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Sample records for deposition hole scale

  1. Boring of full scale deposition holes using a novel dry blind boring method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autio, J.; Kirkkomaeki, T. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-10-01

    Three holes the size of deposition holes (depth 7.5 m and diameter 1.5 m) were bored in the Research Tunnel at Olkiluoto, Finland. A novel full-face boring technique was used based on rotary crushing of rock and removal of crushed rock by vacuum flushing through the drill string. The purpose of the work was to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. During the boring test procedures were carried out in order to determine the effect of changes in operating parameters on the performance of the boring machine and the quality of the hole. The boring method was found to be technically feasible and efficient. Evaluation of the quality of the hole included studies of the geometry of the hole, measurements of the surface roughness using a laser profilometer and study of excavation disturbances in the zone adjacent to the surface of the holes using two novel methods, He-gas diffusion and the {sup 14}C-polymethylmethacrylate methods. 43 refs.

  2. Boring of full scale deposition holes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Operational experiences including boring performance and a work time analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Aasa [SWECO, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    Thirteen experimental deposition holes similar to those in the present KBS-3 design have been bored at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Oskarshamn, Sweden. The objective with the boring program was to test and demonstrate the current technique for boring of large vertical holes in granitic rock. Conclusions and results from this project is used in the planning process for the deposition holes that will be bored in the real repository for spent nuclear fuel. The boreholes are also important for three major projects. The Prototype Repository, the Canister Retrieval Test and the Demonstration project will all need full-scale deposition holes for their commissioning. The holes are bored in full scale and have a radius of 1.75 m and a depth of 8.5 m. To bore the holes an existing TBM design was modified to produce a novel type Shaft Boring Machine (SBM) suitable for boring 1.75 m diameter holes from a relatively small tunnel. The cutter head was equipped with two types of roller cutters: two row carbide button cutters and disc cutters. Removal of the cuttings was made with a vacuum suction system. The boring was monitored and boring parameters recorded by a computerised system for the evaluation of the boring performance. During boring of four of the holes temperature, stress and strain measurements were performed. Acoustic emission measurements were also performed during boring of these four holes. The results of these activities will not be discussed in this report since they are reported separately. Criteria regarding nominal borehole diameter, deviation of start and end centre point, surface roughness and performance of the machine were set up according to the KBS-3 design and were fulfilled with a fair margin. The average total time for boring one deposition hole during this project was 105 hours.

  3. Characterization of the excavation disturbance caused by boring of the experimental full scale deposition holes in the Research Tunnel of Olkiluoto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autio, J. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    Three holes, the size of deposition holes, were bored in the Research Tunnel using a novel full-face boring technique. During the boring test, procedures were carried out in order to determine the effect of changes in operating parameters on the performance of the boring machine and the quality of the hole. Evaluation of the quality of the hole included studies of the geometry of the holes, measurements of surface roughness using a laser profilometer, rock mechanical determinations and study of excavation disturbances in the zone adjacent to the surface of the holes using two novel methods, the He-gas method and the {sup 14}C-polymethylmethacrylate ({sup 14}C-PMMA) method. It was found that there is a distinct disturbed zone adjacent to the surface of the full scale deposition holes which can be divided into three different zones. The zones are as follows: a crushed zone penetrating to a depth of about 3 mm from the surface, a fractured zone extending to a depth of 6 - 10 mm from the crushed zone and a micro fractured zone extending to a depth of 15 - 31 mm from the fractured zone. The porosity of the rock in the disturbed zone measured using the {sup 14}C-PMMA method was clearly greater than the porosity of undisturbed rock to a depth of about 11 mm. The values of permeability and effective diffusion coefficient in the disturbed zone measured in a direction perpendicular to the disturbed surface were found to be approximately one order of magnitude larger than those of undisturbed rock. The degree of disturbance was found to be greater where higher levels of thrust had been employed during the boring process. The results obtained also suggest that the disturbance caused by using 4- and 5-row cutters in the cutter head is more pronounced than the disturbance caused when using 5- and 6-row cutters 31 refs, 118 figs, 15 tabs

  4. Freefem++ in THM analyses of KBS-3 deposition hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempinen, A. [Marintel Ky, Turku (Finland)

    2006-12-15

    The applicability of Freefem++ as a software for thermo-hydro-mechanical analysis of KBS-3V deposition hole was evaluated. Freefem++ is software for multiphysical simulations with finite element method. A set of previously performed analyses were successfully repeated with Freefem++. The only significant problem was to impose unique values for variables at the canister surface. This problem can be circumvented with an iterative method, and it can possibly be solved later, since Freefem++ is opensource software. (orig.)

  5. Scale-Invariant Rotating Black Holes in Quadratic Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Cognola

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Black hole solutions in pure quadratic theories of gravity are interesting since they allow the formulation of a set of scale-invariant thermodynamics laws. Recently, we have proven that static scale-invariant black holes have a well-defined entropy, which characterizes equivalent classes of solutions. In this paper, we generalize these results and explore the thermodynamics of rotating black holes in pure quadratic gravity.

  6. Gott Time Machines, BTZ Black Hole Formation, and Choptuik Scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Birmingham, Daniel; Birmingham, Danny; Sen, Siddhartha

    2000-01-01

    We study the formation of BTZ black holes by the collision of point particles. It is shown that the Gott time machine, originally constructed for the case of vanishing cosmological constant, provides a precise mechanism for black hole formation. As a result, one obtains an exact analytic understanding of the Choptuik scaling.

  7. Gott time machines, BTZ black hole formation, and choptuik scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham; Sen

    2000-02-07

    We study the formation of Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes by the collision of point particles. It is shown that the Gott time machine, originally constructed for the case of vanishing cosmological constant, provides a precise mechanism for black hole formation. As a result, one obtains an exact analytic understanding of the Choptuik scaling.

  8. Swelling of the buffer of KBS-3V deposition hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempinen, A. [Marintel Ky, Turku (Finland)

    2006-12-15

    At the time of the installation of spent nuclear fuel canister in the KBS-3V deposition hole, empty space is left around bentonite buffer for technical reasons. The gap between the buffer and the canister is about 10 mm, and the gap between the buffer and the rock is 30 to 35 mm. In this study, the swelling of the buffer to fill the gaps was simulated, when the gaps are initially filled with water and no external water is available. The model used here is a thermodynamical model for swelling clay, with parameters determined for bentonite. The simulations presented here were performed with Freefem++ software, which is a finite element application for partial differential equations. These equations come from the material model. The simulation results show that the swelling fills the outer gaps in few years, but no significant swelling pressure is generated. For swelling pressure, external water supply is required. (orig.)

  9. Low-scale gravity black holes at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Regos, E; Gamsizkan, H; Trocsanyi, Z

    2009-01-01

    We search for extra dimensions by looking for black holes at LHC. Theoretical investigations provide the basis for the collider experiments. We use black hole generators to simulate the experimental signatures (colour, charge, spectrum of emitted particles, missing transverse energy) of black holes at LHC in models with TeV scale quantum gravity, rotation, fermion splitting, brane tension and Hawking radiation. We implement the extra-dimensional simulations at the CMS data analysis and test further beyond standard models of black holes too.

  10. Black Holes and Quantumness on Macroscopic Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Flassig, D; Wintergerst, N

    2012-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that black holes may be described as condensates of weakly interacting gravitons at a critical point, exhibiting strong quantum effects. In this paper, we study a model system of attractive bosons in one spatial dimension which is known to undergo a quantum phase transition. We demonstrate explicitly that indeed quantum effects are important at the critical point, even if the number of particles is macroscopic. Most prominently, we evaluate the entropy of entanglement between different momentum modes and observe it to become maximal at the critical point. Furthermore, we explicitly see that the leading entanglement is between long wavelength modes and is hence a feature independent of ultraviolet physics. If applicable to black holes, our findings substantiate the conjectured breakdown of semiclassical physics even for large black holes. This can resolve long standing mysteries, such as the information paradox and the no-hair theorem.

  11. Evaporating Black Holes and Long Range Scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Salehi, H

    2003-01-01

    For an effective treatment of the evaporation process of a large black hole the problem concerning the role played by the fluctuations of the (vacuum) stress tensor close to the horizon is addressed. We present arguments which establish a principal relationship between the outward fluctuations of the stress tensor close to the horizon and quantities describing the onset of the evaporation process. This suggest that the evaporation process may be described by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem relating the noise of the horizon to the black hole evaporation rate.

  12. Mathematical Modelling of Silica Scaling Deposition in Geothermal Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizami, M.; Sutopo

    2016-09-01

    Silica scaling is widely encountered in geothermal wells in which produce two-phase geothermal fluid. Silica scaling could be formed due to chemical reacting by mixing a geothermal fluid with other geothermal fluid in different compositions, or also can be caused by changes in fluid properties due to changes pressure and temperature. One of method to overcome silica scaling which is occurred around geothermal well is by workover operation. Modelling of silica deposition in porous medium has been modeled in previously. However, the growth of silica scaling deposition in geothermal wells has never been modeled. Modelling of silica deposition through geothermal is important aspects to determine depth of silica scaling growth and best placing for workover device to clean silica scaling. This study is attempted to develop mathematical models for predicting silica scaling through geothermal wells. The mathematical model is developed by integrating the solubility-temperature correlation and two-phase pressure drop coupled wellbore fluid temperature correlation in a production well. The coupled model of two-phase pressure drop and wellbore fluid temperature correlation which is used in this paper is Hasan-Kabir correlation. This modelling is divided into two categories: single and two phase fluid model. Modelling of silica deposition is constrained in temperature distribution effect through geothermal wells by solubility correlation for silica. The results of this study are visualizing the growth of silica scaling thickness through geothermal wells in each segment of depth. Sensitivity analysis is applied in several parameters, such as: bottom-hole pressure, temperature, and silica concentrations. Temperature is most impact factor for silica scaling through geothermal wellbore and depth of flash point. In flash point, silica scaling thickness has reached maximum because reducing of mole in liquid portion.

  13. Supermassive black holes, large scale structure and holography

    CERN Document Server

    Mongan, T R

    2013-01-01

    A holographic analysis of large scale structure in the universe estimates the mass of supermassive black holes at the center of large scale structures with matter density varying inversely as the square of the distance from their center. The estimate is consistent with two important test cases involving observations of the supermassive black hole with mass 3.6\\times10^{-6} times the galactic mass in Sagittarius A^{*} near the center of our Milky Way and the 2\\times10^{9} solar mass black hole in the quasar ULAS J112001.48+064124.3 at redshift z=7.085. It is also consistent with upper bounds on central black hole masses in globular clusters M15, M19 and M22 developed using the Jansky Very Large Array in New Mexico.

  14. Active galactic nuclei as scaled-up Galactic black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHardy, I M; Koerding, E; Knigge, C; Uttley, P; Fender, R P

    2006-12-07

    A long-standing question is whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) vary like Galactic black hole systems when appropriately scaled up by mass. If so, we can then determine how AGN should behave on cosmological timescales by studying the brighter and much faster varying Galactic systems. As X-ray emission is produced very close to the black holes, it provides one of the best diagnostics of their behaviour. A characteristic timescale--which potentially could tell us about the mass of the black hole--is found in the X-ray variations from both AGN and Galactic black holes, but whether it is physically meaningful to compare the two has been questioned. Here we report that, after correcting for variations in the accretion rate, the timescales can be physically linked, revealing that the accretion process is exactly the same for small and large black holes. Strong support for this linkage comes, perhaps surprisingly, from the permitted optical emission lines in AGN whose widths (in both broad-line AGN and narrow-emission-line Seyfert 1 galaxies) correlate strongly with the characteristic X-ray timescale, exactly as expected from the AGN black hole masses and accretion rates. So AGN really are just scaled-up Galactic black holes.

  15. Following Black Hole Scaling Relations Through Gas-Rich Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Medling, Anne M; Max, Claire E; Sanders, David B; Armus, Lee; Holden, Bradford; Mieda, Etsuko; Wright, Shelley A; Larkin, James E

    2015-01-01

    We present black hole mass measurements from kinematic modeling of high-spatial resolution integral field spectroscopy of the inner regions of 9 nearby (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies in a variety of merger stages. These observations were taken with OSIRIS and laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck I and Keck II telescopes, and reveal gas and stellar kinematics inside the spheres of influence of these supermassive black holes. We find that this sample of black holes are overmassive ($\\sim10^{7-9}$ M$_{Sun}$) compared to the expected values based on black hole scaling relations, and suggest that the major epoch of black hole growth occurs in early stages of a merger, as opposed to during a final episode of quasar-mode feedback. The black hole masses presented are the dynamical masses enclosed in $\\sim$25pc, and could include gas which is gravitationally bound to the black hole but has not yet lost sufficient angular momentum to be accreted. If present, this gas could in principle eventually fuel AGN f...

  16. The scaling of black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Amit

    2012-01-01

    We discuss some general properties of black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity from the perspective of local stationary observers at distance l from the horizon. The present status of the theory indicates that black hole entropy differs from the low energy (IR) expected value A/(4G) (in natural units) in the deep Planckian regime (UV). The partition function is well defined if the number of non-geometric degrees of freedom g_M (encoding the degeneracy of the area a_p eigenvalue at a puncture p) satisfy the holographic bound g_M S_IR=A/(4 G) as the scale l flows.

  17. Transport of Large Scale Poloidal Flux in Black Hole Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Beckwith, Kris; Krolik, Julian H

    2009-01-01

    We perform a global, three-dimensional GRMHD simulation of an accretion torus embedded in a large scale vertical magnetic field orbiting a Schwarzschild black hole. This simulation investigates how a large scale vertical field evolves within a turbulent accretion disk and whether global magnetic field configurations suitable for launching jets and winds can develop. We identify a ``coronal mechanism'' of magnetic flux motion, which dominates the global flux evolution. In this coronal mechanism, magnetic stresses driven by orbital shear create large-scale half-loops of magnetic field that stretch radially inward and then reconnect, leading to discontinuous jumps in the location of magnetic flux. This mechanism is supplemented by a smaller amount of flux advection in the accretion flow proper. Because the black hole in this case does not rotate, the magnetic flux on the horizon determines the mean magnetic field strength in the funnel around the disk axis; this field strength is regulated by a combination of th...

  18. The strong environmental dependence of black hole scaling relations

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, Sean L

    2013-01-01

    We investigate how the scaling relations between central black hole mass (Mbh) and host galaxy properties (velocity dispersion, bulge stellar mass and bulge luminosity) depend on the large scale environment. For each of a sample of 69 galaxies with dynamical black hole measurements we compile four environmental measures (nearest neighbor distance, fixed aperture number density, total halo mass, and central/satellite). We find that central and satellite galaxies follow distinctly separate scalings in each of the three relations we have examined. The Mbh - sigma relation of central galaxies is significantly steeper (6.39 +/- 0.50) than that of satellite galaxies (4.78 +/- 0.51), but has a similar intercept. This behavior remains even after restricting to a sample of only early type galaxies or after removing the 8 brightest cluster galaxies. The Mbh - sigma relation shows more modest differences when splitting the sample based on the other environmental indicators, suggesting that they are driven by the underly...

  19. Scale-invariant radio jets and varying black hole spin

    CERN Document Server

    Moscibrodzka, Monika; Noble, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Compact radio cores associated with relativistic jets are often observed in both active galactic nuclei and X-ray binaries. Their radiative properties follow some general scaling laws which primarily depend on their masses and accretion rates. However, it has been suggested that the black hole spin can also strongly influence the power and radio flux of these. Here, we attempt to estimate the dependency of the radio luminosity of steady jets launched by accretion disks on black hole mass, accretion rate and spin using numerical simulations. We make use of 3D GRMHD simulations of accretion disks around low-luminosity black holes in which the jet radio emission is produced by the jet sheath. We find that the radio flux increases roughly by a factor of 6 as the back hole spin increases from a~0 to a=0.98. This is comparable to the increase in accretion power with spin, meaning that the ratio between radio jet and accretion power is hardly changing. Although our jet spine power scales as expected for the Blandfor...

  20. Using observations in deposition tunnels to avoid intersections with critical fractures in deposition holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, Raymond

    2006-04-15

    We evaluate the efficiency of utilising a Full Perimeter Intersection (hereafter denoted FPI) criterion, for identifying discriminating fractures in deposition tunnels and deposition holes. We also evaluate the consequences of using FPI, expressed in terms of the degree of utilisation. This is achieved by means of stochastic fracture simulation consisting of two steps. The first consists of computing intersection statistics between the tunnel and the fracture array. The second step consists of computing the degree of utilisation based on the statistics derived from the first step. We base our simulations upon the DFN models produced for the Laxemar and Forsmark study sites, versions 1.2. We anticipate that these models will mature further within the framework of SKB's on-going site investigations and Site Modelling (versions 2.2 and onwards) and though we here discuss the impact of various DFN parameters on our results, it is beyond the scope of the work presented here to evaluate the validity of the published models. The DFN models have been used with no modifications and accepted as they were published. The uncertainties presented here thus mirror the uncertainties of the DFN models.The consequence of using the FPC has been quantified in terms of degree of utilisation which was judged reasonable. The degree of utilisation is higher in Forsmark as compared to Laxemar due to, mainly; the latter's higher intensity of the steep fracture sets in the studied size interval. The FPC was found insufficient to detect all potentially discriminating fractures. It needed to be complemented and we defined a new criterion, EFPC, to also address large fractures in the immediate vicinity of the tunnel, which remain undetected by tunnel mapping. We here proposed a criterion consisting in discriminating also all fractures that intersect 5 or more canister positions. The use of EFPC decreased the degree of utilisation further, though we still judge it to be reasonable. A

  1. Temperature buffer test. Installation of buffer, heaters and instruments in the deposition hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Sanden, Torbjoern; Aakesson, Mattias [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Barcena, Ignacio; Garcia-Sineriz, Jose Luis [Aitemin, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    During 2003 the Temperature Buffer Test was installed in Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Temperature, water pressure, relative humidity, total pressure and displacements etc. are measured in numerous points in the test. Most of the cables from the transducers are led in the deposition hole through slots in the rock surface of the deposition hole in watertight tubes to the data collection system in a container placed in the tunnel close to the deposition hole. This report describes the work with the installations of the buffer, heaters, and instruments and yields a description of the final location of all instruments. The report also contains a description of the materials that were installed and the densities yielded after placement.

  2. Black hole physics. Black hole lightning due to particle acceleration at subhorizon scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J; Ansoldi, S; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; Becerra González, J; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; de Oña Wilhelmi, E; Delgado Mendez, C; Dominis Prester, D; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; García López, R J; Garczarczyk, M; Garrido Terrats, D; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; González Muñoz, A; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Prada Moroni, P G; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rodriguez Garcia, J; Rügamer, S; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Zanin, R; Kadler, M; Schulz, R; Ros, E; Bach, U; Krauß, F; Wilms, J

    2014-11-28

    Supermassive black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses are commonly found in the centers of galaxies. Astronomers seek to image jet formation using radio interferometry but still suffer from insufficient angular resolution. An alternative method to resolve small structures is to measure the time variability of their emission. Here we report on gamma-ray observations of the radio galaxy IC 310 obtained with the MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov) telescopes, revealing variability with doubling time scales faster than 4.8 min. Causality constrains the size of the emission region to be smaller than 20% of the gravitational radius of its central black hole. We suggest that the emission is associated with pulsar-like particle acceleration by the electric field across a magnetospheric gap at the base of the radio jet. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Black hole lightning due to particle acceleration at subhorizon scales

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Zanin, R; Kadler, M; Schulz, R; Ros, E; Bach, U; Krauß, F; Wilms, J

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses are commonly found in the centers of galaxies. Astronomers seek to image jet formation using radio interferometry, but still suffer from insufficient angular resolution. An alternative method to resolve small structures is to measure the time variability of their emission. Here, we report on gamma-ray observations of the radio galaxy IC 310 obtained with the MAGIC telescopes revealing variability with doubling time scales faster than 4.8 min. Causality constrains the size of the emission region to be smaller than 20\\% of the gravitational radius of its central black hole. We suggest that the emission is associated with pulsar-like particle acceleration by the electric field across a magnetospheric gap at the base of the radio jet.

  4. Small-scale inviscid accretion discs around black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Beloborodov, A M; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Illarionov, Andrei F.

    2000-01-01

    Gas falling quasi-spherically onto a Schwarzschild black hole can form an inner thin accretion disc if its specific angular momentum, $l$, exceeds $\\lmin\\approx 0.75r_gc$, where $r_g$ is the Schwarzschild radius. The standard disc model assumes $l\\gg\\lmin$. We argue that in many black-hole sources the accretion flows can have $l\\simgt\\lmin$, and assess the mechanism of accretion in this regime. In a range $\\lminscale disc forms in which gas overcomes the centrifugal barrier and spirals fast into the black hole without any help of horizontal viscous stresses. Such an ``inviscid'' disc, however, interacts inelastically with the infall feeding the disc, which leads to energy dissipation. This interaction determines the disc dynamics and luminosity. We find the radiative efficiency of this accretion regime to be comparable with the efficiency of the standard disc. The maximum radius of the fast inviscid disc is $r_{\\rm max}\\approx 2\\lcr^2/r_gc^2\\sim 14 r_g$, and the energy release peaks at...

  5. From Black Hole quantization to universal scaling laws

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, Salvatore; De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Luongo, Orlando

    2012-01-01

    Significative developments on the primordial black hole quantization seem to indicate that the structure formation in the universe behaves under a unified scheme. This leads to the existence of scaling relations, whose validity could offer insights on the process of unification between quantum mechanics and gravity. Encouraging results have been obtained in order to recover the observed magnitudes of angular momenta, peculiar radii and virialized times for large and small structures. In the cosmological regime, we show that it seems possible to infer the magnitude of the cosmological constant in terms of the matter density, in agreement with the observed values.

  6. Fragmentation of black hole scaling throats in N=2 supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Hyeyoun

    2011-01-01

    We find an instanton analogous to the Brill instanton that describes the fragmentation of a single-centered black hole scaling throat of charge $\\Gamma_1 + \\Gamma_2 + \\Gamma_3$ in N=2 supergravity to three disconnected throats of charges $\\Gamma_1, \\Gamma_2, \\Gamma_3$, in the limit where the intersection products between the charges of the three throats satisfies $ \\lll , $. We evaluate the Euclidean action for this instanton and find that the amplitude for the tunneling process is proportional to the difference in entropy between the initial and final configurations.

  7. Black Hole Demography: From scaling relations to models

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    In this contributed paper I review our current knowledge of the local Black Hole (BH) scaling relations, and their impact on the determination of the local BH mass function. I particularly emphasize the remaining systematic uncertainties impinging upon a secure determination of the BH mass function and how progress can be made. I then review and discuss the evidence for a different time evolution for separate BH-galaxy scaling relations, and how these independent empirical evidences can be reconciled with the overall evolution of the structural properties of the host galaxies. I conclude discussing BH demography in the context of semi-empirical continuity accretion models, as well as more complex evolutionary models, emphasizing the general constraints we can set on them.

  8. Black holes and Thunderbolt singularities with Lifshitz scaling terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misonoh, Yosuke; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2015-10-01

    We study a static, spherically symmetric and asymptotic flat spacetime, assuming the hypersurface orthogonal Einstein-aether theory with an ultraviolet modification motivated by the Hořava-Lifshitz theory, which is composed of the z =2 Lifshitz scaling terms such as scalar combinations of a three-Ricci curvature and the acceleration of the aether field. For the case with the quartic term of the acceleration of the aether field, we obtain a two-parameter family of black hole solutions, which possess a regular universal horizon. Whereas, if a three-Ricci curvature squared term is joined in ultraviolet modification, we find a solution with a thunderbolt singularity such that the universal horizon turns out to be a spacelike singularity.

  9. Black Holes and Thunderbolt Singularities with Lifshitz Scaling Terms

    CERN Document Server

    Misonoh, Yosuke

    2015-01-01

    We study a static, spherically symmetric and asymptotic flat spacetime, assuming the hypersurface orthogonal Einstein-aether theory with an ultraviolet modification motivated by the Horava-Lifshitz theory, which is composed of the $z=2$ Lifshitz scaling terms such as scalar combinations of a three-Ricci curvature and the acceleration of the aether field. For the case with the quartic term of the acceleration of the aether field, we obtain a two-parameter family of black hole solutions, which possess a regular universal horizon. While, if three-Ricci curvature squared term is joined in ultraviolet modification, we find a solution with a thunderbolt singularity such that the universal horizon turns to be a spacelike singularity.

  10. Natural Cutoffs effect on Charged Rotating TeV-Scale Black Hole Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Soleimani, M J; Gopir, G; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdullah, W A T Wan

    2015-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of charged rotating black hole in large extra dimensions scenario where quantum gravity effects are taken into account. We consider the effects of minimal length, minimal momentum, and maximal momentum as natural cutoffs on the thermodynamics of charged rotating TeV-scale black holes. In this framework the effect of the angular momentum and charge on the thermodynamics of the black hole are discussed. We focus also on frame dragging and Sagnac effect of the micro black holes.

  11. Grand unification scale primordial black holes: consequences and constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantua, Richard; Easther, Richard; Giblin, John T

    2009-09-11

    A population of very light primordial black holes which evaporate before nucleosynthesis begins is unconstrained unless the decaying black holes leave stable relics. We show that gravitons Hawking radiated from these black holes would source a substantial stochastic background of high frequency gravititational waves (10(12) Hz or more) in the present Universe. These black holes may lead to a transient period of matter-dominated expansion. In this case the primordial Universe could be temporarily dominated by large clusters of "Hawking stars" and the resulting gravitational wave spectrum is independent of the initial number density of primordial black holes.

  12. Local Black Hole Scaling Relations Imply Compton Thick or Super Eddington Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Novak, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    A recent analysis of black hole scaling relations, used to estimate the local mass density in black holes, has indicated that the normalization of the scaling relations should be increased by approximately a factor of five. The local black hole mass density is connected to the mean radiative efficiency of accretion through the time integral of the quasar volume density. The correspondence between this estimate of the radiative efficiency and that expected theoretically from thin-disk accretion has long been used as an argument that most of the growth in black holes occurs via luminous accretion. The increase of the mass density in black holes pushes the mean observed radiative efficiency to values below that expected for thin-disk accretion for any value of the black hole spin, including retrograde accretion disks. This can be accommodated via black hole growth channels that are intrinsically radiatively inefficient, such as super-Eddington accretion, or via growth channels that are intrinsically radiatively ...

  13. Hole-transport material variation in fully vacuum deposited perovskite solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E. Polander

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the effect of energy level alignment between the hole-transporting material and the active layer in vacuum deposited, planar-heterojunction CH3NH3PbIx−3Clx perovskite solar cells. Through a series of hole-transport materials, with conductivity values set using controlled p-doping of the layer, we correlate their ionization potentials with the open-circuit voltage of the device. With ionization potentials beyond 5.3 eV, a substantial decrease in both current density and voltage is observed, which highlights the delicate energetic balance between driving force for hole-extraction and maximizing the photovoltage. In contrast, when an optimal ionization potential match is found, the open-circuit voltage can be maximized, leading to power conversion efficiencies of up to 10.9%. These values are obtained with hole-transport materials that differ from the commonly used Spiro-MeO-TAD and correspond to a 40% performance increase versus this reference.

  14. Cardy formula for charged black holes with anisotropic scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Bravo-Gaete, Moises; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    We first observe that for Lifshitz black holes whose only charge is the mass, the resulting Smarr relation is a direct consequence of the Lifshitz Cardy formula. From this observation, we propose to extend the Cardy formula to the case of electrically charged Lifshitz black holes satisfying as well a Smarr relation. The expression of our formula depends on the dynamical exponent, the energy and the charge of the ground state which is played by a magnetically charged soliton obtained through a double Wick rotation. The expression also involves a factor multiplying the chemical potentials which varies in function of the electromagnetic theory considered. This factor is precisely the one that appears in the Smarr formula for charged Lifshitz black holes. We test the validity of this Cardy formula in different situations where electrically Lifshitz charged black holes satisfying a Smarr relation are known. We then extend these results to electrically charged black holes with hyperscaling violation. Finally, an ex...

  15. From X-ray binaries to quasars black holes on all mass scales black holes on all mass scales

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, L C; Maccarone, T J

    2005-01-01

    This volume brings together contributions from many of the world's leading authorities on black hole accretion. The papers within represent part of a new movement to make use of the relative advantages of studying stellar mass and supermassive black holes and to bring together the knowledge gained from the two approaches. The topics discussed here run the gamut of the state of the art in black hole observational and theoretical work-variability, spectroscopy, disk-jet connections, and multi-wavelength campaigns on black holes are all covered. Reprinted from ASTROPHYSICS AND SPACE SCIENCE, 300:1-3 (2005)

  16. Curing Black Hole Singularities with Local Scale Invariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Dominis Prester

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that Weyl-invariant dilaton gravity provides a description of black holes without classical space-time singularities. Singularities appear due to the ill behaviour of gauge fixing conditions, one example being the gauge in which theory is classically equivalent to standard General Relativity. The main conclusions of our analysis are as follows: (1 singularities signal a phase transition from broken to unbroken phase of Weyl symmetry; (2 instead of a singularity, there is a “baby universe” or a white hole inside a black hole; (3 in the baby universe scenario, there is a critical mass after which reducing mass makes the black hole larger as viewed by outside observers; (4 if a black hole could be connected with white hole through the “singularity,” this would require breakdown of (classical geometric description; (5 the singularity of Schwarzschild BH solution is nongeneric and so it is dangerous to rely on it in deriving general results. Our results may have important consequences for resolving issues related to information loss puzzle. Though quantum effects are still crucial and may change the proposed classical picture, a position of building quantum theory around essentially regular classical solutions normally provides a much better starting point.

  17. Exploring radio and jet properties across the black hole mass scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oers, P.C.N.

    2016-01-01

    Some black holes are bright in radio while others are not. In this thesis we explore why, relating the radio emission to the relativistic jet phenomenon and examining how the emission behaves across the entire observed, 8 magnitude wide black hole mass scale. First we model detailed broadband spectr

  18. Scaling in film growth by pulsed laser deposition and modulated beam deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2011-04-01

    The scalings in film growth by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and modulated beam deposition (MBD) were investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. In PLD, an atomic pulse beam with a period t(0) were deposited instantaneously on a substrate, whereas in MBD, adatoms were deposited during a short time interval t(1) (0≤t(1)≤t(0)) within each period. If t(1)=0, MBD will be identical to PLD and, if t(1)=t(0), MBD will become usual molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Specifically, logarithmic scaling was investigated for the nucleation density reported for PLD, and the scaling of island density was studied regarding the growth for 0MBE growth was observed as t(1) increased. The phase diagram was also presented.

  19. Magnetic origin of black hole winds across the mass scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris; Behar, Ehud; Tombesi, Francesco; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    Invariably, black hole accretion disks seem to produce plasma outflows that result in blue-shifted absorption features in their spectra1. The X-ray absorption-line properties of these outflows are diverse, ranging in velocity from non-relativistic2 (~300 km s-1) to sub-relativistic3 (~0.1c, where c is the speed of light) and a similarly broad range in the ionization states of the wind plasma2,4. We report here that semi-analytical, self-similar magnetohydrodynamic wind models that have successfully accounted for the X-ray absorber properties of supermassive black holes5,6 also offer a good fit to the high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the accreting stellar-mass black hole GRO J1655-40. This provides an explicit theoretical argument of their magnetohydrodynamic origin (aligned with earlier observational claims)7 and supports the notion of a universal magnetic structure of the observed winds across all known black hole sizes.

  20. Super-massive black hole mass scaling relations

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Alister W; Schombert, James

    2014-01-01

    Using black hole masses which span 10^5 to 10^(10) solar masses, the distribution of galaxies in the (host spheroid stellar mass)-(black hole mass) diagram is shown to be strongly bent. While the core-Sersic galaxies follow a near-linear relation, having a mean M_(bh)/M_(sph) mass ratio of ~0.5%, the Sersic galaxies follow a near-quadratic relation: M_bh~M_sph^(2.22+\\-0.58). This is not due to offset pseudobulges, but is instead an expected result arising from the long-known bend in the M_(sph)-sigma relation and the log-linear M_(bh)-sigma relation.

  1. Spectral Characteristics of Large-Scale Radio Emission Areas in Coronal Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Prosovetsky, D V; Kochanov, A A

    2013-01-01

    The spectra of the coronal hole radio emission in solar cycles 23 and 24 have been studied based on RATAN-600 data in the 4-16.5 GHz range at frequencies of 5.7 and 17 GHz and 327 MHz. It has been found that bright features of coronal hole microwave emission at 17 GHz and dark features at 5.7 GHz can exist in coronal holes when the spectral index is 1.25-1.5 in the 6.5-16.5 GHz range; the radio spectrum in this range is flat when coronal holes are indiscernible against the background of a quiet Sun. The possible vertical scale of the solar atmosphere over coronal holes is discussed.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of NiO hole-transporting layers for polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Che-Chen; Su, Heng-Wei; Hou, Cheng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2015-09-25

    NiO is an attractive hole-transporting material for polymer solar cells (PSCs) owing to its excellent stability and electrical/optical properties. This study demonstrates, for the first time, fabrication of uniform, defect-free, and conformal NiO ultra-thin films for use as hole-transporting layers (HTLs) in PSCs by atomic layer deposition (ALD) through optimization of the ALD processing parameters. The morphological, optical, and electrical properties of ALD NiO films were determined to be favorable for their HTL application. As a result, PSCs containing an ALD NiO HTL with an optimized thickness of 4 nm achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.4%, which was comparable to that of a control device with a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) HTL. The high quality and manufacturing scalability of ALD NiO films demonstrated here will facilitate the adoption of NiO HTLs in PSCs.

  3. Atomic layer deposition of NiO hole-transporting layers for polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Che-Chen; Su, Heng-Wei; Hou, Cheng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2015-09-01

    NiO is an attractive hole-transporting material for polymer solar cells (PSCs) owing to its excellent stability and electrical/optical properties. This study demonstrates, for the first time, fabrication of uniform, defect-free, and conformal NiO ultra-thin films for use as hole-transporting layers (HTLs) in PSCs by atomic layer deposition (ALD) through optimization of the ALD processing parameters. The morphological, optical, and electrical properties of ALD NiO films were determined to be favorable for their HTL application. As a result, PSCs containing an ALD NiO HTL with an optimized thickness of 4 nm achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.4%, which was comparable to that of a control device with a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) HTL. The high quality and manufacturing scalability of ALD NiO films demonstrated here will facilitate the adoption of NiO HTLs in PSCs.

  4. Simulation optimization of filament parameters for uniform depositions of diamond films on surfaces of ultra-large circular holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinchang; Shen, Xiaotian; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have been widely applied as protective coatings on varieties of anti-frictional and wear-resistant components, owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties close to the natural diamond. In applications of some components, the inner hole surface will serve as the working surface that suffers severe frictional or erosive wear. It is difficult to realize uniform depositions of diamond films on surfaces of inner holes, especially ultra-large inner holes. Adopting a SiC compact die with an aperture of V80 mm as an example, a novel filament arrangement with a certain number of filaments evenly distributed on a circle is designed, and specific effects of filament parameters, including the filament number, arrangement direction, filament temperature, filament diameter, circumradius and the downward translation, on the substrate temperature distribution are studied by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations based on the finite volume method (FVM), adopting a modified computational model well consistent with the actual deposition environment. Corresponding temperature measurement experiments are also conducted to verify the rationality of the computational model. From the aspect of depositing uniform boron-doped micro-crystalline, undoped micro-crystalline and undoped fine-grained composite diamond (BDM-UMC-UFGCD) film on such the inner hole surface, filament parameters as mentioned above are accurately optimized and compensated by orthogonal simulations. Moreover, deposition experiments adopting compensated optimized parameters and some typical contrastive parameters are also accomplished for further verifying the rationality of the computational model and the correctness of the compensation coefficient 0.7 defined for the downward translation determined by simulations. More importantly, on the basis of more simulations and verification tests, a general filament arrangement model suitable for V50-120 mm

  5. A new mass scale, implications on black hole evaporation and holography

    CERN Document Server

    Burikham, Piyabut; Wuthicharn, Taum

    2016-01-01

    We consider a new mass scale $M_{T}=(\\hbar^{2}\\sqrt{\\Lambda}/G)^{1/3}$ constructed from dimensional analysis by using $G$, $\\hbar$ and $\\Lambda$ and discuss its physical interpretation. Based on the Generalized Uncertainty Relation, a black hole with age comparable to the universe would stop radiating when the mass reaches a new mass scale $M'_{T}=c(\\hbar/G^{2}\\sqrt{\\Lambda})^{1/3}$ at which its temperature corresponds to the mass $M_{T}$. Black hole remnants could have masses ranging from a Planck mass to a trillion kilograms. Holography persists even when the uncertainty relation is modified to the Minimum Length Uncertainty Relation~(MLUR). The remnant black hole entropy is proportional to the surface area of the black hole in unit of the Planck area in arbitrary noncompact dimensions.

  6. Calculation of the coupling impedances of holes and slots on the liner using MAFIA and scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiagarajan, V.; Barts, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Chou, W.

    1993-11-01

    The location of a liner inside the beam tube is one of the options considered for the Super Colliders. The liner could serve as a synchrotron radiation intercept and also help enhance the vacuum. A definite distribution of holes or slots is required to be located on the liner for pumping out the desorbing gases. There will be wake fields propagating within the liner due to diffraction at discontinuities following the incident beam fields. The effect of these wake fields can be minimized by adopting the least number of pumping holes/slots required and through an optimal choice of hole/slot shape and size. The effect of the wake fields on the beam may be expressed through coupling impedances defined proportional to the corresponding forces integrated through distance per unit charge. It is necessary to compute the impedance of holes and slots and determine the scaling of the impedance with the dimensions of the hole/slot and the liner, in order to optimize the choice of pumping holes/slots. The coupling impedances of slots and holes have been calculated here using the code MAFIA and the scaling assessed. The results compare favorably with existing analytical results.

  7. Testing a scale-independent method to measure the mass of black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gliozzi, M; Satyapal, S; Price, D M; Jang, I

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the black hole mass at the center of galaxies is a fundamental step not only for understanding the physics of accretion, but also for the cosmological evolution of galaxies. Recently a new method, based solely on X-ray data, was successfully applied to determine the black hole mass in Galactic systems. Since X-rays are thought to be produced via Comptonization process both in stellar and supermassive black holes, in principle, the same method may be applied to estimate the mass in supermassive black holes. In this work we test this hypothesis by performing a systematic analysis of a sample of AGNs, whose black hole mass has been already determined via reverberation mapping and which possess high quality XMM-Newton archival data. The good agreement obtained between the black hole masses derived with this novel scaling technique and the reverberation mapping values suggests that this method is robust and works equally well on stellar and supermassive black holes, making it a truly scale-independent t...

  8. Formation of the remnant close to Planck scale and the Schwarzschild black hole with global monopole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Ling; Chen, Shuai-Ru

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we use the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) and quantum tunneling method to research the formation of the remnant from a Schwarzschild black hole with global monopole. Based on the corrected Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the corrections to the Hawking temperature, heat capacity and entropy are calculated. We not only find the remnant close to Planck scale by employing GUP, but also research the thermodynamic stability of the black hole remnant according to the phase transition and heat capacity.

  9. Scaling of ballistic deposition from a Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A; Vvedensky, Dimitri D

    2006-04-01

    An exact lattice Langevin equation is derived for the ballistic deposition model of surface growth. The continuum limit of this equation is dominated by the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation at all length and time scales. For a one-dimensional substrate the solution of the exact lattice Langevin equation yields the KPZ scaling exponents without any extrapolation. For a two-dimensional substrate the scaling exponents are different from those found from computer simulations. This discrepancy is discussed in relation to analytic approaches to the KPZ equation in higher dimensions.

  10. Direct formation of supermassive black holes via multi-scale gas inflows in galaxy mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, L; Kazantzidis, S; Escala, A; Callegari, S

    2010-08-26

    Observations of distant quasars indicate that supermassive black holes of billions of solar masses already existed less than a billion years after the Big Bang. Models in which the 'seeds' of such black holes form by the collapse of primordial metal-free stars cannot explain the rapid appearance of these supermassive black holes because gas accretion is not sufficiently efficient. Alternatively, these black holes may form by direct collapse of gas within isolated protogalaxies, but current models require idealized conditions, such as metal-free gas, to prevent cooling and star formation from consuming the gas reservoir. Here we report simulations showing that mergers between massive protogalaxies naturally produce the conditions for direct collapse into a supermassive black hole with no need to suppress cooling and star formation. Merger-driven gas inflows give rise to an unstable, massive nuclear gas disk of a few billion solar masses, which funnels more than 10(8) solar masses of gas to a sub-parsec-scale gas cloud in only 100,000 years. The cloud undergoes gravitational collapse, which eventually leads to the formation of a massive black hole. The black hole can subsequently grow to a billion solar masses on timescales of about 10(8) years by accreting gas from the surrounding disk.

  11. A universal minimal mass scale for present-day central black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Tal; Bar-Or, Ben

    2017-08-01

    The early stages of massive black hole growth are poorly understood1. High-luminosity active galactic nuclei at very high redshift2 z further imply rapid growth soon after the Big Bang. Suggested formation mechanisms typically rely on the extreme conditions found in the early Universe (very low metallicity, very high gas or star density). It is therefore plausible that these black hole seeds were formed in dense environments, at least a Hubble time ago (z > 1.8 for a look-back time of tH = 10 Gyr)3. Intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) of mass M• ≈ 102-105 solar masses, M⊙, are the long-sought missing link4 between stellar black holes, born of supernovae5, and massive black holes6, tied to galaxy evolution by empirical scaling relations7,8. The relation between black hole mass, M•, and stellar velocity dispersion, σ★, that is observed in the local Universe over more than about three decades in massive black hole mass, correlates M• and σ★ on scales that are well outside the massive black hole's radius of dynamical influence6, rh≈GM•/σ★2. We show that low-mass black hole seeds that accrete stars from locally dense environments in galaxies following a universal M•/σ★ relation9,10 grow over the age of the Universe to be above M0≈3×105M⊙ (5% lower limit), independent of the unknown seed masses and formation processes. The mass M0 depends weakly on the uncertain formation redshift, and sets a universal minimal mass scale for present-day black holes. This can explain why no IMBHs have yet been found6, and it implies that present-day galaxies with σ★ < S0 ≈ 40 km s-1 lack a central black hole, or formed it only recently. A dearth of IMBHs at low redshifts has observable implications for tidal disruptions11 and gravitational wave mergers12.

