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Sample records for deposits marine shelf

  1. Modeling Cape- and Ridge-Associated Marine Sand Deposits; A Focus on the U.S. Atlantic Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, James D.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Bolm, Karen S.

    2009-01-01

    Cape- and ridge-associated marine sand deposits, which accumulate on storm-dominated continental shelves that are undergoing Holocene marine transgression, are particularly notable in a segment of the U.S. Atlantic Continental Shelf that extends southward from the east tip of Long Island, N.Y., and eastward from Cape May at the south end of the New Jersey shoreline. These sand deposits commonly contain sand suitable for shore protection in the form of beach nourishment. Increasing demand for marine sand raises questions about both short- and long-term potential supply and the sustainability of beach nourishment with the prospects of accelerating sea-level rise and increasing storm activity. To address these important issues, quantitative assessments of the volume of marine sand resources are needed. Currently, the U.S. Geological Survey is undertaking these assessments through its national Marine Aggregates and Resources Program (URL http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/aggregates/). In this chapter, we present a hypothetical example of a quantitative assessment of cape-and ridge-associated marine sand deposits in the study area, using proven tools of mineral-resource assessment. Applying these tools requires new models that summarize essential data on the quantity and quality of these deposits. Two representative types of model are descriptive models, which consist of a narrative that allows for a consistent recognition of cape-and ridge-associated marine sand deposits, and quantitative models, which consist of empirical statistical distributions that describe significant deposit characteristics, such as volume and grain-size distribution. Variables of the marine sand deposits considered for quantitative modeling in this study include area, thickness, mean grain size, grain sorting, volume, proportion of sand-dominated facies, and spatial density, of which spatial density is particularly helpful in estimating the number of undiscovered deposits within an

  2. The Deposition and Accumulation of Microplastics in Marine Sediments and Bottom Water from the Irish Continental Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jake; Lusher, Amy; Thompson, Richard C; Morley, Audrey

    2017-09-07

    Microplastics are widely dispersed throughout the marine environment. An understanding of the distribution and accumulation of this form of pollution is crucial for gauging environmental risk. Presented here is the first record of plastic contamination, in the 5 mm-250 μm size range, of Irish continental shelf sediments. Sixty-two microplastics were recovered from 10 of 11 stations using box cores. 97% of recovered microplastics were found to reside shallower than 2.5 cm sediment depth, with the area of highest microplastic concentration being the water-sediment interface and top 0.5 cm of sediments (66%). Microplastics were not found deeper than 3.5 ± 0.5 cm. These findings demonstrate that microplastic contamination is ubiquitous within superficial sediments and bottom water along the western Irish continental shelf. Results highlight that cores need to be at least 4-5 cm deep to quantify the standing stock of microplastics within marine sediments. All recovered microplastics were classified as secondary microplastics as they appear to be remnants of larger items; fibres being the principal form of microplastic pollution (85%), followed by broken fragments (15%). The range of polymer types, colours and physical forms recovered suggests a variety of sources. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms influencing microplastic transport, deposition, resuspension and subsequent interactions with biota.

  3. Mineral Resource Assessment of Marine Sand Resources in Cape- and Ridge-Associated Marine Sand Deposits in Three Tracts, New York and New Jersey, United States Atlantic Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, James D.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Arsenault, Matthew A.

    2009-01-01

    Demand is growing in the United States and worldwide for information about the geology of offshore continental shelf regions, the character of the seafloor, and sediments comprising the seafloor and subbottom. Interest in locating sand bodies or high quality deposits that have potential as sources for beach nourishment and ecosystem restoration is especially great in some regions of the country. The Atlantic coast, particularly New York and New Jersey, has been the focus of these studies for the past 40 years with widely varying results. This study is the first attempt at applying probability statistics to modeling Holocene-age cape-and ridge-associated sand deposits and thus focuses on distinct sand body morphology. This modeling technique may have application for other continental shelf regions that have similar geologic character and late Quaternary sea-level transgression history. An estimated volume of 3.9 billion m3 of marine sand resources is predicted in the cape-and ridge-associated marine sand deposits in three representative regions or tracts on the continental shelf offshore of New York and New Jersey. These estimates are taken from probabilistic distributions of sand resources and are produced using deposit models and Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) techniques. The estimated sand resources presented here are for only three tracts as described below and for Holocene age sand resources contained in cape-and ridge-associated marine sand deposit types within this area. Other areas may qualify as tracts for this deposit type and other deposit types and geologic ages (for example, paleo-stream channels, blanket and outwash deposits, ebb-tide shoals, and lower sea level-stand deltas), which are present on the New Jersey and New York continental shelf area but are not delineated and modeled in this initial evaluation. Admittedly, only a portion of these probable sand resources will ultimately be available and suitable for production, dependent largely on

  4. Holocene marine tephrochronology on the Iceland shelf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guomundsdottir, Esther Ruth; Eiriksson, Jón; Larsen, Guorun

    2012-01-01

    Currently the Late-glacial and Holocene marine tephrochronology on the shelf around Iceland comprises 130 tephra layers from 30 sediment cores ranging in age from 15,000 years cal. BP to AD 1947. A vast majority of the cores and tephra layers are from the North Iceland shelf Much fewer tephra...... layers have been found on the South and West Iceland shell The early Holocene Saksunarvatn ash and Vedde Ash are the only tephra layers identified on all investigated shelf areas. For the last 15,000 years correlated tephra layers from the shelf sediments around Iceland to their terrestrial counterparts...... both in Iceland and overseas are 40 of which 26 are terrestrially dated tephra markers. Thirty correlations are within the last 7050 years. The terrestrially dated tephra markers found on the shelf have been used to constrain past environmental variability in the region, as well as marine reservoir age...

  5. Accommodation space in a high-wave-energy inner-shelf during the Holocene marine transgression: Correlation of onshore and offshore inner-shelf deposits (0–12 ka) in the Columbia River littoral cell system, Washington and Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C. D.; Twichell, D. C.; Roberts, M. C.; Vanderburgh, S.; Hostetler, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    The Columbia River Littoral Cell (CRLC), a high-wave-energy littoral system, extends 160 km alongshore, generally north of the large Columbia River, and 10–15 km in across-shelf distance from paleo-beach backshores to about 50 m present water depths. Onshore drill holes (19 in number and 5–35 m in subsurface depth) and offshore vibracores (33 in number and 1–5 m in subsurface depth) constrain inner-shelf sand grain sizes (sample means 0.13–0.25 mm) and heavy mineral source indicators (> 90% Holocene Columbia River sand) of the inner-shelf facies (≥ 90% fine sand). Stratigraphic correlation of the transgressive ravinement surface in onshore drill holes and in offshore seismic reflection profiles provide age constraints (0–12 ka) on post-ravinement inner-shelf deposits, using paleo-sea level curves and radiocarbon dates. Post-ravinement deposit thickness (1–50 m) and long-term sedimentation rates (0.4–4.4 m ka− 1) are positively correlated to the cross-shelf gradients (0.36–0.63%) of the transgressive ravinement surface. The total post-ravinement fill volume of fine littoral sand (2.48 × 1010 m3) in the inner-shelf represents about 2.07 × 106 m3 year− 1 fine sand accumulation rate during the last 12 ka, or about one third of the estimated middle- to late-Holocene Columbia River bedload or sand discharge (5–6 × 106 m3 year− 1) to the littoral zone. The fine sand accumulation in the inner-shelf represents post-ravinement accommodation space resulting from 1) geometry and depth of the transgressive ravinement surface, 2) post-ravinement sea-level rise, and 3) fine sand dispersal in the inner-shelf by combined high-wave-energy and geostrophic flow/down-welling drift currents during major winter storms.

  6. Amery ice shelf DEM and its marine ice distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The Amery Ice Shelf is the largest ice shelf in East Antarctica. A new DEM was generated for this ice shelf, using kriging to interpolate the data from ICESat altimetry and the AIS-DEM. The ice thickness distribution map is converted from the new DEM, assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. The Amery Ice Shelf marine ice, up to 230 m thick, is concentrated in the northwest of the ice shelf. The volume of the marine ice is 2.38×103 km3 and accounts for about 5.6% of the shelf volume.

  7. Geometry, lateral variability, and preservation of downlapped regressive shelf deposits, eastern Tyrrhenian Margin, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, M.E. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Trincardi, F. (Institute di Geologia Marina, Bologna (Italy))

    1990-05-01

    The shelf of the eastern Tyrrhenian margin changes substantially in width, shelf-break depth, and sea-floor steepness over relatively short distances, largely due to marked lateral changes in geologic structure. Remnants of late Pleistocene prograded coastal deposits are locally preserved on the middle and outer parts of this complex shelf. Through the authors studies of these prograded deposits they recognize two major controls on the distribution, lateral extent, thickness, and preservation potential. First, prograded (downlapped) deposits formed only where the physiographic shelf break was deeper than the lowstand shoreline, thus providing accommodation space for the lowstand deposits. Second, the proximity and relative size of sediment sources and the local coastal dispersal system influenced the geometry of the deposit. Mid-shelf and shelf-margin bodies composed of seaward-steepening downlapping reflectors were deposited as thin-to-thick continuous prograding sheets over an irregular eroded shelf surface and onto the shelf edge during the last fall and lowstand of sea level. A dearth of sediment at the end of lowstand conditions led to a switch from deposition to erosion. During sea level rise, shoreface erosion produced a major marine erosional (ravinement) surface landward of the 120-m isobath, and much, and in many places all, of the downlapping deposit was removed. Preservation of downlapping deposits is largely a function of their thickness. Thick continuous deposits are common on the shelf edge, whereas on the mid-shelf only thin remnants are preserved locally where depressions or morphologic steps were present in the shelf surface.

  8. Highstand shelf fans: The role of buoyancy reversal in the deposition of a new type of shelf sand body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Elisabeth; Simms, Alexander R.; Warrick, Jonathan; Yokoyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Although sea-level highstands are typically associated with sediment-starved continental shelves, high sea level does not hinder major river floods. Turbidity currents generated by plunging of sediment-laden rivers at the fluvial-marine interface, known as hyperpycnal flows, allow for cross-shelf transport of suspended sand beyond the coastline. Hyperpycnal flows in southern California have deposited six subaqueous fans on the shelf of the northern Santa Barbara Channel in the Holocene. Using eight cores and nine grab samples, we describe the deposits, age, and stratigraphic architecture of two fans in the Santa Barbara Channel. Fan lobes have up to 3 m of relief and are composed of multiple hyperpycnite beds ∼5 cm to 40 cm thick. Deposit architecture and geometry suggest the hyperpycnal flows became positively buoyant and lifted off the seabed, resulting in well-sorted, structureless, elongate sand lobes. Contrary to conventional sequence stratigraphic models, the presence of these features on the continental shelf suggests that active-margin shelves may locally develop high-quality reservoir sand bodies during sea-level highstands, and that such shelves need not be solely the site of sediment bypass. These deposits may provide a Quaternary analogue to many well-sorted sand bodies in the rock record that are interpreted as turbidites but lack typical Bouma-type features.

  9. Latest Pleistocene Deposition and Erosion on the New Jersey Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, B. A.; Alexander, C.; Stackhouse, S.; Turner, R.; Nordfjord, S.; Austin, J.; Goff, J.; Gulick, S.; Fulthorpe, C.

    2007-12-01

    The New Jersey margin is an ideal location for the study of sedimentary response to glacioeustatic forcing because this passive continental edge is both wide and stable. Although the region has been intensively imaged and mapped geophysically, it is still far from being understood stratigraphically because of a lack of samples to constrain timing and paleo-depositional environment. This study examines the timing and nature of latest Pleistocene erosion and deposition on the shelf, using grab samples and core recovered using the AHC-800 (Active Heave Compensation - 800 m) drilling system. The latest Pleistocene shelf is characterized by (1) downcutting and erosion by rivers associated with subaerial exposure during glacial retreat of sea level; (2) deposition at the shelf edge during sea level fall associated with formation of an outer shelf wedge; and (3) deposition in estuarine environments as sea level rose. Foraminiferal and sediment textural analyses of cores samples ground truth previous seismic reflection-based interpretations of incision and paleochannel formation. Grab samples analyzed for foraminiferal content and grain size identify environment of deposition within three main bathymetric features: sand ridges, sand ribbons, and glacial scours. Radiometric dating (14C) further constrains the timing of intervals of erosion and deposition. We relate our results to other studies and suggest a complex, spatially variable shelf response to glacial advance and retreat. K-Ar analyses of hornblende crystals provide constraints on sediment sources. Two assemblages exist: one consistent with ages of Proterozoic age plutons in the New Jersey area, and another, younger, indicating mixing. K-Ar dates show a clear difference between and Holocene (930- 970 +/- 20 Ma) sedimentary assemblages and sediments older than 30 k.y, (850-880 Ma +/- 20-30 Ma). Holocene hornblend crystal ages are consistent with Grenvillian aged plutons common to the source region (e

  10. 78 FR 48180 - Consolidation of Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection For Outer Continental Shelf Activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ...] Consolidation of Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection For Outer Continental Shelf Activities; Eighth Coast Guard... for all Mobile Offshore Drilling Units and Floating Outer Continental Shelf Facilities (as defined in... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facilities (as defined in 33 CFR 140.10), and other similar vessels that...

  11. Marine intervals in Neogene fluvial deposits of western Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Melanie; Troelstra, Simon; Lammertsma, Emmy; Hoorn, Carina

    2014-05-01

    Amazonia is one of the most species rich areas on Earth, but this high diversity is not homogeneous over the entire region. Highest mammal and tree-alpha diversity is found in the fluvio-lacustrine Pebas system, a Neogene wetland associated with rapid radiation of species. The estuarine to marine origin of various modern Amazonian fish, plants, and invertebrates has been associated with past marine ingressions into this freshwater Pebas system. The exact nature and age of these invasions is, however, debated. Here we present new evidence from fluvial and fluvio-lacustrine deposits of Neogene age in southeast Colombia, that point to periods of widespread marine conditions in western Amazonia. Our evidence is based on an analysis of marine palynomorphs, such as organic linings of foraminifera and dinoflagellate cysts, present in dark sandy clay sediments that outcrop along the Caqueta and Amazon rivers. Characteristically, the foraminiferal linings can be assigned to three benthic morphotypes only, e.g. Ammonia, Elphidium and Trochammina. This low diversity assemblage is associated with estuarine/marginal marine conditions. No distinct marine elements such as shelf or planktonic species were encountered. The observed foraminiferal linings and dinocyst assemblages are typical for a (eutrophic) shallow marine environment, suggesting that the Pebas freshwater wetland system occasionally changed to (marginal) marine. Although some reworked elements are found, a typical Neogene dinocyst taxon is commonly found supporting in situ deposition. Sedimentological features typical for tidal conditions that are reported for sites in Peru and northeastern Brazil likely relate to these marine ingressions. Sea level changes as well as foreland basin development related to Andes formation may have facilitated the entry of marine water during the Neogene.

  12. 77 FR 24734 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Leasing for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Leasing for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Offshore Florida AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management...

  13. Evidence for basal marine ice in the Filchner-Ronne ice shelf

    OpenAIRE

    Oerter, Hans; kipfstuhl, J.; Determann, Jürgen; Miller, Heinrich; Wagenbach, D.; Minikin, A; Graf, W.

    1992-01-01

    The Filchner-Ronne ice shelf, which drains most of the marine-based portions of the West Antarctic ice sheet, is the largest ice shelf on Earth by volume. The origin and properties of the ice that constitutes this shelf are poorly understood, because a strong reflecting interface within the ice and the diffuse nature of the ice-ocean interface make seismic and radio echo sounding data difficult to interpret(1,2). Ice in the upper part of the shelf is of meteoric origin, but it has been propos...

  14. Geochemistry of marine sediments of the Brazilian Northeastern continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Souza do Nascimento

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The marine sediment samples collected from the northeastern Brazilian continental shelf, at water depths between 20 and 80 m, consisted mainly of sands with an almost total absence of gravel and granules. Medium, coarse and very coarse sand grains are mostly composed of halimeda, lithothamnium, rodoliths and bioclastic sands with a carbonate content varying between 77 and 96 %. The chemistry in general shows a decreasing content of Ca (86.1 % >Si (6 % > Cl (3.6 % > Sr (0.8 % > K (0.66 % > S (0.62 % > Al (0.6 % > Na (0.55% > Mg (0.43 % > Fe (0.4 % > P (0.2 % > Br (0.04 % in the samples. There was no correlation between CaCO3 and chemical contents and grain size with depth and bio-components. With the exception of Sr of marine origin, all other elements (P, S, Br, Cl, Fe are of continental origin. The lithothamnium of some offshore samples shows higher CaCO3 content, while Mg and Na are present only in halimedas. Bioclastic sands contain no Br, and silt and clay fractions are rare and characterize samples closer to the coast. These marine bioclastic granulates are of very pure biogenic calcium carbonates and are thus highly to be recommended for economic purposes.Os granulados marinhos, da Plataforma Continental do nordeste brasileiro, coletados de profundidades entre 20 e 80 m, são predominantemente areias cascalhosas constituídas de halimedas, litotames, rodolitos e areias bioclásticas, cujos teores de carbonatos variam de 77 a 96 %. A concentração média geral de elementos químicos na ordem decrescente é Ca (86.1 % > Si (6 % > Cl (3.6 % > Sr (0.8 % > K (0.66 % > S (0.62 % > Al (0.6 % > Na (0.55 % > Mg (0.43 % > Fe (0.4 % > P (0.2 % > Br (0,04 %, independentemente da profundidade e tipo de bio-componente. Com exceção do Sr, que é de origem marinha, os demais elementos (P, S, Br, Cl, Fe são de origem continental. Elementos como Mg e Na foram restritos às halimedas em apenas duas amostras, enquanto Br não foi detectado nas areias

  15. Application of inversion techniques on marine magnetic data: Andaman shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Ramana, M.V.; Murty, G.P.S.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Krishna, K.S.; Chaubey, A.K.; Rao, M.M.M.; Narayana, S.L.

    with optimisation procedure of iteration modelling. The depths derived from these methods match well with the acoustic basement mapped by seismic reflection survey across the Andaman shelf. The interpretation by these methods demonstrates the rapid utility in virgin...

  16. Large flux of iron from the Amery Ice Shelf marine ice to Prydz Bay, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz-Borreguero, L.; Lannuzel, D.; van der Merwe, P.; Treverrow, A.; Pedro, J. B.

    2016-08-01

    The Antarctic continental shelf supports a high level of marine primary productivity and is a globally important carbon dioxide (CO2) sink through the photosynthetic fixation of CO2 via the biological pump. Sustaining such high productivity requires a large supply of the essential micronutrient iron (Fe); however, the pathways for Fe delivery to these zones vary spatially and temporally. Our study is the first to report a previously unquantified source of concentrated bioavailable Fe to Antarctic surface waters. We hypothesize that Fe derived from subglacial processes is delivered to euphotic waters through the accretion (Fe storage) and subsequent melting (Fe release) of a marine-accreted layer of ice at the base of the Amery Ice Shelf (AIS). Using satellite-derived Chlorophyll-a data, we show that the soluble Fe supplied by the melting of the marine ice layer is an order of magnitude larger than the required Fe necessary to sustain the large annual phytoplankton bloom in Prydz Bay. Our finding of high concentrations of Fe in AIS marine ice and recent data on increasing rates of ice shelf basal melt in many of Antarctica's ice shelves should encourage further research into glacial and marine sediment transport beneath ice shelves and their sensitivity to current changes in basal melt. Currently, the distribution, volume, and Fe concentration of Antarctic marine ice is poorly constrained. This uncertainty, combined with variable forecasts of increased rates of ice shelf basal melt, limits our ability to predict future Fe supply to Antarctic coastal waters.

  17. Marine magnetic anomalies off Ratnagiri, Western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, D.G.

    . Identification of these basalts in offshore areas along the northwestern continental shelf of India would support (1) the idea that the onshore Deccan basalts of western India and the rhyolitic tuffs at the Laccadive ridge system (DSDP Site 210) are related...

  18. Macromolecular composition of terrestrial and marine organic matter in sediments across the East Siberian Arctic Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Robert B.; Doğrul Selver, Ayça; Gustafsson, Örjan; Semiletov, Igor P.; Haghipour, Negar; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Talbot, Helen M.; van Dongen, Bart E.

    2016-10-01

    Mobilisation of terrestrial organic carbon (terrOC) from permafrost environments in eastern Siberia has the potential to deliver significant amounts of carbon to the Arctic Ocean, via both fluvial and coastal erosion. Eroded terrOC can be degraded during offshore transport or deposited across the wide East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS). Most studies of terrOC on the ESAS have concentrated on solvent-extractable organic matter, but this represents only a small proportion of the total terrOC load. In this study we have used pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (py-GCMS) to study all major groups of macromolecular components of the terrOC; this is the first time that this technique has been applied to the ESAS. This has shown that there is a strong offshore trend from terrestrial phenols, aromatics and cyclopentenones to marine pyridines. There is good agreement between proportion phenols measured using py-GCMS and independent quantification of lignin phenol concentrations (r2 = 0.67, p < 0.01, n = 24). Furfurals, thought to represent carbohydrates, show no offshore trend and are likely found in both marine and terrestrial organic matter. We have also collected new radiocarbon data for bulk OC (14COC) which, when coupled with previous measurements, allows us to produce the most comprehensive 14COC map of the ESAS to date. Combining the 14COC and py-GCMS data suggests that the aromatics group of compounds is likely sourced from old, aged terrOC, in contrast to the phenols group, which is likely sourced from modern woody material. We propose that an index of the relative proportions of phenols and pyridines can be used as a novel terrestrial vs. marine proxy measurement for macromolecular organic matter. Principal component analysis found that various terrestrial vs. marine proxies show different patterns across the ESAS, and it shows that multiple river-ocean transects of surface sediments transition from river-dominated to coastal-erosion-dominated to marine

  19. Mg/Casea surface temperatures during the Marine Isotope Stage 31 collapse of the Ross Ice Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, G. B.

    2012-04-01

    The recovery of the AND-1b and CRP-1 drill cores from the Southwest Ross Sea highlighted the potential instability in of the Ross Ice Shelf and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet it buttresses. Both cores recovered a few individuals of the planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina pachyderma from marine isotope stage (MIS) 31. This interval is significant because it marks the youngest occurrence of open ocean diatom sediment at AND-1b, which is now situated under the McMurdo Ice Shelf, indicating a substantial retreat of the Ross Ice Shelf occurred during this interglacial. However, sediment deposited after MIS 31 at both sites is represented only by glacial-dominated sediment, suggesting a critical environmental threshold had been crossed enabling the Ross Ice Shelf to form and persist. Numerical modeling by Pollard and DeConto (Nature, 2009) suggested that sub-ice oceanic melting is a critical element in the stability of ice shelves and that "WAIS will begin to collapse when nearby ocean temperatures warm by roughly 5°C." Laser ablation ICPMS measurement of the Mg/Ca content of N. pachyderma shows that although there is considerable heterogeneity in the distribution of Mg in their tests the mean Mg/Ca of a sample population appears proportional to calcification temperature. By empirically calibrating Mg/Ca in CRP-1 N. pachyderma against values measured in modern populations collected from Ross Sea and Southern Ocean sites with SSTs ranging from 1.2°C to 14°C it is concluded that SST during MIS 31 was warmer than today by 5-9°C, consistent with model projections.

  20. Marine ice regulates the future stability of a large Antarctic ice shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulessa, Bernd; Jansen, Daniela; Luckman, Adrian J.; King, Edward C.; Sammonds, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    The collapses of the Larsen A and B ice shelves on the Antarctic Peninsula in 1995 and 2002 confirm the impact of southward-propagating climate warming in this region. Recent mass and dynamic changes of Larsen B’s southern neighbour Larsen C, the fourth largest ice shelf in Antarctica, may herald a similar instability. Here, using a validated ice-shelf model run in diagnostic mode, constrained by satellite and in situ geophysical data, we identify the nature of this potential instability. We demonstrate that the present-day spatial distribution and orientation of the principal stresses within Larsen C ice shelf are akin to those within pre-collapse Larsen B. When Larsen B’s stabilizing frontal portion was lost in 1995, the unstable remaining shelf accelerated, crumbled and ultimately collapsed. We hypothesize that Larsen C ice shelf may suffer a similar fate if it were not stabilized by warm and mechanically soft marine ice, entrained within narrow suture zones. PMID:24751641

  1. MEAD Marine Effects of Atmospheric Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jickells, T.; Spokes, L.

    2003-04-01

    The coastal seas are one of the most valuable resources on the planet but they are threatened by human activity. We rely on the coastal area for mineral resources, waste disposal, fisheries and recreation. In Europe, high population densities and high levels of industrial activity mean that the pressures arising from these activities are particularly acute. One of the main problems concerning coastal seas is the rapid increase in the amounts of nitrogen-based pollutants entering the water. They come from many sources, the most important ones being traffic, industry and agriculture. These pollutants can be used by algae as nutrients. The increasing concentrations of these nutrients have led to excessive growth of algae, some of which are harmful. When algae die and decay, oxygen in the water is used up and the resulting lower levels of oxygen may lead to fish kills. Human activity has probably doubled the amount of chemically and biologically reactive nitrogen present globally. In Europe the increases have been greater than this, leading to real concern over the health of coastal waters. Rivers have, until recently, been thought to be the most important source of reactive nitrogen to the coastal seas but we now know that inputs from the atmosphere are large and can equal, or exceed, those from the rivers. Our initial hypothesis was that atmospheric inputs are important and potentially different in their effect on coastal ecosystems to riverine inputs and hence require different management strategies. However, we had almost no information on the direct effects of atmospheric deposition on marine ecosystems, though clearly such a large external nitrogen input should lead to enhanced phytoplankton growth The aim of this European Union funded MEAD project has been to determine how inputs of nitrogen from the atmosphere affect the chemistry and biology of coastal waters. To try to answer this, we have conducted field experiments in the Kattegat, an area where we know

  2. Characteristics, stratigraphic architecture, and time framework of multi-order mixed siliciclastic and carbonate depositional sequences, outcropping Cisco Group (Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian), Eastern Shelf, north-central Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wan; Kominz, Michelle A.

    2003-01-01

    The Cisco Group on the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin is composed of fluvial, deltaic, shelf, shelf-margin, and slope-to-basin carbonate and siliciclastic rocks. Sedimentologic and stratigraphic analyses of 181 meter-to-decimeter-scale depositional sequences exposed in the up-dip shelf indicated that the siliciclastic and carbonate parasequences in the transgressive systems tracts (TST) are thin and upward deepening, whereas those in highstand systems tracts (HST) are thick and upward shallowing. The sequences can be subdivided into five types on the basis of principal lithofacies, and exhibit variable magnitude of facies shift corresponding to variable extents of marine transgression and regression on the shelf. The sequence stacking patterns and their regional persistence suggest a three-level sequence hierarchy controlled by eustasy, whereas local and regional changes in lithology, thickness, and sequence type, magnitude, and absence were controlled by interplay of eustasy, differential shelf subsidence, depositional topography, and pattern of siliciclastic supply. The outcropping Cisco Group is highly incomplete with an estimated 6-11% stratigraphic completeness. The average duration of deposition of the major (third-order) sequences is estimated as 67-102 ka on the up-dip shelf and increases down dip, while the average duration of the major sequence boundaries (SB) is estimated as 831-1066 ka and decreases down dip. The nondepositional and erosional hiatus on the up-dip shelf was represented by lowstand deltaic systems in the basin and slope.

  3. Evolution and preservation potential of fluvial and transgressive deposits on the Louisiana inner shelf: Understanding depositional processes to support coastal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocks, J.; Miner, M.D.; Twichell, D.C.; Lavoie, D.L.; Kindinger, J.

    2009-01-01

    The barrier-island systems of the Mississippi River Delta plain are currently undergoing some of the highest rates of shoreline retreat in North America (???20 m/year). Effective management of this coastal area requires an understanding of the processes involved in shoreline erosion and measures that can be enacted to reduce loss. The dominant stratigraphy of the delta plain is fluvial mud (silts and clays), delivered in suspension via a series of shallow-water delta lobes that prograded across the shelf throughout the Holocene. Abandonment of a delta lobe through avulsion leads to rapid land subsidence through compaction within the muddy framework. As the deltaic headland subsides below sea level, the marine environment transgresses the bays and wetlands, reworking the available sands into transgressive barrier shorelines. This natural process is further complicated by numerous factors: (1) global sea-level rise; (2) reduced sediment load within the Mississippi River; (3) diversion of the sediment load away from the barrier shorelines to the deep shelf; (4) storm-induced erosion; and (5) human alteration of the littoral process through the construction of hardened shorelines, canals, and other activities. This suite of factors has led to the deterioration of the barrier-island systems that protect interior wetlands and human infrastructure from normal wave activity and periodic storm impact. Interior wetland loss results in an increased tidal prism and inlet cross-sectional areas, and expanding ebb-tidal deltas, which removes sand from the littoral processes through diversion and sequestration. Shoreface erosion of the deltaic headlands does not provide sufficient sand to balance the loss, resulting in thinning and dislocation of the islands. Abatement measures include replenishing lost sediment with similar material, excavated from discrete sandy deposits within the muddy delta plain. These sand bodies were deposited by the same cyclical processes that formed the

  4. The Influence of Terrestrial Matter in Marine Food Webs of the Beaufort Sea Shelf and Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L.; Iken, K.; Bluhm, B.

    2016-02-01

    Forecasted increases in terrestrial organic matter (OMterr) inputs to the Beaufort Sea necessitate a better understanding of the contribution of this organic matter food source to the trophic structure of marine communities. This study investigated the relative ecological importance of OMterr across the Beaufort Sea shelf and slope by examining differences in community trophic structure concurrent with variation in terrestrial versus marine organic matter influence. Interannual variability in organism trophic level was assessed to confirm the persistent impact of these large-scale patterns in food source distribution on marine consumers. Oxygen stable isotope ratios (δ18O) of surface water confirmed the widespread influence of Canada's Mackenzie River plume across the Beaufort Sea. Carbon stable isotope ratios (δ13C values) of pelagic particulate organic matter (pPOM) and marine consumers from locations ranging from 20 to 1000 m bottom depth revealed a strong isotopic imprint of OMterr in the eastern Beaufort Sea, which decreased westward from the Mackenzie River. Food web length, based on the nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ15N values) of marine consumers, was greater closer to the Mackenzie River outflow both in shelf and slope locations due to relatively higher δ15N values of pelagic and benthic primary consumers. Strong microbial processing of OMterr in the eastern regions of the Beaufort Sea is inferred based on a trophic gap between sources and lower trophic consumers. A large proportion of epifaunal biomass occupying higher trophic levels suggests that OMterr as a basal food source can provide substantial energetic support for higher marine trophic levels. These findings support the concept that terrestrial matter is an important source in the Arctic marine food web, and compel a more specific understanding of energy transfer through the OMterr-associated microbial loop.

  5. Marine ice sheet model performance depends on basal sliding physics and sub-shelf melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Rupert Michael; Warner, Roland Charles; Galton-Fenzi, Benjamin Keith; Gagliardini, Olivier; Zwinger, Thomas; Greve, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Computer models are necessary for understanding and predicting marine ice sheet behaviour. However, there is uncertainty over implementation of physical processes at the ice base, both for grounded and floating glacial ice. Here we implement several sliding relations in a marine ice sheet flow-line model accounting for all stress components and demonstrate that model resolution requirements are strongly dependent on both the choice of basal sliding relation and the spatial distribution of ice shelf basal melting.Sliding relations that reduce the magnitude of the step change in basal drag from grounded ice to floating ice (where basal drag is set to zero) show reduced dependence on resolution compared to a commonly used relation, in which basal drag is purely a power law function of basal ice velocity. Sliding relations in which basal drag goes smoothly to zero as the grounding line is approached from inland (due to a physically motivated incorporation of effective pressure at the bed) provide further reduction in resolution dependence.A similar issue is found with the imposition of basal melt under the floating part of the ice shelf: melt parameterisations that reduce the abruptness of change in basal melting from grounded ice (where basal melt is set to zero) to floating ice provide improved convergence with resolution compared to parameterisations in which high melt occurs adjacent to the grounding line.Thus physical processes, such as sub-glacial outflow (which could cause high melt near the grounding line), impact on capability to simulate marine ice sheets. If there exists an abrupt change across the grounding line in either basal drag or basal melting, then high resolution will be required to solve the problem. However, the plausible combination of a physical dependency of basal drag on effective pressure, and the possibility of low ice shelf basal melt rates next to the grounding line, may mean that some marine ice sheet systems can be reliably simulated at

  6. Use of E-Beam for Shelf-Life Extension and Sanitizing of Marinated Pork Loin

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Márquez, I.; Ordóñez, J. A.; Cambero, M. I.; Cabeza, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of E-beam radiation to extend the shelf-life of marinated pork loin slices stored at 4 and 8°C (temperature abuse) has been studied. The shelf-life was extended from 7 to 16 and >20 days after the application of 1 and 2 kGy, respectively. In the event of a temperature abuse occuring during the product distribution (e.g., increase to 8°C), the shelf-life would be extended from 5 to 10 and 16 days, respectively, when applying the doses mentioned previously. From a public health point of view, the irradiation of marinated pork loin may be marketable for a longer period of time of up to two weeks, and guarantees a practically Salmonella and Listeria-free product. Minor changes are produced by the E-beam treatment in the main sensory and rheological characteristics. The odor was the most affected feature, but the off-odors diminished with increased storage. In any case, testers judged the samples to be adequate for marketing. PMID:23227053

  7. Use of E-Beam for Shelf-Life Extension and Sanitizing of Marinated Pork Loin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. García-Márquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of E-beam radiation to extend the shelf-life of marinated pork loin slices stored at 4 and 8°C (temperature abuse has been studied. The shelf-life was extended from 7 to 16 and >20 days after the application of 1 and 2 kGy, respectively. In the event of a temperature abuse occuring during the product distribution (e.g., increase to 8°C, the shelf-life would be extended from 5 to 10 and 16 days, respectively, when applying the doses mentioned previously. From a public health point of view, the irradiation of marinated pork loin may be marketable for a longer period of time of up to two weeks, and guarantees a practically Salmonella and Listeria-free product. Minor changes are produced by the E-beam treatment in the main sensory and rheological characteristics. The odor was the most affected feature, but the off-odors diminished with increased storage. In any case, testers judged the samples to be adequate for marketing.

  8. Marine fish community structure and habitat associations on the Canadian Beaufort shelf and slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Andrew R.; Atchison, Sheila; MacPhee, Shannon; Eert, Jane; Niemi, Andrea; Michel, Christine; Reist, James D.

    2017-03-01

    Marine fishes in the Canadian Beaufort Sea have complex interactions with habitats and prey, and occupy a pivotal position in the food web by transferring energy between lower- and upper-trophic levels, and also within and among habitats (e.g., benthic-pelagic coupling). The distributions, habitat associations, and community structure of most Beaufort Sea marine fishes, however, are unknown thus precluding effective regulatory management of emerging offshore industries in the region (e.g., hydrocarbon development, shipping, and fisheries). Between 2012 and 2014, Fisheries and Oceans Canada conducted the first baseline survey of offshore marine fishes, their habitats, and ecological relationships in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. Benthic trawling was conducted at 45 stations spanning 18-1001 m depths across shelf and slope habitats. Physical oceanographic variables (depth, salinity, temperature, oxygen), biological variables (benthic chlorophyll and integrated water-column chlorophyll) and sediment composition (grain size) were assessed as potential explanatory variables for fish community structure using a non-parametric statistical approach. Selected stations were re-sampled in 2013 and 2014 for a preliminary assessment of inter-annual variability in the fish community. Four distinct fish assemblages were delineated on the Canadian Beaufort Shelf and slope: 1) Nearshore-shelf: 50 and ≤200 m depths, 3) Upper-slope: ≥200 and ≤500 m depths, and 4) Lower-slope: ≥500 m depths. Depth was the environmental variable that best explained fish community structure, and each species assemblage was spatially associated with distinct aspects of the vertical water mass profile. Significant differences in the fish community from east to west were not detected, and the species composition of the assemblages on the Canadian Beaufort Shelf have not changed substantially over the past decade. This community analysis provides a framework for testing hypotheses regarding the trophic

  9. On Physical and Mechanical Behavior of Natural Marine Intermediate Deposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Ming-lei; DENG Xue-jun

    2005-01-01

    Coastal structures may be built on natural sedimentary intermediate grounds, which mainly consist of silty soils and fine sandy soils. In this study, extensive field and laboratory tests were performed on the natural marine intermediate deposits to demonstrate the difference in behavior between natural marine clayey soils and natural marine intermediate deposits. The natural intermediate deposits have almost the same ratios of natural water content to liquid limit as those of the soft natural marine clays, but the former have much higher in-situ strength and sensitivity than the latter. The research results indicate that grain size distributions of soils affect significantly tip resistance obtained in field cone penetration tests. The mechanical parameters of natural marine intermediate deposits are also significantly affected by sample disturbance due to their high sensitivity and relatively large permeability. Unconfined compression shear tests largely underestimate the strength of natural marine intermediate soils. The triaxial consolidated compression shear tests with simulated in-situ confined pressure give results much better than those of uncomfined compression shear tests.

  10. Nineteenth-century collapse of a benthic marine ecosystem on the open continental shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašových, Adam; Kidwell, Susan M

    2017-06-14

    The soft-sediment seafloor of the open continental shelf is among the least-known biomes on Earth, despite its high diversity and importance to fisheries and biogeochemical cycling. Abundant dead shells of epifaunal suspension-feeding terebratulid brachiopods (Laqueus) and scallops on the now-muddy mainland continental shelf of southern California reveal the recent, previously unsuspected extirpation of an extensive offshore shell-gravel ecosystem, evidently driven by anthropogenic siltation. Living populations of attached epifauna, which formerly existed in a middle- and outer-shelf mosaic with patches of trophically diverse muds, are restricted today to rocky seafloor along the shelf edge and to the sandier shelves of offshore islands. Geological age-dating of 190 dead brachiopod shells shows that (i) no shells have been produced on the mainland shelf within the last 100 years, (ii) their shell production declined steeply during the nineteenth century, and (iii) they had formerly been present continuously for at least 4 kyr. This loss, sufficiently rapid (less than or equal to 100 years) and thorough to represent an ecosystem collapse, coincides with intensification of alluvial-plain land use in the nineteenth century, particularly livestock grazing. Extirpation was complete by the start of twentieth-century urbanization, warming, bottom fishing and scientific surveys. The loss of this filter-feeding fauna and the new spatial homogeneity and dominance of deposit- and detritus-feeders would have altered ecosystem functioning by reducing habitat heterogeneity and seawater filtering. This discovery, attesting to the power of this geological approach to recent ecological transitions, also strongly increases the spatial scope attributable to the negative effects of siltation, and suggests that it has been under-recognized on continental shelves elsewhere as a legacy of coastal land use. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Marine species distribution shifts on the U.S. Northeast Continental Shelf under continued ocean warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleisner, Kristin M.; Fogarty, Michael J.; McGee, Sally; Hare, Jonathan A.; Moret, Skye; Perretti, Charles T.; Saba, Vincent S.

    2017-04-01

    The U.S. Northeast Continental Shelf marine ecosystem has warmed much faster than the global ocean and it is expected that this enhanced warming will continue through this century. Complex bathymetry and ocean circulation in this region have contributed to biases in global climate model simulations of the Shelf waters. Increasing the resolution of these models results in reductions in the bias of future climate change projections and indicates greater warming than suggested by coarse resolution climate projections. Here, we used a high-resolution global climate model and historical observations of species distributions from a trawl survey to examine changes in the future distribution of suitable thermal habitat for various demersal and pelagic species on the Shelf. Along the southern portion of the shelf (Mid-Atlantic Bight and Georges Bank), a projected 4.1 °C (surface) to 5.0 °C (bottom) warming of ocean temperature from current conditions results in a northward shift of the thermal habitat for the majority of species. While some southern species like butterfish and black sea bass are projected to have moderate losses in suitable thermal habitat, there are potentially significant increases for many species including summer flounder, striped bass, and Atlantic croaker. In the north, in the Gulf of Maine, a projected 3.7 °C (surface) to 3.9 °C (bottom) warming from current conditions results in substantial reductions in suitable thermal habitat such that species currently inhabiting this region may not remain in these waters under continued warming. We project a loss in suitable thermal habitat for key northern species including Acadian redfish, American plaice, Atlantic cod, haddock, and thorney skate, but potential gains for some species including spiny dogfish and American lobster. We illustrate how changes in suitable thermal habitat of important commercially fished species may impact local fishing communities and potentially impact major fishing ports

  12. Tectonic forcing of shelf-ramp depositional architecture, Laguna Madre-Tuxpan Shelf, western Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniec, Tim F.; Ambrose, W.; Aranda-Garcia, M.; Romano, U. H.

    2004-07-01

    Analysis of seismic reflection data reveals the existence of a major listric fault that accommodates most of the Neogene extension of the Laguna Madre-Tuxpan shelf of the western Gulf of Mexico. The variation of related growth strata, the profile of the modern shelf-slope transition, the linear gradient of shelf extension (as well as basin accommodation) along the trace of the fault support a hypothesis that sediment loading along the northern part of the fault drives fault motion and influences sediment distribution along the southern end of the fault. In particular, where kinematic accommodation appears to outpace sediment supply, sedimentation is maximized along a shelf-ramp system and not the shelf-slope transition.

  13. Shallow sequence stratigraphy of the inner shelf deposits off the southeastern coast of Korea (Korea Strait)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Dong-Geun; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Taejeon(Korea)

    2001-09-01

    High-resolution seismic profiles on the inner shelf off the southeastern coast of Korea reveal that late Quaternary deposits consist of three sedimentary units (A upper, B middle and C lower) accumulated after the last glacial period. The upper unit (A) above the maximum flooding surface is the highstand systems tract formed during the recent highstand of sea level. The middle and lower units (B and C) represent the transgressive systems tract related to shoreface retreat during the post-glacial transgression. The middle unit (B) above the ravinement surface forms a thin veneer of transgressive sands, while lower unit (C) overlying the sequence boundary represents the transgressive estuarine deposits accumulated in the late stage of Holocene transgression. (author). 19 refs., 6 figs.

  14. The Eocene Rusayl Formation, Oman, carbonaceous rocks in calcareous shelf sediments: Environment of deposition, alteration and hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dill, H.G.; Wehner, H.; Kus, J. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, P.O. Box 510163, D-30631 Hannover (Germany); Botz, R. [University Kiel, Geological-Paleontological Department, Olshausenstrasse 40-60, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Berner, Z.; Stueben, D. [Technical University Karlsruhe, Institute for Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Fritz-Haber-Weg 2, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Al-Sayigh, A. [Sultan Qaboos University, Geological Dept. PO Box 36, Al-Khod (Oman)

    2007-10-01

    Paralic carbonaceous series intercalated among calcareous shelf sediments have seldom been investigated. During the early Eocene, calcareous and siliciclastic sediments were deposited on a wide shelf in front of low-reliefed hinterland in the Al Khawd region in NE Oman. The siliciclastic-calcareous sediments originated from strongly reworked debris of the Arabic Shield. The underlying Semail Ophiolite did not act as a direct source of debris but provided some heat to increase the maturity of carbonaceous rocks and modify the isotope signal of the calcareous minerals in the Rusayl Formation. A multidisciplinary approach involving sedimentology, mineralogy, chemistry, coal petrography and paleontology resulted in the establishment of nine stratigraphic lithofacies units and provides the reader with a full picture from deposition of the mixed carbonaceous-calcareous-siliciclastic rocks to the most recent stages of post-depositional alteration of the Paleogene formations. The calcareous Jafnayn Formation (lithofacies unit I) developed in a subtidal to intertidal regime, influenced episodically by storms. Deepening of the calcareous shelf towards younger series was ground to a halt by paleosols developing on a disconformity (lithofacies unit II) and heralding the onset of the Rusayl Formation. The stratigraphic lithofacies units III and IV reflect mangrove swamps which from time to time were flooded through washover fans from the open sea. The presence of Spinozonocolpites and the taxon Avicennia, which today belong to a coastal marsh vegetational community, furnish palynological evidence to the idea of extensive mangrove swamps in the Rusayl Formation [El Beialy, S.Y., 1998. Stratigraphic and palaeonenvironmental significance of Eocene palynomorphs from the Rusayl Shale Formation, Al Khawd, northern Oman. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 102, 249-258]. During the upper Rusayl Formation (lithofacies units V through VII) algal mats episodically flooded by marine

  15. Diagenesis and reservoir quality evolution of palaeocene deep-water, marine sandstones, the Shetland-Faroes Basin, British continental shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansurbeg, H. [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villavaegen 16, SE 752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Morad, S. [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villavaegen 16, SE 752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Petroleum Geosciences, The Petroleum Institute, P.O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Salem, A. [Faculty of Education at Kafr El-Sheikh, Tanta University, Kafr El-Sheikh (Egypt); Marfil, R.; Caja, M.A. [Departmento Petrologia y Geoquimica, Facultad de Geologia, UCM, 28040 Madrid (Spain); El-ghali, M.A.K. (Geology Department, Al-Fateh University, P.O. Box 13696, Libya); Nystuen, J.P. [Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1047 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway); Amorosi, A. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Zamboni 67, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Garcia, D. [Centre SPIN, Department GENERIC, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint Etienne 158, Cours Fauriel 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); La Iglesia, A. [Instituto de Geologia Economica (CSIC-UCM), Facultad de Geologia, UCM, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    The Palaeocene, deep-water marine sandstones recovered from six wells in the Shetland-Faroes Basin represent lowstand, transgressive and highstand systems tract turbiditic sediments. Mineralogic, petrographic, and geochemical analyses of these siliciclastics are used to decipher and discuss the diagenetic alterations and subsequent reservoir quality evolution. The Middle-Upper Palaeocene sandstones (subarkoses to arkoses) from the Shetland-Faroes Basin, British continental shelf are submarine turbiditic deposits that are cemented predominantly by carbonates, quartz and clay minerals. Carbonate cements (intergranular and grain replacive calcite, siderite, ferroan dolomite and ankerite) are of eogenetic and mesogenetic origins. The eogenetic alterations have been mediated by marine, meteoric and mixed marine/meteoric porewaters and resulted mainly in the precipitation of calcite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-10.9 permille and -3.8 permille), trace amounts of non-ferroan dolomite, siderite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-14.4 permille to -0.6 permille), as well as smectite and kaolinite in the lowstand systems tract (LST) and highstand systems tract (HST) turbiditic sandstone below the sequence boundary. Minor eogenetic siderite has precipitated between expanded and kaolinitized micas, primarily biotite. The mesogenetic alterations are interpreted to have been mediated by evolved marine porewaters and resulted in the precipitation of calcite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-12.9 permille to -7.8 permille) and Fe-dolomite/ankerite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-12.1 permille to -6.3 permille) at temperatures of 50-140 and 60-140 C, respectively. Quartz overgrowths and outgrowth, which post- and pre-date the mesogenetic carbonate cements is more common in the LST and TST of distal turbiditic sandstone. Discrete quartz cement, which is closely associated with illite and chlorite, is the final diagenetic phase. The clay minerals include intergranular and grain replacive

  16. Contribution of offshore petroleum deposits to marine food chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, S.

    2009-12-01

    Petroleum production out of offshore petroleum deposits often coincides with abundant fisheries in the world. Superposition of marine microorganism concentration distribution and offshore petroleum field distribution from various data in the literature provides to prove this coincidence. Sakhalin Island coastal regions, North Sea, Gulf of Mexico, etc. are chosen for the superpositions. Significant conformity is observed between the plankton concentration distribution and the offshore petroleum deposit distribution in all those regions. Also, most studies on the consequence of oil spills to marine eco-systems have focused mainly on hazardous marine pollution caused by spilled petroleum at high concentration in marine environment. However, some of those data clearly indicate stimulation of plankton population in properly low concentration levels of dissolved hydrocarbons and dissolved petroleum compositions. Further, increase of hydrocarbon concentration leads to its inhibition from its stimulation conditions upon crossing over a critical concentration level—a plankton stimulation/inhibition threshold concentration (SITC) of hydrocarbons. The SITC varies depending on hydrocarbon compounds, petroleum compositions, and microorganisms such as planktons. Further, petroleum composition diffusing through subterranean layers from petroleum deposits reacts with dissolved oxygen to be consumed at the ocean floor to precipitate the agglomerate suspension of hydrocarbons, leaving the sea water in a condition of oxygen depletion on the ocean floor. Such incidents are also briefly discussed.Plankton stimulation/inhibition threshold concentration of petroleum fractions

  17. Cohesive Sediment Erodibility and Evolution of a Mud Deposit on the Palos Verdes Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, C. R.; Ferre, B.; Murray, C. J.; Sanford, L. P.; Warner, J. C.; Wiberg, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    We have added a cohesive-sediment erodibility algorithm to ROMS, a three-dimensional numerical model for circulation and sediment transport. The new code implements an algorithm developed by Sanford ("Modeling a dynamically varying mixed sediment bed with erosion, deposition, bioturbation, consolidation, and armoring", Computers and Geosciences, in review.) The algorithm assumes that cohesive sediment has a critical stress for erosion that varies (typically increasing) with depth in the sediment, determined by various physical and biological properties or processes. Erosion and deposition alter this profile, but it is reestablished over a characteristic time scale which is longer than typical resuspension events (a few days) but probably less than a year. The critical stress profile limits the amount of sediment that can be eroded during to the mass available at the maximum stress applied during the event. Because the critical stress profile varies with time, the response to events depends on the history of sediment disturbance and recovery. The shapes of the critical stress profiles can vary both horizontally and vertically. In this pilot application, the shapes of the profiles were determined from geostatistical modeling of field data collected on a mud deposit on the Palos Verdes Shelf off Los Angeles. The data include about 30 traditional grain-size measurements, 10 erosion-chamber experiments, and 160 measurements of the penetration depths of a sediment-profiling camera. The penetration depths were highly correlated (r=0.84) with the slope of the erodibility profiles determined by the erosion chamber. Maps of erodibility (i.e., slope and offset of the critical stress profiles) on the Palos Verdes Shelf were made with Gaussian simulation and collocated cokriging of the erosion-chamber data conditioned on the camera-penetration data. These and maps of bottom grain-size distribution were used to initialize the bed sediment in ROMS. Model runs were made for the

  18. Aeolian to shallow-marine shelf architecture off a major desert since the Late Pleistocene (northern Mauritania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanebuth, T. J. J.; Mersmeyer, H.; Kudrass, H. R.; Westphal, H.

    2013-12-01

    Continental shelves off major desert regions are not expected to host substantial amounts of sediments due to long-lasting and unfocused material supply and a high re-mobilization potential of aeolian material. This study, in contrast, demonstrates that significant volumes of sediments have accumulated on the northern Mauritanian shelf under the arid climate conditions and prevail over consecutive climatic cycles. Eight late Pleistocene to Holocene depositional units, each formed under contrasting depositional conditions, are identified in high-resolution seismo-acoustic data and dated sediment cores. These are: (1) a highly differentiated Pleistocene paleo-landscape older than the past climatic cycle, (2) a continental dune complex (MIS-4), (3) a thick regressive shallow-water clinoform (late MIS-3), (4) a regressive to lowstand shore deposit (latest MIS-3), and (5) a local transgressive cover (LGM to deglacial). Additionally, (6) an open-shelf highstand cover, (7) an outer-shelf highstand wedge and (8) mid-shelf mud depocenters have formed during the Holocene sea-level highstand. The common local offshore formation and preservation of confined stratigraphic units, in particular from during MIS-3, mark the interplay of: a) episodes of pronounced arid climatic conditions resulting in enhanced aeolian and coastal sediment input, b) shelf current patterns focusing sediment deposition locally, and c) early post-depositional sediment stabilization providing protection against erosion. Prominent internal surfaces at 63 and 115 m modern water depths indicate widespread and intense erosional activity during late MIS-3 regression and MIS-2 lowstand to post-LGM transgression, hosting coarse shell sands and gravels from beach and shoreface paleo-environments. The reasons for the high preservation potential of confined stratigraphic units are: a) carbonaceous cementation, b) sediment composition (massive widespread shore-related gravel and shell beds with subtle minor

  19. A Note on Soil Structure Resistance of Natural Marine Deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪振舜; 刘松玉; 刘志方

    2004-01-01

    It has been well documented that natural normally-consolidated marine soils are generally subjected to the effects of soil structure. The interpretation of the resistance of soil structure is an important issue in the theory study and engineering practice of ocean engineering and geotechnical engineering. It is traditionally considered that the resistance of soil structure gradually disappears with increasing stress level when the applied stress is beyond the consolidation yield stress.In this study, however, it is found that this traditional interpretation of the resistance of soil structure can not explain the strength behavior of natural marine deposits with a normally-consolidated stress history. A new interpretation of the resistance of soil structure is proposed based on the strength behavior. In the preyield state, the undrained strength of natural marine deposits is composed of two components: one developed by the applied stress and the other developed by the resistance of soil structure. When the applied stress is beyond the consolidation yield stress, the strength behavior is independent of the resistance of soil structure.

  20. Depositional architecture and evolution of inner shelf to shelf edge delta systems since the Late Oliocene and their respone to the tectonic and sea level change, Pear River Mouth Basin, northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Changsong; Zhang, Zhongtao; liu, Jingyan; Jiang, Jing

    2016-04-01

    The Pear River Mouth Basin is located in the northern continent margin of the South China Sea. Since the Late Oligocene, the long-term active fluvial systems (Paleo-Zhujiang) from the western basin margin bebouched into the northern continental margin of the South China Sea and formed widespread deltaic deposits in various depositional geomorphologies and tectonic settings. Based of integral analysys of abundant seismic, well logging and drilling core data, Depositional architecture and evolution of these delta systems and their respone to the tectonic and sea level change are documented in the study. There are two basic types of the delta systems which have been recognized: inner shelf delta deposited in shallow water enviroments and the outer shelf or shelf-edge delta systems occurred in deep water settings. The paleowater depths of these delta systems are around 30 to 80m (inner shelf delta) and 400-1000m (shelf-edge delta) estimated from the thickness (decompaction) of the delta front sequences. The study shows that the inner shelf delta systems are characterized by relatively thin delta forests (20-40m), numereous stacked distributary channel fills, relative coarse river mouth bar deposits and thin distal delta front or distal bar and prodelta deposits. In contrast, the outer shelf or shelf edge delta systems are characteristic of thick (300-800m) and steep (4-60) of deltaic clinoforms, which commonly display in 3D seismic profiles as "S" shape reflection. Large scale soft-sediment deformation structures, slump or debris flow deposits consisting mainly of soft-sediment deformed beds, blocks of sandstones and siltstones or mudstones widely developed in the delta front deposits. The shelf edge delta systems are typically associated with sandy turbidite fan deposits along the prodelta slopes, which may shift basinwards as the progradation of the delta systems. The delta systems underwent several regional cycles of evolution from inner shelf deltas to shelf edge

  1. Seismic analysis of clinoform depositional sequences and shelf-margin trajectories in Lower Cretaceous (Albian) strata, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseknecht, D.W.; Bird, K.J.; Schenk, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Lower Cretaceous strata beneath the Alaska North Slope include clinoform depositional sequences that filled the western Colville foreland basin and overstepped the Beaufort rift shoulder. Analysis of Albian clinoform sequences with two-dimensional (2D) seismic data resulted in the recognition of seismic facies inferred to represent lowstand, transgressive and highstand systems tracts. These are stacked to produce shelf-margin trajectories that appear in low-resolution seismic data to alternate between aggradational and progradational. Higher-resolution seismic data reveal shelf-margin trajectories that are more complex, particularly in net-aggradational areas, where three patterns commonly are observed: (1) a negative (downward) step across the sequence boundary followed by mostly aggradation in the lowstand systems tract (LST), (2) a positive (upward) step across the sequence boundary followed by mostly progradation in the LST and (3) an upward backstep across a mass-failure d??collement. These different shelf-margin trajectories are interpreted as (1) fall of relative sea level below the shelf edge, (2) fall of relative sea level to above the shelf edge and (3) mass-failure removal of shelf-margin sediment. Lowstand shelf margins mapped using these criteria are oriented north-south in the foreland basin, indicating longitudinal filling from west to east. The shelf margins turn westward in the north, where the clinoform depositional system overstepped the rift shoulder, and turn eastward in the south, suggesting progradation of depositional systems from the ancestral Brooks Range into the foredeep. Lowstand shelf-margin orientations are consistently perpendicular to clinoform-foreset-dip directions. Although the Albian clinoform sequences of the Alaska North Slope are generally similar in stratal geometry to clinoform sequences elsewhere, they are significantly thicker. Clinoform-sequence thickness ranges from 600-1000 m in the north to 1700-2000 m in the south

  2. The geochemical similarity of Oligocene and recent phosphorites from the Chiatura deposit (Georgia) and the Namibian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baturin, G. N.; Zhegallo, E. A.; Shkolnik, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed studies of the distribution of macro- and microelements in phosphorites associated with Oligocene manganese ores of the Chiatura deposit revealed their geochemical similarity to the Late Quaternary phosphorites on the recent shelf of Namibia in the Atlantic Ocean. This shows that the Chiatura nodular phosphorites were formed in the shallow-water bioproductive zone of the Oligocene basin by biogenic supply of phosphorus onto the bottom and its subsequent diagenetic concentrating similarly to the granular-nodular phosphorites on the shelf of the recent ocean. The Chiatura phosphorites were later subjected to the epigenetic impact of hydrogeological processes, which modified the initial composition of the contained rareearth elements.

  3. Lithofacies, biofacies, and ichnoassemblage evolution of a shallow submarine volcaniclastic fan-shelf depositional system (Upper Cretaceous, James Ross Island, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scasso, R. A.; Olivero, E. B.; Buatois, L. A.

    The Upper Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian/lower Maastrichtian) Santa Marta Formation on James Ross Island, Antarctica, represents volcaniclastic shallow marine fan and shelf sedimentation adjacent to an active volcanic arc. A combined analysis of sedimentologic, paleoecologic, and ichnologic data allows for the recognition in this unit of six lithofacies associations, eight biofacies, and five trace fossils assemblages. Lithofacies are dominated by fine, massive, tuffaceous rocks; graded, turbidite-like tuffaceous sandstones; carbonaceous mudstones; resedimented conglomerates; coquinas; sandstones; silty sandstones; and minor stromatolite beds. Biofacies are defined by different composition and relative abundance of elements of the benthic fauna, mainly bivalves, gastropods, and serpulids, with minor elements represented by scaphopods, corals, brachiopods, and echinoids. Trace fossil assemblages include the most common elements of the Skolithos and Cruziana ichnofacies. A striking result of the analysis is that lithofacies, biofacies, and trace fossil assemblages form distinct, non-repetitive, vertically successive horizons, with their distribution boundaries roughly coincident. On this basis, seven major facies groups, showing a distinct combination of lithofacies, biofacies, and trace fossils, are distinguished in the Santa Marta Formation. These non-repetitive, vertically stacked facies groups reveal a one-way evolution of the depositional system during a transgressive-regressive cycle, with a new transgression at the top of the unit. The lower facies groups represent shallow marine settings with a very high rate of volcaniclastic sedimentation within subsiding basin. Shallow, volcaniclastic fan systems were probably formed at the base of delta slope and grew rapidly as a consequence of high sedimentary supply in equilibrium with basin subsidence. The upper facies groups probably represent sedimentation within the marine part of the envisaged deltaic system on a

  4. Lithology, monsoon and sea-surface current control on provenance, dispersal and deposition of sediments over the Andaman continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karri Damodararao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sediments deposited on the Northern and Eastern Andaman Shelf along with a few sediments from the Irrawaddy and the Salween Rivers are studied for their elemental, Sr and Nd concentrations and their isotope composition to identify their sources, constrain their transport pathways and assess the factors influencing the erosion in the catchment and their dispersal and deposition over the Andaman Shelf region. Major elemental compositions of the shelf sediments suggest mafic lithology such as ophiolites and ultrabasic rocks in the Irrawaddy drainage and over Indo – Burman – Arakan (IBA ranges as their dominant source. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in sediments of the Northern and Eastern Andaman Shelf range between 0.712245 and 0.742183 whereas, εNd varies from -6.29 to -17.25. Sediments around Mergui have the highest 87Sr/86Sr and the lowest εNd values. Sr and Nd isotope composition of these sediments along with that in the potential sources suggest four major sources of these sediments to the Andaman Shelf, (i the Irrawaddy River, (ii the Salween River, (iii Rivers draining the IBA ranges and (vi Rivers draining the Western/Central granitic ranges of the Southern Myanmar and Western Thailand such as the Tavoy and the Tanintharyi Rivers. Erosion in the catchment is controlled by the precipitation and topography. Intensely focused precipitation over the higher relief of the western slopes of the IBA and western/central granitic ranges causes higher erosion over this mountainous region, supplying huge sediments through the Kaladan, Irrawaddy, Salween, and the Tanintharyi Rivers to the western Myanmar Shelf, Northern, and Eastern Andaman Shelves respectively. The majority of the sediments produced in the drainage are delivered to the shelf during the south-west monsoon which is dispersed eastward by sea-surface circulation from the mouth of the Irrawaddy Rivers towards the Gulf of Martaban and further southward. The Andaman Shelf receives very little

  5. Marine geological study of the continental shelf around Heugsan island, SE Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chi Won; Jin, Jae Hwa; Shin, Won Cheol; Kim, Won Sik; Kim, Jung Ki; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Ho Yong; Chang, Cheong Hae; Kim, Sung Woo; Lee, Yoon Oh; Park, Young Soo; Bahng, Hyo Ky [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    This annual report is a result of marine geological and geophysical surveys conducted in 1995 to obtain a variety of data available for mapping Korean continental shelf geology. The study area is situated off city of Mokpo, comprising a rectangle enclosed by lines connecting between 34 degree 30`N and 35 degree 00`N, and between 125 degree 00`E and 126 degree 00`E. Geophysical surveys included water-depth sounding, sea floor side scanning, 3.5 khz sub-bottom profiling, air gun seismic reflection profiling and measurement of total magnetic intensity. During geological terms, 102 grab samples were collected from a grid of 4 miles x 4 miles spaced on the sea floor, and 31 sediment cores were raised from the proper sites determined by preliminary interpretation of geophysical data. The survey vessel, R/V Tamhae, was positioned by a GPS system (Loran-GPS 10X; Trimble Navigation Co.). The sea floor is largely covered with seven distinct types of surface and near-surface sediments; (1) massive sand, (2) homogeneous clay, (3) laminated silt, (4) bioturbated muddy sand, (5) massive silt, (6) bioturbated gravelly muddy sand, and (7) shell aggregate. Based on synthetic interpretation of high-resolution (3.5 khz) seismic data and correlated sedimentary facies, the shallow substratum comprises low-stand, transgressive and high-stand systems tracts (LST, TST and HST, respectively) formed during the last glacio-eutectics regression and transgression. Air gun seismic profiles show that pre-Pleistocene sediments comprise 4 sequences designated as B, C, D, and E, respectively. (author). 63 refs.

