and depressive symptoms, such that among adolescents with poor planning ability the FFFS positively predicted depressive symptoms, but among adolescents with strong planning ability the FFFS negatively predicts depressive symptoms. Neither set-shifting nor inhibition was associated with depressive symptoms. Findings highlight the need to consider multiple components of EF and to integrate motivational and executive dysfunction models to the study of depression.

  3. Depression symptomatology and the neural correlates of infant face and cry perception during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Helena J V; Graber, Kelsey M; Mayes, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    Depression symptoms during pregnancy may affect emerging maternal sensitivity and have lasting consequences for the dyadic relationship. Here, we examined whether depression was associated with the neural correlates of infant face and cry perception during pregnancy. In 36 women between 34 and 38 weeks gestation, we examined the P300 elicited by infant emotional (happy, distressed, and neutral) faces and cries (high- and low-distress cries and a neutral tone). The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory-II were employed to measure current depression symptomatology. Higher depression symptoms were associated with an attenuated P300 to distressed infant faces, but not with happy or neutral infant faces. There was no association between depression symptoms and the P300 elicited by infant cries. These results suggest that depression symptoms during pregnancy may affect neural processing of infant faces, especially when the infant face is expressing distress.

  4. Test Reviews: Bracken, B. A., & Howell, K. (2004). "Clinical Assessment of Depression." Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghakhani, Anoosha; Chan, Eric K.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors review the Clinical Assessment of Depression (CAD), a 50-item self-report measure of depressive symptoms designed for children, adolescents, adults, and elderly adults from 8 to 79 years of age. Purporting to be sensitive to depressive symptomatology across the lifespan, the test items were written to reflect the…

  5. Spanish "fine tuning" of language to describe depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, Antonio; Centeno, Carlos; Carvajal, Ana; Tejedor, María Angustias Portela; Urdiroz, Juliana; Martínez, Marina

    2009-08-01

    On screening tools for emotional distress, the terms "depression" and "anxiety" are commonly used for patients with advanced cancer. However, these terms could have negative connotations in Spanish such that cultural and unexpected differences in perception may invalidate or skew the results of the screening if the best terms are not chosen. The goal of this study was to determine the best expression that can be used to explore anxiety and depression in Spanish. A prospective study of 100 Spanish-speaking patients was performed. Spanish patients with cancer completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and six Verbal Numerical Scales (VNS) exploring the level of anxiety using the terms ansioso (anxious), nervioso (nervous), or intranquilo (uneasy/disquiet), and the level of depression using the terms deprimido (depressed), desanimado (discouraged), or triste (sad). The correlation, sensitivity, and specificity for all the VNS and HADS (8 and 11 cutoff points) were analyzed. The correlation (Spearman rho) between HADS and the anxiety VNS was r = 0.557 using "anxious"; r = 0.603 using "nervous"; and r = 0.594 using "uneasy." The correlation for the depression VNS was r = 0.662 using "depression"; r = 0.759 using "discouraged" and r = 0.596 using "sad"; alpha anxiety achieved the best levels for sensitivity (0.80) and specificity (0.70). The term "discouraged" with a cutoff point of 4 of 10 shows a sensitivity of 0.89, a specificity of 0.84, as well as a predictive positive value of 0.77 and a negative value of 0.93. In Spanish, the term desanimado seems to be more suitable in screening for depression. Alternate terms could be used to explore anxiety in Spanish. Exploring depression with simple questions in Spanish achieves greater accuracy than the same approach to exploring anxiety.

  6. Climate Sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindzen, Richard [M.I.T.

    2011-11-09

    Warming observed thus far is entirely consistent with low climate sensitivity. However, the result is ambiguous because the sources of climate change are numerous and poorly specified. Model predictions of substantial warming aredependent on positive feedbacks associated with upper level water vapor and clouds, but models are notably inadequate in dealing with clouds and the impacts of clouds and water vapor are intimately intertwined. Various approaches to measuring sensitivity based on the physics of the feedbacks will be described. The results thus far point to negative feedbacks. Problems with these approaches as well as problems with the concept of climate sensitivity will be described.

  7. Neuroticism in remitted major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders; Kristoffersen, Marius; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The personality trait of neuroticism is strongly related to depression, but depression is etiologically heterogeneous. Late-onset depression (LOD) may be more closely related to vascular factors, and previous studies of neuroticism in LOD versus early-onset depression (EOD) have not b...

  8. Do You Have Major Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression Do You Have Major Depression? Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Simple ... member may have major depression. —NIMH Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  9. A REVIEW ON ANIMAL MODELS OF DEPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Madhu Devi* and Ramica Sharma

    2013-01-01

    As described by the world health organization (WHO), depression is the most common and serious disorder leading to suicide. Numbers of synthetic drugs are available for the treatment of this fatal disease, but are associated with serious complications. A wide diversity of animal models has been used to examine antidepressant activity. These range from relatively simple models sensitive to acute treatment, to highly sophisticated models. The number of validated animal models for affective diso...

  10. Telomere length and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Rode, Line

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression has been cross-sectionally associated with short telomeres as a measure of biological age. However, the direction and nature of the association is currently unclear. AIMS: We examined whether short telomere length is associated with depression cross-sectionally as well...... as prospectively and genetically. METHOD: Telomere length and three polymorphisms, TERT, TERC and OBFC1, were measured in 67 306 individuals aged 20-100 years from the Danish general population and associated with register-based attendance at hospital for depression and purchase of antidepressant medication....... RESULTS: Attendance at hospital for depression was associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally, but not prospectively. Further, purchase of antidepressant medication was not associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally or prospectively. Mean follow-up was 7.6 years (range 0...

  11. Doxepin (Depression, Anxiety)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxepin is used to treat depression and anxiety. Doxepin is in a class of medications called tricyclic antidepressants. It works by increasing the amounts of certain natural substances in the brain ...

  12. [Depression and myocardial infaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testuz, A

    2009-03-04

    Several works show an association between depression and the occurence of a first myocardial infarction. Depression after myocardial infarction seems to be a marker of poorer outcome, regardless of other risk factors or severity of the myocardial infarction. Dysautonomia and alteration of platelet activation are a few physiopathological changes shared by both affections, through which they might be related. Treatment of depression is not associated with better cardiovascular outcome, but selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown safe and efficient among patients with coronary heart disease. Cognitivo-comportemental approach and cardiovascular rehabilitation program after myocardial infarction also play a role in improving quality of life of the depressed patient with coronary heart disease.

  13. Depression (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people overcome depression. Talk therapy works by helping people to: understand their emotions, put feelings into words, and feel understood and supported build the confidence to deal with life's struggles work out problems ...

  14. Depression in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Printable Report Election Year: Mental Health and Politics Glossary and Citations Prevalence Data Ranking Guidelines Ranking ... Mental Health. “The Many Dimensions of Depression in Women: Women at Risk,” Accessed June 1999. Netscape: http:// ...

  15. The psychoneuroimmunology of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Brian E; Myint, Ayemu

    2009-04-01

    Chronic stress, by initiating changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the immune system, acts as a trigger for anxiety and depression. There is experimental and clinical evidence that the rise in the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoids, which occurs in a chronically stressful situation and also in depression, contribute to the behavioural changes associated with depression. A defect in serotonergic function is associated with these hormonal and immune changes. Neurodegenerative changes in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdalae are the frequent outcome of the changes in the HPA axis and the immune system. Such changes may provide evidence for the link between chronic depression and dementia in later life.

  16. Increased numbers of orexin/hypocretin neurons in a genetic rat depression model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikrouli, Elli; Wörtwein, Gitta; Soylu, Rana

    2011-01-01

    The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat is a genetic animal model of depression that displays characteristics similar to those of depressed patients including lower body weight, decreased appetite and reduced REM sleep latency. Hypothalamic neuropeptides such as orexin/hypocretin, melanin-concentra......The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat is a genetic animal model of depression that displays characteristics similar to those of depressed patients including lower body weight, decreased appetite and reduced REM sleep latency. Hypothalamic neuropeptides such as orexin/hypocretin, melanin...

  17. Depression and codependency in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Hammer, C; Martsolf, D S; Zeller, R A

    1998-12-01

    Seven million American women are depressed, and 40 million Americans, primarily women, have been labeled as codependent. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of codependency in women undergoing treatment for depression, examine the relationship between codependency and depression, and determine which of the symptoms of codependency are most highly predictive of depression scores. Depression and codependency were measured in a sample of 105 depressed women by using the Beck Depression Inventory and the Codependency Assessment Tool. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's Product Moment Correlation, and multiple regression were used for analysis. Of these depressed women, 36% were moderately to severely codependent. Depression and codependency were strongly related, with the significant gamma = .92 (P codependency subscales, Low Self-Worth and Hiding Self correlate most strongly with depression; Other Focus/Self-Neglect added the least-independent--explanatory power. Thus, future research should be directed toward the relationship of codependency to power, alienation of self, and personality disorders.

  18. Identifying Depression on Twitter

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem, Moin

    2016-01-01

    Social media has recently emerged as a premier method to disseminate information online. Through these online networks, tens of millions of individuals communicate their thoughts, personal experiences, and social ideals. We therefore explore the potential of social media to predict, even prior to onset, Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in online personas. We employ a crowdsourced method to compile a list of Twitter users who profess to being diagnosed with depression. Using up to a year of pri...