  12. Echoes from the Abyss: Evidence for Planck-scale structure at black hole horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Abedi, Jahed; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2016-01-01

    In classical General Relativity (GR), an observer falling into an astrophysical black hole is not expected to experience anything dramatic as she crosses the event horizon. However, tentative resolutions to problems in quantum gravity, such as the cosmological constant problem, or the black hole information paradox, invoke significant departures from classicality in the vicinity of the horizon. It was recently pointed out that such near-horizon structures can lead to late-time echoes in the black hole merger gravitational wave signals that are otherwise indistinguishable from GR. We search for observational signatures of these echoes in the gravitational wave data released by advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), following the three black hole merger events GW150914, GW151226, and LVT151012. In particular, we look for repeating damped echoes with time-delays of $8 M \\log M$ (+spin corrections, in Planck units), corresponding to Planck-scale departures from GR near their respecti...

  13. Hawking evaporation time scale of topological black holes in anti-de Sitter spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Yen Chin, E-mail: yenchin.ong@nordita.org

    2016-02-15

    It was recently pointed out that if an absorbing boundary condition is imposed at infinity, an asymptotically anti-de Sitter Schwarzschild black hole with a spherical horizon takes only a finite amount of time to evaporate away even if its initial mass is arbitrarily large. We show that this is a rather generic property in AdS spacetimes: regardless of their horizon topologies, neutral AdS black holes in general relativity take about the same amount of time to evaporate down to the same size of order L, the AdS length scale. Our discussion focuses on the case in which the black hole has toral event horizon. A brief comment is made on the hyperbolic case, i.e. for black holes with negatively curved horizons.

  14. Hawking evaporation time scale of topological black holes in anti-de Sitter spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Chin Ong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It was recently pointed out that if an absorbing boundary condition is imposed at infinity, an asymptotically anti-de Sitter Schwarzschild black hole with a spherical horizon takes only a finite amount of time to evaporate away even if its initial mass is arbitrarily large. We show that this is a rather generic property in AdS spacetimes: regardless of their horizon topologies, neutral AdS black holes in general relativity take about the same amount of time to evaporate down to the same size of order L, the AdS length scale. Our discussion focuses on the case in which the black hole has toral event horizon. A brief comment is made on the hyperbolic case, i.e. for black holes with negatively curved horizons.

  15. Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald S. Sweetkind; Ronald M. Drake II

    2007-01-22

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of Tertiary and Quaternary rock. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of young alluvial basin-fill deposits will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating ground-water flow in the Yucca Flat area. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, presents data and interpretation regarding the three-dimensional variability of the shallow alluvial aquifers in areas of testing at Yucca Flat, data that are potentially useful in the understanding of the subsurface flow system. This report includes a summary and interpretation of alluvial basin-fill stratigraphy in the Yucca Flat area based on drill hole data from 285 selected drill holes. Spatial variations in lithology and grain size of the Neogene basin-fill sediments can be established when data from numerous drill holes are considered together. Lithologic variations are related to different depositional environments within the basin including alluvial fan, channel, basin axis, and playa deposits.

  16. Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill-Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Drake II, Ronald M.

    2007-01-01

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of Tertiary and Quaternary rock. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of young alluvial basin-fill deposits will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating ground-water flow in the Yucca Flat area. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, presents data and interpretation regarding the three-dimensional variability of the shallow alluvial aquifers in areas of testing at Yucca Flat, data that are potentially useful in the understanding of the subsurface flow system. This report includes a summary and interpretation of alluvial basin-fill stratigraphy in the Yucca Flat area based on drill-hole data from 285 selected drill holes. Spatial variations in lithology and grain size of the Neogene basin-fill sediments can be established when data from numerous drill holes are considered together. Lithologic variations are related to different depositional environments within the basin such as alluvial fan, channel, basin axis, and playa deposits.

  17. Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Drake II, Ronald M.

    2007-01-01

    Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of Tertiary and Quaternary rock. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of young alluvial basin-fill deposits will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating ground-water flow in the Yucca Flat area. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, presents data and interpretation regarding the three-dimensional variability of the shallow alluvial aquifers in areas of testing at Yucca Flat, data that are potentially useful in the understanding of the subsurface flow system. This report includes a summary and interpretation of alluvial basin-fill stratigraphy in the Yucca Flat area based on drill hole data from 285 selected drill holes. Spatial variations in lithology and grain size of the Neogene basin-fill sediments can be established when data from numerous drill holes are considered together. Lithologic variations are related to different depositional environments within the basin including alluvial fan, channel, basin axis, and playa deposits.

  18. Bias in C IV-based quasar black hole mass scaling relationships from reverberation mapped samples

    CERN Document Server

    Brotherton, Michael S; Shang, Zhaohui; DiPompeo, M A

    2015-01-01

    The masses of the black holes powering quasars represent a fundamental parameter of active galaxies. Estimates of quasar black hole masses using single-epoch spectra are quite uncertain, and require quantitative improvement. We recently identified a correction for C IV $\\lambda$1549-based scaling relationships used to estimate quasar black hole masses that relies on the continuum-subtracted peak flux ratio of the ultraviolet emission-line blend Si IV + OIV] (the $\\lambda$1400 feature) to that of C IV. This parameter correlates with the suite of associated quasar spectral properties collectively known as "Eigenvector 1" (EV1). Here we use a sample of 85 quasars with quasi-simultaneous optical-ultraviolet spectrophotometry to demonstrate how biases in the average EV1 properties can create systematic biases in C IV-based black hole mass scaling relationships. This effect results in nearly an order of magnitude moving from objects with small $$, which have overestimated black hole masses, to objects with large $$...

  19. Prediction of wall deposition behaviour in a pilot-scale spray dryer using deposition correlations for pipe flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KOTA K.; LANGRISH T.A.G.

    2007-01-01

    The particle deposition behaviour of skim milk, water and maltodextrin in the conical section of a pilot-scale spray dryer was predicted using simple correlations for particle depositions in pipes. The predicted particle deposition fluxes of these materials were then compared with the measured deposition fluxes. The predicted particle deposition regimes of the spray dryer were expected to be in the diffusional and mixed (diffusional and inertial) regimes, but the experimental results suggested that the particle deposition was mainly in the inertial regime. Therefore, using the pipe correlations for predicting deposition in a pilot-scale spray dryer suggests that they do not sufficiently represent the actual deposition behaviour. This outcome indicates that a further study of particle flow patterns needs to be carried out using numerical simulations (computational fluid dynamics,CFD) in view of the additional geometrical complexity of the spray dryer.

  20. A Universal Scaling for the Energetics of Relativistic Jets From Black Hole Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmen, R. S.; Georganopoulos, M.; Guiriec, S.; Meyer, E. T.; Gehrels, N.; Sambruna, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Black holes generate collimated, relativistic jets which have been observed in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), microquasars, and at the center of some galaxies (active galactic nuclei; AGN). How jet physics scales from stellar black holes in GRBs to the supermassive ones in AGNs is still unknown. Here we show that jets produced by AGNs and GRBs exhibit the same correlation between the kinetic power carried by accelerated particles and the gamma-ray luminosity, with AGNs and GRBs lying at the low and high-luminosity ends, respectively, of the correlation. This result implies that the efficiency of energy dissipation in jets produced in black hole systems is similar over 10 orders of magnitude in jet power, establishing a physical analogy between AGN and GRBs.

  1. A universal scaling for the energetics of relativistic jets from black hole systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmen, R S; Georganopoulos, M; Guiriec, S; Meyer, E T; Gehrels, N; Sambruna, R M

    2012-12-14

    Black holes generate collimated, relativistic jets, which have been observed in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), microquasars, and at the center of some galaxies [active galactic nuclei (AGN)]. How jet physics scales from stellar black holes in GRBs to the supermassive ones in AGN is still unknown. Here, we show that jets produced by AGN and GRBs exhibit the same correlation between the kinetic power carried by accelerated particles and the gamma-ray luminosity, with AGN and GRBs lying at the low- and high-luminosity ends, respectively, of the correlation. This result implies that the efficiency of energy dissipation in jets produced in black hole systems is similar over 10 orders of magnitude in jet power, establishing a physical analogy between AGN and GRBs.

  2. Massive black hole binary mergers within sub-pc scale gas discs

    CERN Document Server

    Cuadra, J; Alexander, R D; Begelman, M C

    2008-01-01

    [ABRIDGED] We study supermassive black hole binary mergers driven by angular momentum loss to small-scale gas discs. Such binaries form after major galaxy mergers, but their fate is unclear since hardening through stellar scattering becomes very inefficient at sub-parsec distances. Gas discs may dominate binary dynamics on these scales, and promote mergers. Using numerical simulations, we investigate the evolution of the orbits of binaries embedded within geometrically thin gas discs. Our simulations directly resolve angular momentum transport within the disc, which at the radii of interest is likely dominated by disc self-gravity. We show that the binary decays at a rate which is in good agreement with analytical estimates, while the eccentricity grows. Saturation of eccentricity growth is not observed up to values e > 0.35. Accretion onto the black holes is variable, and is roughly modulated by the binary orbital frequency. Scaling our results, we analytically estimate the maximum rate of binary decay that ...

  3. Gravitational waves at interferometer scales and primordial black holes in axion inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Unal, Caner

    2016-01-01

    We study the prospects of detection at terrestrial and space interferometers of a stochastic gravitational wave background which can be produced in models of axion inflation. This potential signal, and the development of these interferometers, open a new window on inflation on scales much smaller than those currently probed with Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure measurements. The sourced signal generated in axion inflation is an ideal candidate for such searches, since it naturally grows at small scales, and it has specific properties (chirality and non-gaussianity) that can distinguish it from an astrophysical background. We study under which conditions such a signal can be produced at an observable level, without the simultaneous overproduction of scalar perturbations in excess of what is allowed by the primordial black hole limits. We also explore the possibility that scalar perturbations generated in a modified version of this model may provide a distribution of primordial black holes ...

  4. Collider Production of TeV Scale Black Holes and Higher-Curvature Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, T.

    2005-03-14

    We examine how the production of TeV scale black holes at colliders is influenced by the presence of Lovelock higher-curvature terms in the action of models with large extra dimensions. Such terms are expected to arise on rather general grounds, e.g., from string theory and are often used in the literature to model modifications to the Einstein-Hilbert action arising from quantum and/or stringy corrections. While adding the invariant which is quadratic in the curvature leads to quantitative modifications in black hole properties, cubic and higher invariants are found to produce significant qualitative changes, e.g., classically stable black holes. We use these higher-order curvature terms to construct a toy model of the black hole production cross section threshold. For reasonable parameter values we demonstrate that detailed measurements of the properties of black holes at future colliders will be highly sensitive to the presence of the Lovelock higher-order curvature terms.

  5. Anisotropic scale invariant spacetimes and black holes in Zwei-Dreibein Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goya, A. F.

    2014-09-01

    We show that Zwei-Dreibein Gravity (ZDG), a bigravity theory recently proposed by Bergshoeff, de Haan, Hohm, Merbis, and Townsend in ref. [1], admits exact solutions with anisotropic scale invariance. These type of geometries are the three-dimensional analogues of the spacetimes which were proposed as gravity duals for condensed matter systems. In particular, we find Schrödinger invariant spaces as well as Lifshitz spaces with arbitrary dynamical exponent z. We also find black holes that are asymptotically Lifshitz with z = 3, showing that these (non-constant curvature) solutions of New Massive Gravity (NMG) are persistent after the introduction of the infinite tower of higher-curvature terms of ZDG, provided a renormalization of the parameters. Black holes in asymptotically warped Anti-de Sitter spaces are also found. Interestingly, in almost all the geometries studied in this work, the metric associated with the second dreibein turns out to be equivalent, up to a constant global factor, to the first one. This phenomenon has been previously observed in other bigravity theories in asymptotically flat and asymptotically Anti-de Sitter backgrounds. However, for the particular case of the z = 3 Lifshitz black hole, here we found that the second metric corresponds to a different black hole that coincides with the former only in the asymptotic region. In fact, we find a new family of z = 3 black holes that corresponds to a one-parameter deformation of the NMG solution.

  6. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis on the microstructures of electrolytic Cu deposition in the through hole filling process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.E., E-mail: ceho1975@hotmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liao, C.W. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Pan, C.X. [School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Chen, H.J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, J.C.; Chen, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-10-01

    Through hole (TH) filling by electrolytic Cu deposition has become a critical process for high density interconnection technologies associated with three-dimensional packaging. In this study, the morphological and crystallographic evolutions of the electrolytic Cu TH filling with the plating time (t) were investigated using an optical microscope and a field-emission scanning electron microscope equipped with an electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis system. The Cu deposition rate in the TH was strongly dependent on t, which was established at a moderate rate of ∼ 0.3 μm/min at t = 40 min–74 min, then dramatically accelerated to ∼ 4 μm/min at t = 74 min–80 min (termed “fast deposition regime”), and subsequently decelerated in the final plating regime (t = 80 min–100 min). EBSD analyses showed that the electrolytic Cu predominantly possessed high-angle grain boundaries with strong coincidence site lattices at ∑3 (60° rotation at <111>) and ∑9 (38.9° rotation at <101>) for all t examined. Interestingly, the [111]‖TD (transverse direction) orientation displayed a relatively strong presence in the initial induction regime, while the [111]‖TD + [101]‖TD orientations with large grain sizes became dominant in the fast deposition regime (i.e., t = 74 min–80 min), and there was a very low concentration of the [111]‖TD orientation in the final deposition regime. This research offered a better understanding of the morphological and crystallographic evolutions in each stage of the electrolytic Cu TH filling. - Highlights: • Through hole (TH) filling by electrolytic Cu deposition • The Cu deposition rate is strongly dependent on the plating time in the THs. • The dominant Cu orientations were [111]‖TD (transverse direction) and [101]‖TD. • Cu possessed high angle grain boundaries with strong coincidence site lattices.

  7. Nano-scale gap filling and mechanism of deposit-etch-deposit process for phase-change material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Wan-Chun; Liu Bo; Song Zhi-Tang; Xiang Yang-Hui; Wang Zong-Tao; Zhang Bei-Chao; Feng Song-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 gap filling is one of the key processes for phase-change random access memory manufacture.Physical vapor deposition is the mainstream method of Ge2Sb2Te5 film deposition due to its advantages of film quality,purity,and accurate composition control.However,the conventional physical vapor deposition process cannot meet the gapfilling requirement with the critical device dimension scaling down to 90 nm or below.In this study,we find that the deposit-etch-deposit process shows better gap-filling capability and scalability than the single-step deposition process,especially at the nano-scale critical dimension.The gap-filling mechanism of the deposit-etch-deposit process was briefly discussed.We also find that re-deposition of phase-change material from via the sidewall to via the bottom by argon ion bombardment during the etch step was a key ingredient for the final good gap filling.We achieve void-free gap filling of phase-change material on the 45-nm via the two-cycle deposit-etch-deposit process.We gain a rather comprehensive insight into the mechanism of deposit-etch-deposit process and propose a potential gap-filling solution for over 45-nm technology nodes for phase-change random access memory.

  8. Charge and/or spin limits for black holes at a non-commutative scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Biplab

    2017-08-01

    In the commutative geometrical background, one finds the total charge ( Q) and/or the total angular momentum ( J) of a generalized black hole of mass M to be bounded by the condition Q^2+( J{/}M) ^2≤ M^2, whereas the inclusion of the concept of non-commutativity in geometry leads to a much more richer result. It predicts that the upper limit to Q and/or J is not fixed but depends on the mass/length scale of black holes; it (the upper limit to Q and/or J) goes towards a `commutative limit' when {M≫ √{θ}} (√{θ} characterizes the minimal length scale) and rapidly diminishes towards zero with M decreasing in the strongly non-commutative regime, until approaching a perfect zero value for {M˜eq 1.904√{θ}}. We have performed separate calculations for a pure Kerr or a pure Reissner-Nordström black hole, and briefly done it for a generalized black hole.

  9. Charge and/or spin limits for black holes at a non-commutative scale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BIPLAB PAIK

    2017-08-01

    In the commutative geometrical background, one finds the total charge $\\mathcal{(Q)}$ and/or the total angular momentum $\\mathcal{(J)}$ of a generalized black hole of mass $M$ to be bounded by the condition $\\mathcal{Q^{2} + (J/M)^{2} \\leq M^{2}}$, whereas the inclusion of the concept of non-commutativity in geometry leads to a much more richer result. It predicts that the upper limit to $\\mathcal{Q}$ and/or $\\mathcal{J}$ is not fixed but depends on the mass/length scale of black holes; it (the upper limit to $\\mathcal{Q}$ and/or $\\mathcal{J}$ ) goes towards a ‘commutative limit’ when $M \\gg \\sqrt{\\vartheta} (\\sqrt{\\vartheta}$ characterizes the minimal length scale) and rapidly diminishes towards zero with $M$ decreasing in the strongly non-commutative regime, until approaching a perfect zero value for $M \\simeq 1.904\\sqrt{\\vartheta}$. We have performed separate calculations for a pure Kerr or a pure Reissner–Nordström black hole, and briefly done it for a generalized black hole.

  10. Large-Scale Graphene Film Deposition for Monolithic Device Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-shurman, Khaled

    Since 1958, the concept of integrated circuit (IC) has achieved great technological developments and helped in shrinking electronic devices. Nowadays, an IC consists of more than a million of compacted transistors. The majority of current ICs use silicon as a semiconductor material. According to Moore's law, the number of transistors built-in on a microchip can be double every two years. However, silicon device manufacturing reaches its physical limits. To explain, there is a new trend to shrinking circuitry to seven nanometers where a lot of unknown quantum effects such as tunneling effect can not be controlled. Hence, there is an urgent need for a new platform material to replace Si. Graphene is considered a promising material with enormous potential applications in many electronic and optoelectronics devices due to its superior properties. There are several techniques to produce graphene films. Among these techniques, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) offers a very convenient method to fabricate films for large-scale graphene films. Though CVD method is suitable for large area growth of graphene, the need for transferring a graphene film to silicon-based substrates is required. Furthermore, the graphene films thus achieved are, in fact, not single crystalline. Also, graphene fabrication utilizing Cu and Ni at high growth temperature contaminates the substrate that holds Si CMOS circuitry and CVD chamber as well. So, lowering the deposition temperature is another technological milestone for the successful adoption of graphene in integrated circuits fabrication. In this research, direct large-scale graphene film fabrication on silicon based platform (i.e. SiO2 and Si3N4) at low temperature was achieved. With a focus on low-temperature graphene growth, hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) was utilized to synthesize graphene film using 200 nm thick nickel film. Raman spectroscopy was utilized to examine graphene formation on the bottom side of the Ni film

  11. THE (BLACK HOLE)-BULGE MASS SCALING RELATION AT LOW MASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Alister W. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Scott, Nicholas [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-01-01

    Several recent papers have reported on the occurrence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) containing undermassive black holes relative to a linear scaling relation between black hole mass (M {sub bh}) and host spheroid stellar mass (M {sub sph,} {sub *}). However, dramatic revisions to the M {sub bh}-M {sub sph,} {sub *} and M {sub bh}-L {sub sph} relations, based on samples containing predominantly inactive galaxies, have recently identified a new steeper relation at M {sub bh} ≲ (2-10) × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}, roughly corresponding to M {sub sph,} {sub *} ≲ (0.3-1) × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. We show that this steeper, quadratic-like M {sub bh}-M {sub sph,} {sub *} relation defined by the Sérsic galaxies, i.e., galaxies without partially depleted cores, roughly tracks the apparent offset of the AGN having 10{sup 5} ≲ M {sub bh}/M {sub ☉} ≲ 0.5 × 10{sup 8}. That is, these AGNs are not randomly offset with low black hole masses, but also follow a steeper (nonlinear) relation. As noted by Busch et al., confirmation or rejection of a possible AGN offset from the steeper M {sub bh}-M {sub sph,} {sub *} relation defined by the Sérsic galaxies will benefit from improved stellar mass-to-light ratios for the spheroids hosting these AGNs. Several implications for formation theories are noted. Furthermore, reasons for possible under- and overmassive black holes, the potential existence of intermediate mass black holes (<10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), and the new steep (black hole)-(nuclear star cluster) relation, M{sub bh}∝M{sub nc}{sup 2.7±0.7}, are also discussed.

  12. Reduction of hole doping of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene by photoresist selection and thermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Onejae; Kim, Kyumin; Choi, Eunseok; Kil, Joonpyo; Park, Wanjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-12-01

    The doping effect on graphene by photoresists were studied in this article. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the usual choice for graphene transfer, but it is known to leave a significant amount of residue. PMMA results in strong hole doping and reduction of mobility of the graphene devices. Not only PMMA, but photoresists also leave residues during the lithographic steps and dope the graphene in strong hole-doping states along with water and oxygen molecules. In this article, we tested three types of photoresists for their effects on graphene’s electrical properties. It was found that a specific photoresist can significantly reduce the amount of hole-doping of the graphene transistor more than other photoresists. The use of hydrophobic substrates and additional thermal treatment can help reducing the hole-doping further.

  13. Gravitational waves at interferometer scales and primordial black holes in axion inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Bellido, Juan; Peloso, Marco; Unal, Caner

    2016-12-01

    We study the prospects of detection at terrestrial and space interferometers, as well as at pulsar timing array experiments, of a stochastic gravitational wave background which can be produced in models of axion inflation. This potential signal, and the development of these experiments, open a new window on inflation on scales much smaller than those currently probed with Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure measurements. The sourced signal generated in axion inflation is an ideal candidate for such searches, since it naturally grows at small scales, and it has specific properties (chirality and non-gaussianity) that can distinguish it from an astrophysical background. We study under which conditions such a signal can be produced at an observable level, without the simultaneous overproduction of scalar perturbations in excess of what is allowed by the primordial black hole limits. We also explore the possibility that scalar perturbations generated in a modified version of this model may provide a distribution of primordial black holes compatible with the current bounds, that can act as a seeds of the present black holes in the universe.

  14. Determination of Black Hole Masses in Galactic Black Hole Binaries using Scaling of Spectral and Variability Characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnikov, Nickolai

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of correlations between X-ray spectral and timing properties observed from a number of Galactic Black Hole (BH) binaries during hard-soft state spectral evolution. We analyze 17 transition episodes from 8 BH sources observed with RXTE. Our scaling technique for BH mass determination uses a correlation between spectral index and quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency. In addition, we use a correlation between index and the normalization of the disk "seed" component to cross-check the BH mass determination and estimate the distance to the source. While the index-QPO correlations for two given sources contain information on the ratio of the BH masses in those sources, the index-normalization correlations depend on the ratio of the BH masses and the distance square ratio. In fact, the index-normalization correlation also discloses the index-mass accretion rate saturation effect given that the normalization of disk "seed" photon supply is proportional to the disk mass accretion rate. We pres...

  15. Efficient hole-transporting layer MoO{sub 3}:CuI deposited by co-evaporation in organic photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkat, L.; Khelil, A. [Universite d' Oran 1 - Ahmed Ben Bella, LPCM2E, Oran (Algeria); Hssein, M. [Universite de Nantes, Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), CNRS, UMR 6502, Nantes (France); Laboratoire Optoelectronique et Physico-chimie des Materiaux, Universite Ibn Tofail, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); El Jouad, Z. [Laboratoire Optoelectronique et Physico-chimie des Materiaux, Universite Ibn Tofail, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Universite de Nantes, MOLTECH-Anjou, CNRS, UMR 6200, Nantes (France); Cattin, L.; Louarn, G.; Stephant, N. [Universite de Nantes, Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), CNRS, UMR 6502, Nantes (France); Ghamnia, M. [Universite d' Oran 1 - Ahmed Ben Bella, Laboratoire des Sciences de la Matiere Condensee (LSMC), Oran (Algeria); Addou, M. [Laboratoire Optoelectronique et Physico-chimie des Materiaux, Universite Ibn Tofail, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco); Morsli, M. [Universite de Nantes, Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques, Nantes (France); Bernede, J.C. [Universite de Nantes, MOLTECH-Anjou, CNRS, UMR 6200, Nantes (France)

    2017-01-15

    In order to improve hole collection at the interface anode/electron donor in organic photovoltaic cells, it is necessary to insert a hole-transporting layer. CuI was shown to be a very efficient hole-transporting layer. However, its tendency to be quite rough tends to induce leakage currents and it is necessary to use a very slow deposition rate for CuI to avoid such negative effect. Herein, we show that the co-deposition of MoO{sub 3} and CuI avoids this difficulty and allows deposition of a homogeneous efficient hole-collecting layer at an acceptable deposition rate. Via an XPS study, we show that blending MoO{sub 3}:CuI improves the hole collection efficiency through an increase of the gap state density. This increase is due to the formation of Mo{sup 5+} following interaction between MoO{sub 3} and CuI. Not only does the co-evaporation process allow for decreasing significantly the deposition time of the hole-transporting layer, but also it increases the efficiency of the device based on the planar heterojunction, CuPc/C{sub 60}. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Deposition of Nano-Scaled Coatings Using Inductively Coupled Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D H Jung; B Park; J J Lee

    2004-01-01

    Nano-scaled Ti-B-N coatings could be produced by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) assisted magnetron spurtering. The properties and microstructure of the coating can be changed drastically by applying ICP to conventional magnetron sputtering. In this work, an internal type rf ICP process is used. The core of this technology is the efficient production and control of self-depositing ions and reactive gas ions by an induced electric field. Ti-B-N coatings were prepared by using a TiB2 target and a gas mixture of N2 and Ar at 200 ℃ and a pressure of 60 mTorr. In addition to ICP, the effect of the substrate bias voltage on the structure and properties of the coating was investigated. By applying ICP and a bias voltage to the substrate the hardness of the Ti-B-N coating is increased by more than 75 GPa, as a result of enhanced ionization in the plasma. The Ti-B-N coating, which has the highest hardness, shows the best surface uniformity and a very dense structure with a grain size of 3 nm. This sample also shows a high crystallinity compared to the coating prepared using other deposition parameters.

  17. Exploring mass-scaling physics and outflow geometry in accreting black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Riley Michael Thomas

    2017-01-01

    One of the main tasks facing studies of black hole accretion in both black hole X-ray binaries (XRB) and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is to break spectral model-fitting degeneracies. We explore two methods of simultaneous spectral modelling to reduce these degeneracies: (a) simultaneous fitting of XRBs and AGN, and (b) folding in timing properties in a novel way to better understand the outflow evolution of XRBs during outburst.It is a long-standing idea that AGN are scaled up versions of XRBs, such that the physics of accretion cares only about accretion rate, and not the black hole mass. We show that this principle of scale-invariance may provide us with a way to break degeneracies in broadband spectral modelling of both XRBs and AGN, focusing primarily on low-luminosity sources where degeneracies are more prevalent. We simultaneously model the broadband spectra of the two most quiescent (LX ~ 10-9 LEdd) accreting black holes on opposite ends of the mass scale, the XRB A0620-00 and Sgr A*, the Galactic centre supermassive black hole (during bright flaring). We use an outflow-dominated model capable of reproducing the broadband spectrum from radio to X-ray frequencies, co-evolving parameters that are representative of the mass-scaling properties. Such a method reduces the degeneracies in our model parameters, contributing to answering this question regarding the dominant emission mechanisms.We adopt a similar technique to investigate how spatial parameters of an XRB outflow can be better understood by tracking our model parameters as a function of the XRB variability properties during outburst, focusing in particular on GX 339-4. I shall discuss how utilising a novel characterisation of the timing properties of XRBs allows us to do this in a simple, quantitative way.We are currently developing our models further to incorporate the most up-to-date disc reflection routines in order to describe the jet/disc interaction more accurately. I shall briefly discuss this

  18. Oil Well Top Hole Locations, Oil Well, Published in 2006, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Oil Well Top Hole Locations dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2006. It is described as...

  19. ACCRETION DISKS WITH A LARGE SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD AROUND BLACK HOLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider accretion disks around black holes at high luminosity, and the problem of the formation of a large-scale magnetic field in such disks, taking into account the non-uniform vertical structure of the disk. The structure of advective accretion disks is investigated, and conditions for the formation of optically thin regions in central parts of the accretion disk are found. The high electrical conductivity of the outer layers of the disk prevents outward diffusion of the magnetic field. This implies a stationary state with a strong magnetic field in the inner parts of the accretion disk close to the black hole, and zero radial velocity at the surface of the disk. The problem of jet collimation by magneto-torsion oscillations is investigated.

  20. Regulation of Black Hole Winds and Jets Across the Mass Scale

    CERN Document Server

    King, Ashley L; Raymond, John; Fabian, Andy C; Reynolds, Chris S; Gultekin, Kayhan; Cackett, Edward M; Allen, Steven W; Proga, Daniel; Kallman, Tim R

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the mechanical power generated by both winds and jets across the black hole mass scale. We begin with the study of ionized X-ray winds and present a uniform analysis using Chandra grating spectra. The high quality grating spectra facilitate the characterization of the outflow velocity, ionization and column density of the absorbing gas. We find that the kinetic power of the winds scales with increasing bolometric luminosity as log(L_wind) \\propto (1.57 \\pm 0.07) log(L_Bol). This means that SMBH may be more efficient than stellar-mass black holes in launching winds. In addition, the simplicity of the scaling may suggest common driving mechanisms across the mass scale. For comparison, we next examine jet production, estimating jet power based on the energy required to inflate local bubbles. The jet relation is log(L_Jet)\\propto (1.18\\pm0.24) log(L_Bol). The energetics of the bubble associated with Cygnus X-1 are particularly difficult to determine, and the bubble could be a background SNR....

  1. Testing the blazar sequence and black hole mass scaling with BL Lac objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotkin, R.M.; Markoff, S.; Anderson, S.F.; Kelly, B.C.; Körding, E.; Trager, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    Jets from accreting black holes appear remarkably similar over eight orders of magnitude in black hole mass, with more massive black holes generally launching more powerful jets. For example, there is an observed correlation, termed the fundamental plane of black hole accretion, between black hole

  2. Testing the blazar sequence and black hole mass scaling with BL Lac objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Markoff, Sera; Anderson, Scott F.; Kelly, Brandon C.; Körding, Elmar; Trager, Scott C.; Romero, Gustavo E.; Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Belloni, Tomaso

    Jets from accreting black holes appear remarkably similar over eight orders of magnitude in black hole mass, with more massive black holes generally launching more powerful jets. For example, there is an observed correlation, termed the fundamental plane of black hole accretion, between black hole

  3. Two-Step Physical Deposition of a Compact CuI Hole-Transport Layer and the Formation of an Interfacial Species in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibzadeh, Saba; Nejand, Bahram Abdollahi; Moshaii, Ahmad; Mohammadian, Nasim; Alizadeh, Amir Hossein; Mohammadpour, Rahele; Ahmadi, Vahid; Alizadeh, Abdolali

    2016-08-09

    A simple and practical approach is introduced for the deposition of CuI as an inexpensive inorganic hole-transport material (HTM) for the fabrication of low cost perovskite solar cells (PSCs) by gas-solid phase transformation of Cu to CuI. The method provides a uniform and well-controlled CuI layer with large grains and good compactness that prevents the direct connection between the contact electrodes. Solar cells prepared with CuI as the HTM with Au electrodes displays an exceptionally high short-circuit current density of 32 mA cm(-2) , owing to an interfacial species formed between the perovskite and the Cu resulting in a long wavelength contribution to the incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE), and an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.4 %. The growth of crystalline and uniform CuI on a low roughness perovskite layer leads to remarkably high charge extraction in the cells, which originates from the high hole mobility of CuI in addition to a large number of contact points between CuI and the perovskite layer. In addition, the solvent-free method has no damaging side effect on the perovskite layer, which makes it an appropriate method for large scale applications of CuI in perovskite solar cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Parameters influencing the deposition of methylammonium lead halide iodide in hole conductor free perovskite-based solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bat-El Cohen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Perovskite is a promising light harvester for use in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years, the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells has been dramatically increased, making them a competitive source of renewable energy. An important parameter when designing high efficiency perovskite-based solar cells is the perovskite deposition, which must be performed to create complete coverage and optimal film thickness. This paper describes an in-depth study on two-step deposition, separating the perovskite deposition into two precursors. The effects of spin velocity, annealing temperature, dipping time, and methylammonium iodide concentration on the photovoltaic performance are studied. Observations include that current density is affected by changing the spin velocity, while the fill factor changes mainly due to the dipping time and methylammonium iodide concentration. Interestingly, the open circuit voltage is almost unaffected by these parameters. Hole conductor free perovskite solar cells are used in this work, in order to minimize other possible effects. This study provides better understanding and control over the perovskite deposition through highly efficient, low-cost perovskite-based solar cells.

  5. Parameters influencing the deposition of methylammonium lead halide iodide in hole conductor free perovskite-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Bat-El; Gamliel, Shany; Etgar, Lioz, E-mail: lioz.etgar@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Chemistry, Casali Center for Applied Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 90400 (Israel)

    2014-08-01

    Perovskite is a promising light harvester for use in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years, the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells has been dramatically increased, making them a competitive source of renewable energy. An important parameter when designing high efficiency perovskite-based solar cells is the perovskite deposition, which must be performed to create complete coverage and optimal film thickness. This paper describes an in-depth study on two-step deposition, separating the perovskite deposition into two precursors. The effects of spin velocity, annealing temperature, dipping time, and methylammonium iodide concentration on the photovoltaic performance are studied. Observations include that current density is affected by changing the spin velocity, while the fill factor changes mainly due to the dipping time and methylammonium iodide concentration. Interestingly, the open circuit voltage is almost unaffected by these parameters. Hole conductor free perovskite solar cells are used in this work, in order to minimize other possible effects. This study provides better understanding and control over the perovskite deposition through highly efficient, low-cost perovskite-based solar cells.

  6. A scale dependent black hole in three-dimensional space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Benjamin; Rincón, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Scale dependence at the level of the effective action is a generic result of quantum field theory. Allowing for scale dependence of the gravitational couplings leads to a generalization of the corresponding field equations. In this work, those equations are solved by imposing the "null energy condition" in three-dimensional space time with stationary spherical symmetry. The constants of integration are given in terms of the classical BTZ parameters plus one additional constant, that parametrizes the strength of the scale dependence. The properties such as asymptotics, horizon structure, and thermodynamics are discussed. It is found that the black hole entropy shows a remarkable transition from the usual "area~law" to an "area~$\\times$~radius" law.

  7. A scale dependent black hole in three-dimensional space–time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Benjamin; Reyes, Ignacio A.; Rincón, Ángel

    2016-11-01

    Scale dependence at the level of the effective action is a generic result of quantum field theory. Allowing for scale dependence of the gravitational couplings leads to a generalization of the corresponding field equations. In this work, those equations are solved by imposing the ‘null energy condition’ in three-dimensional space time with stationary spherical symmetry. The constants of integration are given in terms of the classical BTZ parameters plus one additional constant, that parametrizes the strength of the scale dependence. The properties such as asymptotics, horizon structure, and thermodynamics are discussed. It is found that the black hole entropy shows a remarkable transition from the usual ‘area law’ to an ‘area × radius’ law.

  8. The Formation of Kiloparsec-Scale HI Holes in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Steven R; Skillman, Evan D; Cannon, John M; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Dolphin, Andrew E; Kennicutt, Robert C; Jr.,; Koribalski, Barbel; Ott, Juergen; Stilp, Adrienne M; Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Walter, Fabian; West, Andrew A

    2011-01-01

    The origin of kpc-scale holes in the atomic hydrogen (H I) distributions of some nearby dwarf irregular galaxies presents an intriguing problem. Star formation histories (SFHs) derived from resolved stars give us the unique opportunity to study past star forming events that may have helped shape the currently visible H I distribution. Our sample of five nearby dwarf irregular galaxies spans over an order of magnitude in both total H I mass and absolute B-band magnitude and is at the low mass end of previously studied systems. We use Very Large Array H I line data to estimate the energy required to create the centrally dominant hole in each galaxy. We compare this energy estimate to the past energy released by the underlying stellar populations computed from SFHs derived from data taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. The inferred integrated stellar energy released within the characteristic ages exceeds our energy estimates for creating the holes in all cases, assuming expected efficiencies. Therefore, it app...

  9. Direct Formation of Supermassive Black Holes via Multi-Scale Gas Inflows in Galaxy Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, Lucio; Escala, Andres; Callegari, Simone

    2009-01-01

    Observations of distant bright quasars suggest that billion solar mass supermassive black holes (SMBHs) were already in place less than a billion years after the Big Bang. Models in which light black hole seeds form by the collapse of primordial metal-free stars cannot explain their rapid appearance due to inefficient gas accretion. Alternatively, these black holes may form by direct collapse of gas at the center of protogalaxies. However, this requires metal-free gas that does not cool efficiently and thus is not turned into stars, in contrast with the rapid metal enrichment of protogalaxies. Here we use a numerical simulation to show that mergers between massive protogalaxies naturally produce the required central gas accumulation with no need to suppress star formation. Merger-driven gas inflows produce an unstable, massive nuclear gas disk. Within the disk a second gas inflow accumulates more than 100 million solar masses of gas in a sub-parsec scale cloud in one hundred thousand years. The cloud undergoe...

  10. Solution deposition of nanometer scale silver films as an alternative to vapor deposition for plasmonic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Derek S.; Sathish, R. Sai; Kostov, Yordan [Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Rao, Govind, E-mail: grao@umbc.ed [Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States)

    2010-05-03

    We report the attainment of surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) from highly uniform thin silver films, solution-deposited on glass substrates by a wet chemistry approach. The surface morphology of these films was characterized by atomic force microscopy. The SPCE emission enhancements, polarization and angularity obtained from solution-deposited silver on BK7 glass were comparable to that achieved from conventional SPCE slides prepared via vapor deposition. This facile, wet chemistry procedure for the deposition of SPCE films provides an inexpensive, low maintenance alternative to vapor deposition for SPCE substrate preparation. This would allow the fluorescence observation technique to become more readily available for high sensitivity, low cost applications.

  11. New Physical Deposition Approach for Low Cost Inorganic Hole Transport Layer in Normal Architecture of Durable Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejand, Bahram Abdollahi; Ahmadi, Vahid; Shahverdi, Hamid Reza

    2015-10-07

    In this work we reported sputter deposited NiOx/Ni double layer as an HTM/contact couple in normal architecture of perovskite solar cell. A perovskite solar cell that is durable for more than 60 days was achieved, with increasing efficiency from 1.3% to 7.28% within 6 days. Moreover, low temperature direct deposition of NiOx layer on perovskite layer was introduced as a potential hole transport material for an efficient cost-effective solar cell applicable for various morphologies of perovskite layers, even for perovskite layers containing pinholes, which is a notable challenge in perovskite solar cells. The angular deposition of NiOx layers by dc reactive magnetron sputtering showed uniform and crack-free coverage of the perovskite layer with no negative impact on perovskite structure that is suitable for nickel back contact layer, surface shielding against moisture, and mechanical damages. Replacing the expensive complex materials in previous perovskite solar cells with low cost available materials introduces cost-effective scalable perovskite solar cells.

  12. Formation of Nuclear Disks and Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in Multi-Scale Hydrodynamical Galaxy Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, Lucio; Escala, Andres

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged) We review the results of the first multi-scale, hydrodynamical simulations of mergers between galaxies with central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) to investigate the formation of SMBH binaries in galactic nuclei. We demonstrate that strong gas inflows produce nuclear disks at the centers of merger remnants whose properties depend sensitively on the details of gas thermodynamics. In numerical simulations with parsec-scale spatial resolution in the gas component and an effective equation of state appropriate for a starburst galaxy, we show that a SMBH binary forms very rapidly, less than a million years after the merger of the two galaxies. Binary formation is significantly suppressed in the presence of a strong heating source such as radiative feedback by the accreting SMBHs. We also present preliminary results of numerical simulations with ultra-high spatial resolution of 0.1 pc in the gas component. These simulations resolve the internal structure of the resulting nuclear disk down to parsec sca...

  13. Dynamic Scaling of Lipofuscin Deposition in Aging Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, H. E.

    2011-07-01

    Lipofuscin is a membrane-bound cellular waste that can be neither degraded nor ejected from the cell but can only be diluted through cell division and subsequent growth. The fate of postmitotic (non-dividing) cells such as neurons, cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle fibers, and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) is to accumulate lipofuscin, which as an "aging pigment" has been considered a reliable biomarker for the age of cells. Environmental stress can accelerate the accumulation of lipofuscin. For example, accumulation in brain cells appears to be an important issue connected with heavy consumption of alcohol. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, whose abnormal accumulation is related to a range of disorders including Type IV mucolipidosis (ML4), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) which is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. We introduce a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth and aggregation that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin. As an example of lipofuscin deposit in a given kind of postmitotic cell, we study the kinetics of lipofuscin growth in a RPE cell. Our results agree with a linear growth of the number of lipofuscin granules with age. We apply the dynamic scaling approach to our model and find excellent data collapse for the cluster size distribution. An unusual feature of our model is that while small particles are removed from the cell the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation.

  14. Bulk heterojunction perovskite solar cells based on room temperature deposited hole-blocking layer: Suppressed hysteresis and flexible photovoltaic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiliang; Yang, Guang; Zheng, Xiaolu; Lei, Hongwei; Chen, Cong; Ma, Junjie; Wang, Hao; Fang, Guojia

    2017-05-01

    Perovskite solar cells have developed rapidly in recent years as the third generation solar cells. In spite of the great improvement achieved, there still exist some issues such as undesired hysteresis and indispensable high temperature process. In this work, bulk heterojunction perovskite-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester solar cells have been prepared to diminish hysteresis using a facile two step spin-coating method. Furthermore, high quality tin oxide films are fabricated using pulse laser deposition technique at room temperature without any annealing procedure. The as fabricated tin oxide film is successfully applied in bulk heterojunction perovskite solar cells as a hole blocking layer. Bulk heterojunction devices based on room temperature tin oxide exhibit almost hysteresis-free characteristics with power conversion efficiency of 17.29% and 14.0% on rigid and flexible substrates, respectively.