  6. First hydroacoustic evidence of marine, active fluid vents in the Naples Bay continental shelf (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Salvatore; Genovese, Simona; Sacchi, Marco; Barra, Marco; Rumolo, Paola; Tamburrino, Stella; Mazzola, Salvatore; Basilone, Gualtiero; Placenti, Francesco; Aronica, Salvatore; Bonanno, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of a multidisciplinary research aimed at the detection and mapping of Active Fluid Vents (AFVs) at the seafloor of the Naples Bay, Italy. This segment of the Campania continental margin is characterised by severe Quaternary extension and intense volcanism at Ischia and Procida islands, the Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complexes. High resolution hydroacoustic profilers were used to identify and localize fluid emission from the seafloor. ROV direct observation showed that each emission centre is generally composed by the coalescence of several emitting points. CTD probes showed that there are no significant gradients in temperature profiles. The results of this study include the detection and mapping of 54 fluid emission points all located in the - 71/- 158 m depth range, and spatially distributed into four main clusters. Three of the described clusters are located along the margin of a complex, toe-shaped seafloor morphology southwest of the Somma-Vesuvius, representing the shallow expression of partly buried, coalesced depositional features (namely, two flank collapses and one pyroclastic flow) associated with the Late Pleistocene activity of the volcano. The fourth AFV cluster was detected at the morphological - high, located about 8 km south of Naples (Banco della Montagna), represented by a field of volcaniclastic diapirs composed of massive pumiceous deposits originated from the Campi Flegrei intruding rising through the latest Quaternary-Holocene marine deposits. Our study suggests that the occurrence of AFV in this area could be genetically linked to the interaction between volcanic related seafloor morphologies and the main, NE striking faults present in the area, i.e. the Magnaghi-Sebeto line and the Vesuvian fault.

  7. The LARsen Ice Shelf System, Antarctica, LARISSA a Model for Antarctic Integrated System Science (AISS) Investigations using Marine Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, E. W.; Huber, B. A.; Vernet, M.; Leventer, A.; Scambos, T. A.; Mosley-Thompson, E. S.; Smith, C. R.; de Batist, M. A.; Yoon, H.; Larissa

    2010-12-01

    The LARISSA program is the first interdisciplinary project funded in the AISS program of the NSF Office of Polar Programs and was officially launched in the closing days of the IPY. This program brings together investigators, students, and media to address the rapid and fundamental changes taking place in the region of the Larsen Ice Shelf and surrounding areas. Scientific foci include: glaciologic and oceanographic interactions, the response of pelagic and benthic ecosystems to ice shelf decay, sedimentary record of ice shelf break disintegration, the geologic evolution of ice shelf systems over the last 100,000 years, paleoclimate/environmental records from marine sediment and ice cores, and the crustal response to ice mass loss at decade to millennial time scales. The first major field season took place this past austral summer aboard the NB Palmer (cruise NBP10-01) which deployed with a multi-layered logistical infrastructure that included: two Bell 220 aircraft, a multifunctional deep water ROV, video guided sediment corer, jumbo piston core, and an array of oceanographic and biological sensors and instruments. In tandem with this ship based operation Twin Otter aircraft supported an ice core team upon the crest of the Bruce Plateau with logistic support provided by the BAS at Rothera Station. Although unusually heavy sea ice prevented much of the original work from being completed in the Larsen Embayment the interdisciplinary approach proved useful. Further the logistical model of ship based aircraft to support interdisciplinary work proved viable, again despite an unusually severe summer meterologic pattern across the northern Antarctic Peninsula. As the program moves forward other vessels will come into play and the model can be applied to interdisciplinary objectives in other regions of Antarctica which are remote and lack land based infrastructure to support coastal field programs in glaciology, geology, or meteorology. This work could then be completed

  8. Doomed pioneers: Event deposition and bioturbation in anaerobic marine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, K.A. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (USA)); Follmi, K.B. (Geologisches Institut, Zurich (Switzerland))

    1990-05-01

    Isolated horizons of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes burrows, in exclusive association with gravity flow deposits within otherwise unbioturbated sediments, indicate that event deposition in oxygen-depleted sedimentary environments may be accompanied by the appearance of allochthonous infauna. In the Miocene Monterey Formation of Alta California and in the Oligocene-Miocene San Gregorio Formation of Baja California Sur, the authors observe compelling evidence that some turbulent sedimentation events entrain living decapod crustaceans. Upon deposition in anaerobic environments, these imported burrowers rework substantial quantities of laminated, commonly organic-rich sediment, in an environment from which they were previously excluded. The persistence of oxygen-depleted environmental conditions limits the survival time of these transported infaunal dwellers and renders them doomed pioneers. The occurrence of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes, ichnogenera that are generally observed in normal-marine, neritic environments, in anoxic hemipelagic host sediments have been problematic for paleoenvironmental interpretation; in some cases, these features have been incorrectly interpreted to indicate bottom water ventilation and reoxygenation on a basin-wide scale. Accurate recognition of doomed pioneer trace fossil assemblages will permit more precise understanding of paleo-oxygen levels and basin history.

  9. Phylogenetic diversity and biological activity of actinobacteria isolated from the Chukchi Shelf marine sediments in the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Meng; Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; Dong, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-03-06

    Marine environments are a rich source of Actinobacteria and have the potential to produce a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we used four selective isolation media to culture Actinobacteria from the sediments collected from the Chukchi Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. A total of 73 actinobacterial strains were isolated. Based on repetitive DNA fingerprinting analysis, we selected 30 representatives for partial characterization according to their phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial activities and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis genes. Results from the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the 30 strains could be sorted into 18 phylotypes belonging to 14 different genera: Agrococcus, Arsenicicoccus, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Citricoccus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinibacterium and Streptomyces. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report on the isolation of Microlunatus genus members from marine habitats. Of the 30 isolates, 11 strains exhibited antibacterial and/or antifungal activity, seven of which have activities against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. All 30 strains have at least two biosynthetic genes, one-third of which possess more than four biosynthetic genes. This study demonstrates the significant diversity of Actinobacteria in the Chukchi Shelf sediment and their potential for producing biologically active compounds and novel material for genetic manipulation or combinatorial biosynthesis.

  10. Phylogenetic Diversity and Biological Activity of Actinobacteria Isolated from the Chukchi Shelf Marine Sediments in the Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Yuan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine environments are a rich source of Actinobacteria and have the potential to produce a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we used four selective isolation media to culture Actinobacteria from the sediments collected from the Chukchi Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. A total of 73 actinobacterial strains were isolated. Based on repetitive DNA fingerprinting analysis, we selected 30 representatives for partial characterization according to their phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial activities and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis genes. Results from the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the 30 strains could be sorted into 18 phylotypes belonging to 14 different genera: Agrococcus, Arsenicicoccus, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Citricoccus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinibacterium and Streptomyces. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report on the isolation of Microlunatus genus members from marine habitats. Of the 30 isolates, 11 strains exhibited antibacterial and/or antifungal activity, seven of which have activities against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. All 30 strains have at least two biosynthetic genes, one-third of which possess more than four biosynthetic genes. This study demonstrates the significant diversity of Actinobacteria in the Chukchi Shelf sediment and their potential for producing biologically active compounds and novel material for genetic manipulation or combinatorial biosynthesis.

  11. Dispersal and deposition of suspended sediment on the shelf off the Tagus and Sado estuaries, S.W. Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouanneau, J. M.; Garcia, C.; Oliveira, A.; Rodrigues, A.; Dias, J. A.; Weber, O.

    1998-12-01

    The Portuguese margin in front of the Tagus and Sado rivers is characterized by a narrow shelf incised by numerous canyons and by a large mud deposit. The two estuaries that feed this continental margin have distinct impact. The suspended particulate matter concentration values in the mouth of the Tagus are four times higher than in the Sado. During the summer the surface nepheloid layer is always larger than during the winter when it is restricted near the mouth of the estuary. This nepheloid layer may reach 30 km in length extending westward. The bottom nepheloid layer usually shows higher nephelometer values, and has a typical distribution: it is usually diverted southward in the direction of the Lisbon Submarine Canyon. We estimate the amount of suspended matter being discharged annually from the Tagus estuary to be between 0.4 and 1×10 6 t. The area covered by fine deposits is about 560 km 2. Hence the thickness of sediments deposited annually should be between 0.07 and 0.18 cm. The sedimentation rates calculated from the 210Pb excess vary between 0.16 and 2.13 cm y -1 which correspond to the maximum rate. For a layer of 1 cm thick, 81,000 t of particulate organic carbon (POC) should be trapped. That would represent, with a minimum sedimentation rate between 0.07 and 0.18 cm y -1, an entrapment of 6000-15,000 t POC y -1. The trace metals content of box core samples clearly shows the anthropogenic impact in the uppermost level (5 cm thick) in the Tagus estuary and in all the sedimentary deposits (15 cm thick) on the shelf muddy area. Despite the narrowness of the shelf, a significant part of continental fluxes fails to reach the deep ocean.

  12. Origin, development and evolutionary model of shelf desertization environment in late stage of Upper Pleistocene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵松龄; 于洪军; 刘敬圃

    1997-01-01

    Based on the study of palaeo-environmental evolution in the shelves of the Eastern China Seas, the concept of "shelf desertization" in the late stage of Upper Pleistocene is defined; the environmental background and evolutionary process of shelf desertization are analysed. Study on the records of subbottom profiling and the data of core samples from shelf areas revealed that during low sea-level stages, the sedimentary environment in the exposed shelf plains was dominated by aeolian depositional process under cold and dry climatic conditions, i.e. under the action of strong winter-monsoon winds. Parts of the exposed marine strata were disintegrated, and aeolian sand dunes were formed on the disintegrated marine deposits, from which the finer sediment grains were blown away by wind and deposited in the downwind areas to form the derivative loess deposits. Thus a desertization environmental system was formed in the exposed shelf plains of the Eastern China Seas.

  13. Dating ice shelf edge marine sediments: A new approach using single-grain quartz luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, G.W.; Murray, A.S.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2010-01-01

    To develop an alternative dating tool for the Antarctic Peninsula (where the 14C method requires large, spatially variable reservoir corrections), we tested the clock-zeroing assumption of photon-stimulated luminescence (PSL) dating using a variety of PSL procedures. At ice shelf edges around...

  14. Marine magnetic anomalies over the Direction bank, off Bombay western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SubbaRaju, L.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.

    Total magnetic intensity data were collected over the Direction Bank, off Bombay on the western continental shelf of India and the isomagnetic anomaly map prepared at a contour interval of 25nT show NNW-SSE trend resemble those of the Dharwarians...

  15. Quality Aspects of a Marine Aggregate Deposit off the SE Euboea Island, Greece, for its Exploitation - Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasatou, Marianthi; Kapsimalis, Vasilios; Stamatakis, Michael; Tsoutsia, Antonia; Poulos, Serafeim; Rousakis, Grigoris; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Petrakis, Stelios; Aspiotis, Konstantinos; Papavlasopoulou, Nafsika; Stamatakis, Giorgos

    2015-04-01

    Aggregates are inert materials, such as terrestrial or marine sand and gravel, composed mainly of limestone, igneous rocks and sandstone. There is an international trend of increasing demand for aggregates during the last 30 years. Thus, marine aggregate (MA) demand has been displayed a remarkably increased due to limited terrestrial deposits and strict environmental issues related to their exploitation, induced by mining legislation. Regarding offshore MA extraction, important physical and biological seabed impacts that may persist long after the completion of the MA dredging, should be addressed, according to European directives, that deal with aspects such as restoration of the influenced subaqueous mining area. The present contribution focuses on the qualitative determination of the marine sediments on inner continental shelf of SE Euboea (central Aegean Sea), concerning primarily its silica content and secondarily the various environmental issues, in order to evaluate whether or not this subaqueous deposit fulfils the requirements for its exploitation. This MA deposit was found during the implementation of the research project THALES-MARE (MIS 375655) and after taking into consideration the presence of highly siliceous coastal lithology of the South Euboea Island. The area belongs to the Attico-Cycladic geotectonic zone, and especially in the Blueschist Unit, Styra and Ochi nappes. It consists mainly of metamorphosed clastic siliceous sedimentary and calcareous, mafic and felsic volcanic rocks and serpentinites. Sixteen representative samples were analysed out of 48 were collected in June 2014, during the scientific cruise of the M/V Aegaio (Hellenic Centre for Marine Research). The grain size analysis shows that seabed sediments are granulometrically classified mostly as sand, with contaminants of finer fractions and with the sand content often to be >90%. X-Ray Diffraction analysis revealed that the predominant crystalline phase is quartz (often >70

  16. Modeling the role and impact of alien species and fisheries on the Israeli marine continental shelf ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, X.; Ofir, E.; Coll, M.; Goren, M.; Edelist, D.; Heymans, J. J.; Gal, G.

    2017-06-01

    The ecosystems of the Israeli Mediterranean coast have undergone significant changes in recent decades mainly due to species invasions and fishing. In order to characterize the structure and functioning of the marine continental shelf of the Israeli Mediterranean coast and assess temporal changes, we developed a food web model representing two time periods: 1990-1994 and 2008-2012. The 1990-1994 and 2008-2012 food web models were composed of 39 and 41 functional groups, respectively. Functional groups ranged from primary producers to top predators, and included six and eight alien functional groups, respectively, encompassing several crustacean and fish species. Input data included local surveys and fishery statistics, published data on stomach content analyses, and the application of empirical equations to estimate consumption and production rates. Results of the competitive interactions between alien and native species and changes in trophic flows between food web components highlight the increasing impact of alien species over time. Fishing had noticeable impacts in both time periods and played an important role in the ecosystem. Despite different productivity rates and other environmental differences, the Israeli marine ecosystem shared common structural and functional traits with other Mediterranean marine ecosystems. This is the first attempt to study the ecosystem of the Levant region using mass-balance models and to integrate such a large amount of alien species into food web analyses.

  17. Geoacoustic character, sedimentology and chronology of a cross-shelf Holocene sediment deposit off Cabo Frio, Brazil (southwest Atlantic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Ursula; Ayres Neto, Arthur; C. Abuchacra, Rodrigo; Fernandes Barbosa, Cátia; G. Figueiredo, Alberto; C. Gomes, Manoela; Belem, Andre L.; Capilla, Ramsés; S. Albuquerque, Ana Luiza

    2014-08-01

    The Cabo Frio region in the state of Rio de Janeiro, southeast coast of Brazil, is characterized by a local coastal upwelling system and converging littoral sediment transport systems that are deflected offshore at Cabo Frio, as a consequence of which a thick cross-shelf sediment deposit has developed over time. To investigate the evolution of this muddy deposit, geophysical, sedimentological and geochemical data from four sediment cores (3.8-4.1 m in length) recovered in water depths between 88 and 141 m were analyzed. The high-resolution seismic data show variable sediment thicknesses ranging from 1 to 20 m, comprising two sedimentary units separated by a high-impedance layer at a depth of about 10 m below the seafloor at the coring sites. According to the available age datings, the upper sedimentary unit is late Pleistocene to Holocene in age, whereas the lower unit (not dated) must, by implication, be entirely Pleistocene in age. The boomer-seismic reflection signal can be divided into three echo-types, namely transparent (inner shelf), stratified (middle shelf) and reflective (outer shelf), each type seemingly related to the local sediment composition. The upper 4 m of the upper sedimentary unit is dominated by silty sediment on the middle shelf, and by upward-fining sediments (silty sand to sandy silt) on the inner and outer shelf. The downcore trends of P-wave velocity, gamma-ray density and acoustic impedance are largely similar, but generally reversed to those of water and organic carbon contents. Total organic carbon contents increase with decreasing mean grain size, periodic fluctuations suggesting temporal changes in the regional hydrodynamics and primary productivity fuelled by the local upwelling system. The reconstruction of sedimentation rates in the course of the Holocene is based on 35 AMS age datings of organic material recovered from variable downcore depths. These range from a maximum of 13.3 cm/decade near the base of the inner shelf core (7

  18. Marine geological and geophysical study of the continental shelf off southern part of Cheju Island, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chi Won; Kim, Seung Woo; Jang, Jung Hae; Kim, Won Sik; Sin, Won Chul; Min, Gun Hong; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Ho Young; Jin, Jae Hwa; Kim, Sung Pil; Kim, Jung Ki; Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Suk Whan [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    This report is a preliminary result of marine geological and geophysical surveys conducted by KIGAM in 1996 obtain data available for mapping Korean continental shelves. The survey area is located off Seoguipo city of Cheju Island, which is the largest volcanic island in Korea. Total of 1,050 line-km of geophysical survey includes echo sounding, side scan sonar survey, 3.5 KHz subbottom profiling, air gun seismic and magnetic surveys. 75 grab samples were collected from grid positions of 4 x 4 miles spacing by using a Smith McIntyre sampler for textural analysis of surface sediments, and 27 sediment cores were raised from the sites determined by interpretation of geophysical data. The survey vessel, R/V Tamhae, was positioned by GPS system. Isobaths shallower than 90 m are parallel to coastline and the sea floor deepens rapidly from coast to the water depth of more than 100 m deep. The sea floor exceeding 90 m in water depth is comparatively smooth. A moat-like topographic low up to ca. 160 m deep occurs between Gapa and Mara Islands, where the tidal currents in the upper layer is stronger than 3.4 knots. The sea floor is largely covered with thin (<20 cm) shell fragment aggregates including lithic pebbles. The content of CaCO{sub 3} in coarse fraction of the surface sediments ranges from 30 % to 100 %, and is relatively higher values in nearshore. According to textural parameters and sedimentary structures, the shallow substratum can be divided into 10 sedimentary facies; 1) massive sandy mud (MSm), 2) laminated sandy mud (MSl), 3) massive muddy sand (SMm), 4) bioturbated muddy sand (SMb), 5) faintly laminated muddy sand (SMf), 6) fining-upward muddy sand (SMfu), 7) massive sand (Sm), 8) fining-upward gravelly sand (GSfu), and 9) disorganized gravelly sand (GSd). The near-surface sediments of the survey area has deposited largely under low energy conditions interrupted by high energy events. Laminated sandy mud (MSl) and bioturbated muddy sand (SMb) reflect the

  19. Is Kissamos Bay in NW Crete, Greece worth to be exploited as a marine aggregates deposit? An integrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasatou, Marianthi; Tsoutsia, Antonia; Petrakis, Stelios; Rousakis, Grigoris; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Hasiotis, Thomas; Kapsimalis, Vasilios; Poulos, Serafim; Stamatakis, Michael

    2017-04-01

    This study uses an integrated approach to investigate the offshore area of Kissamos Bay, NW Crete Island, Greece, as a prospective marine aggregate (MA) deposit. Non-fuel marine minerals and especially marine aggregates (sand and gravel) are reviewed from the perspective of resources during the last decades. The possible MA deposit of Kissamos Bay was explored during the implementation of the research project THALES-MARE, considering existing information of previous extraction activities in the wider area. Kissamos Bay is located at the inner continental shelf off NW Crete. The onshore basement rocks are composed of Mesozoic to Eocene limestones, shale and sandstone units, along with Neogene sediments such as marls, sandstones and claystones, which locally host Messinian gypsum layers. Sixteen sea-bottom sediment samples were collected with a Smith-McIntyretype grab along four transects, vertical to the shoreline, at water depths of 11 to 44m. A sub-bottom acoustic profiler survey was conducted in order to quantitatively determine the deposit (dimensions and structure). Mineralogical, geochemical, sedimentological and benthic analyses of the samples were carried out, in order to determine the quality of the reservoir and the environmental impact of a potential exploitation. Mineralogical results indicated that the bulk samples consist predominantly of quartz, while calcite occurs as a second significant phase. Chemical analysis of major and trace elements revealed that the average SiO2 content is around 55% with samples closer to the beach (depths quality (quartz sand) is required for cement applications. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by the research program THALES-MARE (MIS: 375655), funded by the Operational Programme "Education and lifelong learning, 2007-2013" of the Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, Culture and Sports.

  20. Groupers on the edge: Shelf edge spawning habitat in and around marine reserves of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, F.C.; Scanlon, K.M.; Koenig, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    The northeastern Gulf of Mexico contains some of the most diverse and productive marine habitat in the United States. Much of this habitat, located on the shelf edge in depths of 50 to 120 m, supports spawning for many economically important species, including groupers. Here, we couple acoustic surveys with georeferenced videography to describe the primary spatial and geologic features of spawning aggregation sites for four economically important species: gag (Mycteroperca microlepis), scamp (M. phenax), red grouper (Epinephelus morio), and red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus), with notes on fish distribution and abundance and spawning activities. We provide information on movement patterns of reef fish determined using acoustic telemetry. Finally, we discuss the possible coupling of geomorphology with hydrographic features to influence the overall productivity of the region and the importance of spatial fishery management in sustaining that productivity. ?? 2011 by Association of American Geographers.

  1. Defining seascapes for marine unconsolidated shelf sediments in an eastern boundary upwelling region: The southern Benguela as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karenyi, Natasha; Sink, Kerry; Nel, Ronel

    2016-02-01

    Marine unconsolidated sediment habitats, the largest benthic ecosystem, are considered physically controlled ecosystems driven by a number of local physical processes. Depth and sediment type are recognised key drivers of these ecosystems. Seascape (i.e., marine landscape) habitat classifications are based solely on consistent geophysical features and provide an opportunity to define unconsolidated sediment habitats based on processes which may vary in distribution through space and time. This paper aimed to classify unconsolidated sediment seascapes and explore their diversity in an eastern boundary upwelling region at the macro-scale, using the South African west coast as a case study. Physical variables such as sediment grain size, depth and upwelling-related variables (i.e., maximum chlorophyll concentration, austral summer bottom oxygen concentration and sediment organic carbon content) were included in the analyses. These variables were directly measured through sampling, or collated from existing databases and the literature. These data were analysed using multivariate Cluster, Principal Components Ordination and SIMPER analyses (in PRIMER 6 + with PERMANOVA add-in package). There were four main findings; (i) eight seascapes were identified for the South African west coast based on depth, slope, sediment grain size and upwelling-related variables, (ii) three depth zones were distinguished (inner, middle and outer shelf), (iii) seascape diversity in the inner and middle shelves was greater than the outer shelf, and (iv) upwelling-related variables were responsible for the habitat diversity in both inner and middle shelves. This research demonstrates that the inclusion of productivity and its related variables, such as hypoxia and sedimentary organic carbon, in seascape classifications will enhance the ability to distinguish seascapes on continental shelves, where productivity is most variable.

  2. Collapse and flow of lowstand shelf-margin deposits: An example from the eastern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trincardi, F.; Field, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    The upper slope of the eastern Tyrrhenian Sea margin has a complex morphology shaped by Quaternary tectonism and by sedimentation phases controlled by changing sea levels. Sediment slides of widely varying size and shape are common in Quaternary deposits of the upper slope, particularly where gradients are steep. Our study of a large sediment failure in lowstand prograded coastal deposits west of Cape Licosa indicates that the nature of shelf-margin deposition is an additional important control on failure. The failure zone has a mobilization surface showing in-situ deformation in the sediment above it; an upper failure surface; a head scarp; and a zone of ponded sediment debris downslope from the exposed surface of failure. The basal mobilization surface is roughly parallel to the seafloor and coincident with a major downlap surface. The failed section is less that 20 m thick and local in extent, but deformation on the basal mobilization surface extends outside the immediate area of the failure. Directly downslope of the slide scarp are internally stratified mounds that show no evidence of deformation or movement. Most of the prograded deposit experienced in-situ deformation that evolved into the collapse of part of the sediment pile above the mobilization surface. A portion of the mobilized sediment flowed a few kilometers basinward and accumulated at the base of a slope-parallel ridge. Sediment failure occurred on the Licosa shelf margin following a major pulse of coastal sedimentation along the lowstand shoreline. On many continental margins, sea-level lowering is thought to be an important cause of failure unconsolidated sediment deposited during previous high-stand conditions. The Licosa slide demonstrates that sea-level fall has another, equally important but indirect, role in sediment failure. As sea level falls and reaches its lowstand position, streams are at their peak efficiency and a coarsening-upward clastic coastal wedge is rapidly emplaced at

  3. Highly diverse, poorly studied and uniquely threatened by climate change: an assessment of marine biodiversity on South Georgia's continental shelf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver T Hogg

    Full Text Available We attempt to quantify how significant the polar archipelago of South Georgia is as a source of regional and global marine biodiversity. We evaluate numbers of rare, endemic and range-edge species and how the faunal structure of South Georgia may respond to some of the fastest warming waters on the planet. Biodiversity data was collated from a comprehensive review of reports, papers and databases, collectively representing over 125 years of polar exploration. Classification of each specimen was recorded to species level and fully geo-referenced by depth, latitude and longitude. This information was integrated with physical data layers (e.g. temperature, salinity and flow providing a visualisation of South Georgia's biogeography across spatial, temporal and taxonomic scales, placing it in the wider context of the Southern Hemisphere. This study marks the first attempt to map the biogeography of an archipelago south of the Polar Front. Through it we identify the South Georgian shelf as the most speciose region of the Southern Ocean recorded to date. Marine biodiversity was recorded as rich across taxonomic levels with 17,732 records yielding 1,445 species from 436 families, 51 classes and 22 phyla. Most species recorded were rare, with 35% recorded only once and 86% recorded <10 times. Its marine fauna is marked by the cumulative dominance of endemic and range-edge species, potentially at their thermal tolerance limits. Consequently, our data suggests the ecological implications of environmental change to the South Georgian marine ecosystem could be severe. If sea temperatures continue to rise, we suggest that changes will include depth profile shifts of some fauna towards cooler Antarctic Winter Water (90-150 m, the loss of some range-edge species from regional waters, and the wholesale extinction at a global scale of some of South Georgia's endemic species.

  4. Multiple Suppression and Imaging of Marine Seismic Data from The Shallow Water Area in Southern East China Sea Shelf Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J.; Luan, X.; Yang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Neither surface-related multiple elimination(SRME) nor predictive de-convolution method is effective to suppress the multiple of marine seismic data from the shallow water area. The former method needs the accurate reflection of seafloor, which is mixed with the direct wave in the near offset range. The other one could probably lose the primary wave when applied to the shallow water seismic data. We introduced the new method: deterministic water-layer de-multiple method (DWD) which is capable for the poor extrapolate result of near-offset traces. Firstly, the data shifts as downward continuation in tau-p domain with a water-layer period and the multiple model will be obtained. Then, the original seismic subtracts adaptively with the multiple model. Finally, we would get the de-multiple data after inverse tau-p transform. Marine seismic real data is from southern part of East China Sea Shelf Basin. This area has become the potential target for marine hydrocarbon exploration, it is located in the junction of the Eurasian plate pacific plate and Indian plate. Because the average water depth is less than 100 meters, seismic data contains abundant of multiple, especially the surface-related multiple. As a result it is difficult to distinguish the strata structure clearly. We used DWD approach to remove the water-layer multiple, cut off the seafloor reflection events and then suppressed the residual surface-related multiple by the traditional SRME. At last , the radon transform was applied to eliminate the multiple with long period . With these steps, we suppressed the multiple of marine seismic data from this area effectively. After multiple is removed , we acquired more accurate velocity to build the velocity model of migration. With the pre-stack migration technique, reflections from each geological period are shown clearly in the seismic section. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation of China(grant no. 41476053).

  5. Highly diverse, poorly studied and uniquely threatened by climate change: an assessment of marine biodiversity on South Georgia's continental shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Oliver T; Barnes, David K A; Griffiths, Huw J

    2011-01-01

    We attempt to quantify how significant the polar archipelago of South Georgia is as a source of regional and global marine biodiversity. We evaluate numbers of rare, endemic and range-edge species and how the faunal structure of South Georgia may respond to some of the fastest warming waters on the planet. Biodiversity data was collated from a comprehensive review of reports, papers and databases, collectively representing over 125 years of polar exploration. Classification of each specimen was recorded to species level and fully geo-referenced by depth, latitude and longitude. This information was integrated with physical data layers (e.g. temperature, salinity and flow) providing a visualisation of South Georgia's biogeography across spatial, temporal and taxonomic scales, placing it in the wider context of the Southern Hemisphere. This study marks the first attempt to map the biogeography of an archipelago south of the Polar Front. Through it we identify the South Georgian shelf as the most speciose region of the Southern Ocean recorded to date. Marine biodiversity was recorded as rich across taxonomic levels with 17,732 records yielding 1,445 species from 436 families, 51 classes and 22 phyla. Most species recorded were rare, with 35% recorded only once and 86% recorded <10 times. Its marine fauna is marked by the cumulative dominance of endemic and range-edge species, potentially at their thermal tolerance limits. Consequently, our data suggests the ecological implications of environmental change to the South Georgian marine ecosystem could be severe. If sea temperatures continue to rise, we suggest that changes will include depth profile shifts of some fauna towards cooler Antarctic Winter Water (90-150 m), the loss of some range-edge species from regional waters, and the wholesale extinction at a global scale of some of South Georgia's endemic species.

  6. Element flows associated with marine shore mine tailings deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, Bernhard

    2006-02-01

    From 1938 until 1975, flotation tailings from the Potrerillos--El Salvador mining district (porphyry copper deposits) were discharged into the El Salado valley and transported in suspension to the sea at Chaliaral Bay, Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Over 220 Mt of tailings, averaging 0.8 +/- 0.25 wt % of pyrite, were deposited into the bay, resulting in over a 1 kilometer seaward displacement of the shoreline and an estimated 10-15 m thick tailings accumulation covering a approximately 4 km2 surface area. The Chaniaral case was classified by the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) in 1983 as one of the most serious cases of marine contamination in the Pacific area. Since 1975, the tailings have been exposed to oxidation, resulting in a 70-188 cm thick low-pH (2.6-4) oxidation zone at the top with liberation of divalent metal cations, such as Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ (up to 2265 mg/L, 18.1 mg/L, and 20.3 mg/ L, respectively). Evaporation-induced transport capillarity led to metal enrichment atthe tailings surface (e.g. up to 2.4% Cu) in the form of secondary chlorides and/or sulfates (dominated by eriochalcite [CuCl.H2O] and halite). These, mainly water-soluble, secondary minerals were exposed to eolian transport in the direction of the Village of Chañaral by the predominant W-SW winds. Two element-flow directions (toward the tailings surface, via capillarity, and toward the sea) and two element groups with different geochemical behaviors (cations such as Cu, Zn, Ni, and oxyanions such as As and Mo) could be distinguished. It can be postulated, that the sea is mainly affected by the following: As, Mo, Cu, and Zn contamination, which were liberated from the oxidation zone from the tailings and mobilized through the tidal cycle, and by Cu and Zn from the subsurface waters flowing in the El Salado valley (up to 19 mg/L and 12 mg/L Zn, respectively), transported as chloro complexes at neutral pH.

  7. Development of an Online Climate and Fisheries Data Dashboard for Stakeholders in the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Morse, R.

    2016-12-01

    Fisheries managers make decisions that shape the future of ecosystems and the communities that depend on them. These decisions are often made without reference to environmental conditions, or are made assuming that past conditions (physical conditions, productivity, and species distributions) will persist. The rapid changes experienced in the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (NES LME), as well as the high degree of natural variability in this system, are prompting new discussions about how to incorporate environmental information into fisheries policy and management and into the industry. Through this project, we are facilitating access to fisheries and climate data for fisheries stakeholders in the Northeast through the creation of an online dynamic data dashboard. The primary goal is to make complex climate-relevant data accessible and easy to understand. Information on past, present, and future environmental conditions in the NES LME are presented in the context of fisheries dependent data. Working with marine fisheries stakeholders, including fisheries management council members, industry leaders and non-profits, we have developed a suite of open source processes and tools to acquire and subset climate relevant data from a variety of sources (satellites, sensors, models), develop long range climatologies, and display through dynamically updated interactive data visualizations. The resulting dashboard allows users to quickly assess conditions in the ocean and evaluate them in the context of past and projected change.

  8. 76 FR 30184 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Interim Policy Leasing for Marine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Energy Program Interim Policy Leasing for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Offshore Florida AGENCY... public in the leasing decision for an offshore technology testing facility located on the OCS, in... resources and socioeconomic conditions that could result from leasing and the technology testing...

  9. Expansion dating: calibrating molecular clocks in marine species from expansions onto the Sunda Shelf Following the Last Glacial Maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Eric D; Sbrocco, Elizabeth J; Deboer, Timery S; Barber, Paul H; Carpenter, Kent E

    2012-02-01

    The rate of change in DNA is an important parameter for understanding molecular evolution and hence for inferences drawn from studies of phylogeography and phylogenetics. Most rate calibrations for mitochondrial coding regions in marine species have been made from divergence dating for fossils and vicariant events older than 1-2 My and are typically 0.5-2% per lineage per million years. Recently, calibrations made with ancient DNA (aDNA) from younger dates have yielded faster rates, suggesting that estimates of the molecular rate of change depend on the time of calibration, decaying from the instantaneous mutation rate to the phylogenetic substitution rate. aDNA methods for recent calibrations are not available for most marine taxa so instead we use radiometric dates for sea-level rise onto the Sunda Shelf following the Last Glacial Maximum (starting ∼18,000 years ago), which led to massive population expansions for marine species. Instead of divergence dating, we use a two-epoch coalescent model of logistic population growth preceded by a constant population size to infer a time in mutational units for the beginning of these expansion events. This model compares favorably to simpler coalescent models of constant population size, and exponential or logistic growth, and is far more precise than estimates from the mismatch distribution. Mean rates estimated with this method for mitochondrial coding genes in three invertebrate species are elevated in comparison to older calibration points (2.3-6.6% per lineage per million years), lending additional support to the hypothesis of calibration time dependency for molecular rates.

  10. Cenomanian-Turonian Bentonites of the Boquillas Formation, Texas, USA: keys to understanding Carbonate Shelf deposition in a Greenhouse Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Steve; Eldrett, James; Ma, Chao; Minisini, Daniel; Macaulay, Calum; Ozkan, Aysen; Kelly, Amy

    2016-04-01

    The Boquillas Formation (Fm.) (equivalent to the Eagle Ford Group) was deposited at the Southern end of the Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway (KWIS) and the northwestern margin of the Gulf of Mexico Carbonate Shelf (passive margin) in a starved retroarc foreland basin setting during part of the Cenomanian and Turonian Stages (CT; 97-90 Ma). The Boquillas Fm. includes several Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAE) marked by global Carbon Isotope Excursions (CIE) and trace metal anomalies. Here we provide a robust zircon U/Pb geochronologic framework used to accurately interpret and predict variability in facies distribution. The Boquillas Fm. consists of a succession of cyclic marlstone and limestone beds and over 300 bentonites deposited in a distal, restricted, suboxic setting mostly below storm wave base. Bentonites are generally homogenous clay-rich layers 1-10 cm thick (average 5 cm, up to 1 m) showing sharp contacts and strong yellow-orange mineral fluorescence under UV light. In addition to detailed logging of roadcuts, two research wells drilled behind outcrops, Shell IONA-1 and Shell INNES-1, recovered >330 m of continuous core from the Austin Chalk at surface through the Boquillas and Buda Limestone Fm. The bentonites form ~5% of the 60-111 m thick Boquillas Fm. intervals and are interpreted as distal pyroclastic fall deposits from large volume (>10-100 km3) Plinian eruptions from calderas associated with the subduction-related Western North American Cordilleran magmatic arc. Some of the Boquillas Fm. bentonites can be correlated using cores, petrophysical logs, geochemistry, and biostratigraphy for more than 1000 km to the north within the Western Interior Seaway at the CT global stratotype (GSSP) section at Pueblo, CO as well as many other sections in the KWIS. This contribution integrates new high-precision zircon U/Pb TIMs age data (2σ as low as 0.05 Myr) from both core and outcrop samples with independent proxies derived from sedimentology, biostratigraphy

  11. Marine bird sighting and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-06-05 to 1976-08-20 (NODC Accession 7800486)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms. Data were collected as part of the Outer Continental Shelf...

  12. Marine bird sighting and other data from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 September 1976 to 02 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7800704)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from the SURVEYOR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP). Data were...

  13. New method for determining sensory shelf life using fuzzy logic: canned marinated artichoke hearts (Cynara scolymus L. case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Vásquez-Villalobos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The sensory preference (sp and shelf life of sensory acceptability (SLSA of canned artichoke hearts were modeled using fuzzy logic (FL and accelerated testing. The artichoke hearts were marinated in oil of sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis, soybean (Glycine max and olive (Olea europea; and evaluated using a Ranking test with a semi-trained panel, to identify the best preference both for flavor (f and limpidity (l. We evaluated a global sp through intersection (AND and union (OR fuzzy operations of f and l, using functions of triangular membership with the Mamdani method for defuzzificacion through 25 linguistic rules. The intersection showed the best modeling performance, with the highest sp value at 3.30 for the treatment with sacha inchi (50%, olive (25% and soybean (25% (p << 0.05 oil, which was subjected to accelerated testing at 37 °C, 49 °C, 55 °C and evaluated according to their sensory acceptability (SA through an unstructured scale test in terms of f and l. The SLSA was determined using accelerated testing with FL through intersection fuzzy operation of f and l, triangular membership functions for f and l, and also 25 linguistic rules. A SLSA at 20 ºC was determined for a "high" SA of 296 days, and 569 days for a SA between "high and beginning of medium SA". Both values were lower than the 892 days’ time determined by accelerated testing when evaluating the peroxide index in canned products.

  14. Local natural electric fields - the electrochemical factor of formation of placers and the criterion of prospectings of oil and gas deposits on the Arctic shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmiansky, Mikhail; Anokhin, Vladimir; Kholmianskaia, Galina

    2014-05-01

    On the basis litologo-facial, geo- and hydrochemical characteristics of a cross-section lito - and shelf hydrospheres, the estimation of structural features modern and paleostatic local electric fields and their influence on transportation of the suspended mineral material is made. The formula of dynamic carrying over of the ore material which is in a subcolloidal condition under the influence of natural electric field of a shelf is deduced. On a structure of a friable cover and its features on G.I. Teodorovicha's method position of oxidation-reduction border, sign Eh was reconstructed. On the basis of the established dependence between Eh and local substatic electric field of a shelf it was reconstructed paleostatic a field and its influence on the weighed mineral particles was estimated. Influence of local electric field on lithodynamic moving of ore minerals is estimated for a shelf of the Arctic seas of Russia. On the basis of this estimation and data on structure of a friable cover the map of influence of local electric field on sedimentation and transportation of ore minerals for water area of the East Arctic seas of Russia is constructed. For Laptev seas and East-Siberian the areas in which limits local electric field promoted are revealed and promotes formation Holocene placers of an ilmenite, a cassiterite and gold. For Chukchi and the Bering Seas such estimation is made for all friable cover. hydrocarbonic deposits located on water area of the Arctic shelf of the Russian Federation, initiate occurrence of jet auras of dispersion of heavy metals in ground deposits and in a layer of the sea water, blocking these deposits. Intensity of auras and their spatial position is caused by a geological structure of deposits of breeds containing them, lithodynamic and oceanologic factors. On the basis of the theoretical representations developed by M.A.Holmjansky and O.F.Putikova (Holmjansky, Putikov, 2000, 2006, 2008) application of electrochemical updating of

  15. Transformation and Deposition of Sulphur and Nitrogen Compounds in the Marine Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, O.

    1995-10-01

    In this thesis the author performs a model study of the transformation and deposition of sulphur and nitrogen compounds in the marine boundary layer, including source-receptor relationships. The central part of the study is the development and testing of a variable scale trajectory model for Europe, with special emphasis on modelling the concentrations of gases and aerosols in the marine atmosphere and the deposition to sea. A one-dimensional version of the model was developed to model the chemical degradation of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) in the marine boundary layer. Although the model reproduces the observed levels of DMS and methane sulphonic acid (MSA) well, the calculated DMS concentration is not always in phase with observed levels, probably because of a local coastal emission that is correlated with the shifting tide. Another version of the trajectory model, Atmospheric Chemistry and Deposition model (ACDEP), was developed to study the deposition of nitrogen compounds to the Danish sea waters. This model uses a new numerical scheme, the Eulerian Backward Iterative method. The model is able to reproduce observations of air concentrations and wet deposition fairly well; data for dry deposition were not available. The model was also used for calculation of deposition of nitrogen compounds to the Kattegat. Finally, a sensitivity study was performed on the model. 175 refs., 87 figs., 32 tabs.

  16. Controls on marine carbon fluxes via phytoplankton-microzooplankton interactions in continental shelf waters. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The project is an in-depth evaluation of the phytoplankton-microzooplankton trophic link. The principal goals of the project remain as originally proposed: (1) Impact of grazing by phagotrophic microzooplankton on phytoplankton, particularly on phototrophic cells <5 {mu}m in size, which are not effectively grazed by macrozooplankton. (2) Impact of grazing by phagotrophic microzooplankton on bacterioplankton. (3) Taxon-specific growth rates of phytoplankton in situ, particularly of <5 {mu}m sized cells, as they are affected by phagotrophy rates. The authors are developing protocols for making quantitative estimates of grazing by phagotrophic protists on ultraphytoplankton, and for determining the intrinsic reproductive rates of phytoplankton species. They have also begun a series of experiments, testing and utilizing these methods, evaluating the grazing impact of flagellates and ciliates on phytoplankton species of different sizes and taxonomic affinities. A series of preliminary experiments in coastal waters adjacent to the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology have provided a coastal benchmark. They participated in a preliminary cruise in May, 1993 to the OMP field site off Cape Hatteras. Their purpose was to obtain background information on heterotrophic microbial distributional patterns in this region and to measure rates of protist bacterivory.

  17. Structure and depositional processes of a gravelly tsunami deposit in a shallow marine setting: Lower Cretaceous Miyako Group, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, S.; Masuda, F.; Tagomori, S.; Matsumoto, D.

    2006-06-01

    This study reports a newly discovered gravelly tsunami deposit from the Lower Cretaceous Miyako Group, Japan. The deposit was formed in an open shallow marine setting. The event deposit erosionally overlies shoreface deposits and shows marked lateral facies change. At the basin margin, the deposit is composed mainly of amalgamated HCS sandstones with liquefaction structures, overlain by finer sediments that contain many plant fragments or micas. Conglomerates accompanying the HCS sandstones contain molluscan fossils and many coral clasts. In the basin center, the event deposit is made up mainly of conglomerates and lenticular sandstone beds, and passes upwards into alternating sandstones and siltstones. A condensed organic debris layer is intercalated within the alternating section. Conglomerates contain abundant beach gravel, and also contain beachrock, coral blocks, and boulders. Bivalve fossils are well preserved despite their occurrence in grain-supported conglomerates. The event deposit is divided into sub-layers bounded by internal scours that are wavy and intersect. Each sub-layer consists of a conglomerate grading into a sandstone layer. Imbrications just above the scours in sub-layers show seawards paleocurrents; however, imbrications just beneath the sandstone horizons in the same sub-layers feature landward paleocurrents. Respective sub-layers in the tsunami deposit were formed by substrate erosion due to backwash flow, gravel deposition, reworking by flood flow, and sand deposition during the stagnant water period. The overall upward-fining trend reflects decline of the tsunami event. Development of the gravelly deposit in the central part of the basin and lateral facies change may be attributed to hydrodynamic response of the tsunami pulse to local bathymetry and geography.

  18. Strain-Rate Dependency of Strength of Soft Marine Deposits of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    abstract number: 090612-057 Strain-rate dependency of strength of soft marine deposits of the Gulf of Mexico Andrei Abelev and Philip Valent...from the Gulf of Mexico . The vane test may not always be the most accurate method of describing the undrained shear strength, mainly because it...deposits of the Gulf of Mexico 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  19. Why is the South Orkney Island shelf (the world's first high seas marine protected area) a carbon immobilization hotspot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, David K A; Ireland, Louise; Hogg, Oliver T; Morley, Simon; Enderlein, Peter; Sands, Chester J

    2016-03-01

    The Southern Ocean archipelago, the South Orkney Islands (SOI), became the world's first entirely high seas marine protected area (MPA) in 2010. The SOI continental shelf (~44 000 km(2) ), was less than half covered by grounded ice sheet during glaciations, is biologically rich and a key area of both sea surface warming and sea-ice losses. Little was known of the carbon cycle there, but recent work showed it was a very important site of carbon immobilization (net annual carbon accumulation) by benthos, one of the few demonstrable negative feedbacks to climate change. Carbon immobilization by SOI bryozoans was higher, per species, unit area and ice-free day, than anywhere-else polar. Here, we investigate why carbon immobilization has been so high at SOI, and whether this is due to high density, longevity or high annual production in six study species of bryozoans (benthic suspension feeders). We compared benthic carbon immobilization across major regions around West Antarctica with sea-ice and primary production, from remotely sensed and directly sampled sources. Lowest carbon immobilization was at the northernmost study regions (South Georgia) and southernmost Amundsen Sea. However, data standardized for age and density showed that only SOI was anomalous (high). High immobilization at SOI was due to very high annual production of bryozoans (rather than high densities or longevity), which were 2x, 3x and 5x higher than on the Bellingshausen, South Georgia and Amundsen shelves, respectively. We found that carbon immobilization correlated to the duration (but not peak or integrated biomass) of phytoplankton blooms, both in directly sampled, local scale data and across regions using remote-sensed data. The long bloom at SOI seems to drive considerable carbon immobilization, but sea-ice losses across West Antarctica mean that significant carbon sinks and negative feedbacks to climate change could also develop in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas.

  20. Regional correlation of deposition sequences in the southern Mesozoic marine province, northwestern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satterfield, J.I.; Oldow, J.S. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    Strata of the Mesozoic marine province of a northwestern Nevada, deposited in subaerial to deep marine environment in a backarc basin, underwent severe deformation during the late Mesozoic. Restoration of stratigraphic relations among constituent volcanic, volcanogenic, carbonate, and continentally-derived siliciclastic rocks has been hampered by sparse biostratigraphic age control. Regional correlation of coeval facies is made possible by coupling depositional sequences with biostratigraphic control in the southwestern Gabbs Valley Range, the southern Shoshone Mountains, and the southern Clan Alpine Mountains, which serve as reference sections for Late Triassic and Early Jurassic ammonite zonation of western North America. Differentiation between regionally significant sequence boundaries and those of limited areal extent is possible only by linking the biostratigraphy and physical stratigraphic relations, such as abrupt vertical transitions in lithology corresponding to large facies changes. Physical stratigraphic relations alone are not adequate for correlation ad indicated by the diachronous initiation of Early to Middle( ) Jurassic deposition in half-graben basins (Dunlap Formation) which locally cloaks eustatically( ) controlled depositional sequences. Within these limitations, three regionally extensive sequences are recognized in the reference sections and have lower boundaries at the base of Upper Triassic shallow marine to deltaic carbonate-clastic rocks (Luning Formation) and at the base and within subtidal to offshore-marine carbonate and clastic rocks (Triassic and Jurassic Volcano Peak Group).

  1. Depositional architecture and evolution of the Late Miocene slope channel-fan-system in the northeastern shelf-margin of South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Lin, Changsong; Zhang, Zhongtao; Tian, Hongxun; Tao, Ze; Liu, Hanyao

    2016-04-01

    The Upper Miocene in the Pearl River Mouth Basin of northwestern shelf-margin of South China Sea Basin contains a series of slope channel - fan systems. Their depositional architecture and evolution are documented in this investigation based on an integrated analysis of cores, logs, and seismic data. Four depositional-palaeogeomorphological elements have been identified in the slope channel-fan systems as follows: broad, shallow and unconfined or partly confined outer-shelf to shelf-break channels; deeply incised and confined unidirectionally migrating slope channels; broad or U-shaped, unconfined erosional-depositional channels; frontal splays-lobes and nonchannelized sheets. The slope channels are mostly oriented NW-SE, which migrated unidirectionally northeastwards and intensively eroded almost the whole shelf-slope zone. The channel infillings are mainly mudstones, interbedded with siltstones. They might be formed by gravity flow erosion as bypassing channels. They were filled with limited gravity flow sediments at the base and mostly filled with lateral accretionary packages of bottom current deposits. At the end of the channels, a series of small-scale slope fans developed and coalesced into fan aprons along the base of the slope. The unconfined erosional-depositional channels at the upper parts of the fan-apron-systems display compound infill patterns, and commonly have concave erosional bases and convex tops. The frontal splays-lobes representing middle to distal deposits of fan-apron-systems have flat-mounded or gull-wing geometries, and the internal architectures include bidirectional downlap, progradation, and chaotic infillings. The distal nonchannelized turbidite sheets are characterized by thin-bedded, parallel to sub-parallel sheet-like geometries. Three major unconformities or obvious erosional surfaces in the channel-fan systems of the Upper Miocene are recognized, and indicate the falling of sea-level. The depositional architecture of sequences

  2. Patterns of seabird and marine mammal carcass deposition along the central California coast, 1980-1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodkin, J.L.; Jameson, R.

    1991-01-01

    At monthly intervals from February 1980 through December 1986, a 14.5-km section of central California coastline was systematically surveyed for beach-cast carcasses of marine birds and mammlas. Five hundred and fifty-four bird carcasses and 194 marine mammal carcasses were found. Common murres, western grebes, and Brandt's cormorants composed 45% of the bird total. California sea lions, sea otters, and harbor seals composed 90% of the mammal total. Several factors appeared to affect patterns of carcass deposition. The El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) of 1982-1983 was the dominate influence in terms of interannual variation in carcassdeposition. During this ENSO, 56% of the seabirds and 48% of the marine mammals washed ashore. Patterns of intra-annual variation were species specificand were related to animal migration patterns, reproduction, and seasonal changes in weather. Nearshore currents and winds influenced the general area of carcass deposition, while beach subtrate type and local patterns of san deposition influenced the location of carcass carcass deposition on a smaller spatial scale. Weekly surveys along a 1.1-km section of coastline indicated that 62% of bird carcasses and 41% of mammal carcasses remained on the beach less than 9 days. Cause of death determined for only 8% of the carcasses. Oiling was the most common indication of cause of death in birds (6%). Neonates composed 8% of all mammal carcasses.

  3. Coastal and Marine Ecological Classifcation Standard (CMECS) geoforms of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This polygon shapefile is part of a data release of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm map site. The polygons have attribute values for...

  4. Oceanographic Time Series Data: Northeast Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank Marine Sanctuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Time-series oceanographic data for the Northeast Atlantic outer continental shelf, Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or...

  5. Oceanographic Time Series Data: Northeast Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank Marine Sanctuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Time-series oceanographic data for the Northeast Atlantic outer continental shelf, Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or...

  6. Chapter D: With or Without Salt-a Comparison of Marine and Continental-Lacustrine Diatomite Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Phillip R.; Dolley, Thomas P.

    2003-01-01

    Diatoms in sedimentary deposits of marine and continental, especially lacustrine, origin have similar nutrient (for example, phosphate, nitrate, and silica) and light requirements; however, their geologic ranges and physiographic environments vary. Marine diatoms range in age from Early Cretaceous to Holocene, and continental diatoms range in age from Eocene to Holocene; however, most commercial diatomites, both marine and lacustrine, were deposited during the Miocene. Marine deposits of commercial value generally accumulated along continental margins with submerged coastal basins and shelves where wind-driven boundary currents provided the nutrient-rich upwelling conditions capable of supporting a productive diatom habitat. Commercial freshwater diatomite deposits occur in volcanic terrains associated with events that formed sediment-starved drainage basins, such as the Basin and Range Province, particularly in Nevada. Marine habitats generally are characterized by stable conditions of temperature, salinity, pH, nutrients, and water currents, in contrast to lacustrine habitats, which are characterized by wide variations in these conditions. Marine deposits generally are of higher quality and contain larger resources, owing to their greater areal extent and thickness, whereas most of the world's known diatomites are of lacustrine origin. Both types of deposit are commonly mined by open-pit methods and subjected to processing designed to remove organic matter, CO2, pore water, and inorganic contaminants in order to produce purified products. The highest quality diatomites, predominantly from marine sources, are used in filtration, although both types of deposit produce filter grades, and additional end uses include fillers, additives, absorbents, and abrasives.

  7. Environmental analysis of heavy metal deposition in a flow-restricted tropical estuary and its adjacent shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Laluraj, C.M.; Martin, G.D.; Srinivas, K.; Venugopal, P.

    metals possessing significant correlation with texture (organic carbon, clay and silt), which belong to sediments in the shelf region and (ii) heavy metals in high concentration showing poor correlation with sediment texture, which are of estuarine origin...

  8. Distribution of marine birds on the mid- and North-Atlantic US outer continental shelf. Technical progress report, January 1978-July 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, K.D.; Pittman, G.L.; Fitch, S.J.

    1980-09-01

    The species composition, distribution, and abundance of marine birds on continental shelf waters from Cape Hatteras to the Bay of Fundy were examined using ships-of-opportunity. Northern Fulmar, Cory's Shearwater, Greater Shearwater, Sooty Shearwater, Wilson's Storm-Petrel, Gannet, Red Phalarope, Great Black-backed Gull, Herring Gull, and Black-legged Kittiwake were the most abundant and common species. These species were ecologically dominant within the bird community in numbers and biomass. Georges Bank and Gulf of Marine regions generally had greatest estimates of standing stock and biomass; whereas, in the Middle Atlantic region these estimates were consistently lowest. Species diversity throughout the study area was greatest in spring and least in fall. Oceanic fronts at the continental shelf break and at Nantucket Shoals influenced the distribution of Wilson's Storm-Petrels and Red Phalaropes. Fishing activities were particularly important to Larus gull distribution. Fishes, squids, and crustaceans were the most important groups of prey items in diets of nine bird species. An oiled bird or pollution index was developed. According to the index, frequency of oiled birds was greatest in winter and spring, and gulls made up the majority of species with oiled plumages.

  9. Filamentous bacteria inhabiting the sheaths of marine Thioploca spp. on the Chilean continental shelf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teske, Andreas; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Gallardo, Victor A.

    2009-01-01

    A new component of the benthic Thioploca mat microbial ecosystem on the Chilean continental shelf was detected by epifluorescence microscopy: filamentous, bacterial endobionts of 4-5-μm filament diameter and length sometimes exceeding 1 mm. These filaments were identified as growing within Thiopl...

  10. Pacific Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment (PaCSEA): aerial seabird and marine mammal surveys off northern California, Oregon, and Washington, 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Josh; Felis, Jonathan J.; Mason, John W.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2014-01-01

    Marine birds and mammals comprise an important community of meso- and upper-trophic-level predators within the northern California Current System (NCCS). The NCCS is located within one of the world’s four major eastern boundary currents and is characterized by an abundant and diverse marine ecosystem fuelled seasonally by wind-driven upwelling which supplies nutrient-rich water to abundant phytoplankton inhabiting the surface euphotic zone. The oceanographic conditions throughout the NCCS fluctuate according to well-described seasonal, inter-annual, and decadal cycles. Such oceanographic variability can influence patterns in the distribution, abundance, and habitat use among marine birds and mammals. Although there are an increasing number of studies documenting distributions and abundances among birds and mammals in various portions of the NCCS, there have been no comprehensive, large-scale, multi-seasonal surveys completed throughout this region since the early 1980s (off northern California; Briggs et al. 1987) and early 1990s (off Oregon and Washington; Bonnell et al. 1992, Briggs et al. 1992, Green et al. 1992). During 2011 and 2012, we completed the Pacific Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment (PaCSEA) which included replicated surveys over the continental shelfslope from shore to the 2000-meter (m) isobath along 32 broad-scale transects from Fort Bragg, California (39° N) through Grays Harbor, Washington (47° N). Additionally, surveys at a finer scale were conducted over the continental shelf within six designated Focal Areas: Fort Bragg, CA; Eureka, CA; Siltcoos Bank, OR; Newport, OR; Nehalem Bank, OR; and Grays Harbor, WA. We completed a total of 26,752 km of standardized, low-elevation aerial survey effort across three bathymetric domains: inner-shelf waters ( Overall, we recorded 15,403 sightings of 59,466 individual marine birds (12 families, 54 species). During winter, seven species groupings comprised >90% of the total number of birds

  11. Remediation of a marine shore tailings deposit and the importance of water-rock interaction on element cycling in the coastal aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, Bernhard; Diaby, Nouhou; Spangenberg, Jorge E

    2011-06-01

    We present the study of the geochemical processes associated with the first successful remediation of a marine shore tailings deposit in a coastal desert environment (Bahía de Ite, in the Atacama Desert of Peru). The remediation approach implemented a wetland on top of the oxidized tailings. The site is characterized by a high hydraulic gradient produced by agricultural irrigation on upstream gravel terraces that pushed river water (∼500 mg/L SO(4)) toward the sea and through the tailings deposit. The geochemical and isotopic (δ(2)H(water) and δ(18)O(water), δ(34)S(sulfate), δ(18)O(sulfate)) approach applied here revealed that evaporite horizons (anhydrite and halite) in the gravel terraces are the source of increased concentrations of SO(4), Cl, and Na up to ∼1500 mg/L in the springs at the base of the gravel terraces. Deeper groundwater interacting with underlying marine sequences increased the concentrations of SO(4), Cl, and Na up to 6000 mg/L and increased the alkalinity up to 923 mg/L CaCO(3) eq. in the coastal aquifer. These waters infiltrated into the tailings deposit at the shelf-tailings interface. Nonremediated tailings had a low-pH oxidation zone (pH 1-4) with significant accumulations of efflorescent salts (10-20 cm thick) at the surface because of upward capillary transport of metal cations in the arid climate. Remediated tailings were characterized by neutral pH and reducing conditions (pH ∼7, Eh ∼100 mV). As a result, most bivalent metals such as Cu, Zn, and Ni had very low concentrations (around 0.01 mg/L or below detection limit) because of reduction and sorption processes. In contrast, these reducing conditions increased the mobility of iron from two sources in this system: (1) The originally Fe(III)-rich oxidation zone, where Fe(III) was reduced during the remediation process and formed an Fe(II) plume, and (2) reductive dissolution of Fe(III) oxides present in the original shelf lithology formed an Fe-Mn plume at 10-m depth. These

  12. Recent marine deposits reconstruction of two depositional environments of the French Atlantic coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouzet, Pierre; Maanan, Mohamed; Schmidt, Sabine; Athimon, Emmanuelle; Robin, Marc

    2017-04-01

    This work provides a 300-yr high-resolution record of past storm and/or tsunami events using a multi-proxy analysis (137Cs and 210Pb dating, chemical composition and grain size) of sedimentary deposits from two coastal depositional environments of the French Atlantic coast. We analyse two wetland areas situated just behind a narrow coastal sand strip: 1) the Mer Blanche and 2) the Turballe. Evidence for strong extratropical storms and /or tsunamis events can be identified in this central part of the Bay of Biscay from the XIXth to the XXth century. Nine short sediment cores were collected in August 2016 using gravity type corer of 10 inner diameter and 100 cm length. Each core was longitudinally sliced, each half section photographed and described. High-resolution elemental analyses of split sediment cores were done using an Avaatech XRF core scanner. Then sediment cores were sampled every 0.5 cm. Grain size analysis was done using a Malvern 2600 laser beam grain sizer; organic carbon was measured by Leco induction furnace. 137Cs, 210Pb and 226Ra activities were measured on about 2 g dried sediment using a low background, well-type γ spectrometer (Canberra). The 210Pb in excess, which is used for dating, was calculated as the difference of measured 210Pb and of its supported activities (226Ra). The history information is performed using historical documents including narrative sources, ancient maps, records of cities repairs, surveys conducted after a disaster, newspaper from different departmental and national archives, and meteorological data. Coastal depositional environments were affected hardest by extreme environmental and climatological events during the last century. In the Mer Blanche core, three extreme episodes can be observed: i) at 36 cm, sediment is characterized by coarser sand and higher Sr/Al ratio, this episode coincides with a high tidal wave in spring 1937; ii) at 55 cm, we observe the presence of many gravels, they dates back to the high tidal

  13. THE PERMIAN -TRIASSIC BOUNDARY, DEAD SEA, JORDAN: TRANSITIONAL ALLUVIAL TO MARINE DEPOSITIONAL SEQUENCES AND BIOSTRATIGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN H. POWELL

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Permian to Triassic transition in Jordan is characterised by a sequence boundary underlain by red-bed, alluvial lithofacies deposited in a humid-tropical climate by low-sinuosity rivers, and overlain by shallow marine siliciclastics with thin carbonates. The low-gradient alluvial floodplain was repeatedly subjected to the development of ferralitic and pisolitic paleosols on the interfluves. In contrast, dysaerobic environments in the fluvial channels and abandoned lakes resulted in the preservation of a prolific flora of macro-plants and palynomorphs that indicate a probable range from Mid- to Late Permian age, though the abundant presence of the distinctive pollen Pretricolpipollenites bharadwajii  indicates the youngest part of that range.  Above the sequence boundary, reddened shallow-marine beds characterised by ripple cross-laminated, siltstones/sandstone with desiccation cracks and sparse surface burrows mark the initial Triassic marine transgression in the region (Arabian Plate Tr 10. These are followed by two thin limestone (packstone beds with shallow scours and bivalve shell lags, that have yielded a low diversity assemblage of conodonts (e.g. Hadrodontina aequabilis and foraminifera (“Cornuspira” mahajeri that are interpreted as euryhaline  taxa characterising the early Induan (Early Triassic. Thus the absence of body fossils and vertical infaunal burrows in the lowest marine beds may reflect low-diversity ecosystems following the Permian-Triassic extinction event, or be a result of stressed shallow marine environments. A gradational upward increase in grey, green and yellow siltstones beds accompanied by a concomitant increase in bioturbation (and infaunal vertical burrows and thin-shelled bivalves about 15 m above the boundary indicates colonisation of the substrate under more normal shallow marine conditions perhaps indicating recovery phase following the extinction event.

  14. Dust deposition in an oligotrophic marine environment: impact on the carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guieu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By bringing new nutrients and particles to the surface ocean, atmospheric deposition impacts biogeochemical cycles. The extent to which those changes are modifying the carbon balance in oligotrophic environments such as the Mediterranean Sea that receives important Saharan dust fluxes is unknown. DUNE project provides the first attempt to evaluate the changes induced in the carbon budget of an oligotrophic system after simulated Saharan dust wet and dry deposition events. Here we report the results for the 3 distinct artificial dust seeding experiments in large mesocosms that were conducted in the oligotrophic waters of the Mediterranean Sea in summer 2008 and 2010. Simultaneous measurements of the metabolic rates (C fixation, C respiration in the water column have shown that the dust deposition did not change drastically the metabolic balance as the tested waters remained net heterotroph (i.e. net primary production to bacteria respiration ratio < 1 and in some cases the net heterotrophy was even enhanced by the dust deposition. Considering the different terms of the carbon budget, we estimate that it was balanced with a dissolved organic carbon (DOC consumption of at least 10% of the initial stock. This corresponds to a fraction of the DOC stock of the surface mixed layer that consequently will not be exported during the winter mixing. Although heterotrophic bacteria were found to be the key players in the response to dust deposition, net primary production increased about twice in case of simulated wet deposition (that includes anthropogenic nitrogen and a small fraction of particulate organic carbon was still exported. Our estimated carbon budgets are an important step forward in the way we understand dust deposition and associated impacts on the oceanic cycles. They are providing knowledge about the key processes (i.e. bacteria respiration, aggregation that need to be considered for an integration of atmospheric deposition in marine

  15. Lithology, monsoon and sea-surface current control on provenance, dispersal and deposition of sediments over the Andaman continental shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Damodararao, K.; Singh, S.K.; Rai, V.K.; Ramaswamy, V.; Rao, P.S.

    such as ophiolites and ultrabasic rocks in the Irrawaddy drainage and over Indo � Burman � Arakan (IBA) ranges as their dominant source. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in sediments of the Northern and Eastern Andaman Shelf range between 0.712245 and 0...