  19. Anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzelere, Michele M; Wiseman, Pamela

    2002-06-01

    Evidence for alternative treatments for depression, anxiety, and insomnia are reviewed in this article. Treatment of depression with St. John's wort, L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, S-adenosylmethionine, dehydroepiandosterone, folate, exercise, acupuncture, and meditation are examined. Evidence for the efficacy of kava kava, exercise, relaxation therapies, and acupuncture in treatment anxiety is reviewed. The use of valerian, melatonin, chamomile, passionflower, exercise, acupuncture, and behavioral therapies (i.e., sleep restriction, stimulus control, relaxation, and sleep hygiene) for insomnia is discussed.

  20. Gluten Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. It is found mainly in foods but ... products like medicines, vitamins, and supplements. People with gluten sensitivity have problems with gluten. It is different ...

  1. [Atypical depression in Japan--39 case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Koji; Yamayoshi, Kayoko; Matsuzaki, Yamato; Kojima, Takuya

    2005-01-01

    In Japan, relatively little attention has been paid to atypical depression, which is defined as the presence of mood reactivity and two of four associated features: hyperphagia, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis, rejection sensitivity. The present study was undertaken to obtain detailed clinical information from patients with a diagnosis of atypical depression. We assessed clinical characteristics of each atypical feature, comorbidity of other psychiatric disorders, presence of a stressful life event, and underlying psychological stress in 39 psychiatric outpatients. We also examined the relationship of interpersonal sensitivity to each atypical feature. Mean age of onset was 22 +/- 6, 74% were female, 20 patients (51%) had comorbid social phobia. Thirty (77%) had hyperphagia and 25 of these were women. Twenty (74%) had hypersomnia. Only seven patients reported daytime sleepiness and others (13) reported difficulty in staying awake due to lack of energy. Nineteen (49%) had leaden paralysis. Thirty-two patients (82%) had rejection sensitivity and this symptom correlated with scores of FNE (fears of negative evaluation), LSAS (Liebowits social anxiety scale) and Brief social phobia scale (BSPA). Seven patients reported disappointment in love as a stressful life event preceding the depressive episode. In patients with comorbid social phobia, loss of confidence due to hypersensitivity to rejection or criticism seemed to be the most important factor as a chronic psychologica stress. Seven patients met criteria for bipolar disorder and five out of seven had comorbid generalized social phobia. The clinical and theoretical implications of these findings were discussed.

  2. [Depression in the workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezerai, Mustapha; Dahane, Abdelkrim; Tachon, Jean-Paul

    2006-05-01

    Depression is the object of a dense literature, and synthesizing it is more of a utopian ideal rather than a concrete possibility. Several specific risk factors for mental health are found in the workplace: work overloads, defective communications, role conflicts, competitive climate, and tolerance of violence. At the same time, few preventive measures have been implemented against mental disorders at work, nor are many protective factors present. One worker in ten suffers from depression, anxiety, stress, or overwork. To be distinguished from "burnout", depressive symptoms must induce clinically significant suffering with substantial deterioration in functioning at work. For depression to be recognized as a workplace accident, the employee must show that it was triggered by an unforeseen and sudden event (or at least one certainly) due to or at work. The causal link between an event at work and the depression must be shown (in particular by expert medical testimony about stress factors and indicators of vulnerability to depression). Its recognition as an occupational disease can be based on the presence of psychosocial factors described by models of workplace stress and on its description by the occupational physician.

  3. Two prospective studies of changes in stress generation across depressive episodes in adolescents and emerging adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Matthew C; Kouros, Chrystyna D; Hellman, Natalie; Rao, Uma; Garber, Judy

    2014-11-01

    The stress generation hypothesis was tested in two different longitudinal studies examining relations between weekly depression symptom ratings and stress levels in adolescents and emerging adults at varied risk for depression. The participants in Study 1 included 240 adolescents who differed with regard to their mothers' history of depressive disorders. Youth were assessed annually across 6 years (Grades 6-12). Consistent with the depression autonomy model, higher numbers of prior major depressive episodes (MDEs) were associated with weaker stress generation effects, such that higher levels of depressive symptoms predicted increases in levels of dependent stressors for adolescents with two or more prior MDEs, but depressive symptoms were not significantly related to dependent stress levels for youth with three or more prior MDEs. In Study 2, the participants were 32 remitted-depressed and 36 never-depressed young adults who completed a psychosocial stress task to determine cortisol reactivity and were reassessed for depression and stress approximately 8 months later. Stress generation effects were moderated by cortisol responses to a laboratory psychosocial stressor, such that individuals with higher cortisol responses exhibited a pattern consistent with the depression autonomy model, whereas individuals with lower cortisol responses showed a pattern more consistent with the depression sensitization model. Finally, comparing across the two samples, stress generation effects were weaker for older participants and for those with more prior MDEs. The complex, multifactorial relation between stress and depression is discussed.

  4. Depression during pregnancy and postpartum: contribution of stress and ovarian hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummelte, S; Galea, Liisa A M

    2010-06-30

    Depression is the most common psychiatric disease among women, exhibiting a prevalence which is 2-3x higher than in men. The postpartum period is considered the time of greatest risk for women to develop major depression and postpartum depression affects approximately 15% of women. A dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is the most prominent endocrine change seen in depression and normalization of the HPA axis is a major target of recent therapies. Females exhibit different stress sensitivities than males which might contribute to their increased vulnerability for depression. Maternal stress or depression during pregnancy and/or postpartum is particularly concerning as early developmental influences can affect the maturation of the offspring as well as the mental health of the mother. Despite the urgent need for more information on depression in females, especially during pregnancy and postpartum, most animal models of depression have utilized only males. Given the sex differences in incidence of depression and treatment, it is vitally important to create or validate animal models of depression in females. This review will focus on the association between stress, glucocorticoids and depression in humans, with a special focus on depression in women during pregnancy and postpartum and on animal models of postpartum depression and the consequences for the offspring.

  5. Depression and Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    There are exciting findings in the field of depression and coronary heart disease. Whether diagnosed or simply self-reported, depression continues to mark very high risk for a recurrent acute coronary syndrome or for death in patients with coronary heart disease. Many intriguing mechanisms have been posited to be implicated in the association between depression and heart disease, and randomized controlled trials of depression treatment are beginning to delineate the types of depression manage...

  6. Late Pregnancy Thyroid-Binding Globulin Predicts Perinatal Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Cort; Leserman, Jane; Garcia, Nacire; Stansbury, Melissa; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Johnson, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Previously we found that late pregnancy total and free thyroxine (TT4, FT4) concentrations were negatively related to greater pre and/or postpartum depressive symptoms. In a much larger cohort, the current study examined whether these thyroid indices measured earlier in the third trimester (31-33 weeks) predict subsequent perinatal depression and anxiety ratings as well as syndromal depression. Thyroid-binding globulin (TBG) concentrations increase markedly during pregnancy and may be an index of sensitivity to elevated estrogen levels. TBG was examined in this study because prior findings suggest that postpartum depression is related to sensitivity to mood destabilization by elevated sex hormone concentrations during pregnancy. Our cohort was 199 euthyroid women recruited from a public health obstetrics clinic (63.8% Hispanic, 21.6% Black). After screening and blood draws for hormone measures at pregnancy weeks 31-33, subjects were evaluated during home visits at pregnancy weeks 35-36 as well as postpartum weeks 6 and 12. Evaluations included psychiatric interviews for current and life-time DSM-IV psychiatric history (M.I.N.I.-Plus), subject self-ratings and interviewer ratings for depression and anxiety (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, Montgomery-Ǻsberg Depression Rating Scale; Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Hamilton Anxiety Inventory), as well as a standardized interview to obtain life-time trauma history. Numerous covariates were included in all regression analyses. Trauma and major depression history were robustly significant predictors of depression and anxiety ratings over the study period when these variables were analyzed individually or in a combined model including FT4 or TBG (pdepression and anxiety ratings (pdepression history, were significant individual predictors of syndromal depression during the study period (pdepression history, FT4 and TBG generally were not significantly predictive of depression or anxiety ratings, and FT4

  7. Lifestyle medicine for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; O'Neil, Adrienne; Coulson, Carolyn E; Schweitzer, Isaac; Berk, Michael

    2014-04-10

    The prevalence of depression appears to have increased over the past three decades. While this may be an artefact of diagnostic practices, it is likely that there are factors about modernity that are contributing to this rise. There is now compelling evidence that a range of lifestyle factors are involved in the pathogenesis of depression. Many of these factors can potentially be modified, yet they receive little consideration in the contemporary treatment of depression, where medication and psychological intervention remain the first line treatments. "Lifestyle Medicine" provides a nexus between public health promotion and clinical treatments, involving the application of environmental, behavioural, and psychological principles to enhance physical and mental wellbeing. This may also provide opportunities for general health promotion and potential prevention of depression. In this paper we provide a narrative discussion of the major components of Lifestyle Medicine, consisting of the evidence-based adoption of physical activity or exercise, dietary modification, adequate relaxation/sleep and social interaction, use of mindfulness-based meditation techniques, and the reduction of recreational substances such as nicotine, drugs, and alcohol. We also discuss other potential lifestyle factors that have a more nascent evidence base, such as environmental issues (e.g. urbanisation, and exposure to air, water, noise, and chemical pollution), and the increasing human interface with technology. Clinical considerations are also outlined. While data supports that some of these individual elements are modifiers of overall mental health, and in many cases depression, rigorous research needs to address the long-term application of Lifestyle Medicine for depression prevention and management. Critically, studies exploring lifestyle modification involving multiple lifestyle elements are needed. While the judicious use of medication and psychological techniques are still advocated