  15. Deposition of hole-transport materials in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells by doctor-blading

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, I-Kang

    2010-07-01

    We report using doctor-blading to replace conventional spin coating for the deposition of the hole-transport material spiro-OMeTAD (2,20,7,70-tetrakis-(N, N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)- 9,90-spirobifluorene) in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Doctor-blading is a roll-to-roll compatible, large-area coating technique, is capable of achieving the same spiro-OMeTAD pore filling fraction as spin coating, and uses much less material. The average power conversion efficiency of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells made from doctorblading is 3.0% for 2-lm thick films and 2.0% for 5-lm thick films, on par with devices made with spin coating. Directions to further improve the filling fraction are also suggested. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Is Current CMBR Temperature: The Scale Independent Quantum Gravitational Result of Black Hole Cosmology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshavatharam, U. V. S.; Lakshminarayana, S.

    If one is willing to consider the current cosmic microwave back ground temperature as a quantum gravitational effect of the evolving primordial cosmic black hole (universe that constitutes dynamic space-time and exhibits quantum behavior) automatically general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics can be combined into a `scale independent' true unified model of quantum gravity. By considering the `Planck mass' as the initial mass of the baby Hubble volume, past and current physical and thermal parameters of the cosmic black hole can be understood. Current rate of cosmic black hole expansion is being stopped by the microscopic quantum mechanical lengths. In this new direction authors observed 5 important quantum mechanical methods for understanding the current cosmic deceleration. To understand the ground reality of current cosmic rate of expansion, sensitivity and accuracy of current methods of estimating the magnitudes of current CMBR temperature and current Hubble constant must be improved and alternative methods must be developed. If it is true that galaxy constitutes so many stars, each star constitutes so many hydrogen atoms and light is coming from the excited electron of galactic hydrogen atom, then considering redshift as an index of `whole galaxy' receding may not be reasonable. During cosmic evolution, at any time in the past, in hydrogen atom emitted photon energy was always inversely proportional to the CMBR temperature. Thus past light emitted from older galaxy's excited hydrogen atom will show redshift with reference to the current laboratory data. As cosmic time passes, in future, the absolute rate of cosmic expansion can be understood by observing the rate of increase in the magnitude of photon energy emitted from laboratory hydrogen atom. Aged super novae dimming may be due to the effect of high cosmic back ground temperature. Need of new mathematical methods & techniques, computer simulations, advanced engineering skills seem to be essential

  17. Cosmological quintessence accretion onto primordial black holes conditions for their growth to the supermassive scale

    CERN Document Server

    Custodio, P S

    2005-01-01

    In this work we revisit the growth of small primordial black holes (PBHs) immersed in a quintessential field and/or radiation to the supermassive black hole (SMBHs) scale. We show the difficulties of scenarios in which such huge growth is possible. For that purpose we evaluated analytical solutions of the differential equations (describing mass evolution) and point out the strong fine tuning for that conclusions. The timescale for growth in a model with a constant quintessence flux is calculated and we show that it is much bigger than the Hubble time.The fractional gain of the mass is further evaluated in other forms, including quintessence and/or radiation. We calculate the cosmological density $\\Omega$ due to quintessence necessary to grow BHs to the supermassive range and show it to be much bigger than one. We also describe the set of complete equations analyzing the evolution of the BH+quintessence universe, showing some interesting effects such the quenching of the BH mass growth due to the evolution of ...

  18. Revisiting the Scaling Relations of Black Hole Masses and Host Galaxy Properties

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, Nicholas J

    2012-01-01

    New kinematic data and modeling efforts in the past few years have substantially expanded and revised dynamical measurements of black hole masses (Mbh) at the centers of nearby galaxies. Here we compile an updated sample of 72 black holes and their host galaxies, and present revised scaling relations between Mbh and stellar velocity dispersion (sigma), V-band luminosity (L), and bulge stellar mass (Mbulge), for different galaxy subsamples. Our best-fitting power law relations for the full galaxy sample are log(Mbh) = 8.33 + 5.57*log(sigma/200 kms), log(Mbh) = 9.23 + 1.11*log(L/10^{11} Lsun), and log(Mbh) = 8.46 + 1.05*log(Mbulge/10^{11} Msun). When the early- and late-type galaxies are fit separately, we obtain nearly identical slopes of ~5 for the Mbh-sigma relation but significantly different intercepts. Within early-type galaxies, we find a significantly higher intercept for galaxies with central core profiles than for those with central power-law profiles. At fixed sigma, our fits predict Mbh to be about ...

  19. Anisotropic Scale Invariant Spacetimes and Black Holes in Zwei-Dreibein Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Goya, Andrés F

    2014-01-01

    We show that Zwei-Dreibein Gravity (ZDG), a bigravity theory recently proposed by Bergshoeff, de Haan, Hohm, Merbis, and Townsend in Phys.Rev.Lett. 111 (2013) 111102, admits exact solutions with anisotropic scale invariance. These type of geometries are the three-dimensional analogues of the spacetimes which were proposed as gravity duals for condensed matter systems. In particular, we find Schr\\"odinger invariant spaces as well as Lifshitz spaces with arbitrary dynamical exponent $z$. We also find black holes that are asymptotically Lifshitz with $z=3$, showing that these (non-constant curvature) solutions of New Massive Gravity (NMG) are persistent after the introduction of the infinite tower of higher-curvature terms of ZDG, provided a renormalization of the parameters. Black holes in asymptotically warped Anti-de Sitter spaces are also found. Interestingly, in almost all the geometries studied in this work, the metric associated with the second dreibein turns out to be equivalent, up to a constant global ...

  20. Design and testing of a mesocosm-scale habitat for culturing the endangered Devils Hole Pupfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerbacher, Olin; Bonar, Scott A.; Barrett, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    aptive propagation of desert spring fishes, whether for conservation or research, is often difficult, given the unique and often challenging environments these fish utilize in nature. High temperatures, low dissolved oxygen, minimal water flow, and highly variable lighting are some conditions a researcher might need to recreate to simulate their natural environments. Here we describe a mesocosm-scale habitat created to maintain hybrid Devils Hole × Ash Meadows Amargosa Pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis × C. nevadensis mionectes) under conditions similar to those found in Devils Hole, Nevada. This 13,000-L system utilized flow control and natural processes to maintain these conditions rather than utilizing complex and expensive automation. We designed a rotating solar collector to control natural sunlight, a biological reactor to consume oxygen while buffering water quality, and a reverse-daylight photosynthesis sump system to stabilize nighttime pH and swings in dissolved oxygen levels. This system successfully controlled many desired parameters and helped inform development of a larger, more permanent desert fish conservation facility at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada. For others who need to raise fish from unique habitats, many components of the scalable and modular design of this system can be adapted at reasonable cost.

  1. Small-scale structure and 21cm fluctuations by primordial black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Kitajima, Naoya

    2017-08-01

    We discuss early structure formation of small scales sourced by primordial black holes (PBHs) which constitute a small part of present cold dark matter component. We calculate the mass function and power spectrum of haloes originated from the Poisson fluctuations of PBH number and show that the number of small haloes is significantly modified in the presence of PBHs even if their fraction accounts for only 10-4-10-3 of total dark matter abundance. We then compute the subsequent 21cm signature from those haloes. We find that PBHs can provide major contributions at high redshifts within the detectability of future experiments such as Square Kilometer Array, and provide a forecast constraint on the PBH fraction.

  2. Tev-Scale Black Hole Lifetimes in Extra-Dimensional Lovelock Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2006-01-05

    We examine the mass loss rates and lifetimes of TeV-scale extra dimensional black holes (BH) in ADD-like models with Lovelock higher-curvature terms present in the action. In particular we focus on the predicted differences between the canonical and microcanonical ensemble statistical mechanics descriptions of the Hawking radiation that results in the decay of these BH. In even numbers of extra dimensions the employment of the microcanonical approach is shown to generally lead to a significant increase in the BH lifetime as in case of the Einstein-Hilbert action. For odd numbers of extra dimensions, stable BH remnants occur when employing either description provided the highest order allowed Lovelock invariant is present. However, in this case, the time dependence of the mass loss rates obtained employing the two approaches will be different. These effects are in principle measurable at future colliders.

  3. TeV Scale Black Holes in Warped Higher-Curvature Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2005-11-09

    We examine the properties of TeV-scale extra dimensional black holes (BH) in Randall-Sundrum-like models with Gauss-Bonnet higher-curvature terms present in the action. These theories naturally lead to a mass threshold for BH production in TeV particle collisions which could be observable at LHC/ILC. The lifetimes of such BH are examined and, in particular, we focus on the predicted lifetime differences between the canonical and microcanonical thermodynamical descriptions of BH decaying to Standard Model brane fields and the possibility of long-lived relics. The sensitivity of these results to the particular mix of fermions and bosons present in the Standard Model spectrum is also briefly examined.

  4. TeV-Scale Black Holes in Warped Higher-Curvature Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, T G

    2005-01-01

    We examine the properties of TeV-scale extra dimensional black holes (BH) in Randall-Sundrum-like models with Gauss-Bonnet higher-curvature terms present in the action. These theories naturally lead to a mass threshold for BH production in TeV particle collisions which could be observable at LHC/ILC. The lifetimes of such BH are examined and, in particular, we focus on the predicted lifetime differences between the canonical and microcanonical thermodynamical descriptions of BH decaying to Standard Model brane fields and the possibility of long-lived relics. The sensitivity of these results to the particular mix of fermions and bosons present in the Standard Model spectrum is also briefly examined.

  5. A Black Hole Mass-Variability Time Scale Correlation at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Bower, Geoffrey C; Markoff, Sera; Gurwell, Mark A; Rao, Ramprasad; McHardy, Ian

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the light curves of 413 radio sources at submillimeter wavelengths using data from the Submillimeter Array calibrator database. The database includes more than 20,000 observations at 1.3 and 0.8 mm that span 13 years. We model the light curves as a damped random walk and determine a characteristic time scale $\\tau$ at which the variability amplitude saturates. For the vast majority of sources, primarily blazars and BL Lac objects, we find only lower limits on $\\tau$. For two nearby low luminosity active galactic nuclei, M81 and M87, however, we measure $\\tau=1.6^{+3.0}_{-0.9}$ days and $\\tau=45^{+61}_{-24}$ days, respectively ($2\\sigma$ errors). Including the previously measured $\\tau=0.33\\pm 0.16$ days for Sgr A*, we show an approximately linear correlation between $\\tau$ and black hole mass for these nearby LLAGN. Other LLAGN with spectra that peak in the submm are expected to follow this correlation. These characteristic time scales are comparable to the minimum time scale for emission processes...

  6. As above, so below: exploiting mass scaling in black hole accretion to break degeneracies in spectral interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Markoff, Sera; Gallo, Elena; Hynes, Robert; Wilms, Jörn; Plotkin, Richard M; Maitra, Dipankar; Silva, Catia V; Drappeau, Samia

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the evidence is mounting that several aspects of black hole accretion physics proceed in a mass-invariant way. One of the best examples of this scaling is the empirical "Fundamental Plane of Black Hole Accretion" relation linking mass, radio and X-ray luminosity over eight orders of magnitude in black hole mass. The currently favored theoretical interpretation of this relation is that the physics governing power output in weakly accreting black holes depends more on relative accretion rate than on mass. In order to test this theory, we explore whether a mass-invariant approach can simultaneously explain the broadband spectral energy distributions from two black holes at opposite ends of the mass scale but at similar Eddington accretion fractions. We find that the same model, with the same value of several fitted physical parameters expressed in mass-scaling units to enforce self-similarity, can provide a good description of two datasets from V404 Cyg and M81*, a stellar and supermassive ...

  7. Epitaxial growth with pulsed deposition: Submonolayer scaling and Villain instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinnemann, Berit; Hinrichsen, H.; Wolf, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    It has been observed experimentally that under certain conditions, pulsed laser deposition (PLD) produces smoother surfaces than ordinary molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). So far, the mechanism leading to the improved quality of surfaces in PLD is not yet fully understood. In the present work, we...

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 for a High-Efficiency Hole-Blocking Layer in Hole-Conductor-Free Perovskite Solar Cells Processed in Ambient Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hang; Dong, Binghai; Hu, Huating; Chen, Fengxiang; Kong, Mengqin; Zhang, Qiuping; Luo, Tianyue; Zhao, Li; Guo, Zhiguang; Li, Jing; Xu, Zuxun; Wang, Shimin; Eder, Dominik; Wan, Li

    2016-07-20

    In this study we design and construct high-efficiency, low-cost, highly stable, hole-conductor-free, solid-state perovskite solar cells, with TiO2 as the electron transport layer (ETL) and carbon as the hole collection layer, in ambient air. First, uniform, pinhole-free TiO2 films of various thicknesses were deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) electrodes by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology. Based on these TiO2 films, a series of hole-conductor-free perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with carbon as the counter electrode were fabricated in ambient air, and the effect of thickness of TiO2 compact film on the device performance was investigated in detail. It was found that the performance of PSCs depends on the thickness of the compact layer due to the difference in surface roughness, transmittance, charge transport resistance, electron-hole recombination rate, and the charge lifetime. The best-performance devices based on optimized TiO2 compact film (by 2000 cycles ALD) can achieve power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of as high as 7.82%. Furthermore, they can maintain over 96% of their initial PCE after 651 h (about 1 month) storage in ambient air, thus exhibiting excellent long-term stability.

  9. A universal scaling law of black hole activity including gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G.

    2017-09-01

    Previous works showed a correlation among radio luminosity, X-ray luminosity and black hole (BH) mass from stellar-mass BHs in X-ray binaries to supermassive BHs in active galactic nuclei, which leads to the so-called Fundamental Plane of BH activity. However, there are two competing explanations for this Fundamental Plane, including the jet-dominated model and the disc-jet model. Thus, the physical origin of this Fundamental Plane remains unknown. In this paper, we show that the X-ray luminosities, radio luminosities and BH masses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and M82 X-1 also show a similar distribution. The universal scaling law among stellar-mass, intermediate and supermassive BH systems, together with the fact that the radio and X-ray emission of GRBs originates from relativistic jets, reveals that the Fundamental Plane of BH activity is controlled by a jet, i.e. the radio and X-ray emission is mainly from the jet. Our work also suggests that the jets are scale-invariant with respect to the BH mass.

  10. Post-Newtonian dynamical modeling of supermassive black holes in galactic-scale simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rantala, Antti; Johansson, Peter H; Naab, Thorsten; Lahén, Natalia; Sawala, Till

    2016-01-01

    We present KETJU, a new extension of GADGET-3 based on algorithmic chain regularization. The key feature of the code is the inclusion of regularized regions around every supermassive black hole (SMBH). This allows for simultaneously following global galactic-scale dynamical and astrophysical processes, while solving the dynamics of SMBHs, SMBH binaries and surrounding stellar systems at sub-parsec scales. The KETJU code includes Post-Newtonian terms in the equations of motions of the SMBHs which enables a new SMBH merger criterion based on the gravitational wave coalescence timescale pushing the merger separation of SMBHs down to $\\sim 0.005 \\ \\rm pc$. We test the performance of our code by comparison to NBODY7 and rVINE. We set up dynamically stable multi-component merger progenitor galaxies to study the SMBH binary evolution during galaxy mergers. In our simulation sample the SMBH binaries do not suffer from the final-parsec problem, which we attribute to the triaxiality of the merger remnants. For bulge-on...

  11. Diamond field-effect transistors for RF power electronics: Novel NO2 hole doping and low-temperature deposited Al2O3 passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasu, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Diamond possesses a combination of exceptional physical properties and is expected to be used as a semiconductor material in high-efficiency and high-power electronic devices. In this study, hole doping was observed when using NO2 molecules on a H-diamond surface. The activation energy of hole concentration in NO2/H-diamond was measured as 0.006 eV, and holes were fully activated at room temperature. A thermal stabilization of the hole channel was realized by passivation with an atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 layer. The passivation method enabled the realization of a thermally stable high-performance diamond field-effect transistor (FET), which exhibited high-performance DC and RF characteristics. NO2 hole-doping and Al2O3-passivation technologies enabled reproducible measurements of MOS structure electric properties. Such technologies also facilitated observations of two-dimensional holes at the MOS interface and type-II band alignment of Al2O3/NO2/H-diamond. Additionally, the band diagram under various gate bias conditions was proposed on the basis of capacitance-voltage measurements and analysis using Poisson’s equations.

  12. Influence of the thickness of electrochemically deposited polyaniline used as hole transporting layer on the behaviour of polymer light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.L. [Dpto. de Fisica y Arquitectura de Computadores, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Av. de la Universidad s/n, Ed. Torrepinet, 03202, Elche, Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: j.l.alonso@umh.es; Ferrer, J.C. [Dpto. de Fisica y Arquitectura de Computadores, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Av. de la Universidad s/n, Ed. Torrepinet, 03202, Elche, Alicante (Spain); Cotarelo, M.A.; Montilla, F. [Dpto. de Quimica Fisica e Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080, Alicante (Spain); Fernandez de Avila, S. [Dpto. de Fisica y Arquitectura de Computadores, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Av. de la Universidad s/n, Ed. Torrepinet, 03202, Elche, Alicante (Spain)

    2009-02-27

    An experimental study about the influence of the thickness of electrochemically deposited polyaniline (PANI), used as hole-transporting layer, on the behaviour of polymer light emitting diodes is presented. Two sets of devices with a different conjugated polymer used as active layer were prepared. Poly(9-vinylcarbazole) was used for the first type of devices, whereas Poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene-vinylene] was used for the second type. Each set consists of five polymeric diodes in which the hole-transporting layer has been varied. In one case of each set no layer was deposited, in other one a Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) layer was deposited, and in the rest of the diodes a different thickness of electrochemically deposited PANI was employed. The optic and electronic characterization of the devices show that controlling the thickness of the PANI hole transporting layer, both the maximum emission peak of the electroluminescence curves and the driving voltage could be tuned. Furthermore, an exponential behaviour has been demonstrated for the maximum intensity of the electroluminescence curves as a function of the applied excitation voltage between anode and cathode.

  13. Molecular Doping of the Hole-Transporting Layer for Efficient, Single-Step Deposited Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Kirmani, Ahmad R.

    2017-07-31

    Employment of thin perovskite shells and metal halides as surface-passivants for colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have been important, recent developments in CQD optoelectronics. These have opened the route to single-step deposited high-performing CQD solar cells. These promising architectures employ a QD hole-transporting layer (HTL) whose intrinsically shallow Fermi level (EF) restricts band-bending at maximum power-point during solar cell operation limiting charge collection. Here, we demonstrate a generalized approach to effectively balance band-edge energy levels of the main CQD absorber and charge-transport layer for these high-performance solar cells. Briefly soaking the QD HTL in a solution of the metal-organic p-dopant, molybdenum tris(1-(trifluoroacetyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)ethane-1,2-dithiolene), effectively deepens its Fermi level, resulting in enhanced band bending at the HTL:absorber junction. This blocks the back-flow of photo-generated electrons, leading to enhanced photocurrent and fill factor compared to undoped devices. We demonstrate 9.0% perovskite-shelled and 9.5% metal-halide-passivated CQD solar cells, both achieving ca. 10% relative enhancements over undoped baselines.

  14. The technicolor "big picture" of black hole evolution: Multiwavelength views of AGN, galaxies, and large-scale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickox, Ryan C.

    2016-08-01

    Large multiwavelength extragalactic surveys have revolutionized our understanding of the cosmic evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). I will discuss recent results on the host galaxies and clustering of AGN selected using a range of techniques from the radio to the hard X-ray wavebands, including data from the NuSTAR and WISE space observatories. I will show that relatively small dark matter halos hosting star-forming galaxies are connected with rapid but highly variable black hole growth that is often heavily obscured. In contrast, massive halos hosting passive galaxies are associated with slower, mechanically-dominated modes of black hole growth. I will conclude by discussing new analysis techniques for measuring AGN clustering and look to the future of large-scale extragalactic surveys.

  15. Simulation of the effect of scale deposition on a geothermal turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, J.A. [Universidad Autonomadel Estado de Morelos (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas; Urquiza-beltran, G. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Turbomaquinaria, Morelos (Mexico)

    2002-10-01

    Dissolved chemicals contained in geothermal steam can lead to corrosion, erosion and deposition of scale on turbine blades, reducing their useful life. In addition, deposits on the blading system reduce the flow area of the turbine. The first-stage nozzle group is typically most affected by deposition of scale although scale may be present in other parts of the system. The most common deposits are of silica and calcium carbonate. This decreases the output capacity and efficiency of the turbine. This paper presents the results of simulation on the effect of scale deposition in the first-stage nozzle group on the steam pressure before and after the first stage, output capacity and efficiency of the turbine. By measuring the steam pressure before and after the first stage the change in the flow area can be estimated. A method of monitoring the percentage of nozzle plugging in real time is proposed. The method can be applied to any turbine that is susceptible to scale deposition. (author)

  16. Towards an understanding of the evolution of the scaling relations for supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C M

    2010-01-01

    The growth of the supermassive black holes (BHs) that reside at the centres of most galaxies is intertwined with the physical processes that drive the formation of the galaxies themselves. The evolution of the relations between the mass of the BH, m_BH, and the properties of its host therefore represent crucial aspects of the galaxy formation process. We use a cosmological simulation, as well as an analytical model, to investigate how and why the scaling relations for BHs evolve with cosmic time. We find that a simulation that reproduces the observed redshift zero relations between m_BH and the properties of its host galaxy, as well as the thermodynamic profiles of the intragroup medium, also reproduces the observed evolution in the ratio m_BH/m_s for massive galaxies. The simulation predicts that the relations between m_BH and the binding energies of both the galaxy and its dark matter halo do not evolve, while the ratio m_BH/m_halo increases with redshift. The simple, analytic model of Booth & Schaye (2...

  17. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype. Repository between April 2007 and September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolezzi, F.; Haycox, J.R.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2008-07-01

    This six-month period of ultrasonic monitoring in the Prototype Repository Experiment, has been undertaken with the following objectives; - Produce accurate source locations for AEs so as to delineate the spatial and temporal extent of any brittle microcracking within the rock mass around the deposition hole and locate any movements on pre-existing macroscopic fractures; - Conduct regular ultrasonic surveys to assess the effect of heating and other environmental changes on the velocity and amplitude of transmitted ultrasonic waves; - Investigate changes in dynamic moduli and crack density to show how the properties of the rock volume around the deposition hole change through the experiment; - Relate the AE and ultrasonic measurements to the measured in situ stress regime and other operating parameters such as temperature and fluid pressure; - Outline how the results from this reporting period relate to previous monitoring periods, and into the overall experimental aims and objectives.

  18. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype. Repository between April 2007 and September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolezzi, F.; Haycox, J.R.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2008-07-01

    This six-month period of ultrasonic monitoring in the Prototype Repository Experiment, has been undertaken with the following objectives; - Produce accurate source locations for AEs so as to delineate the spatial and temporal extent of any brittle microcracking within the rock mass around the deposition hole and locate any movements on pre-existing macroscopic fractures; - Conduct regular ultrasonic surveys to assess the effect of heating and other environmental changes on the velocity and amplitude of transmitted ultrasonic waves; - Investigate changes in dynamic moduli and crack density to show how the properties of the rock volume around the deposition hole change through the experiment; - Relate the AE and ultrasonic measurements to the measured in situ stress regime and other operating parameters such as temperature and fluid pressure; - Outline how the results from this reporting period relate to previous monitoring periods, and into the overall experimental aims and objectives.

  19. High Overtone Quasinormal Modes of Analog Black Holes and the Small Scale Structure of the Background Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Daghigh, Ramin G

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to build a foundation for, and explore the possibility of, using high overtone quasinormal modes of analog black holes to probe the small scale (microscopic) structure of a background fluid in which an analog black hole is formed. This may provide a tool to study the small scale structure of some interesting quantum systems such as Bose-Einstein condensates. In order to build this foundation, we first look into the hydrodynamic case where we calculate the high overtone quasinormal mode frequencies of a 3+1 dimensional canonical non-rotating acoustic black hole. The leading order calculations have been done earlier in the literature. Here, we obtain the first order correction. We then analyze the high overtone quasinormal modes of acoustic black holes in a Bose-Einstein condensate using the linearized Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We point out that at the high overtone quasinormal mode limit, the only term that is important in the linearized Gross-Pitaevskii equation is the quantum poten...

  20. Province-scale commonalities of some world-class gold deposits: Implications for mineral exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I. Groves

    2015-05-01

    Here we promote the concept that mineral explorers need to carefully consider the scale at which their exploration targets are viewed. It is necessary to carefully assess the potential of drill targets in terms of terrane to province to district scale, rather than deposit scale, where most current economic geology research and conceptual thinking is concentrated. If orogenic, IRGD, Carlin-style and IOCG gold-rich systems are viewed at the deposit scale, they appear quite different in terms of conventionally adopted research parameters. However, recent models for these deposit styles show increasingly similar source-region parameters when viewed at the lithosphere scale, suggesting common tectonic settings. It is only by assessing individual targets in their tectonic context that they can be more reliably ranked in terms of potential to provide a significant drill discovery. Targets adjacent to craton margins, other lithosphere boundaries, and suture zones are clearly favoured for all of these gold deposit styles, and such exploration could lead to incidental discovery of major deposits of other metals sited along the same tectonic boundaries.

  1. Hawking Evaporation Time Scale of Topological Black Holes in Anti-de Sitter Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Ong, Yen Chin

    2015-01-01

    It was recently pointed out that if an absorbing boundary condition is imposed at infinity, an asymptotically anti-de Sitter Schwarzschild black hole with a spherical horizon takes only a finite amount of time to evaporate away even if its initial mass is arbitrarily large. We show that this is a rather generic property in AdS spacetimes: regardless of their horizon topologies, neutral AdS black holes in general relativity take about the same amount of time to evaporate down to the same size. Our discussion focuses on the case in which the black hole has toral event horizon. A brief comment is made on the hyperbolic case, i.e. for black holes with negatively curved horizons.

  2. Determining Central Black Hole Masses in Distant Active Galaxies and Quasars. II. Improved Optical and UV Scaling Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Peterson, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    We present four improved empirical relationships useful for estimating the central black hole mass in nearby AGNs and distant luminous quasars alike using either optical or UV single-epoch spectroscopy. These mass-scaling relationships between line widths and luminosity are based on recently...... estimate that the absolute uncertainties in masses given by these mass-scaling relationships are typically around a factor of 4. We include in an Appendix mass estimates for all the Bright Quasar Survey (PG) quasars for which direct reverberation-based mass measurements are not available....

  3. Province-scale commonalities of some world-class gold deposits:Implications for mineral exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David I. Groves; M. Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Discovery rates for all metals, including gold, are declining, the cost per significant discovery is increasing sharply, and the economic situation of the industry is one of low base rate. The current hierarchical structure of the exploration and mining industry makes this situation difficult to redress. Economic geologists can do little to influence the required changes to the overall structure and philosophy of an industry driven by business rather than geological principles. However, it should be possible to follow the lead of the oil industry and improve the success rate of greenfield exploration, necessary for the next group of lower-exploration-spend significant mineral deposit discoveries. Here we promote the concept that mineral explorers need to carefully consider the scale at which their exploration targets are viewed. It is necessary to carefully assess the potential of drill targets in terms of terrane to province to district scale, rather than deposit scale, where most current economic geology research and conceptual thinking is concentrated. If orogenic, IRGD, Carlin-style and IOCG gold-rich systems are viewed at the deposit scale, they appear quite different in terms of conventionally adop-ted research parameters. However, recent models for these deposit styles show increasingly similar source-region parameters when viewed at the lithosphere scale, suggesting common tectonic settings. It is only by assessing individual targets in their tectonic context that they can be more reliably ranked in terms of potential to provide a significant drill discovery. Targets adjacent to craton margins, other lithosphere boundaries, and suture zones are clearly favoured for all of these gold deposit styles, and such exploration could lead to incidental discovery of major deposits of other metals sited along the same tectonic boundaries.

  4. Probing the Magnetic Field Structure in {Sgr}\\,{\\rm{A}}* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Johnson, Michael D.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically arrested disks. We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford–Znajek-driven funnel jet. Our comparisons between the simulations and observations favor models with ordered magnetic fields near the black hole event horizon in Sgr A*, though both disk- and jet-dominated emission can satisfactorily explain most of the current EHT data. We also discuss how the black hole shadow can be filled-in by jet emission or mimicked by the absence of funnel jet emission. We show that stronger model constraints should be possible with upcoming circular polarization and higher frequency (349 GHz) measurements.

  5. "Brans-Dicke" with $\\Lambda>0$: Black holes and large scale structures

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Romano, Antonio E; Tomaras, Theodore N

    2015-01-01

    The no-hair theorem is generalized to stationary axisymmetric black-holes in scalar tensor theories of the Brans-Dicke type with positive cosmological constant, general $\\omega(\\phi)$ and potential $V(\\phi)$. For finite constant $\\omega$ the Brans-Dicke field $\\phi$ is shown to blow-up logarithmically at the horizons. Perturbative solutions of the theory are analyzed relevant to astrophysical applications, where either one or both horizons are "hidden". It is shown that when the stationary cosmological horizon is hidden, the black hole horizon supports non-trivial "$\\phi-$hair". On the other hand, when the black hole horizon is hidden, the presence of the cosmological one leads to an upper bound on $\\omega$.

  6. Control of mineral scale deposition in cooling systems using secondary-treated municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2011-01-01

    Secondary-treated municipal wastewater (MWW) is a promising alternative to freshwater as power plant cooling system makeup water, especially in arid regions. A prominent challenge for the successful use of MWW for cooling is potentially severe mineral deposition (scaling) on pipe surfaces. In this study, theoretical, laboratory, and field work was conducted to evaluate the mineral deposition potential of MWW and its deposition control strategies under conditions relevant to power plant cooling systems. Polymaleic acid (PMA) was found to effectively reduce scale formation when the makeup water was concentrated four times in a recirculating cooling system. It was the most effective deposition inhibitor of those studied when applied at 10 mg/L dosing level in a synthetic MWW. However, the deposition inhibition by PMA was compromised by free chlorine added for biogrowth control. Ammonia present in the wastewater suppressed the reaction of the free chlorine with PMA through the formation of chloramines. Monochloramine, an alternative to free chlorine, was found to be less reactive with PMA than free chlorine. In pilot tests, scaling control was more challenging due to the occurrence of biofouling even with effective control of suspended bacteria. Phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors are not appropriate due to their significant loss through precipitation reactions with calcium. Chemical equilibrium modeling helped with interpretation of mineral precipitation behavior but must be used with caution for recirculating cooling systems, especially with use of MWW, where kinetic limitations and complex water chemistries often prevail. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gas Well Top Hole Locations, LP and LNG, gas, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Washington County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Gas Well Top Hole Locations, LP and LNG dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2009. It is...

  8. Development of countermeasure against scale deposition at steam generators of PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domae, M.; Miyajima, K.; Hirano, H. [Surface Science Dept., Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Kushida, H. [Nuclear Power Engineering Dept., Tokyo Electric Power Environmental Engineering Co., Inc. (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Scale deposition has occurred at steam generators of several PWRs. The scale deposition may lead to reduction of flow rate of coolant, deterioration of heat exchanging efficiency and so on. These phenomena affect plant operation performance. Thus, elucidation of the mechanism of the scale deposition and some effective countermeasure are required. In CRIEPI (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry), the scale deposition is studied from two aspects: fluid dynamics and water chemistry. Concerning the water chemistry, we think that electro-kinetic behavior of scale, that is, metal oxides is of great importance. The final goal of the water chemical approach is to evaluate electro-kinetic potential (zeta potential) of metal oxides such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and to develop some countermeasure of the scale deposition based on the electro-kinetic data. As a first step, the zeta potential of 25 {mu}m Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles was measured by the streaming potential method at room temperature, and effect of dispersant addition was studied. The dispersants examined were poly-acrylic acid (PAA, M{sub w} {proportional_to} 25,000) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, M{sub w} {proportional_to} 40,000). It has been found that the addition of PAA of more than 10 ppm lowers the zeta potentials by 5 - 15 mV in whole pH range, and that the addition of PVP of more than 10 ppm reduces absolute value of the zeta potentials. (authors)

  9. The Dynamic Scaling Study of Vapor Deposition Polymerization: A Monte Carlo Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tangirala, Sairam; Zhao, Y -P; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.011605

    2010-01-01

    The morphological scaling properties of linear polymer films grown by vapor deposition polymerization (VDP) are studied by 1+1D Monte Carlo simulations. The model implements the basic processes of random angle ballistic deposition ($F$), free-monomer diffusion ($D$) and monomer adsorption along with the dynamical processes of polymer chain initiation, extension, and merger. The ratio $G=D/F$ is found to have a strong influence on the polymer film morphology. Spatial and temporal behavior of kinetic roughening has been extensively studied using finite-length scaling and height-height correlations $H(r,t)$. The scaling analysis has been performed within the no-overhang approximation and the scaling behaviors at local and global length scales were found to be very different. The global and local scaling exponents for morphological evolution have been evaluated for varying free-monomer diffusion by growing the films at $G$ = $10$, $10^2$, $10^3$, and $10^4$ and fixing the deposition flux $F$. With an increase in ...

  10. Controlling Barium Sulphate Scale Deposition Problems in an unbleached Kraft Paper Mill

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sithole, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available /phosphonates and polyacrylates were effective in reducing and controlling the scale deposit problems. Institution of these measures led to a cleaner paper machine that required far fewer boil outs than before. In addition, productivity improved and the fisheye defects...

  11. Large-scale nanoelectromechanical switches based on directly deposited nanocrystalline graphene on insulating substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Schmidt, Marek E.; Muruganathan, Manoharan; Chong, Harold M. H.; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    The direct growth of graphene on insulating substrate is highly desirable for the commercial scale integration of graphene due to the potential lower cost and better process control. We report a simple, direct deposition of nanocrystalline graphene (NCG) on insulating substrates via catalyst-free plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at relatively low temperature of ~800 °C. The parametric study of the process conditions that we conducted reveals the deposition mechanism and allows us to grow high quality films. Based on such film, we demonstrate the fabrication of a large-scale array of nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches using regular thin film process techniques, with no transfer required. Thanks to ultra-low thickness, good uniformity, and high Young's modulus of ~0.86 TPa, NCG is considered as a promising material for high performance NEM devices. The high performance is highlighted for the NCG switches, e.g. low pull-in voltage scale integration of graphene due to the potential lower cost and better process control. We report a simple, direct deposition of nanocrystalline graphene (NCG) on insulating substrates via catalyst-free plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at relatively low temperature of ~800 °C. The parametric study of the process conditions that we conducted reveals the deposition mechanism and allows us to grow high quality films. Based on such film, we demonstrate the fabrication of a large-scale array of nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches using regular thin film process techniques, with no transfer required. Thanks to ultra-low thickness, good uniformity, and high Young's modulus of ~0.86 TPa, NCG is considered as a promising material for high performance NEM devices. The high performance is highlighted for the NCG switches, e.g. low pull-in voltage <3 V, reversible operations, minimal leakage current of ~1 pA, and high on/off ratio of ~105. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00253f

  12. One-step large-scale deposition of salt-free DNA origami nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linko, Veikko; Shen, Boxuan; Tapio, Kosti; Toppari, J. Jussi; Kostiainen, Mauri A.; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2015-10-01

    DNA origami nanostructures have tremendous potential to serve as versatile platforms in self-assembly -based nanofabrication and in highly parallel nanoscale patterning. However, uniform deposition and reliable anchoring of DNA nanostructures often requires specific conditions, such as pre-treatment of the chosen substrate or a fine-tuned salt concentration for the deposition buffer. In addition, currently available deposition techniques are suitable merely for small scales. In this article, we exploit a spray-coating technique in order to resolve the aforementioned issues in the deposition of different 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures. We show that purified DNA origamis can be controllably deposited on silicon and glass substrates by the proposed method. The results are verified using either atomic force microscopy or fluorescence microscopy depending on the shape of the DNA origami. DNA origamis are successfully deposited onto untreated substrates with surface coverage of about 4 objects/mm2. Further, the DNA nanostructures maintain their shape even if the salt residues are removed from the DNA origami fabrication buffer after the folding procedure. We believe that the presented one-step spray-coating method will find use in various fields of material sciences, especially in the development of DNA biochips and in the fabrication of metamaterials and plasmonic devices through DNA metallisation.

  13. Inertial-Acoustic Oscillations of Black-Hole Accretion Discs with Large-Scale Poloidal Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Cong

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of large-scale magnetic fields on the non-axisymmetric inertial-acoustic modes (also called p-modes) trapped in the innermost regions of accretion discs around black holes (BHs). These global modes could provide an explanation for the high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) observed in BH X-ray binaries. There may be observational evidence for the presence of such large-scale magnetic fields in the disks since episodic jets are observed in the same spectral state when HFQPOs are detected. We find that a large-scale poloidal magnetic field can enhance the corotational instability and increase the growth rate of the purely hydrodynamic overstable p-modes. In addition, we show that the frequencies of these overstable p-modes could be further reduced by such magnetic fields, making them agree better with observations.

  14. Lateral resolution in focused electron beam-induced deposition: scaling laws for pulsed and static exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szkudlarek, Aleksandra [Empa, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Thun (Switzerland); AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Szmyt, Wojciech; Kapusta, Czeslaw [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Utke, Ivo [Empa, Laboratory for Mechanics of Materials and Nanostructures, Thun (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, we review the single-adsorbate time-dependent continuum model for focused electron beam-induced deposition (FEBID). The differential equation for the adsorption rate will be expressed by dimensionless parameters describing the contributions of adsorption, desorption, dissociation, and the surface diffusion of the precursor adsorbates. The contributions are individually presented in order to elucidate their influence during variations in the electron beam exposure time. The findings are condensed into three new scaling laws for pulsed exposure FEBID (or FEB-induced etching) relating the lateral resolution of deposits or etch pits to surface diffusion and electron beam exposure dwell time for a given adsorbate depletion state. (orig.)

  15. Time scales of porphyry Cu deposit formation: insights from titanium diffusion in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Celestine N.; Reed, Mark H.; Mercer, Cameron M.

    2015-01-01

    Porphyry dikes and hydrothermal veins from the porphyry Cu-Mo deposit at Butte, Montana, contain multiple generations of quartz that are distinct in scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images and in Ti concentrations. A comparison of microprobe trace element profiles and maps to SEM-CL images shows that the concentration of Ti in quartz correlates positively with CL brightness but Al, K, and Fe do not. After calibrating CL brightness in relation to Ti concentration, we use the brightness gradient between different quartz generations as a proxy for Ti gradients that we model to determine time scales of quartz formation and cooling. Model results indicate that time scales of porphyry magma residence are ~1,000s of years and time scales from porphyry quartz phenocryst rim formation to porphyry dike injection and cooling are ~10s of years. Time scales for the formation and cooling of various generations of hydrothermal vein quartz range from 10s to 10,000s of years. These time scales are considerably shorter than the ~0.6 m.y. overall time frame for each porphyry-style mineralization pulse determined from isotopic studies at Butte, Montana. Simple heat conduction models provide a temporal reference point to compare chemical diffusion time scales, and we find that they support short dike and vein formation time scales. We interpret these relatively short time scales to indicate that the Butte porphyry deposit formed by short-lived episodes of hydrofracturing, dike injection, and vein formation, each with discrete thermal pulses, which repeated over the ~3 m.y. generation of the deposit.

  16. Large-scale dynamo of accretion disks around supermassive nonrotating black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poplavsky A.L.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper one presents an analytical model of accretion disk magnetosphere dynamics around supermassive nonrotating black holes in the centers of active galactic nuclei. Based on general relativistic equations of magneto hydrodynamics, the nonstationary solutions for time-dependent dynamo action in the accretion disks, spatial and temporal distribution of magnetic field are found. It is shown that there are two distinct stages of dynamo process: the transient and the steady-state regimes, the induction of magnetic field at t > 6:6665 x 1011GM/c3 s becomes stationary, magnetic field is located near the innermost stable circular orbit, and its value rises up to ~ 105 G. Applications of such systems with nonrotating black holes in real active galactic nuclei are discussed.

  17. Observable Emission Features of Black Hole GRMHD Jets on Event Horizon Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Hung-Yi; Wu, Kinwah; Younsi, Ziri; Asada, Keiichi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Masanori

    2017-08-01

    The general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamical (GRMHD) formulation for black hole-powered jets naturally gives rise to a stagnation surface, where inflows and outflows along magnetic field lines that thread the black hole event horizon originate. We derive a conservative formulation for the transport of energetic electrons, which are initially injected at the stagnation surface and subsequently transported along flow streamlines. With this formulation the energy spectra evolution of the electrons along the flow in the presence of radiative and adiabatic cooling is determined. For flows regulated by synchrotron radiative losses and adiabatic cooling, the effective radio emission region is found to be finite, and geometrically it is more extended along the jet central axis. Moreover, the emission from regions adjacent to the stagnation surface is expected to be the most luminous as this is where the freshly injected energetic electrons are concentrated. An observable stagnation surface is thus a strong prediction of the GRMHD jet model with the prescribed non-thermal electron injection. Future millimeter/submillimeter (mm/sub-mm) very-long-baseline interferometric observations of supermassive black hole candidates, such as the one at the center of M87, can verify this GRMHD jet model and its associated non-thermal electron injection mechanism.