  16. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  17. Eukaryotic diversity in late Pleistocene marine sediments around a shallow methane hydrate deposit in the Japan Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouduka, M; Tanabe, A S; Yamamoto, S; Yanagawa, K; Nakamura, Y; Akiba, F; Tomaru, H; Toju, H; Suzuki, Y

    2017-09-01

    Marine sediments contain eukaryotic DNA deposited from overlying water columns. However, a large proportion of deposited eukaryotic DNA is aerobically biodegraded in shallow marine sediments. Cold seep sediments are often anaerobic near the sediment-water interface, so eukaryotic DNA in such sediments is expected to be preserved. We investigated deeply buried marine sediments in the Japan Sea, where a methane hydrate deposit is associated with cold seeps. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed the reproducible recovery of eukaryotic DNA in marine sediments at depths up to 31.0 m in the vicinity of the methane hydrate deposit. In contrast, the reproducible recovery of eukaryotic DNA was limited to a shallow depth (8.3 m) in marine sediments not adjacent to the methane hydrate deposit in the same area. Pyrosequencing of an 18S rRNA gene variable region generated 1,276-3,307 reads per sample, which was sufficient to cover the biodiversity based on rarefaction curves. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the eukaryotic DNA originated from radiolarian genera of the class Chaunacanthida, which have SrSO4 skeletons, the sea grass genus Zostera, and the seaweed genus Sargassum. Eukaryotic DNA originating from other planktonic fauna and land plants was also detected. Diatom sequences closely related to Thalassiosira spp., indicative of cold climates, were obtained from sediments deposited during the last glacial period (MIS-2). Plant sequences of the genera Alnus, Micromonas, and Ulmus were found in sediments deposited during the warm interstadial period (MIS-3). These results suggest the long-term persistence of eukaryotic DNA from terrestrial and aquatic sources in marine sediments associated with cold seeps, and that the genetic information from eukaryotic DNA from deeply buried marine sediments associated with cold seeps can be used to reconstruct environments and ecosystems from the past. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A geochemical framework for retrieving the linked depositional and diagenetic histories of marine carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming-Yu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2017-02-01

    In modern shallow seawater carbonate platforms, successive changes in diagenetic zones are found as the result of a drop in sea level. Such a relationship is important in identifying diagenetic processes, in interpreting global carbon isotope shifts and in finding the reasons for positive correlations between C and O isotopes in marine carbonates. However, it is not readily recognized in ancient marine carbonates because evidence for sea level changes can be cryptic in the rock record. Because of the fall of sea level, fresh water may add to precipitating marine carbonates on continental substrates, resulting in geochemical mixtures between shallow seawater and fresh water. To resolve this issue, we carry out a combined study of rare earth elements and yttrium (REE + Y) and Csbnd O isotopes in Carboniferous-Triassic marine carbonates from the Lower Yangtze platform in China. The relationships between inter-REE + Y ratios such as Y/Ho vs. (Nd/Yb)PAAS for pure carbonates strongly indicate mixing between fresh water and shallow seawater. The REE + Y patterns for pure carbonates show temporal variations, reflecting changes in the proportion of fresh water addition into shallow seawater, which were likely due to changes in relative sea level. Changes in diagenetic zones indicated by the relationships between carbonate C and O isotopes as well as other evidence follow the changes in relative sea level suggested by the REE + Y patterns. Therefore, a combined study of the REE + Y and Csbnd O isotopes in marine carbonates can provide robust constraints on the changes in the linked depositional environments and diagenetic processes on continental substrates.

  19. Grain size analysis and depositional environment of shallow marine to basin floor, Kelantan River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifah, M. R. Nurul; Aziz, A. Che; Roslan, M. Kamal

    2015-09-01

    Sediment samples were collected from the shallow marine from Kuala Besar, Kelantan outwards to the basin floor of South China Sea which consisted of quaternary bottom sediments. Sixty five samples were analysed for their grain size distribution and statistical relationships. Basic statistical analysis like mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis were calculated and used to differentiate the depositional environment of the sediments and to derive the uniformity of depositional environment either from the beach or river environment. The sediments of all areas were varied in their sorting ranging from very well sorted to poorly sorted, strongly negative skewed to strongly positive skewed, and extremely leptokurtic to very platykurtic in nature. Bivariate plots between the grain-size parameters were then interpreted and the Coarsest-Median (CM) pattern showed the trend suggesting relationships between sediments influenced by three ongoing hydrodynamic factors namely turbidity current, littoral drift and waves dynamic, which functioned to control the sediments distribution pattern in various ways.

  20. Exposure of the marine deposit feeder Hydrobia ulvae to sediment associated LAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauffret, A., E-mail: aourell.mauffret@icman.csic.e [Marine Sciences Institute of Andalusia (CSIC), Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain); Rico-Rico, A. [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University (Netherlands); Temara, A. [The Procter and Gamble Company, Brussels (Belgium); Blasco, J. [Marine Sciences Institute of Andalusia (CSIC), Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonates (LAS) effects (mortality, egestion rate, behaviour) on the marine deposit feeder Hydrobia ulvae were assessed in whole-sediment and water-only systems. The results were combined with a bioenergetic-based kinetic model of exposure pathways to account for the observed toxicity. The 10-d LC50 value based on the freely dissolved fraction was 9.3 times lower in spiked sediment (0.152 +- 0.001 (95% CI) mg/L) than in water-only (1.390 +- 0.020 (95% CI) mg/L). Consequently, the actual 10-d LC50 value (208 mg/kg) was overestimated by the Equilibrium Partitioning calculation (1629 mg/kg). This suggests that the sediment associated LAS fraction was bioavailable to the snails. It could also be due to modifications in physiological parameters in absence of sediment, the organism natural substrate. - Lethality of the marine gastropod deposit feeder Hydrobia ulvae exposed to LAS in water-only system was inappropriate to predict LAS toxicity in sediment system.

  1. Atmospheric aerosol deposition influences marine microbial communities in oligotrophic surface waters of the western Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Teruya; Ishikawa, Akira; Mastunaga, Tomoki; Pointing, Stephen B.; Saito, Yuuki; Kasai, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Koichi; Aoki, Kazuma; Horiuchi, Amane; Lee, Kevin C.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols contain particulates that are deposited to oceanic surface waters. These can represent a major source of nutrients, trace metals, and organic compounds for the marine environment. The Japan Sea and the western Pacific Ocean are particularly affected by aerosols due to the transport of desert dust and industrially derived particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) from continental Asia. We hypothesized that supplementing seawater with aerosol particulates would lead to measurable changes in surface water nutrient composition as well as shifts in the marine microbial community. Shipboard experiments in the Pacific Ocean involved the recovery of oligotrophic oceanic surface water and subsequent supplementation with aerosol particulates obtained from the nearby coastal mountains, to simulate marine particulate input in this region. Initial increases in nitrates due to the addition of aerosol particulates were followed by a decrease correlated with the increase in phytoplankton biomass, which was composed largely of Bacillariophyta (diatoms), including Pseudo-nitzschia and Chaetoceros species. This shift was accompanied by changes in the bacterial community, with apparent increases in the relative abundance of heterotrophic Rhodobacteraceae and Colwelliaceae in aerosol particulate treated seawater. Our findings provide empirical evidence revealing the impact of aerosol particulates on oceanic surface water microbiology by alleviating nitrogen limitation in the organisms.

  2. The benthic marine assemblages of the estuarine and shallow marine Upper Burdigalian deposits of the Korneuburg Basin in Lower Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengst, Babette; Zuschin, Martin; Harzhauser, Mathias; Mandic, Oleg; Roetzel, Reinhard

    2010-05-01

    In the course of highway constructions (Wiener Außenring-Schnellstraße (S1)) a detailed sedimentological transect of 1.8 km length was logged in deposits of the Central Paratethys near the village of Stetten, N of Korneuburg in Lower Austria. A total of 324 sediment- and 118 molluscan samples was studied. The siliciclastic succession consists of pelitic and sandy sediments and sandstones and is rich in fossils. The fossil remains consist of sponges, corals, serpulids, molluscs, balanids, echinoderms, fish and micromammals. Quantitatively the molluscs dominate and have been studied in detail. 139 species were determined from more than 11,000 shells. Two gastropod species, Agapilia pachii und Granulolabium bicinctum make up more than 53% of the assemblage. Another 11 species (Nassarius edlaueri, Bittium spina, Loripes dujardini, Hydrobia spp., Paphia subcarinata, Cyllenina ternodosa, Turritella gradata, Corbula gibba, Cerastoderma praeplicata, Striarca lactea, Sandbergeria perpusilla) each contributes more than 1% to the total molluscan composition, but all other 126 species are quantitatively unimportant. A conspicuous alternation between intertidal and shallow subtidal mollusc associations is evident. The intertidal is dominated by the superabundant Agapilia pachii and Granulolabium plicatum, whereas the heavily bioturbated fully marine subtidal is characterized by a more diverse assemblage including Turritella gradata, Nassarius edlaueri, Anadara diluvii and various venerids. Additionally, layers with large fragments of Crassostrea and thin coal deposits with Terebralia bidentata are quite abundant in the section. Washed in land snails (e.g., Planorbidae) and river snails (Melanopsidae) occur occasionally. This faunal composition, along with its typical alternation points to a vivid dynamic within this Lower Miocene, subtropical ecosystem in the paleo-estuary of the southern Korneuburg basin.

  3. Role of sea-level change in deep water deposition along a carbonate shelf margin, Early and Middle Permian, Delaware Basin: implications for reservoir characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunli; Yu, Xinghe; Li, Shengli; Giles, Katherine A.

    2015-04-01

    The architecture and sedimentary characteristics of deep water deposition can reflect influences of sea-level change on depositional processes on the shelf edge, slope, and basin floor. Outcrops of the northern slope and basin floor of the Delaware Basin in west Texas are progressively exposed due to canyon incision and road cutting. The outcrops in the Delaware Basin were measured to characterize gravity flow deposits in deep water of the basin. Subsurface data from the East Ford and Red Tank fields in the central and northeastern Delaware Basin were used to study reservoir architectures and properties. Depositional models of deep water gravity flows at different stages of sea-level change were constructed on the basis of outcrop and subsurface data. In the falling-stage system tracts, sandy debris with collapses of reef carbonates are deposited on the slope, and high-density turbidites on the slope toe and basin floor. In the low-stand system tracts, deep water fans that consist of mixed sand/mud facies on the basin floor are comprised of high- to low-density turbidites. In the transgression and high-stand system tracts, channel-levee systems and elongate lobes of mud-rich calciturbidite deposits formed as a result of sea level rise and scarcity of sandy sediment supply. For the reservoir architecture, the fan-like debris and high-density turbidites show high net-to-gross ratio of 62 %, which indicates the sandiest reservoirs for hydrocarbon accumulation. Lobe-like deep water fans with net-to-gross ratio of 57 % facilitate the formation of high quality sandy reservoirs. The channel-levee systems with muddy calciturbidites have low net-to-gross ratio of 30 %.

  4. Marine Primary Productivity as a Potential Indirect Source of Selenium and Other Trace Elements in Atmospheric Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazina, Tim; Läderach, Alexander; Jones, Gerrad D; Sodemann, Harald; Wernli, Heini; Kirchner, James W; Winkel, Lenny H E

    2017-01-03

    Atmospheric processes play an important role in the supply of the trace element selenium (Se) as well as other essential trace elements to terrestrial environments, mainly via wet deposition. Here we investigate whether the marine biosphere can be identified as a source of Se and of other trace elements in precipitation samples. We used artificial neural network (ANN) modeling and other statistical methods to analyze relationships between a high-resolution atmospheric deposition chemistry time series (March 2007-January 2009) from Plynlimon (UK) and exposure of air masses to marine chlorophyll a and to other source proxies. Using ANN sensitivity analyses, we found that higher air mass exposure to marine productivity leads to higher concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rainfall. Furthermore, marine productivity was found to be an important but indirect factor in controlling Se as well as vanadium (V), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), and aluminum (Al) concentrations in atmospheric deposition, likely via scavenging by organic compounds derived from marine organisms. Marine organisms may thus play an indirect but important role in the delivery of trace elements to terrestrial environments and food chains.

  5. Assessing the contribution of marine protected areas to the trophic functioning of ecosystems: a model for the Banc d'Arguin and the Mauritanian shelf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Guénette

    Full Text Available Most modelling studies addressed the effectiveness of marine protected areas (MPA for fisheries sustainability through single species approach. Only a few models analysed the potential benefits of MPAs at the ecosystem level, estimating the potential export of fish biomass from the reserve or analysing the trophic relationships between organisms inside and outside the MPA. Here, we propose to use food web models to assess the contribution of a MPA to the trophic functioning of a larger ecosystem. This approach is applied to the Banc d'Arguin National Park, a large MPA located on the Mauritanian shelf. The ecosystem was modeled using Ecopath with Ecosim, a model that accounts for fisheries, food web structure, and some aspects of the spatial distribution of species, for the period 1991-2006. Gaps in knowledge and uncertainty were taken into account by building three different models. Results showed that the Banc d'Arguin contributes about 9 to 13% to the total consumption, is supporting about 23% of the total production and 18% of the total catch of the Mauritanian shelf ecosystem, and up to 50% for coastal fish. Of the 29 exploited groups, 15 depend on the Banc for more than 30% of their direct or indirect consumptions. Between 1991 and 2006, the fishing pressure increased leading to a decrease in biomass and the catch of high trophic levels, confirming their overall overexploitation. Ecosim simulations showed that adding a new fleet in the Banc d'Arguin would have large impacts on the species with a high reliance on the Banc for food, resulting in a 23% decrease in the current outside MPA catches. We conclude on the usefulness of food web models to assess MPAs contribution to larger ecosystem functioning.

  6. Assessing the contribution of marine protected areas to the trophic functioning of ecosystems: a model for the Banc d'Arguin and the Mauritanian shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénette, Sylvie; Meissa, Beyah; Gascuel, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Most modelling studies addressed the effectiveness of marine protected areas (MPA) for fisheries sustainability through single species approach. Only a few models analysed the potential benefits of MPAs at the ecosystem level, estimating the potential export of fish biomass from the reserve or analysing the trophic relationships between organisms inside and outside the MPA. Here, we propose to use food web models to assess the contribution of a MPA to the trophic functioning of a larger ecosystem. This approach is applied to the Banc d'Arguin National Park, a large MPA located on the Mauritanian shelf. The ecosystem was modeled using Ecopath with Ecosim, a model that accounts for fisheries, food web structure, and some aspects of the spatial distribution of species, for the period 1991-2006. Gaps in knowledge and uncertainty were taken into account by building three different models. Results showed that the Banc d'Arguin contributes about 9 to 13% to the total consumption, is supporting about 23% of the total production and 18% of the total catch of the Mauritanian shelf ecosystem, and up to 50% for coastal fish. Of the 29 exploited groups, 15 depend on the Banc for more than 30% of their direct or indirect consumptions. Between 1991 and 2006, the fishing pressure increased leading to a decrease in biomass and the catch of high trophic levels, confirming their overall overexploitation. Ecosim simulations showed that adding a new fleet in the Banc d'Arguin would have large impacts on the species with a high reliance on the Banc for food, resulting in a 23% decrease in the current outside MPA catches. We conclude on the usefulness of food web models to assess MPAs contribution to larger ecosystem functioning.

  7. The Tayiba Red Beds: Transitional marine-continental deposits in the precursor Suez Rift, Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, A. A.; Imam, M. M.

    1999-04-01

    The Tayiba Red Beds, exposed in the Abu Zenima area, west-central Sinai, have been intensively studied for their clay mineralogy and charophytes assemblages. Three surface sections exposed at Wadi El-Tayiba and Wadi Nukhul were studied. The Tayiba Formation uncomformably overlies the Middle Eocene Khaboba Formation at Wadi Nukhul and the Late Eocene Tanka Formation at Wadi El-Tayiba and commonly underlies the Early Miocene Nukhul Formation with unconformable relationships. The Tayiba Formation at Wadi Nukhul consists predominantly of continental coarse clastic sediments represented by polymictic conglomerates, alternating with red to pinkish mudstone, ferruginous sandstone and varicoloured mottled siltstone with plant remains. At Wadi El-Tayiba, the Tayiba Formation is represented by marine, yellow mudstone and red siltstone, alternating with greyish and reddish-yellow argillaceous to sandy limestone, highly fossiliferous with reworked Nummulites spp. and molluscan shell fragments. The mineralogical composition of the studied clay size fraction showed that most samples are dominated by illite, together with smectite, kaolinite and illite/smectite mixed layers. The relative proportion of these constituents shows wide variation. Smectite is more abundant than other constituents at Wadi El-Tayiba. The high content of smectite is usually accompanied by a terrigenous influx in the form of kaolinite and illite, reflecting deposition in an inner neritic shallow marine environment. The sediments of Wadi Nukhul are characterised by an appreciable proportion of illite, together with an illite/smectite mixed layer and minor amounts of kaolinite, suggesting deposition in fluviatile environments. The detailed investigation of charophytes (green algae) in the investigated sections showed that Wadi El-Tayiba is nearly barren of these microflorae, except for some benthic foraminifera from a shallow marine environment. In contrast, Wadi Nukhul yielded a high frequency and great

  8. Marine effect of introduced salmonids: Prey consumption by exotic steelhead and anadromous brown trout in the Patagonian Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancio, J.; Beauchamp, D.A.; Pascual, M.

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of stable isotope analysis, we estimated the marine diet of the most abundant anadromous salmonid species in Patagonian Atlantic basins. The results were coupled with bioenergetic and population models to estimate the consumption of food by salmonids and was compared with that by seabirds, the most abundant top predators in the area. Amphipods were the main salmonid prey, followed by sprat, silversides, squid, and euphausiids. The total consumption, even assuming large anadromous salmonid populations, represented Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  9. Th/U dating of marine and continental mollusk shell, and travertine samples in quaternary deposits in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semghouli, S.; Choukri, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Jahjouh, E.; Chouak, A.; Ben Mohammadi, A.; Latiris, M.; Reyss, J.-L.; Plaziat, J. L.

    2001-06-01

    Th/U measurements by alpha spectrometry have been carried out on samples of quaternary deposits in Morocco Ages yielded by marine samples allow identification of two high sea levels: (1) Last Interglacial ˜133 ka (ii) Harounien sea level ˜266 ka. The scatter of ages around 133 and 266 ka has been discussed and corrected. For continental samples, the ages allowed identification of humid episodes during which these samples have been deposited.

  10. Dry Deposition, Surface Production and Dynamics of Aerosols in the Marine Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fairall, C.W.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1984-01-01

    A model of downward aerosol panicle flux characterized by dry deposition velocity, Vd, due to Slinn and Slinn (1980) is generalized to the case of nonzero surface concentration (absorbing surface with a surface source). A more general expression for the flux at some reference height is developed...... which includes Vd and an effective surface source strength, Si, which is a function of the true surface source strength, Si, and the particle transport properties below the reference height. The general expression for the surface flux is incorporated into a dynamic mixed layer model of the type...... developed by Davidson et al. (1983). This three layer model (diffusion sublayer, turbulent surface layer and mixed layer) is applied to an open ocean marine regime where boundary layer advection is ignored. The aerosol concentration in the boundary layer is considered to consist of sea salt particles...

  11. Layer-by-layer click deposition of functional polymer coatings for combating marine biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen Jing; Pranantyo, Dicky; Neoh, Koon-Gee; Kang, En-Tang; Teo, Serena Lay-Ming; Rittschof, Daniel

    2012-09-10

    "Click" chemistry-enabled layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of multilayer functional polymer coatings provides an alternative approach to combating biofouling. Fouling-resistant azido-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate-based polymer chains (azido-poly(PEGMA)) and antimicrobial alkynyl-functionalized 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride-based polymer chains (alkynyl-poly(META)) were click-assembled layer-by-layer via alkyne-azide 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The polymer multilayer coatings are resistant to bacterial adhesion and are bactericidal to marine Gram-negative Pseudomonas sp. NCIMB 2021 bacteria. Settlement of barnacle ( Amphibalanus (= Balanus ) amphitrite ) cyprids is greatly reduced on the multilayer polymer-functionalized substrates. As the number of the polymer layers increases, efficacy against bacterial fouling and settlement of barnacle cyprids increases. The LBL-functionalized surfaces exhibit low toxicity toward the barnacle cyprids and are stable upon prolonged exposure to seawater. LBL click deposition is thus an effective and potentially environmentally benign way to prepare antifouling coatings.

  12. Quantifying the Cenozoic marine diatom deposition history: links to the C and Si cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaudie, Johan

    2016-11-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms are, today, among the world's main primary producers as well as the main organic carbon exporter to the deep sea despite the fact that they were a very minor component of the plankton at the beginning of the Cenozoic. They are also the main silica exporter to the deep sea, thus balancing global chemical weathering. This study reviews their global Cenozoic depositional pattern in order to understand the modality and the context of their rise to dominance, but also to understand how diatom evolution affected the Cenozoic functioning of the ocean's biological pump. After two short-lived major abundance peaks near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and in the late Oligocene, diatom abundance in sediments shifted in the middle Miocene to globally higher values which have largely persisted to the modern day. These quantitative findings provide support for the hypothesis according to which diatoms, through their ecological role in the ocean's biological carbon pump, have contributed to the Cenozoic changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide pressure and consequently to changes in the global climate state. Additionally, correlations between diatom abundance peaks and shifts in seawater strontium and osmium isotopic composition hint at a strong control of the silicate weathering on diatom deposition.

  13. Depositional and erosional coastal processes during the late postglacial sea-level rise: An example from the central Tyrrhenian continental shelf (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortora, P. [Univ. degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza (Italy). Dept. di Scienze della Terra

    1996-03-01

    A transgressive systems tract (TST) deposit on the inner continental shelf of the south Tuscany region (central Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) formed during the last postglacial sea-level rise. Its small-scale stratigraphy has been detailed using high-resolution seismic profiles, gravity cores, and grab samples. The TST deposit overlies a lowstand unconformity, shows a tabular geometry, and comprises three internal architectures of beach facies. Because the lateral distribution of these vertical successions is not random, but parallel to the coast, each architecture represents an individual sedimentary stage during sea-level rise. However, all architectures were formed via shoreface retreat in response to the landward migration of a beach complex over the unconformity. During this migration the beach system was characterized by a source diastem located in the surf zone and by two sediment dispersal systems. One moved the eroded sand over the flat back-barrier palustrine area by storm washover, while the other transported part of this sand to the lower shoreface, forming a reworked sand sheet above the older and inactive source diastem (ravinement surface). The TST architectures originated from a transgressive succession of beach facies, differentiated according to the intensity of shoreface retreat. Architecture A represents a low preservation potential of the original beach complex, Architecture B relatively high preservation, and Architecture C no preservation. The intensity of erosion and the consequent preservation potential were totally controlled by antecedent topography.

  14. Aeolian deposition change in the Peruvian central continental shelf during the last millennium and its relationship with atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, F. J., Sr.; Sifeddine, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a record of laminated sediment cores retrieved in the Pisco region (14 °S) characterized by local aeolian inputs. This record covers the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) to Little Ice Age (LIA) and the Current Warm Period (CWP) at centennial to sub-decadal resolution. The aim of the study is to reconstruct the patterns of aeolian sedimentation as well as the most important processes that control the input of this material to understand how these components reflect atmospheric climate variability during the last millennium. Assuming that the mineral fraction of the sediment is composed of several lognormally distributed particle populations, we applied an iterative least-square fitting routine to determine the number and the characteristics of the individual particles populations. This allows inferring the spatial and temporal variation of particles populations and thus transport mechanisms involved. Two components with grain size modes at 54±11 μm and 90±11 μm related with local aeolian erosion over the Pisco region were found. Our results showed active aeolian erosion during the second half of the MCA and rapid decrease from the MCA to the LIA. During the LIA the aeolian deposition exhibited a decreasing activity. During the CWP the aeolian deposition increased progressively. Comparison with others South American records indicates that those changes are linked to change in the meridional position of the Intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and South Pacific Subtropical High (SPSH) at the centennial time resolution. Finally the CWP period showed an increase in the aeolian deposition and thus in the wind intensity over the past two centuries. This likely represents the result of the modern position of the ITCZ-SPSH system and the associated intensification of the local and regional winds. Nevertheless, the aeolian deposition and in consequence the wind intensity and variability of the last 100 yr are stronger than during the second sequence of the MCA

  15. Categorizing vitric lithofacies on seamounts: implications for recognizing deep-marine pyroclastic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portner, R. A.; Clague, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    lithofacies has a structureless to 'swirled' habit and interdigitating bedding contacts where it is host to matrix-supported subround vitric lapilli with low-vesicularity. These rare globules have mud-filled embayments, bubbles and quench-cracks, jig-saw fit texture, and fluidal morphologies suggesting a pepperitic origin. Laterally, bottom current reworked lithofacies grade into fine-to medium-grained ash lithofacies proximal to volcanic-constructional landforms. These landforms have broad morphologies with subdued slopes and are interpreted as source vents. Lithofacies generated from these vents invariably contain an abundance of low-vesicular limu-o-Pele'- or highly-vesicular round lapilli. Units are coarse-tail reverse to normal graded and crudely planar laminated or structureless. Locally, basal contacts are erosive. This facies is interpreted as fall-out from particle lofting or high-density gravity flows generated by explosive eruptions. By combining high-resolution bathymetric mapping and sampling with post-cruise geochemical and petrographic examination, we outline a previously unrecognized diversity to seamount-capping vitriclastic deposits. This approach will be useful for studies focused on deciphering explosive origins of deep-marine volcaniclastic deposits.

  16. Hydrogeochemical prospecting for porphyry copper deposits in the tropical-marine climate of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W.R.; Ficklin, W.H.; Learned, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A hydrogeochemical survey utilizing waters from streams and springs was conducted in the area of two known porphyry copper deposits in the tropical-marine climate of westcentral Puerto Rico. The most important pathfinder for regional hydrogeochemical surveys is sulfate which reflects the associated pyrite mineralization. Because of increased mobility due to intense chemical weathering and the low pH environment, dissolved copper can also be used as a pathfinder for regional surveys and has the advantage of distinguishing barren pyrite from pyrite associated with copper mineralization. For follow-up surveys, the most important pathfinders are copper, sulfate, pH, zinc, and fluoride. High concentrations of dissolved copper and moderate concentrations of sulfate is a diagnostic indication of nearby sources of copper minerals. An understanding of the geochemical processes taking place in the streambeds and the weathering environment, such as the precipitation of secondary copper minerals, contributes to the interpretation of the geochemical data and the selection of the most favorable areas for further exploration. ?? 1982.

  17. Small proportions of silt linked to distinct and predictable differences in marine macrofaunal assemblages on the continental shelf of the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, S. K.; Politano, K. K.

    2017-07-01

    Increasing interest in offshore development has motivated intensified efforts to map the seafloor for marine spatial planning. However, surficial geologic maps do not accurately represent habitats for various species groups of concern. This study used a bottom-up approach to integrate macrofaunal densities and benthic conditions on the Pacific Northwest shelf to identify macrofaunal assemblages and associated habitat features. Benthic cores and water-column profiles were collected from 137 stations from 50 to 110 m depth. Analyses grouping stations based on both similar species abundances and benthic conditions resulted in six broad habitats. Within the sampled depth and latitudinal range, sediment characteristics were the primary structuring variable. A major break in assemblages was detected between sediment that had less than 1% silt/clay and those containing more than 1% silt/clay. Assemblages differed primarily in the bivalve species present and secondarily in polychaete species. Within the greater than and less than 1% silt/clay habitats, further discretization of assemblages was based mostly on differing abundances of characteristic bivalves and polychaetes associated with differing median grain sizes, which did not correspond to traditional definitions of fine or medium sand. These data show that a bottom-up methodology is necessary to discern habitats for macrofauna and that site-specific physical sampling is necessary to predict macrofaunal assemblage composition. However, if detailed sediment characteristics are known, macrofaunal assemblages may be predicted without time-intensive biological sampling and processing. These results also indicate that seemingly small sedimentary changes due to offshore installations may have measureable effects on the relative abundances and even the species composition of macrofauna.

  18. Formation of carbonatite-related giant rare-earth-element deposits by the recycling of marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zengqian; Liu, Yan; Tian, Shihong; Yang, Zhiming; Xie, Yuling

    2015-06-02

    Carbonatite-associated rare-earth-element (REE) deposits are the most significant source of the world's REEs; however, their genesis remains unclear. Here, we present new Sr-Nd-Pb and C-O isotopic data for Cenozoic carbonatite-hosted giant REE deposits in southwest China. These REE deposits are located along the western margin of the Yangtze Craton that experienced Proterozoic lithospheric accretion, and controlled by Cenozoic strike-slip faults related to Indo-Asian continental collision. The Cenozoic carbonatites were emplaced as stocks or dykes with associated syenites, and tend to be extremely enriched in Ba, Sr, and REEs and have high (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios (>0.7055). These carbonatites were likely formed by melting of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), which had been previously metasomatized by high-flux REE- and CO2-rich fluids derived from subducted marine sediments. The fertility of these carbonatites depends on the release of REEs from recycled marine sediments and on the intensity of metasomatic REE refertilization of the SCLM. We suggest that cratonic edges, particularly along ancient convergent margins, possess the optimal configuration for generating giant REE deposits; therefore, areas of metamorphic basement bounded or cut by translithospheric faults along cratonic edges have a high potential for such deposits.

  19. Combined effects of marinating and γ-irradiation in ensuring safety, protection of nutritional value and increase in shelf-life of ready-to-cook meat for immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Fadhel, Yosra; Leroy, Valentin; Dussault, Dominic; St-Yves, France; Lauzon, Martine; Salmieri, Stéphane; Jamshidian, Majid; Vu, Dang Khanh; Lacroix, Monique

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combining marinating and γ-irradiation at doses of 1, 1.5 and 3kGy on Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium and Clostridium sporogenes in raw meat packed under vacuum and stored at 4°C and to estimate its safety and shelf-life. Further, the effect of combined treatments on sensorial, nutritional values (lipid oxidation, concentration of thiamin and riboflavin) and color was evaluated. The study demonstrated that the use of marinade in combination with a low dose of γ-irradiation (1.5kGy) could act in synergy to reduce to undetectable level of pathogenic bacteria and increase the shelf-life of ready-to-cook meat loin without affecting its sensorial and nutritional quality.

  20. Trace fossils and sedimentary facies from a Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician tide-dominated shelf (Santa Rosita Formation, northwest Argentina): Implications for ichnofacies models of shallow marine successions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, M.G.; Buatois, L.A.; Acenolaza, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    The Santa Rosita Formation is one the most widely distributed lower Paleozoic units of northwest Argentina. At the Quebrada del Salto Alto section, east of Purmamarca, Jujuy Province, it is represented by four sedimentary facies: thick-bedded planar cross-stratified quartzose sandstones (A), thin-bedded planar cross-stratified quartzose sandstones and mudstones (B), wave-rippled sandstones and bioturbated mudstones (C), and black and greenish gray shales (D). Paleocurrent data, sandstone architecture, and sedimentary structures from facies A and B indicate bipolar/bimodal paleoflows, suggesting the action of tidal currents. The succession is interpreted as that of a tide-dominated shelf, with only secondary influence of wave processes. Trace fossils are restricted to facies B and C. The Cruziana ichnocoenosis is preserved on the soles of thin-bedded planar cross-stratified quartzose sandstones (facies B). This ichnocoenosis consists of Conostichus isp., Cruziana omanica, C. semiplicata, C. cf. tortworthi, Cruziana isp. Helminthopsis abeli, Monomorphichnus bilinearis, M. multilineatus, Palaeophycus tubularis, Rusophycus carbonarius, R. latus, and R. isp. The occurrence of Cruziana semiplicata, C. omanica, C. cf. tortworthi, and Rusophycus latus supports a Late Cambrian-Tremadoc age. Slabbing of Cruziana shows complex interactions between biologic and sedimentologic processes, and suggests a predominance of exhumed traces, washed out and recast by tractive sand deposition. Sandstone soles are densely packed with biogenic structures and exhibit distinctive clusters of Rusophycus isp. that most likely represent trilobite nesting burrows. The Cruziana ichnocoenosis records the resident fauna of a protected, lower intertidal to subtidal interbar setting. The Skolithos ichnocoenosis is represented by high to low density vertical burrows of Skolithos linearis, which extend downwards to the quartzose sandstone soles of facies B and cross the Cruziana ichnocoenosis. The

  1. Boron isotope evidence for the involvement of non-marine evaporites in the origin of the Broken Hill ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, J.F.; Palmer, M.R.; Stevens, B.P.J.

    1989-01-01

    IDENTIFYING the palaeogeographic setting and mode of origin of stratabound ore deposits can be difficult in high-grade metamorphic terranes, where the effects of metamorphism may obscure the nature of the protoliths. Here we report boron isotope data for tourmalines from the early Proterozoic Broken Hill block, in Australia, which hosts giant lead-zinc-silver sulphide deposits. With one exception the 11B/10B ratios are lower than those for all other tourmalines from massive sulphide deposits and tour-malinites elsewhere in the world. We propose that these low ratios reflect leaching of boron from non-marine evaporitic borates by convecting hydrothermal fluids associated with early Proterozoic continental rifting. A possible modern analogue is the Salton Sea geothermal field in California. ?? 1989 Nature Publishing Group.

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity fluxes from coastal marine sediments: model estimates for different shelf environments and sensitivity to global change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Krumins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a one-dimensional reactive transport model to estimate benthic fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and alkalinity (AT from coastal marine sediments. The model incorporates the transport processes of sediment accumulation, molecular diffusion, bioturbation and bioirrigation, while the reactions included are the redox pathways of organic carbon oxidation, re-oxidation of reduced nitrogen, iron and sulfur compounds, pore water acid-base equilibria, and dissolution of particulate inorganic carbon (calcite, aragonite, and Mg-calcite. The coastal zone is divided into four environmental units with different particulate inorganic carbon (PIC and particulate organic carbon (POC fluxes: reefs, banks and bays, carbonate shelves and non-carbonate shelves. Model results are analyzed separately for each environment and then scaled up to the whole coastal ocean. The model-derived estimate for the present-day global coastal benthic DIC efflux is 126 Tmol yr−1, based on a global coastal reactive POC depositional flux of 117 Tmol yr−1. The POC decomposition leads to a~carbonate dissolution from shallow marine sediments of 7 Tmol yr−1 (on the order of 0.1 Pg C yr−1. Assuming complete re-oxidation of aqueous sulfide released from sediments, the effective net flux of alkalinity to the water column is 29 Teq yr−1, primarily from PIC dissolution (46% and ammonification (33%. Because our POC depositional flux falls in the high range of global values given in the literature, the reported DIC and alkalinity fluxes should be viewed as upper-bound estimates. Increasing coastal seawater DIC to what might be expected in year 2100 due to the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 increases PIC dissolution by 2.3 Tmol yr−1 and alkalinity efflux by 4.8 Teq yr−1. Our reactive transport modeling approach not only yields global estimates of benthic DIC, alkalinity

  3. Addressing the ice nucleating abilities of marine aerosol: A combination of deposition mode laboratory and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, L. A.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Miller, L. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Huffman, J. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses, through two types of experiments, the potential for the oceans to act as a source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The INP concentration via deposition mode nucleation was measured in situ at a coastal site in British Columbia in August 2013. The INP concentration at conditions relevant to cirrus clouds (i.e., -40 °C and relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice = 139%) ranged from 0.2 L-1 to 3.3 L-1. Correlations of the INP concentrations with levels of anthropogenic tracers (i.e., CO, SO2, NOx, and black carbon) and numbers of fluorescent particles do not indicate a significant influence from anthropogenic sources or submicron bioaerosols, respectively. Additionally, the INPs measured in the deposition mode showed a poor correlation with the concentration of particles with sizes larger than 500 nm, which is in contrast with observations made in the immersion freezing mode. To investigate the nature of particles that could have acted as deposition INP, laboratory experiments with potential marine aerosol particles were conducted under the ice-nucleating conditions used in the field. At -40 °C, no deposition activity was observed with salt aerosol particles (sodium chloride and two forms of commercial sea salt: Sigma-Aldrich and Instant Ocean), particles composed of a commercial source of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic material), or particle mixtures of sea salt and humic material. In contrast, exudates from three phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nanochloris atomus, and Emiliania huxleyi) and one marine bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) exhibited INP activity at low RHice values, down to below 110%. This suggests that the INPs measured at the field site were of marine biological origins, although we cannot rule out other sources, including mineral dust.

  4. Is Submarine Groundwater Discharge a Gas Hydrate Formation Mechanism on the Circum-Arctic Shelf?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrate is an ice-like solid that can sequester large quantities of methane gas in marine sediments along most continental margins where thermodynamic conditions permit its formation. Along the circum-Arctic shelf, relict permafrost-associated methane hydrate deposits formed when non-glaciated portions of the shelf experienced subaerial exposure during ocean transgressions. Gas hydrate stability and the permeability of circum-Arctic shelf sediments to gas migration is closely linked with relict submarine permafrost. Heat flow observations on the Alaskan North Slope and Canadian Beaufort Shelf suggest the movement of groundwater offshore, but direct observations of groundwater flow do not exist. Submarine discharge, an offshore flow of fresh, terrestrial groundwater, can affect the temperature and salinity field in shelf sediments, and may be an important factor in submarine permafrost and gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. Submarine groundwater discharge may also enhance the transport of organic matter for methanogenesis within marine sediments. Because it is buoyancy-driven, the velocity field contains regions with a vertical (upward) component as groundwater flows offshore. This combination of factors makes submarine groundwater discharge a potential mechanism controlling permafrost-associated gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. In this study, we quantitatively investigate the feasibility of submarine groundwater discharge as a control on permafrost-associated gas hydrate formation on the Arctic continental shelf, using the Canadian Beaufort Shelf as an example. We have developed a shelf-scale, two-dimensional numerical model based on the finite volume method for two-phase flow of pore fluid and methane gas within Arctic shelf sediments. The model tracks the evolution of the pressure, temperature, salinity, methane gas, methane hydrate, and permafrost fields given imposed boundary conditions, with latent heat of

  5. Pleistocene mammals from the southern Brazilian continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Renato Pereira; Buchmann, Francisco Sekiguchi

    2011-02-01

    Fossils of terrestrial mammals preserved in submarine environment have been recorded in several places around the world. In Brazil such fossils are rather abundant in the southernmost portion of the coast, associated to fossiliferous concentrations at depths up to 10 m. Here is presented a review of such occurrences and the first record of fossils in deeper areas of the continental shelf. The fossils encompass several groups of both extinct and extant mammals, and exhibit several distinct taphonomic features, related to the marine environment. Those from the inner continental shelf are removed and transported from the submarine deposits to the coast during storm events, thus forming large konzentrat-lagerstätte on the beach, called “Concheiros”. The only fossils from deeper zones of the shelf known so far are a portion of a skull, a left humerus and of a femur of Toxodon sp. and a lower right molar of a Stegomastodon waringi, all collected by fishermen at depths around 20 m. The presence of fossils at great depths and distances from the present coastline, without signs of abrasion and far from areas of fluvial discharges does indicate that these remains have not been transported from the continent to the shelf, but have been preserved directly on the area that today correspond to the continental shelf. These remains indicate the existence of large fossiliferous deposits that have developed during periods of sea-level lowstand (glacial maxima) and have been submerged and reworked by the sea-level rise at the end of the last glaciation.

  6. Early Pliocene Hiatus in Sand Output by the Colorado River: Evidence From Marine Deposits in the Salton Trough, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, R. J.; Bykerk-Kauffman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Early Pliocene deposits in the western Salton Trough preserve a high-fidelity record of sediment dispersal into the marine realm during initiation and early evolution of the Colorado River (CR). Grain-size fractionation, sediment routing, and transport dynamics of the early CR delta are recorded in sediments of the Fish Creek - Vallecito basin, which was located ~100 km south of Yuma along the transform plate boundary at 5 Ma. Early Pliocene delivery of CR sand to the basin took place in two distinct pulses: (1) deposition of sandy turbidites (Wind Caves Mbr of the Latrania Fm) in a restricted submarine canyon at Split Mt Gorge between ~5.3 and 5.1 Ma; and (2) progradation of a thick, widespread, coarsening-up deltaic sequence of marine mudstone, sandstone, and coquinas (Deguynos Fm) between ~4.8 and 4.2 Ma. Estimated flux of CR sediment during Wind Caves deposition was weak (~3-5 Mt/yr) compared to the long-term average (172±64 Mt/yr). The two pulses of CR sand input are separated by the Coyote Clay (CC, ~5.1-4.8 Ma), a regionally correlable, greenish-yellow-weathering marine claystone unit at the base of the Deguynos Fm. CC gradationally overlies Wind Caves turbidites in the area of the paleocanyon. In contrast, in the Coyote Mts 15-23 km to the south and SE, CC rests on coarse-grained locally-derived late Miocene sedimentary rocks, Alverson volcanics, and metamorphic basement rock along a regional unconformity. Identical claystone facies occur in the NW Indio Hills (restores to Yuma at the mouth of the CR at 5 Ma), and Sierra Cucapa in Mexico (~200 km south of Yuma at 5 Ma). Marine localities outside of the Wind Caves paleocanyon experienced slow to negligible sedimentation along a rugged rocky shoreline until abrupt arrival of CR-derived clay. CC accumulated in a sand-starved, pro-delta marine setting (Winker, 1987) over an inferred N-S distance of ~200 km. We therefore reject an alternate hypothesis that CC accumulated on the muddy slope of the prograding CR

  7. Trace-element deposition in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela Shelf, under sulfate-reducing conditions: a history of the local hydrography and global climate, 20 ka to the present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, David Z.; Dean, Walter E.

    2002-01-01

    A sediment core from the Cariaco Basin on the Venezuelan continental shelf, which recovered sediment that has been dated back to 20 ka (thousand years ago), was examined for its major-element-oxide and trace-element composition. Cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn) can be partitioned between a siliciclastic, terrigenous-derived fraction and two seawater-derived fractions. The two marine fractions are (1) a biogenic fraction represented by nutrient trace elements taken up mostly in the photic zone by phytoplankton, and (2) a hydrogenous fraction that has been derived from bottom water via adsorption and precipitation reactions. This suite of trace elements contrasts with a second suite of trace elements—barium (Ba), cobalt (Co), gallium (Ga), lithium (Li), the rare-earth elements, thorium (Th), yttrium (Y), and several of the major-element oxides—that has had solely a terrigenous source. The partitioning scheme, coupled with bulk sediment accumulation rates measured by others, allows us to determine the accumulation rate of trace elements in each of the three sediment fractions and of the fractions themselves. The current export of organic matter from the photic zone, redox conditions and advection of bottom water, and flux of terrigenous debris into the basin can be used to calculate independently trace-element depositional rates. The calculated rates show excellent agreement with the measured rates of the surface sediment. This agreement supports a model of trace-element accumulation rates in the subsurface sediment that gives a 20-kyr history of upwelling into the photic zone (that is, primary productivity), bottom-water advection and redox, and provenance. Correspondence of extrema in the geochemical signals with global changes in sea level and climate demonstrates the high degree to which the basin hydrography and provenance have responded to the paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic regimes of

  8. Morphologies and depositional/erosional controls on evolution of Pliocene-Pleistocene carbonate platforms: Northern Carnarvon Basin, Northwest Shelf of Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktas, P.; Austin, J. A.; Fulthorpe, C. S.; Gallagher, S. J.

    2016-08-01

    The detailed morphologies, evolution and termination of latest Neogene tropical carbonate platforms in the Northern Carnarvon Basin (NCB), on the passive margin of the Northwest Shelf (NWS) of Australia, defined based upon mapping using 3D seismic images, reveal the history of local/regional oceanographic processes, fluctuations in relative sea-level and changing climate. Cool-water carbonate deposition, dominant during the early-middle Miocene, was followed by a siliciclastic influx, which prograded across the NWS beginning in the late-middle Miocene, during a period of long-term global sea-level fall. The resulting prograding clinoform sets, interpreted as delta lobes, created relict topographic highs following Pliocene termination of the siliciclastic influx. These highs constituted multiple favorable shallow-water environments for subsequent photozoan carbonate production. Resultant platform carbonate development, in addition to being a response to cessation of siliciclastic influx and the existence of suitable shallow-water substrate, was also influenced by development of the warm-water Leeuwin Current (LC), flowing southwestward along this margin. Four flat-topped platforms are mapped; each platform top is a sequence boundary defined by reflection onlap above and truncation below. Successive platforms migrated southwestward through time, along margin strike. All platforms exhibit predominantly progradational seismic geometries. Mapped tops are ≥10 km wide. Seismic evidence of karst on three of four platform tops, e.g., v-shaped troughs up to 50 m deep and ~1 km wide, and broader basins with areas up to 20 km2, suggests episodic subaerial exposure that may have contributed to platform demise. Platform 4, the most recent, is unique in having interpreted biohermal build-ups superimposed on the progradational platform base. The base of these interpreted patch reefs now lies at a water depth of ~153 m; therefore, we suggest that these reefs developed post

  9. Environmental hazard assessment of a marine mine tailings deposit site and potential implications for deep-sea mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Nélia C; Rocha, Thiago L; Canals, Miquel; Cardoso, Cátia; Danovaro, Roberto; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Gambi, Cristina; Regoli, Francesco; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Bebianno, Maria João

    2017-09-01

    Portmán Bay is a heavily contaminated area resulting from decades of metal mine tailings disposal, and is considered a suitable shallow-water analogue to investigate the potential ecotoxicological impact of deep-sea mining. Resuspension plumes were artificially created by removing the top layer of the mine tailings deposit by bottom trawling. Mussels were deployed at three sites: i) off the mine tailings deposit area; ii) on the mine tailings deposit beyond the influence from the resuspension plumes; iii) under the influence of the artificially generated resuspension plumes. Surface sediment samples were collected at the same sites for metal analysis and ecotoxicity assessment. Metal concentrations and a battery of biomarkers (oxidative stress, metal exposure, biotransformation and oxidative damage) were measured in different mussel tissues. The environmental hazard posed by the resuspension plumes was investigated by a quantitative weight of evidence (WOE) model that integrated all the data. The resuspension of sediments loaded with metal mine tails demonstrated that chemical contaminants were released by trawling subsequently inducing ecotoxicological impact in mussels' health. Considering as sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) those indicated in Spanish action level B for the disposal of dredged material at sea, the WOE model indicates that the hazard is slight off the mine tailings deposit, moderate on the mine tailings deposit without the influence from the resuspension plumes, and major under the influence of the resuspension plumes. Portmán Bay mine tailings deposit is a by-product of sulphide mining, and despite differences in environmental setting, it can reflect the potential ecotoxic effects to marine fauna from the impact of resuspension of plumes created by deep-sea mining of polymetallic sulphides. A similar approach as in this study could be applied in other areas affected by sediment resuspension and for testing future deep-sea mining sites in

  10. The high-level marine shell-bearing deposits of Clava, Inverness-shire, and their origin as glacial rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, J. W.

    The enigmatic high-level, till-covered, cold water marine shell-bearing deposits at Clava, Inverness-shire, are described systematically in the light of new observations made at sites documented in the literature. The marine deposits, named here as the Clava Shelly Formation, include three members, the unfossiliferous Clava sand, the underlying Clava shelly clay and a shelly diamicton known as the Clava shelly till. The first two members form a conformable coarsening-upwards sequence containing a shallow water, high-boreal to low-Arctic fauna and flora. The Clava shelly till is essentially glacially re-sedimented glaciomarine clay containing a sparse fauna, but its stratigraphic relationship and age are not absolutely clear. The shelly clay is ascribed to a Mid-Devensian interstadial episode on the basis of amino-acid dating. It is concluded that the Clava shelly clay, and several discrete masses of Clava sand and shelly till, are glacially transported allochthons derived from the Great Glen. The rafts were probably detached as a result of high pore water pressure building up in laterally restricted aquifers beneath a confined glacier that flowed north-eastwards across the Loch Ness basin. This glacier was deflected eastwards and upwards towards Clava by ice flowing from the northern Highlands along the Beauly Firth during the build-up of the last Scottish ice-sheet. The rafts were stacked at the ice margin when the glacier entered the Nairn Valley before being overriden by the expanding ice-sheet.

  11. Petroleum exploration of shallow marine deposit Carboniferous volcanic tuff reservoir in the western margin of Junggar Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jianyong; Wang Xuezhong; Ma Liqun

    2013-01-01

    In 2011,petroleum exploration of shallow marine deposits Carboniferous and volcanic tuff reservoir re-alized breakthroughs at Chepaizi slope in the western margin of Junggar Basin. Pai 61 well ,with 855.7 ~949.6 m section,in the conventional test oil obtained 6 t/d industrial oil flow. The surface viscosity is 390 mPa· s (50℃). The marine deposit of Carboniferous are deep oil source rocks and high-quality reservoir. Magma volcanic activity provides the basis for volcanic reservoir development and distribution. The weathering crust and secondary cracks developed volcanic tuff by strong rock weathering and dissolution of organic acids which has become top quality reservoir. Deep Permian oil-gas migrated and accumulated to high parts along Hong-Che fault belt and stratigraphic unconformity stripping. Permian and Triassic volcanic rocks or dense mudstone sedimentary cover as a regional seal for the late Carboniferous oil-gas to save critically. The seismic pre-stack time migration processing technologies for the problem of poor inner structures of Carboniferous were developed. Response of volcanic rock seismic and logging are obvious. The application imaging logging and nuclear magnetic technology achieved the qualitative identification and quantification of fracture description.

  12. Mapping giant mass transport deposits (MTDs) for delineating the extended Continental Shelf of Spain to the West of Canary Islands according UNCLOS Art. 76

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, Luis; Medialdea, Teresa; León, Ricardo; Vázquez, Juan T.; González, Javier; Palomino, Desiree; González-Aller, Daniel; Fernández-Salas, Luis M.; Espinosa, Salvador

    2017-04-01

    On 19 December 2014, Spain presented a third partial submission for the delineation of the Extended Continental in the area west of the Canary Islands to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS) according to the United Nations Convention on the Law of Sea (UNCLOS). The Canary Islands are located within a NE-SW 1,350 km long ridge of hotspot-inferred volcanic islands and seamounts (composed by more of 100, from Lars to Tropic seamounts). This submission has been documented with an extensive dataset specifically obtained for the project during ten oceanographic cruises between 2010 and 2014 aboard the Spanish research vessels Hespérides, Sarmiento de Gamboa and Miguel Oliver. This new dataset allows to investigate an area of 440,000 km2 with acoustic backscatter images and multibeam echosounder bathymetric (MBES) data (Simrad EM-12, EM-120 and EM-302, and Atlas HYDROSWEEP DS), a dense network of 65,800 km of very-high resolution (VHR) seismic lines (including chirp parametric source TOPAS PS-18 and Atlas PARASOUND P-35) and 4,471 km of multichannel seismic reflection lines (MCS) acquired with an array of air-guns yielding a total volume of 4,600 inch3 (75.38 L) and a 3,500 m long streamer composed of 280 channels. In order to determine the Foot of Slope (FoS), the Base of Slope (BoS) region has been traced following geomorphological arguments based on the morphology of the mass transport deposits (MTDs) extended downslope west of the Canary Islands. Based on backscatter and MBEs mapping, and VHR lines, the BoS has been traced by means of a detailed mapping of the debris flow deposits widespread along the slope. Therefore, the seaward limit of the BoS has been traced following the termination of the debris flow sourced from the Canary Island. Otherwise, the landward limit of the BoS has been defined following the morphological changes in the debris flow forced by the breaking in the slope gradient, which form distributary lobes downslope. Finally

  13. West Florida Shelf: A natural laboratory for the study of ocean acidificiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Pamela; Robbins, Lisa L.; Larson, Rebekka A.; Beck, Tanya; Schwing, Patrick; Martinez-Colon, Michael; Gooch, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Declining oceanic pH and carbonate-ion concentrations are well-known consequences of increased atmospheric and surface-ocean partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2). The possible subject of shifts in seawater carbonate chemistry on biocalcification and survival rates of marine organisms provides questions amenable to both experimental and field study (Kleypas and Langdon, 2006). To date, limited quantitative data exist with which to formalize and test hypotheses regarding such impacts, particularly in continental-shelf settings. The continental shelves of Florida provide an ideal natural laboratory in which to test latitudinal (and temperature and depth) shifts in habitat ranges of calcifying organisms. Both the east and west Florida shelves extend from warm temperate to subtropical latitudes; additionally, the west Florida shelf has very little siliciclastic influx to mask the carbonate production. This study utilizes the natural laboratory of the west and southwest Florida shelf (fig 1.1) to examine the transition from foramol (predominately foraminifera and molluscan) carbonate sediments, characteristic of the west-central Florida shelf, to chlorozoan (algal and coral) sediments characteristic of the southwest Florida shelf. The west Florida shelf is a mixed siliciclastic carbonate ramp that to the south transitions to the carbonate-dominated southwest Florida shelf (Enos, 1977; Brooks and others, 2003). The west Florida shelf is a distally steepened carbonate ramp that is ~250 kilometers (km) wide (Read, 1985). It is covered by a veneer of unconsolidated sediment consisting of mainly biogenic carbonate and quartz in the near shore, with subordinate amounts of phosphate. The sediment-distribution pattern is largely a function of proximity to source, with physical processes playing a minor role in distribution. The carbonate sand-and-gravel fraction is produced by organisms within the depositional basin of the west Florida shelf (Brooks and others, 2003). The

  14. Sedimentary features of tsunami backwash deposits in a shallow marine Miocene setting, Mejillones Peninsula, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalamessa, Gino; Di Celma, Claudio

    2005-07-01

    Miocene shoreface sandstones in the Caleta Herradura half-graben, northern Chile, contain an exceptionally coarse deposit that, based on sedimentologic and stratigraphic features, is regarded as having been laid down during a tsunami event by non-cohesive and sediment-laden subaqueous density flows. Interpretations of the principal sediment-depositing mechanisms effective in the tsunami surges rely largely on field observations of deposit geometry and internal sedimentary characteristics. This example comprises two erosively based sedimentation units that were probably deposited by successive waves in the tsunami wave train. The Lower Unit consists of a clast-supported, polymodal, boulder-bearing breccia composed mostly of angular clasts and fewer well-rounded clasts. Framework components are mostly chaotic but may also exhibit either inverse-to-normal grading or crude normal grading. Laterally, changes in characters of depositional facies are common and abrupt. The sand-sized, bioclastic-rich matrix is poorly sorted and very similar to the underlying lower shoreface bioclastic sandstone, implying that soft sediments eroded at the lower erosional surface contributed to the tsunami deposit. The bulk of the Upper Unit is a poorly sorted, breccia-bearing sandstone. Pebbles and cobbles are scattered, massive or normally graded. Sporadic outsized boulders, emplaced as debris fall deposits, may occur along the erosional base. An array of signatures, such as unusually coarse grain size in comparison to the surrounding deposits, erosional bases, the mixed sources of sediments, multiple erosional and depositional events, normal size grading or massive texture, are all considered distinctive features of tsunamigenic deposits. Backwash deposition is indicated by the incorporation within the tsunami deposits of sediments derived from mixed sources, such as angular clasts from nearby subaerial settings, rounded clasts reworked from beach gravels, and bioclastic sand eroded from

  15. Marine bird specimen, marine bird sighting, and other data from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 24 July 1979 to 19 November 1982 (NODC Accession 8300058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird specimen, marine bird sighting, and other data were collected from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR from 24 July 1979 to 19 November 1982. Data were collected by...

  16. Marine bird sighting, marine toxic substance, and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-03-25 to 1978-05-02 (NODC Accession 7900171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting, marine toxic substance, and other data were collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from 25 March 1976 to 02 May 1978. Data...

  17. Marine mammal specimen and marine animal sighting data from the USCGC POLAR STAR and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 25 February 1981 to 04 December 1981 (NODC Accession 8300129)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and marine animal sighting data were collected from the USCGC POLAR STAR and other platforms from 25 February 1981 to 04 December 1981. Data...

  18. Testing the application of quartz and feldspar luminescence dating to MIS 5 Japanese marine deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, Christine; Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Tokuyasu, Kayoko

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of both quartz and feldspar luminescence dating was tested on twenty-five samples from a marine succession now forming a coastal cliff at Oga Peninsula, Honshu Island, Japan. The quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal shows thermal instability and linear modulated...

  19. Sedimentation and paleoecology of Pliocene lagoonal-shallow marine deposits on the island of Rhodes (Greece)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekman, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the depositional and paleontological characteristics of a section of the Pliocene Kritika Formation on the island of Rhodos is presented. The environmental significance of sedimentary structures, the paleoecology of benthonic Foraminifera, and the sequentional

  20. Influence of Late Paleozoic Gondwana glaciations on the depositional evolution of the northern Pangean shelf, North Greenland, Svalbard and the Barents Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stemmerik, Lars

    2008-01-01

    fluctuations linked to the 100 k.y. Milankovitch cycle. The stratigraphic distribution of subaerial exposure surfaces indicates that during Late Carboniferous-Early Permian time, the northern Pangea shelf repeatedly changed from being a shallow subtropical carbonate platform to a vast subaerially exposed...

  1. Sulfate-reducing bacteria inhabiting natural corrosion deposits from marine steel structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Païssé, Sandrine; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Marty, Florence; Abbas, Ben; Gueuné, Hervé; Amaya, José Maria Sanchez; Muyzer, Gerard; Quillet, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, investigations were conducted on natural corrosion deposits to better understand the role of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the accelerated corrosion process of carbon steel sheet piles in port environments. We describe the abundance and diversity of total and metabolically active SRB within five natural corrosion deposits located within tidal or low water zone and showing either normal or accelerated corrosion. By using molecular techniques, such as quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis, and sequence cloning based on 16S rRNA, dsrB genes, and their transcripts, we demonstrated a clear distinction between SRB population structure inhabiting normal or accelerated low-water corrosion deposits. Although SRB were present in both normal and accelerated low-water corrosion deposits, they dominated and were exclusively active in the inner and intermediate layers of accelerated corrosion deposits. We also highlighted that some of these SRB populations are specific to the accelerated low-water corrosion deposit environment in which they probably play a dominant role in the sulfured corrosion product enrichment.

  2. Sedimentology and chronology of the advance and retreat of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet on the continental shelf west of Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jared L.; Benetti, Sara; Dunlop, Paul; Ó Cofaigh, Colm; Moreton, Steven G.; Wheeler, Andrew J.; Clark, Christopher D.

    2016-05-01

    The last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) had extensive marine-terminating margins and was drained by multiple large ice streams and is thus a useful analogue for marine-based areas of modern ice sheets. However, despite recent advances from investigating the offshore record of the BIIS, the dynamic history of its marine margins, which would have been sensitive to external forcing(s), remain inadequately understood. This study is the first reconstruction of the retreat dynamics and chronology of the western, marine-terminating, margin of the last (Late Midlandian) BIIS. Analyses of shelf geomorphology and core sedimentology and chronology enable a reconstruction of the Late Midlandian history of the BIIS west of Ireland, from initial advance to final retreat onshore. Five AMS radiocarbon dates from marine cores constrain the timing of retreat and associated readvances during deglaciation. The BIIS advanced without streaming or surging, depositing a bed of highly consolidated subglacial traction till, and reached to within ˜20 km of the shelf break by ˜24,000 Cal BP. Ice margin retreat was likely preceded by thinning, grounding zone retreat and ice shelf formation on the outer shelf by ˜22,000 Cal BP. This ice shelf persisted for ≤2500 years, while retreating at a minimum rate of ˜24 m/yr and buttressing a >150-km long, 20-km wide, bathymetrically-controlled grounding zone. A large (˜150 km long), arcuate, flat-topped grounding-zone wedge, termed here the Galway Lobe Grounding-Zone Wedge (GLGZW), was deposited below this ice shelf and records a significant stillstand in BIIS retreat. Geomorphic relationships indicate that the BIIS experienced continued thinning during its retreat across the shelf, which led to increased topographic influence on its flow dynamics following ice shelf break up and grounding zone retreat past the GLGZW. At this stage of retreat the western BIIS was comprised of several discrete, asynchronous lobes that underwent several readvances

  3. Chemistry and fish status of 67 acidified lakes at the coast of Aust-Agder, Southern Norway, in relation to post-glacial marine deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Hindar, A.; Kleiven, E.

    1990-01-01

    67 lakes in a 0-15 km wide coastal zone within Aust-Agder County in Southern Norway have been investigated. The area receives 1,5 g S/m² and, 1,7 g N/m² as wet deposition. All lakes had about the same concentration of non-marine sulphate. Lakes in southwest were significantly less influenced by post-glacial marine deposits and markedly more acidified than lakes in the northeastern part of the region. Twentyone, probably 23, of the lakes were barren of fish. Lakes with pH higher than 5,5 in Ma...

  4. Biologically induced deposition of fine suspended particles by filter-feeding bivalves in land-based industrial marine aquaculture wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Shaojun; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67 ± 0.99 cm) and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43 ± 0.98 cm) was 77.84 ± 7.77 and 6.37 ± 0.67 mg ind(-1) • d(-1), respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS) deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73 ± 0.27 and 2.76 ± 0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products.