  8. Identification of depressive disorder among older people in care homes - a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, C Jane; Curran, Stephen; Topping, Annie; Shaik, Kauserjan; Muthukrishnan, Venkatesh; Stephenson, John

    2011-07-01

    Depression is common among older people but more common among those living in care homes. Depression is not easily detected among older adults because of the presentation, and the tendency for older people not to complain of depression, particularly those living in care homes. In general, care home staff have limited training in recognising depression. Depression is undertreated and residents may not receive a therapeutic dose of antidepressant. The true prevalence of depression among care home residents is uncertain. This feasibility study aimed to explore the level of depression among older people in care homes by comparing the outcome of an assessment by care home staff with the outcome of a diagnostic clinical interview, using ICD-10 criteria and the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), conducted by a psychiatrist. In all, 47 older people from four care homes were interviewed by a psychiatrist. Of them, 39.1% (18/46) of residents were prescribed an antidepressant and were no longer depressed; 8.7% (4/46) were prescribed an antidepressant and remained depressed; and 6.5% (3/46) of residents assessed as being depressed, had not been prescribed an antidepressant. That is, 54% (25/46) of residents had been or were currently depressed. Using ICD-10 criteria, the sensitivity of the GDS at a threshold of 10 and 11 was 100%. In total, 89.4% of residents received a correct diagnosis (presence or absence of depression) using the GDS at the 11 threshold. The prevalence of depression in these homes was 54%. Of the residents with depression, 72% (18/25) were managed with an antidepressant and 28% (7/25) were receiving ineffective or no treatment. The 30-item GDS can provide more useful information than a home care staff assessment for identifying depression. More research should explore the value of training home care staff to administer the 30-item GDS to optimise the management of depression in older people in care homes.

  9. The Validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Mondolo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the concurrent validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS against the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Ham-D in patients with Parkinson’ disease (PD. Forty-six non-demented PD patients were assessed by a neurologist on the Ham-D. Patients also completed four mood rating scales: the HADS, the GDS, the VAS and the Face Scale. For the HADS and the GDS, Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC curves were obtained and the positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV were calculated for different cut-off scores. Maximum discrimination between depressed and non-depressed PD patients was reached at a cut-off score of 10/11 for both the HADS and the GDS. At the same cut-off score of 10/11 for both the HADS and the GDS, the high sensitivity and NPV make these scales appropriate screening instruments for depression in PD. A high specificity and PPV, which is necessary for a diagnostic test, was reached at a cut-off score of 12/13 for the GDS and at a cut-off score of 11/12 for the HADS. The results indicate the validity of using the HADS and the GDS to screen for depressive symptoms and to diagnose depressive illness in PD.

  10. Tele-Interpersonal Psychotherapy Acutely Reduces Depressive Symptoms in Depressed HIV-Infected Rural Persons: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Timothy G; Heckman, Bernadette D; Anderson, Timothy; Lovejoy, Travis I; Markowitz, John C; Shen, Ye; Sutton, Mark

    2016-04-26

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive rural individuals carry a 1.3-times greater risk of a depressive diagnosis than their urban counterparts. This randomized clinical trial tested whether telephone-administered interpersonal psychotherapy (tele-IPT) acutely relieved depressive symptoms in 132 HIV-infected rural persons from 28 states diagnosed with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV major depressive disorder (MDD), partially remitted MDD, or dysthymic disorder. Patients were randomized to either 9 sessions of one-on-one tele-IPT (n = 70) or standard care (SC; n = 62). A series of intent-to-treat (ITT), therapy completer, and sensitivity analyses assessed changes in depressive symptoms, interpersonal problems, and social support from pre- to postintervention. Across all analyses, tele-IPT patients reported significantly lower depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems than SC controls; 22% of tele-IPT patients were categorized as a priori "responders" who reported 50% or higher reductions in depressive symptoms compared to only 4% of SC controls in ITT analyses. Brief tele-IPT acutely decreased depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems in depressed rural people living with HIV.

  11. Path Sensitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵著行; 闵应骅; 等

    1997-01-01

    For different delay models,the concept of sensitization can be very different.Traditonal concepts of sensitization cannot precisely describe circuit behavior when the input vectors change very fast.Using Boolean process aporoach,this paper presents a new definition of sensitization for arbitrary input waveforms.By this new concept it is found that if the inputs of a combinational circuit can change at any time,and each gate's delay varies within an interval (bounded gate delay model),then every path,which is not necessarily a single topological path,is sensitizable.From the experimental results it can be seen that,all nonsensitizable paths for traditional concepts actually can propagate transitions along them for some input waveforms.However,specified time between input transitions(STBIT) and minimum permissible pulse width(ε)are two major factors to make some paths non-sensitizable.

  12. Beside the Geriatric Depression Scale: the WHO-Five Well-being Index as a valid screening tool for depression in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Kramer, Dietmar; Saravo, Barbara; Mergl, Roland; Fejtkova, Sabina; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare criterion validities of the WHO-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5) and the Geriatric Depression Scale 15-item version (GDS-15) and 4-item version (GDS-4) as screening instruments for depression in nursing home residents. Data from 92 residents aged 65-97 years without severe cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Examination ≥15) were analysed. Criterion validities of the WHO-5, the GDS-15 and the GDS-4 were assessed against diagnoses of major and minor depression provided by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Subanalyses were performed for major and minor depression. Areas under the receiver operating curve (AUCs) as well as sensitivities and specificities at optimal cut-off points were computed. Prevalence of depressive disorder was 28.3%. The AUC value of the WHO-5 (0.90) was similar to that of the GDS-15 (0.82). Sensitivity of the WHO-5 (0.92) at its optimal cut-off of ≤12 was significantly higher than that of the GDS-15 (0.69) at its optimal cut-off of ≥7. The WHO-5 was equally sensitive for the subgroups of major and minor depression (0.92), whereas the GDS-15 was sensitive only for major depression (0.85), but not for minor depression (0.54). For specificity, there was no significant difference between WHO-5 (0.79) and GDS-15 (0.88), but both instruments outperformed the GDS-4 (0.53). The WHO-5 demonstrated high sensitivity for major and minor depression. Being shorter than the GDS-15 and superior to the GDS-4, the WHO-5 is a promising screening tool that could help physicians improve low recognition rates of depression in nursing home residents. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Social functioning in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferberg, Aleksandra; Bicks, Lucy; Hasler, Gregor

    2016-10-01

    Depression is associated with social risk factors, social impairments and poor social functioning. This paper gives an overview of these social aspects using the NIMH Research and Domain Criteria 'Systems for Social Processes' as a framework. In particular, it describes the bio-psycho-social interplay regarding impaired affiliation and attachment (social anhedonia, hyper-sensitivity to social rejection, competition avoidance, increased altruistic punishment), impaired social communication (impaired emotion recognition, diminished cooperativeness), impaired social perception (reduced empathy, theory-of-mind deficits) and their impact on social networks and the use of social media. It describes these dysfunctional social processes at the behavioural, neuroanatomical, neurochemical and genetic levels, and with respect to animal models of social stress. We discuss the diagnostic specificity of these social deficit constructs for depression and in relation to depression severity. Since social factors are importantly involved in the pathogenesis and the consequences of depression, such research will likely contribute to better diagnostic assessments and concepts, treatments and preventative strategies both at the diagnostic and transdiagnostic level.

  14. Respiratory muscle training improves hemodynamics, autonomic function, baroreceptor sensitivity, and respiratory mechanics in rats with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo B; Hentschke, Vítor S; Quagliotto, Edson; Cavinato, Paulo R; Schmeing, Letiane A; Xavier, Léder L; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2011-12-01

    Respiratory muscle training (RMT) improves functional capacity in chronic heart-failure (HF) patients, but the basis for this improvement remains unclear. We evaluate the effects of RMT on the hemodynamic and autonomic function, arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and respiratory mechanics in rats with HF. Rats were assigned to one of four groups: sedentary sham (n = 8), trained sham (n = 8), sedentary HF (n = 8), or trained HF (n = 8). Trained animals underwent a RMT protocol (30 min/day, 5 day/wk, 6 wk of breathing through a resistor), whereas sedentary animals did not. In HF rats, RMT had significant effects on several parameters. It reduced left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure (P RMT (P RMT (P RMT (P RMT protocol in HF rats promotes an improvement in hemodynamic function, sympathetic and vagal heart modulation, arterial BRS, and respiratory mechanics, all of which are benefits associated with improvements in cardiopulmonary interaction.

  15. Depressive realism: effects of depression severity and interpretation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendree-Smith, N; Scogin, F

    2000-12-01

    This study examined the theory of depressive realism, which posits that depressed people often are more accurate in perceptions and judgments than nondepressed people. Two possible qualifications to this theory were examined: (1) severity of depression moderates the effect, and (2) length of processing time will impact the presence of bias in depressed people, that is, negative bias will develop over time. College students were presented with a bogus personality profile that actually consisted of items previously rated as neutral in desirability. Participants rated these profiles for desirability initially and then again three days later. Results indicated a significant effect of depression severity on desirability rating. Nondepressed and mildly depressed students found their profiles to be more positive than the moderately/severely depressed students, with both groups having scores in the positive range. However, those participants who were moderately/severely depressed showed a negative bias in their ratings. No support was found for the effect of different times of interpretation.