  18. Event-horizon-scale structure in the supermassive black hole candidate at the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Doeleman, Sheperd; Rogers, Alan E E; Plambeck, Richard; Freund, Robert; Tilanus, Remo P J; Friberg, Per; Ziurys, Lucy M; Moran, James M; Corey, Brian; Young, Ken H; Smythe, Daniel L; Titus, Michael; Marrone, Daniel P; Cappallo, Roger J; Bock, Douglas C J; Bower, Geoffrey C; Chamberlin, Richard; Davis, Gary R; Krichbaum, Thomas P; Lamb, James; Maness, Holly; Niell, Arthur E; Roy, Alan; Strittmatter, Peter; Werthimer, Daniel; Whitney, Alan R; Woody, David

    2008-01-01

    The cores of most galaxies are thought to harbour supermassive black holes, which power galactic nuclei by converting the gravitational energy of accreting matter into radiation (ref 1). Sagittarius A*, the compact source of radio, infrared and X-ray emission at the centre of the Milky Way, is the closest example of this phenomenon, with an estimated black hole mass that is 4 million times that of the Sun (refs. 2,3). A long-standing astronomical goal is to resolve structures in the innermost accretion flow surrounding Sgr A* where strong gravitational fields will distort the appearance of radiation emitted near the black hole. Radio observations at wavelengths of 3.5 mm and 7 mm have detected intrinsic structure in Sgr A*, but the spatial resolution of observations at these wavelengths is limited by interstellar scattering (refs. 4-7). Here we report observations at a wavelength of 1.3 mm that set a size of 37 (+16, -10; 3-sigma) microarcseconds on the intrinsic diameter of Sgr A*. This is less than the expe...

  19. Brans-Dicke Theory with Λ>0: Black Holes and Large Scale Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Dialektopoulos, Konstantinos F; Romano, Antonio Enea; Tomaras, Theodore N

    2015-10-30

    A step-by-step approach is followed to study cosmic structures in the context of Brans-Dicke theory with positive cosmological constant Λ and parameter ω. First, it is shown that regular stationary black-hole solutions not only have constant Brans-Dicke field ϕ, but can exist only for ω=∞, which forces the theory to coincide with the general relativity. Generalizations of the theory in order to evade this black-hole no-hair theorem are presented. It is also shown that in the absence of a stationary cosmological event horizon in the asymptotic region, a stationary black-hole horizon can support a nontrivial Brans-Dicke hair. Even more importantly, it is shown next that the presence of a stationary cosmological event horizon rules out any regular stationary solution, appropriate for the description of a star. Thus, to describe a star one has to assume that there is no such stationary horizon in the faraway asymptotic region. Under this implicit assumption generic spherical cosmic structures are studied perturbatively and it is shown that only for ω>0 or ω≲-5 their predicted maximum sizes are consistent with observations. We also point out how, many of the conclusions of this work differ qualitatively from the Λ=0 spacetimes.

  20. Scaling behavior of the surface roughness of platinum films grown by oblique angle deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Hovgaard, M. B.; Rechendorff, K.; Chevallier, J.; Foss, M.; Besenbacher, F.

    2008-03-01

    Thin platinum films with well-controlled rough surface morphologies are grown by e-gun evaporation at an oblique angle of incidence between the deposition flux and the substrate normal. Atomic force microscopy is used to determine the root-mean-square value w of the surface roughness on the respective surfaces. From the scaling behavior of w , we find that while the roughness exponent α remains nearly unchanged at about 0.90, the growth exponent β changes from 0.49±0.04 to 0.26±0.01 as the deposition angle approaches grazing incidence. The values of the growth exponent β indicate that the film growth is influenced by both surface diffusion and shadowing effects, while the observed change from 0.49 to 0.26 can be attributed to differences in the relative importance of diffusion and shadowing with the deposition angle.

  1. Effect of sub-pore scale morphology of biological deposits on porous media flow properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Biological deposits often influence fluid flow by altering the pore space morphology and related hydrologic properties such as porosity, water retention characteristics, and permeability. In most coupled-processes models changes in porosity are inferred from biological process models using mass-balance. The corresponding evolution of permeability is estimated using (semi-) empirical porosity-permeability functions such as the Kozeny-Carman equation or power-law functions. These equations typically do not account for the heterogeneous spatial distribution and morphological irregularities of the deposits. As a result, predictions of permeability evolution are generally unsatisfactory. In this presentation, we demonstrate the significance of pore-scale deposit distribution on porosity-permeability relations using high resolution simulations of fluid flow through a single pore interspersed with deposits of varying morphologies. Based on these simulations, we present a modification to the Kozeny-Carman model that accounts for the shape of the deposits. Limited comparison with published experimental data suggests the plausibility of the proposed conceptual model.

  2. A new stress-based multi-scale failure criterion of composites and its validation in open hole tension tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xing; Guan Zhidong; Li Zengshan; Liu Lu

    2014-01-01

    A new stress-based multi-scale failure criterion is proposed based on a series of off-axis tension tests, and their corresponding fiber failure modes and matrix failure modes are determined at the microscopic level. It is a physical mechanism based, three-dimensional damage analysis cri-terion which takes into consideration the constituent properties on the macroscopic failure behavior of the composite laminates. A complete set of stress transformation, damage determination and evolution methods are established to realize the application of the multi-scale method in failure analysis. Open-hole tension (OHT) specimens of three material systems (CCF300/5228, CCF300/5428 and T700/5428) are tested according to ASTM standard D5766, and good agreements are found between the experimental results and the numerical predictions. It is found that fiber strength is a key factor influencing the ultimate strength of the laminates, while matrix failure alleviates the stress concentration around the hole. Different matchings of fiber and matrix result in different fail-ure modes as well as ultimate strengths.

  3. Searching for High-energy, Horizon-scale Emissions from Galactic Black Hole Transients during Quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L. C.-C.; Pu, Hung-Yi; Hirotani, Kouichi; Kong, Albert K. H.; Matsushita, Satoki; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Inoue, Makoto; Tam, Pak-Hin T.

    2017-08-01

    We search for the gamma-ray counterparts of stellar-mass black holes using the long-term Fermi archive to investigate the electrostatic acceleration of electrons and positrons in the vicinity of the event horizon. We achieve this by applying the pulsar outer-gap model to their magnetospheres. When a black hole transient (BHT) is in a low-hard or quiescent state, the radiatively inefficient accretion flow cannot emit enough MeV photons that are required to sustain the force-free magnetosphere in the polar funnel via two-photon collisions. In this charge-starved gap region, an electric field arises along the magnetic field lines to accelerate electrons and positrons into ultra-relativistic energies. These relativistic leptons emit copious Gamma-rays via the curvature and inverse-Compton (IC) processes. It is found that these gamma-ray emissions exhibit a flaring activity when the plasma accretion rate typically stays between 0.01% and 0.005% of the Eddington value for rapidly rotating, stellar-mass black holes. By analyzing the detection limit determined from archival Fermi/Large Area Telescope data, we find that the 7-year averaged duty cycle of such flaring activities should be less than 5% and 10% for XTE J1118+480 and 1A 0620-00, respectively, and that the detection limit is comparable to the theoretical prediction for V404 Cyg. It is predicted that the gap emission can be discriminated from the jet emission if we investigate the high-energy spectral behavior or observe nearby BHTs during deep quiescence simultaneously in infrared wavelength and very-high energies.

  4. Small scale analogs of the Cayley Formation and Descarts Mountains in impact associated deposits, part C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The exploration of the Cayley Formation and material of the Descartes Mountains and an understanding of the origin and evolution of these units were primary objectives of the Apollo 16 lunar mission. This section examines several areas associated with impact crater deposits that show small-scale features similar in morphology to the regional characteristics of the Cayley and Descartes units shown in the Apollo 16 photography.

  5. Probing the magnetic field structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gold, Roman; Johnson, Michael D; Doeleman, Sheperd S

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic-field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A$^\\ast$ (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically-arrested disks (MAD). We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford-...

  6. Competition between surface relaxation and ballistic deposition models in scale free networks

    CERN Document Server

    La Rocca, Cristian E; Braunstein, Lidia A

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the scaling behavior of the fluctuations in the steady state $W_S$ with the system size $N$ for a surface growth process given by the competition between the surface relaxation (SRM) and the Ballistic Deposition (BD) models on degree uncorrelated Scale Free networks (SF), characterized by a degree distribution $P(k)\\sim k^{-\\lambda}$, where $k$ is the degree of a node. It is known that the fluctuations of the SRM model above the critical dimension ($d_c=2$) scales logarithmically with $N$ on euclidean lattices. However, Pastore y Piontti {\\it et. al.} [A. L. Pastore y Piontti {\\it et. al.}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 76}, 046117 (2007)] found that the fluctuations of the SRM model in SF networks scale logarithmically with $N$ for $\\lambda <3$ and as a constant for $\\lambda \\geq 3$. In this letter we found that for a pure ballistic deposition model on SF networks $W_S$ scales as a power law with an exponent that depends on $\\lambda$. On the other hand when both processes are in competition, we...

  7. Atomic scale real-space mapping of holes in YBa2Cu3O(6+δ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauquelin, N; Hawthorn, D G; Sawatzky, G A; Liang, R X; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Botton, G A

    2014-07-15

    The high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O(6+δ) consists of two main structural units--a bilayer of CuO2 planes that are central to superconductivity and a CuO(2+δ) chain layer. Although the functional role of the planes and chains has long been established, most probes integrate over both, which makes it difficult to distinguish the contribution of each. Here we use electron energy loss spectroscopy to directly resolve the plane and chain contributions to the electronic structure in YBa2Cu3O6 and YBa2Cu3O7. We directly probe the charge transfer of holes from the chains to the planes as a function of oxygen content, and show that the change in orbital occupation of Cu is large in the chain layer but modest in CuO2 planes, with holes in the planes doped primarily into the O 2p states. These results provide direct insight into the local electronic structure and charge transfers in this important high-temperature superconductor.

  8. Sediment depositions upstream of open check dams: new elements from small scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Guillaume; Le Guern, Jules; Carbonari, Costanza; Recking, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Torrent hazard mitigation remains a big issue in mountainous regions. In steep slope streams and especially in their fan part, torrential floods mainly result from abrupt and massive sediment deposits. To curtail such phenomenon, soil conservation measures as well as torrent control works have been undertaken for decades. Since the 1950s, open check dams complete other structural and non-structural measures in watershed scale mitigation plans1. They are often built to trap sediments near the fan apexes. The development of earthmoving machinery after the WWII facilitated the dredging operations of open check dams. Hundreds of these structures have thus been built for 60 years. Their design evolved with the improving comprehension of torrential hydraulics and sediment transport; however this kind of structure has a general tendency to trap most of the sediments supplied by the headwaters. Secondary effects as channel incision downstream of the traps often followed an open check dam creation. This sediment starvation trend tends to propagate to the main valley rivers and to disrupt past geomorphic equilibriums. Taking it into account and to diminish useless dredging operation, a better selectivity of sediment trapping must be sought in open check dams, i.e. optimal open check dams would trap sediments during dangerous floods and flush them during normal small floods. An accurate description of the hydraulic and deposition processes that occur in sediment traps is needed to optimize existing structures and to design best-adjusted new structures. A literature review2 showed that if design criteria exist for the structure itself, little information is available on the dynamic of the sediment depositions upstream of open check dams, i.e. what are the geomorphic patterns that occur during the deposition?, what are the relevant friction laws and sediment transport formula that better describe massive depositions in sediment traps?, what are the range of Froude and Shields

  9. Continental-scale variation in chloride/bromide ratios of wet deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, M A; de Caritat, P; McPhail, D C

    2017-01-01

    Chlorine and bromine play crucial roles in atmospheric element cycles and are important environmental tracers in catchment investigations, so understanding their distribution at the Earth's near-surface is imperative for deciphering their behaviour. This study presents the first continental-scale analysis of Cl(-) and Br(-) concentrations of wet deposition, based on six and half years of weekly samples collected across North America. A recently developed imputation algorithm was applied to estimate the high proportion of censored Br(-) values, as well as the other eight analytes, based on the multivariate relationships of nine analytes. The results are consistent with previous studies that have found that the concentrations of these two ions in wet deposition, and the Cl(-)/Br(-) ratios of wet deposition decrease with distance inland. Close to the coast, Cl(-)/Br(-) ratios of wet deposition are similar to the ratio found in seawater (~288 by mass), rapidly decrease to approximately a third of the seawater ratio at ~200km inland, and then decrease at a much lesser rate to reach mass-ratios of 20 to 10 at ~1500km inland, following a logarithmic regression. The Niagara Falls and the Great Salt Lake are identified as localised sources of atmospheric solutes based on elevated Cl(-)/Br(-) ratios of wet deposition at proximal sites. Our observations provide further confidence in the findings presented in previous studies that have shown that Cl(-)/Br(-) ratios systematically decrease with increasing distance from the coast, despite the potential confounding impact of other processes, such as weather patterns, chemical behaviour and anthropogenic activity. Our results provide improved estimates of Cl(-)/Br(-) ratios of wet deposition source water in the absence of site-specific data.

  10. INFLUENCE OF NANOFILTRATION PRETREATMENT ON SCALE DEPOSITION IN MULTI-STAGE FLASH THERMAL DESALINATION PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman E Al-Rawajfeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Scale formation represents a major operational problem encountered in thermal desalination plants. In current installed plants, and to allow for a reasonable safety margin, sulfate scale deposition limits the top brine temperature (TBT in multi-stage flash (MSF distillers up to 110-112oC. This has significant effect on the unit capital, operational and water production cost. In this work, the influence of nanofiltration (NF pretreatment on the scale deposition potential and increasing TBT in MSF thermal desalination plants is modeled on the basis of mass transfer with chemical reaction of solutes in the brine. Full and partial NF-pretreatment of the feed water were investigated. TBT can be increased in MSF by increasing the percentage of NF-treated feed. Full NF pretreatment of the make-up allows TBT in the MSF plant to be raised up to 175oC in the case of di hybrid NF-MSF and up to 165oC in the case of tri hybrid NF-RO-MSF. The significant scale reduction is associated with increasing flashing range, unit recovery, unit performance, and will lead to reduction in heat transfer surface area, pumping power and therefore, water production cost.

  11. Origin and Implications of high eccentricities in massive black hole binaries at sub-pc scales

    CERN Document Server

    Roedig, Constanze

    2011-01-01

    We outline the eccentricity evolution of sub-parsec massive black hole binaries (MBHBs) forming in galaxy mergers. In both stellar and gaseous environments, MBHBs are expected to grow large orbital eccentricities before they enter the gravitational wave (GW) observational domain. We re--visit the predicted eccentricities detectable by space based laser interferometers (as the proposed ELISA/NGO) for both environments. Close to coalescence, many MBHBs will still maintain detectable eccentricities, spanning a broad range from <10^{-5} up to <~ 0.5. Stellar and gas driven dynamics lead to distinct distributions, with the latter favoring larger eccentricities. At larger binary separations, when emitted GWs will be observed by pulsar timing arrays (PTAs), the expected eccentricities are usually quite large, in the range 0.01-0.7, which poses an important issue for signal modelling and detection algorithms. In this window, large eccentricities also have implications on proposed electromagnetic counterparts to...

  12. Energy scales in a holographic black hole and conductivity at finite momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Pallab

    2009-01-01

    In this work we discuss the low temperature ($T$) behavior of gauge field correlators with finite momentum (k) in a $AdS^4$ black hole background. At low temperature, a substantial non-zero conductivity is only possible for a frequency range $\\omega>\\omega_g=k$. This tallies with the simple fact that at least an amount of energy $\\omega_g$ is needed to create an excitation of momentum $k$. Due to the existence of this ``gap'',one may expect that at zero frequency limit the real part of momentum dependent conductivity falls exponentially with $\\frac{1}{T}$. Using analytic methods, we found a $\\exp(-\\frac{\\omega_c}{T})$ falloff of the real part of conductivity with inverse temperature. Interestingly, $\\omega_g \

  13. Saharan dust deposition may affect phytoplankton growth in the Mediterranean sea at ecological time scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele Gallisai

    Full Text Available The surface waters of the Mediterranean Sea are extremely poor in the nutrients necessary for plankton growth. At the same time, the Mediterranean Sea borders with the largest and most active desert areas in the world and the atmosphere over the basin is subject to frequent injections of mineral dust particles. We describe statistical correlations between dust deposition over the Mediterranean Sea and surface chlorophyll concentrations at ecological time scales. Aerosol deposition of Saharan origin may explain 1 to 10% (average 5% of seasonally detrended chlorophyll variability in the low nutrient-low chlorophyll Mediterranean. Most of the statistically significant correlations are positive with main effects in spring over the Eastern and Central Mediterranean, conforming to a view of dust events fueling needed nutrients to the planktonic community. Some areas show negative effects of dust deposition on chlorophyll, coinciding with regions under a large influence of aerosols from European origin. The influence of dust deposition on chlorophyll dynamics may become larger in future scenarios of increased aridity and shallowing of the mixed layer.

  14. Saharan Dust Deposition May Affect Phytoplankton Growth in the Mediterranean Sea at Ecological Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallisai, Rachele; Peters, Francesc; Volpe, Gianluca; Basart, Sara; Baldasano, José Maria

    2014-01-01

    The surface waters of the Mediterranean Sea are extremely poor in the nutrients necessary for plankton growth. At the same time, the Mediterranean Sea borders with the largest and most active desert areas in the world and the atmosphere over the basin is subject to frequent injections of mineral dust particles. We describe statistical correlations between dust deposition over the Mediterranean Sea and surface chlorophyll concentrations at ecological time scales. Aerosol deposition of Saharan origin may explain 1 to 10% (average 5%) of seasonally detrended chlorophyll variability in the low nutrient-low chlorophyll Mediterranean. Most of the statistically significant correlations are positive with main effects in spring over the Eastern and Central Mediterranean, conforming to a view of dust events fueling needed nutrients to the planktonic community. Some areas show negative effects of dust deposition on chlorophyll, coinciding with regions under a large influence of aerosols from European origin. The influence of dust deposition on chlorophyll dynamics may become larger in future scenarios of increased aridity and shallowing of the mixed layer. PMID:25333783

  15. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2009 and March 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Andrews, Jennifer [ASC, Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, 2009, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009, Haycox and Duckworth 2009). Further information on the previous monitoring periods can be found in Appendix 1. This report covers the period between 1st October 2009 and 31st March 2010 and is the tenth 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  16. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2009 and September 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will [ASC, Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009, Haycox and Duckworth 2009). Further information on the previous monitoring undertaken can be found in Appendix 1. This report covers the period between 1st April 2009 and 30th September 2009 and is the ninth 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  17. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2008 and March 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Duckworth, Damion [ASC, Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009). Further information on the previous monitoring undertaken can be found in Appendix 1. This report covers the period between 1st October 2008 and 31st March 2009 and is the eighth 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  18. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2008 and March 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Duckworth, Damion [ASC, Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009). Further information on the previous monitoring undertaken can be found in Appendix 1. This report covers the period between 1st October 2008 and 31st March 2009 and is the eighth 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  19. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2009 and September 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will [ASC, Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009, Haycox and Duckworth 2009). Further information on the previous monitoring undertaken can be found in Appendix 1. This report covers the period between 1st April 2009 and 30th September 2009 and is the ninth 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  20. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2010 and September 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon (ASC Applied Seismology Consultants (United Kingdom))

    2011-05-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009, Haycox et al. 2009a, b, 2010). Appendix I contains further information about previous monitoring periods. This report covers the period between 1st April 2010 and 30th September 2010 and is the eleventh 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment

  1. Supermassive black hole binary environments: Effects on the scaling laws and time to detection for the stochastic background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigeland, S. J.; Siemens, X.

    2016-12-01

    One of the primary gravitational wave (GW) sources for pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) is the stochastic background formed by supermassive black holes binaries (SMBHBs). In this paper, we investigate how the environments of SMBHBs effect the sensitivity of PTAs by deriving scaling laws for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optimal cross-correlation statistic. The presence of gas and stars around SMBHBs accelerates the merger at large distances, depleting the GW stochastic background at low frequencies. We show that environmental interactions may delay detection by a few years or more, depending on the PTA configuration and the frequency at which the dynamical evolution transitions from being dominated by environmental effects to GW dominated.

  2. Supermassive Black Hole Binary Environments: Effects on the Scaling Laws and Time to Detection for the Stochastic Background

    CERN Document Server

    Vigeland, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary gravitational wave (GW) sources for pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) is the stochastic background formed by supermassive black holes binaries (SMBHBs). In this paper, we investigate how the environments of SMBHBs will effect the sensitivity of PTAs by deriving scaling laws for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optimal cross-correlation statistic. The presence of gas and stars around SMBHBs will accelerate the merger at large distances, depleting the GW stochastic background at low frequencies. We show that environmental interactions may delay detection by a few years or more, depending on the PTA configuration and the frequency at which the dynamical evolution transitions from being dominated by environmental effects to GW-dominated.

  3. The universal "heartbeat" oscillations in black hole systems accross the mass-scale

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Qingwen; Grzedzielski, Mikolaj; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Gu, Wei-Min; Dong, Ai-jun; Cao, Xiao-Feng; You, Bei; Yan, Zhen; Sun, Mou-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The hyperluminous X-ray source (HLX-1, the peak X-ray luminosity $\\sim 10^{42}\\rm erg\\ s^{-1}$) near the spiral galaxy ESO 243-49 is possibly the best candidate for intermediate mass black hole (IMBH), which underwent recurrent outbursts with a period of $\\sim 400$ days. The physical reason for this quasi-periodic variability is still unclear. We explore the possibility of radiation-pressure instability in accretion disk by modeling the light curve of HLX-1, and find that it can roughly reproduce the duration, period and amplitude of the recurrent outbursts HLX-1 with an IMBH of ~10^5Msun. Our result provides a possible mechanism to explain the recurrent outbursts in HLX-1. We further find a universal correlation between the outburst duration and the bolometric luminosity for the BH sources with a very broad mass range (e.g., X-ray binaries, XRBs, HLX-1 and active galactic nuclei, AGNs), which is roughly consistent with the prediction of radiation-pressure instability of the accretion disk. These results impl...

  4. Ammonia emissions, transport, and deposition downwind of agricultural areas at local to regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zondlo, Mark; Pan, Da; Golston, Levi; Sun, Kang; Tao, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emissions from agricultural areas show extreme spatiotemporal variations, yet agricultural emissions dominate the global NH3 budget and ammoniated aerosols are a dominant component of unhealthy fine particulate matter. The emissions of NH3 and their deposition near and downwind of agricultural areas is complex. As part of a multi-year field intensive along the Colorado Front Range (including the NASA DISCOVER-AQ and NSF FRAPPE field experiments), we have examined temporal emissions of NH3 from feedlots, regional transport of ammonia and ammoniated aerosols from the plains to relatively pristine regions in Rocky Mountain National Park, and dry deposition and re-emission of grassland NH3 in the park. Eddy covariance measurements at feedlots and natural grasslands in the mountains were conducted with newly-developed open-path, eddy covariance laser-based sensors for NH3 (0.7 ng NH3/m2/s detection limit at 10 Hz). These measurements were coupled with other NH3/NHx measurements from mobile laboratories, aircraft, and satellite to examine the transport of NH3 from agricultural areas to cleaner regions downwind. At the farm level, eddy covariance NH3 fluxes showed a strong diurnal component correlated with temperature regardless of the season but with higher absolute emissions in summer than winter. While farm-to-farm variability (N=62 feedlots) was high, similar diurnal trends were observed at all sites regardless of individual farm type (dairy, beef, sheep, poultry, pig). Deposition at scales of several km showed relatively small deposition (10% loss) based upon NH3/CH4 tracer correlations, though the NH3 concentrations were so elevated (up to ppmv) that these losses should not be neglected when considering near-farm deposition. Ammonia was efficiently transported at least 150 km during upslope events to the Colorado Front Range (ele. 3000-4000 m) based upon aircraft, mobile laboratory, and model measurements. The gas phase lifetime of NH3 was estimated to

  5. AS ABOVE, SO BELOW: EXPLOITING MASS SCALING IN BLACK HOLE ACCRETION TO BREAK DEGENERACIES IN SPECTRAL INTERPRETATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markoff, Sera; Silva, Catia V. [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nowak, Michael A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gallo, Elena; Plotkin, Richard M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Hynes, Robert [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Wilms, Jörn [Dr. Karl Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany); Maitra, Dipankar [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wheaton College, Norton, MA 02766 (United States); Drappeau, Samia, E-mail: S.B.Markoff@uva.nl, E-mail: C.V.DeJesusSilva@uva.nl, E-mail: mnowak@space.mit.edu, E-mail: egallo@umich.edu, E-mail: rih@redstick.phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: joern.wilms@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de, E-mail: maitra_dipankar@wheatoncollege.edu, E-mail: samia.drappeau@irap.omp.eu [CNRS, IRAP, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)

    2015-10-20

    Over the past decade, evidence has mounted that several aspects of black hole (BH) accretion physics proceed in a mass-invariant way. One of the best examples of this scaling is the empirical “fundamental plane of BH accretion” relation linking mass, radio, and X-ray luminosity over eight orders of magnitude in BH mass. The currently favored theoretical interpretation of this relation is that the physics governing power output in weakly accreting BHs depends more on relative accretion rate than on mass. In order to test this theory, we explore whether a mass-invariant approach can simultaneously explain the broadband spectral energy distributions from two BHs at opposite ends of the mass scale but that are at similar Eddington accretion fractions. We find that the same model, with the same value of several fitted physical parameters expressed in mass-scaling units to enforce self-similarity, can provide a good description of two data sets from V404 Cyg and M81*, a stellar and supermassive BH, respectively. Furthermore, only one of several potential emission scenarios for the X-ray band is successful, suggesting it is the dominant process driving the fundamental plane relation at this accretion rate. This approach thus holds promise for breaking current degeneracies in the interpretation of BH high-energy spectra and for constructing better prescriptions of BH accretion for use in various local and cosmological feedback applications.

  6. 中国超大型钼矿床%Super scale molybdenum deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文智; 付治国; 郭锐; 付恒一; 马晓辉; 李大卓

    2014-01-01

    中国目前共发现并探明10超大型钼矿床,其成因类型全部属于斑岩型矿床。超大型钼矿床特点是:①全部位于古板块对接带的仰冲带一侧,属于被动的冒地槽单元外侧;②成矿母岩:a.岩石学名称绝大多数是花岗斑岩类;b.岩石化学:三高一低,即高酸、高碱、高钾、低钙镁的正常太平洋型钙碱性系列的超浅成侵入岩;c.岩石地球化学:Mo,W均为特富集元素,Cu,Pb,Zn则为中等富集,从而说明成矿物质主要来源于上地幔与下地壳的混熔体;从成矿母岩的成岩和成矿年代学方面可知,中国超大型钼矿床主要形成于中生代燕山白垩纪中、晚期。%There have been discovered for ten super scale molybdenum deposits,the porphyry type,in China. The mineralization featurs of the super scale molybdenum deposit are as follows.All the deposits are located on the obduction sides of ancient plates connections that belong to the inner side of passive miogeosyncline u-nit.Secondly,their maj ority mother rocks are granite porphyry,with a small amount of granodiorite-por-phyry,with the lower deposit grade for the latter.The intrusive feature is that three highs and one low,they are peracid,high in alkaline and potassium,low in calcium and magnesium,normal Pacific typed calcium al-kaline hypabyssal intrusive rocks.The petro-geochemistry feature is as that Mo and W are both enriched ele-ments,while Cu,Pb,zinc are medium intensive.It is further proved that the ore-forming materials mainly are mixed magma from the upper mantle and lower crust.The diagenesis and mineralization chronology of the mother rock indicate that large molybdenum deposits in China were mainly formed in the middle to late Cretaceous within mid-late Mesozoic Yanshan period.

  7. 3-D solar cells by electrochemical-deposited Se layer as extremely-thin absorber and hole conducting layer on nanocrystalline TiO2 electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy-Cuong; Tanaka, Souichirou; Nishino, Hitoshi; Manabe, Kyohei; Ito, Seigo

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional selenium solar cell with the structure of Au/Se/porous TiO2/compact TiO2/fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass plates was fabricated by an electrochemical deposition method of selenium, which can work for the extremely thin light absorber and the hole-conducting layer. The effect of experimental conditions, such as HCl and H2SeO3 in an electrochemical solution and TiO2 particle size of porous layers, was optimized. This kind of solar cell did not use any buffer layer between an n-type electrode (porous TiO2) and a p-type absorber layer (selenium). The crystallinity of the selenium after annealing at 200°C for 3 min in the air was significantly improved. The cells with a selenium layer deposited at concentrations of HCl = 11.5 mM and H2SeO3 = 20 mM showed the best performance, resulting in 1- to 2-nm thickness of the Se layer, short-circuit photocurrent density of 8.7 mA/cm2, open-circuit voltage of 0.65 V, fill factor of 0.53, and conversion efficiency of 3.0%.

  8. Testing gold nanostructures fabricated by hole-mask colloidal lithography as potential substrates for SERS sensors: sensitivity, signal variability, and the aspect of adsorbate deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peksa, Vlastimil; Lebrušková, Petra; Šípová, Hana; Štěpánek, Josef; Bok, Jiří; Homola, Jiří; Procházka, Marek

    2016-07-20

    Gold nanoplasmonic substrates with high sensitivity and spectral reproducibility are key components of molecular sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). In this work, we used a confocal Raman microscope and several types of gold nanostructures (arrays of nanodiscs, nanocones and nanodisc dimers) prepared by hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL) to determine the sources of variability in SERS measurements. We demonstrate that significant variations in the SERS signal can originate from the method of deposition of analyte molecules onto a SERS substrate. While the method based on incubation of SERS substrates in a solution containing the analyte yields a SERS signal with low variability, the droplet deposition method produces a SERS signal with rather high variability. Variability of the SERS signal of a single nanoparticle was determined from the statistical analysis of the SERS signal in short-range Raman maps recorded using different sized laser spots produced by means of different objectives. We show that the number of nanoparticles located within the laser spot can be a source of substantial SERS signal variability, especially for high-magnification objectives. We demonstrate that SERS substrates prepared by HCL exhibit high SERS enhancement and excellent homogeneity (about 20% relative standard deviation from short-range maps). The nanocone arrays are shown to provide the highest SERS enhancement, the lowest relative level of fluorescence background, and also slightly better homogeneity when compared with arrays of nanodisc dimers or single nanodiscs.

  9. Accretion onto Black Holes from Large Scales Regulated by Radiative Feedback. II. Growth Rate and Duty Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Park, KwangHo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the second of a series on radiation-regulated accretion onto black holes(BHs) from galactic scales, we focus on the effects that radiation pressure and angular momentum of the gas have on the periodic and short-lived luminosity bursts found when thermal pressure of the ionized sphere around the BH regulates the accretion rate. Our simulations focus on intermediate-mass BH, but we derive general scaling relationships that are solutions of the classic Bondi problem when radiation feedback is considered. We find that for ambient gas densities(n) exceeding a critical value n (5x10^6 cm^{-3})/M_2, where M_2 is the mass of the BH in units of 100 solar masses, the period of the oscillations decreases rapidly and the duty cycle increases from 6% to 50%. However, the maximum and mean accretion rates become Eddington limited only if n>n_Edd n_cr/T_4 where T_4 is the ambient gas temperature in units of 10^4 K. In the sub-Eddington regime, the mean accretion rate onto BH is about 1% T_4^{2.5} of the Bondi ...

  10. Data integration modeling applied to drill hole planning through semi-supervised learning: A case study from the Dalli Cu-Au porphyry deposit in the central Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Moslem; Asadi, Hooshang H.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the application of a transductive support vector machine (TSVM), an innovative semi-supervised learning algorithm, has been proposed for mapping the potential drill targets at a detailed exploration stage. The semi-supervised learning method is a hybrid of supervised and unsupervised learning approach that simultaneously uses both training and non-training data to design a classifier. By using the TSVM algorithm, exploration layers at the Dalli porphyry Cu-Au deposit in the central Iran were integrated to locate the boundary of the Cu-Au mineralization for further drilling. By applying this algorithm on the non-training (unlabeled) and limited training (labeled) Dalli exploration data, the study area was classified in two domains of Cu-Au ore and waste. Then, the results were validated by the earlier block models created, using the available borehole and trench data. In addition to TSVM, the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was also implemented on the study area for comparison. Thirty percent of the labeled exploration data was used to evaluate the performance of these two algorithms. The results revealed 87 percent correct recognition accuracy for the TSVM algorithm and 82 percent for the SVM algorithm. The deepest inclined borehole, recently drilled in the western part of the Dalli deposit, indicated that the boundary of Cu-Au mineralization, as identified by the TSVM algorithm, was only 15 m off from the actual boundary intersected by this borehole. According to the results of the TSVM algorithm, six new boreholes were suggested for further drilling at the Dalli deposit. This study showed that the TSVM algorithm could be a useful tool for enhancing the mineralization zones and consequently, ensuring a more accurate drill hole planning.

  11. Deepwater turbidite system analysis : From outcrops studies to basin scale depositional elements. Key learnings for reservoir occurence and characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarre, J.-C.; Dattilo, P.; Crumeyrolle, P.

    2012-04-01

    Decisions on exploration and production in the deepwater domain rely mostly on seismic data (2D or 3D) with limited amount of well geological data. This limited information has to be supplemented by models derived from analogues at different scales, in order to derisk the reservoir presence and infer the reservoir architecture within a larger stratigraphic framework from shelf to deep basin. The fundamental outcrop analysis carried in the 70's and the 80's contributed to identify and characterize the main deep water depositional elements. Outcrop observations are the best way to appraise the architectural and faciological complexity of the subsurface depositional systems within their stratigraphic framework. The lessons learned in the Earth surface provide the key to the subsurface data understanding: core analysis, well-logs correlations and detailed 3D seismic interpretations. Subsurface data is in turn bringing key insights on large scale depositional system; 3D geometry and sediment nature of the depositional elements and processes. Research derived from 3D seismic subsurface data interpretations with tentative continuity between shelf to basin improved the understanding of shelf to deep basin sediment transfer mechanisms. In particular, it has been accompanied by a renewal of interest in the processes associated with hyperpycnal flows in the various deepwater settings. Outcrop and Subsurface integration appears as a powerful tool to characterize and predict reservoir occurence. A seismic based approach on the recognition of depositional elements defined at different scales honoring the stratigraphical architecture of turbidites deposits is systematically applied in our evaluations at a similar scale than the elementary depositional sequences recognized by Mutti (1994). Despite common depositional processes, a large diversity of systems and geobodies will be illustrated from regional scale to reservoir scale from a worldwide portfolio of assets in turbidite

  12. Quasar cartography: From black hole to broad-line region scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelouche, Doron [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa 31905 (Israel); Zucker, Shay, E-mail: doron@sci.haifa.ac.il, E-mail: shayz@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Geophysical, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2013-06-01

    A generalized approach to reverberation mapping (RM) is presented, which is applicable to broad- and narrowband photometric data, as well as to spectroscopic observations. It is based on multivariate correlation analysis techniques and, in its present implementation, is able to identify reverberating signals across the accretion disk and the broad-line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Statistical tests are defined to assess the significance of time-delay measurements using this approach, and the limitations of the adopted formalism are discussed. It is shown how additional constraints on some of the parameters of the problem may be incorporated into the analysis thereby leading to improved results. When applied to a sample of 14 Seyfert 1 galaxies having good-quality high-cadence photometric data, accretion disk scales and BLR sizes are simultaneously determined, on a case-by-case basis, in most objects. The BLR scales deduced here are in good agreement with the findings of independent spectroscopic RM campaigns. Implications for the photometric RM of AGN interiors in the era of large surveys are discussed.

  13. 3D Printing of Biocompatible Acellular Auricular Implant Using Dual Scaled Hydrid Technology Combining Fused Deposition Modeling with Electrospinning

    OpenAIRE

    Rezenda, R; Sabado, M; Kasjanovs, V; Baptista, L.; da Silva, K; Noritomi, P; Sena, F.; Wen, X.; Da Silva, J; Mironov, V.

    2013-01-01

    The dual-scaled hydrid scaffold fabrication technology based on combination of 3D printing (fused deposition modeling) and electrospining have been recently introduced. We report here the design, fabrication, mechanical testing, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility testing of novel auricular implants for treatment microtia fabricated by dual scaled hydbrid scaffold fabrication technology.

  14. Large scale changes in 20th century black carbon deposition to Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Bisiaux

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Refractory black carbon aerosols (rBC emitted by biomass burning (fires and fossil fuel combustion, affect global climate and atmospheric chemistry. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH, rBC is transported in the atmosphere from low latitudes to Antarctica and deposited to the polar ice sheet preserving a history of emissions and atmospheric transport. Here, we present two high-resolution Antarctic rBC ice core records drilled from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet divide and Law Dome on the periphery of the East Antarctic ice sheet. Separated by ~3500 km, the records span calendar years 1850–2001 and reflect the rBC distribution over the Indian and Pacific ocean sectors of the Southern Ocean. Highly correlated over the past 60 yr, the records show that coherent large-scale changes in SH rBC occurred at decadal to inter-annual time scales, notably in ENSO-like periodicities. Decadal trends in the records are similar to inventories of SH rBC emissions from grass fires and biofuels. The combined records suggest a large-scale reduction in rBC from 1950 to 1990 over the remote Southern Hemisphere.

  15. Large-scale quantification of suspended sediment transport and deposition in the Mekong Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Manh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sediment dynamics play a major role for the agricultural and fishery productivity of the Mekong Delta. However, the understanding of sediment dynamics in the Mekong Delta, one of the most complex river deltas in the world, is very limited. This is a consequence of its large extent, the intricate system of rivers, channels and floodplains and the scarcity of observations. This study quantifies, for the first time, the suspended sediment transport and sediment-nutrient deposition in the whole Mekong Delta. To this end, a quasi-2-D hydrodynamic model is combined with a cohesive sediment transport model. The combined model is calibrated automatically using six objective functions to represent the different aspects of the hydraulic and sediment transport components. The model is calibrated for the extreme flood season in 2011 and shows good performance for the two validation years with very different flood characteristics. It is shown how sediment transport and sediment deposition vary from Kratie at the entrance of the Delta to the coast. The main factors influencing the spatial sediment dynamics are the setup of rivers, channels and dike-rings, the sluice gate operations, the magnitude of the floods and tidal influences. The superposition of these factors leads to high spatial variability of sediment transport, in particular in the Vietnamese floodplains. Depending on the flood magnitude, the annual sedimentation rate averaged over the Vietnamese floodplains varies from 0.3 to 2.1 kg m−2 yr−1, and the ring dike floodplains trap between 1 and 6% of the total sediment load at Kratie. This is equivalent to 29 × 103–440 × 103 t of nutrients (N, P, K, TOC deposited in the Vietnamese floodplains. This large-scale quantification provides a basis for estimating the benefits of the annual Mekong floods for agriculture and fishery, and is important information for assessing the effects of deltaic subsidence and climate change related sea level rise.

  16. Sound Hole Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Politzer, David

    2015-01-01

    The volume of air that goes in and out of a musical instrument's sound hole is related to the sound hole's contribution to the volume of the sound. Helmholtz's result for the simplest case of steady flow through an elliptical hole is reviewed. Measurements on multiple holes in sound box geometries and scales relevant to real musical instruments demonstrate the importance of a variety of effects. Electric capacitance of single flat plates is a mathematically identical problem, offering an alternate way to understand the most important of those effects. The measurements also confirm and illuminate aspects of Helmholtz's "bottle" resonator model as applied to musical instrument sound boxes and sound holes.

  17. Micro-scale mechanical characterization of Inconel cermet coatings deposited by laser cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Chang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an Inconel 625-Cr3C2 cermet coating was deposited on a steel alloy by laser cladding. The elastic and plastic mechanical properties of the cermet matrix were studied by the depth sensing indentation (DSI in the micro scale. These results were compared with those obtained from an Inconel 600 bulk specimen. The values of Young's modulus and hardness of cermet matrix were higher than those of an Inconel 600 bulk specimen. Meanwhile, the indentation stress–strain curve of the cermet matrix showed a strain hardening value which was more than twice the one obtained for the Inconel 600 bulk. Additionally, the mechanical properties of unmelted Cr3C2 ceramic particles, embedded in the cermet matrix were also evaluated by DSI using a spherical indenter.

  18. Micro-scale mechanical characterization of Inconel cermet coatings deposited by laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ch.; Verdi, D.; Garrido, M.A.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an Inconel 625-Cr3C2 cermet coating was deposited on a steel alloy by laser cladding. The elastic and plastic mechanical properties of the cermet matrix were studied by the depth sensing indentation (DSI) in the micro scale. These results were compared with those obtained from an Inconel 600 bulk specimen. The values of Young's modulus and hardness of cermet matrix were higher than those of an Inconel 600 bulk specimen. Meanwhile, the indentation stress–strain curve of the cermet matrix showed a strain hardening value which was more than twice the one obtained for the Inconel 600 bulk. Additionally, the mechanical properties of unmelted Cr3C2 ceramic particles, embedded in the cermet matrix were also evaluated by DSI using a spherical indenter. (Author)

  19. Pilot‐scale investigation and CFD modeling of particle deposition in low‐dust monolithic SCR DeNOx catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiredal, Michael Lykke; Jensen, Anker Degn; Thøgersen, Joakim Reimer

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of particles in selective catalytic reduction DeNOx monolithic catalysts was studied by low‐dust pilot‐scale experiments. The experiments showed a total deposition efficiency of about 30%, and the deposition pattern was similar to that observed in full‐scale low‐dust applications....... On extended exposure to the dust‐laden flue gas, complete blocking of channels was observed, showing that also in low‐dust applications soot blowing is necessary to keep the catalyst clean. A particle deposition model was developed in computational fluid dynamics, and simulations were carried out assuming...... either laminar or turbulent flow. Assuming laminar flow, the accumulated mass was underpredicted with a factor of about 17, whereas assuming turbulent flow overpredicted the experimental result with a factor of about 2. The simulations showed that turbulent diffusion in the monolith channels and inertial...