  5. Simulations of the impact of high pulse atmospheric deposition events on a low nutrient low chlorophyll (LNLC) marine ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulaki, Sylvia; Petihakis, George; Tsiaras, Konstantinos; Triantafyllou, George; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Kanakidou, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Nutrient availability controls ocean productivity and partitioning of carbon between the ocean and atmosphere, mediated by the limiting potential of macro and micronutrients such as N, P, Fe and Si. Atmospheric deposition is a major pathway for nutrient delivery with potential to alter the role of the ocean from a sink to a source of CO2 and vice versa. Mediterranean region is of interest for both its marine and atmospheric environments. Its Sea is one of the world's most oligotrophic regions in terms of both primary productivity and chlorophyll-a concentration. Its atmosphere is a cross road of air masses of distinct origin highly affected by both natural and anthropogenic emissions. These emissions strongly interact in the atmosphere, due to the high photochemical activity in the area, leading to the formation of nutrients such as nitrogen compounds. Dust aerosols from the African continent are also affecting the area and act as carriers of nutrients such as iron and phosphorus. In the Eastern Basin, where nutrient riverine inputs are very low, wet and dry atmospheric inputs of N and P are the main source of new nutrients in the euphotic zone of the open sea, particularly during the stratification period. In the present study, the impact of an intense atmospheric nitrogen and phosphorus deposition pulse event on the marine ecosystem in the East Mediterranean Sea is investigated. This is achieved by coupling atmospheric and sea water observations with a 1-D ocean physical-biogeochemical model, set up for the Cretan Sea as a representative E. Mediterranean open sea area (Christodoulaki et al., 2012, Journal of Marine Systems, doi: 10.1016/j.jmarsys.2012.07.007). Atmospheric deposition measurements of Dissolved Inorganic Phosphorous and Nitrogen are obtained from the station of Finokalia, shown to be a representative background station for atmospheric observations in the area, whereas, oceanographic data are obtained from the M3A station. Analysis of this high pulse

  6. Four new species of free-living marine nematodes of the family Desmodoridae (Nematoda: Desmodorida) and a redescription of Desmodora nini (Inglis, 1963) from the continental shelf off northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrazábal-Filho, Alexandre L; Silva, Maria Cristina Da; Esteves, André M

    2015-09-24

    Four new species of marine nematodes were collected from the continental shelf of the Potiguar Basin in northeastern Brazil. Zalonema vicentei sp. n. and Zalonema mariae sp. n. are characterized by having multispiral fovea amphidialis, lateral alae and ventral ala. These features also are found in Pseudochromadora, Desmodorella and Psammonema. They differ in the cephalic arrangement, and shape of the cephalic capsule and the fovea amphidialis. Croconema fortis sp. n. resembles Desmodora in the shape of the fovea amphidialis and cephalic capsule, but differs in the number of subcephalic setae and ornamentation on the cuticule. Desmodora paraconica sp. n. is characterized by the loop-shaped fovea amphidialis and the long conical-cylindrical tail. This species is similar to the genus Bolbonema, but differs in having the cephalic setae anterior to the fovea amphidialis. Desmodora nini is redescribed, to record details lacking in the original description.

  7. Late Pleistocene to Holocene sedimentation and hydrocarbon seeps on the continental shelf of a steep, tectonically active margin, southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Lorenson, T.D.; Ryan, Holly F.; Wong, Florence L.; Sliter, Ray W.; Conrad, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Small, steep, uplifting coastal watersheds are prolific sediment producers that contribute significantly to the global marine sediment budget. This study illustrates how sedimentation evolves in one such system where the continental shelf is largely sediment-starved, with most terrestrial sediment bypassing the shelf in favor of deposition in deeper basins. The Santa Barbara-Ventura coast of southern California, USA, is considered a classic area for the study of active tectonics and of Tertiary and Quaternary climatic evolution, interpretations of which depend upon an understanding of sedimentation patterns. High-resolution seismic-reflection data over >570 km2 of this shelf show that sediment production is concentrated in a few drainage basins, with the Ventura and Santa Clara River deltas containing most of the upper Pleistocene to Holocene sediment on the shelf. Away from those deltas, the major factor controlling shelf sedimentation is the interaction of wave energy with coastline geometry. Depocenters containing sediment 5-20 m thick exist opposite broad coastal embayments, whereas relict material (bedrock below a regional unconformity) is exposed at the sea floor in areas of the shelf opposite coastal headlands. Locally, natural hydrocarbon seeps interact with sediment deposition either to produce elevated tar-and-sediment mounds or as gas plumes that hinder sediment settling. As much as 80% of fluvial sediment delivered by the Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers is transported off the shelf (some into the Santa Barbara Basin and some into the Santa Monica Basin via Hueneme Canyon), leaving a shelf with relatively little recent sediment accumulation. Understanding factors that control large-scale sediment dispersal along a rapidly uplifting coast that produces substantial quantities of sediment has implications for interpreting the ancient stratigraphic record of active and transform continental margins, and for inferring the distribution of hydrocarbon resources

  8. Geomorphology, facies architecture, and high-resolution, non-marine sequence stratigraphy in avulsion deposits, Cumberland Marshes, Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, K. M.

    2001-02-01

    This paper demonstrates field relationships between landforms, facies, and high-resolution sequences in avulsion deposits. It defines the building blocks of a prograding avulsion sequence from a high-resolution sequence stratigraphy perspective, proposes concepts in non-marine sequence stratigraphy and flood basin evolution, and defines the continental equivalent to a parasequence. The geomorphic features investigated include a distributary channel and its levee, the Stage I crevasse splay of Smith et al. (Sedimentology, vol. 36 (1989) 1), and the local backswamp. Levees and splays have been poorly studied in the past, and three-dimensional (3D) studies are rare. In this study, stratigraphy is defined from the finest scale upward and facies are mapped in 3D. Genetically related successions are identified by defining a hierarchy of bounding surfaces. The genesis, architecture, geometry, and connectivity of facies are explored in 3D. The approach used here reveals that avulsion deposits are comparable in process, landform, facies, bounding surfaces, and scale to interdistributary bayfill, i.e. delta lobe deposits. Even a simple Stage I splay is a complex landform, composed of several geomorphic components, several facies and many depositional events. As in bayfill, an alluvial ridge forms as the feeder crevasse and its levees advance basinward through their own distributary mouth bar deposits to form a Stage I splay. This produces a shoestring-shaped concentration of disconnected sandbodies that is flanked by wings of heterolithic strata, that join beneath the terminal mouth bar. The proposed results challenge current paradigms. Defining a crevasse splay as a discrete sandbody potentially ignores 70% of the landform's volume. An individual sandbody is likely only a small part of a crevasse splay complex. The thickest sandbody is a terminal, channel associated feature, not a sheet that thins in the direction of propagation. The three stage model of splay evolution

  9. Marine bird specimen and other data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 29 June 1975 to 25 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8100481)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird specimen and other data were collected from 29 June 1975 to 25 August 1979. Data were collected by the University of California (UC) as part of the Outer...

  10. Marine bird habitat and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) for 1976-07-24 (NODC Accession 7601880)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird habitat and other data were collected from aircraft from 24 July 1976 to 24 July 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish and...

  11. Marine bird sighting and other data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 September 1976 to 15 September 1978 (NODC Accession 8100591)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from 01 September 1976 to 15 September 1978. Data were collected by the Point Reyes Bird Observatory (PRBO) as...

  12. Marine animal sighting and census data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 10 July 1978 to 29 August 1978 (NODC Accession 7900078)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from 10 July 1978 to 29 August 1978. Data were collected by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of...

  13. Feeding ecology of marine birds in the nearshore waters of Kodiak Island: Final report to the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The feeding habits of marine birds in the nearshore waters of Kodiak Island were studied during winter 1976-1977 and February 1978 and during summer 1977 and 1978....

  14. Marine mammal specimen and other data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 February 1975 to 03 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7800649)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected from 01 February 1975 to 03 September 1975. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish and Game...

  15. Biologically induced deposition of fine suspended particles by filter-feeding bivalves in land-based industrial marine aquaculture wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhou

    Full Text Available Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67 ± 0.99 cm and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43 ± 0.98 cm was 77.84 ± 7.77 and 6.37 ± 0.67 mg ind(-1 • d(-1, respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73 ± 0.27 and 2.76 ± 0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P < 0.001. Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P < 0.05. It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products.

  16. Sedimentation and paleoecology of Pliocene lagoonal-shallow marine deposits on the island of Rhodes (Greece)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekman, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the depositional and paleontological characteristics of a section of the Pliocene Kritika Formation on the island of Rhodos is presented. The environmental significance of sedimentary structures, the paleoecology of benthonic Foraminifera, and the sequentional arrangement of s

  17. Corrosion of aluminium in copper-aluminium couples under a marine environment: Influence of polyaniline deposited onto copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, Rosa, E-mail: rvera@ucv.c [Instituto de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avda. Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile); Verdugo, Patricia [Departamento de Quimica y Bioquimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaiso, Av. Gran Bretana 1111, Valparaiso (Chile); Orellana, Marco; Munoz, Eduardo [Instituto de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avda. Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The presence of Polyaniline in the Al-Cu system produces a decrease in the oxygen reduction reaction. {yields} In the marine enviroment, aluminium in Al-Cu couples, suffers pitting and exfoliation. {yields} The aluminium deterioration increases with chloride and enviromental sulphur dioxide presence, mainly when it is united to bare copper. - Abstract: In this study, we examined how aluminium corrosion in Al-Cu/PANI galvanic couples in a marine environment is influenced by deposition of polyaniline (PANI) on copper. Polarization curves and immersion assays in 0.1 M NaCl were performed. The morphologies of etched Al and corrosion products were observed by SEM, and the Al ions in solution were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A reduction in aluminium damage due to galvanic corrosion was observed as a result of decreased effective area for the oxygen reduction reaction on Cu/PANI electrode. Furthermore, an electrochemical reduction of PANI from leucoemeraldine to emeraldine base is proposed.

  18. Fluvial depositional environment evolving into deltaic setting with marine influences in the buntsandstein of northern vosges (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Jean-Claude

    supersaturation of stagnant waters with time. The fluvial environment persists up to the lower part of the Grès à Voltzia where the progression of the sea towards the west gives rise to a close intertonguing of fluvial and marine influences in a deltaic setting. Lenticular sandstone bodies are laid down as stream mouth bars at the end of the distributary channels and as river bars in the watercourses during both normal and flood discharge. Silty-clayey sediments settle out in stagnant water in restricted ponds, pools and puddles as well as in extensive veneers of shallow water in the overbank plain between the streams. Carbonate-bearing deposits originate in the coastal littoral mud flat, marsh seam, beach belt and tidal flat. The Grès à Voltzia has the greatest palaeoenvironmental and palaeoecological significance in the Buntsandstein of the Northern Vosges due to the occurrence of a wealth of extraordinarily well-preserved plant and animal fossils (having been recovered by Louis Grauvogel during almost 50 years and since abt. 25 years by Jean-Claude Gall). The rich suite of faunal and floral elements includes aquatic invertebrates, terrestrial animals and continental plants. The aquatic invertebrate fauna lives in fresh lakes and brackish ponds in the overbank plain and in brackish lagoons in the coastal seam as well as in hypersaline and euhaline marginal marine waters. The terrestrial plants colonize both dry and wet substrates, and the continental fauna consists of mainly arthropods, amphibians and reptiles inhabiting the levee zones of standing and flowing waters and strolling across the desiccated flats. The marine euryhaline association of invertebrates is with time replaced by a stenohaline community, and the deltaic plain of the Grès à Voltzia is finally inundated by a pellicular transgression representing the first stage of the Muschelkalk sea setting an end to Buntsandstein continental deposition.

  19. Origin of ferricretes in fluvial-marine deposits of the Lower Cenomanian Bahariya Formation, Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Lawrence H.; Khalifa, Mohamed A.

    2010-03-01

    The type section of the Lower Cenomanian Bahariya Formation at Gebel El-Dist (Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert), Egypt, comprises claystones, mudstones, siltstones and sandstones deposited in fluvial-deltaic coastal plain, lagoonal, estuarine and shallow marine environments. The formation is characterized by an abundance of ferruginous sandstones that locally weather to form prominent iron crusts. These centimeter to decimeter-scale ferruginous horizons display a continuum of features ranging from unaltered sandstone with a pervasive ferruginous matrix to distinct ironstone beds with massive, nodular, vesicular and pisolitic textures. Ferruginous sandstone typically occurs at the tops of sandstone beds, or bracketing the base and top of beds, in the fining-upward cycles of deltaic plain deposits in the lower part of the formation and on a low-energy fluvial floodplain in the middle of the formation. Indurated ironstone beds occur mainly as the caps of coarsening-upward cycles of prograding shoreface sediments through much of the formation. We interpret the ironstone crusts as ferricretes, formed by iron accumulation that resulted from the oxidation and precipitation of soluble iron or colloids transported in the sediment load or by groundwater. This accumulation possibly took place at the water table or possibly below the water table at the fresh water/saline water interface. However, base-level fall and subsequent subaerial exposure of the sediments resulted in reworking and pedogenic modification of some of the iron-impregnated horizons.

  20. Doomed pioneers: Gravity-flow deposition and bioturbation in marine oxygen-deficient environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föilmi, Karl B.; Grimm, Kurt A.

    1990-11-01

    Isolated horizons of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes burrows appear in exclusive association with gravity-flow deposits within sequences of nonbioturbated hernipelagic sedimentary rocks of the Miocene Monterey Formation of California and the Oligocene-Miocene San Gregorio Formation of Baja California. These burrowed levels are not associated with other ichnogenera such as Zoophycos and Chondrites. We infer a causal relation between gravity flow deposition and the presence of Thalassinoides and Gyrolithes and suggest that these gravity flows entrained thalassinidean crustacea. Upon deposition in oxygen-deficient environments, the surviving borrowers reworked substantial quantities of aminated, commonly organic-rich sediments in an environment from which they were previously excluded. The persistence of or the ecologically rapid return to oxygen-depleted conditions limited the survival time and ecological complexity of the transported infaunal dwellers and rendered them doomed pioneers. Ecological and physiological data support this hypothesis: thalassinidean crustacea have the capability to endure turbulent transport and survive up to 5-7 days of anoxia without being severely limited in their biological activities. The accurate recognition of doomed pioneer trace-fossil assemblages as ephemeral ecological phenomena in otherwise laminated successions may contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of paleo-oxygen levels and basin history.

  1. Modelling of marine base cation emissions, concentrations and deposition in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Werner

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Base cations exert a large impact on various geochemical and geophysical processes both in the atmosphere and at the Earth surface. One of the essential roles of these compounds is impact on surface pH causing an increase in alkalinity and neutralizing the effects of acidity generated by sulphur and nitrogen deposition. During recent years anthropogenic emissions of base cations in the UK have decreased substantially, by about 70%, 78%, 75% and 48% for Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+, respectively, over the period 1990–2006. For the island regions, such as the UK, the main source of base cation particles is the aerosol produced from the sea surface. Here, the sea salt aerosol (SSA emissions are calculated with parameterisations proposed by Mårtensson et al. (2003 for ultra fine particles, Monahan et al. (1986 for fine particles and Smith and Harisson (1998 for coarse particles continuously with a 0.1 μm size step using WRF-modelled wind speed data at a 5 km × 5 km grid square resolution with a 3 h time step for two selected years 2003 and 2006. SSA production has been converted into base cation emissions, with the assumption that the chemical composition of the particle emitted from the sea surface is equal to the chemical composition of sea water, and used as input data in the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange Model (FRAME. FRAME model annual mean concentrations and total wet deposition at a 5 km × 5 km grid resolution, are compared with concentrations in air and wet deposition from the National Monitoring Network and measurements based estimates of UK deposition budget. The correlation coefficient for wet deposition achieves high values (R = 0.8 for Na+ and Mg2+, whereas for Ca2+ the correlation is poor (R < 0.3. Base cation concentrations are also represented well, with some overestimations on the west coast and underestimations in the

  2. Interactions among contaminant exposure route, kinetics and toxicity in marine deposit-feeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selck, Henriette

    as the organic model compound, and cadmium (Cd) as the inorganic compound. Worms were exposed either to dissolved (i.e. ... in this thesis, and earlier published literature, that exposure route does matter both for toxicokinetics and toxicity (i.e. critical body residue) of inorganic- and organic contaminants. Exposure to dissolved contaminants resulted in a lower body-burden, reduced elimination rate and increased toxicity (i......Many of the chemicals having the greatest likelihood of causing damage in ecological systems, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals are of persistent and/or hydrophobic character. Deposit-feeders may be important in facilitating the removal of organic contaminants from bulk...

  3. Interactions among contaminant exposure route, kinetics and toxicity in marine deposit-feeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selck, Henriette

    Many of the chemicals having the greatest likelihood of causing damage in ecological systems, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals are of persistent and/or hydrophobic character. Deposit-feeders may be important in facilitating the removal of organic contaminants from bulk...... the downward transport of Flu in sediment. This thesis highlights the importance of particle ingestion as a pathway whereby contaminants can enter benthic food webs and of tracing both parent compound and metabolic products in all compartments of benthic systems. Therefore, in order to develop reliable...

  4. Late Quaternary Advance and Retreat of an East Antarctic Ice Shelf System: Insights from Sedimentary Beryllium-10 Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitard, M. E.; Shevenell, A.; Domack, E. W.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Observed retreat of Antarctica's marine-based glaciers and the presence of warm (~2°C) modified Circumpolar Deep Water on Antarctica's continental shelves imply ocean temperatures may influence Antarctic cryosphere stability. A paucity of information regarding Late Quaternary East Antarctic cryosphere-ocean interactions makes assessing the variability, timing, and style of deglacial retreat difficult. Marine sediments from Prydz Bay, East Antarctica contain hemipelagic siliceous mud and ooze units (SMO) alternating with glacial marine sediments. The record suggests Late Quaternary variability of local outlet glacier systems, including the Lambert Glacier/Amery Ice Shelf system that drains 15% of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. We present a refined radiocarbon chronology and beryllium-10 (10Be) record of Late Quaternary depositional history in Prydz Channel, seaward of the Amery Ice Shelf system, which provides insight into the timing and variability of this important outlet glacier system. We focus on three piston cores (NBP01-01, JPC 34, 35, 36; 750 m water depth) that contain alternating SMO and granulated units uninterrupted by glacial till; the record preserves a succession of glacial marine deposits that pre-date the Last Glacial Maximum. We utilize the ramped pyrolysis preparatory method to improve the bulk organic carbon 14C-based chronology for Prydz Channel. To determine if the SMO intervals reflect open water conditions or sub-ice shelf advection, we measured sedimentary 10Be concentrations. Because ice cover affects 10Be pathways through the water column, sedimentary concentrations should provide information on past depositional environments in Prydz Channel. In Prydz Channel sediments, 10Be concentrations are generally higher in SMO units and lower in glacial units, suggesting Late Quaternary fluctuations in the Amery Ice Shelf. Improved chronologic constraints indicate that these fluctuations occurred on millennial timescales during the Last Glacial

  5. A ∼ 3000 years-old sequence of extreme events revealed by marine and shore deposits east of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallemand, Serge; Lehu, Rémi; Rétif, Fabien; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Babonneau, Nathalie; Ratzov, Gueorgui; Bassetti, Maria-Angela; Dezileau, Laurent; Hsieh, Meng-Long; Dominguez, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    We have discovered in a marine core, located 20 km east of the Coastal Range of Taiwan at the top of a 1200 m deep submarine high, sheltered from rivers discharges and gravitational flows, a 23 cm-thick anomalous sequence topped with broken bivalves and wood fragments. Based on radiocarbon dating, we distinguish five sub-events within ∼ 100 yrs, about 3000 years ago. The oldest four sub-events are interpreted as the record of local submarine landslides, likely triggered by clustered earthquakes that are common in this tectonically active area. The last event including shells and wood has a different origin. Despite the high level of climatic and tectonic recent activity, no comparable event has been observed at the same site since that time, making it unique during the last 3.75 ka. Hydrodynamical modeling stimulated with a set of submarine landslide-triggered tsunami sources and combined with the regional oceanic circulation dominated by the Kuroshio Current, allow us to better constrain the transport paths of the suspended material, the expected run-up at the coast, and ultimately the trigger and source that best fit our observations. The Kuroshio Current appears as a strong constraint that generally prevents cross-shore transport of suspended material even during a major tsunami. Since the largest aerial debris flow observed along the east coast of Taiwan during the last 4 ka was synchronous with the marine deposit, our preferred scenario starts with the occurrence of four distinct large earthquakes within less than a century, triggering both submarine and aerial landslides in the study area. Then, a giant typhoon reworked the nearshore material as well as the slided material stored upstream resulting in a debris flow. It deeply modified the surface current, allowing the wood debris and shells to fastly reach the core site.

  6. Interactions among contaminant exposure route, kinetics and toxicity in marine deposit-feeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selck, Henriette

    Many of the chemicals having the greatest likelihood of causing damage in ecological systems, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals are of persistent and/or hydrophobic character. Deposit-feeders may be important in facilitating the removal of organic contaminants from bulk...... remained limited and unaffected by organic matter quality. Organic matter quality associated with ingested sediment particles did not affect net accumulation in A. filiformis, and bioaccumulation was not a result of equilibrium partitioning between organism lipid content and organic content of the sediment...... the downward transport of Flu in sediment. This thesis highlights the importance of particle ingestion as a pathway whereby contaminants can enter benthic food webs and of tracing both parent compound and metabolic products in all compartments of benthic systems. Therefore, in order to develop reliable...

  7. Depositional environment, ichnological features and oxygenation of Permian to earliest Triassic marine sediments in central Spitsbergen, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Uchman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Late Early Permian–lowermost Triassic carbonate, siliceous (spiculites and clastic marine sediments in the Marmierfjellet area (Isfjorden, central Spitsbergen contain a relatively diverse and abundant trace fossil assemblage providing important information about the depositional processes. The Vøringen Member (Late Artinskian–Kungurian of the Kapp Starostin Formation (Late Artinskian–? Changhsingian contains trace fossils (Nereites, Phycosiphon, Zoophycos and Arenicolites—common in tempestites typical of the proximal–archetypal Cruziana ichnofacies, which indicates lower shoreface. Nereites, Phycosiphon and Zoophycos, accompanied by other rare trace fossils, characterize the Svenskegga and Hovtinden members of the Kapp Starostin Formation. They are interpreted as the distal Cruziana ichnofacies, possibly transitional to the Zoophycos ichnofacies typical of the lower offshore zone. However, the sporadic occurrences of Arenicolites and Macaronichnus can point to episodic shallowing to upper offshore–lower shoreface. The lowest part of the Triassic Vikinghøgda Formation (Induan–Olenekian contains a very low-diverse ichnoassemblage composed of a few simple and branched forms ascribed to the impoverished Cruziana ichnofacies (lower to upper offshore environment, which is attributed to the early recovery stage after the Permian–Triassic extinction. The trace fossils and loss of primary sedimentary structures caused by intense bioturbation throughout most of the section point to generally oxygenated pore waters on the sea floor. However, some horizons, especially laminated black shales, display reduced or no bioturbational activity. These horizons also show high V/(V+Ni ratios, which indicate oxygen-depleted sediments with periods of anoxic conditions. A remarkable black shale unit deposited under anoxic and sulphidic conditions occurs at the Permian–Triassic transition.

  8. Effect of pH on mechanical, physical and tribological properties of electroless Ni-P-Al2O3 composite deposits for marine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julka, Sahil; Ansari, Mohd Imran; Thakur, Dineshsingh G.

    2016-12-01

    Successful co-deposition of fine particulate matter within an Electroless Nickel-Phosphorous (ENi-P) matrix is dependent on various factors like bath composition, particle compatibility with metallic matrix, bath reactivity (pH), particle size and their distribution. ENi-P deposits incorporating Al2O3/Alumina in a disperse phase have varied effects on properties and attributes like surface roughness ( Ra), microhardness, wear resistance, corrosion resistance and surface morphology of the deposits obtained. This paper experimentally investigates the effect of alumina (1.55 g/L) on Ra, microhardness, surface morphology, deposition rate, wettability, wear resistance and corrosion resistance of ENi-P-Al2O3 composite deposits on mild steel substrates at bath pH 5, 7 and 9. Study reveals that optimum deposit parameters and deposition rates are achieved with bath pH. However, not much study has been undertaken concerning composite deposits obtained from higher bath pH or basic bath. This is attributable to the fact that at higher bath pH or alkaline baths, the bath gets unstable and eventually degrades or decomposes, thereby resulting in sub optimal or poor deposition. Hence, experimental investigations carried out by preparing suitable baths, operating under optimum conditions, and enabling successful composite deposition in acidic and alkaline baths have revealed that there is a significant improvement in the above mentioned properties of the as-deposited composite deposits, as the pH is increased from pH 5 to pH 9. This aspect can therefore be advantageously utilized for preparing various marine components like fasteners, nuts, bolts, washers, pipes, cables, components having relative motion etc.

  9. Marine biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  10. Calibration and validation of a one-dimensional complex marine biogeochemical flux model in different areas of the northern Adriatic shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vichi

    Full Text Available In this paper we show results from numerical simulations carried out with a complex biogeochemical fluxes model coupled with a one-dimensional high-resolution hydrodynamical model and implemented at three different locations of the northern Adriatic shelf. One location is directly affected by the Po River influence, one has more open-sea characteristics and one is located in the Gulf of Trieste with an intermediate behavior; emphasis is put on the comparison with observations and on the functioning of the northern Adriatic ecosystem in the three areas. The work has been performed in a climatological context and has to be considered as preliminary to the development of three-dimensional numerical simulations. Biogeochemical model parameterizations have been ameliorated with a detailed description of bacterial substrate utilization associated with the quality of the dissolved organic matter (DOM, in order to improve the models capability in capturing the observed DOM dynamics in the basin. The coupled model has been calibrated and validated at the three locations by means of climatological data sets. Results show satisfactory model behavior in simulating local seasonal dynamics in the limit of the available boundary conditions and the one-dimensional implementation. Comparisons with available measurements of primary and bacterial production and bacterial abundances have been performed in all locations. Model simulated rates and bacterial dynamics are in the same order of magnitude of observations and show a qualitatively correct time evolution. The importance of temperature as a factor controlling bacteria efficiency is investigated with sensitivity experiments on the model parameterizations.

    The different model behavior and pelagic ecosystem structure developed by the model at the three locations can be attributed to the local hydrodynamical features and interactions with external inputs of nutrients. The onset

  11. Spatial distribution of southern brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus subtilis on the Amazon continental shelf: a fishery, marine geology and GIS integrated approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah E. G. Martins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The spatial distribution of the southern brown shrimp Farfantepenaeus subtilis (Pérez-Farfante, 1967 was studied based on industrial fishing fleet activities and is associated with geological and oceanographic characteristics of the benthonic environments on the Amazon continental shelf. Using a geographical information system (GIS this paper sought to calculate the relative abundance of brown shrimp based on catch per unit effort (CPUE and compare it with bathymetry, type of sedimentary structure, sedimentation rate and bottom salinity. As a result, we have concluded that the relative abundance (in terms of CPUE is not uniformly distributed in space. Spatial analysis indicates that commercial trawling efforts were made in the (foreset region of the subaqueous Amazon delta at depths of 40 to 60 m. In this region, prawn are responsible for the bioturbation of the sediments and the creation of a sedimentary structure called mottled mud. In the foreset region, sedimentation rates progressively increased up to 10 cm.yr-1; re-suspension was reduced and bottom salinity was high (~ 36. It appears that all of these factors define a stable muddy area with intense bioturbation. This notable biological activity is to be explained by the occurrence of a high F. subtilis abundance that appears to originate in a microbial loop. We concluded that by combining fishery information with environmental data from a GIS, it was possible to identify abundance distribution patterns for southern brown shrimp and other economically important fishery resources and to understand how they change on a large spatial-scale.

  12. Tidal shelf sedimentation in the Neoproterozoic Chattisgarh succession of central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarbani Patranabis Deb

    2005-06-01

    The Neoproterozoic Kansapathar Sandstone of the Chattisgarh basin, a shallow marine shelf bar sequence, consists of mineralogically and texturally mature sandstones with subordinate siltstones, mudstones and conglomerates. The sediments were transported, reworked and deposited in subtidal environments by strong tidal currents of macrotidal regime as well as storms, and accumulated as discrete shoaling-upward features, separated from each other by muddy to low-energy sandy deposits. The sandbodies developed into shoaling up linear bars, often more than a kilometre in length, through accretion of thick cross-stratified units in transverse directions under the influence of ebb and flood tidal currents, as well as in longitudinal direction affected by southeasterly flowing along-shore currents. The aggrading upper surfaces of the bars experienced protracted reworking by strong oscillatory wave currents leading to extensive development of subaqueous 2D or 3D dunes mantled with lag pebble deposits at different points. With continued shoaling and progradation, thebars amalgamated into large sandstone sheets with the development of high energy beach depositsand coastal sand flats in the uppermost part of the sequence. The presence of rill marks, flat-topped ripples, wrinkle marks, desiccation cracks and adhesion warts point to intertidal conditions with intermittent exposure. The high energy sandstone bars overlie a thick mudstone-dominated shelf sequence across a sharp interface indicating rapid change in the sea-level, provenance, rate of sediment generation and sediment input, and circulation condition in the shelf. A quiet muddy shelf was replaced by a major sand-depositing environment with strong, open marine circulation. An interplay of tidal currents, oscillatory wave currents and storm currents generated a complex flow pattern that varied in time and space from bimodal-bipolar to strongly unimodal flows. Close parallelism of wave ripple crests, trend of linear bars

  13. Shelf erosion and submarine river canyons: implications for deep-sea oxygenation and ocean productivity during glaciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tsandev

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The areal exposure of continental shelves during glacial sea level lowering enhanced the transfer of erodible reactive organic matter to the open ocean. Sea level fall also activated submarine canyons thereby allowing large rivers to deposit their particulate load, via gravity flows, directly in the deep-sea. Here, we analyze the effects of shelf erosion and particulate matter re-routing to the open ocean during interglacial to glacial transitions, using a coupled model of the marine phosphorus, organic carbon and oxygen cycles. The results indicate that shelf erosion and submarine canyon formation may significantly lower deep-sea oxygen levels, by up to 25%, during sea level low stands, mainly due to the supply of new material from the shelves, and to a lesser extent due to particulate organic matter bypassing the coastal zone. Our simulations imply that deep-sea oxygen levels can drop significantly if eroded shelf material is deposited to the seafloor. Thus the glacial ocean's oxygen content could have been significantly lower than during interglacial stages. Primary production, organic carbon burial and dissolved phosphorus inventories are all affected by the erosion and rerouting mechanisms. However, re-routing of the continental and eroded shelf material to the deep-sea has the effect of decoupling deep-sea oxygen demand from primary productivity in the open ocean. P burial is also not affected showing a disconnection between the biogeochemical cycles in the water column and the P burial record.

  14. Geochemical and faunal investigation of shelf/slope environment of north-central Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy-Williams, N.; Trainor, D.M.; Williams, D.F.; Jenkins, P. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia (United States)); Gary, A. (Unocal, Brea, CA (United States))

    1991-03-01

    The shelf/slope environment of the northern Gulf of Mexico offers a complex pattern of marine and terrestrial derived sediments. The authors have performed geochemical and faunal investigations on approximately 80 box cores from 30 to 1,300 m water depth from the north-central Gulf of Mexico. The geochemical results relate the modern and late Holocene distribution of marine and terrestrial organic carbon to the present day depositional systems of this actively prograding system. Total organic carbon (%TOC) analyses of the surface sediment are used to characterize the distribution of TOC on the Louisiana shelf and slope as a function of distance from the Mississippi delta. Stable carbon isotopic analyses ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) of the TOC are used to distinguish marine from terrestrial organic carbon. Higher amounts of terrestrial organic carbon are associated with the western edge of the Mississippi delta. Marine organic carbon increases seaward of the deltaic system. The percentage of fine-grained (< 63 microns) calcium carbonate also increases seaward of the Mississippi delta as well as with lateral distance along the shelf-slope. Percent CaCO{sub 3} and {delta}{sup 13}C of the fine-grained carbonate determinations have been performed in Plio-Pleistocene cores and exploration wells from this region. The authors use this data to examine how the modern/late Holocene patterns of these variables have changed as a function of continental margin evolution. They have also analyzed the benthic foraminiferal distributions in terms of the sedimentary nature of the box cores. They note increased abundances in certain species in relation to deltaic vs nondeltaic environments along with some species altering their depth ranges between the two environments.

  15. Depositional, diagenetic and stratigraphic aspects of microfacies from Riachuelo Formation, Albian, Sergipe Basin, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Vinícius Gabrig Turbay

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The rocks of the Riachuelo Formation, Sergipe Basin, Brazil, represent an example of carbonate sedimentation related to the drift phase during the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. The Carapeba and Brejo quarries exhibit the best onshore outcrops of the drift carbonate section along the Brazilian continental edge. Field studies and microfacies analysis of the outcropped sedimentary section showed six sedimentary deposits related to the physiography of a carbonate shelf. Proximal mixed deposits are represented by the rich-terrigenous dolostone. Levels with alternate layers of fine grained sandstones and siltstones are here related to distal facies of submarine fans deposits. Mudstones with miliolids and textularids represent a lagoonal environment in a semi-restricted middle shelf. Packstones, grainstones and occasionally wackestones with oncoids, intraclasts and peloids represent sedimentary deposits related to the back of shallow sandy bars and environments at the interface with the lagoon. Grainstones whit ooliths, oncoids, intraclasts and bioclasts, with trough cross-bedding, represent a shallower shoreface environment over the shallow carbonate back on outer shelf. Cements and other post- depositional features suggest four different diagenetic environments: a marine phreatic diagenetic environment with active water circulation; b marine phreatic diagenetic environment with stagnant water; c freshwater phreatic diagenetic environment; d burial diagenetic environment. The sedimentary succession is formed by shallowing upward cycles overlain by a possible transgressive surface, which may indicate the passage of a lowstand to a transgressive system tract.

  16. Regional anomalies of hydrocarbon fluid saturation as a new source of data on promising oil and gas deposits in the Caspian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydenko, D. B.

    2016-10-01

    This paper analyzes the ratio of local and regional anomalies of fluid saturation identified in the southern margins of the Eastern European Platform by remote fluid indexation. A characteristic feature of this area is the very low background values in the initial field, i.e., local anomalies reflecting the deposits. Regional anomalies are mainly related to oil and gas accumulation zones. In the Middle Caspian areas studied, the regional field of the fluid saturation index is the background for local anomalies. We made an attempt to justify the hydrocarbon migration and generation zones as anomaly-forming zones of the regional anomalies. The correlation of oil and gas accumulation zones with the regional field anomalies was noted.

  17. Arctic Sediment Transport from Land to Sea - An Integrated Study of Coastal - Marine Processes and Deposits in Dicksonfjorden, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M.; Choi, K.; Forwick, M.; Howe, J. A.; Husum, K.; Korsun, S.; Maat, D.; Nam, S. I.

    2016-12-01

    Valleys and fjords are the key transport and storage systems for sediments and biogeochemical elements from high arctic landscapes to the ocean. Sediment and nutrient fluxes are important for the biochemical cycle in the fjords and eventually in the ocean, and are important input data to earth system models. At present, high latitude systems are underrepresented in such models (Russell, 2014). Dicksonfjorden is a fjord in the larger Isfjorden system, Central Spitsbergen, Svalbard. It has no direct glacial input, in contrast to fjords affected by tidewater glaciers. The sediment supply is very high and the inner fjord receives sediment from a tide-influenced delta. This study is part of a multidisciplinary project aiming at mapping and quantifying sediment types and dispersal patterns in present Arctic valley - fjord systems and is the first comprehensive study of the depositional system in Dicksonfjorden. The first field campaign took place in summer 2016, when detailed mapping of the tidal delta and the sea floor in the inner fjord, coring onshore and offshore and sampling for foraminifera, nutrients and microbial abundances were performed. The surface mapping is based on high-resolution drone images, which will be processed to a high-resolution digital elevation model, and the bathymetry and sediment distribution data from the sea floor has been collected with a Gavia Offshore Surveyor AUV, providing high-resolution bathymetry and backscatter data of the seabed. Core transects from the delta surface will be described and compared to marine cores from the fjord basin retrieved from R/V Helmer Hanssen. Sediment accumulation rates will be assessed from 210Pb and 137Cs radionuclides. Preliminary results on the physical and chemical characteristics of the sedimentation system in inner Dicksonfjorden will be presented and implications for the fjord ecosystem will be discussed. References Russell , J.L., 2014. Control on the Latitudinal distribution of climate processes

  18. Ni biogeochemical cycle through geological time: insights from Ni isotope variations in modern and ancient marine metallifereous deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, B.; Rouxel, O.; Ponzevera, E.; Sorensen, J. V.; Toner, B.; Bekker, A.

    2011-12-01

    Studies of isotopic composition of transition metals such as Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo as biogeochemical tracers became popular recently. Since Ni is ubiquitous in marine metallifereous deposits and its concentration in water column is coupled to that of nutrients, it has a potential as a biogeochemical tracer. Isotopic analyses were performed on a Neptune MC-ICP-MS using a double-spike correction method for instrumental mass bias. Deep-sea ferromanganese crusts have been used to establish a record of seawater over the last 60 Myr. Our results show that Fe-Mn crusts from both Atlantic and Pacific oceans are systematically enriched in heavy isotopes relative to Bulk Silicate Earth with δ60/58Ni values ranging from 0.30 to 1.80% (2se = 0.04%). In contrast, Iron Formations (IF) with ages ranging from 3.8 to 0.7 Gyr display a wider range of values with a striking negative Ni isotope excursion down to -2.46% (2se = 0.03%) in Neoproterozoic IF. Although correlation between Ni isotope compositions, Ni concentrations and BIFs ages seems to be lacking, several Ni isotope excursions to either positive or negative Ni isotope values are notable prior to 2.4 Gyr. Methanogens were likely abundant in Precambrian water column until they retreated to pore waters and local environments once the oceans were oxygenated after the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). They preferentially uptake light Ni isotopes leaving isotopically heavier Ni in oceans. Our Ni isotope record of Precambrian IF does not show a unidirectional change across the GOE implying that Ni isotope composition of the Archean oceans was not dominated by this metabolism. Preliminary Ni adsorption experiments on Fe-Mn oxy-hydroxides show a maximum fractionation factor between the mineral phase and aqueous solution of -1.00% (2se = 0.03%). Hence, isotopic variations in Fe-Mn crusts and IF cannot be simply explained by adsorption processes, but require changes in composition of either Ni sources (local or global) to seawater (e

  19. Corrosion and runoff rates of Cu and three Cu-alloys in marine environments with increasing chloride deposition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Zhang, Xian; Goidanich, Sara; Le Bozec, Nathalie; Herting, Gunilla; Leygraf, Christofer

    2014-02-15

    Bare copper sheet and three commercial Cu-based alloys, Cu15Zn, Cu4Sn and Cu5Al5Zn, have been exposed to four test sites in Brest, France, with strongly varying chloride deposition rates. The corrosion rates of all four materials decrease continuously with distance from the coast, i.e. with decreasing chloride load, and in the following order: Cu4Sn>Cu sheet>Cu15Zn>Cu5Al5Zn. The patina on all materials was composed of two main layers, Cu2O as the inner layer and Cu2(OH)3Cl as the outer layer, and with a discontinuous presence of CuCl in between. Additional minor patina constituents are SnO2 (Cu4Sn), Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2 (Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn) and Zn6Al2(OH)16CO3·4H2O/Zn2Al(OH)6Cl·2H2O/Zn5Cl2(OH)8·H2O and Al2O3 (Cu5Al5Zn). The observed Zn- and Zn/Al-containing corrosion products might be important factors for the lower sensitivity of Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn against chloride-induced atmospheric corrosion compared with Cu sheet and Cu4Sn. Decreasing corrosion rates with exposure time were observed for all materials and chloride loads and attributed to an improved adherence with time of the outer patina to the underlying inner oxide. Flaking of the outer patina layer was mainly observed on Cu4Sn and Cu sheet and associated with the gradual transformation of CuCl to Cu2(OH)3Cl of larger volume. After three years only Cu5Al5Zn remains lustrous because of a patina compared with the other materials that appeared brownish-reddish. Significantly lower release rates of metals compared with corresponding corrosion rates were observed for all materials. Very similar release rates of copper from all four materials were observed during the fifth year of marine exposure due to an outer surface patina that with time revealed similar constituents and solubility properties. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Potential for Suboxic Ammonium Oxidation in Louisiana Continental Shelf Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediments deposited onto the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) west of the Mississippi River Delta form mobile muds varying in thickness from meters near the outfall to centimeters on the western portion of the shelf. The muds have high concentrations of iron which promote rapid...

  1. Depositional environments of Laborcita Formation (Wolfcampian), northern Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fly, S.H. III

    1986-03-01

    Depositional environments that change dramatically over short lateral distances are represented by exposures of the Laborcita Formation. A siliclastic source area lay to the east and southeast, in the Pedernal Mountains. To the west, a shallow marine sea filled the orogrande basin. Alternating cycles of marine and nonmarine sedimentation resulted from fan-delta lobe shifting and eustatic sea level movements. In clear-water areas not affected by fan-deltaic sedimentation, deposits become increasingly calcareous. Various carbonate facies resulted from organisms adapting to changing environmental conditions. Mud-cracked algal mats, digitate algal stromatolites, and small phylloid red algal mounds and rhodoliths indicate deposition in shallow-water subtidal to supratidal settings. Large buildups (20 m thick) of phylloid green algae associated with abundant submarine cement occurred in a position near the edge of the narrow shelf. Widespread skeletal detritus beds overlie and extend hundreds of meters away from the massive buildups. Influx of terrigenous mud and silt in advance of a prograding fan-delta system terminated growth of the buildups. The next transgression is represented by a carbonate grainstone exhibiting characteristics of shallow-water marine, storm-dominated shelf bars. The shelf bars migrated in a northwest-southeast direction.

  2. Neogene stratigraphy, foraminifera, diatoms, and depositional history of Maria Madre Island, Mexico: Evidence of early Neogene marine conditions in the southern Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloy, C.; Ingle, J.C.; Barron, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Foraminifera and diatoms have been analyzed from an upper Miocene through Pleistocene(?) sequence of marine sediments exposed on Maria Madre Island, largest of the Tre??s Marias Islands off the Pacific coast of Mexico. The Neogene stratigraphic sequence exposed on Maria Madre Island includes a mid-Miocene(?) non-marine and/or shallow marine sandstone unconformably overlain by a lower upper Miocene to uppermost Miocene upper to middle bathyal laminated and massive diatomite, mudstone, and siltstone unit. This unit is unconformably overlain by lower Pliocene middle to lower bathyal sandstones and siltstones which, in turn, are unconformably overlain by upper Pliocene through Pleistocene(?) upper bathyal to upper middle bathyal foraminiferal limestones and siltstones. These beds are unconformably capped by Pleistocene terrace deposits. Basement rocks on the island include Cretaceous granite and granodiorite, and Tertiary(?) andesites and rhyolites. The upper Miocene diatomaceous unit contains a low diversity foraminiferal fauna dominated by species of Bolivina indicating low oxygen conditions in the proto-Gulf Maria Madre basin. The diatomaceous unit grades into a mudstone that contains a latest Miocene upper to middle bathyal biofacies characterized by Baggina californica and Uvigerina hootsi along with displaced neritic taxa. An angular unconformity separates the upper Miocene middle bathyal sediments from overlying lower Pliocene siltstones and mudstones that contain a middle to lower bathyal biofacies and abundant planktonic species including Neogloboquadrina acostaensis and Pulleniatina primalis indicating an early Pliocene age. Significantly, this Pliocene unit contains common occurrences of benthic species restricted to Miocene sediments in California including Bulimina uvigerinaformis. Pliocene to Pleistocene(?) foraminiferal limestones and siltstones characterize submarine bank accumulations formed during uplift of the Tre??s Marias Island area, and include

  3. Limited grounding-line advance onto the West Antarctic continental shelf in the easternmost Amundsen Sea Embayment during the last glacial period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klages, Johann P; Kuhn, Gerhard; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Smith, James A; Graham, Alastair G C; Nitsche, Frank O; Frederichs, Thomas; Jernas, Patrycja E; Gohl, Karsten; Wacker, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Precise knowledge about the extent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; c. 26.5-19 cal. ka BP) is important in order to 1) improve paleo-ice sheet reconstructions, 2) provide a robust empirical framework for calibrating paleo-ice sheet models, and 3) locate potential shelf refugia for Antarctic benthos during the last glacial period. However, reliable reconstructions are still lacking for many WAIS sectors, particularly for key areas on the outer continental shelf, where the LGM-ice sheet is assumed to have terminated. In many areas of the outer continental shelf around Antarctica, direct geological data for the presence or absence of grounded ice during the LGM is lacking because of post-LGM iceberg scouring. This also applies to most of the outer continental shelf in the Amundsen Sea. Here we present detailed marine geophysical and new geological data documenting a sequence of glaciomarine sediments up to ~12 m thick within the deep outer portion of Abbot Trough, a palaeo-ice stream trough on the outer shelf of the Amundsen Sea Embayment. The upper 2-3 meters of this sediment drape contain calcareous foraminifera of Holocene and (pre-)LGM age and, in combination with palaeomagnetic age constraints, indicate that continuous glaciomarine deposition persisted here since well before the LGM, possibly even since the last interglacial period. Our data therefore indicate that the LGM grounding line, whose exact location was previously uncertain, did not reach the shelf edge everywhere in the Amundsen Sea. The LGM grounding line position coincides with the crest of a distinct grounding-zone wedge ~100 km inland from the continental shelf edge. Thus, an area of ≥6000 km2 remained free of grounded ice through the last glacial cycle, requiring the LGM grounding line position to be re-located in this sector, and suggesting a new site at which Antarctic shelf benthos may have survived the last glacial period.

  4. Elephant teeth from the atlantic continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, F.C.; Emery, K.O.; Cooke, H.B.S.; Swift, D.J.P.

    1967-01-01

    Teeth of mastodons and mastodons have been recovered by fishermen from at least 40 sites on the continental shelf as deep as 120 meters. Also present are submerged shorelines, peat deposits, lagoonal shells, and relict sands. Evidently elephants and other large mammals ranged this region during the glacial stage of low sea level of the last 25.000 years.

  5. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1975-01-01

    Appalachian Piedmont province. Triassic deposits are likely to exist beneath the inner Continental Shelf, and probably consist of nonmarine arkosic sandstones, shales, basalt flows, and diabase intrusions deposited in relatively narrow northeast-trending grabens. Jurassic marine carbonates in the Bahamas grade northward to carbonates, shales, sand, and arkose in North Carolina. Salt may be present in the basal Jurassic section in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. Up to 4,000 m of Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous rocks are expected out to the 600 m water depth. Lower Cretaceous rocks in southern Florida are shallow-water marine limestone and dolomites with beds of anhydrite. In coastal North Carolina the Lower Cretaceous is a marine section made up of shales, sand, and sandy limestone. The Upper Cretaceous is composed almost entirely of marine carbonates in southern Florida grading northward to nonmarine to marginal marine, sandstones and shales with minor amounts of carbonates. In general, Upper Cretaceous rocks will probably maintain a fairly constant thickness (600 m) on the Continental Shelf and grade downdip from terrigeneous sands and shales to more marine chalks, limestones, and dolomites. The Cenozoic rocks are predominantly shallow-water marine carbonates in Florida grading northward into a marginal marine to marine clastic facies composed of sands, marls, and limestones. The offshore Cenozoic section is expected to range in thickness from 600 to 1100 m. A reconstruction of the geologic history suggests that the present continental margin is a result of a collision of the North American and African continental plates during late Paleozoic time and later modification during Late Triassic time when the continental plates separated, forming the present Atlantic Ocean. No commercial production of hydrocarbons has been developed on the Atlantic Coastal Plain immediately adjacent to the studied area even though hydrocarbon shows have been encountered in ons

  6. Spatial heterogeneity of sources of branched tetraethers in shelf systems: The geochemistry of tetraethers in the Berau River delta (Kalimantan, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-08-01

    The bulk organic matter composition (total organic carbon (TOC) content and δ13CTOC) and composition of isoprenoid and branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGT) in surface sediments from 43 stations in the Berau River delta (east Kalimantan, Indonesia), including two coast-shelf transects and stations within the river mouth, were examined to reveal the spatial heterogeneity in these parameters in order to assess the impact of a tropical river loaded with suspended matter on the sedimentary organic matter in the shelf system. The high-resolution study showed that, despite the extensive transport of eroded soil material by the river to the sea, terrestrial organic matter and brGDGTs are only deposited on a relatively small part of the shelf. The concentrations of brGDGTs are highest (up to 120 μg g-1 TOC) in sediments deposited in and close to the mouth of the Berau River and their distribution indicates that they represent a mixture of soil-derived and river in-situ produced brGDGTs. Crenarchaeol concentrations reach 700 μg g-1 TOC in sediments deposited on the outer shelf due to Thaumarchaeotal production in shelf waters. This results in a strong gradient (0.93-0.03) in the BIT index, with high values in the river mouth and low values on the shelf. The decline in the BIT index is caused by both decreasing concentrations of the brGDGTs and increasing concentrations of crenarchaeol. The BIT index shows a highly significant but non-linear relationship with δ13CTOC. On the shelf, in the area not under the direct influence of the Berau River, cyclic brGDGTs become relatively dominant, most probably due to in-situ production in the alkaline pore waters of the surface sediments. The spatial heterogeneity of sources of brGDGTs on the Berau shelf complicates the use of brGDGTs as temperature proxies. Application of the global soil calibration to sedimentary mixtures of brGDGTs in the river-influenced area of the shelf results in a severe underestimation of

  7. Upper Cretaceous rudist-bearing deposits from the eastern border of the Gilau Mountains (Corni section, Hasdate: palaeoecological remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Săsăran

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Along the eastern border of the Gilău Mountains crop out carbonate deposits which were formed during the Late Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian. These deposits are characterized by a significant presence of rudists and were formed on the border of a narrow marine shelf. The typical feature is represented by the dominance of the coral-rudist associations. The paleontological study of these deposits revealed the presence of four evolutionary stages when corals, rudists and red calcareous algae stabilised and colonised the sediment depending on the relative sea level evolution. All the evolutionary stages have been included into an idealised ecological sequence.

  8. Effects of deposition of heavy-metal-polluted harbor mud on microbial diversity and metal resistance in sandy marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toes, Ann-Charlotte M; Finke, Niko; Kuenen, J Gijs;

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of dredged harbor sediments in relatively undisturbed ecosystems is often considered a viable option for confinement of pollutants and possible natural attenuation. This study investigated the effects of deposition of heavy-metal-polluted sludge on the microbial diversity of sandy...

  9. Actively evolving subglacial conduits and eskers initiate ice shelf channels at an Antarctic grounding line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, R; Pattyn, F; Hewitt, I J; Ng, F S L; Berger, S; Matsuoka, K; Helm, V; Bergeot, N; Favier, L; Neckel, N

    2017-05-09

    Ice-shelf channels are long curvilinear tracts of thin ice found on Antarctic ice shelves. Many of them originate near the grounding line, but their formation mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we use ice-penetrating radar data from Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, East Antarctica, to infer that the morphology of several ice-shelf channels is seeded upstream of the grounding line by large basal obstacles indenting the ice from below. We interpret each obstacle as an esker ridge formed from sediments deposited by subglacial water conduits, and calculate that the eskers' size grows towards the grounding line where deposition rates are maximum. Relict features on the shelf indicate that these linked systems of subglacial conduits and ice-shelf channels have been changing over the past few centuries. Because ice-shelf channels are loci where intense melting occurs to thin an ice shelf, these findings expose a novel link between subglacial drainage, sedimentation and ice-shelf stability.

  10. Towards Sustainable Aquafeeds: Complete Substitution of Fish Oil with Marine Microalga Schizochytrium sp. Improves Growth and Fatty Acid Deposition in Juvenile Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Pallab K.; Kapuscinski, Anne R.; Lanois, Alison J.; Livesey, Erin D.; Bernhard, Katie P.; Coley, Mariah L.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a 84-day nutritional feeding experiment with dried whole cells of DHA-rich marine microalga Schizochytrium sp. (Sc) to determine the optimum level of fish-oil substitution (partial or complete) for maximum growth of Nile tilapia. When we fully replaced fish oil with Schizochytrium (Sc100 diet), we found significantly higher weight gain and protein efficiency ratio (PER), and lower (improved) feed conversion ratio (FCR) and feed intake compared to a control diet containing fish oil (Sc0); and no significant change in SGR and survival rate among all diets. The Sc100 diet had the highest contents of 22:6n3 DHA, led to the highest DHA content in fillets, and consequently led to the highest DHA:EPA ratios in tilapia fillets. Schizochytrium sp. is a high quality candidate for complete substitution of fish oil in juvenile Nile tilapia feeds, providing an innovative means to formulate and optimize the composition of tilapia juvenile feed while simultaneously raising feed efficiency of tilapia aquaculture and to further develop environmentally and socially sustainable aquafeeds. Results show that replacing fish oil with DHA-rich marine Sc improves the deposition of n3 LC PUFA levels in tilapia fillet. These results support further studies to lower Schizochytrium production costs and to combine different marine microalgae to replace fish oil and fishmeal into aquafeeds. PMID:27258552

  11. Towards Sustainable Aquafeeds: Complete Substitution of Fish Oil with Marine Microalga Schizochytrium sp. Improves Growth and Fatty Acid Deposition in Juvenile Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Pallab K; Kapuscinski, Anne R; Lanois, Alison J; Livesey, Erin D; Bernhard, Katie P; Coley, Mariah L

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a 84-day nutritional feeding experiment with dried whole cells of DHA-rich marine microalga Schizochytrium sp. (Sc) to determine the optimum level of fish-oil substitution (partial or complete) for maximum growth of Nile tilapia. When we fully replaced fish oil with Schizochytrium (Sc100 diet), we found significantly higher weight gain and protein efficiency ratio (PER), and lower (improved) feed conversion ratio (FCR) and feed intake compared to a control diet containing fish oil (Sc0); and no significant change in SGR and survival rate among all diets. The Sc100 diet had the highest contents of 22:6n3 DHA, led to the highest DHA content in fillets, and consequently led to the highest DHA:EPA ratios in tilapia fillets. Schizochytrium sp. is a high quality candidate for complete substitution of fish oil in juvenile Nile tilapia feeds, providing an innovative means to formulate and optimize the composition of tilapia juvenile feed while simultaneously raising feed efficiency of tilapia aquaculture and to further develop environmentally and socially sustainable aquafeeds. Results show that replacing fish oil with DHA-rich marine Sc improves the deposition of n3 LC PUFA levels in tilapia fillet. These results support further studies to lower Schizochytrium production costs and to combine different marine microalgae to replace fish oil and fishmeal into aquafeeds.

  12. Towards Sustainable Aquafeeds: Complete Substitution of Fish Oil with Marine Microalga Schizochytrium sp. Improves Growth and Fatty Acid Deposition in Juvenile Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallab K Sarker

    Full Text Available We conducted a 84-day nutritional feeding experiment with dried whole cells of DHA-rich marine microalga Schizochytrium sp. (Sc to determine the optimum level of fish-oil substitution (partial or complete for maximum growth of Nile tilapia. When we fully replaced fish oil with Schizochytrium (Sc100 diet, we found significantly higher weight gain and protein efficiency ratio (PER, and lower (improved feed conversion ratio (FCR and feed intake compared to a control diet containing fish oil (Sc0; and no significant change in SGR and survival rate among all diets. The Sc100 diet had the highest contents of 22:6n3 DHA, led to the highest DHA content in fillets, and consequently led to the highest DHA:EPA ratios in tilapia fillets. Schizochytrium sp. is a high quality candidate for complete substitution of fish oil in juvenile Nile tilapia feeds, providing an innovative means to formulate and optimize the composition of tilapia juvenile feed while simultaneously raising feed efficiency of tilapia aquaculture and to further develop environmentally and socially sustainable aquafeeds. Results show that replacing fish oil with DHA-rich marine Sc improves the deposition of n3 LC PUFA levels in tilapia fillet. These results support further studies to lower Schizochytrium production costs and to combine different marine microalgae to replace fish oil and fishmeal into aquafeeds.

  13. Cetacean line-transect survey conducted in the eastern Bering Sea shelf by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from NOAA Ship Miller Freeman from 1999-07-07 to 2004-06-30 (NCEI Accession 0131862)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Visual surveys for cetaceans were conducted on the eastern Bering Sea shelf along transect lines, in association with the AFSC’s echo integration trawl surveys for...

  14. Geomorphology and late Holocene accretion history of Adele Reef: a northwest Australian mid-shelf platform reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solihuddin, Tubagus; Bufarale, Giada; Blakeway, David; O'Leary, Michael J.

    2016-08-01

    The mid-shelf reefs of the Kimberley Bioregion are one of Australia's more remote tropical reef provinces and such have received little attention from reef researchers. This study describes the geomorphology and late Holocene accretion history of Adele Reef, a mid-shelf platform reef, through remote sensing of contemporary reef habitats, shallow seismic profiling, shallow percussion coring and radiocarbon dating. Seismic profiling indicates that the Holocene reef sequence is 25 to 35 m thick and overlies at least three earlier stages of reef build-up, interpreted as deposited during marine isotope stages 5, 7 and 9 respectively. The cored shallow subsurface facies of Adele Reef are predominantly detrital, comprising small coral colonies and fragments in a sandy matrix. Reef cores indicate a `catch-up' growth pattern, with the reef flat being approximately 5-10 m deep when sea level stabilised at its present elevation 6,500 years BP. The reef flat is rimmed by a broad low-relief reef crest only 10-20 cm high, characterised by anastomosing ridges of rhodoliths and coralliths. The depth of the Holocene/last interglacial contact (25-30 m) suggests a subsidence rate of 0.2 mm/year for Adele Reef since the last interglacial. This value, incorporated with subsidence rates from Cockatoo Island (inshore) and Scott Reefs (offshore), provides the first quantitative estimate of hinge subsidence for the Kimberley coast and adjacent shelf, with progressively greater subsidence across the shelf.

  15. Geomorphology and late Holocene accretion history of Adele Reef: a northwest Australian mid-shelf platform reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solihuddin, Tubagus; Bufarale, Giada; Blakeway, David; O'Leary, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    The mid-shelf reefs of the Kimberley Bioregion are one of Australia's more remote tropical reef provinces and such have received little attention from reef researchers. This study describes the geomorphology and late Holocene accretion history of Adele Reef, a mid-shelf platform reef, through remote sensing of contemporary reef habitats, shallow seismic profiling, shallow percussion coring and radiocarbon dating. Seismic profiling indicates that the Holocene reef sequence is 25 to 35 m thick and overlies at least three earlier stages of reef build-up, interpreted as deposited during marine isotope stages 5, 7 and 9 respectively. The cored shallow subsurface facies of Adele Reef are predominantly detrital, comprising small coral colonies and fragments in a sandy matrix. Reef cores indicate a `catch-up' growth pattern, with the reef flat being approximately 5-10 m deep when sea level stabilised at its present elevation 6,500 years BP. The reef flat is rimmed by a broad low-relief reef crest only 10-20 cm high, characterised by anastomosing ridges of rhodoliths and coralliths. The depth of the Holocene/last interglacial contact (25-30 m) suggests a subsidence rate of 0.2 mm/year for Adele Reef since the last interglacial. This value, incorporated with subsidence rates from Cockatoo Island (inshore) and Scott Reefs (offshore), provides the first quantitative estimate of hinge subsidence for the Kimberley coast and adjacent shelf, with progressively greater subsidence across the shelf.

  16. Sources, degradation and transport of terrigenous organic carbon on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, Tommaso; Semiletov, Igor; Dudarev, Oleg; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2013-04-01

    transport of fine sediments relatively rich in cutin. Finally, in addition to degradation and sorting processes, our results indicated dilution of land-derived material with marine phytodetritus with increasing distance from the shore. Results from our study indicate that the benthic sediment transport system in the ESAS is quite dynamic and acts as an efficient incinerator of terrigenous material as observed in mid-latitude settings. Therefore, considering the mega-pool of terrigenous carbon susceptible to remobilization because of climate-induced changes, our results suggest future limited burial of this material in mid- and outer-shelf deposits.

  17. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  18. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  19. Architecture and depositional development of the Eocene deep-marine Morillo and Coscojuela formations, Ainsa Basin, Spain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, F.; McCann, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The Aínsa Basin of northern Spain contains a deep-marine succession comprising up to 24 sandstone bodies separated by thick marl-rich units. A detailed analysis of nine outcrops (>900m of sediment profiles) from the Morillo Formation of the San Vicente Group, from the upper part of the basin success

  20. Crustal architecture and deep structure of the Namibian continental shelf and adjacent oceanic basins around the landfall of Walvis Ridge from wide-angle seismic and marine magnetotelluric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planert, L.; Behrmann, J.; Jegen, M.; Heincke, B.; Jokat, W.; Bialas, J.; Marti, A.

    2012-12-01

    results for a marine magnetotelluric profile. Tomographic analysis of the seismic data reveals the velocity structure of the crust down into the uppermost mantle. The probably most striking feature of our models is the sharp lateral transition in crustal structure and thickness associated with the northern boundary zone of Walvis Ridge towards the Angola Basin. Here, the rather thin oceanic crust in the basin lies opposite to the ~35 km thick igneous crustal root founding the highest elevated northern portions of Walvis Ridge. In contrast, the southern termination of Walvis Ridge and the corresponding transition towards the adjacent 25-30 km thick crustal portions further south is much more subdued. Due to the presence of a high-velocity (6.5-7.2 km/s) lower crust we argue that the Namibian shelf south of Walvis Ridge comprises a transitional igneous origin. We suggest that the northern boundary zone close to the landfall of Walvis Ridge represents an important transtensional tectonic feature which may have provoked the preferential extraction of melts into the footwall of this structure.

  1. Thermostabilized Shelf Life Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchonok, Michele H.; Catauro, Patricia M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the shelf life end-point of various food items by means of actual measurement or mathematical projection. The primary goal of the Advanced Food Technology Project in these long duration exploratory missions is to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious and safe food system while minimizing volume, mass, and waste. The Mars missions could be as long as 2.5 years with the potential of the food being positioned prior to the crew arrival. Therefore, it is anticipated that foods that are used during the Mars missions will require a 5 year shelf life. Shelf life criteria are safety, nutrition, and acceptability. Any of these criteria can be the limiting factor in determining the food's shelf life. Due to the heat sterilization process used for the thermostabilized food items, safety will be preserved as long as the integrity of the package is maintained. Nutrition and acceptability will change over time. Since the food can be the sole source of nutrition to the crew, a significant loss in nutrition may determine when the shelf life endpoint has occurred. Shelf life can be defined when the food item is no longer acceptable. Acceptability can be defined in terms of appearance, flavor, texture, or aroma. Results from shelf life studies of the thermostabilized food items suggest that the shelf life of the foods range from 0 months to 8 years, depending on formulation.

  2. Thermostable Shelf Life Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchonok, M. H.; Antonini, D. K.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the shelf life end-point of various food items by means of actual measurement or mathematical projection. The primary goal of the Advanced Food Technology Project in these long duration exploratory missions is to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious and safe food system while minimizing volume, mass, and waste. The Mars missions could be as long as 2.5 years with the potential of the food being positioned prior to the crew arrival. Therefore, it is anticipated that foods that are used during the Mars missions will require a 5 year shelf life. Shelf life criteria are safety, nutrition, and acceptability. Any of these criteria can be the limiting factor in determining the food's shelf life. Due to the heat sterilization process used for the thermostabilized food items, safety will be preserved as long as the integrity of the package is maintained. Nutrition and acceptability will change over time. Since the food can be the sole source of nutrition to the crew, a significant loss in nutrition may determine when the shelf life endpoint has occurred. Shelf life can be defined when the food item is no longer acceptable. Acceptability can be defined in terms of appearance, flavor, texture, or aroma. Results from shelf life studies of the thermostabilized food items suggest that the shelf life of the foods range from 0 months to 8 years, depending on formulation.