  16. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milgrom Jeannette

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Methods Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26–32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161 also completed questionnaires at 10–12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1. Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2. Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3. Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator

  17. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Bronwyn; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2008-04-16

    Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26-32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161) also completed questionnaires at 10-12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1). Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2). Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3). Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator for other risk factors. Risk factor profiles for

  18. Depression Subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale applied preoperatively in spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of the Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D in spine surgery, comparing it to Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, the HADS-D and the BDI were applied to patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar (n=139 or cervical spondylosis (n=17. Spearman correlation tests for HADS-D and BDI were applied. The internal consistency of HADS-D was estimated by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. RESULTS: According to the BDI, the prevalence of depression was of 28.8% (n=45. The Spearman r coefficient between HADS-D and BDI was 0.714 (p10, there was a sensitivity of 71.1%, specificity of 95.4%, and positive likelihood-ratio of 15.78. CONCLUSIONS: HADS-D showed a strong correlation with BDI and good reliability. HADS-D is a good alternative for screening depression and assessing its severity.

  19. The Factor Structure and Presentation of Depression Among HIV-Positive Adults in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Psaros, Christina; Haberer, Jessica E.; Boum, Yap; Tsai, Alexander C.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Peter W Hunt; David R Bangsberg; Safren, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent psychiatric comorbidities of HIV and one of the greatest barriers to HIV self-care and adherence. Despite this, little consensus exists on how to best measure depression among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in African settings. Measurement of depression among PLWHA may be confounded by somatic symptoms. Some research recommends excluding these items to enhance measurement validity; sensitivity may be lost with this approach. We sought to characteri...

  20. ICD-10 and the clinical features of depressions: data of the CIRCADIAN-I program

    OpenAIRE

    O V Serdyuk; Ovchinnikov, A.; N A Kutuzova; M Y Drobizhev; K Y Retyunsky

    2011-01-01

    The data of the CIRCADIAN-I trial suggest that depressions are unsatisfactorily diagnosed in psychiatric practice. Thus, some of the ICD-10 diagnoses used to denote depressive states (dysthymia, cyclothymia) are made extremely rarely. Only comparatively short-term and reversible vital depressions are considered to be preferred for the categories of affective disorders (F.30-F.33). Any clinical deviations from this clinical presentation (sensitive, anxiety symptoms, a prolonged course, and no ...

  1. STUDY OF DEPRESSION IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmesh V

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: The presence of depression in schizophrenia has been recognized since the time of Kraepelin and Bleuler. Depressive symptoms associated with schizophrenia have received considerable attention in recent years. It has been suggested that patient may manifest depressive symptoms during the onset of psychotic symptoms, during course of chronic schizophrenia or after the psychotic symptoms has been abated. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: 1. To study the prevalence of depression in schizophrenia. 2. To study the correlation between depression and subtype of schizophrenia. MATERALS & METHODS: 50 consecutive patients suffering from schizophrenia according to DSM-IV criteria, who were brought to psychiatric OPD were selected for this study. Patients between 15-55years age were included in this study. HDRS (Hamilton depression rating scale was administered to all patients to assess severity of depression. RESULTS: Out of 50 patients suffering from schizophrenia, 44% of patients suffering from schizophrenia were depressed. In this study the most common symptoms of depression were depressed mood, loss of interest on pleasure, sleep disturbance, loss of energy/fatigue, psychomotor disturbance, suicidal thought or death wish, feeling of hopelessness. CONCLUSION: Depression is common in patients suffering from schizophrenia. The severity of depression was mild to moderate, no one had severe depression. It is more common in patients who are living in nuclear family, who are divorced, who have paranoid type of schizophrenia, who were not on antipsychotic medicine.

  2. Atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonov S.F.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature presents current data on cli¬nical picture and diagnostics of atypical depression. Rubric “atypical depression” includes a variety of depressive states characterized by reactively caused changes of mood, sensitivity to interpersonal contacts, inverted vegetative and somatic symptoms such as increased appetite and hypersomnia. The article considers the place of atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders. Positions of foreign authors that produce atypical depression as a clinical entity in the structure of Bipolar affective disorder II type are represented, the views of other authors on the structure of atypical depression are considered. The analysis of national concept of non-circular depression is carried out. Questions of atypical affective conditions acquire special significance due to preparation of International Classification of Diseases of the 11th revision, because inclusion in it of Bipolar affective disorder II type, a manifestation of which is considered to be atypical depressions, is under discussion.

  3. Brainstem raphe and substantia nigra echogenicity in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder with comorbid depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Dolores; Iranzo, Alex; Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Serradell, Mónica; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2015-07-01

    In Parkinson disease (PD), REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and depression may occur before the onset of parkinsonism. Transcranial sonography (TCS) shows that hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra (SN+) and hypoechogenicity of the brainstem raphe (BR+) are frequent in PD, particularly when depression is associated. Combined SN+ and BR+ identify PD subjects in whom depression antedates parkinsonism onset. It can be speculated that SN+ and BR+ may also identify idiopathic RBD (IRBD) subjects with comorbid depression, supporting the clinical diagnosis of this mood disorder. We aimed to study the brainstem raphe and substantia nigra echogenicity and their ability to predict comorbid depression in IRBD. Seventy-two IRBD patients and 71 age and sex-matched controls underwent TCS. Depression was diagnosed by means of DSM-IV criteria. Depression was more frequent in IRBD patients than in controls (44.4 vs. 18.3 %; p = 0.001). BR+ was more frequent in depressed than in nondepressed IRBD patients (32.0 vs. 11.4 %; p = 0.050). Sensitivity of BR+ to predict depression in IRBD was 32.0 %, specificity was 88.6 %, and relative risk was 1.88. Sensitivity of SN+ to predict depression in IRBD was 72.0 %, specificity was 44.1 %, and relative risk was 1.53. Sensitivity of combined BR+ and SN+ to predict depression in IRBD was 23.1 %, specificity 97.1 %, and relative risk was 2.31. Hypoechogenicity of the brainstem raphe, particularly when combined with hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra, detects comorbid depression in IRBD. This finding suggests that dysfunction of the serotonergic dorsal raphe may be involved in the pathophysiology of depression in IRBD.

  4. Hopelessness, Depression, Suicidal Ideation, and Clinical Diagnosis of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined relevance of clinical diagnosis of depression for explaining discrepant relationships of hopelessness and depression with suicidal ideation. Administered Beck Depression Inventory, Hopelessness Scale, and Scale for Suicide Ideation to 1,306 patients with mood disorder and 488 patients without mood disorder. Found that hopelessness was 1.3…

  5. Shared Etiology of Psychotic Experiences and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescence: A Longitudinal Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavos, Helena M S; Eley, Thalia C; McGuire, Philip; Plomin, Robert; Cardno, Alastair G; Freeman, Daniel; Ronald, Angelica

    2016-09-01

    Psychotic disorders and major depression, both typically adult-onset conditions, often co-occur. At younger ages psychotic experiences and depressive symptoms are often reported in the community. We used a genetically sensitive longitudinal design to investigate the relationship between psychotic experiences and depressive symptoms in adolescence. A representative community sample of twins from England and Wales was employed. Self-rated depressive symptoms, paranoia, hallucinations, cognitive disorganization, grandiosity, anhedonia, and parent-rated negative symptoms were collected when the twins were age 16 (N = 9618) and again on a representative subsample 9 months later (N = 2873). Direction and aetiology of associations were assessed using genetically informative cross-lagged models. Depressive symptoms were moderately correlated with paranoia, hallucinations, and cognitive disorganization. Lower correlations were observed between depression and anhedonia, and depression and parent-rated negative symptoms. Nonsignificant correlations were observed between depression and grandiosity. Largely the same genetic effects influenced depression and paranoia, depression and hallucinations, and depression and cognitive disorganization. Modest overlap in environmental influences also played a role in the associations. Significant bi-directional longitudinal associations were observed between depression and paranoia. Hallucinations and cognitive disorganization during adolescence were found to impact later depression, even after controlling for earlier levels of depression. Our study shows that psychotic experiences and depression, as traits in the community, have a high genetic overlap in mid-adolescence. Future research should test the prediction stemming from our longitudinal results, namely that reducing or ameliorating positive and cognitive psychotic experiences in adolescence would decrease later depressive symptoms. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  6. [Events of life and links with severe depression at different ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourion, D

    2009-12-01

    Major depression is a common, severe, chronic, and often life-threatening illness. There is a growing body of evidence that, far from being a disease with purely psychological manifestations, major depression is a systemic disease with deleterious effects on multiple organ systems. Stressful life events have a substantial causal association with depression, and there is now compelling evidence that even early life stress constitutes a major risk factor for the subsequent development of depression. This review will focus on the association between severity of depression and diachronic vulnerability across the life-span, in terms of events of life, stress, and hormonal modulation, with a special focus on depression in young adults, women during postpartum and in depression in ederly people. Given the high prevalence of depressive disorders, the significant burden and the severity of disease in adolescents and young adults experiencing their first episode, they represent a group at high risk of relapse, recurrence, comorbidity and suicide to whom early intervention and prevention efforts should be targeted. Females exhibit different stress sensitivities than males which might contribute to their increased vulnerability for depression and the disease exhibit a prevalence among women which is 2-3x higher than in men. The postpartum period is considered the time of greatest risk for women to develop major depression and postpartum depression affects approximately 15% of women. In old age, depression mainly affects those with chronic medical illness, severe disability or mental decline. Depression in elderly worsens the outcomes of many medical illness and increases mortality. Environmental factors, such as isolation, caregiving and bereavement, contribute to further increase susceptibility to depression or triggering depression in already vulnerable elderly people. Suitable treatment of depression in elderly reduces the symptoms, prevents suicidal ideation, improves

  7. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in Dutch advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmenhoven, Franca; van Rijswijk, Eric; Engels, Yvonne; Kan, Cornelis; Prins, Judith; van Weel, Chris; Vissers, Kris

    2012-02-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in advanced cancer patients, but the diagnosis of depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer is difficult. Screening instruments could facilitate diagnosing depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the validity of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. Patients with advanced metastatic disease, visiting the outpatient palliative care department, were asked to fill out a self-questionnaire containing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question "Are you feeling depressed?" The mood section of the PRIME-MD was used as a gold standard. Sixty-one patients with advanced metastatic disease were eligible to be included in the study. Complete data were obtained from 46 patients. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristics analysis of the BDI-II was 0.82. The optimal cut-off point of the BDI-II was 16 with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 69%. The single screening question showed a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 94%. The BDI-II seems an adequate screening tool for a depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. The sensitivity of a single screening question is poor.