  20. ESO 243-49 HLX-1: scaling of X-ray spectral properties and black hole mass determination

    CERN Document Server

    Titarchuk, Lev

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of Swift/XRT observations (2008-2015) of a hyper-luminous X-ray source, ESO 243-49 HLX-1. We found a strong observational evidence that ESO 243-49 HLX-1 underwent spectral transitions from the low/hard state to the high/soft state during these observations. The spectra of ESO 243-49 HLX-1 are well fitted by the so-{called} bulk motion Comptonization model for all spectral states. We have established the photon index Gamma saturation level, Gamma_{sat}$=3.0+/-0.1, in the correlation of Gamma versus mass accretion rate dot M. This Gamma-dot M correlation allows us to estimate the black hole (BH) mass in ESO 243-49 HLX-1 to be M_{BH}~ 7x 10^4 solar masses, assuming the distance to ESO 243-49 of 95 Mpc. For the BH mass estimate we used the scaling method, taking Galactic BHs XTE~J1550-564, H~1743-322 and 4U~1630-472, and an extragalactic BH source, M101 ULX-1 as reference sources. The Gamma-dot M correlation revealed in ESO 243-49 HLX-1 is similar to those in a number of Galactic and extraga...

  1. Determination of Black Hole Mass in Cyg X-1 by Scaling of Spectral Index-QPO Frequency Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnikov, N; Shaposhnikov, Nickolai; Titarchuk, Lev

    2007-01-01

    It is well established that timing and spectral properties of Galactic Black Hole (BH) X-ray binaries (XRB) are strongly correlated. In particular, it has been shown that low frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillation (QPO) frequency - photon index correlation curves have a specific pattern. In a number of sources the shape of the index-low frequency QPO correlations are self-similar with a position offset in the QPO frequency-Gamma plane. Titarchuk & Fiorito presented strong theoretical and observational arguments that the QPO frequency values in this QPO frequency-Gamma correlation should be inversely proportional to M_{BH}. A simple translation of the correlation for a given source along the frequency axis leads to the observed correlation for another source. As a result of this translation one can obtain a scaling factor which is simply a BH mass ratio for these particular sources. This property of the correlations offers a fundamentally new method for BH mass determination in XRBs. Here we use the observed...

  2. Cosmic Train Wreck by Massive Black Holes: Discovery of a kpc-Scale Triple Active Galactic Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xin; Strauss, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Hierarchical galaxy mergers will lead to the formation of binary and, in particular, triple SMBHs, given that most massive galaxies harbor central SMBHs. A triple of SMBHs becomes visible as a triple Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) when the BHs accrete large amounts of gas at the same time. Here we report the discovery of a kpc-scale triple AGN, SDSSJ1027+1749 at z = 0.066, from our systematic search for hierarchical mergers of AGNs. The galaxy contains three emission-line nuclei, two of which are offset by ~ 450 and 110 km/s in velocity and by 2.4 and 3.0 kpc in projected separation from the central nucleus. All three nuclei are classified as obscured AGNs based on optical diagnostic emission line ratios, with black hole mass estimates M_BH >~ 10^8 M_sun from stellar velocity dispersions measured in the associated stellar components. Based on dynamical friction timescale estimates, the three stellar components in SDSSJ1027+1749 will merge in ~ 40 Myr, and their associated SMBHs may evolve into a gravitationall...

  3. Mechanisms of formation of sub- and micrometre-scale holes in thin metal films by single nano- and femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, P A; Zayarnyi, D A; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V; Rudenko, A A; Yurovskikh, V I [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulchin, Yu N; Vitrik, O B; Kuchmizhak, A A [Institute for Automation and Control Processes, Far-Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Drozdova, E A; Odinokov, S B [N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-30

    Mechanisms of formation of sub- and micrometre-scale holes in thin silver and chromium films of variable thickness by tightly-focused single nanosecond IR laser pulses with fluences in the range of 10 – 10{sup 4} J cm{sup -2} are studied by means of optical and scanning electron microscopy. At the minimal fluences above 5 J cm{sup -2}, the micrometre (2 – 5 μm in radius) holes are produced in these films, accompanying the lateral heat conduction in the film during the pump laser pulse, cavitation at the metallic/glass interface and subsequent explosive removal of the molten film. At the fluences of ∼1 – 10 kJ cm{sup -2} much larger (20 – 40 μm in radius) holes are formed in the film as a result of its heating by the erosive surface microplasma through the lateral heat conduction in the film during the plasma lifetime of the order of a few microseconds. Finally, at the maximal fluences (well above 10 kJ cm{sup -2}), the submillimetre holes were produced in these films by intense shock waves, generated in the erosive microplasmas. The comparative analysis of the formation mechanisms for sub- and micrometrescale holes in the same thin metal films by the single nano- and femtosecond laser pulses is provided. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  4. Size variation and collapse of emphysema holes at inspiration and expiration CT scan: evaluation with modified length scale method and image co-registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang Young; Lee, Minho; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Jae Seung; Oh, Yeon Mok

    2017-01-01

    A novel approach of size-based emphysema clustering has been developed, and the size variation and collapse of holes in emphysema clusters are evaluated at inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT). Thirty patients were visually evaluated for the size-based emphysema clustering technique and a total of 72 patients were evaluated for analyzing collapse of the emphysema hole in this study. A new approach for the size differentiation of emphysema holes was developed using the length scale, Gaussian low-pass filtering, and iteration approach. Then, the volumetric CT results of the emphysema patients were analyzed using the new method, and deformable registration was carried out between inspiratory and expiratory CT. Blind visual evaluations of EI by two readers had significant correlations with the classification using the size-based emphysema clustering method (r-values of reader 1: 0.186, 0.890, 0.915, and 0.941; reader 2: 0.540, 0.667, 0.919, and 0.942). The results of collapse of emphysema holes using deformable registration were compared with the pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters using the Pearson's correlation test. The mean extents of low-attenuation area (LAA), E1 (size variation and collapse of emphysema holes may be useful for understanding the dynamic collapse of emphysema and its functional relation.

  5. Small-scale filament eruptions as the driver of X-ray jets in solar coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Adams, Mitzi

    2015-07-01

    Solar X-ray jets are thought to be made by a burst of reconnection of closed magnetic field at the base of a jet with ambient open field. In the accepted version of the `emerging-flux' model, such a reconnection occurs at a plasma current sheet between the open field and the emerging closed field, and also forms a localized X-ray brightening that is usually observed at the edge of the jet's base. Here we report high-resolution X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of 20 randomly selected X-ray jets that form in coronal holes at the Sun's poles. In each jet, contrary to the emerging-flux model, a miniature version of the filament eruptions that initiate coronal mass ejections drives the jet-producing reconnection. The X-ray bright point occurs by reconnection of the `legs' of the minifilament-carrying erupting closed field, analogous to the formation of solar flares in larger-scale eruptions. Previous observations have found that some jets are driven by base-field eruptions, but only one such study, of only one jet, provisionally questioned the emerging-flux model. Our observations support the view that solar filament eruptions are formed by a fundamental explosive magnetic process that occurs on a vast range of scales, from the biggest mass ejections and flare eruptions down to X-ray jets, and perhaps even down to smaller jets that may power coronal heating. A similar scenario has previously been suggested, but was inferred from different observations and based on a different origin of the erupting minifilament.

  6. Monitoring a Field-Scale Biostimulation Pilot Project Using Cross-Hole Radar and Borehole Geophysical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J. W.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2004-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical investigations in support of a field-scale biostimulation pilot project at the Anoka County Riverfront Park (ACP), located downgradient of the Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, in Fridley, Minnesota. The objective of the pilot project, conducted by the U.S. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, is to assess the applicability of subsurface injection of vegetable-oil emulsion (VOE) to promote microbial degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Naturally occurring microbes, which use the VOE as substrate, ultimately break down chlorinated hydrocarbons into chloride, carbon dioxide, and water through oxidation-reduction reactions. To monitor movement of the VOE and changes in water chemistry resulting from VOE advection, dissolution, and (or) enhanced biological activity, the USGS acquired cross-hole zero-offset radar profiles; radar travel-time tomography data; and a suite of borehole geophysical logs, including electromagnetic (EM) induction conductivity. Data were collected during 5 site visits over 1.5 years. Preliminary results of these experiments have been reported elsewhere; this paper reports on the final analysis and combined interpretation of multiple data types, including application of petrophysical models to radar zero-offset profiles and tomograms to yield estimates of VOE saturation and changes in total-dissolved solids downgradient of the VOE injection zones. Comparison of pre- and post-injection datasets provides insight into the spatial and temporal distributions of both VOE and ground water with altered chemistry-information critical to understanding and verifying biodegradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons at the site. Cross-hole radar zero-offset slowness profiles and tomograms indicate the VOE remained close to the injection wells. Downgradient of the injection zones, radar amplitude profiles and EM logs indicate bulk formation electrical conductivity changes after VOE injection, which

  7. Dynamic scaling and optical properties of Zn(S, O,OH) thin film grown by chemical bath deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yi; Li Bo-Yan; Dang Xiang-Yu; Wu Li; Jin Jing; Li Feng-Yan; Ao Jian-Ping; Sun Yun

    2011-01-01

    The scaling behavior and optical properties of Zn(S,O and OH) thin films deposited on soda-lime glass substrates by chemical bath deposition method were studied by combined roughness measurements,scanning electron microscopy and optical properties measurement.From the scaling behaviour,the value of growth scaling exponent β,0.38±0.06,was determined.This value indicated that the Zn(S,O,OH) film growth in the heterogeneous process was influenced by the surface diffusion and shadowing effect.Results of the optical properties measurements disclosed that the transmittance of the film was in the region of 70%-88% and the optical properties of the film grown for 40 min were better than those grown under other conditions.The energy band gap of the film deposited with 40 min was around 3.63 eV.

  8. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L.; Emelko, Monica B.

    2015-12-01

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or “sag effect” was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition.

  9. Selection bias in dynamically measured supermassive black hole samples: scaling relations and correlations between residuals in semi-analytic galaxy formation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barausse, Enrico; Shankar, Francesco; Bernardi, Mariangela; Dubois, Yohan; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2017-07-01

    Recent work has confirmed that the scaling relations between the masses of supermassive black holes and host-galaxy properties such as stellar masses and velocity dispersions may be biased high. Much of this may be caused by the requirement that the black hole sphere of influence must be resolved for the black hole mass to be reliably estimated. We revisit this issue with a comprehensive galaxy evolution semi-analytic model. Once tuned to reproduce the (mean) correlation of black hole mass with velocity dispersion, the model cannot account for the correlation with stellar mass. This is independent of the model's parameters, thus suggesting an internal inconsistency in the data. The predicted distributions, especially at the low-mass end, are also much broader than observed. However, if selection effects are included, the model's predictions tend to align with the observations. We also demonstrate that the correlations between the residuals of the scaling relations are more effective than the relations themselves at constraining models for the feedback of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In fact, we find that our model, while in apparent broad agreement with the scaling relations when accounting for selection biases, yields very weak correlations between their residuals at fixed stellar mass, in stark contrast with observations. This problem persists when changing the AGN feedback strength, and is also present in the hydrodynamic cosmological simulation Horizon-AGN, which includes state-of-the-art treatments of AGN feedback. This suggests that current AGN feedback models are too weak or simply not capturing the effect of the black hole on the stellar velocity dispersion.

  10. Dynamic Scaling and Island Growth Kinetics in Pulsed Laser Deposition of SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eres, Gyula; Tischler, J. Z.; Rouleau, C. M.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Christen, H. M.; Zschack, P.; Larson, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    We use real-time diffuse surface x-ray diffraction to probe the evolution of island size distributions and its effects on surface smoothing in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of SrTiO3 . We show that the island size evolution obeys dynamic scaling and two distinct regimes of island growth kinetics. Our data show that PLD film growth can persist without roughening despite thermally driven Ostwald ripening, the main mechanism for surface smoothing, being shut down. The absence of roughening is concomitant with decreasing island density, contradicting the prevailing view that increasing island density is the key to surface smoothing in PLD. We also report a previously unobserved crossover from diffusion-limited to attachment-limited island growth that reveals the influence of nonequilibrium atomic level surface transport processes on the growth modes in PLD. We show by direct measurements that attachment-limited island growth is the dominant process in PLD that creates step flowlike behavior or quasistep flow as PLD "self-organizes" local step flow on a length scale consistent with the substrate temperature and PLD parameters.

  11. Coronal Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Cranmer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations, and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are established in the extended corona. For example, the importance of kinetic plasma physics and turbulence in coronal holes has been affirmed by surprising measurements from the UVCS instrument on SOHO that heavy ions are heated to hundreds of times the temperatures of protons and electrons. These observations point to specific kinds of collisionless Alfvén wave damping (i.e., ion cyclotron resonance, but complete theoretical models do not yet exist. Despite our incomplete knowledge of the complex multi-scale plasma physics, however, much progress has been made toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms ultimately responsible for producing the observed properties of coronal holes.

  12. Nitrogen deposition reduces plant diversity and alters ecosystem functioning: field-scale evidence from a nationwide survey of UK heathlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina E Southon

    Full Text Available Findings from nitrogen (N manipulation studies have provided strong evidence of the detrimental impacts of elevated N deposition on the structure and functioning of heathland ecosystems. Few studies, however, have sought to establish whether experimentally observed responses are also apparent under natural, field conditions. This paper presents the findings of a nationwide field-scale evaluation of British heathlands, across broad geographical, climatic and pollution gradients. Fifty two heathlands were selected across an N deposition gradient of 5.9 to 32.4 kg ha(-1 yr(-1. The diversity and abundance of higher and lower plants and a suite of biogeochemical measures were evaluated in relation to climate and N deposition indices. Plant species richness declined with increasing temperature and N deposition, and the abundance of nitrophilous species increased with increasing N. Relationships were broadly similar between upland and lowland sites, with the biggest reductions in species number associated with increasing N inputs at the low end of the deposition range. Both oxidised and reduced forms of N were associated with species declines, although reduced N appears to be a stronger driver of species loss at the functional group level. Plant and soil biochemical indices were related to temperature, rainfall and N deposition. Litter C:N ratios and enzyme (phenol-oxidase and phosphomonoesterase activities had the strongest relationships with site N inputs and appear to represent reliable field indicators of N deposition. This study provides strong, field-scale evidence of links between N deposition--in both oxidised and reduced forms--and widespread changes in the composition, diversity and functioning of British heathlands. The similarity of relationships between upland and lowland environments, across broad spatial and climatic gradients, highlights the ubiquity of relationships with N, and suggests that N deposition is contributing to biodiversity

  13. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  14. ESO 243-49 HLX-1: scaling of X-ray spectral properties and black hole mass determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Seifina, Elena

    2016-11-01

    We report the results of Swift/XRT observations (2008-2015) of a hyper-luminous X-ray source, ESO 243-49 HLX-1. We demonstrate a strong observational evidence that ESO 243-49 HLX-1 undergoes spectral transitions from the low/hard state to the high/soft state during these observations. The spectra of ESO 243-49 HLX-1 are well fitted by the so-called bulk motion Comptonization model for all spectral states. We have established the photon index (Γ) saturation level, Γsat = 3.0 ± 0.1, in the Γ versus mass accretion rate (Ṁ) correlation. This Γ-Ṁ correlation allows us to estimate black hole (BH) mass in ESO 243-49 HLX-1 to be MBH 7 × 104 M⊙ assuming the distance to ESO 243-49 of 95 Mpc. For the BH mass estimate we use the scaling method taking Galactic BHs XTE J1550-564, H 1743-322 and 4U 1630-472, and an extragalactic BH source, M101 ULX-1 as reference sources. The Γ versus Ṁ correlation revealed in ESO 243-49 HLX-1 is similar to those in a number of Galactic and extragalactic BHs and it clearly shows the correlation along with the strong Γ saturation at ≈3. This is a robust observational evidence for the presence of a BH in ESO 243-49 HLX-1. We also find that the seed (disk) photon temperatures are quite low, of order of 50-140 eV which are consistent with high BH mass in ESO 243-49 HLX-1.

  15. Scaling relations between black holes and their host galaxies: comparing theoretical and observational measurements, and the impact of selection effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraf, C.; Di Matteo, T.; Treu, T.; Feng, Y.; Woo, J.-H.; Park, D.

    2015-11-01

    We use the high-resolution simulation MassiveBlackII to examine scaling relations between black hole (BH) mass and host galaxy properties (σ, total M* and LV), finding good agreement with recent observational data, especially at the high-mass end. We find Gaussian intrinsic scatter (˜half the observed scatter) about all three relations, except among the most massive objects. Below z ˜ 2 the slope of the relations remain roughly z-independent, and only steepen by 50 per cent by z ˜ 4. The normalization of the σ, LV relations evolve by 0.3, 0.43 dex, while the M* correlation does not evolve out to at least z ˜ 2. Testing for selection biases, we find MBH- or M*-selected samples have steeper slopes than random samples, suggesting a constant-mass selection function can exhibit faster evolution than a random sample. We find a potential bias among high-LBH subsamples due to their more massive hosts, but that bright (active) active galactic nuclei exhibit no intrinsic bias relative to fainter (inactive) BHs in equivalent-mass hosts. Finally, we show that BHs below the local relation tend to grow faster than their host (72 per cent of BHs >0.3 dex below the mean relation have an MBH-M* trajectory steeper than the local relation), while those above have shallower trajectories (only 14 per cent are steeper than local). Thus BHs tend to grow faster than their hosts until surpassing the local relation, when their growth is suppressed, bringing them back towards the mean relation.

  16. Black Hole Mass Determination In the X-Ray Binary 4U 1630-47: Scaling of Spectral and Variability Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive investigation on the evolution of spectral and timing properties of the Galactic black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its spectral transitions. In particular, we show how a scaling of the correlation of the photon index of the Comptonized spectral component gamma with low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), ?(sub L), and mass accretion rate, M, can be applied to the black hole mass and the inclination angle estimates.We analyze the transition episodes observed with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and BeppoSAX satellites.We find that the broadband X-ray energy spectra of 4U 1630-47 during all spectral states can be modeled by a combination of a thermal component, a Comptonized component, and a red-skewed iron-line component. We also establish that gamma monotonically increases during transition from the low-hard state to the high-soft state and then saturates for high mass accretion rates. The index saturation levels vary for different transition episodes. Correlations of gamma versus ?(sub L) also show saturation at gamma (is) approximately 3. Gamma -M and gamma -?(sub L) correlations with their index saturation revealed in 4U 1630-47 are similar to those established in a number of other black hole candidates and can be considered as an observational evidence for the presence of a black hole in these sources. The scaling technique, which relies on XTE J1550-564, GRO 1655-40, and H1743-322 as reference sources, allows us to evaluate a black hole mass in 4U 1630-47 yielding M(sub BH) (is) approximately 10 +/- 0.1 solar masses and to constrain the inclination angle of i (is) approximately less than 70 deg.

  17. Black hole mass determination in the X-ray binary 4U 1630-47: Scaling of spectral and variability characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifina, Elena [Moscow M. V. Lomonosov State University/Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Universitetsky Prospect 13, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Titarchuk, Lev [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Shaposhnikov, Nikolai, E-mail: seif@sai.msu.ru, E-mail: titarchuk@fe.infn.it, E-mail: lev@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov, E-mail: nikolai.v.shaposhnikov@nasa.gov [Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Code 663, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive investigation on the evolution of spectral and timing properties of the Galactic black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its spectral transitions. In particular, we show how a scaling of the correlation of the photon index of the Comptonized spectral component Γ with low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), ν {sub L}, and mass accretion rate, M-dot , can be applied to the black hole mass and the inclination angle estimates. We analyze the transition episodes observed with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and BeppoSAX satellites. We find that the broadband X-ray energy spectra of 4U 1630-47 during all spectral states can be modeled by a combination of a thermal component, a Comptonized component, and a red-skewed iron-line component. We also establish that Γ monotonically increases during transition from the low-hard state to the high-soft state and then saturates for high mass accretion rates. The index saturation levels vary for different transition episodes. Correlations of Γ versus ν {sub L} also show saturation at Γ ∼ 3. Γ-- M-dot and Γ-ν {sub L} correlations with their index saturation revealed in 4U 1630-47 are similar to those established in a number of other black hole candidates and can be considered as an observational evidence for the presence of a black hole in these sources. The scaling technique, which relies on XTE J1550-564, GRO 1655-40, and H1743-322 as reference sources, allows us to evaluate a black hole mass in 4U 1630-47 yielding M {sub BH} ∼ 10 ± 0.1 solar masses and to constrain the inclination angle of i ≲ 70°.

  18. Optimization Design of Medium-length Hole Blasting in Small-scale and Opencast Quarry%小型露天采石场中深孔爆破方案优化设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈星明; 肖正学; 谭诚; 尹轶东

    2012-01-01

    Achieve higher efficiency is a aim of mining enterprises on the basis of safety produce, choice of the blasting method is an important restraining factor about mining costs. The deficiencies of medium-length hole blasting in small-scale and opencast quarry of Mianyang area were analyzed and pointed out by detailed survey. The suitable method of medium-length hole blasting in small-scale and opencast quarry of Mianyang area were designed according to deposit condition of mine and production status. It achieved good results on safe production and economic efficiency by carrying out the design. The optimization design can promote and improve small Small-scale and opencast quarry safety in production and economy efficiency.%钻孔爆破方式的选择是采矿成本高低的一个重要制约因素:通过调研绵阳地区部分小型露天采石场使用的中深孔爆破的方案,分析并指出其在爆破质量、生产安全性能和效率方面存在的不足之处,根据矿体赋存条件和实际生产状况对该中深孔爆破方案进行了重新设计,并进行了矿山现场实践,在安全生产和经济效果方面取得了良好的效果.研究成果可用于小型采石场.

  19. Broad-scale distribution of epiphytic hair lichens correlates more with climate and nitrogen deposition than with forest structure

    OpenAIRE

    Esseen, Per-Anders; Ekström, Magnus; Westerlund, Bertil; Palmqvist, Kristin; Jonsson, Bengt Gunnar; Grafström, Anton; Ståhl, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Hair lichens are strongly influenced by forest structure at local scales, but their broad-scale distributions are less understood. We compared the occurrence and length of Alectoria sarmentosa (Ach.) Ach., Bryoria spp., and Usnea spp. in the lower canopy of > 5000 Picea abies (L.) Karst. trees within the National Forest Inventory across all productive forest in Sweden. We used logistic regression to analyse how climate, nitrogen deposition, and forest variables influence lichen occurrence....

  20. Accretion onto Black Holes from Large Scales Regulated by Radiative Feedback. III. Enhanced Luminosity of Intermediate Mass Black Holes Moving at Supersonic Speeds

    CERN Document Server

    Park, KwangHo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the third of a series, we study the growth rate and luminosity of black holes (BHs) in motion with respect to their surrounding medium by running a large set of 2D axis-symmetric radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Contrary to the case without radiation feedback, we find that the accretion rate increases with increasing BH velocity v reaching a maximum value at v = 2c_s ~ 50 km/s, where c_s is the sound speed inside the "cometary-shaped" HII region around the BH, before decreasing as v^{-3}. The increase of the accretion rate with v is produced by the formation of a D-type (density) ionization front (I-front) preceded by a standing bow-shock that reduces the downstream gas velocity to transonic values. Since the I-front is beyond the classical Bondi radius for the hot ionized gas, the accretion flow in the BH frame of reference is similar to the stationary case. Interestingly, there is a range of densities and velocities in which the dense shell downstream of the bow-shock is unstable; its cent...

  1. Ocean biogeochemistry exhibits contrasting responses to a large scale reduction in dust deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tagliabue

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dust deposition of iron is thought to be an important control on ocean biogeochemistry and air-sea CO2 exchange. In this study, we examine the impact of a large scale, yet climatically realistic, reduction in the aeolian Fe input during a 240 year transient simulation. In contrast to previous studies, we find that the ocean biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen are relatively insensitive to a 60% reduction in Fe input from dust. Net primary productivity (NPP is reduced in the Fe limited regions, but the excess macronutrients that result are able to fuel additional NPP elsewhere. Overall, NPP and air-sea CO2 exchange are only reduced by around 3% between 1860 and 2100. While the nitrogen cycle is perturbed more significantly (by ~15%, reduced N2 fixation is balanced by a concomitant decline in denitrification. Feedbacks between N2 fixation and denitrification are controlled by variability in surface utilization of inorganic nitrogen and subsurface oxygen consumption, as well as the direct influence of Fe on N2 fixation. Overall, there is relatively little impact of reduced aeolian Fe input (<4% on cumulative CO2 fluxes over 240 years. The lower sensitivity of our model to changes in dust input is primarily due to the more detailed representation of the continental shelf Fe, which was absent in previous models.

  2. ACCRETION ONTO BLACK HOLES FROM LARGE SCALES REGULATED BY RADIATIVE FEEDBACK. III. ENHANCED LUMINOSITY OF INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES MOVING AT SUPERSONIC SPEEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, KwangHo [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Ricotti, Massimo, E-mail: kpark@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: ricotti@astro.umd.edu [Joint Space-Science Institute (JSI), College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    In this third paper of a series, we study the growth and luminosity of black holes (BHs) in motion with respect to their surrounding medium. We run a large set of two-dimensional axis-symmetric simulations to explore a large parameter space of initial conditions and formulate an analytical model for the accretion. Contrary to the case without radiation feedback, the accretion rate increases with increasing BH velocity v{sub bh} reaching a maximum value at v{sub bh} = 2c{sub s,in} {approx} 50 km s{sup -1}, where c{sub s,in} is the sound speed inside the ''cometary-shaped'' H II region around the BH, before decreasing as v{sub bh}{sup -3} when the ionization front (I-front) becomes R-type (rarefied) and the accretion rate approaches the classical Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton solution. The increase of the accretion rate with v{sub bh} is produced by the formation of a D-type (dense) I-front preceded by a standing bow shock that reduces the downstream gas velocity to transonic values. There is a range of densities and velocities where the dense shell is unstable producing periodic accretion rate peaks which can significantly increase the detectability of intermediate-mass BHs. We find that the mean accretion rate for a moving BH is larger than that of a stationary BH of the same mass if the medium temperature is T{sub {infinity}} < 10{sup 4} K. This result could be important for the growth of seed BHs in the multi-phase medium of the first galaxies and for building an early X-ray background that may affect the formation of the first galaxies and the reionization process.

  3. Gas Well Bottom Hole Locations, LP and LNG, Utah Oil and Gas Well Bottom Hole Points for horizontallly drilled wells only. From the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Oil Gas and Mining Division., Published in 2000, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Gas Well Bottom Hole Locations, LP and LNG dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2000. It...

  4. Achieving Thin Films with Micro/Nano-Scale Controllable Morphology by Glancing Angle Deposition Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Shao-Ji; WANG Chao-Yi; TANG Ji-Jia; HU Lin-Xin

    2008-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate that thin films with micro/nanometre controllable morphology can be fabricated by the glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique which is a physical vapour deposition technique.In this technique, there are parameters which determine the morphology of the thin films: the incident angle, ratio of the deposition rate with respect to the substrate rotation rate, nature of the material being deposited, etc.We fabricate the morphology of column, pillar, helices, zigzag and study the parameters which determine morphology by given some examples of SEM.

  5. Dynamical evolution of massive black holes in galactic-scale N-body simulations - introducing the regularized tree code `rVINE'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Simon J.; Aarseth, Sverre J.; Naab, Thorsten; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Spurzem, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    We present a hybrid code combining the OpenMP-parallel tree code VINE with an algorithmic chain regularization scheme. The new code, called `rVINE', aims to significantly improve the accuracy of close encounters of massive bodies with supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in galaxy-scale numerical simulations. We demonstrate the capabilities of the code by studying two test problems, the sinking of a single massive black hole to the centre of a gas-free galaxy due to dynamical friction and the hardening of an SMBH binary due to close stellar encounters. We show that results obtained with rVINE compare well with NBODY7 for problems with particle numbers that can be simulated with NBODY7. In particular, in both NBODY7 and rVINE we find a clear N-dependence of the binary hardening rate, a low binary eccentricity and moderate eccentricity evolution, as well as the conversion of the galaxy's inner density profile from a cusp to a core via the ejection of stars at high velocity. The much larger number of particles that can be handled by rVINE will open up exciting opportunities to model stellar dynamics close to SMBHs much more accurately in a realistic galactic context. This will help to remedy the inherent limitations of commonly used tree solvers to follow the correct dynamical evolution of black holes in galaxy-scale simulations.

  6. Landscape-scale analysis of wetland sediment deposition from four tropical cyclone events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Tweel

    Full Text Available Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike deposited large quantities of sediment on coastal wetlands after making landfall in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We sampled sediments deposited on the wetland surface throughout the entire Louisiana and Texas depositional surfaces of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and the Louisiana portion of Hurricane Ike. We used spatial interpolation to model the total amount and spatial distribution of inorganic sediment deposition from each storm. The sediment deposition on coastal wetlands was an estimated 68, 48, and 21 million metric tons from Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Gustav, respectively. The spatial distribution decreased in a similar manner with distance from the coast for all hurricanes, but the relationship with distance from the storm track was more variable between events. The southeast-facing Breton Sound estuary had significant storm-derived sediment deposition west of the storm track, whereas sediment deposition along the south-facing coastline occurred primarily east of the storm track. Sediment organic content, bulk density, and grain size also decreased significantly with distance from the coast, but were also more variable with respect to distance from the track. On average, eighty percent of the mineral deposition occurred within 20 km from the coast, and 58% was within 50 km of the track. These results highlight an important link between tropical cyclone events and coastal wetland sedimentation, and are useful in identifying a more complete sediment budget for coastal wetland soils.

  7. Landscape-scale analysis of wetland sediment deposition from four tropical cyclone events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweel, Andrew W; Turner, R Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Ike deposited large quantities of sediment on coastal wetlands after making landfall in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We sampled sediments deposited on the wetland surface throughout the entire Louisiana and Texas depositional surfaces of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and the Louisiana portion of Hurricane Ike. We used spatial interpolation to model the total amount and spatial distribution of inorganic sediment deposition from each storm. The sediment deposition on coastal wetlands was an estimated 68, 48, and 21 million metric tons from Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Gustav, respectively. The spatial distribution decreased in a similar manner with distance from the coast for all hurricanes, but the relationship with distance from the storm track was more variable between events. The southeast-facing Breton Sound estuary had significant storm-derived sediment deposition west of the storm track, whereas sediment deposition along the south-facing coastline occurred primarily east of the storm track. Sediment organic content, bulk density, and grain size also decreased significantly with distance from the coast, but were also more variable with respect to distance from the track. On average, eighty percent of the mineral deposition occurred within 20 km from the coast, and 58% was within 50 km of the track. These results highlight an important link between tropical cyclone events and coastal wetland sedimentation, and are useful in identifying a more complete sediment budget for coastal wetland soils.

  8. Growth of Primordial Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tomohiro

    Primordial black holes have important observational implications through Hawking evaporation and gravitational radiation as well as being a candidate for cold dark matter. Those black holes are assumed to have formed in the early universe typically with the mass scale contained within the Hubble horizon at the formation epoch and subsequently accreted mass surrounding them. Numerical relativity simulation shows that primordial black holes of different masses do not accrete much, which contrasts with a simplistic Newtonian argument. We see that primordial black holes larger than the 'super-horizon' primordial black holes have decreasing energy and worm-hole like struture, suggesting the formation through quamtum processes.

  9. Stellar Velocity Dispersion Measurements in High-Luminosity Quasar Hosts and Implications for the AGN Black Hole Mass Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Grier, C J; Watson, L C; Peterson, B M; Bentz, M C; Dasyra, K M; Dietrich, M; Ferrarese, L; Pogge, R W; Zu, Y

    2013-01-01

    We present new stellar velocity dispersion measurements for four luminous quasars with the NIFS instrument and the ALTAIR laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Gemini North 8-m telescope. Stellar velocity dispersion measurements and measurements of the supermassive black hole masses in luminous quasars are necessary to investigate the coevolution of black holes and galaxies, trace the details of accretion, and probe the nature of feedback. We find that higher-luminosity quasars with higher-mass black holes are not offset with respect to the MBH-sigma relation exhibited by lower-luminosity AGNs with lower-mass black holes, nor do we see correlations with galaxy morphology. As part of this analysis, we have recalculated the virial products for the entire sample of reverberation-mapped AGNs and used these data to redetermine the mean virial factor hfi that places the reverberation data on the quiescent M_BH-sigma relation. With our updated measurements and new additions to the AGN sample, we obtain = 4...

  10. Transient jet formation and state transitions from large-scale magnetic reconnection in black hole accretion discs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dexter, J.; McKinney, J.C.; Markoff, S.; Tchekhovskoy, A.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetically arrested accretion discs (MADs), where the magnetic pressure in the inner disc is dynamically important, provide an alternative mechanism for regulating accretion to what is commonly assumed in black hole systems. We show that a global magnetic field inversion in the MAD state can destr

  11. Inkjet-based deposition of polymer thin films enabled by a lubrication model incorporating nano-scale parasitics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Shrawan; Meissl, Mario J.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    Thin film lubrication theory has been widely used to model multi-scale fluid phenomena. Variations of the same have also found application in fluid-based manufacturing process steps for micro- and nano-scale devices over large areas where a natural disparity in length scales exists. Here, a novel inkjet material deposition approach has been enabled by an enhanced thin film lubrication theory that accounts for nano-scale substrate parasitics. This approach includes fluid interactions with a thin flexible superstrate towards a new process called Jet and Coat of Thin-films (JCT). Numerical solutions of the model have been verified, and also validated against controlled experiments of polymer film deposition with good agreement. Understanding gleaned from the experimentally validated model has then been used to facilitate JCT process synthesis resulting in substantial reduction in the influence of parasitics and a concomitant improvement in the film thickness uniformity. Polymer films ranging from 20 to 500 nm mean thickness have been demonstrated with standard deviation of less than 2% of the mean film thickness. The JCT process offers advantages over spin coating which is not compatible with roll-to-roll processing and large area processing for displays. It also improves over techniques such as knife edge coating, slot die coating, as they are limited in the range of thicknesses of films that can be deposited without compromising uniformity.

  12. Watershed-scale changes in terrestrial nitrogen cycling during a period of decreased atmospheric nitrate and sulfur deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Robert D.; Scanga, Sara E.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Nelson, David M.; Eshleman, Keith N.; Zabala, Gabriel A.; Alinea, Alexandria A.; Schirmer, Charles D.

    2016-12-01

    Recent reports suggest that decreases in atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition throughout Europe and North America may have resulted in declining nitrate export in surface waters in recent decades, yet it is unknown if and how terrestrial N cycling was affected. During a period of decreased atmospheric N deposition, we assessed changes in forest N cycling by evaluating trends in tree-ring δ15N values (between 1980 and 2010; n = 20 trees per watershed), stream nitrate yields (between 2000 and 2011), and retention of atmospherically-deposited N (between 2000 and 2011) in the North and South Tributaries (North and South, respectively) of Buck Creek in the Adirondack Mountains, USA. We hypothesized that tree-ring δ15N values would decline following decreases in atmospheric N deposition (after approximately 1995), and that trends in stream nitrate export and retention of atmospherically deposited N would mirror changes in tree-ring δ15N values. Three of the six sampled tree species and the majority of individual trees showed declining linear trends in δ15N for the period 1980-2010; only two individual trees showed increasing trends in δ15N values. From 1980 to 2010, trees in the watersheds of both tributaries displayed long-term declines in tree-ring δ15N values at the watershed scale (R = -0.35 and p = 0.001 in the North and R = -0.37 and p <0.001 in the South). The decreasing δ15N trend in the North was associated with declining stream nitrate concentrations (-0.009 mg N L-1 yr-1, p = 0.02), but no change in the retention of atmospherically deposited N was observed. In contrast, nitrate yields in the South did not exhibit a trend, and the watershed became less retentive of atmospherically deposited N (-7.3% yr-1, p < 0.001). Our δ15N results indicate a change in terrestrial N availability in both watersheds prior to decreases in atmospheric N deposition, suggesting that decreased atmospheric N deposition was not the sole driver of tree-ring δ15N values at these

  13. Characterization of copper selenide thin film hole-injection layers deposited at room temperature for use with p-type organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Koizumi, Ikue; Kim, Ki-Beom; Yanagi, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Toshio; Hirano, Masahiro; Matsunami, Noriaki; Hosono, Hideo

    2008-12-01

    Copper selenide, CuxSe(x ˜2), was examined as a hole-injection layer for low-temperature organic devices. Crystalline CuxSe films grown at room temperature with atomically flat surfaces exhibited metallic conduction with a high electrical conductivity of 4.5×103 S/cm, a hole concentration of 1.4×1022 cm-3, and a mobility of 2.0 cm2/(V s). Analysis of the free carrier absorption using the Drude model estimated the effective mass of a hole as 1.0me. Photoemission spectroscopy measurements of the interfaces between CuxSe and organic hole transport layers, N ,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N ,N'-bis(phenyl) benzidine (NPB) and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), verified that the hole-injection barriers of these interfaces (0.4 eV for NPB and 0.3 eV for CuPc) are smaller than that of a conventional indium tin oxide (ITO) hole-injection electrode/NPB interface (0.6 eV) but are comparable to that of an ITO electrode/CuPc interface (0.3 eV). Hole-only devices using the CuxSe layer as a hole-injection anode exhibited very low threshold voltages (0.4-0.5 V) and nearly Ohmic characteristics. The NPB layer on the CuxSe layer was found to be highly doped at 1017-1019 cm-3, probably due to copper diffusion, while the CuPc layer is nearly intrinsic with a doping concentration lower than 1015 cm-3. These results indicated that a CuxSe film combined with CuPc is a promising candidate for a low-voltage hole-injection anode or a buffer layer in low-temperature devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and thin film transistors.

  14. Characterization of elemental and structural composition of corrosion scales and deposits formed in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ching-Yu; Korshin, Gregory V; Valentine, Richard L; Hill, Andrew S; Friedman, Melinda J; Reiber, Steve H

    2010-08-01

    Corrosion scales and deposits formed within drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) have the potential to retain inorganic contaminants. The objective of this study was to characterize the elemental and structural composition of extracted pipe solids and hydraulically-mobile deposits originating from representative DWDSs. Goethite (alpha-FeOOH), magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) and siderite (FeCO(3)) were the primary crystalline phases identified in most of the selected samples. Among the major constituent elements of the deposits, iron was most prevalent followed, in the order of decreasing prevalence, by sulfur, organic carbon, calcium, inorganic carbon, phosphorus, manganese, magnesium, aluminum and zinc. The cumulative occurrence profiles of iron, sulfur, calcium and phosphorus for pipe specimens and flushed solids were similar. Comparison of relative occurrences of these elements indicates that hydraulic disturbances may have relatively less impact on the release of manganese, aluminum and zinc, but more impact on the release of organic carbon, inorganic carbon, and magnesium.

  15. Regional-Scale Ozone Deposition to North-East Atlantic Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Coleman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A regional climate model is used to evaluate dry deposition of ozone over the North East Atlantic. Results are presented for a deposition scheme accounting for turbulent and chemical enhancement of oceanic ozone deposition and a second non-chemical, parameterised gaseous dry deposition scheme. The first deposition scheme was constrained to account for sea-surface ozone-iodide reactions and the sensitivity of modelled ozone concentrations to oceanic iodide concentration was investigated. Simulations were also performed using nominal reaction rate derived from in-situ ozone deposition measurements and using a preliminary representation of organic chemistry. Results show insensitivity of ambient ozone concentrations modelled by the chemical-enhanced scheme to oceanic iodide concentrations, and iodide reactions alone cannot account for observed deposition velocities. Consequently, we suggest a missing chemical sink due to reactions of ozone with organic matter at the air-sea interface. Ozone loss rates are estimated to be in the range of 0.5–6 ppb per day. A potentially significant ozone-driven flux of iodine to the atmosphere is estimated to be in the range of 2.5–500 M molec cm−2  s−1, leading to a mixing-layer enhancement of organo-iodine concentrations of 0.1–22.0 ppt, with an average increase in the N.E. Atlantic of around 4 ppt per day.

  16. Large clusters of gold deposits and large-scale metallogene-sis in the Jiaodong Peninsula, Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Jiaodong Peninsula is the largest repository of gold in China based on the production in history. It covers less than 0.2% of China's territory, but production of gold accounts for about one fourth of the whole country. Thus, the Jiaodong Peninsula is a typical area or case of large-scale metallogenesis and a large clusters of mineral deposits in China. It is characterized by the large clusters of gold deposits in large scale, high reserve and short mineralizing stage. In this study, we suggest that the eastern boundary of the large clusters of gold deposits is as same as that of North China Block, the gold deposits are hosted by Archean metamorphic rocks or Mesozoic granites, and the age of gold mineralization is 121.6 to 122.7 Ma. Gold and related ore-forming materials are derived from multisources, i.e. Archean metamorphic rocks, granites and intermediate-mafic dikes, especially, intermediate-mafic dikes and calc-alkaline granites. The metallogenic geodynamic process is constrained by the tectonic evolution of eastern North China Block during Late Mesozoic, and it is the result of the interaction between mantle and crust as the boundary plates are playing role on the block.

  17. Modern muddy deposit along the Zhejiang coast in the East China Sea: Response to large-scale human projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Liu, Jian; Liu, Shengfa; Wang, Zhongbo; Hu, Gang; Kong, Xianghuai

    2016-11-01

    Grain size and clay minerals in the surface sediment off Zhejiang Province, China, of the East China Sea were analyzed to study changes in grain size, muddy deposit boundary, and major riverine and other derived matters transport paths in the Zhejiang coastal muddy deposit since the impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam and after other large-scale human projects. The results show that the sediment types are mainly silt and mud in the muddy deposit, divided based on the 10% isoline of the sand-sized component. The sources of sediment in the muddy deposit are mainly the Yangtze River and simultaneously supplies from the Qiantang Jiang, Ou Jiang, relict fine-grain matter, and hydrolyzed volcanic rocks around the Zhoushan Islands. The transport and dispersal of sediments in the study area are largely controlled by the Zhejiang-Fujian coastal current and the Taiwan Warm Current and appear seasonally. The contributions from the Ou Jiang, relict matter, local hydrolyzed matter, and the Qiantang Jiang are enlarged owing to the decline of Yangtze suspended matter and the constructions of major human projects in the Hangzhou Bay, respectively. In addition, the sediment grain size exhibits a fining trend because of the influence of the Three Gorges Dam. The boundary of the muddy deposit is relatively stable after the Three Gorges Dam impoundment north of the city of Zhoushan. In contrast, south of the city of Zhoushan the boundary of the muddy deposit lies toward the east because the sediment supply from the relict fine-grained matters resuspended by the Taiwan Warm Current east of the study area. The changes in the grain size and contributions from smaller rivers and other derived matter as well as the boundary of the muddy deposit there will probably become more pronounced in the future.