  3. Basement influences on dolomite-hosted vertical sedimentary intrusions in marine erg-margin deposits from the Pennsylvanian of Northern Wyoming (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Sébastien; Frank, Tracy D.; Fielding, Christopher R.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding soft-sediment deformation structures and their triggers can help in assessing the influence of tectonics, climate, and diagenesis on the stratigraphic record. Such features commonly record processes that would not otherwise be preserved. The description of soft-sediment deformation in Pennsylvanian deposits of the western United States, characterized by orbitally driven alternations between eolian sandstones, marine dolomites, and shales, has been limited to contorted cross-beds. We document discordant, sheet-like sedimentary intrusions in three marine intervals over a 45-km-wide area. Intrusions consist of very well to moderately cemented, very fine to fine-grained quartz sandstone. Body widths range from 5 to 50 cm, and heights up to 2 m. The orientations of 103 vertical bodies were measured. Based on upward- and downward-tapering, and the presence of deformed, microfractured fragments of host rocks, these intrusions are interpreted to result from seismically induced fluidization of water-saturated sands. Their sheet-like morphology indicates injection through fractures. Two predominant directions (WNW-ESE and N-S) were recognized and interpreted as pre-injection fracture sets. Folding of surrounding layers around the intrusions suggests negligible compaction prior to injection, indicating penecontemporaneous or shallow burial fluidization. The intraplate location of Wyoming implies that seismicity did not originate at a plate boundary. The area within which intrusions are found is crossed by a zone characterized by localized development of thick eolian stories at the top of the formation, interpreted to reflect the rejuvenation of a basement lineament. The seismically active character of lineaments may explain overpressure and fluidization, substantiating the notion that Precambrian structures repeatedly affected Phanerozoic sedimentation. Similar intrusive features may be wrongly identified or overlooked in deposits of arid environments, but their

  4. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 28 June 1977 to 16 July 1977 (NODC Accession 7700756)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental...

  5. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 02 July 1977 to 11 July 1977 (NODC Accession 7800451)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the lower Cook Inlet from the ACONA. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental...

  6. Marine invertebrate pathology and other data from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-08-24 to 1976-10-13 (NODC Accession 7700664)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine invertebrate pathology and other data were collected from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)...

  7. Marine mammal sighting and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 15 March 1976 to 20 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7601881)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal sighting and other data were collected from aircraft from 15 March 1976 to 20 June 1976. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service...

  8. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-09-08 to 1976-09-24 (NODC Accession 7700044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory...

  9. Marine toxic substance and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program from 25 June 1976 to 078 July 1976 (NODC Accession 7601849)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)...

  10. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 May 1985 to 14 June 1985 (NODC Accession 8600336)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft from 20 May 1985 to 14 June 1985. Data were collected by the Battelle Marine Research Laboratory...

  11. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Bering Sea from helicopter as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 16 September 1976 to 20 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700783)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Bering Sea from a helicopter. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental...

  12. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-09-12 to 1975-11-10 (NODC Accession 7700045)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory...

  13. An introductory perspective on non-tropical shelf carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Campbell S.

    1988-11-01

    This brief account introduces the topic of non-tropical shelf carbonate deposits, both modern and ancient, specific aspects of which are described and discussed in the 22 accompanying papers in this Special Issue of Sedimentary Geology. "Non-tropical" shelves are loosely defined as lying poleward of the present limit of development of hermatypic coral reefs, or beyond the mean annual surface-water isotherm of about 20°C, typically near 30° latitude. Most geoscientists have traditionally regarded shallow-water carbonate formation as a low-latitude phenomenon. However, wherever the rate and extent of terrigenous sediment dilution is small, the potential exists for extensive deposits of skeletal carbonate to accumulate on shelves beyond the (sub)tropics. The facies attributes of the modern non-tropical carbonates are distinctive and contrast significantly with the structural, lithological, faunal, floral, mineralogical and diagenetic character of their tropical counterparts. In the rock record, non-tropical limestones probably occur throughout the Phanerozoic, but generally remain to be identified and/or interpreted as such. They are presently described mainly from the Ordovician, Permian and Tertiary-Quaternary, periods of major continental glaciations and accentuated latitudinal thermal gradients. A uniformitarian approach to the recognition and interpretation of ancient shallow-marine limestones requires acceptance of both tropical and non-tropical carbonate facies models.

  14. Denudation of the continental shelf between Britain and France at the glacial-interglacial timescale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellett, Claire L; Hodgson, David M; Plater, Andrew J; Mauz, Barbara; Selby, Ian; Lang, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The erosional morphology preserved at the sea bed in the eastern English Channel dominantly records denudation of the continental shelf by fluvial processes over multiple glacial-interglacial sea-level cycles rather than by catastrophic flooding through the Straits of Dover during the mid-Quaternary. Here, through the integration of multibeam bathymetry and shallow sub-bottom 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with vibrocore records, the first stratigraphic model of erosion and deposition on the eastern English Channel continental shelf is presented. Published Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and (14)C ages were used to chronometrically constrain the stratigraphy and allow correlation of the continental shelf record with major climatic/sea-level periods. Five major erosion surfaces overlain by discrete sediment packages have been identified. The continental shelf in the eastern English Channel preserves a record of processes operating from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 to MIS 1. Planar and channelised erosion surfaces were formed by fluvial incision during lowstands or relative sea-level fall. The depth and lateral extent of incision was partly conditioned by underlying geology (rock type and tectonic structure), climatic conditions and changes in water and sediment discharge coupled to ice sheet dynamics and the drainage configuration of major rivers in Northwest Europe. Evidence for major erosion during or prior to MIS 6 is preserved. Fluvial sediments of MIS 2 age were identified within the Northern Palaeovalley, providing insights into the scale of erosion by normal fluvial regimes. Seismic and sedimentary facies indicate that deposition predominantly occurred during transgression when accommodation was created in palaeovalleys to allow discrete sediment bodies to form. Sediment reworking over multiple sea-level cycles (Saalian-Eemian-early Weichselian) by fluvial, coastal and marine processes created a multi-lateral, multi-storey succession of

  15. Denudation of the continental shelf between Britain and France at the glacial–interglacial timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellett, Claire L.; Hodgson, David M.; Plater, Andrew J.; Mauz, Barbara; Selby, Ian; Lang, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The erosional morphology preserved at the sea bed in the eastern English Channel dominantly records denudation of the continental shelf by fluvial processes over multiple glacial–interglacial sea-level cycles rather than by catastrophic flooding through the Straits of Dover during the mid-Quaternary. Here, through the integration of multibeam bathymetry and shallow sub-bottom 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with vibrocore records, the first stratigraphic model of erosion and deposition on the eastern English Channel continental shelf is presented. Published Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and 14C ages were used to chronometrically constrain the stratigraphy and allow correlation of the continental shelf record with major climatic/sea-level periods. Five major erosion surfaces overlain by discrete sediment packages have been identified. The continental shelf in the eastern English Channel preserves a record of processes operating from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 to MIS 1. Planar and channelised erosion surfaces were formed by fluvial incision during lowstands or relative sea-level fall. The depth and lateral extent of incision was partly conditioned by underlying geology (rock type and tectonic structure), climatic conditions and changes in water and sediment discharge coupled to ice sheet dynamics and the drainage configuration of major rivers in Northwest Europe. Evidence for major erosion during or prior to MIS 6 is preserved. Fluvial sediments of MIS 2 age were identified within the Northern Palaeovalley, providing insights into the scale of erosion by normal fluvial regimes. Seismic and sedimentary facies indicate that deposition predominantly occurred during transgression when accommodation was created in palaeovalleys to allow discrete sediment bodies to form. Sediment reworking over multiple sea-level cycles (Saalian–Eemian–early Weichselian) by fluvial, coastal and marine processes created a multi-lateral, multi-storey succession of

  16. Denudation of the continental shelf between Britain and France at the glacial-interglacial timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellett, Claire L.; Hodgson, David M.; Plater, Andrew J.; Mauz, Barbara; Selby, Ian; Lang, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The erosional morphology preserved at the sea bed in the eastern English Channel dominantly records denudation of the continental shelf by fluvial processes over multiple glacial-interglacial sea-level cycles rather than by catastrophic flooding through the Straits of Dover during the mid-Quaternary. Here, through the integration of multibeam bathymetry and shallow sub-bottom 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with vibrocore records, the first stratigraphic model of erosion and deposition on the eastern English Channel continental shelf is presented. Published Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and 14C ages were used to chronometrically constrain the stratigraphy and allow correlation of the continental shelf record with major climatic/sea-level periods. Five major erosion surfaces overlain by discrete sediment packages have been identified. The continental shelf in the eastern English Channel preserves a record of processes operating from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 to MIS 1. Planar and channelised erosion surfaces were formed by fluvial incision during lowstands or relative sea-level fall. The depth and lateral extent of incision was partly conditioned by underlying geology (rock type and tectonic structure), climatic conditions and changes in water and sediment discharge coupled to ice sheet dynamics and the drainage configuration of major rivers in Northwest Europe. Evidence for major erosion during or prior to MIS 6 is preserved. Fluvial sediments of MIS 2 age were identified within the Northern Palaeovalley, providing insights into the scale of erosion by normal fluvial regimes. Seismic and sedimentary facies indicate that deposition predominantly occurred during transgression when accommodation was created in palaeovalleys to allow discrete sediment bodies to form. Sediment reworking over multiple sea-level cycles (Saalian-Eemian-early Weichselian) by fluvial, coastal and marine processes created a multi-lateral, multi-storey succession of

  17. Mining of phosphorite resources from the Indian continental shelf will help food production

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Qasim, S.Z.; Nair, R.R.

    of phosphorite deposits would depend on several technical and economic factors Phosphorites occur in water depths upto 200 meters of the western continental shelf of India These are the areas associated with upwelling The relationship between phosphorite deposits...

  18. The Effect of Local Topographic Unevenness on Contourite Paleo-Deposition Around Marine Capes: A Novel "Geostrophic Cascade" in Cape Suvero and Cape Cilento (Tyrrhenian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salusti, E.; Chiocci, F. L.; Martorelli, E.; Falcini, F.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that two neighboring headlands in the Italian Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Cape Cilento and Cape Suvero, have rather similar morphology and contouring flows, their contourite drifts were recognized, respectively, upstream the Cape Cilento tip and downstream Cape Suvero tip. Such an intriguing difference is discussed in terms of paleo-sedimentary processes induced by the interaction between large scale marine current turbulence and seafloor morphology around a cape (Martorelli et al., 2010). However Martorelli's et al. model for contourite location - which allows only an upstream contourite location for this kind of capes - fails in trying to explain such a difference. We thus focus on the local effect of a topographic depression, viz. a landslide scar off Cape Suvero, on flows contouring a cape. By applying the classical conservation of marine water potential vorticity we find a steady cyclonic circulation over the scar, that generates a "geostrophic cascade" that affects contourite deposition and stability. All this intuitively reminds the current dynamics around the Galileo's Red Spot in Jupiter's atmosphere. We thus show that the application of the potential vorticity conservation can provide a novel theoretical tool for investigating sedimentary structures and their evolution.

  19. Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine HydrateDeposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol,Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

    2007-11-16

    Although significant hydrate deposits are known to exist in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea, their survey and evaluation as a possible energy resource has not yet been completed. However, it is possible to develop preliminary estimates of their production potential based on the limited data that are currently available. These include the elevation and thickness of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL), the water depth, and the water temperature at the sea floor. Based on this information, we developed estimates of the local geothermal gradient that bracket its true value. Reasonable estimates of the initial pressure distribution in the HBL can be obtained because it follows closely the hydrostatic. Other critical information needs include the hydrate saturation, and the intrinsic permeabilities of the system formations. These are treated as variables, and sensitivity analysis provides an estimate of their effect on production. Based on the geology of similar deposits, it is unlikely that Ulleung Basin accumulations belong to Class 1 (involving a HBL underlain by a mobile gas zone). If Class 4 (disperse, low saturation accumulations) deposits are involved, they are not likely to have production potential. The most likely scenarios include Class 2 (HBL underlain by a zone of mobile water) or Class 3 (involving only an HBL) accumulations. Assuming nearly impermeable confining boundaries, this numerical study indicates that large production rates (several MMSCFD) are attainable from both Class 2 and Class 3 deposits using conventional technology. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the dependence of production on the well design, the production rate, the intrinsic permeability of the HBL, the initial pressure, temperature and hydrate saturation, as well as on the thickness of the water zone (Class 2). The study also demonstrates that the presence of confining boundaries is indispensable for the commercially viable production of gas from these deposits.

  20. The Myanmar continental shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Rao, P.S.

    conditions, and neotectonic activity. The most prominent bathymetric feature on the Ayeyarwady continental shelf is the 120 km-wide Martaban Depression, at the centre of which is located the Martaban Canyon. Most of the suspended sediment discharge...

  1. Transition from marine deep slope deposits to evaporitic facies of an isolated foreland basin: case study of the Sivas Basin (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichat, Alexandre; Hoareau, Guilhem; Legeay, Etienne; Lopez, Michel; Bonnel, Cédric; Callot, Jean-Paul; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2017-04-01

    The Sivas Basin, located in the central part of the Anatolian Plateau in Turkey, formed after the closure of the northern Neotethys from Paleocene to Pliocene times. It developed over an ophiolitic basement obducted from the north during the Late Cretaceous. During Paleocene to Eocene times, the onset of the Tauride compression led to the development of a foreland basin affected by north-directed thrusts. The associate general deepening of the basin favored the accumulation of a thick marine turbiditic succession in the foredeep area, followed by a fast shallowing of the basin and thick evaporitic sequence deposition during the late Eocene. We present here the detailed sedimentological architecture of this flysch to evaporite transition. In the northern part of the basin, volcanoclastic turbidites gradually evolved into basinal to prodelta deposits regularly fed by siliciclastic material during flood events. Locally (to the NE), thick-channelized sandstones are attributed to the progradation of delta front distributary channels. The basin became increasingly sediment-starved and evolved toward azoic carbonates and shaly facies, interlayered with organic-rich shales before the first evaporitic deposits. In the southern part of the basin, in the central foredeep, the basinal turbidites become increasingly gypsum-rich and record a massive mega-slump enclosing olistoliths of gypsum and of ophiolitic rocks. Such reworked evaporites were fed by the gravitational collapsing of shallow water evaporites that had previously precipitated in silled piggy-back basins along the southern fold-and-thrust-belt of the Sivas Basin. Tectonic activity that led to the dismantlement of such evaporites probably also contributed to the closure of the basin from the marine domain. From the north to the south, subsequent deposits consist in about 70 meters of secondary massive to fine-grained gypsiferous beds interpreted as recording high to low density gypsum turbidites. Such facies were

  2. Environmental geologic studies on the southeastern United States Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf, 1977-1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popenoe, Peter; Popenoe, Peter

    1981-01-01

    This report is a summary of the second year of marine environmental research activities by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on the southeaster U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin, in accordance with with Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) AA551-MU8-13 between the USGS and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The report covers studies whose fieldwork was conducted during the period from 1 October 1977 to 30 September 1978. The results of the first year of study are reported in Popenoe (1978a and b) and as U.S. Department of Commerce NTIS report PB 300-820. The purpose of these investigations is to provide basic geologic and oceanographic data to the BLM Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Marine Environmental Studies Program in support of management decisions which relate to possible development of oil and gas resources of the continental shelf. The objectives of the USGS-BLM geologic research program for fiscal year 1978 (FY-78) were 1) to determine the sedimentation rates and processes on the upper slope and inner Blake Plateau; 2) to determine the distribution, areal extent, and vertical characteristics of geological features supportive of biological communities; 3) to monitor the transport of bottom sediment across the OCS, evaluate its possible effect on pollutant transfer along the seabed and the potential of sediment as a pollutant sink, determine the implications of erosion/deposition on pipeline emplacement, and aid the interpretation of chemical, biological, and physical data; 4) to determine the concentration levels of chosen trace metals and silica in three chemically defined fractions of the suspended particulate matter (seston); 5) to study the shelf edge and slope near areas of oil and gas interest, and the northern portion of the Blake Plateau for evidence of slope instability and other geologic hazards, and 6) to determine the depth and rate of sediment mixing caused by large storms and/or by benthic organisms and where possible to estimate the rate of

  3. Origins of terrestrial organic matter in surface sediments of the East China Sea shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hailong; Xing, Lei; Zhao, Meixun

    2017-10-01

    Terrestrial organic matter (TOM) is an important component of marine sedimentary OM, and revealing the origins and transport mechanisms of TOM to the East China Sea (ECS) is important for understanding regional carbon cycle. A novel approach combining molecular proxies and compound-specific carbon isotopes is used to quantitatively constrain the origins and transport mechanisms of TOM in surface sediments from the ECS shelf. The content of terrestrial biomarkers of (C27+C29+C31) n-alkanes (52 to 580 ng g-1) revealed a seaward decreasing trend, the δ13CTOC values (-20.6‰ to -22.7‰) were more negative near the coast, and the TMBR (terrestrial and marine biomarker ratio) values (0.06 to 0.40) also revealed a seaward decreasing trend. These proxies all indicated more TOM (up to 48%) deposition in the coastal areas. The Alkane Index, the ratio of C29/(C29+C31) n-alkanes indicated a higher proportion of grass vegetation in the coastal area; While the δ13C values of C29 n-alkane (-29.3‰ to -33.8‰) indicated that terrestrial plant in the sediments of the ECS shelf were mainly derived from C3 plants. Cluster analysis afforded detailed estimates of different-sourced TOM contributions and transport mechanisms. TOM in the Zhejiang-Fujian coastal area was mostly delivered by the Changjiang River, and characterized by higher %TOM (up to 48%), higher %C3 plant OM (68%-85%) and higher grass plant OM (56%-61%); TOM in the mid-shelf area was mostly transported by aerosols, and characterized by low %TOM (less than 17%), slightly lower C3 plant OM (56%-72%) and lower grass plant OM (49%-55%).

  4. Origins of late- Pleistocene coastal dune sheets, Magdalena and Guerrero Negro, from continental shelf low-stand supply (70-20 ka), under conditions of southeast littoral- and eolian-sand transport, in Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Curt D.; Murillo-Jiménez, Janette M.; Stock, Errol; Price, David M.; Hostetler, Steve W.; Percy, David

    2017-10-01

    Shallow morpho-stratigraphic sections (n = 11) in each of two large coastal dune sheets including the Magdalena (7000 km2) and Guerrero Negro (8000 km2) dune sheets, from the Pacific Ocean side of Baja California Sur, Mexico, have been analyzed for dune deposit age. The shallow morpho-stratigraphic sections (∼2-10 m depth) include 11 new TL and 14C ages, and paleosol chronosequences, that differentiate cemented late Pleistocene dune deposits (20.7 ± 2.1 to 99.8 ± 9.4 ka) from uncemented Holocene dune deposits (0.7 ± 0.05 to at least 3.2 ± 0.3 ka). Large linear dune ridges (5-10 m in height) in the dune sheet interiors trend southeast and are generally of late Pleistocene age (∼70-20 ka). The late Pleistocene dune deposits reflect eolian transport of marine sand across the emerged continental shelf (30-50 km southeast distance) from low-stand paleo-shorelines (-100 ± 25 m elevation), which were locally oriented nearly orthogonal to modeled deep-water wave directions (∼300° TN). During the Holocene marine transgression, onshore and alongshore wave transport delivered remobilized shelf-sand deposits to the nearshore areas of the large dune sheets, building extensive barrier islands and sand spits. Submerged back-barrier lagoons generally precluded marine sand supply to dune sheet interiors in middle to late Holocene time, though exceptions occur along some ocean and lagoon shorelines. Reactivation of the late Pleistocene dune deposits in the dune sheet interiors lead to generally thin (1-3 m thickness), but widespread, covers of Holocene dune deposits (0.41 ± 0.05 to 10.5 ± 1.6 ka). Mechanical drilling will be required to penetrate indurated subsoil caliche layers to reach basal Pleistocene dune deposits.

  5. Ichnofabric analysis of the Tithonian shallow marine sediments (Bhadasar Formation) Jaisalmer Basin, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhawanisingh G Desai; Rajendra Dutt Saklani

    2014-08-01

    The shallow marine sedimentary sequence of the Jaisalmer Basin exhibits one of the important and well-developed Tithonian sedimentary outcrops for western India. The ichnology and ichnofabric of the lower part of Bhadasar Formation (i.e., Kolar Dongar Member) belonging to Tithonian age are presented and discussed. The Kolar Dongar Member represents a shallow marine succession that contains 16 ichnotaxa: Ancorichnus ancorichnus, Conichnus conicus, Gyrochorte comosa, cf. Jamesonichnites heinbergi, Imponoglyphus kevadiensis, Laevicyclus mongraensis, Monocraterion tentaculatum, Ophiomorpha nodosa, Palaeophycus tubularis, P. bolbiterminus, Phycodes palmatus, Planolites beverleyensis, Rhizocorallium isp., Rosselia rotatus, R. socialis, and Teichichnus rectus. The ichnofabric analysis divulges five distinct ichnofabrics, each typifying distinct depositional environment within shallow marine conditions. The ichnofabric Ophiomorpha 1 with syn-sedimentary faulting exemplifies high energy conditions typical of lower shoreface environment, whereas the Ophiomorpha 2 ichnofabric typifies upper shoreface environment. The Ancorichnus ichnofabric reflects lower offshore condition of deposition. The high ichnodiversity Ancorichnus–Rosselia ichnofabric is indicative of inner shelf conditions, while low ichno-diversity Teichichnus ichnofabric indicates prevalence of low energy brackish bay environment. Thus, Tithonian Kolar Dongar Member indicates depositional environment ranging from shoreface to offshore to inner shelf and finally to brackish bay environment.

  6. INFLUENCE OF EARLY DIAGENESIS ON MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF INNER SHELF DEPOSITS OF THE EAST CHINA SEA%东海内陆架沉积物磁性特征对早期成岩作用的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡忠行; 张卫国; 董辰寅; 刘莹; 陈静; 俞立中

    2012-01-01

    magnetic minerals to early diagenesis, magnetic measurements can play a significant role in the study of iron migration and transformation in continental shelf deposits.

  7. Quantification of vertical movement of low elevation topography combining a new compilation of global sea-level curves and scattered marine deposits (Armorican Massif, western France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessin, Paul; Guillocheau, François; Robin, Cécile; Braun, Jean; Bauer, Hugues; Schroëtter, Jean-Michel

    2017-07-01

    A wide range of methods are available to quantify Earth's surface vertical movements but most of these methods cannot track low amplitude (5 Ma, e.g. cosmogenic isotope studies) vertical movements characteristic of plate interiors. The difference between the present-day elevation of ancient sea-level markers (deduced from well dated marine deposits corrected from their bathymetry of deposition) and a global sea-level (GSL) curve are sometimes used to estimate these intraplate vertical movements. Here, we formalized this method by re-assessing the reliability of published GSL curves to build a composite curve that combines the most reliable ones at each stage, based on the potential bias and uncertainties inherent to each curve. We suggest i) that curves which reflect ocean basin volume changes are suitable for the ca. 100 to 35 Ma ;greenhouse; period ii) whereas curves that reflects ocean water volume changes are better suited for the ca. 35 to 0 Ma ;icehouse; interval and iii) that, for these respective periods, the fit is best when using curves that accounts for both volume changes. We used this composite GSL curve to investigate the poorly constrained Paleogene to Neogene vertical motions of the Armorican Massif (western France). It is characterized by a low elevation topography, a Variscan basement with numerous well dated Cenozoic marine deposits scattered upon it. Using our method, we identify low amplitude vertical movements ranging from 66 m of subsidence to 89 m of uplift over that time period. Their spatial distribution argues for a preferred scale of deformation at medium wavelengths (i.e., order 100 km), which we relate to the deformation history of northwestern European lithosphere in three distinct episodes. i) A phase of no deformation between 38 and 34 Ma, that has been previously recognized at the scale of northwestern Europe, ii) a phase of low subsidence between 30 and 3.6 Ma, possibly related to buckling of the lithosphere and iii) a phase of

  8. Shallow marine sedimentation within an active margin basin, James Ross Island, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrie, Duncan

    1989-06-01

    The Santa Marta Formation exposed on northern James Ross Island, Antarctica, represents shallow marine shelf sedimentation within an active margin basin. The formation is approximately 1000 m thick, is of uppermost Santonian to Campanian age and represents part of a 5000-6000 m thick sedimentary sequence forming the Larsen Basin. The Larsen Basin represents either a back-arc basin, or a half-graben basin, developed on the extending margin of the Weddell Sea. Twelve sedimentary facies have been recognised, which can be subdivided into two groups: those which are controlled by shelf processes and those which are related to active arc volcanism. Background shelf processes include fair-weather suspension sedimentation, storm sands and rare tidal current reworking. Active arc processes include direct settling of airfall detritus and rapid resedimentation of volcaniclastic detritus by sandy debris-flows and both high- and low-concentration turbidity currents. In addition sheet conglomerates represent debris flows that evolved from syn-sedimentary slumps. Two facies associations representing a mid to outer shelf and an inner shelf depositional setting respectively can be distinguished, with an apparent regression in the ?mid to late Campanian.

  9. Seaweed culture and continental shelf protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przhemenetskaya, V.F.

    1985-07-01

    The initial impression that the resources of the oceans were limitless has been replaced by a more rational appreciation that everything has its limits, including the seemingly infinite resources of marine plant life. In addition, experience in California, Australia, China, Japan and Korea has demonstrated that depletion of seaweed resources for commercial utilization has a deleterious effect on the biocenotic status of the continental shelf. In view of this, many countries, such as Japan, China, Korea, the Philippines and the USSR, have embarked on aquaculture programs, in which seaweeds are cultivated on marine plantations. Successful developments in this direction should go a long way to preserving the natural ecologic balance on the continental shelf, and yet provide mankind with the resources of the deep. Many difficulties remain to be resolved before aquaculture programs become fully cost effective, one of which deals with the susceptibility of a monoculture to a given predator or disease. To that end, such programs necessitate the creation of well balanced systems that would support a variety of marine plant and animal life without an adverse effect on the desired crop. 4 references, 6 figures.

  10. Late Quaternary transgressive large dunes on the sediment-starved Adriatic shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correggiari, A.; Field, M.E.; Trincardi, F.

    1996-01-01

    The Adriatic epicontinental basin is a low-gradient shelf where the late-Quaternary transgressive systems tract (TST) is composed of thin parasequences of backbarrier, shoreface and offshore deposits. The facies and internal architecture of the late-Quaternary TST in the Adriatic epicontinental basin changed consistently from early transgression to late transgression reflecting: (1) fluctuations in the balance between sediment supply and accommodation increase, and (2) a progressive intensification of the oceanographic regime, driven by the transgressive widening of the basin to as much as seven times its lowstand extent. One of the consequences of this trend is that high-energy marine bedforms such as sand ridges and sand waves characterize only areas that were flooded close to the end of the late-Quaternary sea-level rise, when the wind fetch was maximum and bigger waves and stronger storm currents could form. We studied the morphology, sediment composition and sequence-stratigraphical setting of a field of asymmetric bedforms (typically 3 m high and 600 m in wavelength) in 20-24 m water depth offshore the Venice Lagoon in the sediment-starved North Adriatic shelf. The sand that forms these large dunes derived from a drowned transgressive coastal deposit reworked by marine processes. Early cementation took place over most of the dune crests limiting their activity and preventing their destruction. Both the formation and deactivation of this field of sand dunes occurred over a short time interval close to the turn-around point that separates the late-Quaternary sea-level rise and the following highstand and reflect rapid changes in the oceanographic regime of the basin.

  11. Submarine geomorphology of the Celtic Sea - new observations and hypotheses for the glaciation of a mid-latitude continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praeg, Daniel; McCarron, Stephen; Dove, Dayton; Cofaigh, Colm Ó.; Monteys, Xavier; Coxon, Peter; Accettella, Daniella; Cova, Andrea; Facchin, Lorenzo; Romeo, Roberto; Scott, Gill

    2015-04-01

    glacigenic deposits that extends across the shelf, and at least in part overlies the seabed ridges. These observations challenge available models of ridge formation by paleo-tidal deposition and/or erosion during the post-LGM marine transgression, and raise the possibility that they are glacial landforms. We consider two hypotheses: the ridges are paleo-tidal banks formed during the Eemian transgression, overridden by and largely preserved beneath the last BIIS; or they are glaciofluvial landforms (giant eskers and De Geer moraines), the results of meltwater drainage beneath the last ice sheet. We favor the latter hypothesis, which if correct has broad implications for the maximum extent and dynamics of the Irish Sea Ice Stream.

  12. Australian Continental Shelf as an Inverse Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjabin, T.; Pattiaratchi, C. B.; Hetzel, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Transport of inshore waters and suspended material off the continental shelf by Dense Shelf Water Cascades (DSWC) has important ecological and biogeochemical implications in Australian waters. Because of high rates of evaporation, denser saline water along the sea bed occurs in a majority of the shallow coastal regions around Australia, setting up horizontal density gradients that can form DSWC. This study uses data available from the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS), which is operated by the Australian National Facility for Ocean Gliders (ANFOG) located at the University of Western Australia, to measure cross-shelf density profiles under varying conditions around the entire continent. Analysis of 143 transects of 97 sets of spatial and temporal resolution data from the ocean gliders under varying wind and tide conditions for seven contrasting regions surrounding Australia has allowed us to confirm that DSWC occurs on a regular basis during autumn and winter seasons. Results indicate that cascades occur during these seasons mainly due to cooling of the coastal water which already have higher salinity due to evaporation during the summer months. The cascades were present under different wind and tidal energy conditions and the controlling parameter for cascade formation is the cross-shelf density gradient. The cross-shelf density gradient in North-West Australia is maximum in July (14.23x10-6 kgm-4); whereas it is a maximum in June in South Australia (18.78x10-6 kgm-4) and in May in South-West Australia (25.884x10-6 kgm-4). Greater knowledge of the occurrence of DSWC will enhance understanding of the offshore transport of larvae, nutrients, salt, heat, carbon, low-oxygen water, sediment, and pollutants in Australian waters.

  13. Tectonic and eustatic controls of late quaternary shelf sedimentation along the Central California (Santa Cruz) continental margin: high-resolution seismic stratigraphic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Henry T.; Nagel, David K.; Dominguez, Laura L.

    1985-07-01

    A high-resolution "uniboom", seismic stratigraphic investigation of a portion of the central California continental shelf has demonstrated that depositional patterns and sequences are controlled largely by an interplay of glacioeustatic sea-level fluctuations superimposed on local tectonics. Wrench tectonics, associated with active right-lateral shear along the San Gregorio fault zone, and the Pigeon Point Basement High control the location, distribution and overall geometry of depositional sequences via en echelon folding and differential subsidence. Areas of relatively thick and thin late Quaternary sediments conform in large part with structures produced during wrenching. Glacioeustatic sea-level oscillations have also shaped depositional patterns and sequences. Correlation of our seismic stratigraphic data with a southern California continental margin sea-level curve, suggests that during the last glacial maximum, approximately 18,000 yrs ago, a relative lowstand resulted in the erosion of a distinct unconformity upon which late Quaternary sediments have accumulated. A rapid rise of sea level to a relative stillstand, approximately 12,000 yrs ago, produced a concave-up, marine terrace profile across the mid-shelf, that has since been infilled with as much as 22 m of Holocene clastic sediments. A relative drop of sea level, approximately 11,000 yrs ago, allowed sediments to build seaward as a series of prograding clinoforms that form the basal sequences of the late Quaternary sediment fill. The succeeding Holocene transgression partially eroded the top of this earlier regressive sequence, and has now established a typical, wave-graded shelf along which sediments fine in a seaward direction to water depths of 90-100 m. At greater shelf water depths, surface sediments coarsen and appear to be relicts of previous relative sea-level lowstands. The presence of now submerged and buried marine terraces along both the central and southern California continental margins

  14. Fe isotope fractionation during Fe(II) oxidation by the marine photoferrotroph Rhodovulum iodosum in the presence of Si - Implications for Precambrian iron formation deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenfang; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Schoenberg, Ronny; Pan, Yongxin; Kappler, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    The iron (Fe) isotopic composition of Precambrian iron formations (IFs), besides providing geological context through its mineralogical properties, was suggested to function as a biosignature that can be used to infer a potential microbial role in the formation of the deposited Fe minerals. Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (photoferrotrophs), capable of oxidizing Fe(II) anoxically using light energy, were potentially involved in Fe(II) oxidation in anoxic or suboxic Precambrian oceans. The effect of Si on Fe isotopic fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe-Si-co-precipitates has been investigated before. However, it is currently unknown how stable Fe isotopes are fractionated during enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation under marine hydrogeochemical conditions, and particularly how the presence of Si affects the Fe isotope composition and the isotopic exchange among different Fe phases. We therefore studied Fe isotope fractionation during Fe(II) oxidation by the marine photoferrotroph Rhodovulum iodosum in simulated Precambrian seawater amended with 1 mM dissolved Si. Our results show that the change in the Fe isotope compositions over time for both the initial aqueous Fe(II) (Feaq) and the Fe(III) precipitates (Feppt) follow a Rayleigh distillation model. Moreover, the fractionation (ε56Feppt-aq) determined independently from either δ56Feaq or δ56Feppt data resulted in a value of 2.3 ± 0.3 (2SD, N = 6). This value differs from the fractionation factor determined previously for Fe(II) oxidation by R. iodosum in the absence of Si, where the fractionation calculated from δ56Feaq (i.e. 0.96-1.18) was different from that calculated from δ56Feppt (1.96-1.98). This difference was attributed to isotopic exchange processes with soluble and sorbed Fe species. The present study suggests that Si present in Precambrian oceans retards Fe isotopic exchange, likely through combined effects of complexation of dissolved Fe species by Si and sorption of Si to Fe

  15. Modelling the shelf circulation off eastern Tasmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Eric C. J.; Herzfeld, Mike; Holbrook, Neil J.

    2016-11-01

    The marine waters across Tasmanian's eastern continental shelf are biologically productive and home to economically important fisheries and aquaculture industries. However, the marine climate there is poorly understood. We use a high-resolution (∼2 km in the horizontal), three-dimensional ocean model for eastern Tasmania (ETAS) to examine the simulated mean state and seasonal cycle of temperature, salinity and three-dimensional flow field, and the evaluation of daily model outputs against in situ and remote observations for the 1993-2014 period. We also use the model to examine the roles of river input and tidal forcing. The model is evaluated against remotely-sensed sea surface temperature and in-situ observations of sea level and subsurface temperature, salinity, and currents. The mean state demonstrates the influence of two well-known boundary currents (the East Australian Current, EAC, and the Zeehan Current, ZC) as well as the effects of local freshwater input from river runoff. The EAC is dominant in summer and the ZC in winter; the influence of the EAC also increases northwards and in the offshore direction. In addition, the model indicates the presence of a semi-permanent subsurface (50-100 m depth) northward flow trapped near the coast. Cool freshwater runoff from the Derwent and Huon Rivers directly impacts the temperature and salinity in their estuaries but has little influence further across the shelf. Tidal forcing impacts the mean state through tide-river interactions which flush Frederick Henry Bay and Norfolk Bay with freshwater. Tidal forcing also impacts the variability of temperature all along the coastline, most likely due to changes in the turbulent mixing near to the coast. The ETAS model output data are available as a high-resolution representation of the mean state, seasonal variations, and interannual variability of Tasmania's eastern continental shelf marine climate.

  16. Marine bird specimen and other data from the Beaufort/Simpson Lagoon as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 25 June 1978 to 23 September 1978 (NODC Accession 8000051)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird specimen and other data were collected from the Beaufort/Simpson Lagoon from 25 June 1978 to 23 September 1978. Data were collected by the Alaska...

  17. Marine bird specimen and other data from various small vessels as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 24 June 1976 to 11 August 1980 (NODC Accession 8200073)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird specimen and other data were collected from various small vessels from 24 June 1976 to 11 August 1980. Data were collected by the University of Alaska -...

  18. Marine bird habitat and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 February 1976 to 24 March 1976 (NODC Accession 7601879)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird habitat and other data were collected from aircraft from 22 February 1976 to 24 March 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish...

  19. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 07 March 1977 to 19 September 1977 (NODC Accession 7800158)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms from 07 March 1977 to 19 September 1977. Data were collected by the Alaska State...

  20. Marine bird habitat and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 September 1976 to 03 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7700042)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird habitat and other data were collected from aircraft from 30 September 1976 to 03 October 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish...

  1. Marine mammal and other data from aircraft in the Bering Sea and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 10 June 1975 to 18 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7700222)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal and other data were collected from aircraft in the Bering Sea and other locations from 10 June 1975 to 18 June 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska...

  2. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 28 May 1976 to 04 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7601850)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft from 28 May 1976 to 04 August 1976. Data were collected by the Institute of Arctic Biology (IAB)...

  3. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 13 October 1976 to 06 October 1977 (NODC Accession 7800054)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft from 13 October 1976 to 06 October 1977. Data were collected by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  4. Marine animal sighting and census data from the RESOLUTE and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 15 June 1971 to 29 September 1977 (NCEI Accession 7800682)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from the RESOLUTE and other platforms from 15 June 1971 to 29 September 1977. Data were collected by the...

  5. Marine animal sighting and census data from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 11 May 1982 to 19 March 1983 (NODC Accession 8400150)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR from 11 May 1982 to 19 March 1983. Data were collected by the Envirosphere Co. as...

  6. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft from the Beaufort Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 25 May 1982 to 21 September 1982 (NODC Accession 8300121)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft from the Beaufort Sea from 25 May 1982 to 21 September 1982. Data were collected by the Alaska...

  7. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 November 1977 to 21 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8000047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft and other platforms from 22 November 1977 to 21 August 1979. Data were collected by the Alaska...

  8. Marine bird sighting and other data from the Beaufort Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 27 July 1980 to 26 August 1980 (NODC Accession 8100692)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected in the Beaufort Sea from 27 July 1980 to 26 August 1980. Data were collected by the University of California (UC)...

  9. Marine bird sighting and other data from platform in the Bering Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 06 May 1976 to 19 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7700132)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from a platform in the Bering Sea from 06 May 1976 to 19 August 1976. Data were collected by the University of...

  10. Marine bird land sighting and other data from platforms from Pribilof Island as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 23 June 1975 to 11 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601386)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird land sighting and other data were collected from platforms from Pribilof Island from 23 June 1975 to 11 August 1975. Data were collected by the...

  11. Marine bird colony and other data from platforms in the Bering Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 15 June 1975 to 15 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7700654)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird colony and other data were collected from platforms in the Bering Sea from 15 June 1975 to 15 October 1976. Data were collected by the College of the...

  12. Marine bird sighting and other data from platforms in the Beaufort Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 11 June 1975 to 05 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7601518)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from platforms in the Beaufort Sea from 11 June 1975 to 05 September 1975. Data were collected by the University...

  13. Marine bird sighting and other data from platform as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 June 1976 to 24 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7700707)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from a platform from 04 June 1976 to 24 August 1976. Data were collected by the University of Alaska; Institute of...

  14. Marine bird sighting and other data from platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 June 1977 to 09 September 1977 (NODC Accession 7900255)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from platforms from 01 June 1977 to 09 September 1977. Data were collected by the University of California (UC) as...

  15. Marine bird sighting and other data from platforms in the Beaufort Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 08 June 1976 to 17 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700308)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from platforms in the Beaufort Sea from 08 June 1976 to 17 September 1976. Data were collected by the University...

  16. Marine bird sighting and other data from platform as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 08 May 1977 to 18 September 1977 (NODC Accession 7700778)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from a platform from 08 May 1977 to 18 September 1977. Data were collected by the University of Alaska; Institute...

  17. Marine bird sighting and other data from platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 28 May 1978 to 09 September 1978 (NODC Accession 8100312)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from platforms from 28 May 1978 to 09 September 1978. Data were collected by the University of California (UC) as...

  18. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1979-05-07 to 1979-07-18 (NODC Accession 8000466)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 07 May 1979 to 18 July 1979. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  19. Marine bird habitat and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 July 1976 to 31 July 1976 (NODC Accession 7700040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird habitat and other data were collected from aircraft from 30 July 1976 to 31 July 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish and...

  20. Marine bird habitat and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 13 October 1976 to 17 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7700043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird habitat and other data were collected from aircraft from 13 October 1976 to 17 October 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish...

  1. Marine bird habitat and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 21 June 1976 to 25 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7700039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird habitat and other data were collected from aircraft from 21 June 1976 to 25 June 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish and...

  2. Marine bird habitat and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 March 1978 to 04 March 1978 (NODC Accession 7800329)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird habitat and other data were collected from aircraft from 03 March 1978 to 04 March 1978. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish and...

  3. Marine toxic substance and other data from pump casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-04-03 to 1979-07-25 (NODC Accession 8100691)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from pump casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 03 April 1977 to 25 July 1979. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  4. Marine bird sighting and other data from the BARGE and other platforms from Beaufort Sea and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 07 May 1976 to 15 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7800031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from the BARGE and other platforms from the Beaufort Sea and other locations from 07 May 1976 to 15 October 1976....

  5. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 15 May 1976 to 12 August 1978 (NODC Accession 7700862)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft from 15 May 1976 to 12 August 1978. Data were collected by the Point Reyes Bird Observatory (PRBO)...

  6. Marine bird sighting and other data from the GLACIER and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 02 August 1977 to 06 September 1977 (NODC Accession 8100583)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from the GLACIER and other platforms from 02 August 1977 to 06 September 1977. Data were collected by the Point...

  7. Marine bird sighting and other data from the ALUMIAK as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 05 August 1978 to 29 August 1978 (NODC Accession 8000391)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from the ALUMIAK from 05 August 1978 to 29 August 1978. Data were collected by the Point Reyes Bird Observatory...

  8. Marine bird sighting and other data from the BURTON ISLAND and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 July 1975 to 12 August 1978 (NODC Accession 7800157)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from the BURTON ISLAND and other platforms from 30 July 1975 to 12 August 1978. Data were collected by the Point...

  9. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 13 August 1980 to 21 February 1981 (NODC Accession 8100531)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR from 13 August 1980 to 21 February 1981. Data were collected by...

  10. Marine toxic substance and other data from grab casts from the ACONA and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 July 1974 to 31 August 1978 (NODC Accession 8100533)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from grab casts from the ACONA and other platforms from 01 July 1974 to 31 August 1978. Data were collected by...

  11. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts in the Bering Sea from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1981-05-11 to 1981-06-04 (NODC Accession 8200099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Bering Sea from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 11 May 1981 to 04 June 1981. Data were...

  12. Marine toxic substance and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-05-05 to 1979-05-18 (NODC Accession 8100493)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 05 May 1977 to 18 May 1979. Data were collected by the...

  13. Marine toxic substance and other data from grab casts in the Bering Sea from the USCGC POLAR STAR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 29 April 1980 to 28 June 1980 (NODC Accession 8100551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from grab casts in the Bering Sea from the USCGC POLAR STAR from 29 April 1980 to 28 June 1980. Data were...

  14. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from the Beaufort Seas as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 August 1970 (NODC Accession 8100505)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Beaufort Sea from 01 August 1970. Data were collected by the University of Alaska -...

  15. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-05-05 to 1978-05-16 (NCEI Accession 7900274)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 05 May 1978 to 16 May 1978. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  16. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 08 June 1977 to 05 July 1977 (NODC Accession 7800635)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft from 08 June 1977 to 05 July 1977. Data were collected by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks;...

  17. Marine bird habitat and other data from the BARGE and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 28 April 1978 to 16 August 1978 (NODC Accession 7900063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird habitat and other data were collected from the BARGE and other platforms from 28 April 1978 to 16 August 1978. Data were collected by the Alaska State...

  18. Marine animal sighting and census data from various small vessels as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 26 July 1982 to 24 August 1982 (NODC Accession 8300139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from various small vessels from 26 July 1982 to 24 August 1982. Data were collected by the University of Alaska...

  19. Marine bird colony and other data from land platforms on St. George Island as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 June 1975 to 08 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7700108)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird colony and other data were collected from land platforms on St. George Island from 20 June 1975 to 08 August 1975. Data were collected by the University...

  20. Marine bird colony and other data from platforms on as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 15 May 1977 to 05 September 1977 (NODC Accession 7800777)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird colony and other data were collected from platforms from 15 May 1977 to 05 September 1977. Data were collected by the University of California (UC) as...

  1. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 October 1975 to 16 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7700122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft from 01 October 1975 to 16 June 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish...

  2. Marine bird sighting and other data from platform from Kotzebue Sound as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 10 July 1976 to 10 September 1977 (NODC Accession 7900079)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from a platform in the Kotzebue Sound from 10 July 1976 to 10 September 1977. Data were collected by the Institute...

  3. Marine bird sighting, wind, and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-07-02 to 1978-09-01 (NODC Accession 7800821)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting, wind, and other data were collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from 02 July 1975 to 01 September 1978. Data were collected...

  4. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from the USCGC GLACIER and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 August 1977 to 03 September 1977 (NODC Accession 8000247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from the USCGC GLACIER and other platforms from 03 August 1977 to 03 September 1977. Data were...

  5. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from the Beaufort Sea as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 June 1971 (NODC Accession 8100514)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Beaufort Sea from 01 June 1971. Data were collected by the University of Alaska -...

  6. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-03-22 to 1978-08-18 (NODC Accession 8000246)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from 22 March 1977 to 18 August 1978. Data were...

  7. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 12 May 1975 to 22 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601354)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft and other platforms from 12 May 1975 to 22 August 1975. Data were collected by the Institute of...

  8. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 05 May 1981 to 15 August 1981 (NODC Accession 8300084)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft from 05 May 1981 to 15 August 1981. Data were collected by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game...

  9. Marine animal sighting and census data from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 May 1975 to 13 October 1977 (NODC Accession 8000349)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR from 17 May 1975 to 13 October 1977. Data were collected by the U.S. National...

  10. Marine bird sighting and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-08-12 to 1976-11-06 (NODC Accession 7800516)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from 12 August 1975 to 06 November 1976. Data were collected by...

  11. Marine bird habitat and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 April 1976 to 09 May 1976 (NODC Accession 7601878)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird habitat and other data were collected from aircraft from 30 April 1976 to 09 May 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish and...

  12. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 October 1975 to 10 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7601903)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft from 01 October 1975 to 10 June 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish...

  13. Marine bird habitat and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 November 1977 to 13 January 1978 (NODC Accession 7800245)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird habitat and other data were collected from aircraft from 22 November 1977 to 13 January 1978. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish...

  14. Marine bird sighting and other data from platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 June 1976 to 31 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7800255)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from platforms from 17 June 1976 to 31 August 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish and...

  15. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-11-11 to 1978-08-01 (NODC Accession 7900267)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from 11 November 1977 to 01 August 1978. Data...

  16. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 21 April 1975 to 05 October 1977 (NODC Accession 7800812)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms from 21 April 1975 to 05 October 1977.. Data were collected by the Fish and...

  17. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 11 May 1982 to 14 August 1982 (NODC Accession 8400075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft and other platforms from 11 May 1982 to 14 August 1982. Data were collected by Envirosphere Co....

  18. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from core casts from the ALUMINIAK in the Beaufort Sea as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 14 August 1977 to 25 August 1977 (NODC Accession 7900067)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from core casts in the Beaufort Sea from the ALUMINIAK. Data were collected by the University of Alaska -...

  19. Marine mammal specimen and other data from the Bering Sea and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 18 November 1976 to 23 November 1976 (NODC Accession 7800800)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected from the Bering Sea and other locations from 18 November 1976 to 23 November 1976. Data were collected by the...

  20. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 June 1972 to 07 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700541)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft and other platforms from 01 June 1972 to 07 September 1976. Data were collected by the U.S. Fish...

  1. Marine mammal specimen and other data from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 July 1975 to 28 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8100349)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR from 22 July 1975 to 28 August 1979. Data were collected by the University of...

  2. Marine mammal specimen and other data from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 10 February 1977 to 19 November 1977 (NODC Accession 7900320)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected from the SURVEYOR and other platforms from 10 February 1977 to 19 November 1977. Data were collected by the...

  3. Marine mammal specimen and other data from the Beaufort Sea and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 06 May 1979 to 12 October 1981 (NODC Accession 8200202)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected in the Beaufort Sea and other locations from 06 May 1979 to 12 October 1981. Data were collected by the...

  4. Marine mammal specimen and other data from the SURVEYOR and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 March 1977 to 02 November 1977 (NODC Accession 7900319)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected from the SURVEYOR and other platforms from 20 March 1977 to 02 November 1977. Data were collected by the Alaska...

  5. Marine bird habitat and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 April 1976 to 02 April 1976 (NODC Accession 7700098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird habitat and other data were collected from aircraft from 01 April 1976 to 02 April 1976. Data were collected by the Alaska State Department of Fish and...

  6. Marine bird sighting and other data from the COMMANDO and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 16 May 1978 to 09 September 1978 (NODC Accession 8100584)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from the COMMANDO and other platforms from 6 May 1978 to 09 September 1978. Data were collected by the Fish and...

  7. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 09 January 1975 to 09 December 1975 (NODC Accession 7800865)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms. Data were collected by the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) as part of the Outer...

  8. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft and other platforms from the Bering Sea and North Pacific as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 09 February 1976 to 01 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7800904)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms in the Bering Sea and North Pacific. Data were collected by the Fish and...

  9. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 06 March 1975 to 21 March 1976 (NODC Accession 7900039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms. Data were collected by the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) as part of the Outer...

  10. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 18 June 1975 to 04 April 1976 (NODC Accession 7800721)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms from 18 June 1975 to 04 April 1976. Data were collected by the Fish and Wildlife...

  11. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 19 August 1975 to 11 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7700651)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft from 19 August 1975 to 11 October 1976. Data were collected by the College of the Atlantic as part...

  12. Marine bird sighting and other data from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 16 August 1980 to 05 September 1980 (NODC Accession 8100473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR from 16 August 1980 to 05 September 1980. Data were collected by the University of...

  13. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft in the Eastern Chukchi Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 25 July 1978 to 20 August 1978 (NODC Accession 8200032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft in the Eastern Chukchi Sea from 25 July 1978 to 20 August 1978. Data were collected by the...

  14. First results of a high resolution reflection seismic survey of the Central Northern Venezuelan Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, J.; van Welden, A.; Audemard, F.; de Batist, M.; Beck, C.; Scientific Party, G.

    2008-05-01

    In September - November 2007 the first high resolution marine seismic campaign on the North-Central coast of Venezuela was carried out between Cabo Codera and Golfo Triste. The principal aim of this work was to characterize the active San Sebastian Fault (SSF) and to analyze Cenozoic sedimentation on the Venezuela shelf focusing on: i) effects of active tectonics and ii) coastal landslides/flashflood deposits related to 1999 Vargas catastrophic event or to similar phenomena. Data were acquired onboard R/V GUAIQUERI II from the Oceanographic Institute of the Oriente University. The seismic source was a "CENTIPEDE" sparker (RCGM) operated between 300 and 600 J, 1.3 kHz main frequency. We used a single-channel streamer with 10 hydrophones. In total, 49 seismic profiles were collected, with a cumulative length of 1000 km approximately. In these seismic profiles we identified and separated the deposits into three main units. Unit (U1) comprises low energy reflectors mainly dipping in southward direction (i.e. toward the coast bounded by the San Sebastian Fault). This unit also includes a number of isolated acoustic anomalies, which we tentatively interpret as coral reefs. Its top is defined as Basal Erosional Discontinuity (BED) onto which Unit 2 (U2) deposits are onlapping. U2 is acoustically well-stratified, with strong reflectors. Gradual variations in thickness and a wavy configuration allow us to interpret U2 as probably Quaternary current-related deposits. Last Unit (U3) was defined on the Venezuela shelf and corresponds to prograding sequences probably related to the terrigenous input of the Tuy River. Impact of eustatic fluctuations on these deposits are discussed. The data were also used to construct a simplified bathymetry of the studied area. The lateral transition from the western Cariaco-Tuy pull-apart basin to the (single) SSF was clearly imaged (mostly folds and gravity faults). The survey also displayed prograding sediments bodies in La Tortuga Shelf

  15. Large clean mesocosms and simulated dust deposition: a new methodology to investigate responses of marine oligotrophic ecosystems to atmospheric inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guieu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Intense Saharan dust deposition occurs over large oligotrophic areas in the Mediterranean Sea and the Tropical Atlantic and its impact on the biogeochemical functioning of such oligotrophic ecosystems needs to be understood. However, due to the logistical difficulties to investigate in-situ natural dust events and due to the inherent limitations of microcosm laboratory experiments, new experimental approaches need to be developed. In this paper, we present a new experimental set up based on large clean mesocoms deployed in the frame of the DUNE (a DUst experiment in a low-Nutrient, low-chlorophyll Ecosystem project. We demonstrate that these tools are highly relevant and provide a powerful new strategy to in situ study the response of an oligotrophic ecosystem to chemical forcing by atmospheric deposition of African dust. First, we describe how to cope with the large amount of dust aerosol needed to conduct the seeding experiments, by producing an analogue from soil collection in a source area and performing subsequent appropriate physico-chemical treatment in the laboratory including an eventual processing by simulated cloud water. The comparison of physico-chemical characteristics of produced dust analogues with the literature confirms that our experimental simulations are representative of dust, ageing during atmospheric transport, and subsequent deposition to the Mediterranean. Second, we demonstrate the feasibility in coastal area to installing in situ, a series of large (6×52 m3 mesocosms without perturbing the local ecosystem. All the setup, containing no metallic part and with as less as possible induced perturbation during the sampling sequence, allows working with the required conditions for biogeochemical studies in oligotrophic environments where nutrient and micronutrients are at nano- or subnano-molar levels. Two distinct "seeding experiments" were conducted by deploying mesocosms in triplicates: three mesocosms serving

  16. Large clean mesocosms and simulated dust deposition: a new methodology to investigate responses of marine oligotrophic ecosystems to atmospheric inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guieu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Intense Saharan dust deposition occurs over large oligotrophic areas in the Mediterranean Sea and in the Tropical Atlantic, and its impact on the biogeochemical functioning of such oligotrophic ecosystems needs to be understood. However, due to the logistical difficulties of investigating in situ natural dust events, and due to the inherent limitations of microcosm laboratory experiments, new experimental approaches need to be developed. In this paper, we present a new experimental setup based on large, clean mesocoms deployed in the frame of the DUNE (a DUst experiment in a low-Nutrient, low-chlorophyll Ecosystem project. We demonstrate that these tools are highly relevant and provide a powerful new strategy to in situ studies of the response of an oligotrophic ecosystem to chemical forcing by atmospheric deposition of African dust. First, we describe how to cope with the large amount of dust aerosol needed to conduct the seeding experiments by producing an analogue from soil collected in a source area and by performing subsequent appropriate physico-chemical treatments in the laboratory, including an eventual processing by simulated cloud water. The comparison of the physico-chemical characteristics of produced dust analogues with the literature confirms that our experimental simulations are representative of dust, aging during atmospheric transport, and subsequent deposition to the Mediterranean. Second, we demonstrate the feasibility in coastal areas to installing, in situ, a series of large (6 × 52 m3 mesocosms without perturbing the local ecosystem. The setup, containing no metallic parts and with the least possible induced perturbation during the sampling sequence, provides an approach for working with the required conditions for biogeochemical studies in oligotrophic environments, where nutrient and micronutrients are at nano- or subnano-molar levels. Two, distinct "seeding experiments" were conducted by deploying three

  17. Bauxite Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨化洲

    1989-01-01

    Bauxite deposits in China,rangin in age from Late Paleozoic to Cenozoic ,are distributed mainly in Shanxi,Shandong Henan,Guizhou,Guangxi and Yunnan.Based on stratigraphic relations they can be clas-sified as 6 types:inter-system marine,inter-system continental,intra-system marine,intra-system continent-tal,weathering lateritic and weathering accumulation types.But in terms of depositional environments,only four types are distinguished,I.e.the marine deposits,continental deposits,lateritic deposits and weath-ering-accumulation deposits.These deposits have been formed in two steps:firstly,the depression of paraplatform or front basin margins in paleocontinents and secondly,the development of littoral-lagoons on the eroded surface of karstified carbonate bedrocks.The aluminum may have been derived from the carbonate rocks with which the ores are associated,or from adjacent aluminosilicate rocks.

  18. Unraveling signatures of biogeochemical processes and the depositional setting in the molecular composition of pore water DOM across different marine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frauke; Koch, Boris P.; Goldhammer, Tobias; Elvert, Marcus; Witt, Matthias; Lin, Yu-Shih; Wendt, Jenny; Zabel, Matthias; Heuer, Verena B.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in marine sediment pore waters derives largely from decomposition of particulate organic matter and its composition is influenced by various biogeochemical and oceanographic processes in yet undetermined ways. Here, we determine the molecular inventory of pore water DOM in marine sediments of contrasting depositional regimes with ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry and complementary bulk chemical analyses in order to elucidate the factors that shape DOM composition. Our sample sets from the Mediterranean, Marmara and Black Seas covered different sediment depths, ages and a range of marine environments with different (i) organic matter sources, (ii) balances of organic matter production and preservation, and (iii) geochemical conditions in sediment and water column including anoxic, sulfidic and hypersaline conditions. Pore water DOM had a higher molecular formula richness than overlying water with up to 11,295 vs. 2114 different molecular formulas in the mass range of 299-600 Da and covered a broader range of element ratios (H/C = 0.35-2.19, O/C = 0.03-1.19 vs. H/C = 0.56-2.13, O/C = 0.15-1.14). Formula richness was independent of concentrations of DOC and TOC. Near-surface pore water DOM was more similar to water column DOM than to deep pore water DOM from the same core with respect to formula richness and the molecular composition, suggesting exchange at the sediment-water interface. The DOM composition in the deeper sediments was controlled by organic matter source, selective decomposition of specific DOM fractions and early diagenetic molecule transformations. Compounds in pelagic sediment pore waters were predominantly highly unsaturated and N-bearing formulas, whereas oxygen-rich CHO-formulas and aromatic compounds were more abundant in pore water DOM from terrigenous sediments. The increase of S-bearing molecular formulas in the water column and pore waters of the Black Sea and the Mediterranean Discovery Basin was

  19. Lithostratigraphic classification and depositional history of the Permian rocks in Al Qasim Province, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, M. A.

    1993-04-01

    Surface and subsurface investigations on the Permian rocks (Khuff Formation) in Al Qasim Province, Saudi Arabia led to the subdivision of these rocks into two formal rock units. The lower is the Sark Formation and the upper is the Al Watah Formation. The Sark Formation consists of carbonates with interbeds of claystones and marl. Its type locality lies south of Unayzah (lat. 26° 02' N and long.44° 00' E). The Al Watah comprises two members, the lower is the Midhnab Shale Member and the upper is the Khartam Limestone Member. The type section of the Al Watah Formation lies at Jal Al Watah (lat. 26° 30'N and long. 44° 02' E). The Sark Formation exhibits facies change along the strike of the Arabian basin. Southeastwards at Al Arid, the environment was coastal marine, while at Al Mulayh the environment was quiet marine shelf, where the facies are fine-grained wackestones. In Al Qasim Province, the environment is open marine platform where the sequence consists of shallowing-upward carbonate cycles which were deposited under subtidal-supratidal conditions. The Al Watah Formation also shows gradual transition from one environment to another along southeast-northwest direction. At Al Arid, the depositional environment is coastal marine which changes northwestwards at Al Mulayh to lagoonal shelf since the facies are mostly of fine-grained dolostones. In Al Qasim Province, deeper open marine is recognized depositing the Midhnab Shale Member in low sea level and the Khartam Limestone Member in submerged platform (subtidal zone).

  20. Evidence for an ice shelf covering the central Arctic Ocean during the penultimate glaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Martin; Nilsson, Johan; Anderson, Leif; Backman, Jan; Björk, Göran; Cronin, Thomas M; Kirchner, Nina; Koshurnikov, Andrey; Mayer, Larry; Noormets, Riko; O'Regan, Matthew; Stranne, Christian; Ananiev, Roman; Barrientos Macho, Natalia; Cherniykh, Denis; Coxall, Helen; Eriksson, Björn; Flodén, Tom; Gemery, Laura; Gustafsson, Örjan; Jerram, Kevin; Johansson, Carina; Khortov, Alexey; Mohammad, Rezwan; Semiletov, Igor

    2016-01-18

    The hypothesis of a km-thick ice shelf covering the entire Arctic Ocean during peak glacial conditions was proposed nearly half a century ago. Floating ice shelves preserve few direct traces after their disappearance, making reconstructions difficult. Seafloor imprints of ice shelves should, however, exist where ice grounded along their flow paths. Here we present new evidence of ice-shelf groundings on bathymetric highs in the central Arctic Ocean, resurrecting the concept of an ice shelf extending over the entire central Arctic Ocean during at least one previous ice age. New and previously mapped glacial landforms together reveal flow of a spatially coherent, in some regions >1-km thick, central Arctic Ocean ice shelf dated to marine isotope stage 6 (∼ 140 ka). Bathymetric highs were likely critical in the ice-shelf development by acting as pinning points where stabilizing ice rises formed, thereby providing sufficient back stress to allow ice shelf thickening.

  1. Evidence for an ice shelf covering the central Arctic Ocean during the penultimate glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Martin; Nilsson, Johan; Anderson, Leif G.; Backman, Jan; Bjork, Goran; Cronin, Thomas M.; Kirchner, Nina; Koshurnikov, Andrey; Mayer, Larry; Noormets, Riko; O'Regan, Matthew; Stranne, Christian; Ananiev, Roman; Macho, Natalia Barrientos; Cherniykh, Dennis; Coxall, Helen; Eriksson, Bjorn; Floden, Tom; Gemery, Laura; Gustafsson, Orjan; Jerram, Kevin; Johansson, Carina; Khortov, Alexey; Mohammad, Rezwan; Semiletov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis of a km-thick ice shelf covering the entire Arctic Ocean during peak glacial conditions was proposed nearly half a century ago. Floating ice shelves preserve few direct traces after their disappearance, making reconstructions difficult. Seafloor imprints of ice shelves should, however, exist where ice grounded along their flow paths. Here we present new evidence of ice-shelf groundings on bathymetric highs in the central Arctic Ocean, resurrecting the concept of an ice shelf extending over the entire central Arctic Ocean during at least one previous ice age. New and previously mapped glacial landforms together reveal flow of a spatially coherent, in some regions >1-km thick, central Arctic Ocean ice shelf dated to marine isotope stage 6 (~140 ka). Bathymetric highs were likely critical in the ice-shelf development by acting as pinning points where stabilizing ice rises formed, thereby providing sufficient back stress to allow ice shelf thickening.

  2. Core descriptions, core photographs, physical property logs and surface textural data of sediment cores recovered from the continental shelf of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary during the research cruises M-1-95-MB, P-2-95-MB, and P-1-97-MB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, Kevin M.; Dahl, Wendy E.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2001-01-01

    In response to the 1992 creation of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS), the United States Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a multiyear investigation of the Sanctuary continental margin. As part of the investigative effort, this report summarizes the shipboard procedures, subsequent laboratory analyses, and data results from three seafloor sampling cruises conducted on the continental shelf between Monterey peninsula, CA and San Francisco, CA. The cruises were conducted in 1995 aboard the NOAA Ship McArthur (M-1-95-MB) and in 1995 and 1997 aboard the R/V Point Sur (P-2-95-MB and P-1-97-MB). Scientists and representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), and the San Jose State University Moss Landing Marine Laboratory (SJSU-MLML) supported the research effort. In this report we present sediment descriptions, sediment textural data, physical property logs, station metadata, and photographs of subcores from a total of three hundred and eighty four sample stations. At these sites either a box corer, MultiCore™r, grab sampler or a combination of these sampling devices were used to collect the sea floor sediments. The report is presented in an interactive web-based format with each mapped core station linked to the corresponding description and photo, and to a spreadsheet of surface texture and other sampling data.