  8. Association between Depression and C-Reactive Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsheng Ma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Depression has been associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, and a depression-related elevation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP has been proposed as a possible mechanism. The objective of this paper is to examine association between depression and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP. Methods. Subjects consisted of 508 healthy adults (mean age 48.5 years; 49% women, 88% white residing in central Massachusetts. Data were collected at baseline and at quarterly intervals over a one-year period per individual. Multivariable linear mixed models were used to assess the association for the entire sample and by gender. Results. The mean Beck Depression Inventory score was 5.8 (standard deviation (SD 5.4; median 4.3, and average serum hs-CRP was 1.8 mg/L (SD 1.7; median 1.2. Results from the multivariable linear mixed models show that individuals with higher depression scores have higher levels of hs-CRP. Analyses by gender show persistence of an independent association among women, but not among men. Body mass index (BMI = weight(kg/height(m2 appears to be a partial mediator of this relationship. Conclusion. Depression score was correlated to hs-CRP levels in women. Further studies are required to elucidate the biological mechanisms underlying these associations and their implications.

  9. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Opportunities & Announcements Funding Strategy for Grants Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research Training Labs at NIMH Labs ... Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression discuss how they got help. & ...

  10. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Autism (13 items) Bipolar Disorder (2 items) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (28 items) Eating Disorders ( ... Autism (13 items) Bipolar Disorder (2 items) Borderline Personality Disorder (3 items) Depression (28 items) Eating Disorders ( ...

  11. Major depression with psychotic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000933.htm Major depression with psychotic features To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Major depression with psychotic features is a mental disorder in ...

  12. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... why. Scientists at the National Institute of Mental Health are studying brain images of people who suffer from depression trying to learn why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression ...

  13. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... suffer from depression trying to learn why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression do work. One type of effective psychotherapy is called cognitive behavioral therapy or CBT. ...

  14. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a serious illness that affects many people. Symptoms can vary, but many depressed people lose interest in ... lot of weight. NARRATOR : A person with depression can feel irritable and restless, and have sleep problems. ...

  15. Executive Dysfunction in Geriatric Depression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lockwood, Kathryn A; Alexopoulos, George S; van Gorp, Wilfred G

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to characterize the neuropsychological presentation of geriatric depression and to determine whether depression-related executive dysfunction is more pronounced during advanced age. METHOD...

  16. Facebook Bullying Can Cause Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160991.html Facebook Bullying Can Cause Depression Social media attacks have ' ... Sept. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Negative experiences on Facebook can increase the odds of depression in young ...

  17. Sensitive innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Katia Dupret

    Present paper discusses sources of innovation as heterogenic and at times intangible processes. Arguing for heterogeneity and intangibility as sources of innovation originates from a theoretical reading in STS and ANT studies (e.g. Callon 1986, Latour 1996, Mol 2002, Pols 2005) and from field work...... in the area of mental health (Dupret Søndergaard 2009, 2010). The concept of sensitive innovation is developed to capture and conceptualise exactly those heterogenic and intangible processes. Sensitive innovation is therefore primarily a way to understand innovative sources that can be......, but are not necessarily, recognized and acknowledged as such in the outer organisational culture or by management. The added value that qualifies these processes to be defined as “innovative” are thus argued for along different lines than in more traditional innovation studies (e.g. studies that build on the classic...

  18. Determining a diagnostic cut-off on the Teate Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balsamo M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Michela Balsamo, Aristide SagginoDepartment of Psychological Sciences, Humanities and Territory, G. d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, ItalyAbstract: A small but growing body of literature suggests that the Teate Depression ­Inventory (TDI may be an “objective” measure of depression compared with other commonly used scales. Furthermore, the TDI has strong psychometric properties in both clinical and nonclinical samples. The present study aimed to extend the use of TDI by identifying cut-off scores that could differentiate varying levels of depression severity in a group of clinically diagnosed depression disorder patients (N=125. Three receiver operating characteristic curve analyses indicated cut-off scores of 21 (sensitivity =0.86, specificity =0.94, and classification accuracy =0.90; 36 (sensitivity =0.84, specificity =0.96, and classification accuracy =0.92; and 50 (sensitivity =0.81, specificity =0.93, and classification accuracy =0.90, for minimal, mild, moderate, and severe depression, respectively. Results suggest that the TDI measures depression severity across a broad range with high test accuracy and may be appropriately used to screen for depression.Keywords: major depression, ROC curve, self-report scales, Rasch analysis, depression screening

  19. Self-compassion in depression: associations with depressive symptoms, rumination, and avoidance in depressed outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Tobias; Altenstein, David; Baettig, Isabelle; Doerig, Nadja; Holtforth, Martin Grosse

    2013-09-01

    Self-compassion involves being kind to oneself when challenged with personal weaknesses or hardship and has been claimed to be associated with resilience in various areas. So far, there are only a handful of studies that investigate self-compassion and its relation to clinical depression. Therefore, the principal goals of the present study were (a) to compare self-compassion in clinically depressed patients and never-depressed subjects, (b) to investigate self-compassion and its relation to cognitive-behavioral avoidance and rumination in depressed outpatients, and (c) to investigate rumination and avoidance as mediators of the relationship between self-compassion and depressive symptoms. One hundred and forty-two depressed outpatients and 120 never-depressed individuals from a community sample completed a self-report measure of self-compassion along with other measures. Results indicate that depressed patients showed lower levels of self-compassion than never-depressed individuals, even when controlled for depressive symptoms. In depressed outpatients, self-compassion was negatively related to depressive symptoms, symptom-focused rumination, as well as cognitive and behavioral avoidance. Additionally, symptom-focused rumination and cognitive and behavioral avoidance mediated the relationship between self-compassion and depressive symptoms. These findings extend previous research on self-compassion, its relation to depression, as well as processes mediating this relationship, and highlight the importance of self-compassion in clinically depressed patients. Since depressed patients seem to have difficulties adopting a self-compassionate attitude, psychotherapists are well advised to explore and address how depressed patients treat themselves.

  20. Exercise Against Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artal, Michal; Sherman, Carl

    1998-01-01

    Physical activity is useful for preventing and easing depression symptoms. When prescribing exercise as an adjunct to medication and psychotherapy, physicians must consider each patient's individual circumstances. Hopelessness and fatigue can make physical exercise difficult. A feasible, flexible, and pleasurable program has the best chance for…

  1. Clock genes in depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sofie Laage; Bouzinova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Data demonstrate that abnormal regulation of the circadian system can result in cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, obesity, immune dysfunction, increased risk for cancer, reproductive complications, etc. It is highly individual among depressed patients and may be expressed as a phase adv...

  2. Genetic Determinants of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. López León (Sandra)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the studies in this genetic epidemiological thesis was to investigate candidate genes that play a role in the etiology of depression and to obtain new insights about biological pathways that may be involved in this disorder. The introduction of the thesis presents a review of

  3. Depression and Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body techniques into your routine may help alleviate depression. Even 5 to 10 minutes of any of these techniques may be beneficial. These are some to try: Meditation Prayer Deep breathing Acupuncture Yoga Massage Listening to music Creating art Guided imagery Journaling Supplements: Herbal “over- ...

  4. Depression in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aspects of patients' lives to their condition more easily than psychiatrists. .... underdiagnose both dementia and depression in their elderly patients.20,21 A recent ... could lead to great improvement in the quality of life of many patients who ...

  5. Sadness, Depression, and Avoidance Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Allan M.

    2008-01-01

    Research into genetic, psychosocial, and cognitive explanations for depression (biopsychosocial models) provides support for the role of these variables in the etiology of depression. Regularly identified as basic to depression is loss, and the experience of loss has been found to be more influential than genetic factors in the causation of…

  6. Male Depression: Understanding the Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Depression (major depressive disorder) Male depression is a serious medical condition, but many men try to ignore it or refuse treatment. Learn the signs and symptoms — and what to do. By Mayo Clinic Staff Do you feel irritable, isolated or withdrawn? Do you find yourself working all ...