  18. Patterns of floodplain sediment deposition along the regulated lower Roanoke River, North Carolina: annual, decadal, centennial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, Cliff R.; Schenk, Edward R.; Kroes, Daniel; Willard, Debra A.; Townsend, Phil A.; Peet, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    The lower Roanoke River on the Coastal Plain of North Carolina is not embayed and maintains a floodplain that is among the largest on the mid-Atlantic Coast. This floodplain has been impacted by substantial aggradation in response to upstream colonial and post-colonial agriculture between the mid-eighteenth and mid-nineteenth centuries. Additionally, since the mid-twentieth century stream flow has been regulated by a series of high dams. We used artificial markers (clay pads), tree-ring (dendrogeomorphic) techniques, and pollen analyses to document sedimentation rates/amounts over short-, intermediate-, and long-term temporal scales, respectively. These analyses occurred along 58 transects at 378 stations throughout the lower river floodplain from near the Fall Line to the Albemarle Sound. Present sediment deposition rates ranged from 0.5 to 3.4 mm/y and 0.3 to 5.9 mm/y from clay pad and dendrogeomorphic analyses, respectively. Deposition rates systematically increased from upstream (high banks and floodplain) to downstream (low banks) reaches, except the lowest reaches. Conversely, legacy sediment deposition (A.D. 1725 to 1850) ranged from 5 to about 40 mm/y, downstream to upstream, respectively, and is apparently responsible for high banks upstream and large/wide levees along some of the middle stream reaches. Dam operations have selectively reduced levee deposition while facilitating continued backswamp deposition. A GIS-based model predicts 453,000 Mg of sediment is trapped annually on the floodplain and that little watershed-derived sediment reaches the Albemarle Sound. Nearly all sediment in transport and deposited is derived from the channel bed and banks. Legacy deposits (sources) and regulated discharges affect most aspects of present fluvial sedimentation dynamics. The lower river reflects complex relaxation conditions following both major human alterations, yet continues to provide the ecosystem service of sediment trapping.

  19. Sedimentology of new fluvial deposits on the Elwha River, Washington, USA, formed during large-scale dam removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy; Ritchie, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Removal of two dams 32 m and 64 m high on the Elwha River, Washington, USA, provided the first opportunity to examine river response to a dam removal and controlled sediment influx on such a large scale. Although many recent river-restoration efforts have included dam removal, large dam removals have been rare enough that their physical and ecological effects remain poorly understood. New sedimentary deposits that formed during this multi-stage dam removal result from a unique, artificially created imbalance between fluvial sediment supply and transport capacity. River flows during dam removal were essentially natural and included no large floods in the first two years, while draining of the two reservoirs greatly increased the sediment supply available for fluvial transport. The resulting sedimentary deposits exhibited substantial spatial heterogeneity in thickness, stratal-formation patterns, grain size and organic content. Initial mud deposition in the first year of dam removal filled pore spaces in the pre-dam-removal cobble bed, potentially causing ecological disturbance but not aggrading the bed substantially at first. During the second winter of dam removal, thicker and in some cases coarser deposits replaced the early mud deposits. By 18 months into dam removal, channel-margin and floodplain deposits were commonly >0.5 m thick and, contrary to pre-dam-removal predictions that silt and clay would bypass the river system, included average mud content around 20%. Large wood and lenses of smaller organic particles were common in the new deposits, presumably contributing additional carbon and nutrients to the ecosystem downstream of the dam sites. Understanding initial sedimentary response to the Elwha River dam removals will inform subsequent analyses of longer-term sedimentary, geomorphic and ecosystem changes in this fluvial and coastal system, and will provide important lessons for other river-restoration efforts where large dam removal is planned or

  20. Dynamical evolution of massive black holes in galactic-scale N-body simulations - introducing the regularized tree code "rVINE"

    CERN Document Server

    Karl, S J; Naab, T; Haehnelt, M G; Spurzem, R

    2015-01-01

    We present a hybrid code combining the OpenMP-parallel tree code VINE with an algorithmic chain regularization scheme. The new code, called "rVINE", aims to significantly improve the accuracy of close encounters of massive bodies with supermassive black holes in galaxy-scale numerical simulations. We demonstrate the capabilities of the code by studying two test problems, the sinking of a single massive black hole to the centre of a gas-free galaxy due to dynamical friction and the hardening of a supermassive black hole binary due to close stellar encounters. We show that results obtained with rVINE compare well with NBODY7 for problems with particle numbers that can be simulated with NBODY7. In particular, in both NBODY7 and rVINE we find a clear N-dependence of the binary hardening rate, a low binary eccentricity and moderate eccentricity evolution, as well as the conversion of the galaxy's inner density profile from a cusp to a a core via the ejection of stars at high velocity. The much larger number of par...

  1. High Tc superconductors: The scaling of Tc with the number of bound holes associated with charge transfer neutralizing the multivalence cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, G. C.; Chen, M. F.; Craver, F.

    1991-01-01

    It is observed that for the known high-T(sub c) Cu-, Tl-, and Bi-based superconductors, T(sub c) scales consistently with the number of bound holes per unit cell which arise from charge transfer excitations of frequency approximately = 3 x 10(exp 13) that neutralized the multivalence cations into diamagnetic states. The resulting holes are established on the oxygens. Extrapolation of this empirical fit in the up-temperature direction suggests a T(sub c) of about 220-230 K at a value of 25 holes/unit cell (approximately the maximum that can be materials-engineered into a high-T(sub c) K2MnF4 or triple Perovskite structure). In the down-temperature direction, the extrapolation gives a T(sub c) in the vicinity of 235 K for the Y-Ba-Cu-O system as well as the known maximum temperature of 23 K for low-T(sub c) materials shown by Nb3Ge. The approach is also consistent with the experimental findings that only multivalence ions which are diamagnetic in their atomic state (Cu, Tl, Bi, Pb, and Sb) associate with high-T(sub c) compounds.

  2. Regional scale gradients of climate and nitrogen deposition drive variation in ectomycorrhizal fungal communities associated with native Scots pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, S; Woodward, S; Alexander, I J; Taylor, A F S

    2013-06-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi commonly associate with the roots of forest trees where they enhance nutrient and water uptake, promote seedling establishment and have an important role in forest nutrient cycling. Predicting the response of ectomycorrhizal fungi to environmental change is an important step to maintaining forest productivity in the future. These predictions are currently limited by an incomplete understanding of the relative significance of environmental drivers in determining the community composition of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi at large spatial scales. To identify patterns of community composition in ECM fungi along regional scale gradients of climate and nitrogen deposition in Scotland, fungal communities were analysed from 15 seminatural Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests. Fungal taxa were identified by sequencing of the ITS rDNA region using fungal-specific primers. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling was used to assess the significance of 16 climatic, pollutant and edaphic variables on community composition. Vector fitting showed that there was a strong influence of rainfall and soil moisture on community composition at the species level, and a smaller impact of temperature on the abundance of ectomycorrhizal exploration types. Nitrogen deposition was also found to be important in determining community composition, but only when the forest experiencing the highest deposition (9.8 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) was included in the analysis. This finding supports previously published critical load estimates for ectomycorrhizal fungi of 5-10 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) . This work demonstrates that both climate and nitrogen deposition can drive gradients of fungal community composition at a regional scale.

  3. An observational search for large-scale organization of five-minute oscillations on the sun. [coronal holes or sector structure relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmer, P. H.; Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The large-scale solar velocity field has been measured over an aperture of radius 0.8 solar radii on 121 days between April and September, 1976. Measurements are made in the line Fe I 5123.730 A, employing a velocity subtraction technique similar to that of Severny et al. (1976). Comparisons of the amplitude and frequency of the five-minute resonant oscillation with the geomagnetic C9 index and magnetic sector boundaries show no evidence of any relationship between the oscillations and coronal holes or sector structure.

  4. Transient jet formation and state transitions from large-scale magnetic reconnection in black hole accretion discs

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, Jason; Markoff, Sera; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Magnetically arrested accretion discs (MADs), where the magnetic pressure in the inner disc is dynamically important, provide an alternative mechanism for regulating accretion to what is commonly assumed in black hole systems. We show that a global magnetic field inversion in the MAD state can destroy the jet, significantly increase the accretion rate, and move the effective inner disc edge in to the marginally stable orbit. Reconnection of the MAD field in the inner radii launches a new type of transient outflow containing hot plasma generated by magnetic dissipation. This transient outflow can be as powerful as the steady magnetically-dominated Blandford-Znajek jet in the MAD state. The field inversion qualitatively describes many of the observational features associated with the high luminosity hard to soft state transition in black hole X-ray binaries: the jet line, the transient ballistic jet, and the drop in rms variability. These results demonstrate that the magnetic field configuration can influence t...

  5. Episodic speleothem deposition tracks the terrestrial impact of millennial-scale last glacial climate variability in SW Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankhauser, Adelheid; McDermott, Frank; Fleitmann, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    Eighty four new U-Th ages are presented for twenty randomly selected broken, displaced and reworked calcite speleothems retrieved from clastic sedimentary fill and from isolated bedding-plane shelves in Crag cave (SW Ireland). The dated pre-Holocene samples span much of the last glacial, ranging in age from 85.15 ± 0.60 to 23.45 ± 0.17 ka. Speleothem deposition requires the presence of liquid water, and because Crag cave is a shallow system, deposition is considered likely only when mean annual air temperatures (MAAT) exceed the freezing point of water. Deposition at this mid-latitude ocean-marginal site occurred episodically during MIS5a through to MIS2, synchronously within dating uncertainties, with the timing of Greenland Interstadials (GI). In the latter part of Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3), deposition was particularly intense, consistent with regional scale climate amelioration inferred previously from radiocarbon ages for sparse MIS3 organic and freshwater surficial deposits in N. Ireland. A brief episode of speleothem deposition at c.23.40 ± 0.22 ka coincides with GI-2, demonstrating the sensitivity of the site to brief climate amelioration episodes in Greenland during MIS2. Conditions favourable for speleothem deposition occurred periodically during the last glacial, indicating temperature changes of at least 10 °C between stadials and interstadials at this mid-latitude site. Deposition ceased during Greenland Stadials (GS), including during periods of ice-rafting in the adjacent N. Atlantic Ocean (Heinrich events). Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of the last glacial speleothems are generally elevated, reflecting non-equilibrium isotope fractionation effects. However, establishment of low δ13C values often occurred within a few decades of climate amelioration, indicating that biogenic CO2 production resumed rapidly at this site, particularly during MIS3. Speleothem δ18O variability was driven largely by long-term changes in the δ18O value of the

  6. Selective isolation of the electron or hole in photocatalysis: ZnO-TiO2 and TiO2-ZnO core-shell structured heterojunction nanofibers via electrospinning and atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaci, Fatma; Vempati, Sesha; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi; Uyar, Tamer

    2014-05-01

    Heterojunctions are a well-studied material combination in photocatalysis studies, the majority of which aim to improve the efficacy of the catalysts. Developing novel catalysts begs the question of which photo-generated charge carrier is more efficient in the process of catalysis and the associated mechanism. To address this issue we have fabricated core-shell heterojunction (CSHJ) nanofibers from ZnO and TiO2 in two combinations where only the `shell' part of the heterojunction is exposed to the environment to participate in the photocatalysis. Core and shell structures were fabricated via electrospinning and atomic layer deposition, respectively which were then subjected to calcination. These CSHJs were characterized and studied for photocatalytic activity (PCA). These two combinations expose electrons or holes selectively to the environment. Under suitable illumination of the ZnO-TiO2 CSHJ, e/h pairs are created mainly in TiO2 and the electrons take part in catalysis (i.e. reduce the organic dye) at the conduction band or oxygen vacancy sites of the `shell', while holes migrate to the core of the structure. Conversely, holes take part in catalysis and electrons diffuse to the core in the case of a TiO2-ZnO CSHJ. The results further revealed that the TiO2-ZnO CSHJ shows ~1.6 times faster PCA when compared to the ZnO-TiO2 CSHJ because of efficient hole capture by oxygen vacancies, and the lower mobility of holes.Heterojunctions are a well-studied material combination in photocatalysis studies, the majority of which aim to improve the efficacy of the catalysts. Developing novel catalysts begs the question of which photo-generated charge carrier is more efficient in the process of catalysis and the associated mechanism. To address this issue we have fabricated core-shell heterojunction (CSHJ) nanofibers from ZnO and TiO2 in two combinations where only the `shell' part of the heterojunction is exposed to the environment to participate in the photocatalysis. Core and

  7. Selective isolation of the electron or hole in photocatalysis: ZnO-TiO2 and TiO2-ZnO core-shell structured heterojunction nanofibers via electrospinning and atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaci, Fatma; Vempati, Sesha; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi; Uyar, Tamer

    2014-06-07

    Heterojunctions are a well-studied material combination in photocatalysis studies, the majority of which aim to improve the efficacy of the catalysts. Developing novel catalysts begs the question of which photo-generated charge carrier is more efficient in the process of catalysis and the associated mechanism. To address this issue we have fabricated core-shell heterojunction (CSHJ) nanofibers from ZnO and TiO2 in two combinations where only the 'shell' part of the heterojunction is exposed to the environment to participate in the photocatalysis. Core and shell structures were fabricated via electrospinning and atomic layer deposition, respectively which were then subjected to calcination. These CSHJs were characterized and studied for photocatalytic activity (PCA). These two combinations expose electrons or holes selectively to the environment. Under suitable illumination of the ZnO-TiO2 CSHJ, e/h pairs are created mainly in TiO2 and the electrons take part in catalysis (i.e. reduce the organic dye) at the conduction band or oxygen vacancy sites of the 'shell', while holes migrate to the core of the structure. Conversely, holes take part in catalysis and electrons diffuse to the core in the case of a TiO2-ZnO CSHJ. The results further revealed that the TiO2-ZnO CSHJ shows ∼1.6 times faster PCA when compared to the ZnO-TiO2 CSHJ because of efficient hole capture by oxygen vacancies, and the lower mobility of holes.

  8. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2007 and March 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2008-12-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The experiment has been designed to simulate a disposal tunnel in a real deep repository environment for storage of high-level radioactive waste. The test consists of a 90 m long, 5 m diameter subhorizontal tunnel excavated in dioritic granite. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing.

  9. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2007 and March 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2008-12-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The experiment has been designed to simulate a disposal tunnel in a real deep repository environment for storage of high-level radioactive waste. The test consists of a 90 m long, 5 m diameter subhorizontal tunnel excavated in dioritic granite. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing.

  10. Investigation of Spiral and Sweeping Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Douglas; Poinsatte, Philip; Ameri, Ali; Culley, Dennis; Raghu, Surya; Shyam, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Surface infrared thermography, hotwire anemometry, and thermocouple surveys were performed on two new film cooling hole geometries: spiral/rifled holes and fluidic sweeping holes. The spiral holes attempt to induce large-scale vorticity to the film cooling jet as it exits the hole to prevent the formation of the kidney shaped vortices commonly associated with film cooling jets. The fluidic sweeping hole uses a passive in-hole geometry to induce jet sweeping at frequencies that scale with blowing ratios. The spiral hole performance is compared to that of round holes with and without compound angles. The fluidic hole is of the diffusion class of holes and is therefore compared to a 777 hole and Square holes. A patent-pending spiral hole design showed the highest potential of the non-diffusion type hole configurations. Velocity contours and flow temperature were acquired at discreet cross-sections of the downstream flow field. The passive fluidic sweeping hole shows the most uniform cooling distribution but suffers from low span-averaged effectiveness levels due to enhanced mixing. The data was taken at a Reynolds number of 11,000 based on hole diameter and freestream velocity. Infrared thermography was taken for blowing rations of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 at a density ration of 1.05. The flow inside the fluidic sweeping hole was studied using 3D unsteady RANS.

  11. Relation between forest vegetation, atmospheric deposition and site conditions at regional and European scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobben, van H.F.; Vries, de W.

    2010-01-01

    Several monitoring programs have been set up to assess effects of atmospheric deposition on forest ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to evaluate effects on the understorey vegetation, based on the first round of a regional (the Netherlands) and a European forest monitoring program. A mult

  12. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  13. Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    1992-09-01

    Foreword to the French edition; Foreword to the English edition; Acknowledgements; Part I. Gravitation and Light: 1. First fruits; 2. Relativity; 3. Curved space-time; Part II. Exquisite Corpses: 4. Chronicle of the twilight years; 5. Ashes and diamonds; 6. Supernovae; 7. Pulsars; 8. Gravitation triumphant; Part III. Light Assassinated: 9. The far horizon; 10. Illuminations; 11. A descent into the maelstrom; 12. Map games; 13. The black hole machine; 14. The quantum black hole; Part IV. Light Regained: 15. Primordial black holes; 16. The zoo of X-ray stars; 17. Giant black holes; 18. Gravitational light; 19. The black hole Universe; Appendices; Bibliography; Name index; Subject index.

  14. Black Hole Critical Phenomena Without Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Liebling, S L

    2000-01-01

    Studying the threshold of black hole formation via numerical evolution has led to the discovery of fascinating nonlinear phenomena. Power-law mass scaling, aspects of universality, and self-similarity have now been found for a large variety of models. However, questions remain. Here I briefly review critical phenomena, discuss some recent results, and describe a model which demonstrates similar phenomena without gravity.

  15. Helical superconducting black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  16. Large-scale fluid-deposited mineralization in Margaritifer Terra, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rebecca J.; Potter-McIntyre, Sally L.; Hynek, Brian M.

    2017-07-01

    Mineral deposits precipitated from subsurface-sourced fluids are a key astrobiological detection target on Mars, due to the long-term viability of the subsurface as a habitat for life and the ability of precipitated minerals to preserve biosignatures. We report morphological and stratigraphic evidence for ridges along fractures in impact crater floors in Margaritifer Terra. Parallels with terrestrial analog environments and the regional context indicate that two observed ridge types are best explained by groundwater-emplaced cementation in the shallow subsurface and higher-temperature hydrothermal deposition at the surface, respectively. Both mechanisms have considerable astrobiological significance. Finally, we propose that morphologically similar ridges previously documented at the Mars 2020 landing site in NE Syrtis Major may have formed by similar mechanisms.

  17. Study of Straggling and Extreme Cases of Energy Deposition in Micron Scale Silicon Volumes using the DEPFET Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wilk, Fabian; Schwenker, Benjamin

    The Depleted P-channel Field-Effect Transistor detector is a pixel detector type currently under development. In high energy physics, pixel detectors measure space points along the trajectory of charged particles. They determine the spatial position by measuring the charges created as a result of interactions with the passing particle. Thus the detector’s signals can be used to determine the energy deposited by the particle in single pixels of a pixel matrix. The development of a new detector raises the question whether our simulation models can accurately describe the physical processes – like ionisation and scattering – taking place during operation. The thesis aims to validate one of the current Monte-Carlo simulations (based on the Geant4 simulation package) of high energy straggling processes using experimental data of a test beam run of DEPFET modules. This is done by calculating the spatial distribution of the electron/hole pairs created in extreme cases of ionisation and using this distribution ...

  18. X-shaped radio galaxies as observational evidence for the interaction of supermassive binary black holes and accretion disk at pc scale

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, F K

    2004-01-01

    A supermassive black hole binary may form during galaxy mergering. we investigate the interaction of the supermassive binary black holes (SMBBHs) and an accretion disk and show that the detected X-shaped structure in some FRII radio galaxies may be due to the interaction-realignment of inclined binary and accretion disk occurred within the pc scale of the galaxy center. We compare in detail the model and observations and show that the configuration is consistent very well with the observations of X-shaped radio sources. X-shaped radio feature form only in FRII radio sources due to the strong interaction between the binary and a standard disk, while the absence of X-shaped FRI radio galaxies is due to that the interaction between the binary and the radiatively inefficient accretion flow in FRI radio sources is negligible. It is suggested that the binary would keep misaligned with the outer disk for most of the life time of FRII radio galaxies and the orientation of jet in most FRII radio galaxies distributes r...

  19. Low-Temperature Soft-Cover Deposition of Uniform Large-Scale Perovskite Films for High-Performance Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Tang, Wentao; Xie, Fengxian; Yin, Maoshu; He, Jinjin; Wang, Yanbo; Chen, Han; Qiang, Yinghuai; Yang, Xudong; Han, Liyuan

    2017-07-14

    Large-scale high-quality perovskite thin films are crucial to produce high-performance perovskite solar cells. However, for perovskite films fabricated by solvent-rich processes, film uniformity can be prevented by convection during thermal evaporation of the solvent. Here, a scalable low-temperature soft-cover deposition (LT-SCD) method is presented, where the thermal convection-induced defects in perovskite films are eliminated through a strategy of surface tension relaxation. Compact, homogeneous, and convection-induced-defects-free perovskite films are obtained on an area of 12 cm(2) , which enables a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.5% on a solar cell with an area of 5 cm(2) . This is the highest efficiency at this large cell area. A PCE of 15.3% is also obtained on a flexible perovskite solar cell deposited on the polyethylene terephthalate substrate owing to the advantage of presented low-temperature processing. Hence, the present LT-SCD technology provides a new non-spin-coating route to the deposition of large-area uniform perovskite films for both rigid and flexible perovskite devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Impact of coal fly ash addition on ash transformation and deposition in a full-scale wood suspension-firing boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Bashir, Muhammad Shafique; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2013-01-01

    Ash transformation and deposition during pulverized wood combustion in a full-scale power plant boiler of 800 MWth were studied with and without the addition of coal fly ash. The transient ash deposition behavior was characterized by using an advanced deposit probe system at two boiler locations...... constant after a few hours. The formed deposits, especially those at the location with low flue gas temperatures, contained a considerable amount of K2SO4, KCl, and KOH/K2CO3. With the addition of a large amount (about 4 times of the mass flow of wood ash) of coal fly ash to the boiler, these alkali...

  1. Mechanistic Model for Ash Deposit Formation in Biomass Suspension-Fired Boilers. Part 2: Model Verification by Use of Full Scale Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    describes particle sticking or rebound by a combination of the description of (visco)elsatic particles impacting a solid surface and particle capture by a viscous surface. The model is used to predict deposit formation rates measured during tests conducted with probes in full-scale suspension-fired biomass...... of some physical parameters related to the description of surface capture are suggested. Based on these examinations of the model ability to describe observed deposit formation rates, the proposed model can be regarded as a promising tool for description of deposit formation in full-scale biomass......A model for deposit formation in suspension firing of biomass has been developed. The model describes deposit build-up by diffusion and subsequent condensation of vapors, thermoforesis of aerosols, convective diffusion of small particles, impaction of large particles and reaction. The model...

  2. Size variation and collapse of emphysema holes at inspiration and expiration CT scan: evaluation with modified length scale method and image co-registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh SY

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sang Young Oh,1,* Minho Lee,1,* Joon Beom Seo,1,* Namkug Kim,1,2,* Sang Min Lee,1 Jae Seung Lee,3 Yeon Mok Oh3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Convergence Medicine, 3Department of Pulmonology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A novel approach of size-based emphysema clustering has been developed, and the size variation and collapse of holes in emphysema clusters are evaluated at inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT. Thirty patients were visually evaluated for the size-based emphysema clustering technique and a total of 72 patients were evaluated for analyzing collapse of the emphysema hole in this study. A new approach for the size differentiation of emphysema holes was developed using the length scale, Gaussian low-pass filtering, and iteration approach. Then, the volumetric CT results of the emphysema patients were analyzed using the new method, and deformable registration was carried out between inspiratory and expiratory CT. Blind visual evaluations of EI by two readers had significant correlations with the classification using the size-based emphysema clustering method (r-values of reader 1: 0.186, 0.890, 0.915, and 0.941; reader 2: 0.540, 0.667, 0.919, and 0.942. The results of collapse of emphysema holes using deformable registration were compared with the pulmonary function test (PFT parameters using the Pearson’s correlation test. The mean extents of low-attenuation area (LAA, E1 (<1.5 mm, E2 (<7 mm, E3 (<15 mm, and E4 (≥15 mm were 25.9%, 3.0%, 11.4%, 7.6%, and 3.9%, respectively, at the inspiratory CT, and 15.3%, 1.4%, 6.9%, 4.3%, and 2.6%, respectively at the expiratory CT. The extents of LAA, E2, E3, and E4 were found to be significantly correlated with the PFT ­parameters (r=−0.53, −0.43, −0.48, and −0.25, with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1; −0.81, −0.62, −0.75, and

  3. STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY QUASAR HOSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE AGN BLACK HOLE MASS SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grier, C. J.; Martini, P.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Zu, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Watson, L. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bentz, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Dasyra, K. M. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA (CNRS:UMR8112), 61 Avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014, Paris (France); Dietrich, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45601 (United States); Ferrarese, L. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria BV V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2013-08-20

    We present new stellar velocity dispersion measurements for four luminous quasars with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer instrument and the ALTAIR laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Gemini North 8 m telescope. Stellar velocity dispersion measurements and measurements of the supermassive black hole (BH) masses in luminous quasars are necessary to investigate the coevolution of BHs and galaxies, trace the details of accretion, and probe the nature of feedback. We find that higher-luminosity quasars with higher-mass BHs are not offset with respect to the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation exhibited by lower-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with lower-mass BHs, nor do we see correlations with galaxy morphology. As part of this analysis, we have recalculated the virial products for the entire sample of reverberation-mapped AGNs and used these data to redetermine the mean virial factor (f) that places the reverberation data on the quiescent M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation. With our updated measurements and new additions to the AGN sample, we obtain (f) = 4.31 {+-} 1.05, which is slightly lower than, but consistent with, most previous determinations.

  4. Aquifer composition and the tendency toward scale-deposit formation during reverse osmosis desalination - Examples from saline ground water in New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, G.F.

    2006-01-01

    Desalination is expected to make a substantial contribution to water supply in the United States by 2020. Currently, reverse osmosis is one of the most cost effective and widely used desalination technologies. The tendency to form scale deposits during reverse osmosis is an important factor in determining the suitability of input waters for use in desalination. The tendency toward scale formation of samples of saline ground water from selected geologic units in New Mexico was assessed using simulated evaporation. All saline water samples showed a strong tendency to form CaCO3 scale deposits. Saline ground water samples from the Yeso Formation and the San Andres Limestone showed relatively stronger tendencies to form CaSO4 2H2O scale deposits and relatively weaker tendencies to form SiO2(a) scale deposits than saline ground water samples from the Rio Grande alluvium. Tendencies toward scale formation in saline ground water samples from the Dockum Group were highly variable. The tendencies toward scale formation of saline waters from the Yeso Formation, San Andres Limestone, and Rio Grande alluvium appear to correlate with the mineralogical composition of the geologic units, suggesting that scale-forming tendencies are governed by aquifer composition and water-rock interaction. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Growth of centimeter-scale atomically thin MoS2 films by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene Siegel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting the growth of single layer and few-layer MoS2 films on single crystal sapphire substrates using a pulsed-laser deposition technique. A pulsed KrF excimer laser (wavelength: 248 nm; pulse width: 25 ns was used to ablate a polycrystalline MoS2 target. The material thus ablated was deposited on a single crystal sapphire (0001 substrate kept at 700 °C in an ambient vacuum of 10−6 Torr. Detailed characterization of the films was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM, Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL measurements. The ablation of the MoS2 target by 50 laser pulses (energy density: 1.5 J/cm2 was found to result in the formation of a monolayer of MoS2 as shown by AFM results. In the Raman spectrum, A1g and E12g peaks were observed at 404.6 cm−1 and 384.5 cm−1 with a spacing of 20.1 cm−1, confirming the monolayer thickness of the film. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum exhibited two exciton absorption bands at 672 nm (1.85 eV and 615 nm (2.02 eV, with an energy split of 0.17 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.15 eV. The monolayer MoS2 exhibited a PL peak at 1.85 eV confirming the direct nature of the band-gap. By varying the number of laser pulses, bi-layer, tri-layer, and few-layer MoS2 films were prepared. It was found that as the number of monolayers (n in the MoS2 films increases, the spacing between the A1g and E12g Raman peaks (Δf increases following an empirical relation, Δ f = 26 . 45 − 15 . 42 1 + 1 . 44 n 0 . 9 cm − 1 .

  6. Explaining the reportedly over-massive black holes in early-type galaxies with intermediate-scale discs

    CERN Document Server

    Savorgnan, Giulia A D

    2015-01-01

    The classification "early-type" galaxy includes both elliptically- and lenticular-shaped galaxies. Theoretically, the spheroid-to-disc flux ratio of an early-type galaxy can assume any positive value, but in practice studies often consider only spheroid/disc decompositions in which the disc neatly dominates over the spheroid at large galaxy radii, creating an inner "bulge" as observed in most spiral galaxies. Here we show that decompositions in which the disc remains embedded within the spheroid, labelled by some as "unphysical", correctly reproduce both the photometric and kinematic properties of early-type galaxies with intermediate-scale discs. Intermediate-scale discs have often been confused with large-scale discs and incorrectly modelled as such; when this happens, the spheroid luminosity is considerably underestimated. This has recently led to some surprising conclusions, such as the claim that a number of galaxies with intermediate-scale discs (Mrk 1216, NGC 1277, NGC 1271, and NGC 1332) host a centra...

  7. Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Coatings for Large Scale Radio Frequency Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namhoon; Withanage, Wenura; Tan, Teng; Wolak, Matthaeus; Xi, Xiaoxing

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered to be a great candidate for next generation superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities due to its higher critical temperature Tc (40 K) and increased thermodynamic critical field Hc compared to other conventional superconductors. These properties significantly reduce the BCS surface resistance (RsBCS)and residual resistance (Rres) according to theoretical studies and suggest the possibility of an enhanced accelerating field (Eacc) . We have investigated the possibility of coating the inner surface of a 3 GHz SRF cavity with MgB2 by using a hybrid physical-vapor deposition (HPCVD) system which was modified for this purpose. To simulate a real 3 GHz SRF cavity, a stainless steel mock cavity has been employed for the study. The film quality was characterized on small substrates that were placed at selected locations within the cavity. MgB2 films on stainless steel foils, niobium pieces and SiC substrates showed transition temperatures of above 36 K. Dielectric resonance measurements resulted in promising Q values as obtained for the MgB2 films grown on the various substrates. By employing the HPCVD technique, a uniform film was achieved across the cavity interior, demonstrating the feasibility of HPCVD for MgB2 coatings for SRF cavities.

  8. Multi-Length Scale Tribology of Electrophoretically Deposited Nickel-Diamond Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Shikha; Goel, Sneha; Pandey, Chandra Prabha; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-02-01

    Electrophoretically deposited (EPD) nickel and its composite coatings are widely used to enhance the life span of continuous ingot casting molds in the steel, aerospace and automotive industries. This article reports the effect of different concentrations of diamond particles (2.5-10 g/L) on the wear mechanism of EPD Ni. The distribution of diamond particles in the Ni matrix was observed using Voronoi tessellation. Variation in COF was observed by a fretting wear test to be 0.51 ± 0.07 for Ni, which decreases to 0.35 ± 0.03 for the Ni-diamond coatings. The wear volume of the coatings with 7.5 g/L concentration of diamond was observed to be a minimum (0.051 ± 0.02 × 10-3 mm3) compared with other composite coatings. Further, the micro-scratch testing of the coatings also exhibited a reduced COF (0.03-0.12) for 7.5 g/L diamond concentration compared with Ni (0.08-0.13). Higher wear resistance of the diamond-added coatings (optimum 7.5 g/L concentration) is due to the balance between the dispersion strengthening mechanism and the enhancement of the load-bearing capacity due to the incorporation of diamond particles. Thus, these composites can be used for applications in automotive and aerospace industries.

  9. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2008 and September 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2009-03-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation [Pettitt et al., 1999], and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation [Haycox et al., 2005a and 2005b; Haycox et al., 2006a and 2006b; Zolezzi et al., 2007 and Duckworth et al., 2008]. Further information on this monitoring can be found in Appendix I. This report covers the period between 1st April 2008 and 30th September 2008 and is the seventh instalment of the 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  10. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2008 and September 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2009-03-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation [Pettitt et al., 1999], and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation [Haycox et al., 2005a and 2005b; Haycox et al., 2006a and 2006b; Zolezzi et al., 2007 and Duckworth et al., 2008]. Further information on this monitoring can be found in Appendix I. This report covers the period between 1st April 2008 and 30th September 2008 and is the seventh instalment of the 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  11. Black hole gravitohydromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Black hole gravitohydromagnetics (GHM) is developed from the rudiments to the frontiers of research in this book. GHM describes plasma interactions that combine the effects of gravity and a strong magnetic field, in the vicinity (ergosphere) of a rapidly rotating black hole. This topic was created in response to the astrophysical quest to understand the central engines of radio loud extragalactic radio sources. The theory describes a "torsional tug of war" between rotating ergospheric plasma and the distant asymptotic plasma that extracts the rotational inertia of the black hole. The recoil from the struggle between electromagnetic and gravitational forces near the event horizon is manifested as a powerful pair of magnetized particle beams (jets) that are ejected at nearly the speed of light. These bipolar jets feed large-scale magnetized plasmoids on scales as large as millions of light years (the radio lobes of extragalactic radio sources). This interaction can initiate jets that transport energy fluxes exc...

  12. Large-scale variations in ozone and polar stratospheric clouds measured with airborne lidar during formation of the 1987 ozone hole over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Poole, Lamont R.; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Ismail, Syed; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.; Szedlmayer, Margaret M.; Jones, Rod; Krueger, Arlin J.; Tuck, Adrian

    1988-01-01

    A joint field experiment between NASA and NOAA was conducted during August to September 1987 to obtain in situ and remote measurements of key gases and aerosols from aircraft platforms during the formation of the ozone (O3) hole over Antarctica. The ER-2 (advanced U-2) and DC-8 aircraft from the NASA Ames Research Center were used in this field experiment. The NASA Langley Research Center's airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system was operated from the DC-8 to obtain profiles of O3 and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere during long-range flights over Antarctica from August 28 to September 29, 1987. The airborne DIAL system was configured to transmit simultaneously four laser wavelengths (301, 311, 622, and 1064 nm) above the DC-8 for DIAL measurements of O3 profiles between 11 to 20 km ASL (geometric altitude above sea level) and multiple wavelength aerosol backscatter measurements between 11 to 24 km ASL. A total of 13 DC-8 flights were made over Antarctica with 2 flights reaching the South Pole. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) were detected in multiple thin layers in the 11 to 21 km ASL altitude range with each layer having a typical thickness of less than 1 km. Two types of PSC's were found based on aerosol backscattering ratios: predominantly water ice clouds (type 2) and clouds with scattering characteristics consistent with binary solid nitric acid/water clouds (type 1). Large-scale cross sections of O3 distributions were obtained. The data provides additional information about a potentially important transport mechanism that may influence the O3 budget inside the vortex. There is also some evidence that strong low pressure systems in the troposphere are associated with regions of lower stratospheric O3. This paper discusses the spatial and temporal variations of O3 inside and outside the polar vortex region during the development of the O3 hole and relates these data to other measurements obtained during this field experiment.

  13. Optical modeling of plasma-deposited ZnO films: Electron scattering at different length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoops, Harm C. M., E-mail: H.C.M.Knoops@tue.nl; Loo, Bas W. H. van de; Smit, Sjoerd; Ponomarev, Mikhail V.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Sharma, Kashish [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.; Creatore, Mariadriana, E-mail: M.Creatore@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands and Solliance, High Tech Campus 5, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    In this work, an optical modeling study on electron scattering mechanisms in plasma-deposited ZnO layers is presented. Because various applications of ZnO films pose a limit on the electron carrier density due to its effect on the film transmittance, higher electron mobility values are generally preferred instead. Hence, insights into the electron scattering contributions affecting the carrier mobility are required. In optical models, the Drude oscillator is adopted to represent the free-electron contribution and the obtained optical mobility can be then correlated with the macroscopic material properties. However, the influence of scattering phenomena on the optical mobility depends on the considered range of photon energy. For example, the grain-boundary scattering is generally not probed by means of optical measurements and the ionized-impurity scattering contribution decreases toward higher photon energies. To understand this frequency dependence and quantify contributions from different scattering phenomena to the mobility, several case studies were analyzed in this work by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The obtained electrical parameters were compared to the results inferred by Hall measurements. For intrinsic ZnO (i-ZnO), the in-grain mobility was obtained by fitting reflection data with a normal Drude model in the IR range. For Al-doped ZnO (Al:ZnO), besides a normal Drude fit in the IR range, an Extended Drude fit in the UV-vis range could be used to obtain the in-grain mobility. Scattering mechanisms for a thickness series of Al:ZnO films were discerned using the more intuitive parameter “scattering frequency” instead of the parameter “mobility”. The interaction distance concept was introduced to give a physical interpretation to the frequency dependence of the scattering frequency. This physical interpretation furthermore allows the prediction of which Drude models can be used in a specific

  14. Small-scale cyclic deposition in the Frasnian (Upper Devonian of the Holy Cross Mountains, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vierek Aleksandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In sections exposing Frasnian limestones at five outcrops in the Holy Cross Mountains, five lithofacies (L1 to L5 that represent upper slope to basinal environments are identified. These lithofacies are characterised by dark-coloured micritic limestones-marly shale couplets with many light-coloured intercalations of fine- to coarse-grained limestones (= event beds. This lithofacies pattern characterises mostly low-energy domains punctuated by storm episodes. In addition, these upper-slope to basinal lithofacies are arranged into small-scale, coarsening-upward beds and cycles. The cycles are locally composed of fining/thinning-upward beds. The small-scale cycles have a calculated duration of 19 to 42 kyr. The differential thickness of beds and cycles within and between sections was probably caused by differential subsidence and local tectonics. Possible evidence of tectonic activity is also related to a difference in number of cycles recorded in the time-equivalent sections. The recognised cyclicity shows sea-level fluctuations and a few deepening episodes. Some of them are correlated with the Timan global eustatic events. However, local tectonics and episodic subsidence may have played a significant role in recording brief deepening pulses. Thus, low-amplitude sea-level changes were major factors in platform generation and evolution in the Frasnian of the Holy Cross Mountains modified by local, block-related subsidence.

  15. Large-scale synthesis of uniform hexagonal boron nitride films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hamin; Kim, Tae Keun; Cho, Sung Woo; Jang, Hong Seok; Lee, Sang Ick; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2017-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been previously manufactured using mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition methods, which make the large-scale synthesis of uniform h-BN very challenging. In this study, we produced highly uniform and scalable h-BN films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, which were characterized by various techniques including atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The film composition studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy corresponded to a B:N stoichiometric ratio close to 1:1, and the band-gap value (5.65 eV) obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy was consistent with the dielectric properties. The h-BN-containing capacitors were characterized by highly uniform properties, a reasonable dielectric constant (3), and low leakage current density, while graphene on h-BN substrates exhibited enhanced electrical performance such as the high carrier mobility and neutral Dirac voltage, which resulted from the low density of charged impurities on the h-BN surface.

  16. Inhibitory effect of Hydrex anti-scalant on calcium scale deposition from seawater under multiple-effect distillers' conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman Eid Al-Rawajfeh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the inhibitory effect of a commercial anti-scalant (Veolia Hydrex® 9209 on the calcium minerals of carbonate, sulfate and hydrocalumite (Ca/Al clay deposition from seawater has been investigated. Different concentration factors and anti-scalant doses were studied by analyzing the water hardness and turbidity. The inhibitory effect of the investigated anti-scalant was efficient even at lower concentrations. The percentage inhibition decreases with increasing the temperature and increases with increasing the dose/amount of the anti-scalant. The carbonate scale inhibition was >99% and 98–99% at 50 and 70 °C, respectively. The percentage inhibition of sulfate from hemihydrate was ranged from 80% to 87% for 2 and 8 ppm anti-scalant at 50 °C. The inhibition of Ca/Al hydrocalumite deposition increases from 70% to 90% upon increasing the dose from 3 to 5 ppm, respectively. A recommended useful dose of antiscalant for seawater is 5 ppm.

  17. Highly Uniform Wafer-scale Synthesis of α-MoOsub>3sub> by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyeongU; Son, Juhyun; Kulkarni, Atul; Ahn, Chisung; Kim, Ki Seok; Shin, Dongjoo; Yeom, Geun; Kim, Taesung

    2017-03-20

    Molybdenum oxide (MoOsub>3sub>) has gained immense attention because of its high electron mobility, wide band gap, and excellent optical and catalytic properties. However, the synthesis of uniform and large-area MoOsub>3sub> is challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of wafer-scale α-MoO3 by plasma oxidation of Mo-deposited on Si/SiOsub>2sub>. Mo was oxidized by Osub>2sub> plasma in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system at 150 °C. Mo was oxidized by Osub>2sub> plasma in a PECVD system at 150 °C. It was found that the synthesized α-MoOsub>3sub> had a highly uniform crystalline structure. For the as-synthesized α-MoOsub>3sub> sensor, we observed a current change when the relative humidity was increased from 11% to 95%. The sensor was exposed to different humidity levels with fast recovery time of about 8 s. Hence this feasibility study shows that MoOsub>3sub> synthesized at low temperature can be utilized for the gas sensing applications by adopting flexible device technology.

  18. Radio Monitoring of the Tidal Disruption Event Swift J164449.3+573451. I. Jet Energetics and the Pristine Parsec-Scale Environment of a Supermassive Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, E; Pooley, G G; Soderberg, A M; Sari, R; Brunthaler, A; Bietenholz, M F

    2011-01-01

    We present continued radio observations of the tidal disruption event SwiftJ164449.3+573451 extending to \\sim216 days after discovery. The data are part of a long-term program to monitor the expansion and energy scale of the relativistic outflow, and to trace the parsec-scale environment around a previously-dormant supermassive black hole (SMBH). The new observations reveal a significant change in the radio evolution starting at \\sim1 month, with a brightening at all frequencies that requires an increase in the energy by about an order of magnitude, and an overall density profile around the SMBH of rho \\propto r^{-3/2} (0.1-1.2 pc) with a significant flattening at r\\sim0.4-0.6 pc. The increase in energy cannot be explained with continuous injection from an L \\propto t^{-5/3} tail, which is observed in the X-rays. Instead, we conclude that the relativistic jet was launched with a wide range of Lorentz factors, obeying E(>Gamma) \\propto Gamma^{-2.5}. The similar ratio of duration to dynamical timescale for Sw16...