  3. Holocene sediment dynamics on a cool-water carbonate shelf: Otway, southeastern Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreen, T.D.; James, N.P. (Queen' s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-07-01

    The Otway Shelf is covered by cool waters and veneered by bryozoan-dominated carbonate sediments. Radiocarbon dating and stratigraphy of shelf vibracores and slope gravity cores document late Pleistocene/Holocene deposition. Shelf sediments of the late Pleistocene high-stand are rare, either never having been deposited or having been removed during the following sea-level fall. During the subsequent lowstand the shelf was exposed, facies shifted basinward, and beach/dune complexes were constructed near the shelf edge. The deep shelf was characterized by nondeposition and hardground formation, and the shelf margin became locally erosional. Upper-slope bryozoan/sponge assemblages continued to grow actively, and lower-slope foraminifera and nannofossil ooze was increasingly enriched in hemipelagic terrigenous mud swept off the wide shelf. Coarse shelf debris and lowstand dune sands were erosively reworked and transported onto the upper slope and redistributed to deep-slope aprons during early transgression. The late Quaternary shelf record resembles that of flat-topped, warm-water platforms with Holocene sediment overlying Pleistocene/Tertiary limestone, but for different reasons. The slow growth potential, uniform profile of sediment production and distribution, and inability of constituent organisms to construct rigid frameworks favor maintenance of a shallow ramp profile and makes the cool-water carbonate system an excellent modern analog for interpretation of many ancient ramp successions.

  4. A land micro-mammal fauna from the Early Eocene marine Egem deposits (NP12, Belgium) and the first occurrence of the peradectid marsupial Armintodelphys outside North America

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, T.; Smith, R

    2013-01-01

    Dental remains of land mammals are sometimes discovered in shallow marine Paleogene deposits of the North Sea Basin. Such is the case for eleven specimens we describe here from the Early Eocene Egemkapel Clay Member in the middle part of the Tielt Formation, found in Ampe quarry at Egem in Northwestern Belgium. The small fauna consists of 6 taxa, including the neoplagiaulacid multituberculate Ectypodus, the erinaceomorph insectivore Macrocranion, the nyctitheriid Leptacodon, an eochiropteran ...

  5. Calcium isotope constraints on the marine carbon cycle and CaCO3 deposition during the late Silurian (Ludfordian) positive δ13C excursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkaš, Juraj; Frýda, Jiří; Holmden, Chris

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates calcium isotope variations (δ 44 / 40 Ca) in late Silurian marine carbonates deposited in the Prague Basin (Czech Republic), which records one of the largest positive carbon isotope excursion (CIE) of the entire Phanerozoic, the mid-Ludfordian CIE, which is associated with major climatic changes (abrupt cooling) and global sea-level fluctuations. Our results show that during the onset of the CIE, when δ13 C increases rapidly from ∼0‰ to ∼8.5‰, δ 44 / 40Ca remains constant at about 0.3 ± 0.1 ‰ (relative to NIST 915a), while 87Sr/86Sr in well-preserved carbonates are consistent with a typical Ludfordian seawater composition (ranging from ∼0.70865 to ∼0.70875). Such decoupling between δ13 C and δ 44 / 40Ca trends during the onset of the CIE is consistent with the expected order-of-magnitude difference in the residence times of Ca (∼106yr) and C (∼105yr) in the open ocean, suggesting that the mid-Ludfordian CIE was caused by processes where the biogeochemical pathways of C and Ca in seawater were mechanistically decoupled. These processes may include: (i) near shore methanogenesis and photosynthesis, (ii) changes in oceanic circulation and stratification, and/or (iii) increased production and burial of organic C in the global ocean. The latter, however, is unlikely due to the lack of geological evidence for enhanced organic C burial, and also because of unrealistic parameterization of the ocean C cycle needed to generate the observed CIE over the relatively short time interval. In contrast, higher up in the section where δ13 C shifts back to pre-excursion baseline values, there is a correlated shift to higher δ 44 / 40Ca values. Such coupling of the records of Ca and C isotope changes in this part of the study section is inconsistent with the abovementioned differences in oceanic Ca and C residence times, indicating that the record of δ 44 / 40Ca changes does not faithfully reflect the evolution of the oceanic Ca

  6. Southeast continental shelf studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, D.W.

    1979-02-12

    Research efforts on the southeast continental shelf currently describe the manner in which fluctuations in Gulf Stream motion influence biological and chemical processes. Current meter arrays are maintained in the Georgia Bight and in Onslow Bay to describe general circulation patterns and to identify forcing functions. biological studies describe processes affecting temporal and spatial variations on the shelf and have attempted to track the biological history of intruded Gulf Stream water masses. Chemical studies examine the influence of both physical and biological variables on the distribution and fate of trace elements. The current state of knowledge is reviewed, the hypotheses developed and are described, a rationale for testing these hypotheses is given. 1 figure, 1 table.

  7. Searching for tsunamis evidences on the Algarve (Southern Portugal) continental shelf sedimentary record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Teresa; Silva, Pedro; Lopes, Ana; Magalhães, Vitor; Roque, Cristina; Rodrigues, Ana Isabel; Noiva, João; Terrinha, Pedro; Mena, Anxo; Francés, Guillermo; Kopf, Achim; Völker, David; Omira, Rachid; Baptista, Maria Ana

    2016-04-01

    Tsunami hazard assessment is important in order to prevent and/or minimize its effects, which is only possible if a complete and long record dataset of past events is available, allowing the estimation of their recurrence intervals. The knowledge of past tsunami events are based on instrumental, historical and geological records. Although instrumental and historical records are reliable sources they are limited in time. Geological records can give a much more extended reconstruction overview of thousand years, which can provide a good estimation of tsunami return periods. Most of the existing studies have been conducted onshore and only a few were based on offshore sedimentary record. These last ones, have the advantage to provide a more continuous and almost undisturbed records but the identification of tsunami sediments in marine environment require a multi-proxy approach in order to better identify the allochtonous layers/deposits and to differentiate them from storm deposits. In the context of ASTARTE project (FP7), five gravity and piston cores on the southern Portuguese continental shelf collected in 2008 and 2014 were studied. The methodology included XRF, MSCL, sedimentological and magnetic analyses. Preliminary results show some identifiable layers that may related with allochthonous sedimentary material, compatible with a genesis resulting from tsunami backwash sediment transport and deposition. Acknowledgments - Publication supported by project FCT UID/GEO/50019/2013 - Instituto Dom Luiz.

  8. Dynamics of marine ecosystems: biological-physical interactions in the oceans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mann, K.H; Lazier, J.R.N

    2006-01-01

    .... Dynamics of Marine Ecosystems considers the influence of physical forcing on biological processes in a wide range of marine habitats including coastal estuaries, shelf-break fronts, major ocean gyres...

  9. A note on cross-shelf exchange in the northern Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, C.; Stabeno, P.; Cokelet, E. D.

    2005-03-01

    The continental shelf of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) is a complex system characterized by large freshwater runoff and strong winds. The GOA supports one of the world's richest ecosystems, including numerous species of fishes, marine mammals and sea birds. The mechanisms that provide nutrients to support this ecosystem are not well understood. The rivers and streams that provide freshwater to the shelf are low in nitrate, and the regional winds favor downwelling. High concentrations of nitrate are available in the deep basin of the GOA, but these must be introduced to the shelf in order to support the high productivity. We present evidence for cross-shelf exchange due to three different mechanisms. Episodes of downwelling relaxation result in a flux of saline, nutrient-rich water onto the shelf at depth. Eddies, formed in the northeastern GOA, propagate along the shelf-break influencing cross-shelf exchange by carrying shelf-origin water from the formation region into the basin and by interacting with the shelf-break circulation. Bathymetric steering in the many canyons that incise the GOA shelf results in flow into the canyons where strong tidal mixing results in cross-isobath movement of water properties.

  10. Les granulats marins

    OpenAIRE

    Augris, Claude; Cressard, Alain

    1984-01-01

    Urbanization and the protection of sites and ground waters reduce the number of alluvial aggregate exploitation areas. The ocean provides different substitution possibilities. In France, marine aggregates represent a substantial potential in the supply of material from coastal regions. A large number of cruises on the French continental shelf, using different exploration (seismic, drilling, dredging) and identification techniques, enabled the C.N.E.X.O. to make an inventory of the resources a...

  11. Actinobacterial diversity across a marine transgression in the deep subsurface off Shimokita Peninsula, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, B. K.; Bailey, J. V.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment horizons represent a significant - but not permanent - barrier to microbial transport. Cells commonly attach to mineral surfaces in unconsolidated sediments. However, by taxis, growth, or passive migration under advecting fluids, some portion of the microbial community may transgress sedimentary boundaries. Few studies have attempted to constrain such transport of community signatures in the marine subsurface and its potential impact on biogeography. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 337 off the Shimokita Peninsula recovered sediments over a greater than 1km interval representing a gradual decrease of terrestrial influence, from tidal to continental shelf depositional settings. This sequence represents a key opportunity to link subsurface microbial communities to lithological variability and investigate the permanence of community signatures characteristic of distinct depositional regimes. The phylogenetic connectivity between marine and terrestrially-influenced deposits may demonstrate to what degree sediments offer a substantial barrier to cell transport in the subsurface. Previous work has demonstrated that the Actinobacterial phylum is broadly distributed in marine sediments (Maldonado et al., 2005), present and active in the deep subsurface (Orsi et al., 2013), and that marine and terrestrial lineages may potentially be distinguished by 16S rRNA gene sequencing (e.g. Prieto-Davó et al., 2013). We report on Actinobacteria-specific 16S rRNA gene diversity recovered between 1370 and 2642 mbsf with high-throughput sequencing using the Illumina MiSeq platform, as well as selective assembly and analysis of environmental clone libraries.

  12. Evolution of Geochemical and Mineralogical Parameters during In Situ Remediation of a Marine Shore Tailings Deposit by the Implementation of a Wetland Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouhou Diaby

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present data of the time-evolution of a remediation approach on a marine shore tailings deposit by the implementation of an artificial wetland. Two remediation cells were constructed: one in the northern area at sea-level and one in the central delta area (above sea-level of the tailings. At the beginning, the “sea-level” remediation cell had a low pH (3.1, with high concentrations of dissolved metals and sulfate and chloride ions and showed sandy grain size. After wetland implementation, the “sea-level” remediation cell was rapidly water-saturated, the acidity was consumed, and after four months the efficiency of metal removal from solution was up to 79.5%–99.4% for Fe, 94.6%–99.9% for Mn, and 96.1%–99.6% for Zn. Al and Cu concentrations decreased below detection limit. The “above sea-level” remediation cell was characterized by the same pH (3.1 and finer grain size (clayey–silty, and with some lower element concentrations than in the “sea-level” cell. Even after one year of flooding, the “above sea-level” cell was not completely flooded, showing on-going sulfide oxidation in between the wetland cover and the groundwater level; the pH increased only to 4.4 and metal concentrations decreased only by 96% for Fe, 88% for Al, 51% for Cu, 97% for Mn, and 95% for Zn. During a dry period, the water level dropped in the “sea-level” cell, resulting in a seawater ingression, which triggered the desorption of As into solution. These data show that the applied remediation approach for this tailings deposit is successful, if the system is maintained water-saturated. Metal removal from solution was possible in both systems: first, as a result of sorption on Fe(III hydroxide/and/or clay minerals and/or co-precipitation processes after rise of pH; and then, with more reducing conditions, due to metal sulfides precipitation.

  13. Composite Phymatoderma from Neogene deep-marine deposits in Japan: Implications for Phanerozoic benthic interactions between burrows and the trace-makers of Chondrites and Phycosiphon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Izumi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Among composite trace fossils, one of the most common structures throughout the Phanerozoic are structures (e.g., dwelling trace, feeding trace reworked by Chondrites and/or Phycosiphon. However, differences in the nature of the reworking behaviors of these two ichnogenera remain unknown. Thus, in this study, composite Phymatoderma specimens from the Neogene deep-marine Shiramazu Formation in Japan, particularly those reworked by Chondrites and Phycosiphon, were analyzed to reveal the specific conditions that might control the activities of these trace-makers. Phymatoderma reworked by Phycosiphon is significantly larger than non-reworked Phymatoderma, whereas Phymatoderma reworked by Chondrites shows no significant difference in burrow diameter compared with non-reworked Phymatoderma. The recognized size selectivity (i.e., preference for larger burrows by the Phycosiphon trace-maker can be explained by considering the different feeding strategies of these two ichnogenera; namely deposit-feeding Phycosiphon-makers, which must have processed a significant mass of sediment to obtain sufficient organic matter, whereas chemosymbiotic Chondrites-producers did not require a lot of sediment to obtain nutrients. In order to test these interpretations, a dataset of Phanerozoic trace fossils reworked by Chondrites/Phycosiphon were compiled. Consequently, the Phycosiphon-producers’ preference toward relatively larger burrows was recognized, quantitatively supporting the results of this study. The compilation also indicates that the burrow size might have become one of the important limiting factors for the Phycosiphon-producers that tried to rework the sediments within previous subsurface burrows, at least for 80 million years.

  14. Phosphate geochemistry, mineralization processes, and Thioploca distribution in shelf sediments off central Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmkvist, Lars; Arning, Esther T.; Küster-Heins, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    mineralization, and occurrence of dense communities of the filamentous sulfur bacteria, Thioploca spp., on the continental shelf off central Chile during the austral summer when high phytoplankton productivity and anoxic bottom water prevailed. Freshly deposited phytodetritus stimulated extremely high sulfate...

  15. Phosphate geochemistry, mineralization processes, and Thioploca distribution in shelf sediments off central Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmkvist, Lars; Arning, Esther T.; Küster-Heins, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    mineralization, and occurrence of dense communities of the filamentous sulfur bacteria, Thioploca spp., on the continental shelf off central Chile during the austral summer when high phytoplankton productivity and anoxic bottom water prevailed. Freshly deposited phytodetritus stimulated extremely high sulfate...

  16. Salinity variability along the eastern continental shelf of Canada and the United States, 1973-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisagni, James J.

    2016-09-01

    Continental shelf waters located off the east coast of Canada and the United States are part of a long shelf current system that is partly comprised of colder, less-saline waters originating from high latitudes, including waters from the North Atlantic sub-polar gyre, along with ice-melt and freshwater input from local rivers. A 41-year analysis (1973-2013) of near-surface salinity (NSS) using three hydrographic datasets (Bedford Institute of Oceanography "Climate", NOAA/ESDIM, and Canadian Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS)) allowed an examination of NSS variability within 11 continental shelf sub-regions, extending from the southern Newfoundland Shelf of eastern Canada to the DelMarVa/Hatteras Shelf of the United States. Although the periods of record containing sufficient data vary between sub-regions, regional mean NSS values are lowest within the Gulf of St. Lawrence and highest on the DelMarVa/Hatteras shelf, with largest annual variability within the Gulf of St. Lawrence. After removal of outliers, long-term linear trends computed from annual mean NSS were detected along the Newfoundland Shelf (+0.011 y-1), Western Scotian Shelf (-0.007 y-1), Gulf of Maine (-0.014 y-1), Georges Bank (-0.011 y-1), and DelMarVa/Hatteras Shelf (+0.024 y-1). A long-term quadratic fit to annual mean NSS from the Eastern Scotian Shelf displays a salinity increase through 1992 of +0.026 y-1, decreasing thereafter until 2013 by -0.028 y-1. A quadratic fit for the Western Grand Banks displays a NSS increase through 2007 of +0.022 y-1, decreasing thereafter through 2013 by -0.006 y-1. Annual mean NSS from the Eastern Grand Banks, Tail of the Grand Banks, Gulf of St. Lawrence, and Middle Atlantic Bight display no long-term trends. Inter-annual variability (IAV) of NSS residuals shows similar small mean squared error (mse) of 0.02-0.04 for the four northern-most sub-regions (Newfoundland Shelf, Eastern, Tail and Western Grand Banks) and are correlated at 0-year lag. IAV of NSS

  17. Comparative taphonomy, taphofacies, and bonebeds of the Mio-Pliocene Purisima Formation, central California: strong physical control on marine vertebrate preservation in shallow marine settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Boessenecker

    Full Text Available Taphonomic study of marine vertebrate remains has traditionally focused on single skeletons, lagerstätten, or bonebed genesis with few attempts to document environmental gradients in preservation. As such, establishment of a concrete taphonomic model for shallow marine vertebrate assemblages is lacking. The Neogene Purisima Formation of Northern California, a richly fossiliferous unit recording nearshore to offshore depositional settings, offers a unique opportunity to examine preservational trends across these settings.Lithofacies analysis was conducted to place vertebrate fossils within a hydrodynamic and depositional environmental context. Taphonomic data including abrasion, fragmentation, phosphatization, articulation, polish, and biogenic bone modification were recorded for over 1000 vertebrate fossils of sharks, bony fish, birds, pinnipeds, odontocetes, mysticetes, sirenians, and land mammals. These data were used to compare both preservation of multiple taxa within a single lithofacies and preservation of individual taxa across lithofacies to document environmental gradients in preservation. Differential preservation between taxa indicates strong preservational bias within the Purisima Formation. Varying levels of abrasion, fragmentation, phosphatization, and articulation are strongly correlative with physical processes of sediment transport and sedimentation rate. Preservational characteristics were used to delineate four taphofacies corresponding to inner, middle, and outer shelf settings, and bonebeds. Application of sequence stratigraphic methods shows that bonebeds mark major stratigraphic discontinuities, while packages of rock between discontinuities consistently exhibit onshore-offshore changes in taphofacies.Changes in vertebrate preservation and bonebed character between lithofacies closely correspond to onshore-offshore changes in depositional setting, indicating that the dominant control of preservation is exerted by physical

  18. Comparative taphonomy, taphofacies, and bonebeds of the Mio-Pliocene Purisima Formation, central California: strong physical control on marine vertebrate preservation in shallow marine settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessenecker, Robert W; Perry, Frank A; Schmitt, James G

    2014-01-01

    Taphonomic study of marine vertebrate remains has traditionally focused on single skeletons, lagerstätten, or bonebed genesis with few attempts to document environmental gradients in preservation. As such, establishment of a concrete taphonomic model for shallow marine vertebrate assemblages is lacking. The Neogene Purisima Formation of Northern California, a richly fossiliferous unit recording nearshore to offshore depositional settings, offers a unique opportunity to examine preservational trends across these settings. Lithofacies analysis was conducted to place vertebrate fossils within a hydrodynamic and depositional environmental context. Taphonomic data including abrasion, fragmentation, phosphatization, articulation, polish, and biogenic bone modification were recorded for over 1000 vertebrate fossils of sharks, bony fish, birds, pinnipeds, odontocetes, mysticetes, sirenians, and land mammals. These data were used to compare both preservation of multiple taxa within a single lithofacies and preservation of individual taxa across lithofacies to document environmental gradients in preservation. Differential preservation between taxa indicates strong preservational bias within the Purisima Formation. Varying levels of abrasion, fragmentation, phosphatization, and articulation are strongly correlative with physical processes of sediment transport and sedimentation rate. Preservational characteristics were used to delineate four taphofacies corresponding to inner, middle, and outer shelf settings, and bonebeds. Application of sequence stratigraphic methods shows that bonebeds mark major stratigraphic discontinuities, while packages of rock between discontinuities consistently exhibit onshore-offshore changes in taphofacies. Changes in vertebrate preservation and bonebed character between lithofacies closely correspond to onshore-offshore changes in depositional setting, indicating that the dominant control of preservation is exerted by physical processes. The

  19. Marine Habitat Mapping for the Norwegian Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Noji, Thomas; Thorsnes, Terje; Fosså, Jan Helge

    2000-01-01

    An initiative is currently being taken by several Norwegian organizations to obtain funds to intensify ongoing investigations on marine sea-floor mapping off Norway. Led by the Geological Survey of Norway and Institute of Marine Research, planning during the last two years has led to the inception of a large-scale mapping project entitled “MAREANO - Marine Areal Database for the Norwegian Sea”. The investigation area covers 270 000 km2 of the shelf and deep sea off the central ...

  20. Microbial ecology of marinated meat products

    OpenAIRE

    Björkroth, Johanna

    2004-01-01

    www.elsevier.com/locate/meatsci Marinated meat products are consumed increasingly because they are convenient in meal preparing. In addition to sensory effects, marinating has been considered to increase product safety and shelf life quality. There are variations in meat marinating technologies around the world. In Finland, marinades are complex sauces which have a great effect on product appearance and taste. They are water-oil emulsions typically containing salt, sugar and acids (acetic,...

  1. Antarctica - Ross Ice Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This color picture of Antarctica is one part of a mosaic of pictures covering the entire polar continent taken during the hours following Galileo's historic first encounter with its home planet. The view shows the Ross Ice Shelf to the right and its border with the sea. An occasional mountain can be seen poking through the ice near the McMurdo Station. It is late spring in Antarctica, so the sun never sets on the frigid, icy continent. This picture was taken about 6:20 p.m. PST on December 8, 1990. From top to bottom, the frame looks across about half of Antarctica.

  2. Modelling temporal and spatial dynamics of benthic fauna in North-West-European shelf seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessin, Gennadi; Bruggeman, Jorn; Artioli, Yuri; Butenschön, Momme; Blackford, Jerry

    2017-04-01

    Benthic zones of shallow shelf seas receive high amounts of organic material. Physical processes such as resuspension, as well as complex transformations mediated by diverse faunal and microbial communities, define fate of this material, which can be returned to the water column, reworked within sediments or ultimately buried. In recent years, numerical models of various complexity and serving different goals have been developed and applied in order to better understand and predict dynamics of benthic processes. ERSEM includes explicit parameterisations of several groups of benthic biota, which makes it particularly applicable for studies of benthic biodiversity, biological interactions within sediments and benthic-pelagic coupling. To assess model skill in reproducing temporal (inter-annual and seasonal) dynamics of major benthic macrofaunal groups, 1D model simulation results were compared with data from the Western Channel Observatory (WCO) benthic survey. The benthic model was forced with organic matter deposition rates inferred from observed phytoplankton abundance and model parameters were subsequently recalibrated. Based on model results and WCO data comparison, deposit-feeders exert clear seasonal variability, while for suspension-feeders inter-annual variability is more pronounced. Spatial distribution of benthic fauna was investigated using results of a full-scale NEMO-ERSEM hindcast simulation of the North-West European Shelf Seas area, covering the period of 1981-2014. Results suggest close relationship between spatial distribution of biomass of benthic faunal functional groups in relation to bathymetry, hydrodynamic conditions and organic matter supply. Our work highlights that it is feasible to construct, implement and validate models that explicitly include functional groups of benthic macrofauna. Moreover, the modelling approach delivers detailed information on benthic biogeochemistry and food-web at spatial and temporal scales that are unavailable

  3. Total Petroleum Systems of the Northwest Shelf, Australia: The Dingo-Mungaroo/Barrow and the Locker-Mungaroo/Barrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michele G.

    1999-01-01

    The Northwest Shelf Province (U.S.G.S. #3948) of Australia contains two important hydrocarbon source-rock intervals and numerous high quality reservoir intervals. These are grouped into two petroleum systems, Dingo-Mungaroo/Barrow and Locker-Mungaroo/Barrow, where the Triassic Mungaroo Formation and the Early Cretaceous Barrow Group serve as the major reservoir rocks for the Jurassic Dingo Claystone and Triassic Locker Shale source rocks. The primary source rock, Dingo Claystone, was deposited in restricted marine conditions during the Jurassic subsidence of a regional sub-basin trend. The secondary source rock, Locker Shale, was deposited in terrestrially-influenced, continental seaway conditions during the Early Triassic at the beginning of the breakup of Pangea. These systems share potential reservoir rocks of deep-water, proximal and distal deltaic, marginal marine, and alluvial origins, ranging in age from Late Triassic through Cretaceous. Interformational seals and the regional seal, Muderong Shale, along with structural and stratigraphic traps account for the many types of hydrocarbon accumulations in this province. In 1995, the Northwest Shelf produced 42% of the hydrocarbon liquids in Australia, and in 1996 surpassed the Australian Bass Straits production, with 275,000 barrels per day (bpd) average. This region is the major producing province of Australia. Known reserves as of 1995 are estimated at 11.6 billion of barrels of oil equivalent (BBOE)(Klett and others, 1997) . Although exploration has been conducted since 1955, many types of prospects have not been targeted and major reserves continue to be discovered.

  4. Sources, Fate and Distribution of Organic Matter on the Western Adriatic Continental Shelf, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesi, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.tesi@bo.ismar.cnr.it; Miserocchi, Stefano; Langone, Leonardo [ISMAR-CNR, Sede di Bologna - Geologia Marina (Italy); Boni, Laurita; Guerrini, Franca [Universita di Bologna, Laboratorio di Biologia e Fisiologia Algale, Sc. Ambientali (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    In the framework of the EUROSTRATAFORM projects, a multidisciplinary research was focused on processes that involve transport and deposition of riverine material in the Adriatic Sea. The aim of our contribution was to increase a more complete understanding of organic matter deposition on the Adriatic shelf, also taking into account the role of Apennine rivers beyond the Po influence. In order to characterize origin, fate and variability of sedimentary organic carbon we utilized elemental and stable carbon isotope data in surficial sediments along shallow cross-shelf transects on the western Adriatic shelf.

  5. Boundary condition of grounding lines prior to collapse, Larsen-B Ice Shelf, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebesco, M; Domack, E; Zgur, F; Lavoie, C; Leventer, A; Brachfeld, S; Willmott, V; Halverson, G; Truffer, M; Scambos, T; Smith, J; Pettit, E

    2014-09-12

    Grounding zones, where ice sheets transition between resting on bedrock to full floatation, help regulate ice flow. Exposure of the sea floor by the 2002 Larsen-B Ice Shelf collapse allowed detailed morphologic mapping and sampling of the embayment sea floor. Marine geophysical data collected in 2006 reveal a large, arcuate, complex grounding zone sediment system at the front of Crane Fjord. Radiocarbon-constrained chronologies from marine sediment cores indicate loss of ice contact with the bed at this site about 12,000 years ago. Previous studies and morphologic mapping of the fjord suggest that the Crane Glacier grounding zone was well within the fjord before 2002 and did not retreat further until after the ice shelf collapse. This implies that the 2002 Larsen-B Ice Shelf collapse likely was a response to surface warming rather than to grounding zone instability, strengthening the idea that surface processes controlled the disintegration of the Larsen Ice Shelf.

  6. Polychaete community structure of Indian west coast shelf, Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joydas, T.V.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Damodaran, R.

    CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 97, NO. 5, 10 SEPTEMBER 2009 634 Polychaete community structure of Indian west coast shelf, Arabian Sea Ellis 1 introduced the concept of taxono- mic sufficiency (TS) in which identifica- tion is required only to the level... the effects of pollution on marine communities. As TS moves progressively to species, costs, in terms of the expertise and time needed to identify organisms, decrease 4 . It is quicker and easier to train personnel to sort higher taxonomic levels than...

  7. Acid-labile sulfides in shallow marine bottom sediments: A review of the impact on ecosystems in the Azov Sea, the NE Black Sea shelf and NW Adriatic lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Yu. I.; Zakuskina, O. Yu

    2012-02-01

    Acid-labile sulfides (LS) increase in bottom sediments at sites in the Azov Sea, at the NE Black Sea shelf and in the coastal lagoons of NW Adriatic Sea experiencing direct impacts of anthropogenic pollution. Fresh anthropogenic organic matter stimulates the bacterial sulfate reduction and here the rate of the LS production overcomes their loss during the oxidation and pyritization. This results in the expansion of reduced sediment layer up to the bottom surface. The LS concentration in the reduced sediments varies between 300 and 2000 mg S l -1 of wet silt depending on the size of pollution loading and on the rate of sedimentation. In the oxidized sediments away from the direct pollution impact, the LS concentration did not exceed 100-150 mg S l -1. Being a strong cytochrome toxin, the LS adversely affect the coastal ecosystems. The concentrations over 600 mg S l -1 result in quasi total benthic mortality whereas >300-400 mg S l -1 depletes the benthic faunal abundance and taxonomic diversity. Accumulation of the LS in sediments also induces nocturnal hypoxia and stimulates domination of toxic cyanobacteria in the pelagic phytocenoses.

  8. Heavy minerals occurrences in the continental shelf inner/mean west of CearÃ

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Borges de Aguiar Neto

    2015-01-01

    This study embraces the west continental shelf of Cearà (147 samples of marine sediments) and two fluvial courses (4 sediment samples of Curu and SÃo GonÃalo rivers) to determine heavy minerals distribution with their possible provenances and economic potential. Sedimentary facies on the continental shelf were distinguished through the particle size and calcium carbonate content. Heavy minerals were investigated for their total content (%), relative abundance (%) of each mineral species, conc...

  9. Cosmetics Safety Q&A: Shelf Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources for You Consumers Cosmetics Safety Q&A: Shelf Life Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Email Print FAQs Main Page What is the shelf life of cosmetics? The shelf life for eye- ...

  10. Ice streaming in western Scotland and the deglaciation of the Hebrides Shelf and Firth of Lorn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Riccardo; Howe, John; O'Cofaigh, Colm; Crocket, Kirsty

    2014-05-01

    Previously, numerous studies have been undertaken both onshore and offshore to decipher the morphological and sedimentological record in order to better constrain the limits and duration of the British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) (Ballantyne et al. 2009, Bradwell et al. 2008b, Clark et al. 2011, Dunlop et al. 2010, Howe et al. 2012, O'Cofaigh et al., 2012). Late glacial ice sheet dynamics have been revealed to be far more rapid and responsive to climatic amelioration than had previously been considered. Notable in this debate has been the evidence that has been obtained in the inshore and, to a lesser extent, offshore on the UK continental shelf. Here new geomorphological data, principally multibeam echo sounder (MBES) data has provided imagery of previously unseen features interpreted as being glacial in origin. In the wake of these new discoveries this projects aims to investigate the extent, timing, growth and final disintegration of the BIIS across Western Scotland. This area of particular interest for the development of the glaciated North Atlantic margin has been generally neglected in past studies, especially across the mid-outer shelf, which constitutes a missing part in the jigsaw of the reconstructed BIIS during the last ~20.000yrs. We aim to mainly focus on geomorphological analyses of MBES data collected in the Firth of Lorn and Sea of Hebrides; a study of features as moraines, glacial lineations and drumlins will provide important clues on the dynamics and maximum extension of the sheet. Subsequently we will examine the geometry and composition of the shelf sediment infill, aiming to constrain the influence of ice retreat on depositional environments using multi-element geochemical (Pb-isotopes ratios, 14C and OSL dating) and sedimentological techniques. Such an investigation will also give retrospective information on the sources for these sediments, hence more indications on ice configuration. Ultimately we aim to provide a model of deglaciation for the

  11. The marine diversity spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuman, Daniel C.; Gislason, Henrik; Barnes, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    of taxonomy (all the species in a region regardless of clade) are much less studied but are equally important and will illuminate a different set of ecological and evolutionary processes. We develop and test a mechanistic model of how diversity varies with body mass in marine ecosystems. The model predicts...... the form of the diversity spectrum', which quantifies the distribution of species' asymptotic body masses, is a species analogue of the classic size spectrum of individuals, and which we have found to be a new and widely applicable description of diversity patterns. The marine diversity spectrum...... is predicted to be approximately linear across an asymptotic mass range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Slope -0 center dot 5 is predicted for the global marine diversity spectrum for all combined pelagic zones of continental shelf seas, and slopes for large regions are predicted to lie between -0 center...

  12. Shelf sediment transport during hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kehui; Mickey, Rangley C.; Chen, Qin; Harris, Courtney K.; Hetland, Robert D.; Hu, Kelin; Wang, Jiaze

    2016-05-01

    Hurricanes can greatly modify the sedimentary record, but our coastal scientific community has rather limited capability to predict hurricane-induced sediment deposition. A three-dimensional sediment transport model was developed in the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to study seabed erosion and deposition on the Louisiana shelf in response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in the year 2005. Sensitivity tests were performed on both erosional and depositional processes for a wide range of erosional rates and settling velocities, and uncertainty analysis was done on critical shear stresses using the polynomial chaos approximation method. A total of 22 model runs were performed in sensitivity and uncertainty tests. Estimated maximum erosional depths were sensitive to the inputs, but horizontal erosional patterns seemed to be controlled mainly by hurricane tracks, wave-current combined shear stresses, seabed grain sizes, and shelf bathymetry. During the passage of two hurricanes, local resuspension and deposition dominated the sediment transport mechanisms. Hurricane Katrina followed a shelf-perpendicular track before making landfall and its energy dissipated rapidly within about 48 h along the eastern Louisiana coast. In contrast, Hurricane Rita followed a more shelf-oblique track and disturbed the seabed extensively during its 84-h passage from the Alabama-Mississippi border to the Louisiana-Texas border. Conditions to either side of Hurricane Rita's storm track differed substantially, with the region to the east having stronger winds, taller waves and thus deeper erosions. This study indicated that major hurricanes can disturb the shelf at centimeter to meter levels. Each of these two hurricanes suspended seabed sediment mass that far exceeded the annual sediment inputs from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, but the net transport from shelves to estuaries is yet to be determined. Future studies should focus on the modeling of sediment exchange between

  13. New Jersey shallow shelf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Expedition 313 Scientists; Bjerrum, Christian J.

    2009-01-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 313 to the New Jersey Shallow Shelf off the east coast of the United States is the third IODP expedition to use a mission-specific platform. It was conducted by the European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) Science Operator (ESO...... to sea level change. We drilled at three locations in 35 m of water 45–67 km offshore, targeting the topsets, foresets, and toesets of several clinoforms at 180–750 m core depth below seafloor (CSF-A). Seismic correlations to previously drilled holes on the continental slope and extrapolations of depths...... successions to as many as 16 surfaces and/or sequence-bounding unconformities mapped in the regional seismic grid. Eight lithologic units are recognized that contain important physical and biofacies indicators of paleobathymetry. Reliable zonations of multiple fossil groups, Sr isotopic ages measured...

  14. Widespread collapse of the Ross Ice Shelf during the late Holocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yusuke; Anderson, John B; Yamane, Masako; Simkins, Lauren M; Miyairi, Yosuke; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Koizumi, Mamito; Suga, Hisami; Kusahara, Kazuya; Prothro, Lindsay; Hasumi, Hiroyasu; Southon, John R; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2016-03-01

    The stability of modern ice shelves is threatened by atmospheric and oceanic warming. The geologic record of formerly glaciated continental shelves provides a window into the past of how ice shelves responded to a warming climate. Fields of deep (-560 m), linear iceberg furrows on the outer, western Ross Sea continental shelf record an early post-Last Glacial Maximum episode of ice-shelf collapse that was followed by continuous retreat of the grounding line for ∼200 km. Runaway grounding line conditions culminated once the ice became pinned on shallow banks in the western Ross Sea. This early episode of ice-shelf collapse is not observed in the eastern Ross Sea, where more episodic grounding line retreat took place. More widespread (∼280,000 km(2)) retreat of the ancestral Ross Ice Shelf occurred during the late Holocene. This event is recorded in sediment cores by a shift from terrigenous glacimarine mud to diatomaceous open-marine sediment as well as an increase in radiogenic beryllium ((10)Be) concentrations. The timing of ice-shelf breakup is constrained by compound specific radiocarbon ages, the first application of this technique systematically applied to Antarctic marine sediments. Breakup initiated around 5 ka, with the ice shelf reaching its current configuration ∼1.5 ka. In the eastern Ross Sea, the ice shelf retreated up to 100 km in about a thousand years. Three-dimensional thermodynamic ice-shelf/ocean modeling results and comparison with ice-core records indicate that ice-shelf breakup resulted from combined atmospheric warming and warm ocean currents impinging onto the continental shelf.

  15. Inner-shelf ocean dynamics and seafloor morphologic changes during Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, John C.; Schwab, William C.; List, Jeffrey H.; Safak, Ilgar; Liste, Maria; Baldwin, Wayne

    2017-04-01

    Hurricane Sandy was one of the most destructive hurricanes in US history, making landfall on the New Jersey coast on October 30, 2012. Storm impacts included several barrier island breaches, massive coastal erosion, and flooding. While changes to the subaerial landscape are relatively easily observed, storm-induced changes to the adjacent shoreface and inner continental shelf are more difficult to evaluate. These regions provide a framework for the coastal zone, are important for navigation, aggregate resources, marine ecosystems, and coastal evolution. Here we provide unprecedented perspective regarding regional inner continental shelf sediment dynamics based on both observations and numerical modeling over time scales associated with these types of large storm events. Oceanographic conditions and seafloor morphologic changes are evaluated using both a coupled atmospheric-ocean-wave-sediment numerical modeling system that covered spatial scales ranging from the entire US east coast (1000 s of km) to local domains (10 s of km). Additionally, the modeled response for the region offshore of Fire Island, NY was compared to observational analysis from a series of geologic surveys from that location. The geologic investigations conducted in 2011 and 2014 revealed lateral movement of sedimentary structures of distances up to 450 m and in water depths up to 30 m, and vertical changes in sediment thickness greater than 1 m in some locations. The modeling investigations utilize a system with grid refinement designed to simulate oceanographic conditions with progressively increasing resolutions for the entire US East Coast (5-km grid), the New York Bight (700-m grid), and offshore of Fire Island, NY (100-m grid), allowing larger scale dynamics to drive smaller scale coastal changes. Model results in the New York Bight identify maximum storm surge of up to 3 m, surface currents on the order of 2 ms-1 along the New Jersey coast, waves up to 8 m in height, and bottom stresses

  16. Inner-shelf ocean dynamics and seafloor morphologic changes during Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, John C.; Schwab, William C.; List, Jeffrey; Safak, Ilgar; Liste, Maria; Baldwin, Wayne E.

    2017-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy was one of the most destructive hurricanes in US history, making landfall on the New Jersey coast on Oct 30, 2012. Storm impacts included several barrier island breaches, massive coastal erosion, and flooding. While changes to the subaerial landscape are relatively easily observed, storm-induced changes to the adjacent shoreface and inner continental shelf are more difficult to evaluate. These regions provide a framework for the coastal zone, are important for navigation, aggregate resources, marine ecosystems, and coastal evolution. Here we provide unprecedented perspective regarding regional inner continental shelf sediment dynamics based on both observations and numerical modeling over time scales associated with these types of large storm events. Oceanographic conditions and seafloor morphologic changes are evaluated using both a coupled atmospheric-ocean-wave-sediment numerical modeling system and observation analysis from a series of geologic surveys and oceanographic instrument deployments focused on a region offshore of Fire Island, NY. The geologic investigations conducted in 2011 and 2014 revealed lateral movement of sedimentary structures of distances up to 450 m and in water depths up to 30 m, and vertical changes in sediment thickness greater than 1 m in some locations. The modeling investigations utilize a system with grid refinement designed to simulate oceanographic conditions with progressively increasing resolutions for the entire US East Coast (5-km grid), the New York Bight (700-m grid), and offshore of Fire Island, NY (100-m grid), allowing larger scale dynamics to drive smaller scale coastal changes. Model results in the New York Bight identify maximum storm surge of up to 3 m, surface currents on the order of 2 ms-1 along the New Jersey coast, waves up to 8 m in height, and bottom stresses exceeding 10 Pa. Flow down the Hudson Shelf Valley is shown to result in convergent sediment transport and deposition along its axis

  17. Hollow rhodoliths increase Svalbard's shelf biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Sebastian

    2014-11-01

    Rhodoliths are coralline red algal assemblages that commonly occur in marine habitats from the tropics to polar latitudes. They form rigid structures of high-magnesium calcite and have a good fossil record. Here I show that rhodoliths are ecosystem engineers in a high Arctic environment that increase local biodiversity by providing habitat. Gouged by boring mussels, originally solid rhodoliths become hollow ecospheres intensely colonised by benthic organisms. In the examined shelf areas, biodiversity in rhodolith-bearing habitats is significantly greater than in habitats without rhodoliths and hollow rhodoliths yield a greater biodiversity than solid ones. This biodiversity, however, is threatened because hollow rhodoliths take a long time to form and are susceptible to global change and anthropogenic impacts such as trawl net fisheries that can destroy hollow rhodoliths. Rhodoliths and other forms of coralline red algae play a key role in a plurality of environments and need improved management and protection plans.

  18. Evolution of Devonian carbonate-shelf margin, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, J.R.; Sandberg, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    The north-trending, 550-km-long Nevada segment of the Devonian carbonate-shelf margin, which fringed western North America, evidences the complex interaction of paleotectonics, eustasy, biotic changes, and bolide impact-related influences. Margin reconstruction is complicated by mid-Paleozoic to Paleogene compressional tectonics and younger extensional and strike-slip faulting. Reports published during the past three decades identify 12 important events that influenced development of shelf-margin settings; in chronological order, these are: (1) Early Devonian inheritance of Silurian stable shelf inargin, (2) formation of Early to early Middle 'Devonian shelf-margin basins, (3) propradation of later Middle Devonian shelf margin, (4) late Middle Devonian Taghanic ondap and continuing long-term Frasnian transgression, (5) initiation of latest Middle Devonian to early Frasnian proto-Antler orogenic forebulge, (6) mid-Frasnian Alamo Impact, (7) accelerated development of proto-Antler forebulge and backbulge Pilot basin, (8) global late Frasnian sentichatovae sea-level rise, (9) end-Frasnian sea-level fluctuations and ensuing mass extinction, (10) long-term Famennian regression and continept-wide erosion, (11) late Famennian emergence: of Ahtler orogenic highlands, and (12) end-Devonian eustatic sea-level fall. Although of considerable value for understanding facies relationships and geometries, existing standard carbonate platform-margin models developed for passive settings else-where do not adequately describe the diverse depositional and, structural settings along the Nevada Devonian platform margin. Recent structural and geochemical studies suggest that the Early to Middle Devonian-shelf-margin basins may have been fault-bound and controlled by inherited Precambrian structure. Subsequently, the migrating latest Middle to Late Devonian Antler orogenic forebulge exerted a dominant control on shelf-margin position, morphology, and sedimentation. ??Geological Society of

  19. 黔中-渝南石炭纪铝土矿含矿岩系中的海相沉积特征%Characteristics of marine deposits of the bauxite-bearing rock series in central Guizhou-southern Chongqing area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘平; 廖友常; 张雅静

    2015-01-01

    黔中—渝南地区于紫云运动初期的泥盆纪末已准平原化,在石炭纪铝土矿含矿岩系沉积过程中,含矿岩系下段(铁质−粘土岩段)主要为近海湖泊相,含矿岩系上段(铝质岩段)为近海平原相。在这种大环境前提下,经常会受到海泛与强风暴潮的影响与改造,使得主要是陆相环境沉积形成的铝土矿含矿岩系中,含有少量海相大化石(腕足类)和微体生物化石(疑源类和牙形石);另在下段和上段岩矿层间,时夹海相碳酸盐岩透镜体,具明显海相沉积特征。以上表明,黔中—渝南石炭系铝土矿含矿岩系形成环境具有显著的多样性和复杂性,而非单纯的陆相沉积环境所能概括的。%The central Guizhou-southern Chongqing area had experienced peneplanation at the beginning of Ziyun Movement before the end of the Devonian. In the deposition process of the Carboniferous bauxite-bearing rock series, the lower bauxite-bearing rock series (iron-clay rock) was mostly offshore lake facies, and the upper bauxite-bearing rock series (aluminous rock) was mostly offshore plain facies. In this environment, the influence and reformation of ingression and strong storm surge were frequent. Thus, there exsited a few marine plant fossils (brachiopoda) and marine microfossils (acritarch and conodont) in the bauxite-bearing rock series, which mostly deposited in a continental environment. And there were less marine carbonate lens in the lower (iron-clay rock segment) and the upper (aluminiferous rock segment) bauxite-bearing rock series, suggesting obvious characteristics of marine deposition. All these phenomena indicate that the formation environment of the bauxite-bearing rock series in central Guizhou-southern Chongqing area was very diverse and complex. It was affected not only by continental sedimentary environment but also by other factors.

  20. Recurrent Pleistocene sub-marine slide events on the south Vøring Plateau, mid-Norwegian continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelstuen, B.; Skaug, M.; Haflidason, H.

    2009-12-01

    Throughout the Pleistocene the sediment input and depositional environments on the continental slope off Norway have been strongly controlled by variability in the ocean circulation, glaciations and sea-level changes. Repeated occurrence of shelf edge glaciations along the whole NW European margin, from Ireland to Svalbard, started at Marine Isotope Stage 12 (c. 0.5 Ma). During these periods, fast moving ice streams crossed the continental shelf on a number of locations, and large submarine fans and prograding wedges accumulated on the continental slope. During glacial maximums and in the early phases of the deglaciations high sedimentation rates, >2000 cm/ka, characterised the Norwegian continental margin. Within these depositional environments more than 30 large-scale mass failures have been identified. Here, we report on three slide events on the south Vøring Plateau, on the mid-Norwegian margin. These slides have affected an area between 2900 and 12000 km2 and involved 580-2400 km3 of sediments, noting that the slide debrites left by the failure events reach a maximum thickness of c. 150 m. For comparison the Holocene Storegga Slide, considered the largest exposed sub-marine slide in the world today, mobilized c. 2500-3500 km3 of masses and affected an area of c. 95 000 km2. The Vøring Plateau sub-marine slides are most likely younger than 0.5 Ma, thus occurring in a time period of repeated ice sheet growth to the shelf edge and high accumulation rates. The failures have occurred within an area dominated by gradients less than 1 degree, and observation of long run-out distances indicate that hydroplaning was important during slide development. Our multichannel seismic profiles further show that gas hydrate bearing sediments are observed on the mid-Norwegian continental margin. Thus, dissociation of gas hydrates and high sedimentation rates may have promoted conditions for failures to occur.

  1. Seismic stratigraphy and cenozoic evolution of the mesetan moroccan atlantic continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Pascal; Sahabi, Mohamed; Lahsini, Salim; Mehdi, Khalid; Zourarah, Bendehhou

    2004-06-01

    A recent high-resolution seismic survey of the El Jadida continental shelf allows the characterization of the Cenozoic evolution of the Northern Atlantic Moroccan Shelf, which belongs to the Western Meseta structural domain. Seismic stratigraphy indicates a subdivision of the Cenozoic deposits into four sequences (Sca1 to Sca4) restricted to the northern portion of the shelf. Chronostratigraphic identification of the sequences shows that principal deposits correspond to Upper Miocene deposits overlying the Cenomanian carbonate platform. Quaternary deposits are restricted to the lowstand sedimentary wedge extending below a water depth of 130 m and to the last highstand system tract corresponding to the Oum Er Rbia prodelta. Cenozoic evolution of the continental shelf was controlled by a combination of pluvial/interpluvial stages and eustatic fluctuations, but also by local tectonics. Terrigenous sediments built up the Oum Er Rbia prodelta during the estimated time interval 6-2 ka coinciding with stabilisation of high sea level and pluvial stage. Tectonic deformations occurred mainly during the Upper Miocene and accentuated shelf subsidence through reactivation of inherited N20°/N40° and N140° faults in response to the Europe/Africa collision. Some of the N140° faulting zones are still active during the Quaternary. Currently subsidence has ceased and a broad uplift of the greater part of the continental shelf probably occurs.

  2. Seafloor glacial geomorphology in a cross shelf trough: insights into the deglaciation of the Melville Bay Ice Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Andrew; Huuse, Mads

    2016-04-01

    Compared to other glaciated margins such as offshore mid-Norway and Svalbard, the Greenland continental shelf has, until recently, been the subject of only a limited amount of academic and industry research. This has been mainly due to the difficulty and expense of obtaining data in such harsh and operationally complex settings. Climate amelioration and technological advance has, particularly in recent years, allowed both academics and industry to substantially increase data collection across the many glaciated continental shelves in the Northern Hemisphere. Baffin Bay has been one of the primary regions of interest for the hydrocarbon industry which has sought to operate in the frontier basins offshore Greenland. As a result of these industry operations, a large database of geophysical and geological data has been collected. Some of this data has been made available to glacial scientists and provides a unique opportunity to investigate the seafloor geomorphology for regions where the majority of previous work has been hypothetical rather than grounded in geological evidence. In the work presented here we present a landform record offshore NW Greenland in the Melville Bay cross-shelf trough. This is one of the largest troughs on the entire Greenland shelf and measures up to 140 km in width. Shallow-marine cores collected in the coastal part of the trough show bedrock of Miocene age and indicate that a significant cover has likely been removed from the shelf by ice streams operating through the Late Cenozoic. This material has then been deposited at the shelf edge as a trough mouth fan. Using multibeam and seismic reflection data a large number of glacial landforms are observed and mapped in the trough. These include mega-scale glacial lineations, grounding-zone wedges, iceberg scours, and iceberg grounding pits. These landforms are used to reconstruct the ice dynamics of the Melville Bugt Ice Stream at the last glacial maximum and during its deglaciation. The

  3. Mesoproterozoic graphite deposits, New Jersey Highlands: Geologic and stable isotopic evidence for possible algal origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkert, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Graphite deposits of Mesoproterozoic age are locally abundant in the eastern New Jersey Highlands, where they are hosted by sulphidic biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss, metaquartzite, and anatectic pegmatite. Gneiss and metaquartzite represent a shallow marine shelf sequence of locally organic-rich sand and mud. Graphite from massive deposits within metaquartzite yielded ??13C values of -26 ?? 2??? (1??), and graphite from massive deposits within biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss yielded ??13C values of -23 ??4???. Disseminated graphite from biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss country rock was -22 ??3???, indistinguishable from the massive deposits hosted by the same lithology. Anatectic pegmatite is graphitic only where generated from graphite-bearing host rocks; one sample gave a ??13C value of -15???. The ??34S values of trace pyrrhotite are uniform within individual deposits, but vary from 0 to 9??? from one deposit to another. Apart from pegmatitic occurrences, evidence is lacking for long-range mobilization of carbon during Grenvillian orogenesis or post-Grenvillian tectonism. The field, petrographic, and isotope data suggest that massive graphite was formed by granulite-facies metamorphism of Proterozoic accumulations of sedimentary organic matter, possibly algal mats. Preservation of these accumulations in the sedimentary environment requires anoxic basin waters or rapid burial. Anoxia would also favour the accumulation of dissolved ferrous iron in basin waters, which may explain some of the metasediment-hosted massive magnetite deposits in the New Jersey Highlands. ?? 2000 NRC.

  4. On the distribution of batch shelf lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Michelle; Stroup, Walter; Christopher, David; Schwenke, James

    2013-01-01

    Implicit in ICH Q1E (International Conference on Harmonization [ICH], 2003b ) are definitions of batch shelf life (the time the batch mean crosses the acceptance limit) and product shelf life (the minimum batch shelf life). The distribution of batch means over time projects to a distribution of batch shelf lives on the x-axis. Assuming multivariate normality, shelf life is the ratio of correlated Gaussian variables. Using Hinkley ( 1969 ), we describe the relationship between quantiles of the distributions of batch shelf lives and batch means. Exploiting this relationship, a linear mixed model is used to estimate a target quantile of batch shelf lives to address the ICH objective.

  5. Piping coarse-grained sediment to a deep water fan through a shelf-edge delta bypass channel: Tank experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yuri; Kim, Wonsuck; Cheong, Daekyo; Muto, Tetsuji; Pyles, David R.

    2013-12-01

    is now generally accepted that deltas that prograde to the shelf edge are able to transport coarse sediment to deep water either with or without sea level changes. However, it is still unclear how feeder rivers behave differently in the shelf-edge delta case to rivers found in a delta that progrades over the shelf. A series of nine shelf-edge delta experiments are presented to investigate the lateral mobility of the feeder channel at the shelf edge and the associated deep water depositional system under a range of sediment supply rates and shelf-front depths. In the experiments, constant sediment supply from an upstream point source under static sea level led the fluviodeltaic system to prograde over the shallow shelf surface and advance beyond the shelf edge into deep water. The feeder river of the fluviodeltaic system became a bypass system once the toe of the delta front reached the shelf edge. After the delta front was perched at the shelf edge, a submarine fan developed in deep water although remaining disconnected from the delta. In this bypass stage, no regional avulsion or lateral migration of the feeder river occurred and all sediment from the upstream source bypassed the river, delta front, and shelf-front slope. The duration of the bypass stage is proportional to shelf-front depth and inversely proportional to sediment discharge. The combined duration of the shelf-transit phase of the fluviodeltaic system and the bypass phase is the characteristic time scale for the continental margin to "anneal" transgression-inducing perturbation due to high-frequency and/or high-amplitude relative sea level rise. The sequential evolution in the experiment compares favorably to the Eocene Sobrarbe Formation, a shelf-edge delta in Spain, although natural variations are noted. This comparison justifies the application of concepts proposed herein to natural systems and provides insight into interpreting processes from ancient shelf-edge delta systems.

  6. Exploration Potential of Atectonic Oil-gas Pools in the Northern Shelf Basin of the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuWeilin; WangZhenfeng; LvMing

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale oil exploration has been done and large quantities of oil-gas fields have been found in the northern shelf basin of the South China Sea for more than 20 years. The tectonic oil-gas pools are the main type. With the exploration to be deepened, looking for atectonic oil-gas pools is listed in China's exploration strategy. There are advantages for the forming of atectonic oil-gas pools in the northern shelf basin of the South China Sea. Because the level of water has been frequently changing within all historical periods, lithozones are changed alternately in both vertical and lateral directions and formed lithologic deposition especially at low water level stages, such as the low-lying fans of basin-floor fans and slope fans. Due to frequent tectonic movement within all historical periods, many structural surfaces and structural unconformities were formed. At the same time, they also formed many kinds of structural unconformity oil-gas pools. According to our exploration and research, the promising areas of atectonic reservoirs within marine basins include: (1) the basin-floor fan of the deep water district, such as the central depression of the Southeast Qiong basin and Baiyun sag in the Zhujiangkou basin; (2) the frontal area of the large ancient delta, such as the Lingao structural belt in the Yingge Sea basin and Huizhou sag in the Zhujiangkou basin; (3) the unconformity pinchout belt or denudation belt in the slope area and the uplift area, for instance, the Yingdong slope belt in the Yingge Sea basin and Yacheng 13-1 structural belt in the southeast Qiong basin. All this proves that the prospects for atectonic oil-gas pools in the northern shelf basin of the South China Sea are very broad.

  7. The records of coastline changes reflected by mangroves on the Sunda Shelf since the last 40 ka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XiaoMei; SUN XiangJun; WANG PinXian; Karl Stattegger

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a 40000-year-long high-resolution mangrove record from sediments of Core 18300,18302 and 18323 on the continental shelf of the southern South China Sea and reconstructs the coast-line changes on Sunda Shelf since the last 40000 years.In the period Marine Isotope 3,the old Sunda Shelf had low sea level,and it was partly exposed.Flourishing vegetations grew on the exposed old land.Mangroves developed along the coastline.On the Last Glacial Maximum,the sea level dropped greatly,coastline moved from inner shelf to outer shelf,the Old Sunda Land exposed further,and the lowering sea level induced the gradual disappearing of mangroves from the inner Sunda Shelf to the outer Sunda Shelf.And pioneer vegetation ferns covered the broadly exposed old land immediately.At the time of the last Deglaciation,sea level rose greatly,the coastline moved to the sea and the Sunda Shelf was drown again.Mangroves were emergent again from outer shelf to inner shelf and developed quickly.

  8. A facies distribution model controlled by a tectonically inherited sea bottom topography in the carbonate rimmed shelf of the Upper Tithonian-Valanginian Southern Tethyan continental margin (NW Sicily, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilone, Luca; Sulli, Attilio

    2016-08-01

    The Upper Tithonian-Valanginian shallow-water carbonates outcropping in the Palermo Mts (NW Sicily) consist of several facies associations reflecting different depositional environments of a carbonate rimmed shelf, pertaining to the Southern Tethyan continental margin. The reconstructed depositional model, based on the sedimentological features, cyclic facies arrangement and biota distribution, shows that a wide protected lagoon, dominated by algae, molluscs and scattered patch reefs, was bordered landward by a tidal flat, where stromatolitic algal mats were cyclically subaerial exposed, and seaward by a marine sand belt and reef complex. Oolitic packstone-grainstone lithofacies, cyclically subjected to subaerial exposure, suggests the occurrence of a barrier island, located nearly to the lagoonal carbonate shoreline, allowing the development of narrow embayments with restricted circulation. In the outer platform, the oolitic lithofacies of the marine sand belt pass landward into the protected lagoon, where washover oolite sands occur, and seaward into a high-energy zone (back-reef apron) gradually merging in the reef complex. In the latter, coral framestone occupied the inner sector (reef flat), while the facies association dominated by boundstone with Ellipsactinia sp. developed in the outer sectors (reef wall), adjacent to the fore-reef and upper slope environments. Stratigraphic evidence, associated with the recognized facies associations, helped to reconstruct the geo-tectonic setting of the carbonate platform, where the distribution of the depositional facies along the shelf and their extension were influenced by the tectonically-inherited sea bottom topography. In a regime of extensional tectonics, localized and thin succession of high-energy prograding oolite sand belt depositional facies occupied structural highs (footwall uplift), while the largely diffused and thick low energy aggrading peritidal-to-lagoonal depositional facies developed in subsiding

  9. Facies analysis of the Late Cretaceous deposits from Corni Quarry (north-eastern border of Gilău Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanoil Săsăran

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The Late Cretaceous deposits outcropping along the northeastern border of Gilău Mountains form a NW-SE-oriented crest. The crest is delimited westwards by the crystalline formations of Baia de Arieş Nappe. Within these deposits, two distinctive sedimentary complexes could be separated: a The Gosau-type facies formation, that can be correlated to the “Lower Gosau Subgroup” (Wagreich & Faupl, 1994, represented by alluvial/fluvial fans and shallow marine deposits; b The flysch-type formation, that is similar with the “Upper Gosau Subgroup” (Wagreich & Faupl, 1994 and includes deep sea deposits (hemipelagites/turbidites.The syndepositional and postdepositional tectonics controlled the sedimentation and facies distribution; the shallow carbonate deposits are embedded in distal shelf marine ones. Isolated blocks of various sizes represent the rudist-bearing limestones (from m2 up to hundreds of m2. The present study focuses on the identification of facies and depositional environments of the limestones outcropping along Pleşcuţa valley, in Corni Quarry (SW from Finişel village. Based on sedimentological features and faunal associations, the following facies associations have been identified: 1 Marls and limestone with terrigenous clasts; 2 Build-ups with tubular/massive corals and rudists; 3 pillarstone-type bioaccumulations with branching/platy corals; 4 bioclastic rudstone/grainstone; 5 bioclastic floatstone/ packstone. All these facies associations indicate a coastal environment developed along a shelf margin influenced by both the terrigenous supply, and the relative sea level variations.

  10. Geochemistry and particle size of surface sediments of Exmouth Gulf, Northwest Shelf, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunskill, G. J.; Orpin, A. R.; Zagorskis, I.; Woolfe, K. J.; Ellison, J.

    2001-01-01

    Exmouth Gulf is a shallow (mean depth 11.9 m, 2600 km 2 area) inverse estuarine embayment on the northwest shelf of Australia, with a catchment area of 6400 km 2 with low human and livestock populations in an arid climate. The Gulf is an extreme example of a tide and wave dominated estuary, with very small river inputs. Freshwater supply from the land is very small, and terrestrial run-off nutrient supply is estimated to be 0.8 mmol TN and 0.4 mmol TP per square metre Gulf area per year (TN=total dissolved and particulate nitrogen, TP=total dissolved and particulate phosphorus). Holocene deposits in the mangrove margins are less than 1 m thick, and are relict and partly aeolian in origin. Surficial sediments are largely quartz and calcite sand, and fine-grained recent sediments are probably removed by energetic Indian Ocean tide and wave mixing and circulation. Geochemical variations in sediment composition across the Gulf are small, and appear to be little affected by redox cycles. Marine organic matter is efficiently decomposed, leaving behind excess phosphorus associated with carbonate and iron-rich sediments. The thin ribbon of stunted mangroves along the eastern margin of the Gulf has little influence on the composition of sedimentary organic matter in the Gulf, and the mangrove sediments are not a trap for trace elements as has been found in other parts of the tropical world. Ba, Li, Pb, and Cu vary in direct proportion to the abundance of the bulk sediment aluminosilicate fraction, boron is enriched by evaporation in the supratidal saltflat regions, and cadmium has large variations perhaps related to the carbonate fraction of the sediments. There is little evidence for coastal trapping of sediment and oceanic elements in Exmouth Gulf, and some regions of the intertidal mangrove and saltflat zones are being eroded into the Gulf and adjacent shelf.

  11. Linking continental erosion to marine transport and sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoping; Braun, Jean; Guerit, Laure

    2017-04-01

    Limited attention has been given to linking continental erosion to marine transport and sedimentation in large-scale landscape evolution models. Although either of the two environments has been thoroughly investigated, the details of how erosional events are recorded in the sedimentary and stratigraphic records have not been studied in a consistent quantitative manner. Here we present results obtained from a new numerical model for marine sediment transport and deposition that is directly coupled to FastScape, a landscape evolution model that solves the continental stream power law and hillslope diffusion equation using fully implicit and O(n) algorithms. The model of marine transport and sedimentation is simulated by a nonlinear 2D diffusion model where a source term represents mass flux arising from continental river erosion. It is based on the simplest representation of marine transport that assumes that flux is proportional to slope, which leads to a diffusion-type equation that we solve using an alternating direction implicit scheme. Multiple lithologies are implemented that vary by their transport coefficients. This method is also highly efficient (O(n) and implicit), which allows us to perform a large number of simulations to undertake a Bayesian inversion of stratigraphic data. Using our model we not only show the manner in which the stratigraphic record responds to tectonic and climate events but also how it is controlled by the coefficients for river erosion, hillslope diffusion, the transport coefficients in the ocean environment, and variations in sea level. The model is used to better constrain the nature and timing of erosional events on adjacent continents through an inversion of the stratigraphic record. In the longer term, we are looking at ways to improve the equations governing marine sediment transport especially, to better represent the deep part of that transport, i.e. in the abyssal plains or past the shelf and slope.

  12. Boundary condition of grounding lines prior to collapse, Larsen-B Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Rebesco, M.; Domack, E.; Zgur, F.; Lavoie, C.; Leventer, A.; Brachfeld, S.; Willmott, V.; Halverson, G.; M. Truffer; Scambos, T; Smith, J.; E. Pettit

    2014-01-01

    Grounding zones, where ice sheets transition between resting on bedrock to full floatation, help regulate ice flow. Exposure of the sea floor by the 2002 Larsen-B Ice Shelf collapse allowed detailed morphologic mapping and sampling of the embayment sea floor. Marine geophysical data collected in 2006 reveal a large, arcuate, complex grounding zone sediment system at the front of Crane Fjord. Radiocarbon-constrained chronologies from marine sediment cores indicate loss of ice contact with the ...