  7. Responding to a Student's Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crundwell, R. Marc A.; Killu, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Although depression is classified as an adult mental health disorder, middle to late adolescence is the age when symptoms most commonly surface. If teachers can recognize the signs of depression in students, Crundwell and Killu assert, they can provide a supportive, flexible school environment that enables depressed students to learn and thrive.…

  8. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 3 items) Institute Announcements (24 items) Symptoms and Treatment of Depression February 1, 2010 People with depression discuss how ... why it affects some people but not others. Treatments for depression do work. One type of effective psychotherapy is ...

  9. Symptoms and Treatment of Depression

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the road to recovery. Depression treatment can take time to work, so don't give up. Read more about depression on this Web page. If the symptoms fit, get help now. Share More Video and Audio about Depression Contact ...

  10. Depressive Realism: Wiser or Quieter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Fernando; Matute, Helena; Vadillo, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Depressive realism consists of the lower personal control over uncontrollable events perceived by depressed as compared to nondepressed individuals. In this article, we propose that the realism of depressed individuals is caused not by an increased accuracy in perception, but by their more comprehensive exposure to the actual environmental…

  11. Discriminant possibilities of the Hamilton depression scale: ROC analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novović Zdenka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare discrimination power of original and reconstructed version of Hamilton’s depression scale in separation of depressive vs. anxious patients and to suggest some possibilities which offer ROC analysis. The subjects of the study were 119 patients of Psychiatric clinic in Novi Sad. 67 of them were diagnosed with some of the forms of affective disorders and 52 with an anxious-phobic diagnosis. Results of ROC analysis suggest that both instruments can be used in distinguishing depressive from anxious patients, but reconstructed version shows greater sensitivity and specificity with optimal cut-off score. It also has more significant AUC, which refers to probability of prediction on the basis of the whole spectrum of the results. These data is commented in relation with current debates, between unitaristic and pluralistic oriented authors, about the nature of the anxious-depression relationship.

  12. Spectral asymmetry and Higuchi's fractal dimension measures of depression electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Maie; Lass, Jaanus; Suhhova, Anna; Hinrikus, Hiie

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed to compare two electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis methods, spectral asymmetry index (SASI) and Higuchi's fractal dimension (HFD), for detection of depression. Linear SASI method is based on evaluation of the balance of powers in two EEG frequency bands in one channel selected higher and lower than the alpha band spectrum maximum. Nonlinear HFD method calculates fractal dimension directly in the time domain. The resting EEG signals of 17 depressive patients and 17 control subjects were used as a database for calculations. SASI values were positive for depressive and negative for control group (P 0.05). The results indicated that the linear EEG analysis method SASI and the nonlinear HFD method both demonstrated a good sensitivity for detection of characteristic features of depression in a single-channel EEG.

  13. Screening for depression in terminally ill cancer patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Tatsuo; Okuyama, Toru; Sugawara, Yuriko; Shima, Yasuo; Furukawa, Toshiaki A; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2006-01-01

    This study attempted to assess the performance of several screening instruments for adjustment disorders (ADs) and major depression (MD) among terminally ill Japanese cancer patients. Two hundred and nine consecutive patients were assessed for ADs and MD using a structured clinical interview at the time of their registration with a palliative care unit, and two single-item interviews ("Are you depressed?" and "Have you lost interest?") and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were administered. Screening performance was investigated by calculating sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value, negative predictive value, likelihood ratio, and stratum-specific likelihood ratios. When the screening target included both an AD and MD, the HADS is a more useful screening method than the single-item interviews. Regarding screening for MD, both single-item interviews and the HADS possess useful screening performance. Different screening instruments may be recommended depending on the depressive disorders and specific populations.

  14. Three tests of cortisol secretion in adult endogenous depressives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachar, E J; Puig-Antich, J; Ryan, N D; Asnis, G M; Rabinovich, H; Davies, M; Halpern, F S

    1985-01-01

    Seventy-nine drug-free adult patients fitting RDC criteria for major depressive disorder endogenous subtype (EMDD), and 64 normal adult volunteers, were studied at pretreatment with at least one of three tests of cortisol secretion. The tests were: 1) Mean half-hourly cortisol concentrations from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. (1-4 PM CORT); 2) plasma cortisol response to 0.15 mg/kg of dextroamphetamine hydrochloride (DACT) in the afternoon; 3) dexamethasone suppression test (DST) using 1 or 2 mg. Thirty-six depressive and 27 volunteers underwent all three tests. Analysis of the data was performed for each test singly, for all pairs of tests and for all three tests in same subjects. Results show that the single most sensitive cortisol test for depressions is the DACT (72%), with a specificity of 88%. These tests may measure different underlying pathophysiologies associated with depression.

  15. Overview of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Nyoman Wistya Tri Mayasari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Depression is a state of disorder tone generally feeling characterized by feelings of sadness, apathy, pessimism, and loneliness. Epidemiology of depression showed a lifetime prevalence of 7-12% for men and 20-25% for women. The reason for the prevalence differences between men and women not much can be explained, but biological factors and socio-cultural influences. In the depression is sadness lasts for days so that it can disrupt work, study, eat, sleep, and enjoyment. The cause of depression is not just one, but multifactorial. Most of the cause may arise from or the people themselves. Because it is not clear on anatomy, biochemistry, or physiology. To diagnose depression may use criteria of PPDGJ or using DSM-IV-TR /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  16. Cushing's syndrome masquerading as treatment resistant depression

    OpenAIRE

    Anil Kumar, B. N.; Sandeep Grover

    2016-01-01

    Treatment resistant depression (TRD) is a common clinical occurrence among patients treated for major depressive disorder. A significant proportion of patients remain significantly depressed in spite of aggressive pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches. Management of patient with treatment resistant depression requires thorough evaluation for physical causes. We report a case of recurrent depressive disorder, who presented with severe depressive episode without psychotic symptoms, n...

  17. Plain Talk about Depression. Plain Talk Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Marilyn

    Depression is defined as a "whole-body" illness, involving the body, mood, and thoughts. Three of the most prevalent types of depressive disorders are described: major depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disorders (formerly called manic-depressive illness). Eleven symptoms of depression and 10 symptoms of mania are listed. Causes of depression are…

  18. Activated depression: mixed bipolar disorder or agitated unipolar depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Alan C

    2013-08-01

    The combination of depression and activation presents clinical and diagnostic challenges. It can occur, in either bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder, as increased agitation as a dimension of depression. What is called agitation can consist of expressions of painful inner tension or as disinhibited goal-directed behavior and thought. In bipolar disorder, elements of depression can be combined with those of mania. In this case, the agitation, in addition to increased motor activity and painful inner tension, must include symptoms of mania that are related to goal-directed behavior or manic cognition. These diagnostic considerations are important, as activated depression potentially carries increased behavioral risk, especially for suicidal behavior, and optimal treatments for depressive episodes differ between bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder.

  19. Relação entre depressão pós-parto e disponibilidade emocional materna The relationship between postpartum depression and maternal emotional availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Regina J. R. M. Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A depressão pós-parto é um transtorno de alta prevalência que pode comprometer a qualidade da relação mãe-criança. Este estudo pretende determinar a prevalência do referido transtorno, comparar a interação mãe-bebê nos grupos com e sem depressão e verificar a relação entre depressão, apoio social e estilos de relacionamento e disponibilidade emocional maternos. As participantes eram gestantes que pretendiam dar à luz no Hospital Universitário da Universidade de São Paulo entre dezembro de 2006 e dezembro de 2008. A prevalência de depressão pós-parto em nossa amostra foi 28%. Não houve diferença significativa na relação mãe-criança no grupo com e sem depressão. Encontrou-se correlação positiva entre sensibilidade materna e escolaridade e entre sensibilidade e certas dimensões de apoio social e estilo de relacionamento. Conclui-se que a prevalência de depressão pós-parto em nossa amostra é mais alta que a média mundial, mas a sintomatologia depressiva não interfere significativamente na qualidade da interação mãe-bebê. A sensibilidade materna é influenciada por fatores sócio-cognitivos e afetivos.Postpartum depression is a highly prevalent disorder that can interfere in the mother-infant relationship. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of postpartum depression in our sample to compare mother-infant interaction in depressed and non-depressed mothers and to assess the relationship between maternal depression, social support, attachment style, and emotional availability. Participants were pregnant women who planned to deliver at the University of São Paulo Hospital between December 2006 and December 2008. Postpartum depression prevalence in our sample was 28%. No difference was found in emotional availability between depressed and non-depressed mothers. There was a positive correlation between maternal sensitivity and education, and between sensitivity and some dimensions of social support and

  20. The prolactin response to sulpiride in major depression: the role of the D2 receptor in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, W J; Berk, M; Paiker, J; Jersky, B

    2001-06-01

    Multiple lines of investigations have implicated the role of the dopaminergic system in depression. The aim of the study was to characterise the Dopamine D2 receptor sensitivity status in depressed patients versus controls by means of a novel neuro-endocrine challenge test, the prolactin response to sulpiride. In this intervention, ten patients and ten age matched male volunteers were studied. The patients were diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, and Montgomery Asberg and Zung scales were done. There was no significant difference in baseline levels of prolactin between the depressed and control groups. Significantly higher prolactin levels after sulpiride challenge were however found in depressed patients than controls at all time points after sulpiride administration. This neuroendocrine challenge paradigm suggests that the prolactin response to sulpiride, a D2 receptor antagonist, is enhanced in depression, which suggests that this receptor might be supersensitive in depression compared to controls. This adds to the data implicating the dopaminergic system in the pathophysiology of depression, and suggests that dopaminergic mechanisms might be a target of therapeutic interest.