  19. Comparisons of Fly Ash and Deposition Between Air and Oxy-Fuel Combustion in Bench-Scale Fluidized Bed with Limestone Addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhimin Zheng; Hui Wang∗; Yongjun Guo; Li Yang; Shuai Guo; Shaohua Wu

    2015-01-01

    In Oxy⁃fuel circulating fluidized bed, the residual CaO particles may react with high concentration of CO2 in flue gas to form bonded deposit on heat transfer surfaces in backpass when limestone is used as a sorbent to capture SO2 .In this paper, experiments were designed on ash deposition in a bench⁃scale fluidized bed under oxy⁃fuel and air atmosphere. A novel ash deposit sampling probe was used to simulate the tubes of tail surfaces. The chemical composition of fly ash and ash deposit from both air⁃firing and oxy⁃fuel firing cases were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma⁃Atomic Emission Spectrometry ( ICP⁃AES ) and Scanning Electron Microscopy ( SEM) , respectively. The degrees of carbonation reaction of ash deposits were measured by Thermo Gravimetric Analysis. The results showed that there are distinct differences in fly ash deposition rate between oxy⁃fuel and air firing cases, and oxy⁃fuel combustion with limestone addition can affect chemical composition of fly ash and ash deposit, especially for elements of Ca, Na, K, and S. However, the carbonation reaction degree of ash deposits is found weak, which is due to the relatively low CaO content in ash deposit or not long enough of the sampling time.

  20. Ultramassive Black Hole Coalescence

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Fazeel; Berczik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Although supermassive black holes (SMBHs) correlate well with their host galaxies, there is an emerging view that outliers exist. Henize 2-10, NGC 4889, and NGC1277 are examples of SMBHs at least an order of magnitude more massive than their host galaxy suggests. The dynamical effects of such ultramassive central black holes is unclear. Here, we perform direct N-body simulations of mergers of galactic nuclei where one black hole is ultramassive to study the evolution of the remnant and the black hole dynamics in this extreme regime. We find that the merger remnant is axisymmetric near the center, while near the large SMBH influence radius, the galaxy is triaxial. The SMBH separation shrinks rapidly due to dynamical friction, and quickly forms a binary black hole; if we scale our model to the most massive estimate for the NGC1277 black hole, for example, the timescale for the SMBH separation to shrink from nearly a kiloparsec to less than a parsec is roughly 10 Myr. By the time the SMBHs form a hard binary, gr...

  1. Deposit formation in a full-scale pulverized wood-fired power plant with and without coal fly ash addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2013-01-01

    temperatures of ~1300oC and ~800oC, respectively. It was found that during pulverized wood combustion, the deposit formation at the hightemperature location was characterized by a slow and continuous growth of deposits followed by the shedding of a large layer of deposits, while the deposit formation...

  2. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event‐scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measures, R.; Hicks, D. M.; Brasington, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics‐based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth‐averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high‐flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high‐resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach‐scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers. PMID:27708477

  3. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event-scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R D; Measures, R; Hicks, D M; Brasington, J

    2016-08-01

    Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics-based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth-averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high-flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach-scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers.

  4. Black hole critical phenomena without black holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Steven L Liebling

    2000-10-01

    Studying the threshold of black hole formation via numerical evolution has led to the discovery of fascinating nonlinear phenomena. Power-law mass scaling, aspects of universality, and self-similarity have now been found for a large variety of models. However, questions remain. Here I briefly review critical phenomena, discuss some recent results, and describe a model which demonstrates similar phenomena without gravity.

  5. Continental Scale Antarctic deposition of sulphur and black carbon from anthropogenic and volcanic sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-F. Graf

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available While Antarctica is often described as a pristine environment, the potential threats from local pollution sources including tourist ships and emissions associated with scientific activities have recently been raised. However, to date there has been no systematic attempt to model the impacts of such pollutants at the continental scale. Indeed, until very recently there was not even a sulphur emission budget available for Antarctica. Here we present the first comprehensive study of atmospheric pollution in Antarctica using a limited area chemistry climate model, and a monthly emissions inventory for sulphur from maintenance of research stations, ground and air traffic, shipping and the active volcano Mt. Erebus. We find that ship emissions, both sulphurous and black carbon, dominate anthropogenic pollution near the ground. These are likely to rise considerably if recent trends in tourism continue.

  6. Continental scale Antarctic deposition of sulphur and black carbon from anthropogenic and volcanic sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-F. Graf

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available While Antarctica is often described as a pristine environment, there is an increasing awareness of the potential threats from local pollution sources including tourist ships and emissions associated with scientific activities. However, to date there has been no systematic attempt to model the impacts of such pollutants at the continental scale. Indeed, until very recently there was not even a sulphur emission budget available for Antarctica. Here we present the first comprehensive study of atmospheric pollution in Antarctica using a limited area chemistry climate model, and a monthly emissions inventory for sulphur from maintenance of research stations, ground and air traffic, shipping and the active Erebus volcano. We find that ship emissions, both sulphurous and black carbon, dominate anthropogenic pollution near the ground. Their prevalence is likely to rise dramatically if recent trends in tourism continue.

  7. Speciation of trace inorganic contaminants in corrosion scales and deposits formed in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ching-Yu; Korshin, Gregory V

    2011-11-01

    Sequential extractions utilizing the modified Tessier scheme (Krishnamurti et al., 1995) and measurements of soluble and particulate metal released from suspended solids were used in this study to determine the speciation and mobility of inorganic contaminants (As, Cr, V, U, Cd, Ni, and Mn) found in corrosion scales and particles mobilized during hydraulic flushing events. Arsenic, chromium and vanadium are primarily associated with the mobilization-resistant fraction that is resistant to all eluents used in this study and also bound in highly stable crystalline iron oxides. Very low concentrations of these elements were released in resuspension experiments. X-ray absorbance measurements demonstrated that arsenic in the sample with the highest As concentration was dominated by As(V) bound by iron oxides. Significant fractions of uranium and cadmium were associated with carbonate solids. Nickel and manganese were determined to be more mobile and significantly associated with organic fractions. This may indicate that biofilms and natural organic matter in the drinking water distributions systems play an important role in the accumulation and release of these inorganic contaminants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The fuzzball proposal for black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skenderis, K.; Taylor, M.

    2008-01-01

    The fuzzball proposal states that associated with a black hole of entropy S, there are expS horizon-free non-singular solutions that asymptotically look like the black hole but generically differ from the black hole up to the horizon scale. These solutions, the fuzzballs, are considered to be the bl

  9. On Quantum Contributions to Black Hole Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Wheeler’s quantum foam on black hole growth are explored from an astrophysical per- spective. Quantum fluctuations in the form of mini (10−5 g) black holes can couple to macroscopic black holes and allow the latter to grow exponentially in mass on a time scale of 109 years.

  10. On Quantum Contributions to Black Hole Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Wheeler’s quantum foam on black hole growth are explored from an astrophysical per- spective. Quantum fluctuations in the form of mini (10−5 g) black holes can couple to macroscopic black holes and allow the latter to grow exponentially in mass on a time scale of 109 years. Consequent

  11. Scaling of the photon index vs mass accretion rate correlation and estimate of black hole mass in M101 ULX-1

    CERN Document Server

    Titarchuk, Lev

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of Swift and Chandra observations of an ultra-luminous X-ray source, ULX-1 in M101. We show strong observational evidence that M101 ULX-1 undergoes spectral transitions from the low/hard state to the high/soft state during these observations. The spectra of M101 ULX-1 are well fitted by the so-called bulk motion Comptonization (BMC) model for all spectral states. We have established the photon index (\\Gamma) saturation level, \\Gamma_{sat}=2.8 +/- 0.1, in the \\Gamma vs. mass accretion rate (\\dot M) correlation. This \\Gamma-\\dot M correlation allows us to evaluate black hole (BH) mass in M101 ULX-1 to be M_{BH}~(3.2 - 4.3)x10^4 solar masses assuming the spread in distance to M101 (from 6.4+/- 0.5 Mpc to 7.4+/-0.6 Mpc). For this BH mass estimate we use the scaling method taking Galactic BHs XTE~J1550-564, H~1743-322 and 4U~1630-472 as reference sources. The Gamma vs. \\dot M correlation revealed in M101~ULX-1 is similar to that in a number of Galactic BHs and exhibits clearly the correlation...

  12. Modeling the cosmological co-evolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies: I. BH scaling relations and the AGN luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Marulli, Federico; Branchini, Enzo; Moscardini, Lauro; Springel, Volker

    2007-01-01

    We model the cosmological co-evolution of galaxies and their central supermassive black holes (BHs) within a semi-analytical framework developed on the outputs of the Millennium Simulation. This model, described in detail in Croton et al. (2006) and De Lucia & Blaizot (2007), introduces a `radio mode' feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at the centre of X-ray emitting atmospheres in galaxy groups and clusters. Thanks to this mechanism, the model can simultaneously explain: (i) the low observed mass drop-out rate in cooling flows; (ii) the exponential cut-off in the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function; and (iii) the bulge-dominated morphologies and old stellar ages of the most massive galaxies in clusters. This paper is the first of a series in which we investigate how well this model can also reproduce the physical properties of BHs and AGN. Here we analyze the scaling relations, the fundamental plane and the mass function of BHs, and compare them with the most recent observational data. M...

  13. A Ringed Dwarf LINER 1 Galaxy Hosting an Intermediate-mass Black Hole with Large-scale Rotation-like Hα Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Juan; Qian, Lei; Dong, Xiao-Bo; Jiang, Ning; Lira, Paulina; Cai, Zheng; Wang, Feige; Yang, Jinyi; Xiao, Ting; Kim, Minjin

    2017-03-01

    We report the discovery of a 20 kpc sized {{H}}α emission in SDSS J083803.68+540642.0, a ringed dwarf galaxy ({M}V=-17.89 mag) hosting an accreting intermediate-mass black hole at z = 0.02957. Analysis of the Hubble Space Telescope images indicates that it is an early-type galaxy with a featureless low-surface brightness disk ({μ }0=20.39 mag arcsec‑2 in the V band) and a prominent, relatively red bulge (V ‑ I = 2.03, {R}{{e}}=0.28 {kpc} or 0.″48) that accounts for ≈81% of the total light in the I band. A circumgalactic ring of a diameter 16 kpc is also detected, with a disperse shape on its south side. The optical emission lines reveal the nucleus to be a broad-line LINER. Our MMT longslit observation indicates that the kinematics of the extended {{H}}α emission is consistent with a rotational gaseous disk, with a mean blueshifted velocity of 162 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and mean redshifted velocity of 86 {km} {{{s}}}-1. According to our photoionization calculations, the large-scale {{H}}α emission is unlikely to be powered by the central nucleus or by hot evolved (post-AGB) stars interspersed in the old stellar populations, but by in situ star formation; this is vindicated by the line-ratio diagnostic of the extended emission. We propose that both the ring and large-scale {{H}}α -emitting gas are created by the tidal accretion in a collision—and then merger—with a gas-rich galaxy of a comparable mass.

  14. Black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Chrúsciel, P T

    2002-01-01

    This paper is concerned with several not-quantum aspects of black holes, with emphasis on theoretical and mathematical issues related to numerical modeling of black hole space-times. Part of the material has a review character, but some new results or proposals are also presented. We review the experimental evidence for existence of black holes. We propose a definition of black hole region for any theory governed by a symmetric hyperbolic system of equations. Our definition reproduces the usual one for gravity, and leads to the one associated with the Unruh metric in the case of Euler equations. We review the global conditions which have been used in the Scri-based definition of a black hole and point out the deficiencies of the Scri approach. Various results on the structure of horizons and apparent horizons are presented, and a new proof of semi-convexity of horizons based on a variational principle is given. Recent results on the classification of stationary singularity-free vacuum solutions are reviewed. ...

  15. Black Holes and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Mathur, Samir D

    2012-01-01

    The black hole information paradox forces us into a strange situation: we must find a way to break the semiclassical approximation in a domain where no quantum gravity effects would normally be expected. Traditional quantizations of gravity do not exhibit any such breakdown, and this forces us into a difficult corner: either we must give up quantum mechanics or we must accept the existence of troublesome `remnants'. In string theory, however, the fundamental quanta are extended objects, and it turns out that the bound states of such objects acquire a size that grows with the number of quanta in the bound state. The interior of the black hole gets completely altered to a `fuzzball' structure, and information is able to escape in radiation from the hole. The semiclassical approximation can break at macroscopic scales due to the large entropy of the hole: the measure in the path integral competes with the classical action, instead of giving a subleading correction. Putting this picture of black hole microstates ...

  16. Large clusters of gold deposits and large-scale metallogene-sis in the Jiaodong Peninsula, Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI; Mingguo

    2001-01-01

    [1]Tu, G. C., The unique nature in ore deposition, geological background and metallogenic mechanism of non-conventional superlarge ore deposits: A preliminary discussion, Science in China (in Chinese), Ser. D, 1998, 41 (sup.): 1-6.[2]Pei, R. F., Qiu, X. P., Yin, B. C. et al., The Explosive anomaly of ore-forming processes and super-accumulation of metals, Mineral Deposits (in Chinese), 1999, 18 (4): 333-340.[3]Zhai, Y. S., De, J., Li, X. B., Essentials of Metallogeny (in Chinese), Beijing: Geological Publishing House, 1999: 1-288.[4]Mao, J. W., Hua, R. M., Li, X. B., A preliminary study of large-scale metallogenesis and large clusters of mineral deposits, Mineral Deposits (in Chinese), 1999, 18(4): 291-298.[5]Zhang, C. H., Gu, D. L., Study on the microstructure and deformation mechanism of the sinistral slick ductile shear zone in the middle of the northern Jiaonan uplift, in Tectonic and Geological Evolution of the Northern Jiaonan Uplift (in Chi-nese) (eds. Gu, D. L., Zhang, C. H.), Beijing: China University of Geosciences Press, 1996, 96-104.[6]Zhai, M. G., Guo, J. H., Wang, Q. C. et al., Division of geological-tectonic units in the northern Sulu ultra-high pressure zone: An example of thick-skin thrust of crystalline units, Scientica Geologica Acta (in Chinese), 2000, 35(1): 16-26.[7]Zhai, M. G., Guo, J. H., Cong, B. L. et al., Sm-Nd geochronolgy and petrography of garnet pyroxene granulites in the northern Sulu region and their geotectonic implication, Scientica Geologica Acta (in Chinese), 1999, 34(3): 301-310.[8]Zhai, M. G., Cong, B., Guo, J., Sm-Nd geochronology and petrography of garnet pyroxene granulites in the northern Sulu region of China and their geotectonic implication, Lithos, 2000, 52: 23-33.[9]Jahn, B. M., Geochemical and isotopic study of UHP terrain in China (abstract), in First Workshop on UHP Metamor-phism and Tectonics, Stanford: Stanford University, 1994, A71-74.[10]Li, S. G., Jagoutz

  17. Towards a uniform and large-scale deposition of MoS2 nanosheets via sulfurization of ultra-thin Mo-based solid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangelista, Silvia; Cinquanta, Eugenio; Martella, Christian; Alia, Mario; Longo, Massimo; Lamperti, Alessio; Mantovan, Roberto; Basset, Francesco Basso; Pezzoli, Fabio; Molle, Alessandro

    2016-04-29

    Large-scale integration of MoS2 in electronic devices requires the development of reliable and cost-effective deposition processes, leading to uniform MoS2 layers on a wafer scale. Here we report on the detailed study of the heterogeneous vapor-solid reaction between a pre-deposited molybdenum solid film and sulfur vapor, thus resulting in a controlled growth of MoS2 films onto SiO2/Si substrates with a tunable thickness and cm(2)-scale uniformity. Based on Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence, we show that the degree of crystallinity in the MoS2 layers is dictated by the deposition temperature and thickness. In particular, the MoS2 structural disorder observed at low temperature (structure at high temperature (1000 °C) and high thickness (four layers). From an atomic force microscopy investigation prior to and after sulfurization, this parametrical dependence is associated with the inherent granularity of the MoS2 nanosheet that is inherited by the pristine morphology of the pre-deposited Mo film. This work paves the way to a closer control of the synthesis of wafer-scale and atomically thin MoS2, potentially extendable to other transition metal dichalcogenides and hence targeting massive and high-volume production for electronic device manufacturing.

  18. Estimation of Scale Deposition in the Water Walls of an Operating Indian Coal Fired Boiler: Predictive Modeling Approach Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Amrita; Das, Suchandan Kumar; Srivastava, Prem Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Application of computational intelligence for predicting industrial processes has been in extensive use in various industrial sectors including power sector industry. An ANN model using multi-layer perceptron philosophy has been proposed in this paper to predict the deposition behaviors of oxide scale on waterwall tubes of a coal fired boiler. The input parameters comprises of boiler water chemistry and associated operating parameters, such as, pH, alkalinity, total dissolved solids, specific conductivity, iron and dissolved oxygen concentration of the feed water and local heat flux on boiler tube. An efficient gradient based network optimization algorithm has been employed to minimize neural predictions errors. Effects of heat flux, iron content, pH and the concentrations of total dissolved solids in feed water and other operating variables on the scale deposition behavior have been studied. It has been observed that heat flux, iron content and pH of the feed water have a relatively prime influence on the rate of oxide scale deposition in water walls of an Indian boiler. Reasonably good agreement between ANN model predictions and the measured values of oxide scale deposition rate has been observed which is corroborated by the regression fit between these values.

  19. Modeling of inertial deposition in scaled models of rat and human nasal airways: Towards in vitro regional dosimetry in small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Zhou, Yue

    2016-09-01

    Rodents are routinely used in inhalation toxicology tests as human surrogates. However, in vitro dosimetry tests in rodent casts are still scarce due to small rodent airways and in vitro tests to quantify sub-regional dosimetry are still impractical. We hypothesized that for inertial particles whose deposition is dominated by airflow convection (Reynolds number) and particle inertia (Stokes number), the deposition should be similar among airway replicas of different scales if their Reynolds and Stokes numbers are kept the same. In this study, we aimed to (1) numerically test the hypothesis in three airway geometries: a USP induction port, a human nose model, and a Sprague-Dawley rat nose model, and (2) find the range of applicability of this hypothesis. Five variants of the USP and human nose models and three variants of the rat nose model were tested. Inhalation rates and particle sizes were scaled to match the Reynolds number and Stokes numbers. A low-Reynolds-number k–ω model was used to resolve the airflow and a Lagrangian tracking algorithm was used to simulate the particle transport and deposition. Statistical analysis of predicted doses was conducted using ANOVA. For normal inhalation rates and particle dia- meters ranging from 0.5 to 24 mm, the deposition differences between the life-size and scaled models are insignificant for all airway geometries considered (i.e., human nose, USP, and rat nose). Furthermore, the deposition patterns and exit particle profiles also look similar among scaled models. However, deposition rates and patterns start to deviate if inhalation rates are too low, or particle sizes are too large. For the rat nose, the threshold velocity was found to be 0.71 m/s and the threshold Froude number to be 50. Results of this study provide a theoretical foundation for sub-regional in vitro dosimetry tests in small animals and for interpretation of data from inter-species or intra-species with varying body sizes.

  20. Electroless Deposition and Nanolithography Can Control the Formation of Materials at the Nano-Scale for Plasmonic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Coluccio

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The new revolution in materials science is being driven by our ability to manipulate matter at the molecular level to create structures with novel functions and properties. The aim of this paper is to explore new strategies to obtain plasmonic metal nanostructures through the combination of a top down method, that is electron beam lithography, and a bottom up technique, that is the chemical electroless deposition. This technique allows a tight control over the shape and size of bi- and three-dimensional metal patterns at the nano scale. The resulting nanostructures can be used as constituents of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS substrates, where the electromagnetic field is strongly amplified. Our results indicate that, in electroless growth, high quality metal nanostructures with sizes below 50 nm may be easily obtained. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA model, that is a simulation model that makes it possible to decipher, at an atomic level, the rules governing the evolution of the growth front; moreover, we give a description of the physical mechanisms of growth at a basic level. In the discussion, we show how these findings can be utilized to fabricate dimers of silver nanospheres where the size and shape of those spheres is controlled with extreme precision and can be used for very large area SERS substrates and nano-optics, for single molecule detection.

  1. Electroless deposition and nanolithography can control the formation of materials at the nano-scale for plasmonic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Francardi, Marco; Perozziello, Gerardo; Malara, Natalia; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2014-03-27

    The new revolution in materials science is being driven by our ability to manipulate matter at the molecular level to create structures with novel functions and properties. The aim of this paper is to explore new strategies to obtain plasmonic metal nanostructures through the combination of a top down method, that is electron beam lithography, and a bottom up technique, that is the chemical electroless deposition. This technique allows a tight control over the shape and size of bi- and three-dimensional metal patterns at the nano scale. The resulting nanostructures can be used as constituents of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) substrates, where the electromagnetic field is strongly amplified. Our results indicate that, in electroless growth, high quality metal nanostructures with sizes below 50 nm may be easily obtained. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model, that is a simulation model that makes it possible to decipher, at an atomic level, the rules governing the evolution of the growth front; moreover, we give a description of the physical mechanisms of growth at a basic level. In the discussion, we show how these findings can be utilized to fabricate dimers of silver nanospheres where the size and shape of those spheres is controlled with extreme precision and can be used for very large area SERS substrates and nano-optics, for single molecule detection.

  2. Durability tests and up-scaling of selective absorbers based on copper-manganese oxide deposited by dip-coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayon, Rocio; San Vicente, Gema; Morales, Angel [Unidad de Concentracion Solar, Plataforma Solar de Almeria, Departamento de Energia, CIEMAT, Avd. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    Selective absorbers based on copper-manganese oxide were prepared by dip-coating method. The optical properties of the 2-layer configuration (Al/CuMnO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}) were improved by introducing an additional absorber-protective layer directly in contact with the aluminium substrate (i.e. 3-layer absorber), for which solar absorptance up to 0.950 was achieved. Long-term durability of these absorbers was investigated by applying both thermal stability and humidity tests established by the IEA-SHC Task X. All the analyzed samples qualified for both tests leading to similar or even better results than some commercial absorbers. In order to prove the feasibility of the up-scaling process, 3-layer absorber samples of 30 x 30 cm{sup 2} size were prepared. It was observed that sintering process was determinant for obtaining fully homogenous films within the whole large-area surface. By using a sintering process with increasing temperature, 30 x 30 cm{sup 2} samples with {alpha}{sub s}=0.935{+-}0.005 (100 measurements) could be obtained. This study reveals that it is possible to deposit CuMn-oxide absorbers on large-area substrates and that they could be a good alternative to the materials present today in the market, not only in terms of optical properties but also in terms of long term durability. (author)

  3. Electroless deposition and nanolithography can control the formation of materials at the nano-scale for plasmonic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Coluccio, Maria Laura

    2014-03-27

    The new revolution in materials science is being driven by our ability to manipulate matter at the molecular level to create structures with novel functions and properties. The aim of this paper is to explore new strategies to obtain plasmonic metal nanostructures through the combination of a top down method, that is electron beam lithography, and a bottom up technique, that is the chemical electroless deposition. This technique allows a tight control over the shape and size of bi- and three-dimensional metal patterns at the nano scale. The resulting nanostructures can be used as constituents of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) substrates, where the electromagnetic field is strongly amplified. Our results indicate that, in electroless growth, high quality metal nanostructures with sizes below 50 nm may be easily obtained. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model, that is a simulation model that makes it possible to decipher, at an atomic level, the rules governing the evolution of the growth front; moreover, we give a description of the physical echanisms of growth at a basic level. In the discussion, we show how these findings can be utilized to fabricate dimers of silver nanospheres where the size and shape of those spheres is controlled with extreme precision and can be used for very large area SERS substrates and nano-optics, for single molecule detection. 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  4. Basin-Scale Sand Deposition in the Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation of the Sichuan Basin, Southwest China: Sedimentary Framework and Conceptual Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiucheng Tan; Qingsong Xia; Jingshan Chen; Ling Li; Hong Liu; Bing Luo; Jiwen Xia; Jiajing Yang

    2013-01-01

    The Upper Triassic Xujiahe(须家河) Formation in the Sichuan (四川) Basin,Southwes China is distinctive for the basin-scale sand deposition.This relatively rare sedimentary phenomenon has not been well interpreted.Here we addressed this issue by discussing sedimentary framework and conceptual model.Analysis of sedimentary setting implied that the basin received transgression during the deposition.It had multiple provenance supplies and river networks,as being surrounded by oldlands in multiple directions including the north,east and south.Thus,the basin was generally characterized by coastal and widely open and shallow lacustrine deposition during the Late Triassic Xujiahe period.This is similar to the modern well-known Poyang(鄱阳) Lake.Therefore,we investigated the framework and conceptual model of the Sichuan Basin during the Xujiahe period with an analogue to the Poyang Lake.Results show that the conceptual model of the deposition can be divided into transgressive and regressive stages.The first,third and fifth members of the formation are in transgressive stage and the deposits are dominated by shore and shallow lacustrine mud.In contrast,the deposition is mainly of braided river channel sand deposits during the regressive stage,mainly including the second,fourth and sixth members of the formation.The sand deposited in almost the entire basin because of the lateral migration and forward moving of the cross networks of the braided rivers.The multiple alternations of short and rapid transgression and relatively long regression are beneficial to the basin-scale sand deposition.Thus,the main channel of the braided river and its extensional areas are favorable for the development of hydrocarbon reservoir.This provides practical significance to the reservoir evaluation and exploration.In addition,the results also justify the relatively distinctive sedimentary phenomenon in the study area and may also have implications for understanding the large-scale

  5. The link between quasar broad-line region and galaxy-scale outflows and accurate CIV-based black hole masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coatman, Liam; Hewett, Paul C.; Banerji, Manda; Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, Jason X.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate black-hole (BH) mass estimates for high-redshift (z>2) quasars are essential for better understanding the relationship between super-massive BH accretion and star formation. Progress is currently limited by the large systematic errors in virial BH-masses derived from the CIV broad emission line, which is often significantly blueshifted relative to systemic, most likely due to outflowing gas in the quasar broad-line region. We have assembled Balmer-line based BH masses for a large sample of 230 high-luminosity (1045.5-1048 ergs-1), redshift 1.5blueshifts seen in the quasar population. We find the CIV-based BH-masses to be larger than the corresponding Balmer line-based masses by almost an order of magnitude at the most extreme blueshifts (˜5000 kms-1). An empirical correction to the CIV BH-masses is derived, which depends only on the properties of the CIV line itself (i.e. blueshift and FWHM). We show that this new correction now enables the derivation of un-biased CIV-based virial BH masses for the majority of high-luminosity, high-redshift quasars.In the same high-luminosity quasar sample, we find the narrow [OIII] emission to be weaker and more asymmetric than is generally found in lower-luminosity AGN and that a significant fraction of our quasars have exceptionally broad (FWHM > 3000 kms-1), blueshifted [OIII] emission. We find a strong correlation between the CIV and [OIII] blueshifts. This correlation holds even for quasars at fixed luminosity and suggests that broad line region outflows in quasars are connected to galaxy-scale winds.

  6. Full Scale Deposition Trials at 150 MWe PF-boiler Co-firing COal and Straw: Summary of Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karin Hedebo; Frandsen, Flemming; Hansen, Peter Farkas Binderup

    1999-01-01

    . In the visual analysis, a significant increase in amount and tenacity of primarily the upstream deposit was observed as a function of increased straw share, exposure time and/or boiler load.The chemical analysis of the deposits suggest an increased participation of K and S in the formation of the deposits...... for the coal types utilised in the tests.The deposit formation observed during co-firing with up to 20% straw (energy basis), does not lead to fouling and slagging problems which cannot be overcome by increased sootblowing when firing the two coals used in the demonstration programme. However, slagging...

  7. Modelling the effectiveness of urban trees and grass on PM2.5 reduction via dispersion and deposition at a city scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanjean, A. P. R.; Monks, P. S.; Leigh, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Green infrastructure can reduce PM2.5 traffic emissions on a city scale, by a combination of dispersion by trees and deposition on buildings, trees and grass. Simulations of PM2.5 concentrations were performed using a validated CFD model. A 2 × 2 km area has been reconstructed as a 3D representation of Leicester (UK) city centre which is on a scale larger than most of the other CFD studies. Combining both the effects of tree aerodynamics and the deposition capabilities of trees and grass is also something that has not yet been modelled at this scale. During summer time in Leicester City, the results show that the aerodynamic dispersive effect of trees on PM2.5 concentrations result in a 9.0% reduction. In contrast, a decrease of PM2.5, by 2.8% owing to deposition on trees (11.8 t year-1) and 0.6% owing to deposition on grass (2.5 t year-1), was also observed. Trees and grass are shown to have greater effects locally, as smaller decreases in PM2.5 were found when considering reduction across the whole boundary layer. Densely built areas like Leicester City centre have relatively less vegetation and subsequently have a smaller effect on PM2.5 concentration. It was found that particle deposition on buildings was negligible with less than 0.03%. An empirical equation was derived to describe the changes in PM2.5 based on ground surface fraction of trees and grass, and their deposition velocities.

  8. Mechanistic feature-scale profile simulation of SiO{sub 2} low-pressure chemical vapor deposition by tetraethoxysilane pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labun, Andrew H. [Compaq Computer Corporation, 334 South Street, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 01545 (United States); Moffat, Harry K. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Cale, Timothy S. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Simulation of chemical vapor deposition in submicron features typical of semiconductor devices has been facilitated by extending the EVOLVE [T. S. Cale, T. H. Gandy, and G. B. Raupp, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 9, 524 (1991)] thin film etch and deposition simulation code to use thermal reaction mechanisms expressed in the Chemkin format. This allows consistent coupling between EVOLVE and reactor simulation codes that use Chemkin. In an application of a reactor-scale simulation code providing surface fluxes to a feature-scale simulation code, a proposed reaction mechanism for tetraethoxysilane [Si(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4}] pyrolysis to deposit SiO{sub 2}, which had been applied successfully to reactor-scale simulation, does not correctly predict the low step coverage over trenches observed under short reactor residence time conditions. One apparent discrepancy between the mechanism and profile-evolution observations is a reduced degree of sensitivity of the deposition rate to the presence of reaction products, i.e., the by-product inhibition effect is underpredicted. The cause of the proposed mechanism's insensitivity to by-product inhibition is investigated with the combined reactor and topography simulators. This is done first by manipulating the surface-to-volume ratio of a simulated reactor and second by adjusting parameters in the proposed mechanism such as the calculated free energies of proposed surface species. The conclusion is that simply calibrating mechanism parameters to enhance the by-product inhibition can improve the fit to profile evolution data; however, the agreement between with reactor-scale data and simulations decreases. Additional surface reaction channels seem to be required to simultaneously reproduce experimental reactor-scale growth rates and feature-scale step coverages. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  9. Study of materials and machines for 3D printed large-scale, flexible electronic structures using fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seyeon

    The 3 dimensional printing (3DP), called to additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), is emerged to revolutionize manufacturing and completely transform how products are designed and fabricated. A great deal of research activities have been carried out to apply this new technology to a variety of fields. In spite of many endeavors, much more research is still required to perfect the processes of the 3D printing techniques especially in the area of the large-scale additive manufacturing and flexible printed electronics. The principles of various 3D printing processes are briefly outlined in the Introduction Section. New types of thermoplastic polymer composites aiming to specified functional applications are also introduced in this section. Chapter 2 shows studies about the metal/polymer composite filaments for fused deposition modeling (FDM) process. Various metal particles, copper and iron particles, are added into thermoplastics polymer matrices as the reinforcement filler. The thermo-mechanical properties, such as thermal conductivity, hardness, tensile strength, and fracture mechanism, of composites are tested to figure out the effects of metal fillers on 3D printed composite structures for the large-scale printing process. In Chapter 3, carbon/polymer composite filaments are developed by a simple mechanical blending process with an aim of fabricating the flexible 3D printed electronics as a single structure. Various types of carbon particles consisting of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), conductive carbon black (CCB), and graphite are used as the conductive fillers to provide the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) with improved electrical conductivity. The mechanical behavior and conduction mechanisms of the developed composite materials are observed in terms of the loading amount of carbon fillers in this section. Finally, the prototype flexible electronics are modeled and manufactured by the FDM process using Carbon/TPU composite filaments and

  10. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  11. Geology, Bedrock, Drill hole locations, most with samples, for oil and gas exploratory wells, municipal water wells, stratigraphic test holes, and mineral exploration holes. Note that bedrock samples may not be available for all drill holes., Published in 1998, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, NC DENR / Div. of Land Resources / Geological Survey Section.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geology, Bedrock dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 1998. It is described as...

  12. Coronal Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations), and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are establish...

  13. Ash transformation and deposit build-up during biomass suspension and grate firing: Full-scale experimental studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    of this study was to investigate ash transformation and deposition behavior in two biomass-fired boilers, firing wheat straw and/or wood. The influence of strawfiring technology (grate and suspension) on the ash transformation, deposit formation rate and deposit characteristics has been investigated. Bulk...... on similar levels. This was observed even though the concentration of fly ash in the flue gas was significantly higher during straw suspension firing. The influence of co-combustion of wood with straw on deposit formation rate, probe heat uptake and deposit characteristicswas also investigated during...... suspension firing conditions. Data from 35% straw suspension firing with wood showed a deposit formation rate of 33 g/m2/h for the first 12 h. The deposit formation rate increased to 41 g/m2/h with 100% strawfiring. The probe heat uptake reduction up to 40 h of exposure time was 3.0, 7.3, 8.4 and 16.5 kW/m2...

  14. Simulation of the atmospheric transport and deposition on a local/meso-and regional scale after hypothetical accidents at the Kola nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaning, Lennart; Baklanov, Alexander [Defence Research Establishment, FOA, Division of NBC Defence, Umea (Sweden)

    1997-08-25

    An accident at the Kola nuclear power plant could cause a large release of radioactivity into the atmosphere. To illustrate possible effects on the environment, potential atmospheric transport and deposition are calculated for two different scales - the local/meso- and the regional, using two different models. A 3-dimensional meso-scale model, developed at the Kola Science Centre, and suitable for distances out to a few hundred kilometres, has been used for the local/meso-scale, and a model system based on the MATHEW/ADPIC code, for the regional scale. Some consequences for the population have been estimated by using the MACCS model. Calculated aerial radionuclide activity concentrations, ground contamination and consequences for the population of the Euro-Arctic Barents region are discussed for two scenarios. The results for the local scale show a considerable influence on the radionuclide ground contamination pattern from the presence of precipitation. The significance of wet deposition is confirmed by the results for the regional scale which also emphasise the importance of having access to high quality weather predictions in emergency response organisations. The importance of the specific Arctic nutrition pathways, not included in this study, is discussed. It is important to make further studies in order to investigate the significance of these pathways.

  15. Dumb holes: analogues for black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, W G

    2008-08-28

    The use of sonic analogues to black and white holes, called dumb or deaf holes, to understand the particle production by black holes is reviewed. The results suggest that the black hole particle production is a low-frequency and low-wavenumber process.

  16. The Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary deposit in the Gulf of Mexico: Large-scale oceanic basin response to the Chicxulub impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Jason C.; Snedden, John W.; Gulick, Sean P. S.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrocarbon exploration in the last decade has yielded sufficient data to evaluate the Gulf of Mexico basin response to the Chicxulub asteroid impact. Given its passive marine setting and proximity to the impact structure on the Yucatán Peninsula, the gulf is the premier locale in which to study the near-field geologic effect of a bolide impact. We mapped a thick (decimeter- to hectometer-scale) deposit of carbonate debris at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary that is ubiquitous in the gulf and readily identifiable on borehole and seismic data. We interpret deposits seen in seismic and borehole data in the deepwater gulf to be predominately muddy debrites with minor turbidites based on cores in the southeastern gulf. Mapping of the deposit in the northern Gulf of Mexico reveals that the impact redistributed roughly 1.05 × 105 km3 of sediment therein and over 1.98 × 105 km3 gulfwide. Deposit distribution suggests that the majority of sediment derived from coastal and shallow-water environments throughout the gulf via seismic and megatsunamic processes initiated by the impact. The Texas shelf and northern margin of the Florida Platform were significant sources of sediment, while the central and southern Florida Platform underwent more localized platform collapse. The crustal structure of the ancestral gulf influenced postimpact deposition both directly and indirectly through its control on salt distribution in the Louann Salt Basin. Nevertheless, impact-generated deposition overwhelmed virtually all topography and depositional systems at the start of the Cenozoic, blanketing the gulf with carbonate debris within days.

  17. Up-scaled Teer-UDP850/4 Unbalanced Magnetron Deposition System Used for Mass-Production of CrTiAlN Hard Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-jun; YANG Shi-cai; JIANG Bai-ling; BAI Li-jing; CHEN Di-chun; WEN Xiao-bin; TEER D.G.

    2004-01-01

    Up-scaled deposition process of Teer-UDP850/4 has been established and used for massive production of CrTiAlN hard coatings in applications of anti-wear, cutting and forming tools. This deposition system uses four magnetrons that are arranged by unbalanced magnets to form closed magnetic field enabling the system running in high current density.Elemental metals of Cr, Ti and Al are used as the target materials which are co-deposited with nitrogen forming multialloy nitride, nanoscale multi-layer or superlattice hard coatings. The substrate turntable is designed as planet rotation mechanism with three folds so that components or tools with complicate geometry can be uniformly coated onto all their surfaces and cutting edges. The power units for the magnetrons are straight dc whilst the substrate is biased by pulsed dc. Two solid heaters are installed in the system to enable running a wide range of deposition temperature from 200℃ to 500℃. The pumping system is powerful that incorporated with a polycold to pump the system to a good vacuum in a very short time. A front door and a movable substrate table are available to benefit easily loading and unloading. Deposition procedure,properties and performance of the coatings is also presented in this paper.

  18. Gravity Fields Generation In The Universe By The Large Range of Scales Convection Systems In Planets, Stars, Black Holes and Galaxies Based On The "Convection Bang Hypothesis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, H.; Amirshahkarami, A.; Gholibeigian, K.

    2015-12-01

    In our vision it is believed that the Big Bang was Convection Bang (CB). When CB occurred, a gigantic large-scale forced convection system (LFCS) began to create space-time including gravitons and gluons in more than light speed. Then, simultaneously by a swirling wild wind, created inflation process including many quantum convection loops (QCL) in locations which had more density of temperature and energetic particles like gravitons. QCL including fundamental particles, grew and formed black holes (BHs) as the core of galaxies. LFCSs of heat and mass in planets, stars, BHs and galaxies generate gravity and electromagnetic fields and change the properties of matter and space-time around the systems. Mechanism: Samples: 1- Due to gravity fields of Sun and Moon, Earth's inner core is dislocated toward them and rotates around the Earth's center per day and generates LFCSs, Gholibeigian [AGU, 2012]. 2- Dislocated Sun's core due to gravity fields of planets/ Jupiter, rotates around the Sun's center per 25-35 days and generates LFCSs, Gholibeigian [EGU, 2014]. 3- If a planet/star falls into a BH, what happens? It means, its dislocated core rotates around its center in less than light speed and generates very fast LFCS and friction, while it is rotating/melting around/inward the center of BH. Observable Factors: 1- There is not logical relation between surface gravity fields of planets/Sun and their masses (general relativity); see Planetary Fact Sheet/Ratio to Earth Values-NASA: Earth: mass/gravity =1/1, Jupiter=317.8/2.36, Neptune=17.1/1.12, Saturn=95.2/0.916, Moon=0.0128/0.166, Sun=333000/28. 2- Convective systems in thunderstorms help bring ozone down to Earth [Brian-Kahn]. 3- In 12 surveyed BHs, produced gravity force & magnetic field strength were matched (unique LFCS source) [PhysOrg - June 4, 2014]. Justification: After BB/CB, gravitons were created without any other masses and curvature of space-time (general relativity), but by primary gigantic convection

  19. Gas Well Top Hole Locations, LP and LNG, DNROilGasWells-Utah Oil and Gas Well Surface Points from the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Oil Gas and Mining Division. http://ogm.utah.gov, Published in 2007, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Gas Well Top Hole Locations, LP and LNG dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is...

  20. Gas Well Top Hole Locations, LP and LNG, DNROilGasHD-Path-Utah Oil and Gas Well Horizontal drill paths. From the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Oil Gas and Mining Division. http://ogm.utah.gov, Published in 2007, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Gas Well Top Hole Locations, LP and LNG dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is...

  1. Oil Well Top Hole Locations, DNROilGasHD_Path-Utah Oil and Gas Well Horizontal drill paths. From the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Oil Gas and Mining Division. http://ogm.utah.gov, Published in 2007, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Oil Well Top Hole Locations dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described...

  2. Oil Well Top Hole Locations, DNROilGasWells-Utah Oil and Gas Well Surface Points from the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Oil Gas and Mining Division. http://ogm.utah.gov, Published in 2007, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Oil Well Top Hole Locations dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described...