  13. Organic geochemical characterization and depositional paleoenvironments of the Devonian strata in Guizhong region,Guangxi,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Devonian strata in the Guizhong region,Guangxi,China consist mainly of marine deposition carbonates(limestones and dolomites) as well as restricted clastic rocks. The strata thickness is measured as 2041m and classified into 14 formations. An integrated field geological,petrographic,sedimentological,palaeobiological,and geochemical study of these strata reveals that the depositional paleoenvironments were carbonate tidal flat,restricted platform,open platform,shelf,platform margin slop,and algal herm. The total organic carbon(TOC) of sedimentary organic matter ranges between 0.07% and 1.96% with average of 0.21%. The organic matter types are Type ? and Type II1. The vitrinite reflectance(R0) of kerogen ranges between 0.99% and 2.03%,indicating the maturated and highly maturated stages. The analytical results of the representative samples collected from shelf and subtidal facies show that the differences of organic matter type and biological diagnostic compounds are related to the types of source rocks deposited in different paleoenvironments.

  14. Reconnaissance Marine Geophysical Survey for the Shallow Water Acoustics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    sedimentologic interpretation. SEPM Spec. Publ. No. 64, Tulsa, OK, pp. 95-126. McBride, R.A., Moslow, T.F., Roberts, H.H., and Diecchio, R.J., 2004...Late Quaternary geology of the northeast Gulf of Mexico shelf: sedimentology , depositional history and ancient analogs of a major shelf sand sheet...534-552. Swift, D.J.P., Field, M.E., 1981. Evolution of a classic sand ridge field: Maryland sector, North American inner shelf. Sedimentology , v

  15. Origin and processing of terrestrial organic carbon in the Amazon system: lignin phenols in river, shelf, and fan sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuwen; Schefuß, Enno; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Sawakuchi, André O.; Zabel, Matthias; Baker, Paul A.; Hefter, Jens; Mollenhauer, Gesine

    2017-05-01

    The Amazon River transports large amounts of terrestrial organic carbon (OCterr) from the Andean and Amazon neotropical forests to the Atlantic Ocean. In order to compare the biogeochemical characteristics of OCterr in the fluvial sediments from the Amazon drainage basin and in the adjacent marine sediments, we analysed riverbed sediments from the Amazon mainstream and its main tributaries as well as marine surface sediments from the Amazon shelf and fan for total organic carbon (TOC) content, organic carbon isotopic composition (δ13CTOC), and lignin phenol compositions. TOC and lignin content exhibit positive correlations with Al / Si ratios (indicative of the sediment grain size) implying that the grain size of sediment discharged by the Amazon River plays an important role in the preservation of TOC and leads to preferential preservation of lignin phenols in fine particles. Depleted δ13CTOC values (-26.1 to -29.9 ‰) in the main tributaries consistently correspond with the dominance of C3 vegetation. Ratios of syringyl to vanillyl (S / V) and cinnamyl to vanillyl (C / V) lignin phenols suggest that non-woody angiosperm tissues are the dominant source of lignin in the Amazon basin. Although the Amazon basin hosts a rich diversity of vascular plant types, distinct regional lignin compositions are not observed. In the marine sediments, the distribution of δ13CTOC and Λ8 (sum of eight lignin phenols in organic carbon (OC), expressed as mg/100 mg OC) values implies that OCterr discharged by the Amazon River is transported north-westward by the North Brazil Current and mostly deposited on the inner shelf. The lignin compositions in offshore sediments under the influence of the Amazon plume are consistent with the riverbed samples suggesting that processing of OCterr during offshore transport does not change the encoded source information. Therefore, the lignin compositions preserved in these offshore sediments can reliably reflect the vegetation in the Amazon

  16. Marine Pollution and the Law of the Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Arthur E., III

    1975-01-01

    Despite a rising tide of contamination, effective controls of marine pollution appear dubious because of conflicting national and economic interests. Since countries can not agree on problems such as national sovereignty, dispute settlement, jurisdiction over oil on the Continental Shelf and international seabed sources, marine pollution will…

  17. Study of marine magnetic field

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattacharya, G.C.

    (COB) is again both a basic scientific requirement as well at some places is a requirement under the UNCLOS related Legal Continental Shelf demarcation purpose. In the oceanic areas, the marine magnetic studies are one of the essential tools... oceans increased, more and more deviations from this simplified model, such as propagating ridges and overlapping spreading centers were discovered. These observations enabled the study of new aspects of seafloor spreading process beyond the initial...

  18. Cold-water coral ecosystem (Tisler Reef, Norwegian Shelf) may be a hotspot for carbon cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, M.; Wolff, G.A.; Lundälv, T.; Guihen, D.; Kiriakoulakis, K.; Lavaleye, M.; Duineveld, G.

    2012-01-01

    Cold-water coral (CWC) reefs are recognised as an important marine benthic eco system at continental margins. Where abundant, they most likely play a role both in the maintenance of biodiversity and in the provision of ecosystem services provided by shelf seas. Here, we directly measure the

  19. Marine Lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. H.; Green, D.

    Marine diesel engines are classified by speed, either large (medium speed) or very large (slow speed) with high efficiencies and burning low-quality fuel. Slow-speed engines, up to 200 rpm, are two-stroke with separate combustion chamber and sump connected by a crosshead, with trunk and system oil lubricants for each. Medium-speed diesels, 300-1500 rpm, are of conventional automotive design with one lubricant. Slow-speed engines use heavy fuel oil of much lower quality than conventional diesel with problems of deposit cleanliness, acidity production and oxidation. Lubricants are mainly SAE 30/40/50 monogrades using paraffinic basestocks. The main types of additives are detergents/dispersants, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear/load-carrying/ep, pour-point depressants and anti-foam compounds. There are no simple systems for classifying marine lubricants, as for automotive, because of the wide range of engine design, ratings and service applications they serve. There are no standard tests; lubricant suppliers use their own tests or the Bolnes 3DNL, with final proof from field tests. Frequent lubricant analyses safeguard engines and require standard sampling procedures before determination of density, viscosity, flash point, insolubles, base number, water and wear metal content.

  20. Modelling shelf-ocean exchange and its biogeochemical consequences in coastal upwelling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchamad, Al Azhar

    reactions and biological respiration of marine organic matter (remineralization) under oxic and anoxic conditions. The developed model was coupled into a three-dimensional physical circulation model called the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Then, the coupled model was employed and calibrated...... to relatively wide shelf areas because more sinking organic matter reach the shelf sea-floor and remineralize there, enhancing the nutrient trapping effect of the shelf circulation system. These results highlight the important role of the continental shelf bathymetry in modulating the shelf–ocean exchange......The biogeochemical cycles of organic carbon, nutrients, oxygen, and sulfur in the oceans have been suggested to dominantly occur across the shelf–ocean transition over the continental margin, although this zone represents only a small percentage of the global ocean area. Coastal upwelling zones...

  1. NW European shelf under climate warming: implications for open ocean – shelf exchange, primary production, and carbon absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gröger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Shelves have been estimated to account for more than one fifth of the global marine primary production. It has been also conjectured that shelves strongly influence the oceanic absorption of atmospheric CO2 (carbon shelf pump. Owing to their coarse resolution, currently applied global climate models are inappropriate to investigate the impact of climate change on shelfs and regional models do not account for the complex interaction with the adjacent open ocean. In this study, a global ocean general circulation model and biogeochemistry model were set up with a distorted grid providing a maximal resolution for the NW European shelf and the adjacent North Atlantic.

    Using model climate projections we found that already a moderate warming of about 2.0 K of the sea surface is linked with a reduction by ~ 30% of biological production on the NW European shelf. If we consider the decline of anthropogenic riverine eutrophication since the 90's the reduction of biological production amounts to 39%. The decline of NW European shelf productivity is twice as strong as the decline in the open ocean (~ 15%. The underlying mechanism is a spatially well confined stratification feedback along the continental shelf break. This feedback reduces the nutrient supply from the deep Atlantic to about 50%. In turn, the reduced productivity draws down CO2 absorption on the NW European shelf by ~ 34% at the end of the 21st century compared to the end of the 20th century implying a strong weakening of shelf carbon pumping. Sensitivity experiments with diagnostic tracers indicate that not more than 20% of the carbon absorbed in the North Sea contributes to the long term carbon uptake of the world ocean. The rest remains within the ocean mixed layer where it is exposed to the atmosphere.

    The predicted decline in biological productivity and decrease of phytoplankton concentration (by averaged 25% due to reduced nutrient imports from the

  2. Potash—A vital agricultural nutrient sourced from geologic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Douglas B.

    2016-11-15

    This report summarizes the primary sources of potash in the United States. Potash is an essential nutrient that, along with phosphorus and nitrogen, is used as fertilizer for growing crops. Plants require sufficient potash to activate enzymes, which in turn catalyze chemical reactions important for water uptake and photosynthesis. When potassium is available in quantities necessary for healthy plant growth, disease resistance and physical quality are improved and crop yield and shelf life are increased. Potash is a water-soluble compound of potassium formed by geologic and hydrologic processes. The principal potash sources discussed are the large, stratiform deposits that formed during retreat and evaporation of intracontinental seas. The Paradox, Delaware, Holbrook, Michigan, and Williston sedimentary basins in the United States are examples where extensive potash beds were deposited. Ancient marine-type potash deposits that are close to the surface can be mined using conventional underground mining methods. In situ solution mining can be used where beds are too deep, making underground mining cost-prohibitive, or where underground mines are converted to in situ solution mines. Quaternary brine is another source of potash that is recovered by solar evaporation in manmade ponds. Groundwater from Pleistocene Lake Bonneville (Wendover, Utah) and the present-day Great Salt Lake in Utah are sources of potashbearing brine. Brine from these sources pumped to solar ponds is evaporated and potash concentrated for harvesting, processing, and refinement. Although there is sufficient potash to meet near-term demand, the large marine-type deposits are either geographically restricted to a few areas or are too deep to easily mine. Other regions lack sources of potash brine from groundwater or surface water. Thus, some areas of the world rely heavily on potash imports. Political, economic, and global population pressures may limit the ability of some countries from securing

  3. Environment of deposition of Clear Fork Formation: Yoakum County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    The Clear Fork Formation is Permian (Leonardian) in age and constitutes a major oil-bearing unit in the Permian basin of west Texas. In Yoakum County, west Texas, the upper Clear Fork carbonates record a subtidal upward-shoaling sequence of deposition. A small bryozoan-algal patch reef is situated within these carbonates near the southern edge of the North Basin platform. The reef is completely dolomitized, but paramorphic replacement has facilitated a study of the paleoecology, lateral variations, and community succession within this buildup. Build-ups of this type are scarcely known in strata of Permian age. The reef was apparently founded on a coquina horizon at the base of the buildup. The reef apparently had a low-relief, dome-shaped morphology. The trapping and binding of sediment by bryozoa appear to have been the main constructional process. A significant role was also played by encrusting forams and the early precipitation of submarine cements, both of which added rigidity to the structure. The reef also contains a low-diversity community of other invertebrates. Algal constituents predominate at the basinward edge of the buildup. The reef was formed entirely subaqueously on a broad, relatively shallow tropical marine carbonate shelf environment. An understanding of the lithofacies distribution and paragenesis within this sequence will provide information on porosity variations and the nature and distribution of permeability barriers. Such information is useful in reservoir modeling studies and for secondary recovery techniques in shelf-edge carbonate reservoirs of this type.

  4. Degradation state of organic matter in surface sediments from the Beaufort Shelf: a lipid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontani, J.-F.; Charriere, B.; Petit, M.; Vaultier, F.; Heipieper, H. J.; Link, H.; Chaillou, G.; Sempéré, R.

    2012-03-01

    The lipid content of surface sediments collected on the Beaufort Shelf was examined. Particular attention was given to biotic and abiotic degradation products of sterols and monounsaturated fatty acids. By using sitosterol and campesterol degradation products as tracers of the degradation of terrestrial higher plant inputs and brassicasterol degradation products as tracers of degradation of phytoplanktonic organisms, it could be observed that autoxidation, photooxidation and biodegradation processes act much more intensively on higher plant debris than on phytoplanktonic organisms. Examination of oxidation products of monounsaturated fatty acids showed that photo- and autoxidation processes act more intensively on bacteria than on phytodetritus. Enhanced damages induced by singlet oxygen (transferred from senescent phytoplanktonic cells) in bacteria were attributed to the lack of an adapted antioxidant system in these microorganisms. The strong oxidative stress observed in the sampled sediments resulted in the production of significant amounts of epoxyacids and unusually very high proportions of monounsaturated fatty acids with a trans double bond. The formation of epoxyacids was attributed to peroxygenases (enzymes playing a protective role against the deleterious effects of fatty acid hydroperoxides in vivo), while cis/trans isomerization was probably induced by thiyl radicals produced during the reaction of thiols with hydroperoxides. Our results confirm the important role played by abiotic oxidative processes in the degradation of marine bacteria and do not support the generally expected refractory character of terrigenous material deposited in deltaic systems.

  5. Degradation state of organic matter in surface sediments from the Beaufort Shelf: a lipid approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Rontani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The lipid content of surface sediments collected on the Beaufort Shelf was examined. Particular attention was given to biotic and abiotic degradation products of sterols and monounsaturated fatty acids. By using sitosterol and campesterol degradation products as tracers of the degradation of terrestrial higher plant inputs and brassicasterol degradation products as tracers of degradation of phytoplanktonic organisms, it could be observed that autoxidation, photooxidation and biodegradation processes act much more intensively on higher plant debris than on phytoplanktonic organisms. Examination of oxidation products of monounsaturated fatty acids showed that photo- and autoxidation processes act more intensively on bacteria than on phytodetritus. Enhanced damages induced by singlet oxygen (transferred from senescent phytoplanktonic cells in bacteria were attributed to the lack of an adapted antioxidant system in these microorganisms. The strong oxidative stress observed in the sampled sediments resulted in the production of significant amounts of epoxyacids and unusually very high proportions of monounsaturated fatty acids with a trans double bond. The formation of epoxyacids was attributed to peroxygenases (enzymes playing a protective role against the deleterious effects of fatty acid hydroperoxides in vivo, while cis/trans isomerization was probably induced by thiyl radicals produced during the reaction of thiols with hydroperoxides. Our results confirm the important role played by abiotic oxidative processes in the degradation of marine bacteria and do not support the generally expected refractory character of terrigenous material deposited in deltaic systems.

  6. The allochthonous material input in the trophodynamic system of the shelf sediments of the Gulf of Tigullio (Ligurian Sea, NW Mediterranean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misic, Cristina; Gaozza, Luigi; Petrillo, Mario; Covazzi Harriague, Anabella

    2016-09-01

    The organic allochthonous material input in the benthic system of a NW Mediterranean shelf area was studied using a three-pronged approach, focusing firstly on the evaluation of the sedimentary stable isotope ratios and organic matter (OM) composition, then on the OM recycling processes performed by the microbial organisms, and finally on the potential trophic relationships between the macrobenthic organisms. The highest allochthonous signal, indicating continental input, was observed within the 50-m isobath, while at the 80-m isobath the marine signal was higher, pointing to a rather low continental influence approximately 5 km from the shore. Heavier rainfall, often generating abrupt allochthonous inputs by river outfalls, led to a wider spread of fine sediment particles. Carbohydrates were the compounds that best represented the continental input and these compounds were associated with potential recycling activities by microbiota, pointing to the entry of these C-containing allochthonous materials into the microbial food web. The macrofaunal deposit-feeders used sedimentary OM characterised by a continental signature as a food source, although the isotopic ratios of the organisms also pointed to selective feeding on materials that had a marine signature, especially at our offshore sampling stations. Predators fed on deposit- or suspension-feeders, with a potential selection of the latter during the highest inputs of continental materials occurring in winter.

  7. Environmental significance of foraminiferal assemblages dominated by small-sized Ammodiscus and Trochammina in Triassic and Jurassic delta-influenced deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Jenö; Hess, Silvia; Alve, Elisabeth

    2010-04-01

    The sediment packages analyzed for benthic foraminifera consist of mudstones with interbedded sandstones deposited in shallow delta-influenced shelf to deltaic environments. The sections are located in Spitsbergen, the Barents Sea, northern North Sea and Yorkshire, and range in age from Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic. Salient features of the foraminiferal successions are: (1) The assemblages consist entirely or dominantly of agglutinated taxa. (2) The faunal diversities are extremely low. (3) The dominant genera are Ammodiscus and Trochammina. (4) The species are generally of small size compared to usual dimensions within the genera. The features listed above suggest that the assemblages were adapted to restricted conditions (clearly divergent from those of a normal marine shelf), where the main limiting factors were low salinity and reduced amount of dissolved oxygen in unstable, storm-influenced environments. Evidence for environmental conditions is obtained from modern analogues, although the large evolutionary changes in foraminifera during post-Jurassic time make it difficult to find such analogues. Additional information is derived from functional morphology, sedimentary features and paleogeography. The analyzed sediment packages show close faunal similarities suggesting opening of a marine pathway, which connected the paleo-Arctic Ocean with the western European shelf seas in Early Jurassic. A depositional biofacies model of the small-sized Ammodiscus- Trochammina assemblages envisages a delta-influenced shelf environment, where high freshwater influx would have created a density-stratified water column with a tendency to develop hypoxic conditions in its deeper parts. The depth interval between fair-weather and storm wave base (the offshore-transition zone) is indicated as the habitat of the small-sized Ammodiscus- Trochammina assemblages. In this zone, benthic biota would have been stressed by intermittent periods with moderate hypoxia combined with

  8. Geochemical Characteristics of Sedimentary Manganese Deposit of Guichi, Anhui Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The sedimentary manganese deposits occurring in Gufeng formation of the Permian in Guichi area, south Anhui Province, include manganese carbonate deposit formed by sedimentation, and manganese oxide deposit made by later oxidation. The total REE contents of these samples are relatively low ( < 250 × 10-6), belonging to LREE-enriched type,showing LREE enrichment during the process of formation of Mn deposit, especially during Mn-oxidizing process. Three normalized REE patterns and SCNA-normalized trace elements spider diagrams of the Mn-bearing sequence rocks and ores in this area reflect their same origin of ore sources, which is similar to rock-forming and ore-forming conditions. The Mnforming materials primarily came from the continent with higher mature degree and single material source. The δEu and δCe negative anomaly and Ce anomaly ( < - 0.1 ) manifest that Mn-bearing sequence of the Permian was mostly formed in marine basin and oxidative environment. The Sr and Ba anomaly, Sr/Ba and Co/Ni values reflect the Mn deposit environment was of deep water and high-salinity of marine facies. Although the Ce/La (mean 1.05), Y/Ho (25 ~ 41.5) and trace metals show a variety of correlations with Mn in the ten rock samples, which show multiple sources for the manganese, the analysis of geochemical characteristics indicate that the material sources of Mn deposit have been primarily terrestrially derived. Another source of the manganese probably comes from the seafloor volcanism in this area. Analysis of sedimentary features and geohistoric evolvement reveals that the maximum transgression of the Qixia Period, ore district is then in deep shelf-basin sedimentary setting and the Mn-bearing sequence is deposited.

  9. The anthropogenic perturbation of the marine nitrogen cycle by atmospheric deposition: Nitrogen cycle feedbacks and the 15N Haber-Bosch effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Simon; Gruber, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 100 years, anthropogenic emissions have led to a strong increase of atmospheric nitrogen deposition over the ocean, yet the resulting impacts and feedbacks are neither well understood nor quantified. To this end, we run a suite of simulations with the ocean component of the Community Earth System Model v1.2 forced with five scenarios of nitrogen deposition over the period from 1850 through 2100, while keeping all other forcings unchanged. Even though global oceanic net primary production increases little in response to this fertilization, the higher export and the resulting expansion of the oxygen minimum zones cause an increase in pelagic and benthic denitrification and burial by about 5%. In addition, the enhanced availability of fixed nitrogen in the surface ocean reduces global ocean N2 fixation by more than 10%. Despite the compensating effects through these negative feedbacks that eliminate by the year 2000 about 60% of the deposited nitrogen, the anthropogenic nitrogen input forced the upper ocean N budget into an imbalance of between 9 and 22 Tg N yr-1 depending on the deposition scenario. The excess nitrogen accumulates to highly detectable levels and causes in most areas a distinct negative trend in the δ15N of the oceanic fixed nitrogen pools—a trend we refer to as the 15N Haber-Bosch effect. Changes in surface nitrate utilization and the nitrogen feedbacks induce further changes in the δ15N of NO3-, making it a good but complex recorder of the overall impact of the changes in atmospheric deposition.

  10. Preliminary considerations on the potential influence of submarine fans on marine delimitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Wenxian; JIN Xianglong; SCHOFIELD Clive; LI Mingbi

    2013-01-01

    The complex issues associated with marine delineation for the outer limit of continental shelf and the boundary delimitation have provoked considerable attention among researchers in a variety of academic circles, particularly in the juristic filed and the geo-science field. In the present contribution, we start from an overview of submarine fans, as one of common types of sediment-deposit bodies in the ocean, and ex-plore the related geological features which may be of relevance to the marine delimitation in accordance with the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. We carry out a comparative assessment of certain significant geological features of submarine fans, using the Bengal fan as an example, which is the biggest submarine fan in the world and represents an important factor in the maritime boundary dispute between the neighboring states currently. The relationship between the special geological bodies and the international principle in the 1982 United Nations Convention can be established by combining geological and juristic analyses. This preliminary observation on the effect of submarine bodies both on the marine entitlement and boundary delimitation indicates that it is important for the international society to appro-priately deal with this problem so that the marine right of any state can be protected.

  11. Tsunami Deposit Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, B. H.; Wanink, M.

    2007-05-01

    A digital database has been established describing tsunami deposits around the world (3 phases; 15 months). The projects involved the review and tabulation of data derived from books, catalogs, journals, preprints, citations and abstracts (currently 1000 references), into a database designed to provide a comprehensive review of the types of tsunami deposits, their geographic distribution and location, sedimentary characteristics, fossil content, age, preservation, run-up, wave height and inundation observations, etc. (34 parameters). The tsunami occurrences can be divided into many subjects, e.g., Volcanogenic (N=375), Seismites (N=49), Co-seismic (N=258), K/T Boundary Impact-triggered debris flows (N=97), Landslides (N=43), etc. Numerous publications compare tsunami deposits to storm deposits (N=38), or analyze the origin of megaboulders (N=22). Tsunami deposits occur throughout geologic time (Pre-Cambrian to present day), and because of plate tectonics, they occur along plate margins (primarily subduction zones) as well as interior to plates. In addition, they occur in epi-continental seas, fjords, etc. Few publications describe depositional processes. Deposits generated by tsunamis occur in multiple environments such as the marine, fresh water, and subaerial. Common characteristics of tsunami deposits include: 1) Deposition of thin sand sheets (can be normal, massive, inversely graded, chaotic or bimodal). 2) Erosional: basal uncomformity, mud balls, rip-up clasts, reworked fossils produced by scouring. 3) Lithology: Stacks of couplets reflecting marine incursions (often sands) into fresh water or subaerial environments (mud, soil, peat). 4) Fossil: Couplets reflects marine fossils, fresh water fossils or a mixed assemblage. 5) Geomorphology: The sand sheets taper landward and can rise in elevation. 6) Deformation: syn-depositional (soft sediments) and intraformational (stiff sediments).

  12. Marine Mineral Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The past 20 years have seen extensive marine exploration work by the major industrialized countries. Studies have, in part, been concentrated on Pacific manganese nodule occurrences and on massive sulfides on mid-oceanic ridges. An international jurisdictional framework of the sea-bed mineral...... in EEZ areas are fairly unknown; many areas need detailed mapping and mineral exploration, and the majority of coastal or island states with large EEZ areas have little experience in exploration for marine hard minerals. This book describes the systematic steps in marine mineral exploration....... Such exploration requires knowledge of mineral deposits and models of their formation, of geophysical and geochemical exploration methods, and of data evaluation and interpretation methods. These topics are described in detail by an international group of authors. A short description is also given of marine...

  13. Relative sea level and coastal environments in arctic Alaska during Marine Isotope Stage 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, L. M.; Mann, D. H.; Jones, B. M.; Rittenour, T. M.; Grosse, G.; Groves, P.

    2015-12-01

    Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 was characterized by marked fluctuations in climate, the warmest being MIS 5e (124-119 ka) when relative sea level (RSL) stood 2-10 m higher than today along many coastlines. In northern Alaska, marine deposits now 5-10 m above modern sea level are assigned to this time period and termed the Pelukian transgression (PT). Complicating this interpretation is the possibility that an intra-Stage 5 ice shelf extended along the Alaskan coast, causing isostatic depression along its grounded margins, which caused RSL highs even during periods of low, global RSL. Here we use optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to date inferred PT deposits on the Beaufort Sea coastal plain. A transition from what we interpret to be lagoonal mud to sandy tidal flat deposits lying ~ 2.75 m asl dates to 113+/-18 ka. Above this, a 5-m thick gravelly barrier beach dates to 95 +/- 20 ka. This beach contains well-preserved marine molluscs, whale vertebrae, and walrus tusks. Pleistocene-aged ice-rich eolian silt (yedoma) blanket the marine deposits and date to 57.6 +/-10.9 ka. Our interpretation of this chronostratigraphy is that RSL was several meters higher than today during MIS 5e, and lagoons or brackish lakes were prevalent. Gravel barrier beaches moved onshore as local RSL rose further after MIS 5e. The error range of the OSL age of the barrier-beach unit spans the remaining four substages of MIS 5; however, the highstand of RSL on this arctic coastline appears to occurr after the warmest part of the last interglacial and appears not to be coeval with the eustatic maximum reached at lower latitudes during MIS 5. One possibility is that RSL along the Beaufort Sea coast was affected by isostatic depression caused by an ice shelf associated with widespread, intra-Stage 5 glaciation that was out of phase with lower latitude glaciation and whose extent and timing remains enigmatic.

  14. Water masses of Visakhapatnam shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RamaRaju, V.S.; Sarma, V.V.; Rao, B.P.; Rao, V.S.

    The T-S relationships of shelf waters off Visakhapatnam in the Bay of Bengal are studied for the different seasons with the data collected during February 1979 to January 1981. The T-S relationships indicate distinct characteristics of the water...

  15. West Florida shelf upwelling: Origins and pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan; Liu, Yonggang

    2016-08-01

    Often described as oligotrophic, the west Florida continental shelf supports abundant fisheries, experiences blooms of the harmful alga, Karenia brevis, and exhibits subsurface chlorophyll maxima evident in shipboard and glider surveys. Renewal of inorganic nutrients by the upwelling of deeper ocean water onto the shelf may account for this, but what are the origins and pathways by which such new water may broach the shelf break and advance toward the shoreline? We address these questions via numerical model simulations of pseudo-Lagrangian, isopycnic water parcel trajectories. Focus is on 2010, when the west Florida shelf was subjected to an anomalously protracted period of upwelling caused by Gulf of Mexico Loop Current interactions with the shelf slope. Origins and pathways are determined by integrating trajectories over successive 45 day intervals, beginning from different locations along the shelf break and at various locations and depths along the shelf slope. Waters upwelling across the shelf break are found to originate from relatively shallow depths along the shelf slope. Even for the anomalous 2010 year, much of this upwelling occurs from about 150 m and above, although waters may broach the shelf break from 300 m depth, particularly in the Florida Panhandle. Such interannual renewal of west Florida shelf waters appears to have profound effects on west Florida shelf ecology.

  16. Late Quaternary sea level and environmental changes from relic carbonate deposits of the western margin of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Purnachandra Rao; G Rajagopalan; K H Vora; F Almeida

    2003-03-01

    Relic carbonate deposits along the western margin of India occur as dolomite crusts, aragonite sands (pelletal / oolitic) and aragonite-cemented limestones, oyster shells, corals, encrusted coralline algal and foraminiferal-dominated nodules. The petrology and mineralogy of the deposits indicate that except for aragonite sands and foraminiferal nodules, the others were formed in shallow marine conditions and serve as sea level indicators. Radiocarbon dates were measured for 62 relic deposits covering the entire margin. The age of these deposits on the continental shelf off Cape Comorin and Mangalore, between 110 and 18m depth, ranges between 12, 610 14C yr BP and 6,390 14C yr BP. On the northwestern margin of India, especially on the carbonate platform (between 64 and 100 m), the age ranges from 17,250 to 6,730 14C yr BP. The relic deposits of the Gulf of Kachchh at depths between 35 and 25m are dated at 12,550-9,630 14C yr BP. The age vs. depth plot of the relic deposits further indicates that the Gulf of Kachchh was inundated much early, atleast by 15 ka, after the Last Glacial Maximum, and was subjected to uplift and subsidence during the Holocene. The carbonate platform subsided during the early Holocene. Some of the relic deposits between Cape Comorin and Mangalore plot on or, closely follow the glacio-eustatic sea level curve. Despite abundant siliciclastic flux discharged by the Narmada and Tapti during the early Holocene, the platform off these rivers is largely devoid of this flux and carbonate sedimentation continued until 6,700 14C yr BP. We suggest that the river-derived ediment flux diverted southwards under the influence of the SW monsoon current and, thereby, increased the turbidity on the shelf and slope southeast of the carbonate platform and facilitated the formation of deeper water foraminiferal nodules off Vengurla-Goa.

  17. Depositional environment and organic matter accumulation of Upper Ordovician–Lower Silurian marine shale in the Upper Yangtze Platform, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangfang; Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Shao, Deyong

    2017-01-01

    The main controlling factors of organic matter accumulation in the Upper Ordovician Wufeng–Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formations are complex and remain highly controversial. This study investigates the vertical variation of total organic carbon (TOC) content as well as major and trace element concentrations of four Ordovician–Silurian transition sections from the Upper Yangtze Platform of South China to reconstruct the paleoenvironment of these deposits and to improve our understanding of those factors that have influenced organic matter accumulation in these deposits.The residual TOC content of the Wufeng Formation averages 3.2% and ranges from 0.12 to 6.0%. The overlying lower Longmaxi Formation displays higher TOC content (avg. 4.4%), followed upsection by consistent and lower values that average 1.6% in the upper Longmaxi Formation. The concentration and covariation of redox-sensitive trace elements (Mo, U and V) suggest that organic-rich intervals of the Wufeng Formation accumulated under predominantly anoxic conditions. Organic-rich horizons of the lower Longmaxi Formation were deposited under strongly anoxic to euxinic conditions, whereas organic-poor intervals of the upper Longmaxi Formation accumulated under suboxic conditions. Positive correlations between redox proxies and TOC contents suggest that organic matter accumulation was predominantly controlled by preservation. Barium excess (Baxs) values indicate high paleoproductivity throughout the entire depositional sequence, with an increase in the lower Longmaxi Formation. Increased productivity may have been induced by enhanced P recycling, as evidenced by elevated Corg/Ptot ratios. Mo–U covariation and Mo/TOC values reveal that the Wufeng Formation was deposited under extremely restricted conditions, whereas the Longmaxi Formation accumulated under moderately restricted conditions. During the Late Ordovician, the extremely restricted nature of ocean circulation on the Upper Yangtze Platform in

  18. CMIP5-downscaled projections for the NW European Shelf Seas: initial results and insights into uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Jonathan; Palmer, Matthew; Lowe, Jason; Howard, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The North Sea, and wider Northwest European Shelf seas (NWS) are economically, environmentally, and culturally important for a number of European countries. They are protected by European legislation, often with specific reference to the potential impacts of climate change. Coastal climate change projections are an important source of information for effective management of European Shelf Seas. For example, potential changes in the marine environment are a key component of the climate change risk assessments (CCRAs) carried out under the UK Climate Change Act We use the NEMO shelf seas model combined with CMIP5 climate model and EURO-CORDEX regional atmospheric model data to generate new simulations of the NWS. Building on previous work using a climate model perturbed physics ensemble and the POLCOMS, this new model setup is used to provide first indication of the uncertainties associated with: (i) the driving climate model; (ii) the atmospheric downscaling model (iii) the shelf seas downscaling model; (iv) the choice of climate change scenario. Our analysis considers a range of physical marine impacts and the drivers of coastal variability and change, including sea level and the propagation of open ocean signals onto the shelf. The simulations are being carried out as part of the UK Climate Projections 2018 (UKCP18) and will feed into the following UK CCRA.

  19. Mineralogy of Holocene Sediments from the Southwestern Black Sea Shelf (Turkey) in Relation to Provenance, Sea-level and Current Regimes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emel BAYHAN; Mustafa ERG(I)N; Abidin TEMEL; Seref KESK(I)N

    2005-01-01

    Grain size and mineral composition of core sediments were used to investigate influences of various terrestrial and marine conditions,which have prevailed on the southwestern Black Sea shelf during the Holocene.Siliciclastic mud with small amounts of sand and gravel from nearby coastal hinterland is the principal sediment type,whereas sediments deposited near the shelf edge and the (I)stanbul Strait and off the Duru Lake (a paleo-river mouth)constitued large quantities of sand and gravel of both biogenic and terrigenic origin.Variable amounts of aragonite,1 nm-micas,quartz,feldspars,calcite and dolomite constitute the dominant non-clay minerals in bulk sediments.The clay mineral assemblage in the < 2 μm fraction is made up of smectite,illite,kaolinite and chlorite.Aragonite and calcite are mainly derived from benthic accumulations,whereas feldspars (mainly plagioclase) and smectite reflect magmaticvolcanic provenance and the distribution of 1 nm-micas and chlorite correlate with nearby metamorphic sources onland.Nevertheless,grain size and mineral distribution generally indicate a combination of effects of wind and wave climate,longshore and offshore cyclonic currents,changing sea-level stands and nearby source rock and morphological conditions.It is also suggested that at least part of clay minerals could be derived from the northwesterly Danube River input.

  20. Sedimentary process control on carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter in an ancient shallow-water shelf succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, S. J.; Leng, M. J.; Macquaker, J. H. S.; Hawkins, K.

    2012-11-01

    Source and delivery mechanisms of organic matter are rarely considered when interpreting changing δ13C through sedimentary successions even though isotope excursions are widely used to identify and correlate global perturbations in the carbon cycle. Combining detailed sedimentology and geochemistry we demonstrate how organic carbon abundance and δ13C values from sedimentary organic matter from Carboniferous-aged mudstones are influenced by the proportion of terrestrial versus water column-derived organic matter. Silt-bearing clay-rich shelf mudstones that were deposited by erosive density flows are characterized by 1.8-2.4% organic carbon and highδ13C values (averaging -22.9 ± 0.3‰, n = 12). Typically these mudstones contain significant volumes of terrestrial plant-derived material. In contrast, clay-rich lenticular mudstones, with a marine macrofauna, are the products of the transport of mud fragments, eroded from pre-existing water-rich shelfal muds, when shorelines were distant and biological productivity in the water column was high. Higher organic carbon (2.1-5.2%) and lowerδ13C values (averaging -24.3 ± 0.5‰, n = 11) characterize these mudstones and are interpreted to reflect a greater contribution by (isotopically more negative) amorphous organic matter derived from marine algae. Differences in δ13C between terrestrial and marine organic matter allow the changing proportions from different sources to be tracked through this succession. Combining δ13C values with zirconium (measured from whole rock), here used as a proxy for detrital silt input, provides a novel approach to distinguishing mudstone provenance and ultimately using δ13C to identify oil-prone organic matter in potential source rocks. These results have important implications for using bulk organic matter to identify and characterize global C-isotope excursions.

  1. Sunda Shelf Seas: flushing rates and residence times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mayer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The region of the Sunda Shelf has an average depth of approx. 48 m and is subject to many physical and biogeochemical processes with a strong impact from human activities. For the investigation of marine environmental water properties and quality, it is helpful to have an idea about exchange rates of water masses in the different parts of this region. Four numerical models, the global hydrodynamical model MPI-OM, the global hydrological model MPI-HM, the regional hydrodynamical model HAMSOM and a Lagrangian tracer model have been utilized to estimate the flushing rates and residence times in different seas on the Sunda Shelf. Using decadal averaged monthly transports, the commonly used flushing rate formula gives rates for the different months of approximately 40 to 70 days for the entire Sunda Shelf. For most parts of it (Malacca Strait, southern South China Sea, Java Sea, the results are similar, while for the Gulf of Thailand, the flushing rates amount to 80 to 170 days. The tracer model provides quite different but very detailed 3-D pictures with residence times of below 30 days to more than two years, depending on the location within the region, on the starting layer and on the season.

  2. National Marine Fisheries Service Grain Size Data from the Baltimore Canyon Trough

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Grain size analyses produced by Robert Reid of the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service for the NOAA/BLM Outer Continental Shelf Mid-Atlantic Project, Baltimore...

  3. Coastal ocean and shelf-sea biogeochemical cycling of trace elements and isotopes: lessons learned from GEOTRACES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Kwon, Eun Young; Hatje, Vanessa; Shiller, Alan M.; Cutter, Gregory A.; Thomas, Alex; Milne, Angela; Thomas, Helmuth; Andersson, Per S.; Porcelli, Don; Tanaka, Takahiro; Geibert, Walter; Dehairs, Frank; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Continental shelves and shelf seas play a central role in the global carbon cycle. However, their importance with respect to trace element and isotope (TEI) inputs to ocean basins is less well understood. Here, we present major findings on shelf TEI biogeochemistry from the GEOTRACES programme as well as a proof of concept for a new method to estimate shelf TEI fluxes. The case studies focus on advances in our understanding of TEI cycling in the Arctic, transformations within a major river estuary (Amazon), shelf sediment micronutrient fluxes and basin-scale estimates of submarine groundwater discharge. The proposed shelf flux tracer is 228-radium (T1/2 = 5.75 yr), which is continuously supplied to the shelf from coastal aquifers, sediment porewater exchange and rivers. Model-derived shelf 228Ra fluxes are combined with TEI/ 228Ra ratios to quantify ocean TEI fluxes from the western North Atlantic margin. The results from this new approach agree well with previous estimates for shelf Co, Fe, Mn and Zn inputs and exceed published estimates of atmospheric deposition by factors of approximately 3–23. Lastly, recommendations are made for additional GEOTRACES process studies and coastal margin-focused section cruises that will help refine the model and provide better insight on the mechanisms driving shelf-derived TEI fluxes to the ocean. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry’.

  4. Coastal ocean and shelf-sea biogeochemical cycling of trace elements and isotopes: lessons learned from GEOTRACES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charette, Matthew A.; Lam, Phoebe J.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Kwon, Eun Young; Hatje, Vanessa; Jeandel, Catherine; Shiller, Alan M.; Cutter, Gregory A.; Thomas, Alex; Boyd, Philip W.; Homoky, William B.; Milne, Angela; Thomas, Helmuth; Andersson, Per S.; Porcelli, Don; Tanaka, Takahiro; Geibert, Walter; Dehairs, Frank; Garcia-Orellana, Jordi

    2016-11-01

    Continental shelves and shelf seas play a central role in the global carbon cycle. However, their importance with respect to trace element and isotope (TEI) inputs to ocean basins is less well understood. Here, we present major findings on shelf TEI biogeochemistry from the GEOTRACES programme as well as a proof of concept for a new method to estimate shelf TEI fluxes. The case studies focus on advances in our understanding of TEI cycling in the Arctic, transformations within a major river estuary (Amazon), shelf sediment micronutrient fluxes and basin-scale estimates of submarine groundwater discharge. The proposed shelf flux tracer is 228-radium (T1/2 = 5.75 yr), which is continuously supplied to the shelf from coastal aquifers, sediment porewater exchange and rivers. Model-derived shelf 228Ra fluxes are combined with TEI/ 228Ra ratios to quantify ocean TEI fluxes from the western North Atlantic margin. The results from this new approach agree well with previous estimates for shelf Co, Fe, Mn and Zn inputs and exceed published estimates of atmospheric deposition by factors of approximately 3-23. Lastly, recommendations are made for additional GEOTRACES process studies and coastal margin-focused section cruises that will help refine the model and provide better insight on the mechanisms driving shelf-derived TEI fluxes to the ocean. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  5. The coarse- to fine-grained boundary beneath the New England Mud Patch: evidence from seismic and core data for an abrupt post-transgressive change in hydrologic regime on the continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, J.; Chaytor, J. D.; Reed, A. H.; Liu, S.; Wilson, P. S.; Knobles, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    The New England Mud Patch (NEMP) is an anomaly on the Atlantic coast of North America. This 13,000 km2 area, located south of Cape Cod between the 60 m and 160 m isobaths, is a region of active fine-grained deposition on a shelf that is predominantly non-depositional and even erosional in places. Prior studies theorized that NEMP sediments are derived from fines winnowed from Georges Bank, transported westward by coastal currents, and then settled in more quiescent conditions at the mud patch. A CHIRP seismic reflection (2015) and coring (2016) survey of the NEMP was conducted in support of a planned acoustic experiment for the Office of Naval Research. The survey focused on a 30 km (E-W) by 8 km (N-S) region between the 75 m and 85 m isobaths, encompassing a sediment "pond" up to 13 m thick. The dense (250 m) CHIRP survey lines allow a pseudo-3D stratigraphic interpretation. The sediment pond itself occupies an accommodation space that appears to have been eroded into substrate (Pleistocene?) sediments, perhaps by glacial processes. The interpreted transgressive ravinement is capped by marine sands organized into oblique sand ridge morphology. The sense of obliquity, morphologic asymmetry and internal dipping reflectors indicate that the sand ridges formed under an east-directed transport regime. However, as evidenced by prograding internal layering, NEMP deposition occurred under a west-directed transport regime, consistent with modern shelf conditions. The onset of fine-grained deposition was therefore contemporaneous with a significant shift in the hydrologic regime. Layer reflectivity increases with depth, likely indicating that terrestrial sources may have been more prominent in the early stages of NEMP deposition. Several cores penetrated the finer-grained sediment ("mud") to sand transition; analysis this Fall should help us to better understand this important transition.

  6. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-03-16 to 1977-03-18 (NODC Accession 7800002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  7. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-07-19 to 1976-07-31 (NODC Accession 7601930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  8. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-10-05 to 1977-10-09 (NODC Accession 7800450)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  9. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program from 1976-04-13 to 1976-04-30 (NODC Accession 7601548)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  10. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-04-05 to 1977-04-16 (NODC Accession 7800383)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  11. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-07-19 to 1976-07-31 (NCEI Accession 7700784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  12. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-04-05 to 1977-04-22 (NODC Accession 7700755)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  13. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the Gulf of Alaska as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-08-28 to 1978-09-06 (NODC Accession 7900069)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER . Data were collected by the Pacific Marine...

  14. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-05-06 to 1978-05-16 (NODC Accession 7800684)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  15. Marine geology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    the western continental margin of India indicate evidences of late Quaternary neo-tectonic activity in the Gulf of Kachchh and carbonate platform. Provenance studies have been carried out on the Ayeyarwady continental shelf, Andaman Sea and western margin...

  16. Onshore-offshore movement of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) on the continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Julia S.; Gilly, William F.; Field, John C.; Payne, John C.

    2013-10-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) have greatly extended their range in the California Current System, where they forage on a variety of ecologically and economically important species that inhabit both coastal and offshore mesopelagic regions. Swimming abilities and behavior are important factors in assessing the impacts of this range expansion, particularly in regard to foraging in conjunction with onshore-offshore movement over the continental shelf. Here we describe a study of horizontal movements by jumbo squid along and across the continental shelf off Washington, USA, using acoustic tags in association with the Census of Marine Life's Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking Program (POST) receiver arrays. We detected frequent movements along the shelf break, movement onto the shelf at night, and no evidence of movement as a cohesive school. Our results demonstrate feasibility of using acoustic tags and arrays to document horizontal movements of jumbo squid along and across the continental shelf. This is important in order to determine how those movements overlap with those of other ecologically and commercially important fish species.

  17. HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-07-01

    . Examination of upper Ismay cores identified seven depositional facies: open marine, middle shelf, inner shelf/tidal flat, bryozoan mounds, phylloid-algal mounds, quartz sand dunes, and anhydritic salinas. Lower Desert Creek facies include open marine, middle shelf, protomounds/collapse breccia, and phylloid-algal mounds. Mapping the upper Ismay zone facies delineates very prospective reservoir trends that contain porous, productive buildups around the anhydrite-filled intra-shelf basins. Facies and reservoir controls imposed by the anhydritic intra-shelf basins should be considered when selecting the optimal location and orientation of any horizontal drilling from known phylloidalgal reservoirs to undrained reserves, as well as identifying new exploration trends. Although intra-shelf basins are not present in the lower Desert Creek zone of the Blanding sub-basin, drilling horizontally along linear shoreline trends could also encounter previously undrilled, porous intervals and buildups. Technology transfer activities consisted of a technical presentation at a Class II Review conference sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory at the Center for Energy and Economic Diversification in Odessa, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  18. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Shallow marine syn-rift sedimentation: Middle Jurassic Pelion Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engkilde, Michael

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Jurassic Pelion Formation – Fossilbjerget Formation couplet of Jameson Land, East Greenland, is a well-exposed example of the Middle Jurassic inshore–offshore successions characteristicof the rifted seaways in the Northwest European – North Atlantic region. Early Jurassic deposition took place under relatively quiet tectonic conditions following Late Permian – earliest Triassic and Early Triassic rift phases and the Lower Jurassic stratal package shows an overall layer-cake geometry. A long-term extensional phase was initiated in Middle Jurassic (Late Bajocian time, culminated in the Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian–Volgian, and petered out in the earliest Cretaceous (Valanginian. The Upper Bajocian – Middle Callovian early-rift succession comprises shallow marine sandstones of the Pelion Formation and correlative offshore siltstones of theFossilbjerget Formation. Deposition was initiated by southwards progradation of shallow marine sands of the Pelion Formation in the Late Bajocian followed by major backstepping in Bathonian–Callovian times and drowning of the sandy depositional system in the Middle–Late Callovian. Six facies associations are recognised in the Pelion–Fossilbjerget couplet, representing estuarine, shoreface, offshore transition zone and offshore environments. The north–southtrendingaxis of the Jameson Land Basin had a low inclination, and deposition was sensitive to even small changes in relative sea level which caused the shorelines to advance or retreat over tens to several hundreds of kilometres. Eight composite sequences, termed P1–P8, are recognised and are subdivided into a total of 28 depositional sequences. The duration of the two orders of sequences was about 1–2 Ma and 360,000 years, respectively. The Upper Bajocian P1–2 sequencesinclude the most basinally positioned shallow marine sandstones, deposited during major sealevel lowstands. The lowstands were terminated by significant marine

  19. Shelf Stable Epoxy Repair Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    manufacturing operations are more efficient , discarding less expired film. Commercial and military aircraft repair operations at Boeing experience very similar...successfully encapsulated at concentrations greater than 50 wt% within four N N = CC Infoscitex Corporation Shelf Stable Epoxy Resin Adhesive WP-1763 8...affects the composition of the encapsulant , which in turn affects the ability of the encapsulant to wet the core phase, the barrier properties of the

  20. Earth - Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This color picture of Antarctica is one part of a mosaic of pictures covering the entire Antarctic continent taken during the hours following Galileo's historic first encounter with its home planet. The view shows the Ross Ice Shelf. An occasional mountain can be seen poking through the ice. It is late spring in Antarctica, so the sun never sets on the frigid, icy continent. This picture was taken on December 8, 1990.

  1. The distinction of submarine mass failure deposits from tsunami backwash deposits - an example from Hornitos, Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiske, M.; Bahlburg, H.; Weiss, R.

    2013-12-01

    Sedimentary features of onshore tsunami deposits were studied in great detail within the last decade. While the characteristics of such onshore deposits are well documented, the associated marine tsunami effects, such as sediment dispersion, re-deposition, and sediment bypassing during runup and backwash are scarcely reported. The knowledge of the appearance of submarine tsunami features is important, not only to understand the hydrodynamic processes involved, but also because pre-Quaternary sediments tend to be of marine origin when extending the geological record farther into the past. In this study we challenge the former interpretation of a backwash tsunami origin of a Pliocene coarse clast unit at Hornitos that was previously linked to the Eltanin impact tsunami. The respective unit contains several tens of meters long rock slabs and components from both the shallow marine basin and onshore environments, such as alluvial fans, beaches, cliffs and the local basement rocks. It is intercalated into breccia layers of smaller scale that represent the likewise energetic background sedimentation. The unit was most likely emplaced by a high-density flow with possible hydroplaning at its base and front. This is underlined by soft-sediment deformation and sand dykes. The comparison to recent submarine tsunami sediments shows that there are hardly any similarities, most notably because the unit at Hornitos was deposited en masse without any obvious trends. Our re-interpretation considers the local synsedimentary tectonic background and a comparison to recent submarine tsunami sediments caused by tsunamis with similar onshore wave heights. We show that a relation to the Eltanin impact can be excluded because enhanced models that include a shoaling effect as soon as the tsunami approaches shallow shelf regions prove that such an impact did not entail large onshore wave heights at Hornitos. Additionally, the biostratigraphic age of the La Portada formation is not

  2. Architectures of the Moroccan continental shelf of the Alboran Sea: insights from high-resolution bathymetry and seismic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafosse, Manfred; Gorini, Christian; Leroy, Pascal; d'Acremont, Elia; Rabineau, Marina; Ercilla, Gemma; Alonso, Belén; Ammar, Abdellah

    2016-04-01

    The MARLBORO and the SARAS oceanographic surveys have explored the continental shelf in the vicinity of the transtensive Nekor basin (South Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean) and over three submarine highs located at several tens of kilometers from the shelf. Those surveys have produced high-resolution (≤29m²/pixel) bathymetry maps. Simultaneously, seismic SPARKER and TOPAS profiles were recorded. To quantify and understand Quaternary vertical motions of this tectonically active area, we searched for morphological and sedimentary paleobathymetric or paleo-elevations markers. Shelf-edge wedges associated marine terraces and paleo-shorelines have been identified on the bathymetry and on seismic cross-sections. These features reflect the trends of long term accommodation variations. Along the Moroccan continental shelf the lateral changes of shelf-edges geometries and the spatial distribution of marine landforms (sedimentary marine terraces, sediment wave fields, marine incisions) reflect the interaction between sea level changes and spatial variations of subsidence rates. Positions of paleo-shorelines identified in the studied area have been correlated with the relative sea-level curve (Rohling et al., 2014). Several still stands or slow stands periods have been recognized between -130-125m, -100-110m and -85-80m. The astronomical forcing controls the architecture of Mediterranean continental shelves. Marine landforms distribution also reveals the way sea level changed since the LGM. The comparison with observations on other western Mediterranean margins (e.g. the Gulf of Lion, the Ionian-Calabrian shelf) allowed a first order access to vertical motion rates.

  3. Genome sequence of obligate marine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading bacterium Cycloclasticus sp. 78-ME, isolated from petroleum deposits of the sunken tanker Amoco Milford Haven, Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Enzo; Denaro, Renata; Crisafi, Francesca; Smedile, Francesco; Cappello, Simone; Genovese, Maria; Genovese, Lucrezia; Giuliano, Laura; Russo, Daniela; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter; Yakimov, Michail M

    2016-02-01

    Cycloclasticus sp. 78-ME isolated from petroleum deposits of the sunken tanker “Amoco Milford Haven” (Gulf of Genoa, Ligurian Sea, Italy) could effectively degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of up to five condensed rings. The genome of 78-ME was sequenced and analysed to gain insights into its remarkable degrading capacities. It comprises two circular replicons, the 2,613,078 bp chromosome and the plasmid of 42,347 bp, with 41.84% and 53.28% of the G + C content respectively. A total of 2585 protein-coding genes were obtained, and three large operons with more than fifteen enzymes belonging to four different classes of ring-cleavage dioxygenases were found.

  4. Temporal evolution of bacterial communities associated with the in situ wetland-based remediation of a marine shore porphyry copper tailings deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaby, N; Dold, B; Rohrbach, E; Holliger, C; Rossi, P

    2015-11-15

    Mine tailings are a serious threat to the environment and public health. Remediation of these residues can be carried out effectively by the activation of specific microbial processes. This article presents detailed information about temporal changes in bacterial community composition during the remediation of a section of porphyry copper tailings deposited on the Bahía de Ite shoreline (Peru). An experimental remediation cell was flooded and transformed into a wetland in order to prevent oxidation processes, immobilizing metals. Initially, the top oxidation zone of the tailings deposit displayed a low pH (3.1) and high concentrations of metals, sulfate, and chloride, in a sandy grain size geological matrix. This habitat was dominated by sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria, such as Leptospirillum spp., Acidithiobacillus spp., and Sulfobacillus spp., in a microbial community which structure resembled acid mine drainage environments. After wetland implementation, the cell was water-saturated, the acidity was consumed and metals dropped to a fraction of their initial respective concentrations. Bacterial communities analyzed by massive sequencing showed time-dependent changes both in composition and cell numbers. The final remediation stage was characterized by the highest bacterial diversity and evenness. Aside from classical sulfate reducers from the phyla δ-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, community structure comprised taxa derived from very diverse habitats. The community was also characterized by an elevated proportion of rare phyla and unaffiliated sequences. Numerical ecology analysis confirmed that the temporal population evolution was driven by pH, redox, and K. Results of this study demonstrated the usefulness of a detailed follow-up of the remediation process, not only for the elucidation of the communities gradually switching from autotrophic, oxidizing to heterotrophic and reducing living conditions, but also for the long term management of the remediation

  5. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science ... sustainable coastal development in the region, as well as contributing to the global base of marine science. ..... Gössling S (2003) The political ecology of tourism in Zan-.

  6. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science provides an ... are not limited to: theoretical studies, oceanography, marine biology and ecology, ... consist of special issues on major events or important thematic issues.

  7. Cryolithozone of Western Arctic shelf of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmyanskii, Mikhail; Vladimirov, Maksim; Snopova, Ekaterina; Kartashev, Aleksandr

    2017-04-01

    We propose a new original version of the structure of the cryolithozone of west Arctic seas of Russia. In contrast to variants of construction of sections and maps based on thermodynamic modeling, the authors have used electrometric, seismic, and thermal data including their own profile measurements by near-field transient electromagnetic technique and seismic profile observations by reflection method. As a result, we defined the spatial characteristics of cryolithozone and managed to differentiate it to several layers, different both in structure and formation time. We confirmed once again that the spatial boundary of cryolithozone, type and thickness of permafrost, chilled rocks and thawed ground are primarily determined by tectonic and oceanographic regimes of the Arctic Ocean and adjacent land in different geological epochs. Permafrost formed on the land in times of cold weather, turn to submarine during flooding and overlap, in the case of the sea transgression, by marine sediments accumulating in the period of warming. We have been able to establish a clear link between the permafrost thickness and the geomorphological structure of the area. This can be explained by the distribution of thermodynamic flows that change the temperature state of previously formed permafrost rocks. Formation in the outer parts of the shelf which took place at ancient conversion stage can be characterized by the structure: • permafrost table - consists of rocks, where the sea water with a temperature below 0 °C has replaced the melted ice; • middle horizon - composed of undisturbed rocks, and the rocks chilled through the lower sieving underlay; As a result of the interpretation and analysis of all the available data, the authors created a map of types of cryolithozone of the Western Arctic shelf of Russia. The following distribution areas are marked on the map: • single-layer cryolithozone (composed of sediments upper Pleistocene and Holocene); • monosyllabic relict

  8. Late Quaternary Halimeda bioherms and aragonitic faecal pellet-dominated sediments on the carbonate platform of the western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Veerayya, M.; Nair, R.R.; Dupeuble, P.A.; Lamboy, M.

    The Fifty Fathom Flat is a drowned carbonate platform located on the outer continental shelf of western India. It unique because the carbonate depositional environment prevailed until Early Holocene in spite of its proximity to major siliciclastic...

  9. NW European shelf under climate warming: implications for open ocean – shelf exchange, primary production, and carbon absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gröger

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Shelves have been estimated to account for more than one-fifth of the global marine primary production. It has been also conjectured that shelves strongly influence the oceanic absorption of anthropogenic CO2 (carbon shelf pump. Owing to their coarse resolution, currently applied global climate models are inappropriate to investigate the impact of climate change on shelves and regional models do not account for the complex interaction with the adjacent open ocean. In this study, a global ocean general circulation model and biogeochemistry model were set up with a distorted grid providing a maximal resolution for the NW European shelf and the adjacent northeast Atlantic. Using model climate projections we found that already a~moderate warming of about 2.0 K of the sea surface is linked with a reduction by ~ 30% of the biological production on the NW European shelf. If we consider the decline of anthropogenic riverine eutrophication since the 1990s, the reduction of biological production amounts is even larger. The relative decline of NW European shelf productivity is twice as strong as the decline in the open ocean (~ 15%. The underlying mechanism is a spatially well confined stratification feedback along the continental shelf break. This feedback reduces the nutrient supply from the deep Atlantic to about 50%. In turn, the reduced productivity draws down CO2 absorption in the North Sea by ~ 34% at the end of the 21st century compared to the end of the 20th century implying a strong weakening of shelf carbon pumping. Sensitivity experiments with diagnostic tracers indicate that not more than 20% of the carbon absorbed in the North Sea contributes to the long-term carbon uptake of the world ocean. The rest remains within the ocean's mixed layer where it is exposed to the atmosphere. The predicted decline in biological productivity, and decrease of phytoplankton concentration (in the North Sea by averaged 25% due to reduced nutrient imports from

  10. Palaeoshorelines on the Australian continental shelf: Morphology, sea-level relationship and applications to environmental management and archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Brendan P.; Nichol, Scott L.; Huang, Zhi; Beaman, Robin J.

    2017-02-01

    Palaeoshorelines that lie submerged on stable continental shelves are relict coastal depositional and erosional structures formed during periods of lower sea level. An analysis of the well-dated Late Quaternary (0-128 ka) sea-level record indicates that the most persistent (modal) lower sea levels were at 30 - 40 m below present, which occurred between 97 and 116 ka and at approximately 85 ka and 10 ka. A secondary modal position was at 70-90 m that occurred mostly during a period of fluctuating sea level between 30 and 60 ka, as well as at around 87 ka (70 - 80 m only) and 12-15 ka. For the tectonically stable Australian continental shelf, we show that a range of shorelines formed at each of these sea level modal positions and their morphology and degree of preservation depends on composition (carbonate vs siliciclastic) and oceanographic setting (wave, tide and wind energy). These ancient coasts record a range of oceanographic and geological regimes that existed during relatively long periods of lower sea level and provide a guide to the general depth zones in which similar features likely occur on other shelves globally. Australian palaeoshorelines represent distinctive benthic habitats that strongly influence the distribution of biodiversity across the shelf. Accurate mapping of these features provides a robust geospatial framework for investigations of marine species distributions and environmental change monitoring. These data also enable the better targeting of relict coastal areas that potentially include sand resources and sites of human occupation during periods of lower sea level.

  11. Size distribution and carbonate content of the sediments of the western shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Pylee, A.

    this zonation, as off Bombay, and the zones have been classified into two categories. (1) The inner shelf, up to a depth of 20 fms is characterised by high rates of sedimentation and composed of recently deposited silts and clay with low carbonate values (20...

  12. Insights into Diversity and Imputed Metabolic Potential of Bacterial Communities in the Continental Shelf of Agatti Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhare, Shreyas V; Dhotre, Dhiraj P; Dhar, Sunil Kumar; Jani, Kunal; Apte, Deepak A; Shouche, Yogesh S; Sharma, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Marine microbes play a key role and contribute largely to the global biogeochemical cycles. This study aims to explore microbial diversity from one such ecological hotspot, the continental shelf of Agatti Island. Sediment samples from various depths of the continental shelf were analyzed for bacterial diversity using deep sequencing technology along with the culturable approach. Additionally, imputed metagenomic approach was carried out to understand the functional aspects of microbial community especially for microbial genes important in nutrient uptake, survival and biogeochemical cycling in the marine environment. Using culturable approach, 28 bacterial strains representing 9 genera were isolated from various depths of continental shelf. The microbial community structure throughout the samples was dominated by phylum Proteobacteria and harbored various bacterioplanktons as well. Significant differences were observed in bacterial diversity within a short region of the continental shelf (1-40 meters) i.e. between upper continental shelf samples (UCS) with lesser depths (i.e. 1-20 meters) and lower continental shelf samples (LCS) with greater depths (i.e. 25-40 meters). By using imputed metagenomic approach, this study also discusses several adaptive mechanisms which enable microbes to survive in nutritionally deprived conditions, and also help to understand the influence of nutrition availability on bacterial diversity.

  13. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    The GABEX I experiment is designed to provide synoptic coverage of a series of Gulf Stream wave-like disturbances, the effect of these on the circulation of the entire shelf, and on biological and chemical processes. This study was initiated in February 1980 when current meter arrays were deployed. These meters will be removed in July 1980. In April three ships will simultaneously study the effects of Gulf Stream disturbances on the hydrography, chemistry, and biology of the shelf. One vessel will track a specific wave-like disturbance and provide synoptic coverage of the shelf area. The second vessel will determine the effect of shelf break processes on adjacent shelf water; and the third will study trace metal distributions in and outside of disturbances. Research progress is reported in continental shelf studies, nearshore and estuarine studies (diffusion of freshwater out of nearshore zone), tidal currents and material transport, and mixing of inlet plumes.

  14. On the shelf life of pharmaceutical products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capen, Robert; Christopher, David; Forenzo, Patrick; Ireland, Charles; Liu, Oscar; Lyapustina, Svetlana; O'Neill, John; Patterson, Nate; Quinlan, Michelle; Sandell, Dennis; Schwenke, James; Stroup, Walter; Tougas, Terrence

    2012-09-01

    This article proposes new terminology that distinguishes between different concepts involved in the discussion of the shelf life of pharmaceutical products. Such comprehensive and common language is currently lacking from various guidelines, which confuses implementation and impedes comparisons of different methodologies. The five new terms that are necessary for a coherent discussion of shelf life are: true shelf life, estimated shelf life, supported shelf life, maximum shelf life, and labeled shelf life. These concepts are already in use, but not named as such. The article discusses various levels of "product" on which different stakeholders tend to focus (e.g., a single-dosage unit, a batch, a production process, etc.). The article also highlights a key missing element in the discussion of shelf life-a Quality Statement, which defines the quality standard for all key stakeholders. Arguments are presented that for regulatory and statistical reasons the true product shelf life should be defined in terms of a suitably small quantile (e.g., fifth) of the distribution of batch shelf lives. The choice of quantile translates to an upper bound on the probability that a randomly selected batch will be nonconforming when tested at the storage time defined by the labeled shelf life. For this strategy, a random-batch model is required. This approach, unlike a fixed-batch model, allows estimation of both within- and between-batch variability, and allows inferences to be made about the entire production process. This work was conducted by the Stability Shelf Life Working Group of the Product Quality Research Institute.