  1. Metacognitions and Mindful Attention Awareness in Depression: A Comparison Of Currently Depressed, Previously Depressed and Never Depressed Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solem, Stian; Hagen, Roger; Wang, Catharina E A; Hjemdal, Odin; Waterloo, Knut; Eisemann, Martin; Halvorsen, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to test (1) how metacognition relates to the concept of mindful attention awareness, and (2) whether metacognitions or mindful attention awareness best predicted symptoms of depression. Data was collected from three samples: currently depressed (n = 37), previously depressed (n = 81) and never depressed controls (n = 50). There was a moderate correlation between mindful attention awareness and three of five metacognitive subscales. Both mindful attention awareness and metacognition were significantly correlated with depression severity scores after controlling for anxiety. The depressed group had significantly more dysfunctional metacognitions and less mindful attention awareness than the never depressed group. Negative beliefs about worry and mindful attention awareness were also significantly different in the previously depressed group compared with the never depressed. This suggests that metacognitions and mindful attention awareness can be vulnerability factors for depression. The results also indicated that anxiety symptoms and negative beliefs about worry were the most important factors in predicting depression. In conclusion, the study shows that metacognitions and mindful attention awareness are two related but separate constructs and that metacognitions emerged as the best predictor of depression. These results provide support for the metacognitive model of emotional disorders. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Metacognitions and mindful attention awareness are related but separate constructs Both mindful attention awareness and metacognition are associated with depression Anxiety and negative beliefs about worry (metacognitions) are most important in predicting depression Addressing metacognitions in therapy should be considered in treatment of depression. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Couple Discord and Depression in Couples during Couple Therapy and in Depressed Individuals during Depression Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, David C.; Dimidjian, Sona; Bedics, Jamie D.; Christensen, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The association between depression and relationship distress as well as the impact of treatment for the one on the other was examined across 2 treatment-seeking samples: individuals seeking treatment for depression (N = 120) and couples seeking marital therapy (N = 134 couples). Although there was a baseline association between depression and…

  3. Couple Discord and Depression in Couples during Couple Therapy and in Depressed Individuals during Depression Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, David C.; Dimidjian, Sona; Bedics, Jamie D.; Christensen, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The association between depression and relationship distress as well as the impact of treatment for the one on the other was examined across 2 treatment-seeking samples: individuals seeking treatment for depression (N = 120) and couples seeking marital therapy (N = 134 couples). Although there was a baseline association between depression and…

  4. Sadness might isolate you in a non-smelling world: olfactory perception and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schablitzky, Sylvia; Pause, Bettina M.

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) occurs with a high prevalence among mental illnesses. MDD patients experience sadness and hopelessness, with blunted affective reactivity. However, such depressive episodes are also key symptoms in other depressive disorders, like Bipolar Disorder (BPD) or Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Moreover, depressive symptoms can also be found in healthy individuals, but are experienced as less severe or for a shorter duration than in patients. Here, it is aimed to summarize studies investigating odor perception in depression, including depressive states in healthy individuals and patient populations. Odor perception in depression has been assessed with psychophysical methods (olfactory sensitivity, odor identification, and discrimination), and odor ratings (intensity, emotional valence, familiarity). In addition, some studies investigated affective reactions to odors, and physiological and anatomical correlates of odor perception in depression. The summary reveals that MDD is associated with reduced olfactory sensitivity. However, odor identification and discrimination scores seem to be unaffected by depression. The reduced olfactory sensitivity might be associated with a reduced ability to encode olfactory information and a reduced volume of the olfactory bulb. While similar processes seem to occur in healthy individuals experiencing depressive states, they have not been observed in BPD or SAD patients. However, in order to conclude that the reduced olfactory sensitivity is directly linked to depression, it is suggested that studies should implement control measures of cognitive performances or perceptual abilities in other stimulus modalities. It is concluded that the reduced olfactory performance in MDD patients seems to be disorder-, modality-, and test-specific, and that the application of an appropriate olfactory and cognitive test-battery might be highly useful in the differential diagnosis of MDD. PMID:24570666

  5. Sadness might isolate you in a non-smelling world: Olfactory perception and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia eSchablitzky

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD occurs with a high prevalence among the mental illnesses. MDD patients experience sadness and hopelessness, with blunted affective reactivity. However, such depressive episodes are also key symptoms in other depressive disorders, like Bipolar Disorder (BPD or Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD. Moreover, depressive symptoms can also be found in healthy individuals, but are experienced as less severe or for a shorter duration than in patients. Here, it is aimed to summarize studies investigating odor perception in depression, including depressive states in healthy individuals and patient populations. Odor perception in depression has been assessed with psychophysical methods (olfactory sensitivity, odor identification and discrimination, and odor ratings (intensity, emotional valence, familiarity. In addition, some studies investigated affective reactions to odors, and physiological and anatomical correlates of odor perception in depression. The summary reveals that MDD is associated with a reduced olfactory sensitivity. However, odor identification and discrimination scores seem to be unaffected by depression. The reduced olfactory sensitivity might be associated with a reduced ability to encode olfactory information and a reduced volume of the olfactory bulb. While similar processes seem to occur in healthy individuals experiencing depressive states, they cannot be observed in BPD or SAD patients. However, in order to conclude that the reduced olfactory sensitivity is directly linked to depression, it is suggested that studies should implement control measures of cognitive performances or perceptual abilities in other stimulus modalities. It is concluded that the reduced olfactory performance in MDD patients seems to be disorder-, modality-, and test-specific, and that the application of an appropriate olfactory and cognitive test-battery might be highly useful in the differential diagnosis of MDD.

  6. Unipolar Depression in Paroxysmal Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Bobrov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the current study, the clinical characteristics of unipolar depression in the clinical picture of schizophrenia with the paroxysmal type of disease course are presented. Given the concomitant depression with phobic symptoms, the following clinical variants are marked: depression with generalized social phobia and/or anthropophobia and depression with generalized pathological body sensations and hypochondriacal phobias. In other words, we are talking about a necessity to allocate a special type of schizophrenia with affective structure episodes and comorbid neurosis-like symptoms. Information on the basic treatment strategy of schizophrenia with depressive structure episodes and comorbid neurosis-like symptoms in everyday psychiatric practice is also provided.

  7. Use of the late-life function and disability instrument to assess disability in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Jordan F; Skidmore, Elizabeth; Lotz, Meredith; Lenze, Eric; Dew, Mary Amanda; Reynolds, Charles F

    2009-09-01

    To determine whether there was greater disability in subjects with depression than in those without, the correlation between disability and depression severity and quality of life, and whether improvement in disability after antidepressant pharmacotherapy was greater in those who responded to antidepressant treatment. Disability in subjects with and without depression from two different studies was compared for 22 weeks. Correlations were performed for the subjects with depression between disability and depression, anxiety, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and medical comorbidity. T-tests were used to compare disability between subjects who did and did not respond to antidepressant treatment and change in disability after pharmacotherapy. Late-life depression research clinic. The 313 subjects were recruited from primary care and the community and were aged 60 and older; 244 subjects were participants in a depression treatment protocol, and 69 subjects without depression participated in a separate longitudinal observational study of the mental and cognitive health of depression-free older adults. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (LL-FDI), a measure of instrumental activity of daily living, personal role, and social role functioning. Subjects with depression scored lower than controls for domains measuring limitation (can do) and frequency (does do) of activities. Both disability domains correlated with depression severity, anxiety, HRQOL, and cognition. Disability improved with antidepressant treatment; for partial responders who continued to receive higher-dose antidepressant treatment out to 22 weeks, there was continued improvement, although not to the level of comparison subjects without depression. The LL-FDI appears to discriminate subjects with depression from those without, correlates with depression severity, and demonstrates sensitivity to antidepressant treatment response. We recommend further investigation of the LL-FDI and similar

  8. Influence of depression symptoms on history-independent reward and punishment processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevers, Christopher G; Worthy, Darrell A; Gorlick, Marissa A; Nix, Brittany; Chotibut, Tanya; Todd Maddox, W

    2013-05-15

    Prior research indicates that depressed individuals are less responsive to rewards and more sensitive to punishments than non-depressed individuals. This study examines decision-making under reward maximizing or punishment minimizing conditions among adults with low (n=47) or high (n=48) depression symptoms. We utilized a history-independent decision-making task where learning is experience-based and the participants' goal is to enhance immediate payoff. Results indicated a significant interaction between incentive condition (reward maximizing, punishment minimizing) and depression group. Within the low depression group, better performance was observed for reward maximization than punishment minimization. In contrast, within the high depression group, better performance was observed for punishment minimization than reward maximization. Further, the high depression group outperformed the low depression symptom group in the punishment minimization condition, but no depression group differences were observed in the reward maximization condition. Computational modeling indicated that the high depression group was more likely to choose options with the highest expected reward, particularly in the punishment condition. Thus, decision-making is improved for people with elevated depression symptoms when minimizing punishment relative to maximizing rewards.

  9. Development and validation of the geriatric depression inventory in Chinese culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhijuan; Lv, Xiaozhen; Hu, Yongdong; Ma, Wanxin; Xie, Hengge; Lin, Kai; Yu, Xin; Wang, Huali

    2015-09-01

    Depression among older adults is under-recognized either in the community or in general hospitals in Chinese culture. This study aimed to develop a culturally appropriate screening instrument for late-life depression in the non-psychiatric settings and to test its reliability and validity for a diagnosis of depression. Using a Delphi method, we developed a geriatric depression inventory (GDI), consisting of 12 core symptoms of depressive disorder in old age. We investigated its reliability and validity on 89 patients with late-life depression and 249 non-depression controls. Both self-report (GDI-SR) and physician-interview (GDI-RI) versions were assessed. Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.843 for GDI-SR and 0.880 for GDI-RI. Both GDI-SR and GDI-RI showed good concurrent validity with the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) (GDI-SR: r = 0.750, p depression versus non-depression. Using a cut-off of three items endorsed, sensitivity and specificity were 92.1% and 81.9% for GDI-SR, and 93.3% and 87.1% for GDI-RI. The GDI, either based on self-report or rater interview, is a reliable and valid instrument for the detection of depression among older adults in non-psychiatric medical settings in Chinese culture.

  10. Screening for depression among community-dwelling elders: Usefulness of the center for epidemiologic studies depression scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Though common, depressive disorders often remain undetected in late life. Aim: To examine the usefulness of Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D for identifying depression among older people. Settings and Design: Community resident older people (aged 65 years or more, were evaluated by clinicians trained in psychiatry, as part of a cross-sectional study of late-life depression. Assessments were done in the community. Methods and Material: The participants were assigned ICD-10 diagnoses and assessed using Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS and CES-D. A short version of CES-D with 10 items, translated to the local language Malayalam, was used. Statistical Analysis: The sensitivity and specificity of CES-D was evaluated against ICD-10 clinical diagnosis of depression. The correlation of CES-D and MADRS was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: 220 consenting adults from 3 wards of the Panchayath were assessed. On analysis of the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve of CES-D scores in relation to clinical diagnosis, the large Area Under Curve (AUC showed efficient screening and a cut off score of 4 in CES-D had a sensitivity of 97.7% and a specificity of 79.1% for depression. There was also good correlation between the MADRS and CES-D scores (0.838. Conclusion: CES-D is a short simple scale which can be used by health care professionals for detecting depression in older people in primary care settings.

  11. Depression in Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Safaie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is one of the Common psychological disorders. From the cognitive point of view, the unhealthy attitudes increase the severity of the depression. The aim of this study was to investigate depression and unhealthy attitudes in coronary patients hospitalized at Tabriz Shahid Madani Heart Center. Methods: One hundred twenty eight hospitalized patients having myocardial Infarctions were studied regarding unhealthy attitudes, severity of depression and demographic data. Results: The study showed a significant relation between unhealthy attitudes, BDI (Beck Depression Inventory and severe depression. Moreover, a significant relation existed between gender and depression (P=0.0001. In addition, the level of education increased the intensity of unhealthy attitudes (P=0.0001. Several researches in both outside and inside Iran support the idea. Conclusion: Based on present study and more other investigations, it can be suggested to provide the necessary elements and parameters such as antidepressant medication, psychologists, complementary treatment for coping with negative mood and its unwanted consequences.

  12. Ethnicity, music experience, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Paul D; Swope, Alan J; Heide, Frederick J

    2009-01-01

    The researchers studied differences in self-reported music experience and depression across ethnic groups, as well as differences in the relationship between music experience and depression across groups. College participants (78 African Americans, 111 Asian Americans, 218 Whites, and 87 in other ethnic groups) completed the Music Experience Questionnaire (MEQ) and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale. Statistically significant differences across groups were found on depression as well as on the MEQ factor for Subjective/Physical Reactions to music and on MEQ scales for Commitment to Music, Affective Reactions, Positive Psychotropic Effects, and Reactive Musical Behavior. A distinctive pattern of relationship was found between music variables and depression in the Asian American group, relative to the White and Other group. In particular, among Asian Americans there were negative correlations between depression and the MEQ Subjective/ Physical Reactions factor as well as the Affective Reactions scale. Implications were discussed for the literature on ethnicity and depression, music experience, and music therapy.

  13. Depression of Glass Transition Temperatures of Polymer Networks by Diluents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinke, Gerrit ten; Karasz, Frank E.; Ellis, Thomas S.

    1983-01-01

    A classical thermodynamic theory is used to derive expressions for the depression of the glass transition temperature Tg of a polymer network by a diluent. The enhanced sensitivity of Tg in cross-linked systems to small amounts of diluent is explained. Predictions of the theory are in satisfactory a

  14. [Sensitive paranoia, concepts and a clinical case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Marie-Paule; Testard, Ingrid; Landazuri, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive paranoia, classified by Ernst Kretschmer, is a combination of a paranoid disorder with solitude and mental distress. Sensitive paranoiacs, often depressive and anxious, perceive themselves as being excluded from society while at the same time cultivating a resentment towards it. They also constantly put themselves down. Group therapy can help these patients to find appeasement in their social life.

  15. Vascular dysfunction associated with major depression-like symptoms: monoamine homeostasis and endothelial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzinova, Elena; Andresen, Jørgen; Wiborg, Ove;

    Major depression and cardiovascular diseases have strong co-morbidity but the reason for this is unknown. In Chronic Mild Stress (CMS) model of depression only some rats develop depression-like symptoms (i.e. anhedonia, measured by sucrose intake) while others are resilient to 8 weeks of CMS...... and reduced expression of extra-neuronal transporter (OCT-2) in anhedonic arteries. The contractility of middle cerebral arteries to 5-HT was reduced by CMS but recovered by anti-depressant treatment. Resistance arteries from anhedonic rats were less sensitive to acetylcholine compared to non...

  16. [Postpartal depression: possible effects on early mother-child interaction and psychotherapeutical treatment approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Corinna

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between mother and child helds a central position in in- and outpatient treatment of postpartal depressive mothers. Infants are highly sensitive towards the emotional state of their mothers and other attachment figures. This sensivity is essential for the comprehension of the influence of a psychiatric illness of the mother on child development Postpartal depression as the most common psychiatric illness in young mothers takes a central part. The specific situation of young depressive mothers demands an adaptation of the therapeutic treatment. Different approaches towards the treatment of postpartal depression with respect to the mother-child interaction are elucidated.

  17. ICD-10 and the clinical features of depressions: data of the CIRCADIAN-I program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O V Serdyuk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The data of the CIRCADIAN-I trial suggest that depressions are unsatisfactorily diagnosed in psychiatric practice. Thus, some of the ICD-10 diagnoses used to denote depressive states (dysthymia, cyclothymia are made extremely rarely. Only comparatively short-term and reversible vital depressions are considered to be preferred for the categories of affective disorders (F.30-F.33. Any clinical deviations from this clinical presentation (sensitive, anxiety symptoms, a prolonged course, and no well-defined seasonal and circadian rhythms of mood worsening are regarded as a guide for ruling out the diagnosis of affective disorder. At the same time depressive states are classified as schizophrenia, adjustment disorders, etc.

  18. Depression and major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Tanaka, Teruaki; Nakagawa, Shin; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2010-01-15

    The prevalence of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) varies greatly. In this study, we investigated major depressive disorder (MDD) and depressive symptoms without MDD in patients with PD. The psychopathological characteristics of depressive symptoms were assessed by a psychiatric interview. A total of 105 Japanese patients with PD without dementia were included. The Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) with a cutoff score of 13/14 was used to screen for depression. Using a structured interview, a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation of patients with BDI-II scores >13 (high BDI patients) was completed using the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR. Forty patients (38%) had a BDI-II >13, but 29 did not show any depressed mood. Five cases met the criteria for MDD (three current, two past) and one patient was diagnosed with minor depressive disorder. A slight depressed mood that was associated with worrying about PD was seen in 6 of 34 patients without any depressive disorder and fluctuated with aggravation of PD symptoms in two of these patients. For the diagnosis of MDD, the number of positive items from the DSM-IV-TR definition of MDD is most important and useful for differentiating MDD and non-MDD. The low-prevalence rate of MDD in our patient population suggests that PD may be a psychological stressor for MDD, but does not necessarily induce MDD.

  19. Sensitivity, Recalculated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, J. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-07

    Prior to this study, the sensitivity in nEXO was calculated using an approximate method that does not provide 90% coverage. I find it useful to understand the confidence level of a limit by focusing on the confidence level as a property of the method used to find the limit.A particular method (algorithm,formula) is applied to an experiment to produce a limit. That experiment was conducted in a particular universe with certain values of the physical parameters. We’d like a method than produces a correct limit for 90% of the experiments that could run. We also want that to be true for every universe—that is, regardless of the physical parameter value, the method should still produce a correct limit 90% of the time.

  20. Beyond sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stott, Iain; Hodgson, David James; Townley, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    1. Perturbation analyses of population models are integral to population management: such analyses evaluate how changes in vital rates of members of the population translate to changes in population dynamics. Sensitivity and elasticity analyses of long-term (asymptotic) growth are popular...... formulae for the transfer function of population inertia, which describes nonlinear perturbation curves of transient population dynamics. The method comfortably fits into wider frameworks for analytical study of transient dynamics, and for perturbation analyses that use the transfer function approach. 3....... We use case studies to illustrate how the transfer function of population inertia may be used in population management. These show that strategies based solely on asymptotic perturbation analyses can cause undesirable transient dynamics and/ or fail to exploit desirable transient dynamics...