  15. The weeding handbook a shelf-by-shelf guide

    CERN Document Server

    Vnuk, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    "No! We can't rid of that!" Vnuk, author of the popular "Weeding Tips" column on Booklist Online, is here to show you that yes, you can. A library is an ever-changing organism; when done the right way, weeding helps a library thrive by focusing its resources on those parts of the collection that are the most useful to its users. Her handbook takes the guesswork out of this delicate but necessary process, giving public and school library staff the knowledge and the confidence to effectively weed any collection, of any size. Going through the proverbial stacks shelf by shelf, Vnuk: Explains why weeding is important for a healthy library, demonstrating that a vibrant collection leads to robust circulation, which in turn affects library budgets Walks readers through a library's shelves by Dewey area, with recommended weeding criteria and call-outs in each area for the different considerations of large collections and smaller collections Features a chapter addressing reference, media, magazines and newspapers, e-b...

  16. Distribution and sources of organic matter in surface marine sediments across the North American Arctic margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi, Miguel A.; O'Connor, Alison E.; Kuzyk, Zou Zou; Yunker, Mark B.; Gobeil, Charles; Macdonald, Robie W.

    2013-09-01

    As part of the International Polar Year research program, we conducted a survey of surface marine sediments from box cores along a section extending from the Bering Sea to Davis Strait via the Canadian Archipelago. We used bulk elemental and isotopic compositions, together with biomarkers and principal components analysis, to elucidate the distribution of marine and terrestrial organic matter in different regions of the North American Arctic margin. Marked regional contrasts were observed in organic carbon loadings, with the highest values (≥1 mg C m-2 sediment) found in sites along Barrow Canyon and the Chukchi and Bering shelves, all of which were characterized by sediments with low oxygen exposure, as inferred from thin layers (cutin acids) all indicate marked regional differences in the proportions of marine and terrigenous organic matter present in surface sediments. Regions such as Barrow Canyon and the Mackenzie River shelf were characterized by the highest contributions of land-derived organic matter, with compositional characteristics that suggested distinct sources and provenance. In contrast, sediments from the Canadian Archipelago and Davis Strait had the smallest contributions of terrigenous organic matter and the lowest organic carbon loadings indicative of a high degree of post-depositional oxidation.

  17. Continental Shelf Morphology and Stratigraphy Offshore San Onofre, CA: The Interplay Between Rates of Eustatic Change and Sediment Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotsko, Shannon; Driscoll, Neal W.; Kent, Graham; Brothers, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    New high-resolution CHIRP seismic data acquired offshore San Onofre, southern California reveal that shelf sediment distribution and thickness are primarily controlled by eustatic sea level rise and sediment supply. Throughout the majority of the study region, a prominent abrasion platform and associated shoreline cutoff are observed in the subsurface from ~ 72 to 53 m below present sea level. These erosional features appear to have formed between Melt Water Pulse 1A and Melt Water Pulse 1B, when the rate of sea-level rise was lower. There are three distinct sedimentary units mapped above a regional angular unconformity interpreted to be the Holocene transgressive surface in the seismic data. Unit I, the deepest unit, is interpreted as a lag deposit that infills a topographic low associated with an abrasion platform. Unit I thins seaward by downlap and pinches out landward against the shoreline cutoff. Unit II is a mid-shelf lag deposit formed from shallower eroded material and thins seaward by downlap and landward by onlap. The youngest, Unit III, is interpreted to represent modern sediment deposition. Faults in the study area do not appear to offset the transgressive surface. The Newport Inglewood/Rose Canyon fault system is active in other regions to the south (e.g., La Jolla) where it offsets the transgressive surface and creates seafloor relief. Several shoals observed along the transgressive surface could record minor deformation due to fault activity in the study area. Nevertheless, our preferred interpretation is that the shoals are regions more resistant to erosion during marine transgression. The Cristianitos fault zone also causes a shoaling of the transgressive surface. This may be from resistant antecedent topography due to an early phase of compression on the fault. The Cristianitos fault zone was previously defined as a down-to-the-north normal fault, but the folding and faulting architecture imaged in the CHIRP data are more consistent with a

  18. Acquisition, processing and interpretation of high-resolution seismic data using a small-scale multi-channel system: an example from the Korea Strait inner shelf, south-east Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dong-Geun; Koo, Nam-Hyung; Lee, Ho-Young; Kim, Byoung-Yeop; Kim, Young-Jun; Cheong, Snons

    2016-10-01

    A high-resolution seismic survey was designed to improve the quality of seismic data and study the evolution of inner shelf deposits off the southern coast of Korea. A 0.5 L air gun and 6- or 8-channel streamer cable with a 5 m group interval were used as a seismic source and receiver system, respectively. Data recording was digitally performed at a shot interval of 2 s and a sample interval of 0.1 ms using a personal computer (PC)-based recording system with an analogue to digital (A/D) converter. In the data processing, deconvolution and static corrections were very effective for improving the data resolution. The data resolution and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio were improved by using multi-channel digital seismic systems as opposed to a single-channel analogue streamer. The results show that a small-scale multi-channel seismic system is an effective way to investigate late Quaternary deposits. Seismic stratigraphic analysis of the high-resolution seismic profiles revealed that inner shelf deposits, up to 30 m thick, consist of three sedimentary units, which comprise transgressive and highstand systems tracts deposited after the last glacial period. The transgressive systems tract includes two units (I and II) separated by a ravinement surface (RS). The lower Unit I, lying below the RS, consists of estuarine sediments left behind by shoreface erosion during transgression, and represents a paralic component. The upper Unit II, including two sub-units (IIa and IIb), lies above the RS and consists of sand produced by shoreface erosion during landward transgression, which corresponds to a marine component. The uppermost Unit III lies above the maximum flooding surface and consists of thick mud clinoforms of the modern Nakdong and Seomjin subaqueous deltas. This unit likely formed during the recent sea level highstand and represents the highstand systems tract.

  19. 26 CFR 1.638-1 - Continental Shelf areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Continental Shelf areas. 1.638-1 Section 1.638-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Continental Shelf Areas § 1.638-1 Continental Shelf areas. (a) General rule. For.... The terms Continental Shelf of the United States and Continental Shelf of a possession of the United...

  20. Shelf waves with diurnal tidal frequency at the Greenland shelf edge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, F.P.A

    1999-01-01

    Tidal analysis was carried out on current measurements at a 'cross-shelf' transect off Greenland at 71°N. The diurnal tides manifest themselves mainly as a barotropic continental shelf wave, travelling southward along the shelf slope. This follows from the amplitude distribution of the diurnal tidal

  1. Characteristics and source appointment of atmospheric particulate mercury over East China Sea: Implication on the deposition of atmospheric particulate mercury in marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Cheng, Na; Xiu, Guangli; Wang, Fujiang; Chen, Ying

    2017-02-12

    Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) samples were collected at Huaniao Island in northern East China Sea (ECS) from March 2012 to January 2013. Chemical analysis were conducted to measure the concentration of total particulate mercury (TPM) and speciated particulate mercury including HCl-soluble particulate mercury (HPM), elemental particulate mercury (EPM) and residual particulate mercury (RPM). The bromine (Br) and iodine (I) on particles were also detected. The mean concentration of TPM during the study period was 0.23 ± 0.15 ng m(-3), while the obviously seasonal variation was found that the concentrations of TPM in spring, summer, fall and winter were 0.34 ± 0.20 ng m(-3), 0.15 ± 0.03 ng m(-3), 0.15 ± 0.05 ng m(-3) and 0.27 ± 0.26 ng m(-3), respectively. The statistically strong correlation of bromine and iodine to HPM was only found in spring with r = 0.81 and 0.77 (p < 0.01), respectively. While the strongest correlations between EPM and bromine and iodine were found in winter with r = 0.92 (Br) and 0.96 (I) (p < 0.01), respectively. The clustered 72-h backward trajectories of different seasons and the whole sampling period were categorized into 4 groups. In spring, the clusters passed a long distance across the East China Sea and brought about low concentration of mercury due to the deposition of mercury over the sea. The cluster of air mass across the sea had low concentration of HPM in winter, which suggested that the oxidation of mercury in winter might be related to other oxidants. During the whole sampling period, the air mass from the north of China contributed to the higher concentration of TPM in Huaniao Island.

  2. Modeling River Networks in the Continental Shelf during Sea Level Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagherazzi, S.; Wiberg, P. L.

    2003-12-01

    Several processes influence the development of fluvial networks in the continental shelf during sea level low stands. In order to understand the specific role of each process and quantify its influence on channel formation and incision, the Detachment Limited Model (DeLiM) (Howard, 1994) has been applied to several shelf configurations and with different sea-level curves. The computer model incorporates deltaic deposition on the continental shelf as well as sea-level oscillations and is parameterized with Virginia coastal plain data. Simulations show that the major factor controlling incision and channel development is the tendency of streams to reach an equilibrium (graded) configuration. If, for a given river discharge and shelf slope, the sediment load is less than that required to be at grade, channel incision will occur in the exposed shelf until the river long profile is in equilibrium with the current sea level (base level). The geometry and thickness of sediments deposited in deltas and estuaries have a minor influence on the total channel incision, but are of fundamental importance for the spatial development of the channel network. Model results show that the detailed structure of sea level oscillations is important for sediment redistribution and channel changes. Conceptual models that consider a mere succession of sea level high stands and low stands are oversimplified and miss the complex response of the system to gradual sea level oscillations. The initial shelf topography strongly characterizes the future network development. During the simulations the drainage network is initially strongly fragmented, but gradually becomes integrated through depression infilling and dissection of steep scarps. Finally the role of coastal processes is of crucial importance for sediment redistribution and shelf topography modification during sea-level oscillations.

  3. Mapping and classifying the seabed of the West Greenland continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougeon, S.; Kemp, K. M.; Blicher, M. E.; Yesson, C.

    2017-03-01

    Marine benthic habitats support a diversity of marine organisms that are both economically and intrinsically valuable. Our knowledge of the distribution of these habitats is largely incomplete, particularly in deeper water and at higher latitudes. The western continental shelf of Greenland is one example of a deep (more than 500 m) Arctic region with limited information available. This study uses an adaptation of the EUNIS seabed classification scheme to document benthic habitats in the region of the West Greenland shrimp trawl fishery from 60°N to 72°N in depths of 61-725 m. More than 2000 images collected at 224 stations between 2011 and 2015 were grouped into 7 habitat classes. A classification model was developed using environmental proxies to make habitat predictions for the entire western shelf (200-700 m below 72°N). The spatial distribution of habitats correlates with temperature and latitude. Muddy sediments appear in northern and colder areas whereas sandy and rocky areas dominate in the south. Southern regions are also warmer and have stronger currents. The Mud habitat is the most widespread, covering around a third of the study area. There is a general pattern that deep channels and basins are dominated by muddy sediments, many of which are fed by glacial sedimentation and outlets from fjords, while shallow banks and shelf have a mix of more complex habitats. This first habitat classification map of the West Greenland shelf will be a useful tool for researchers, management and conservationists.

  4. Where to look for tsunami deposits? A case study from the Santorini related tsunami and the 1956 tsunami at Palaikastro, Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qupty, Nairooz; Synalokis, Costas; MacGillvray, Alexander; Goodman-Tchernov, Beverly

    2016-04-01

    Searching within the shallow offshore zones for preserved tsunamiginic deposits has been demonstrated as a worthwhile and important means to identify and study its tsunami events. For example, research at Caesarea Maritima, Israel, recognized tsunamigenic deposits in shallow (less than 30 m) upper shelf offshore deposits, while the onland signature of the same events were still unidentified. In Palaikastros, Crete, Late Minoan period layers were reported on coastal cliffs, and eye-witness observations described tsunami run-up and inundation following the 1956 Amorgos earthquake. In an effort to find remnant deposits from these tsunami events, four cores were collected offshore. The cores were collected from different marine settings (which include river influence, posidonia rich seafloor, micro-morphological changes, etc.). On-land samples were also collected for comparison. Results from the offshore cores reveal two distinctive anomalous horizons. The deeper and older disturbance is most probably the post-depositional sedimentation just above the Santorini eruption deposit, and the shallower disturbance represents the 1956 AD tsunami event. Interestingly, no sedimentological evidence for the 1956 tsunami event was noticed in the coastal backshore. The sedimentological signatures of the two tsunami events were very different in the cores collected from the varied marine settings. In the cores collected immediately offshore from the river, the 1956 event is marked by what appears to be a massive flood-like deposit, rather than the coarse deposits seen elsewhere. Cores in the area of the posidonia-rich seafloor had the most subtle variations that could only be speculatively associated to the tsunamigenic layers. The Santorini tsunami sedimentological signatures in these cores were not significant. It is possible that the layers were reworked and washed away following their deposition, or rather, affected from stream inflow or sediments turbidation in posidonia

  5. Surficial sediment character of the Louisiana offshore continental shelf region: a GIS compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Arsenault, Matthew A.; Buczkowski, Brian J.; Reid, Jane A.; Flocks, James; Kulp, Mark A.; Penland, Shea; Jenkins, Chris J.

    2007-01-01

    switching by the Mississippi River and its distributaries over the past ~10,000 years that resulted in laterally overlapping deltaic depocenters. The interactions among riverine, coastal, and inner shelf processes have been superimposed on the Holocene transgression resulting in distinctive landforms and sedimentary sequences. Four Holocene shelf-phase delta complexes have been identified using seismic reflection data and vibracores. Each delta complex is bounded by transgressive surfaces. Following each cycle of deposition and abandonment, the delta lobes undergo regional subsidence and marine reworking that forms transgressive coastal systems and barrier islands. Ultimately, the distal end of each of the abandoned delta lobes is marked by submerged marine sand bodies representing drowned barriers. These sand bodies (e.g. Ship Shoal, Outer Shoal, Trinity Shoal, Tiger Shoal, St. Bernard Shoal) offer the largest volumes and highest quality sand for beach nourishment and shoreline and wetlands restoration. These four large sand shoals on inner continental shelf, representing the reworked remnants of former prograded deltaic headlands that existed on the continental shelf at lower sea level, were generated in the retreat path of the Mississippi River delta plain during the Holocene transgression. Penland and others (1989) have shown these sand bodies represent former shoreline positions associated with lower still stands in sea level. Short periods of rapid relative sea-level rise led to the transgressive submergence of the shorelines which today can be recognized at the -10 m to -20 m isobaths on the Louisiana continental shelf. Trinity Shoal and Ship Shoal represent the -10 m middle-to-late Holocene shoreline trend, whereas Outer Shoal and the St. Bernard Shoals define the -20 m early Holocene shoreline trend (Penland and others, 1989). Collectively, these sand shoals constitute a large volume of high quality sandy sediment potentially suitable for barrier island nourishment

  6. Sponges of the Guyana Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN Soest, Rob W M

    2017-01-12

    Sponges collected on the Guyana Shelf, predominantly in Suriname offshore waters, by Dutch HMS 'Snellius' O.C.P.S. 1966, HMS 'Luymes' O.C.P.S. II 1969, and HMS 'Luymes' Guyana Shelf 1970 expeditions are described in this study. Sponges were obtained by trawling, dredging or grabbing on sandy, muddy, shelly, and fossil reef bottoms at 88 stations between 19 and 681 m depth. A total of 351 samples were identified to species level, each consisting of one or more specimens of a given species from each individual station (together comprising 547 individuals and fragments). The collection yielded 119 species together belonging to all sponge classes, but in large majority are Demospongiae. All species are identified to species level, occasionally tentatively, and all are described and illustrated. A new subgenus is proposed, Tedania (Stylotedania) subgen. nov. and a previously synonymized genus, Tylosigma Topsent, 1894 is revived. Thirtysix species were found to be new to science, excluding the first Central West Atlantic record of the genus Halicnemia, not named at the species level because of lack of sufficient material. The new species erected are, in alphabetical order: Amphoriscus ancora sp. nov., Biemna rhabdotylostylota sp. nov., Callyspongia (Callyspongia) scutica sp. nov., Chelonaplysilla americana sp. nov., Cladocroce guyanensis sp. nov., Clathria (Axosuberites) riosae sp. nov., Clathria (Clathria) gomezae sp. nov., Clathria (Microciona) snelliusae sp. nov., Clathria (Thalysias) complanata sp. nov., Clathria (Thalysias) zeai sp. nov., Coelosphaera (Coelosphaera) lissodendoryxoides sp. nov., Craniella crustocorticata sp. nov., Diplastrella spirastrelloides sp. nov., Epipolasis tubulata sp. nov., Erylus rhabdocoronatus sp. nov., Erylus surinamensis sp. nov., Geodia pocillum sp. nov., Geodia sulcata sp. nov., Hemiasterella camelus sp. nov., Hymedesmia (Stylopus) alcoladoi sp. nov., Hymenancora cristoboi sp. nov., Penares sineastra sp. nov., Hymerhabdia kobluki sp

  7. Identification of Late Pleistocene Ice-Rafted Debris (IRD) on the New Jersey Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. J.; Christensen, B. A.; Wampler, J.; Uptegrove, J.; Goff, J.

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential for ice-rafted debris (IRD) on the New Jersey shelf and develop procedures for IRD identification on a shelf environment using a variety of techniques to assess texture and age of the sediments. Pleistocene New Jersey shelf sedimentology is strongly defined by glacially driven sea level changes. IRD and its provenance may be identified on a shelf environment through analysis of grain size distribution, heavy mineral content (higher % suggests non-fluvial processes), mineralogical point counts (anomalous mineralogy indicates distal source), isotopic dating methods (age value determination to narrow down potential source rocks), and surface texture analysis (specific glacial transport features). IRD must be differentiated from sediment derived from the NJ bedrock. Likely sources for IRD include the bedrock of Maine and of the southeastern Canadian Shield. Duncan and Goff (2001) reported iceberg grounding along the NJ shelf. IRD is typically identified in the deep sea through anomalously large grain size within pelagic mud, but different methods are needed for the shelf, where regressive shoreline processes, subaerial exposure, fluvial downcutting, and deposition and reworking during transgression have influenced the sediment composition found today. We analyzed grab samples in or near the features believed to be iceberg scour marks and downcore samples from recent Geoclutter drilling in the same area. The coarse grain size fractions of shelf samples were separated by phi classes before heavy mineral separation methods were employed. Initial analyses show high percentages of heavy minerals in the 2 phi and 3 phi size fractions, consistent with past NJ shelf studies. Hornblende grains were hand-picked from select samples for K-Ar dating, providing age values of about 0.96 ± 0.03 Ga for three sites within iceberg scours. Mineral content of each size fraction is determined by point count. Qualitative assessment of

  8. Ice Shelf Modeling: A Cross-Polar Bayesian Statistical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, N.; Furrer, R.; Jakobsson, M.; Zwally, H. J.

    2010-12-01

    Ice streams interlink glacial terrestrial and marine environments: embedded in a grounded inland ice such as the Antarctic Ice Sheet or the paleo ice sheets covering extensive parts of the Eurasian and Amerasian Arctic respectively, ice streams are major drainage agents facilitating the discharge of substantial portions of continental ice into the ocean. At their seaward side, ice streams can either extend onto the ocean as floating ice tongues (such as the Drygalsky Ice Tongue/East Antarctica), or feed large ice shelves (as is the case for e.g. the Siple Coast and the Ross Ice Shelf/West Antarctica). The flow behavior of ice streams has been recognized to be intimately linked with configurational changes in their attached ice shelves; in particular, ice shelf disintegration is associated with rapid ice stream retreat and increased mass discharge from the continental ice mass, contributing eventually to sea level rise. Investigations of ice stream retreat mechanism are however incomplete if based on terrestrial records only: rather, the dynamics of ice shelves (and, eventually, the impact of the ocean on the latter) must be accounted for. However, since floating ice shelves leave hardly any traces behind when melting, uncertainty regarding the spatio-temporal distribution and evolution of ice shelves in times prior to instrumented and recorded observation is high, calling thus for a statistical modeling approach. Complementing ongoing large-scale numerical modeling efforts (Pollard & DeConto, 2009), we model the configuration of ice shelves by using a Bayesian Hiearchial Modeling (BHM) approach. We adopt a cross-polar perspective accounting for the fact that currently, ice shelves exist mainly along the coastline of Antarctica (and are virtually non-existing in the Arctic), while Arctic Ocean ice shelves repeatedly impacted the Arctic ocean basin during former glacial periods. Modeled Arctic ocean ice shelf configurations are compared with geological spatial

  9. Analysing the Cenozoic depositional record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goledowski, Bartosz; Clausen, O.R.; Nielsen, S.B.

    It is well known that sediment deposition in the North Sea and on the Norwegian Shelf varied significantly during the Cenozoic as a consequence of varying erosion rate mainly in Western Scandinavia, in Scotland and in the Alps. Recent results have demonstrated that a causal relationship exists...... of variations in erosion rates. Here we present the rationale behind the project, the data available and some preliminary results. The dense seismic and well coverage in the area makes it possible to estimate the rate of deposition of matrix mass. Assuming that sediment storage is not important, this provides...

  10. 3D multidisciplinary numerical model of polychlorinated biphenyl dynamics on the Black Sea north-western shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagaiev, Andrii; Ivanov, Vitaliy

    2014-05-01

    The Black Sea north-western shelf plays a key role in economics of the developing countries such as Ukraine due to food supply, invaluable recreational potential and variety of the relevant maritime shipping routes. On the other hand, a shallow flat shelf is mostly affected by anthropogenic pollution, eutrophication, hypoxia and harmful algae blooms. The research is focused on modeling the transport and transformation of PCBs (PolyChlorinated Biphenyls) because they are exceedingly toxic and highly resistant to degradation, hence cumulatively affect marine ecosystems. Being lipophilic compounds, PCBs demonstrate the distinguishing sorption/desorption activity taking part in the biogeochemical fluxes via the organic matter particles and sediments. In the framework of the research, the coastal in-situ data on PCB concentration in the water column and sediments are processed, visualized and analyzed. It is concluded that the main sources of PCBs are related to the Danube discharge and resuspension from the shallow-water sediments. Developed 3D numerical model is aimed at simulation of PCB contamination of the water column and sediment. The model integrates the full physics hydrodynamic block as well as modules, which describe detritus transport and transformation and PCB dynamics. Three state variables are simulated in PCB transport module: concentration in solute, on the settling particles of detritus and in the top layer of sediments. PCB adsorption/desorption on detritus; the reversible PCB fluxes at the water-sediment boundary; destruction of detritus are taken into consideration. Formalization of PCB deposition/resuspension in the sediments is adapted from Van Rijn's model of the suspended sediment transport. The model was spun up to reconstruct the short term scenario of the instantaneous PCB release from the St. George Arm of Danube. It has been shown that PCB transport on sinking detritus represents the natural buffer mechanism damping the spreading PCB

  11. Sediment transport on the Palos Verdes shelf, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferre, B.; Sherwood, C.R.; Wiberg, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    Sediment transport and the potential for erosion or deposition have been investigated on the Palos Verdes (PV) and San Pedro shelves in southern California to help assess the fate of an effluent-affected deposit contaminated with DDT and PCBs. Bottom boundary layer measurements at two 60-m sites in spring 2004 were used to set model parameters and evaluate a one-dimensional (vertical) model of local, steady-state resuspension, and suspended-sediment transport. The model demonstrated skill (Brier scores up to 0.75) reproducing the magnitudes of bottom shear stress, current speeds, and suspended-sediment concentrations measured during an April transport event, but the model tended to underpredict observed rotation in the bottom-boundary layer, possibly because the model did not account for the effects of temperature-salinity stratification. The model was run with wave input estimated from a nearby buoy and current input from four to six years of measurements at thirteen sites on the 35- and 65-m isobaths on the PV and San Pedro shelves. Sediment characteristics and erodibility were based on gentle wet-sieve analysis and erosion-chamber measurements. Modeled flow and sediment transport were mostly alongshelf toward the northwest on the PV shelf with a significant offshore component. The 95th percentile of bottom shear stresses ranged from 0.09 to 0.16 Pa at the 65-m sites, and the lowest values were in the middle of the PV shelf, near the Whites Point sewage outfalls where the effluent-affected layer is thickest. Long-term mean transport rates varied from 0.9 to 4.8 metric tons m-1 yr-1 along the 65-m isobaths on the PV shelf, and were much higher at the 35-m sites. Gradients in modeled alongshore transport rates suggest that, in the absence of a supply of sediment from the outfalls or PV coast, erosion at rates of ???0.2 mm yr-1 might occur in the region southeast of the outfalls. These rates are small compared to some estimates of background natural sedimentation

  12. Sediment transport on the Palos Verdes shelf, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Bénédicte; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2010-04-01

    Sediment transport and the potential for erosion or deposition have been investigated on the Palos Verdes (PV) and San Pedro shelves in southern California to help assess the fate of an effluent-affected deposit contaminated with DDT and PCBs. Bottom boundary layer measurements at two 60-m sites in spring 2004 were used to set model parameters and evaluate a one-dimensional (vertical) model of local, steady-state resuspension, and suspended-sediment transport. The model demonstrated skill (Brier scores up to 0.75) reproducing the magnitudes of bottom shear stress, current speeds, and suspended-sediment concentrations measured during an April transport event, but the model tended to underpredict observed rotation in the bottom-boundary layer, possibly because the model did not account for the effects of temperature-salinity stratification. The model was run with wave input estimated from a nearby buoy and current input from four to six years of measurements at thirteen sites on the 35- and 65-m isobaths on the PV and San Pedro shelves. Sediment characteristics and erodibility were based on gentle wet-sieve analysis and erosion-chamber measurements. Modeled flow and sediment transport were mostly alongshelf toward the northwest on the PV shelf with a significant offshore component. The 95th percentile of bottom shear stresses ranged from 0.09 to 0.16 Pa at the 65-m sites, and the lowest values were in the middle of the PV shelf, near the Whites Point sewage outfalls where the effluent-affected layer is thickest. Long-term mean transport rates varied from 0.9 to 4.8 metric tons m -1 yr -1 along the 65-m isobaths on the PV shelf, and were much higher at the 35-m sites. Gradients in modeled alongshore transport rates suggest that, in the absence of a supply of sediment from the outfalls or PV coast, erosion at rates of ˜0.2 mm yr -1 might occur in the region southeast of the outfalls. These rates are small compared to some estimates of background natural sedimentation

  13. Thermal and cementation histories of Permian shelf-edge carbonate rocks in the Nanpanjiang Basin, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Robert B.; Parrish, Judith T.; Zahn, Xie; Wenhai, Hu; Scholle, Peter A.; Zhongrui, Su; Yirong, Zhang; Yunming, Huang; Guangxuan, Li

    1989-01-01

    As of 1984, the Nanpanjiang Basin of South China has had almost no exploration by drilling although oil seeps exist among its margins and producing wells occur in adjacent basins.  however, cooperative studies by petroleum geologists and geochemists of the United States and the People's Republic of China (1982-1984) show that calcite-cemented reef and fore-reef carbonate rocks near Ziyun contain bitumen in Upper Permian shelf-edge sediment.  the cementation history consists of three episodes: (1)precipitation of syndepositional marine cement (formerly botryoidal aragonnite and fibrous magnesian calcite); (2)precipitation of post-depositional early cement (radiaxial calcite); and (3)precipitation of late burial cement (white calcite spar).  Hydrocarbons were introduced into the rocks between cementation episodes 2 and 3.  Fluid inclusion analysis of secondary inclusions in the burial cement indicates that the rocks were heated to nearly 200 C after hydrocarbon migration and cementation episode 3.  Bitumen remains in the rocks as evidence of the earlier presence of liquid hydrocarbons.

  14. Some problematic shallow-marine structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manten, A.A.

    1966-01-01

    The lowermost Devonian beds in Gotland (Sweden) were deposited in a very shallow marine environment, close to the coast. In these beds three structures were observed, whose mode of formation cannot be explained by the author.

  15. Effects of seasonal and interannual variability in along-shelf and cross-shelf transport on groundfish recruitment in the eastern Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestfals, Cathleen D.; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Duffy-Anderson, Janet T.; Ladd, Carol

    2014-11-01

    The Bering Sea responds rapidly to atmospheric perturbations and over the past several decades has experienced extreme variability in both its physical and biological characteristics. These changes can impact organisms that inhabit the region, particularly marine fishes, as normal current patterns to which reproductive habits are tuned can be disrupted, which, in turn, may influence recruitment and population dynamics. To understand the influence of ocean circulation on groundfish recruitment in the eastern Bering Sea, we examined transport along and across the Bering Slope derived from 23 years (1982-2004) of simulations from a Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) ocean circulation model. We expected that changes in the strength and position of the Bering Slope Current (BSC) would affect recruitment in selected species (Pacific cod, walleye pollock, Greenland halibut, Pacific halibut, and arrowtooth flounder), and that circulation features along and across the shelf edge would be strongly influenced by atmospheric forcing. Variability in along-shelf transport at three transects along the path of the BSC, cross-shelf transport across the 100 and 200 m isobaths, and transport through Unimak Pass were examined. Strong seasonal and interannual variations in flow were observed, with transport typically highest during fall and winter months, coinciding with timing of spawning activity in the five species. Significant correlations were found between transport, BSC position, and groundfish recruitment. Pacific cod, in particular, benefitted from decreased along-shelf and on-shelf flow, while Pacific halibut recruitment increased in relation to increased on-shelf transport through southern canyons. The results of this study improve our understanding of variability in circulation and associated effects on groundfish recruitment in the eastern Bering Sea.

  16. Statistics of Stacked Strata on Experimental Shelf Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, A. M.; Straub, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Continental margin deposits provide the most complete record on Earth of paleo-landscapes, but these records are complex and difficult to interpret. To a seismic geomorphologist or stratigrapher, mapped surfaces often present a static diachronous record of these landscapes through time. We present data that capture the dynamics of experimental shelf-margin landscapes at high-temporal resolution and define internal hierarchies within stacked channelized and weakly channelized deposits from the shelf to the slope. Motivated by observations from acoustically-imaged continental margins offshore Brunei and in the Gulf of Mexico, we use physical experiments to quantify stratal patterns of sub-aqueous slope channels and lobes that are linked to delta-top channels. The data presented here are from an experiment that was run for 26 hours of experimental run time. Overhead photographs and topographic scans captured flow dynamics and surface aggradation/degradation every ten minutes. Currents rich in sediment built a delta that prograded to the shelf-edge. These currents were designed to plunge at the shoreline and travel as turbidity currents beyond the delta and onto the continental slope. Pseudo-subsidence was imposed by a slight base-level rise that generated accommodation space and promoted the construction of stratigraphy on the delta-top. Compensational stacking is a term that is frequently applied to deposits that tend to fill in topographic lows in channelized and weakly channelized systems. The compensation index, a metric used to quantify the strength of compensation, is used here to characterize deposits at different temporal scales on the experimental landscape. The compensation timescale is the characteristic time at which the accumulated deposits begins to match the shape of basin-wide subsidence rates (uniform for these experiments). We will use the compensation indices along strike transects across the delta, proximal slope and distal slope to evaluate the

  17. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas, with... informational purposes only. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams in the North Atlantic,...

  18. Marine genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Ribeiro, Ângela Maria; Foote, Andrew D.; Kupczok, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Marine ecosystems occupy 71% of the surface of our planet, yet we know little about their diversity. Although the inventory of species is continually increasing, as registered by the Census of Marine Life program, only about 10% of the estimated two million marine species are known. This lag......-throughput sequencing approaches have been helping to improve our knowledge of marine biodiversity, from the rich microbial biota that forms the base of the tree of life to a wealth of plant and animal species. In this review, we present an overview of the applications of genomics to the study of marine life, from...... evolutionary biology of non-model organisms to species of commercial relevance for fishing, aquaculture and biomedicine. Instead of providing an exhaustive list of available genomic data, we rather set to present contextualized examples that best represent the current status of the field of marine genomics....

  19. The Relationship between Phytoplankton Distribution and Water Column Characteristics in North West European Shelf Sea Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Keith; Bolch, Christopher J. S.; Brand, Tim D.; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E.

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton underpin the marine food web in shelf seas, with some species having properties that are harmful to human health and coastal aquaculture. Pressures such as climate change and anthropogenic nutrient input are hypothesized to influence phytoplankton community composition and distribution. Yet the primary environmental drivers in shelf seas are poorly understood. To begin to address this in North Western European waters, the phytoplankton community composition was assessed in light of measured physical and chemical drivers during the “Ellett Line” cruise of autumn 2001 across the Scottish Continental shelf and into adjacent open Atlantic waters. Spatial variability existed in both phytoplankton and environmental conditions, with clear differences not only between on and off shelf stations but also between different on shelf locations. Temperature/salinity plots demonstrated different water masses existed in the region. In turn, principal component analysis (PCA), of the measured environmental conditions (temperature, salinity, water density and inorganic nutrient concentrations) clearly discriminated between shelf and oceanic stations on the basis of DIN∶DSi ratio that was correlated with both salinity and temperature. Discrimination between shelf stations was also related to this ratio, but also the concentration of DIN and DSi. The phytoplankton community was diatom dominated, with multidimensional scaling (MDS) demonstrating spatial variability in its composition. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was used to investigate the link between environment and the phytoplankton community. This demonstrated a significant relationship between community composition and water mass as indexed by salinity (whole community), and both salinity and DIN∶DSi (diatoms alone). Diatoms of the Pseudo-nitzschia seriata group occurred at densities potentially harmful to shellfish aquaculture, with the potential for toxicity being elevated by the likelihood of DSi limitation

  20. The relationship between phytoplankton distribution and water column characteristics in North West European shelf sea waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehling, Johanna; Davidson, Keith; Bolch, Christopher J S; Brand, Tim D; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton underpin the marine food web in shelf seas, with some species having properties that are harmful to human health and coastal aquaculture. Pressures such as climate change and anthropogenic nutrient input are hypothesized to influence phytoplankton community composition and distribution. Yet the primary environmental drivers in shelf seas are poorly understood. To begin to address this in North Western European waters, the phytoplankton community composition was assessed in light of measured physical and chemical drivers during the "Ellett Line" cruise of autumn 2001 across the Scottish Continental shelf and into adjacent open Atlantic waters. Spatial variability existed in both phytoplankton and environmental conditions, with clear differences not only between on and off shelf stations but also between different on shelf locations. Temperature/salinity plots demonstrated different water masses existed in the region. In turn, principal component analysis (PCA), of the measured environmental conditions (temperature, salinity, water density and inorganic nutrient concentrations) clearly discriminated between shelf and oceanic stations on the basis of DIN:DSi ratio that was correlated with both salinity and temperature. Discrimination between shelf stations was also related to this ratio, but also the concentration of DIN and DSi. The phytoplankton community was diatom dominated, with multidimensional scaling (MDS) demonstrating spatial variability in its composition. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was used to investigate the link between environment and the phytoplankton community. This demonstrated a significant relationship between community composition and water mass as indexed by salinity (whole community), and both salinity and DIN:DSi (diatoms alone). Diatoms of the Pseudo-nitzschia seriata group occurred at densities potentially harmful to shellfish aquaculture, with the potential for toxicity being elevated by the likelihood of DSi limitation of

  1. Determination of grain-size characteristics from electromagnetic seabed mapping data: A NW Iberian shelf study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baasch, Benjamin; Müller, Hendrik; von Dobeneck, Tilo; Oberle, Ferdinand K. J.

    2017-05-01

    The electric conductivity and magnetic susceptibility of sediments are fundamental parameters in environmental geophysics. Both can be derived from marine electromagnetic profiling, a novel, fast and non-invasive seafloor mapping technique. Here we present statistical evidence that electric conductivity and magnetic susceptibility can help to determine physical grain-size characteristics (size, sorting and mud content) of marine surficial sediments. Electromagnetic data acquired with the bottom-towed electromagnetic profiler MARUM NERIDIS III were analysed and compared with grain size data from 33 samples across the NW Iberian continental shelf. A negative correlation between mean grain size and conductivity (R=-0.79) as well as mean grain size and susceptibility (R=-0.78) was found. Simple and multiple linear regression analyses were carried out to predict mean grain size, mud content and the standard deviation of the grain-size distribution from conductivity and susceptibility. The comparison of both methods showed that multiple linear regression models predict the grain-size distribution characteristics better than the simple models. This exemplary study demonstrates that electromagnetic benthic profiling is capable to estimate mean grain size, sorting and mud content of marine surficial sediments at a very high significance level. Transfer functions can be calibrated using grains-size data from a few reference samples and extrapolated along shelf-wide survey lines. This study suggests that electromagnetic benthic profiling should play a larger role for coastal zone management, seafloor contamination and sediment provenance studies in worldwide continental shelf systems.

  2. Variations of marine pore water salinity and chlorinity in Gulf of Alaska sediments (IODP Expedition 341)

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Christian; Mix, Alan C.; McClymont, Erin; Nakamura, Atsunori; Berbel, Glaucia; Gulick, Sean; Jaeger, John; Schneider (LeVay), Leah

    2014-05-01

    Pore waters of marine sediments usually have salinities and chlorinities similar to the overlying sea water, ranging around 34-35 psu (Practical Salinity Units) and around 550 mM Cl-, respectively. This is because these parameters are conservative in the sense that they do not significantly participate in biogeochemical cycles. However, pore water studies carried out in the frame of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and its predecessors have shown that salinities and chlorinities of marine pore waters can substantially deviate from the modern bottom water composition in a number of environmental settings, and various processes have been suggested to explain these phenomena. Also during the recent IODP Expedition 341 that drilled five sites in the Gulf of Alaska (Northeast Pacific Ocean) from the deep Surveyor Fan across the continental slope to the glaciomarine shelf deposits, several occurrences of pore waters with salinities and chlorinities significantly different from respective bottom waters were encountered during shipboard analyses. At the pelagic Sites U1417 and U1418 (~4,200 and ~3,700 m water depth, respectively), salinity and chlorinity maxima occur around 20-50 m sediment depth, but values gradually decrease with increasing drilling depths (down to 30 psu in ~600 m sediment depth). While the pore water freshening at depth is most likely an effect of clay mineral dehydration due to increasing burial depth, the shallow salinity and chlorinity maxima are interpreted as relicts of more saline bottom waters that existed in the North Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (Adkins et al., 2002). In contrast, the glaciomarine slope and shelf deposits at Site U1419 to U1421 (~200 to 1,000 m water depth) are characterised by unexpectedly low salinitiy and chlorinity values (as low as 16 psu and 295 mM Cl-, respectively) already in very shallow sediment depths (~10 m), and their records do not show systematic trends with sediment depth. Freshening

  3. Surficial sediment character of the New York-New Jersey offshore continental shelf region: a GIS compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Arsenault, Matthew A.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Reid, Jane A.; Reid, Jamey M.; Jenkins, Chris J.

    2007-01-01

    Broad continental shelf regions such as the New York Bight are the product of a complex geologic history and dynamic oceanographic processes, dominated by the Holocene marine transgression (>100 m sea-level rise) following the end of the last Pleistocene ice advance ~ 20,000 years ago. The area of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (U.S. EEZ) territory, extending 200 nautical miles seaward from the coast, is larger than the continental U.S. and contains submerged landforms that provide a variety of natural functions and societal benefits, such as: critical habitats for fisheries, ship navigation and homeland security, and engineering activities (i.e. oil and gas platforms, pipeline and cable routes, potential wind-energy-generation sites). Some parts of the continental margins, particularly inner-continental shelf regions, also contain unconsolidated hard-mineral deposits such as sand and gravel that are regarded as potential aggregate resources to meet or augment needs not met by onshore deposits (Williams, 1992). The present distribution of surficial sediment off the northeastern United States is shaped from the deposits left by the last glaciation and reflects the cumulative effects of sediment erosion, transport, sorting, and deposition by storm and tidal processes during the Holocene rise in sea level. As a result, the sediments on the sea floor represent both an historical record of former conditions and a guide to possible future sedimentary environments. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) through the Coastal and Marine Geology Program, in cooperation with the University of Colorado and other partners, has compiled extant sediment character and textural data as well as other geologic information on the sea floor from all regions around the U.S. into the usSEABED data system (Reid and others, 2005; Buczkowski and others, 2006; Reid and others, 2006). The usSEABED system, which contains information on sediment grain size and lithology for more than 340

  4. The geological record preserved by Amazon shelf sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, Charles A.; Kuehl, Steven A.; Figueiredo, Alberto G.; Allison, Mead A.; Sommerfield, Christopher K.; Rine, James M.; Faria, L. Ercilio C.; Silveira, Odete M.

    A recent study of the subaqueous delta and coastal plain near the mouth of the Amazon River provides insight to the geological record created there and elsewhere. A compound clinoform structure is forming across the Amazon shelf. The uppermost portion is the shoreline, whose aggradation brings the modern sedimentary deposit to sea level and produces a deposit 5-10 m thick. It contains sediments accumulating primarily in shallow subtidal areas, intertidal mudflats and mangrove forests, and progradation occurs by overlapping of northward-extending mudcapes. Through these processes, the coastal plain has been widened by 10-100 km during the Holocene. The shoreline deposits are prograding across topset strata of the modern subaqueous delta, which is the lowermost and dominant portion of the compound clinoform structure. The subaqueous delta extends to a water depth of 70 m, with a depositional break between topset and foreset strata at 30-40 m. Advective sediment input to the foreset region causes high accumulation rates, which control the geometry and progradation of the clinoform structure. On time scales of 10 2-10 3 y, physical processes (e.g. waves, currents) have changed and the upper portions of the coastal plain and subaqueous delta have been eroded. One expression of this is a widespread unconformity recorded within late Holocene strata on the inner shelf. Over longer time scales (10 3-10 4 y) sea-level changes have led to more extensive erosion and only the lower 20 m of the compound clinoform structure is preserved, overlain by a transgressive sand layer. On other continental margins with different regional characteristics (e.g. more rapid subsidence) larger fractions of the clinoform structures could be preserved.

  5. Marine cosmeceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed in the cosmetic industry regarding marine-derived cosmetic active ingredients due to their numerous beneficial effects on human skin health. Bioactive substances derived from marine resources have diverse functional roles as natural skin care agents, and these properties can be applied to the development of novel cosmetics as well as nutricosmetics (from edible seaweeds and edible marine animals). This contribution focuses on marine-derived cosmeceutical active ingredients and presents an overview of their health beneficial effects on human skin.

  6. A nuclear DNA basis for shelf- and bank scale population structure in northwest Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua ) : Labrador to Georges Bank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzzante, D.E.; Taggart, C.T.; Cook, D.

    1998-01-01

    -ST measures of population structure, differences are revealed among populations at continental shelf scales (NE Newfoundland Shelf, Grand Banks, Flemish Cap, Scotian Shelf, Georges Bank) where regions are separated by submarine saddles, channels and trenches. However, we also provide evidence of genetic...... by the associated oceanographic features and processes that conceivably form the template for the evolution of the structure. We suggest that bathymetric and hydrodynamic structure represents a rational starting point for developing hypotheses to examine the processes that lead to the genetic structuring of marine...

  7. Prey consumption and energy transfer by marine birds in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, G.L.; Drew, G.S.; Jahncke, J.; Piatt, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated prey consumption by marine birds and their contribution to cross-shelf fluxes in the northern Gulf of Alaska. We utilized data from the North Pacific Pelagic Seabird Database for modeling energy demand and prey consumption. We found that prey consumption by marine birds was much greater over the continental shelf than it was over the basin. Over the shelf, subsurface-foraging marine birds dominated food consumption, whereas over the basin, surface-foraging birds took the most prey biomass. Daily consumption by marine birds during the non-breeding season ("winter") from September through April was greater than daily consumption during the breeding season, between May and August. Over the shelf, shearwaters, murres and, in winter, sea ducks, were the most important consumers. Over the basin, northern fulmars, gulls and kittiwakes predominated in winter and storm-petrels dominated in May to August. Our results suggest that marine birds contribute little to cross-shelf fluxes of energy or matter, but they do remove energy from the marine system through consumption, respiration and migration. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The last glaciation and deglaciation of the Northeast Greenland continental shelf revealed by hydro-acoustic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Jan Erik; Jokat, Wilfried; Dorschel, Boris

    2017-03-01

    About 16% of the Greenland Ice Sheet drains in the area of the Northeast Greenland shelf between 76°N and 80.5°N via marine terminating glaciers. Most of it is via the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream, the largest ice stream of Greenland. During ice ages, the ice sheet extended onto the continental shelf and modern-day cross-shelf troughs were filled by ice streams. In this study, high-resolution hydro-acoustic data acquired during three decades of research were jointly investigated to reveal the past glacial conditions. Our data shows that Westwind Trough and Norske Trough were filled by fast flowing ice streams that extended to the shelf edge during the last glacial maximum. In between the cross-shelf troughs, ice domes resided on shallow banks that may have contributed about a decimetre to global sea level. Most probably these ice domes initiated fast ice flow through sinks in the inter-trough area. In Westwind Trough, ice sheet retreat to the inner shelf after the last glacial maximum was intermittent. In contrast, in Norske Trough the ice sheet retreat appears relatively rapid with no evidences for phases of grounding line stabilization. Probably during the Younger Dryas, the ice sheet readvanced to a mid-shelf position in both troughs documented by grounding zone wedges. During this time, a thick ice shelf was present in Norske Trough releasing tabular icebergs. Ice sheet retreat from the mid-shelf to the coastline during Holocene deglaciation was rapid.

  9. Marine Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  10. Glacial geomorphology of the northwestern Weddell Sea, eastern Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf: Shifting ice flow patterns during deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Jennifer M.; Wellner, Julia S.; Domack, Eugene; Lavoie, Caroline; Yoo, Kyu-Cheul

    2017-03-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum, grounded ice from the expanded Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet extended across the continental shelf. Grounded and flowing ice created a distinctive array of glacial geomorphic features on the sea floor, which were then exposed as the ice sheet retreated. The recent disintegration of the northern parts of the Larsen Ice Shelf (Larsen A and B) have permitted acquisition of marine geophysical data in previously inaccessible and unmapped areas. We present a reconstruction of the evolving ice-flow path and ice sheet geometry of the eastern Antarctic Peninsula, with particular focus paid to newly surveyed areas that shed light on the dynamics of a marine-terminating glacial geomorphic environment, where ice shelves play a major role in grounding line stability. Shifting flow directions were mapped in several areas, including across the Seal Nunataks, which divide Larsen A and B, and offshore of Larsen C, indicating flow reorientation that reflects the changing ice sheet geometry as retreat neared the modern coastline. The measured flow indicators in this area reveal comparatively high elongation ratios (> 20), indicating rapid ice flow. Evidence of possible previous ice-shelf collapses are noted near the shelf break, further illustrating the critical, protective effect that ice shelves impart to marine-terminating glacial environments. Modern ice retreat is governed in part by reorganization of flow patterns accompanying grounding line movement; such reorganizations happened in the past and can aid understanding of modern processes.

  11. High Resolution Ice Surface of the Ross Ice Shelf: Accuracy and Links to Basal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    We use airborne laser altimetry data from IcePod and IceBridge to map the surface across the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica. Laser altimetry and radar data is analyzed from the IcePod 2014 and 2015 field campaigns as well as IceBridge 2013. Icepod is a multi sensor suite that includes ice penetrating radars, a swath scanning laser, visible and IR cameras as well as GPS mounted on a LC-130. Using shallow ice radar data from both IcePod and IceBridge we identify the base of the ice shelf. Across the shelf we observe distinct areas of high reflectivity in the radar data suggesting basal crevassing. In some regions, the basal reflector is not well defined. Laser altimetry profiles correlate surface morphology with features at the base including basal crevasses and marine ice formed by freezing on to the base of the ice shelf. Building Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) from the laser altimetry data, we investigate the relationship between the surface expressions of these ice shelf dynamics including thickness changes, potential sites of marine ice at the base and basal morphology in regions where a well defined basal reflector does not exist in the radar profiles. We present accuracy of the IcePod laser altimetry dataset using ground control points and GPS grids from Greenland and Antarctica as well as Photogrammetric DEMs. Our laser altimetry analysis resolves sub-meter surface features which, combined with coincident radar, provides a link between basal processes and their surface expressions.

  12. Exchanges between the open Black Sea and its North West shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Georgy; Wobus, Fred; Zhou, Feng

    2014-05-01

    offshore flow over a large section of the shelf break. Due to the short duration of strong wind effects (4-7 days) the horizontal extent of cross-shelf-break exchanges is limited to the outer shelf. The effect of Ekman drift is confined to the upper layers. In contrast, eddies and meanders penetrate deep down to the bottom, but they are restricted laterally. During the strong wind events of April 15 - 22 and July 1 - 4, some 0.66×1012 and 0.44×1012 m3of water were removed from the northwestern shelf respectively. In comparison, the single long-lived Sevastopol Eddy generated a much larger offshore transfer of 2.84×1012 m3 over the period April 23 to June 30, which is equivalent to 102% of the volume of northwestern shelf waters. This result is consistent with the data obtained from satellite derived information (Shapiro et al, 2010). The open Black Sea is generally warmer and more saline than the northwest shelf. Hence the exchanges contribute to the increase in both salinity and temperature of shelf waters. Over the study period, salt exchanges increased the average density of the shelf waters by 0.67 kg m-3 and reduced the density contrast between the shelf and deep sea, while lateral heat exchanges reduced the density of the shelf waters by 0.16 kg m-3 and thus enhanced density contrast across the shelf break. This study was supported by the EU (via PERSEUS grant FP7-OCEAN-2011-287600 and MyOcean SPA.2011.1.5-01 grant 283367), Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant 2011CB409803), the Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant 41276031), Zhejiang Association for International Exchange of Personnel, and the University of Plymouth Marine Institute Innovation Fund. References Huthnance, J. M., 1995. Circulation, exchange and water masses at the ocean margin: the role of physical processes at the shelf edge, Prog Oceanogr, 35(4), 353-431, Ivanov L.I., Besiktepe S., Ozsoy E., 1997. In: E.Ozsoy and A.Mikaelyan (eds). Sensitivity to change: Black Sea , Baltic Sea

  13. Marine toxic substance, phytoplankton, and other data from bottle casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-10-24 to 1976-04-13 (NODC Accession 7601545)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance, phytoplankton, and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from bottle casts and other instruments from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data...

  14. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-04-14 to 1976-06-26 (NODC Accession 7700241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms. Data were collected by...

  15. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the North Pacific and other locations from the ACONA and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 09 October 1974 to 22 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700852)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the North Pacific and other locations from the ACONA and other platforms. Data were...

  16. Marine animal sighting, benthic organism, and other data from aircraft and other platforms in the Bering and Beaufort Seas as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 19 August 1971 to 12 March 1983 (NODC Accession 8500273)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting, benthic organism, and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms in the Bering and Beaufort Seas from 19 August 1971 to 12...

  17. Marine toxic substance and other data from grab casts in the Norton Sound from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-09-11 to 1978-08-22 (NODC Accession 8000076)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from grab casts in the Norton Sound from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from 11 September 1975 to 22...

  18. Marine bird sightings from aircraft, temperature profiles from XBT casts, and other data from the YANKEE CLIPPER and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1969-12-02 to 1977-06-28 (NODC Accession 7700893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sightings from aircraft, temperature profiles from XBT casts, and other data were collected from the YANKEE CLIPPER and other platforms from 02 December...

  19. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Bering Sea and other locations from the MOANA WAVE as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 25 June 1976 to 08 July 1976 (NODC Accession 7700782)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by Pacific...

  20. Marine animal sighting and census data from aircraft and other platforms from the Southeastern Bering Sea and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 07 March 1979 to 04 March 1983 (NODC Accession 8600251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine animal sighting and census data were collected from aircraft and other platforms in the Bering Sea and other locations from 07 March 1979 to 044 March 1983....

  1. Marine toxic substance and other data from pump casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-09-11 to 1975-10-10 (NODC Accession 8200094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from pump casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 11 September 1975 to 10 October 1975. Data...

  2. Marine mammal specimen and other data from the Beaufort Sea and other locations from the USCGC NORTHWIND and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 January 1978 to 13 July 1979 (NODC Accession 8000431)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected in the Beaufort Sea and other locations from the USCGC NORTHWIND and other platforms from 01 January 1978 to 13...

  3. Marine mammal specimen and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms in the Bering Sea and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-10-27 to 1977-07-12 (NODC Accession 7700220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms in the Bering Sea and other locations from 27 October 1975 to 12...

  4. Marine mammal specimen, CTD, and other data from the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 March 1978 to 28 July 1979 (NODC Accession 8000009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen, CTD, and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA and other platforms from 22 March 1978 to 28 July...

  5. Marine mammal specimen and other data from the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-04-06 to 1978-09-12 (NODC Accession 8000004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR and other platforms from 06 April 1978 to 12 September 1978. Data...

  6. Marine mammal specimen and other data from the Beaufort Sea and other locations from the SURVEYOR and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 25 January 1977 to 17 November 1977 (NODC Accession 7900339)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine mammal specimen and other data were collected in the Beaufort Sea from the SURVEYOR and other platforms from 25 January 1977 to 17 November 1977. Data were...

  7. Marine bird sighting and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from the Gulf of Alaska and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-04-26 to 1976-11-20 (NODC Accession 7900049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations. Data were collected by...

  8. Marine bird sighting and other data from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from the Bering Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-08-20 to 1977-08-04 (NODC Accession 7900090)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms in the Bering Sea from 20 August 1975 to 04 August 1977. Data were...

  9. Marine bird sighting and other data from aircraft and other platforms from the Gulf of Alaska and other locations as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 March 1976 to 08 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7900046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine bird sighting and other data were collected from aircraft and other platforms in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations. Data were collected by the Fish and...

  10. Petroleum resources assessment on the continental shelf basin of the south sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Tae Jin; Kwak, Young Hun; Oh, Jae Ho; Bong, Pil Youn; Son, Jin Dam; Lee, Ho Young; Ryu, Byung Jae; Son, Byoung Kook; Hwang, In Geul; Kwon, Young In; Lee, Young Ju; Kim, Hak Ju; Park, Kwan Soon; Park, Keun Pil; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    On the basis of diverse microfossils such as foraminifers, ostracods, micromulluscs, fossil spores and pollen and calcareous nannofossils derived from 14 drill holes, the sediments are divided into two part, the upper marine part and the lower nonmarine one. Marine part is subdivided into 4 foraminiferal zones and 3 nannofossil zones of Plio-Pleistocene age. In the lower part ranging from Oligocene to Late Miocene 4 palynomoph assemblages are established, which reflect climatic changes fluctuating between subtropical and cool temperate. Some fine sediments occurring in the South Sea continental shelf are rich in organic matter to be hydrocarbon source rock. The organic matter is mainly compared to type 3. However, lower part of the Geobuk-1 and Okdom-1 shows more oil prone geochemical characteristics than other wells. The kerosene is mixture type 1 and type 3 organic matter. The main oil generation zone located between 2,500 m and 3,000 m and gas generation zone from 3,500 m to 4,000 m approximately. Hydrocarbon accumulation could be expected in the trap formed in the period earlier than 10 Ma. as the hydrocarbon started to be expelled at 10 Ma. according to the modeling. Approximately 13,000 Line-km of multichannel seismic data integrated with 14 wells and gravity and magnetic data were analyzed to investigate the structural and stratigraphic evolution of southern part of offshore Korea. The northeast-southwest trending Taiwan-Sinzi Uplift Belt separates the area into two regions with different tectonic features, northwestern and southwestern regions. Tectonics of the rifting phase in both regions have been established on the basis of structural and stratigraphic analyses of depositional sequences and their seismic expressions. In the northwestern region, the large rifting activity appears to be occurred during Oligocene and pre-Oligocene, while in the southeastern region it occurred from late Miocene to early Pliocene. The potential hydrocarbon traps associated

  11. A CRITICAL REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF APPLYING SEMI-VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (SVOCS AS A GEOCHEMICAL TRACER TO INDICATE TSUNAMI BACKWASH: The Bilateral, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG and National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT Funded Project “Tsunami Deposits in Near-Shore- and Coastal Waters of Thailand (TUNWAT”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwatt Pongpiachan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tsunamis symbolize one of the most harmful natural disasters for low-lying coastal zones and their residents, due to both its destructive power and irregularity. The 2004 Boxing Day tsunami, which attack the Andaman Sea coast of Thailand, resulted 5,395 of deaths and inestimable casualties, interrupted economies and social well-being in numerous coastal villages and caused in extreme alterations of both onshore and offshore coastal morphology. The Great Indian Ocean tsunami also highlighted that there are many missing jigsaw puzzle pieces in scientific knowledge, starting from the generating of tsunamis offshore to the countless influences to the marine ecosystems on the continental shelf, coastal areas and on land and to the economic and social systems consequences. As with all deposits that do not have a direct physical link to their causative sources, marine tsunami deposits must be distinguished from other deposits through regional correlation, dating and criteria for recognition within the deposits themselves. This study aims to provide comprehensive reviews on using Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs as a chemical proxy to discriminate tsunami relateddeposits from typical marine sediments. The advantages and disadvantages of this chemical tracer will be critically reviewed and further discussed.

  12. Tracking small mountainous river derived terrestrial organic carbon across the active margin marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, L. B.; Blair, N. E.; Orpin, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Active margins are particularly efficient in the burial of organic carbon due to the close proximity of highland sources to marine sediment sinks and high sediment transport rates. Compared with passive margins, active margins are dominated by small mountainous river systems, and play a unique role in marine and global carbon cycles. Small mountainous rivers drain only approximately 20% of land, but deliver approximately 40% of the fluvial sediment to the global ocean. Unlike large passive margin systems where riverine organic carbon is efficiently incinerated on continental shelves, small mountainous river dominated systems are highly effective in the burial and preservation of organic carbon due to the rapid and episodic delivery of organic carbon sourced from vegetation, soil, and rock. To investigate the erosion, transport, and burial of organic carbon in active margin small mountainous river systems we use the Waipaoa River, New Zealand. The Waipaoa River, and adjacent marine depositional environment, is a system of interest due to a large sediment yield (6800 tons km-2 yr-1) and extensive characterization. Previous studies have considered the biogeochemistry of the watershed and tracked the transport of terrestrially derived sediment and organics to the continental shelf and slope by biogeochemical proxies including stable carbon isotopes, lignin phenols, n-alkanes, and n-fatty acids. In this work we expand the spatial extent of investigation to include deep sea sediments of the Hikurangi Trough. Located in approximately 3000 m water depth 120 km from the mouth of the Waipaoa River, the Hikurangi Trough is the southern extension of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction system. Piston core sediments collected by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA, NZ) in the Hikurangi Trough indicate the presence of terrestrially derived material (lignin phenols), and suggest a continuum of deposition, resuspension, and transport across the margin

  13. Depositional Environments of Late Danian Plant Localities: Chubut Provice, Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, E.; Slingerland, R. L.; Wilf, P.

    2010-12-01

    Diverse, well-preserved macroflora are observed within Cretaceous and Paleocene sediments of Chubut Province, Patagonia, Argentina. These macroflora are the most well preserved early Paleocene flora from Gondwana and add new insight into the diversity and environments of that epoch. Two major sites of fossil preservation, Palacio de los Loros and Parque Provincial Ormachea, sit near the top of the Late Danian (65.5-61.7 Ma) Salamanca Formation. Understanding the depositional history of the Salamanca is important in characterizing paleoenvironments in which these flora lived and relating these Patagonian macroflora to concurrent Paleocene flora within the Gondwanan supercontinent. During a two week field season, twenty stratigraphic sections were measured along the outcrop belt at Palacio de los Loros and Ormachea Park as well as two minor sites; Las Flores, and Rancho Grande. Photo mosaics, laser ranger data, and stratigraphic columns were merged with elevated geologic maps and imported into Fledermaus to generate a 3-D visualization of facies relationships. Rock samples were also collected and will be thin sectioned and analyzed for petrography and grain size. The Salamanca Fm. consists of 7 facies, listed here in stratigraphically ascending order: 1)Transgressive sands, 2)Wispy-bedded claystone, 3)Banco Verde, 4)White Cross bedded sandstone, 5)Accretion set siltstone, 6)Transitional silty claystone and 7)Banco Negro. Based on these facies, the Salamanca Fm. is interpreted as a marine-shelf to brackish, tide-dominated, estuarine deposit. The base of the Salamanca Fm. rests on an unconformity representing a marine flooding surface and lower sections of the Salamanca, facies 1 and 2, contain abundant glauconite and fossils indicative of a marine shelf environment. These facies give way upwards to bi-directional trough cross bedded sandstones interspersed with flaser bedded sandy siltstones (facies 3 and 4) indicating a less marine estuary with strong flow regimes

  14. Cenomanian-turonian stable isotope signatures and depositional sequences in northeast Egypt and central Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouk, Sherif; Ahmad, Fayez; Powell, John H.

    2017-02-01

    Lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic and microfacies studies of two Cenomanian-Turonian shallow-marine, siliciclastic-carbonate successions at Gebel Ekma plateau (southwestern Sinai, Egypt) and Wadi Karak section (central Jordan) are calibrated with δ13C-, profiles to reveal relative sea-level changes within a sequence stratigraphic framework. The study provides significantly enhanced stratigraphic resolution and key sections for regional correlation. Lithofacies are dominated by well-developed peritidal to subtidal facies associations indicating deposition in a rimmed carbonate shelf setting. Biostratigraphic analysis indicates the presence of 6 ammonite zones, 3 calcareous nannofossil zones and 3 planktonic foraminiferal zones within the Cenomanian to Turonian succession. Six, third-order depositional sequences, bounded by correlatable sequence boundaries can be traced across the African-Arabian platform. Comparison with δ13C records in deeper water pelagic sequences help to improve the resolution of the boundaries of each depositional sequence. Recognition of time gaps at the sequence boundaries on the platform, recorded in different parts of African-Arabian platform, is attributed to local tectonic activity, associated with the change from passive to active margins, which are overprinted by the global eustatic signature.

  15. Detection of introduced sessile species on the near shore continental shelf in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína de Araújo Bumbeer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Invasion by marine species, often considered a grave threat to marine ecosystems, occurs throughout the world as a consequence of many anthropogenic activities. In coastal Paraná, many factors including shipping, aquaculture and the use of artificial substrates provide suitable environments for the establishment and rapid spread of introduced marine species. To better understand this process, the encrusting community was studied on polyethylene plates (n = 120, 10 x 10 cm that were placed seasonally at fixed locations on the inner continental shelf to detect non-native species. Of the 62 taxa found, 40 were identified to species, 14 of which were native, 9 introduced and 17 cryptogenic. We found a new introduction while most introduced species were previously reported at a nearby estuary with an international port. Possible complementary explanations for these detections are 1 estuaries influence ecological processes on the inner continental shelf, 2 the study area is near the route of cargo and other ships entering the port, 3 other local vectors, such as hulls of fishing and recreational boats, and artificial reefs link the estuary to the offshore areas. Thus, not only are estuaries invaded by exotic species, but also non-indigenous marine species may be present in the open sea where they are likely to colonize artificial substrates.

  16. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisited using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M.M.; McBride, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf ???5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  17. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisted using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marci M.; McBride, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf not, vert, ~5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  18. 41 CFR 101-27.205 - Shelf-life codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-Management of Shelf-Life Materials § 101-27.205 Shelf-life codes. Shelf-life items shall be identified by use... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Shelf-life codes. 101-27.205 Section 101-27.205 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  19. Atlantic NAD 83 Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Atlantic Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  20. Continental Shelf Boundary - Alaska NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundaries (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...