  3. Magnetic fields around black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, David A. G.

    Active Galactic Nuclei are the most powerful long-lived objects in the universe. They are thought to harbor supermassive black holes that range from 1 million solar masses to 1000 times that value and possibly greater. Theory and observation are converging on a model for these objects that involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy of accreting gas to radiation as well as Poynting flux produced by the interaction of the rotating spacetime and the electromagnetic fields originating in the ionized accretion flow. The presence of black holes in astrophysics is taking center stage, with the output from AGN in various forms such as winds and jets influencing the formation and evolution of the host galaxy. This dissertation addresses some of the basic unanswered questions that plague our current understanding of how rotating black holes interact with their surrounding magnetized accretion disks to produce the enormous observed energy. Two magnetic configurations are examined. The first involves magnetic fields connecting the black hole with the inner accretion disk and the other involves large scale magnetic fields threading the disk and the hole. We study the effects of the former type by establishing the consequences that magnetic torques between the black hole and the inner accretion disk have on the energy dissipation profile. We attempt a plausible explanation to the observed "Deep Minimum" state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6- 30-15. For the latter type of magnetic geometry, we study the effects of the strength of the magnetic field threading the black hole within the context of the cherished Blandford & Znajek mechanism for black hole spin energy extraction. We begin by addressing the problem in the non-relativistic regime where we find that the black hole-threading magnetic field is stronger for greater disk thickness, larger magnetic Prandtl number, and for a larger accretion disk. We then study the problem in full relativity where we show that our

  4. Particle accelerators inside spinning black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Kayll

    2010-05-28

    On the basis of the Kerr metric as a model for a spinning black hole accreting test particles from rest at infinity, I show that the center-of-mass energy for a pair of colliding particles is generically divergent at the inner horizon. This shows not only that classical black holes are internally unstable, but also that Planck-scale physics is a characteristic feature within black holes at scales much larger that the Planck length. The novel feature of the divergence discussed here is that the phenomenon is present only for black holes with rotation, and in this sense it is distinct from the well-known Cauchy horizon instability.

  5. Investigation of ash deposition in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor co-firing biomass with lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogebakan, Z.; Gogebakan, Y.; Selcuk, N.; Seliuk, E. [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-01-15

    This study presents the results from investigation of ash deposition characteristics of a high ash and sulfur content lignite co-fired with three types of biomass (olive residue, 49 wt%; hazelnut shell, 42 wt%; and cotton residue, 41 wt%) in 0.3 MWt Middle East Technical University (METU) Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustion (ABFBC) Test Rig. Deposit samples were collected on all air-cooled probe at a temperature of 500{degree}C. Samples were analyzed by SEM/EDX and XRD methods. The results reveal that co-firing lignite with olive residue, hazelnut shell and cotton residue show low deposition rates. High concentrations of silicon, calcium, sulfur, iron, and aluminum were found in deposit samples. No chlorine was detected in deposits. Calcium sulfate and potassium sulfate were detected as major and minor components of the deposits, respectively. High sulfur and alumina-silicate content of lignite resulted in formation of alkali sulfates instead of alkali chlorides. Therefore, fuel blends under consideration can be denoted to have low-fouling propensity.

  6. Investigation of ash deposition in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor co-firing biomass with lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogebakan, Zuhal; Gogebakan, Yusuf; Selçuk, Nevin; Selçuk, Ekrem

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the results from investigation of ash deposition characteristics of a high ash and sulfur content lignite co-fired with three types of biomass (olive residue, 49 wt%; hazelnut shell, 42 wt%; and cotton residue, 41 wt%) in 0.3 MW(t) Middle East Technical University (METU) Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustion (ABFBC) Test Rig. Deposit samples were collected on an air-cooled probe at a temperature of 500 degrees C. Samples were analyzed by SEM/EDX and XRD methods. The results reveal that co-firing lignite with olive residue, hazelnut shell and cotton residue show low deposition rates. High concentrations of silicon, calcium, sulfur, iron, and aluminum were found in deposit samples. No chlorine was detected in deposits. Calcium sulfate and potassium sulfate were detected as major and minor components of the deposits, respectively. High sulfur and alumina-silicate content of lignite resulted in formation of alkali sulfates instead of alkali chlorides. Therefore, fuel blends under consideration can be denoted to have low-fouling propensity.

  7. Several factors which influence the dynamics of drill hole flooding and the accumulated oil samples using the installation at the B/sub 8/ Soviet deposit as an example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagautdinov, A.K.; Kharitonova, T.P.; Solopakha, V.M.

    1979-01-01

    Individual groupings which are characterized by a variety of dynamics of drill hole flooding were isolated as a result of studying the dynamics of drill hole flooding. The latter is associated with the location (the positioning) of productive drill holes, the inter-grouping of external and internal observational drill holes, and the influence of a variety of geological and industrial factors. Recommendations on the drilling of installations established that strata analogous to the B/sub 8/ type are determined based on the analytical results of these factors.

  8. 祁连山天然气水合物赋存区钻孔细菌多样性%Bacterial diversity in bore holes of gas hydrate-rich deposit districts in Qilian Mountains of Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武淑娇; 韩路; 吕杰; 董建英; 祝有海

    2012-01-01

    分析了青海省祁连山冻土区天然气水合物赋存区DK-6钻孔的4个样品,对岩心样品进行处理提取微生物总基因组,采用PCR构建了细菌16S rDNA基因文库,4个文库包括44个OTU,其中有厚壁菌门(Firmicutes)、拟杆菌门(Bacteroidetes)、变形杆菌门(Proteobacteria)(包括α-、β-和y-变形杆菌亚群)、放线菌纲(Actinobacteria)和异常球菌-栖热菌门(Deinococcus-Thermus)5类,煤、泥岩、粉砂岩等不同岩性的微生物群落之间显示出较大的组成差异,优势菌不同.细菌菌群多样性随采集点地质环境不同而有较明显的变化,天然气水合物含量、水含量、有机质含量等环境因素对冻土区天然气水合物赋存区中细菌菌群有一定的影响.4个样品中存在的微生物大部分可以代谢有机烃类,在天然气水合物环境的特殊条件下,外界环境因素制约了微生物的种类.%In this study, four core samples were collected from the DK-6 bore holes of gas hy-drate-rich deposit districts in the permafrost zone of Qilian Mountains, Qinghai Province of North-west China, with the total bacterial genome in the samples analyzed. Four 16S rDNA gene librar-ies were created by PCR. There were 44 OTUs, including five categories, i. e. , Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria (α-, β-, and γ-Proteobacteria) , Actinobacteria, and Deinococ-cus-Thermus, in the four gene libraries. The microbial communities of different lithology showed a relatively large composition difference, and had different dominant species. Lithology played a certain decisive role to the growth of bacteria. Bore holes DK6-12 (117.5 m) and DK6-17 (161.9 m) were of mudstone, in which, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans was the dominant bacterium. K6-23 (194.6 m) was of fine sandstone, in which, a large number of Spirosoma panaciterrae was found in cloning sequences. DK6-25 (213 m) was of coal, with the highest abundance of Pantoea ananatis. Most of the microbes presented in the four

  9. Quasistars: Accreting black holes inside massive envelopes

    CERN Document Server

    Begelman, Mitchell C; Armitage, Philip J

    2007-01-01

    We study the structure and evolution of "quasistars," accreting black holes embedded within massive hydrostatic gaseous envelopes. These configurations may model the early growth of supermassive black hole seeds. The accretion rate onto the black hole adjusts so that the luminosity carried by the convective envelope equals the Eddington limit for the total mass. This greatly exceeds the Eddington limit for the black hole mass alone, leading to rapid growth of the black hole. We use analytic models and numerical stellar structure calculations to study the structure and evolution of quasistars. We derive analytically the scaling of the photospheric temperature with the black hole mass and envelope mass, and show that it decreases with time as the black hole mass increases. Once the photospheric temperature becomes lower than 10000 K, the photospheric opacity drops precipitously and the photospheric temperature hits a limiting value, analogous to the Hayashi track for red giants and protostars, below which no hy...

  10. The Black Hole Uncertainty Principle Correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, B J

    2014-01-01

    The Black Hole Uncertainty Principle correspondence proposes a connection between the Uncertainty Principle on microscopic scales and black holes on macroscopic scales. This is manifested in a unified expression for the Compton wavelength and Schwarzschild radius. It is a natural consequence of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, which suggests corrections to the Uncertainty Principle as the energy increases towards the Planck value. It also entails corrections to the event horizon size as the black hole mass falls to the Planck value, leading to the concept of a Generalized Event Horizon. One implication of this is that there could be sub-Planckian black holes with a size of order their Compton wavelength. Loop quantum gravity suggests the existence of black holes with precisely this feature. The correspondence leads to a heuristic derivation of the black hole temperature and suggests how the Hawking formula is modified in the sub-Planckian regime.

  11. Black holes and quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooft, G. ' t, E-mail: g.thooft@uu.n [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University and Spinoza Institute, P.O. Box 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-07-15

    After a brief review of quantum black hole physics, it is shown how the dynamical properties of a quantum black hole may be deduced to a large extent from Standard Model Physics, extended to scales near the Planck length, and combined with results from perturbative quantum gravity. Together, these interactions generate a Hilbert space of states on the black hole horizon, which can be investigated, displaying interesting systematics by themselves. To make such approaches more powerful, a study is made of the black hole complementarity principle, from which one may deduce the existence of a hidden form of local conformal invariance. Finally, the question is raised whether the principles underlying Quantum Mechanics are to be sharpened in this domain of physics as well. There are intriguing possibilities.

  12. Black hole accretion disc impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Pihajoki, Pauli

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytic model for computing the luminosity and spectral evolution of flares caused by a supermassive black hole impacting the accretion disc of another supermassive black hole. Our model includes photon diffusion, emission from optically thin regions and relativistic corrections to the observed spectrum and time-scales. We test the observability of the impact scenario with a simulated population of quasars hosting supermassive black hole binaries. The results indicate that for a moderate binary mass ratio of 0.3, and impact distances of 100 primary Schwarzschild radii, the accretion disc impacts can be expected to equal or exceed the host quasar in brightness at observed wavelength {\\lambda} = 510 nm up to z = 0.6. We conclude that accretion disc impacts may function as an independent probe for supermassive black hole binaries. We release the code used for computing the model light curves to the community.

  13. Ground penetrating radar evaluation of the internal structure of fluvial tufa deposits (Dévanos-Añavieja system, NE Spain): an approach to different scales of heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo Anchuela, Ó.; Luzón, A.; Pérez, A.; Muñoz, A.; Mayayo, M. J.; Gil Garbi, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Quaternary Añavieja-Dévanos tufa system is located in the northern sector of the Iberian Chain. It has been previously tackled by means sedimentological studies focused on the available outcrops and some boreholes. They have permitted the proposal of a sedimentary scenario that fits with a pool-barrage fluvial tufa model. However a better knowledge of the characteristics and internal distribution of the usually non-outcropping pool deposits as well as of its relationship with barrage deposits has not been evaluated in detail yet. Palaeoenvironmental studies on tufas are usually biased because tufas are commonly delicate facies exposed to intense erosion during water level fall stages; for this reason outcrops are usually scarce and very often coincide with the most cemented barrage deposits. In order to analyse the internal characteristics of the tufa deposits under study, but also the lateral correlation among different facies, ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been employed both for the evaluation of its applicability in such kind of environments and to improve, if possible, the sedimentary model using geophysical data in sectors without outcrops. A GPR survey including different antennas ranging from 50 to 500 MHz along different sectors and its comparison with natural outcrops has been carried out. GPR results have permitted to deduce clear differences between pool and barrage deposits and to recognise its internal structure and geometrical relationships. The survey also permitted an approach to different scales of heterogeneities in the radarfacies evaluation by using distinct antennas and therefore, reaching different resolutions and penetrations. The resulting integration from different antennas allows three different attenuant and eight reflective radarfacies to be defined permitting a better approach to the real extension of the pool areas. These results have permitted to decipher the horizontal and vertical facies changes and the identification of

  14. Joint evolution of black holes and galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Colpi, M; Haardt, F

    2006-01-01

    OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE FOR SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES Introduction Some Useful Formalism General Considerations Resolved Stellar Dynamics Gas as a Tracer of the Gravitational Potential Tackling the Unresolvable: Reverberation Mapping Scaling Relations for SMBHs Black Hole Demographics The Future JOINT EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLES AND GALAXIES: OBSERVATIONAL ISSUES Galaxy Activity: Generalities Local Evidence on the Interplay Between the Stellar and Gravitational Origin of AGN Activity The Cosmic History of Galaxy Activity Constraints on the Cosmic Energy Budget Current Observational Programs and Fut

  15. Validation of the DIFFAL, HPAC and HotSpot Dispersion Models Using the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device (FSRDD) Field Trials Witness Plate Deposition Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Murray; Parkes, David

    2016-05-01

    Three atmospheric dispersion models--DIFFAL, HPAC, and HotSpot--of differing complexities have been validated against the witness plate deposition dataset taken during the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device (FSRDD) Field Trials. The small-scale nature of these trials in comparison to many other historical radiological dispersion trials provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the near-field performance of the models considered. This paper performs validation of these models using two graphical methods of comparison: deposition contour plots and hotline profile graphs. All of the models tested are assessed to perform well, especially considering that previous model developments and validations have been focused on larger-scale scenarios. Of the models, HPAC generally produced the most accurate results, especially at locations within ∼100 m of GZ. Features present within the observed data, such as hot spots, were not well modeled by any of the codes considered. Additionally, it was found that an increase in the complexity of the meteorological data input to the models did not necessarily lead to an improvement in model accuracy; this is potentially due to the small-scale nature of the trials.

  16. Full-Particle Simulations on Electrostatic Plasma Environment near Lunar Vertical Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Y.; Nishino, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Kaguya satellite and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter have observed a number of vertical holes on the terrestrial Moon [Haruyama et al., GRL, 2009; Robinson et al., PSS, 2012], which have spatial scales of tens of meters and are possible lava tube skylights. The hole structure has recently received particular attention, because the structure gives an important clue to the complex volcanic history of the Moon. The holes also have high potential as locations for constructing future lunar bases, because of fewer extra-lunar rays/particles and micrometeorites reaching the hole bottoms. In this sense, these holes are not only interesting in selenology, but are also significant from the viewpoint of electrostatic environments. The subject can also be an interesting resource of research in comparative planetary science, because hole structures have been found in other solar system bodies such as the Mars. The lunar dayside electrostatic environment is governed by electrodynamic interactions among the solar wind plasma, photoelectrons, and the charged lunar surface, providing topologically complex boundaries to the plasma. We use the three-dimensional, massively-parallelized, particle-in-cell simulation code EMSES [Miyake and Usui, POP, 2009] to simulate the near-hole plasma environment on the Moon [Miyake and Nishino, Icarus, 2015]. We took into account the solar wind plasma downflow, photoelectron emission from the sunlit part of the lunar surface, and plasma charge deposition on the surface. The simulation domain consists of 400×400×2000 grid points and contains about 25 billion plasma macro-particles. Thus, we need to use supercomputers for the simulations. The vertical wall of the hole introduces a new boundary for both photo and solar wind electrons. The current balance condition established at a hole bottom is altered by the limited solar wind electron penetration into the hole and complex photoelectron current paths inside the hole. The self

  17. Black Holes: Attractors for Intelligence?

    CERN Document Server

    Vidal, Clement

    2011-01-01

    The Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has so far been unsuccessful and needs additional methods. We introduce a two-dimensional metric for civilization development, using the Kardashev scale of energy increase and the Barrow scale of inward manipulation. To support Barrow's scale limit, we contend with energetic, societal, scientific, computational, and philosophical arguments that black holes are attractors for intelligence. An application of the two-dimensional metric leads to a simple, consistent and observable hypothesis to test the existence of very advanced civilizations. We suggest that some already observed X-Ray binaries may be unnoticed advanced civilizations, of type KII-Bomega. The appendix provides an argumentative map of the paper's main thesis. KEYWORDS: SETI, black holes, Kardashev scale, Barrow scale, star lifting, XRB

  18. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20111761 Chen Hua(115 Geological Party,Guizhou Bureau of Geology and Mineral Exploration & Development,Guiyang 551400,China);Deng Chao Analysis on the Metallogenic Environment of Maochang Bauxite in Guizhou Province(Guizhou Geology,ISSN1000-5943,CN52-1059/P,27(3),2010,p.198-201,2 illus.,1 table,8 refs.)Key words:bauxite deposit,Guizhou Province By long time physical and chemical process,the carbonate rock after Central Guizhou uplidft,becomes red clay,after further weathering,the red clay decomposed into the oxide,hydroxide of Al and Fe,in the dissolution hole and depression,it concentrates primary fragmentary tight and earthy karst bauxite ore.Because the variation of landform,it decomposes and cracks again,affords the material source

  19. Blanking die design of manual scale mark for crescent hole%月牙形孔手动分度冲裁模设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟少明; 聂慧萍; 陈晨

    2013-01-01

    As a stainless steel impeller disk used for aviation,25 crescent holes are uniformly distributed on stamping part,and the size requirements of the hole positions should be met.According to the aviation parts feature,the blanking workpiece positioning scheme was determined,through the use of unique position mode and the coordination of high precision index plate,positioning shaft and shaft pin,a blanking die mechanism of manual scalemark for crescent hole was designed to realize the stamping of 25 uniform crescent shape holes.Production results show that the stamping die structure design is reasonable and convenient to operation.The size of workpiece in stamping processing fully meets the requirements of design drawings.%某航空用不锈钢叶轮盘零件需要冲压加工该零件上均布的25对月牙孔,并满足相应的孔位置尺寸要求.根据叶轮盘的零件特征,确定了工件的冲裁方案.采用独特的模具定位方式,通过高精度分度盘、定位轴与轴销三者的配合,设计了一种月牙形孔手动分度冲裁模机构,实现了对该零件上25个均布的月牙形孔手动分度冲压加工.生产结果表明,该冲裁模结构设计合理、操作方便,冲压加工的工件尺寸完全符合图纸设计要求.

  20. On the cosmic evolution of the scaling relations between black holes and their host galaxies: Broad Line AGN in the zCOSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Merloni, A; Bolzonella, M; Brusa, M; Civano, F; Comastri, A; Elvis, M; Fiore, F; Gilli, R; Hao, H; Jahnke, K; Koekemoer, A M; Lusso, E; Mainieri, V; Mignoli, M; Miyaji, T; Renzini, A; Salvato, M; Silverman, Joseph; Trump, J; Vignali, C; Zamorani, G; Capak, P; Lilly, S J; Sanders, D; Taniguchi, Y; Bardelli, S; Carollo, C M; Caputi, K; Contini, T; Coppa, G; Cucciati, O; De la Torre, S; de Ravel, L; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Hasinger, G; Impey, C; Iovino, A; Iwasawa, K; Kampczyk, P; Kneib, J -P; Knobel, C; Kovac, K; Lamareille, F; Le Borgne, J F; Le Brun, V; Le Fèvre, O; Maier, C; Pellò, R; Peng, Y; Montero, E Perez; Ricciardelli, E; Scodeggio, M; Tanaka, M; Tasca, L A M; Tresse, L; Vergani, D; Zucca, E

    2009-01-01

    (Abriged) We report on the measurement of the rest frame K-band luminosity and total stellar mass of the hosts of 89 broad line Active Galactic Nuclei detected in the zCOSMOS survey in the redshift range 1hole in their Spectral Energy Distributions. We derive an estimate of black hole masses through the analysis of the broad Mg II emission lines observed in the medium-resolution spectra taken with VIMOS/VLT as part of the zCOSMOS project. We found that, as compared to the local value, the average black hole to host galaxy mass ratio appears to evolve positively with redshift, with a best fit evolution of the form (1+z)^{0.68 \\pm0.12 +0.6 -0.3}, where the large asymmetric systematic errors stem from the uncertainties in the choice of IMF, in the calibration of the virial relation used to estimate BH masses and in the mean QSO SED adopted. A thoroug...

  1. Slowly balding black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2011-01-01

    The "no hair" theorem, a key result in General Relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the "no hair" theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively "frozen-in" the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes $N_B = e \\Phi_\\infty /(\\pi c \\hbar)$, where $\\Phi_\\infty \\approx 2 \\pi^2 B_{NS} R_{NS}^3 /(P_{\\rm NS} c)$ is the initial magnetic flux through the hemisphere...

  2. Effectiveness of Devices to Monitor Biofouling and Metals Deposition on Plumbing Materials Exposed to a Full-Scale Drinking Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbin, Scott; Wylie, Jason; Krishna, K. C. Bal

    2017-01-01

    A Modified Robbins Device (MRD) was installed in a full-scale water distribution system to investigate biofouling and metal depositions on concrete, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and stainless steel surfaces. Bulk water monitoring and a KIWA monitor (with glass media) were used to offline monitor biofilm development on pipe wall surfaces. Results indicated that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and metal concentrations on coupons increased with time. However, bacterial diversities decreased. There was a positive correlation between increase of ATP and metal deposition on pipe surfaces of stainless steel and HDPE and no correlation was observed on concrete and glass surfaces. The shared bacterial diversity between bulk water and MRD was less than 20% and the diversity shared between the MRD and KIWA monitor was only 10%. The bacterial diversity on biofilm of plumbing material of MRD however, did not show a significant difference suggesting a lack of influence from plumbing material during early stage of biofilm development. PMID:28060947

  3. Effectiveness of Devices to Monitor Biofouling and Metals Deposition on Plumbing Materials Exposed to a Full-Scale Drinking Water Distribution System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Garbin, Scott; Wylie, Jason; Krishna, K C Bal

    2017-01-01

    A Modified Robbins Device (MRD) was installed in a full-scale water distribution system to investigate biofouling and metal depositions on concrete, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and stainless steel surfaces. Bulk water monitoring and a KIWA monitor (with glass media) were used to offline monitor biofilm development on pipe wall surfaces. Results indicated that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and metal concentrations on coupons increased with time. However, bacterial diversities decreased. There was a positive correlation between increase of ATP and metal deposition on pipe surfaces of stainless steel and HDPE and no correlation was observed on concrete and glass surfaces. The shared bacterial diversity between bulk water and MRD was less than 20% and the diversity shared between the MRD and KIWA monitor was only 10%. The bacterial diversity on biofilm of plumbing material of MRD however, did not show a significant difference suggesting a lack of influence from plumbing material during early stage of biofilm development.

  4. Numerical simulation of regional scale dispersion and deposition of radioactive pollutants from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satomura, Takehiko [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    The dispersion and deposition of radioactive pollutants from the Chernobyl accident was simulated according to a transfer model for air pollutants, which was made by Meteorological Research Institute. The observation data and the data of emission source used here were obtained from the document distributed by ATMES (Atmospheric Transport Model Evaluation Study). The numerical model used consisted of two parts. One is an atmospheric estimation model which allows to predict meteorological factors and the other is a part to calculate the advection diffusion based on the predicted meteorological factors. The time-course changes in {sup 137}Cs concentration in the air determined in Stockholm, Mol, Budapest and Attikis were well coincident with the calculated {sup 137}Cs levels for the respective cities. For atmospheric {sup 137}Cs concentrations at Bilthoven and Berlin, the estimation was also satisfactory, but the calculated deposition levels in both cities did not agree with the respective observation levels. (M.N.)

  5. Black Holes versus Supersymmetry at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava; Cavaglia, Marco

    2007-11-01

    Supersymmetry and extra dimensions are the two most promising candidates for new physics at the TeV scale. Supersymmetric particles or extra-dimensional effects could soon be observed at the Large Hadron Collider. In this paper we assess the distinguishability of supersymmetry and black hole events at the LHC. Black hole events are simulated with the CATFISH black hole generator. Supersymmetry simulations use a combination of PYTHIA and ISAJET, the latter providing the mass spectrum. Our analysis shows that supersymmetry and black hole events at the Large Hadron Collider can be easily discriminated.

  6. Microcanonical Description of (Micro Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Harms

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The microcanonical ensemble is the proper ensemble to describe black holes which are not in thermodynamic equilibrium, such as radiating black holes. This choice of ensemble eliminates the problems, e.g., negative specific heat (not allowed in the canonical ensemble and loss of unitarity, encountered when the canonical ensemble is used. In this review we present an overview of the weaknesses of the standard thermodynamic description of black holes and show how the microcanonical approach can provide a consistent description of black holes and their Hawking radiation at all energy scales. Our approach is based on viewing the horizon area as yielding the ensemble density at fixed system energy. We then compare the decay rates of black holes in the two different pictures. Our description is particularly relevant for the analysis of micro-black holes whose existenceis predicted in models with extra-spatial dimensions.

  7. Energy deposition in small-scale targets of liquid water using the very low energy electromagnetic physics processes of the Geant4 toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incerti, S.; Champion, C.; Tran, H. N.; Karamitros, M.; Bernal, M.; Francis, Z.; Ivanchenko, V.; Mantero, A.; Members of Geant4-DNA Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    In the perspective of building an open source simulation platform dedicated to the modelling of early biological molecular damages due to ionising radiation at the DNA scale, the general-purpose Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit has been recently extended with specific very low energy electromagnetic physics processes for liquid water medium. These processes - also called “Geant4-DNA” processes - simulate the physical interactions induced by electrons, hydrogen and helium atoms of different charge states. The present work reports on the energy deposit distributions obtained for incident electrons, protons and alpha particles in nanometre-size volumes comparable to those present in the genetic material of mammalian cells. The frequency distributions of the energy deposition obtained for three typical geometries of nanometre-size cylindrical targets placed in a spherical phantom are found to be in reasonable agreement with prior works. Furthermore, we present a combination of the Geant4-DNA processes with a simplified geometrical model of a cellular nucleus allowing the evaluation of energy deposits in volumes of biological interest.

  8. Deburring small intersecting holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-08-01

    Deburring intersecting holes is one of the most difficult deburring tasks faced by many industries. Only 14 of the 37 major deburring processes are applicable to most intersecting hole applications. Only five of these are normally applicable to small or miniature holes. Basic process capabilities and techniques used as a function of hole sizes and intersection depths are summarized.

  9. Continental-scale assessment of long-term trends in wet deposition trajectories: Role of anthropogenic and hydro-climatic drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Gall, H. E.; Niyogi, D.; Rao, S.

    2012-12-01

    The global trend of increased urbanization, and associated increased intensity of energy and material consumption and waste emissions, has contributed to shifts in the trajectories of aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric environments. Here, we focus on continental-scale spatiotemporal patterns in two atmospheric constituents (nitrate and sulfate), whose global biogeochemical cycles have been dramatically altered by emissions from mobile and fixed sources in urbanized and industrialized regions. The observed patterns in wet deposition fluxes of nitrate and sulfate are controlled by (1) natural hydro-climatic forcing, and (2) anthropogenic forcing (emissions and regulatory control), both of which are characterized by stochasticity and non-stationarity. We examine long-term wet deposition records in the U.S., Europe, and East Asia to evaluate how anthropogenic and natural forcing factors jointly contributed to the shifting temporal patterns of wet deposition fluxes at continental scales. These data offer clear evidence for successful implementation of regulatory controls and widespread adoption of technologies contributed to improving water quality and mitigation of adverse ecological impacts. We developed a stochastic model to project the future trajectories of wet deposition fluxes in emerging countries with fast growing urban areas. The model generates ellipses within which projected wet deposition flux trajectories are inscribed, similar to the trends in observational data. The shape of the ellipses provides information regarding the relative dominance of anthropogenic (e.g., industrial and urban emissions) versus hydro-climatic drivers (e.g., rainfall patterns, aridity index). Our analysis facilitates projections of the trajectory shift as a result of urbanization and other land-use changes, climate change, and regulatory enforcement. We use these observed data and the model to project likely trajectories for rapidly developing countries (BRIC), with a

  10. Large-scale concentration and deposition maps for the Netherlands. Report on 2012; Grootschalige concentratie- en depositiekaarten Nederland. Rapportage 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velders, G.J.M.; Aben, J.M.M.; Jimmink, B.A.; Geilenkirchen, G.P.; Van der Swaluw, E.; De Vries, W.J.; Wesseling, J.; Van Zanten, M.C.

    2012-06-15

    RIVM (National Institute for Public Health and the Environment) presents new concentration maps for the Netherlands, for eight air pollutants, including nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter, for the period up to 2030. New deposition maps for nitrogen are also presented. These maps are produced annually and show a combined image of the air quality and level of deposition in the Netherlands. They are used in the national air quality collaboration programme (NSL) and in the programmatic approach to nitrogen (PAS) of the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment and the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation. The maps are based both on measurements and model calculations. They have legal status and are considered a touchstone for new infrastructural projects [Dutch] Het RIVM presenteert de nieuwe kaarten waarin de concentraties van acht luchtverontreinigende stoffen (onder andere stikstofdioxide en fijn stof) in Nederland tot 2030 staan weergegeven. Hetzelfde geldt voor de mate waarin stikstof op de bodem neerslaat. Deze kaarten worden jaarlijks gemaakt en geven een beeld van de luchtkwaliteit en de neerslag van stikstof op de bodem in Nederland. Ze worden gebruikt in het Nationaal Samenwerkingsprogramma Luchtkwaliteit (NSL) en de Programmatische Aanpak Stikstof (PAS) van de ministeries van Infrastructuur en Milieu (IenM) en Economische Zaken, Landbouw en Innovatie (ELI). De kaarten hebben een wettelijke status en gelden als toetssteen voor ruimtelijke ordeningsplannen. Ze zijn gemaakt op basis van metingen en modelberekeningen.

  11. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  12. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  13. Could supermassive black holes be quintessential primordial black holes?

    CERN Document Server

    Bean, R; Bean, Rachel; Magueijo, Joao

    2002-01-01

    There is growing observational evidence for a population of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in galactic bulges. We examine in detail the conditions under which these black holes must have originated from primordial black holes (PBHs). We consider the merging and accretion history experienced by SMBHs to find that, whereas it is possible that they were formed by purely astrophysical processes, this is unlikely and most probably a populations of primordial progenitors is necessary. We identify the mass distribution and comoving density of this population and then propose a cosmological scenario producing PBHs with the right properties. Although this is not essential we consider PBHs produced at the end of a period of inflation with a blue spectrum of fluctuations. We constrain the value of the spectral tilt in order to obtain the required PBH comoving density. We then assume that PBHs grow by accreting quintessence showing that their mass scales like the horizon mass while the quintessence field itself is scal...

  14. Geochemical Characteristics and Significance of Major Elements, Trace Elements and REE in Mineralized Altered Rocks of Large-Scale Tsagaan Suvarga Cu-Mo Porphyry Deposit in Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The alteration types of the large-scale Tsagaan Suvarga Cu-Mo porphyry deposit mostly comprise stockwork silicification, argillization, quartz-sericite alteration, K-silicate alteration, and propylitization.The mineralized and altered zones from hydrothermal metallogenic center to the outside successively are Cu-bearing stockwork silicification zone, Cu-bearing argillized zone, Cu-Mo-bearing quartz-sericite alteration zone, Cu-Mo-bearing K-silicate alteration zone, and propylitization zone.The K-silicate alteration occurred in the early phase, quartz-sericite alteration in the medium phase, and argillization and carbonatization (calcite) in the later phase.Ore-bearing-altered rocks are significantly controlled by the structure and fissure zones of different scales, and NE- and NW-trending fissure zones could probably be the migration pathways of the porphyry hydrothermal system.Results in this study indicated that the less the concentrations of REE, LREE, and HREE and the more the extensive fractionation between LREE and HREE, the closer it is to the center circulatory hydrothermal ore-forming and the more extensive silicification.The exponential relationship between the fractionation of LREE and HREE and the intensity of silicification and K-silicate alteration was found in the Cu-Mo deposit studied.The negative Eu anomaly, normal Eu, positive Eu anomaly and obviously positive Eu anomaly are coincident with the enhancement of Na2O and K2O concentrations gradually, which indicated that Eu anomaly would be significantly controlled by the alkaline metasomatism of the circulatory hydrothermal ore-forming system.Therefore, such characteristics as the positive Eu anomaly, the obvious fractionation between LREE and HREE and their related special alteration lithofacies are suggested to be metallogenic prognostic and exploration indications for Tsagaan Suvarga-style porphyry Cu-Mo deposits in Mongolia and China.

  15. Life inside black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Dokuchaev, V I

    2012-01-01

    We consider test planet and photon orbits of the third kind inside a black hole, which are stable, periodic and neither come out of the black hole nor terminate at the singularity. Interiors of supermassive black holes may be inhabited by advanced civilizations living on planets with the third-kind orbits. In principle, one can get information from the interiors of black holes by observing their white hole counterparts.

  16. Observational strong gravity and quantum black hole structure

    CERN Document Server

    Giddings, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    Quantum considerations have led many theorists to believe that classical black hole physics is modified not just deep inside black holes but at horizon scales, or even further outward. The near-horizon regime has just begun to be observationally probed for astrophysical black holes -- both by LIGO, and by the Event Horizon Telescope. This suggests exciting prospects for observational constraints on or discovery of new quantum black hole structure.

  17. Scrambling with matrix black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Lucas; Sahakian, Vatche

    2013-08-01

    If black holes are not to be dreaded sinks of information but rather fully described by unitary evolution, they must scramble in-falling data and eventually leak it through Hawking radiation. Sekino and Susskind have conjectured that black holes are fast scramblers; they generate entanglement at a remarkably efficient rate, with the characteristic time scaling logarithmically with the entropy. In this work, we focus on Matrix theory—M-theory in the light-cone frame—and directly probe the conjecture. We develop a concrete test bed for quantum gravity using the fermionic variables of Matrix theory and show that the problem becomes that of chains of qubits with an intricate network of interactions. We demonstrate that the black hole system evolves much like a Brownian quantum circuit, with strong indications that it is indeed a fast scrambler. We also analyze the Berenstein-Maldacena-Nastase model and reach the same tentative conclusion.

  18. Disrupting Entanglement of Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Leichenauer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We study entanglement in thermofield double states of strongly coupled CFTs by analyzing two-sided Reissner-Nordstrom solutions in AdS. The central object of study is the mutual information between a pair of regions, one on each asymptotic boundary of the black hole. For large regions the mutual information is positive and for small ones it vanishes; we compute the critical length scale, which goes to infinity for extremal black holes, of the transition. We also generalize the butterfly effect of Shenker and Stanford to a wide class of charged black holes, showing that mutual information is disrupted upon perturbing the system and waiting for a time of order $\\log E/\\delta E$ in units of the temperature. We conjecture that the parametric form of this timescale is universal.

  19. Growth of centimeter-scale atomically thin MoS{sub 2} films by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Gene; Venkata Subbaiah, Y. P.; Prestgard, Megan C.; Tiwari, Ashutosh, E-mail: tiwari@eng.utah.edu [Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    We are reporting the growth of single layer and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films on single crystal sapphire substrates using a pulsed-laser deposition technique. A pulsed KrF excimer laser (wavelength: 248 nm; pulse width: 25 ns) was used to ablate a polycrystalline MoS{sub 2} target. The material thus ablated was deposited on a single crystal sapphire (0001) substrate kept at 700 °C in an ambient vacuum of 10{sup −6} Torr. Detailed characterization of the films was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The ablation of the MoS{sub 2} target by 50 laser pulses (energy density: 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}) was found to result in the formation of a monolayer of MoS{sub 2} as shown by AFM results. In the Raman spectrum, A{sub 1g} and E{sup 1}{sub 2g} peaks were observed at 404.6 cm{sup −1} and 384.5 cm{sup −1} with a spacing of 20.1 cm{sup −1}, confirming the monolayer thickness of the film. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum exhibited two exciton absorption bands at 672 nm (1.85 eV) and 615 nm (2.02 eV), with an energy split of 0.17 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted value of 0.15 eV. The monolayer MoS{sub 2} exhibited a PL peak at 1.85 eV confirming the direct nature of the band-gap. By varying the number of laser pulses, bi-layer, tri-layer, and few-layer MoS{sub 2} films were prepared. It was found that as the number of monolayers (n) in the MoS{sub 2} films increases, the spacing between the A{sub 1g} and E{sup 1}{sub 2g} Raman peaks (Δf) increases following an empirical relation, Δf=26.45−(15.42)/(1+1.44 n{sup 0.9}) cm{sup −1}.

  20. Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    't entirely understand, the other one gets the upper hand." GRS 1915+105 Chandra X-ray Image of GRS 1915+105 The latest Chandra results also show that the wind and the jet carry about the same amount of matter away from the black hole. This is evidence that the black hole is somehow regulating its accretion rate, which may be related to the toggling between mass expulsion via either a jet or a wind from the accretion disk. Self-regulation is a common topic when discussing supermassive black holes, but this is the first clear evidence for it in stellar-mass black holes. "It is exciting that we may be on the track of explaining two mysteries at the same time: how black hole jets can be shut down and also how black holes regulate their growth," said co-author Julia Lee, assistant professor in the Astronomy department at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "Maybe black holes can regulate themselves better than the financial markets!" Although micro-quasars and quasars differ in mass by factors of millions, they should show a similarity in behavior when their very different physical scales are taken into account. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Jet Power and Black Hole Assortment Revealed in New Chandra Image Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption "If quasars and micro-quasars behave very differently, then we have a big problem to figure out why, because gravity treats them the same," said Neilsen. "So, our result is actually very reassuring, because it's one more link between these different types of black holes." The timescale for changes in behavior of a black hole should vary in proportion to the mass. For example, an hour-long timescale for changes in GRS 1915 would correspond to about 10,000 years for a supermassive black hole that weighs a billion times the mass of the Sun. "We cannot hope to explore at this level of detail in any single supermassive black hole

  1. Virtual Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Stephen William

    1996-01-01

    One would expect spacetime to have a foam-like structure on the Planck scale with a very high topology. If spacetime is simply connected (which is assumed in this paper), the non-trivial homology occurs in dimension two, and spacetime can be regarded as being essentially the topological sum of S^2\\times S^2 and K3 bubbles. Comparison with the instantons for pair creation of black holes shows that the S^2\\times S^2 bubbles can be interpreted as closed loops of virtual black holes. It is shown that scattering in such topological fluctuations leads to loss of quantum coherence, or in other words, to a superscattering matrix \\ that does not factorise into an S matrix and its adjoint. This loss of quantum coherence is very small at low energies for everything except scalar fields, leading to the prediction that we may never observe the Higgs particle. Another possible observational consequence may be that the \\theta angle of QCD is zero without having to invoke the problematical existence of a light axion. The pic...

  2. Spatial distribution and reconstruction potential of Japanese anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) based on scale deposition records in recent anaerobic sediment of the Yellow Sea and East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jiansheng; SUN Yao; JIA Haibo; YANG Qian; TANG Qisheng

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have revealed that anchovy has exhibited large variability in population size on decadal tim-escales. However, such works concerning anchovy population are mainly based on short historical catch records. In order to understand the causes of variability in fish stocks (natural and/or anthropogenic) and calibrate the error between catches and standing stocks, it is essential to develop long-term time series of fish stocks from the time when human impacts are minimal or negligible. Well preserved fish scales from sediment record are regarded as useful indicators revealing the history of fish population dynamics over the last centuries. Anchovy scales was first analyzed over the Yellow Sea and East China Sea and the largest abundance was found in the central South Yellow Sea where is regarded as the largest overwintering ground for Japanese anchovy (Engraulis japonicas). Thus in the central South Yellow Sea, two cores covering the last 150 years were collected for estimating fish scale flux. The scale deposition rate (SDR) records show that the decadal scale SDRs were obviously coherent between cores with independent chronologies. Thecalibration of downcore SDRs to the standing stocks of anchovy further validated that SDR is a reliable proxy to recon-struct the long-term anchovy population dynamic in the central South Yellow Sea where anoxic conditions prevail in the sediment. When assembled with other productivity proxies, it would be expected that SDR could be associated with changes in oceanic productivity and may make a contribution to determine the forcing factors and elucidate the mechanism of the process in future.

  3. Black Holes and Exotic Spinors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Hoff da Silva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Exotic spin structures are non-trivial liftings, of the orthogonal bundle to the spin bundle, on orientable manifolds that admit spin structures according to the celebrated Geroch theorem. Exotic spin structures play a role of paramount importance in different areas of physics, from quantum field theory, in particular at Planck length scales, to gravity, and in cosmological scales. Here, we introduce an in-depth panorama in this field, providing black hole physics as the fount of spacetime exoticness. Black holes are then studied as the generators of a non-trivial topology that also can correspond to some inequivalent spin structure. Moreover, we investigate exotic spinor fields in this context and the way exotic spinor fields branch new physics. We also calculate the tunneling probability of exotic fermions across a Kerr-Sen black hole, showing that the exotic term does affect the tunneling probability, altering the black hole evaporation rate. Finally we show that it complies with the Hawking temperature universal law.

  4. Micrometer scale carbon isotopic study of bitumen associated with Athabasca uranium deposits: Constraints on the genetic relationship with petroleum source-rocks and the abiogenic origin hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangély, L.; Chaussidon, M.; Michels, R.; Brouand, M.; Cuney, M.; Huault, V.; Landais, P.

    2007-06-01

    In situ analytical techniques - Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (μFTIR) and ion microprobe - have been used to unravel the origin of solid bitumen associated with the uranium deposits of Athabasca (Saskatchewan, Canada). Both aliphaticity and carbon isotopic compositions within the samples are heterogeneous but spatially organized in concentric zonations at the micrometer scale. Finally, the δ13C values are positively correlated to the aliphatic contents over an extremely large isotopic range from ˜ - 49‰ to ˜ - 31‰. We infer that this positive correlation may be related to the carbon isotopic fractionations associated with the synthesis of bitumen through the catalytic hydrogenation of CO 2, rather than the result of pre-existing petroleum product precipitation and/or alteration (such as radiolysis). This explanation is consistent with (i) published results of abiogenic synthesis experiments, in which the differences in δ13C values between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons range from + 2 and + 19‰, in contrast to the differences systematically observed in conventional bitumen and petroleum ranging from 0‰ to - 4‰; (ii) the absence of a similar positive correlation between aliphatic contents and δ13C values in the other bitumen analyzed in the present study, for which a biogenic origin has been unequivocally established (samples from Oklo, Gabon, and Lodève, France, uranium deposits); (iii) the presence of CO 2 and H 2 in the gas-phase of fluid inclusions in the Athabasca uranium deposits, H 2 resulting from water radiolysis. The present results suggest that the δ13C vs. aliphaticity correlation could be used as a criterion to discriminate between abiogenic vs. biogenic origin of macromolecular organic matter.

  5. Atomic Layer Deposition of Titanium Oxide on Single-Layer Graphene: An Atomic-Scale Study toward Understanding Nucleation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Controlled synthesis of a hybrid nanomaterial based on titanium oxide and single-layer graphene (SLG) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) is reported here. The morphology and crystallinity of the oxide layer on SLG can be tuned mainly with the deposition temperature, achieving either a uniform amorphous layer at 60 °C or ∼2 nm individual nanocrystals on the SLG at 200 °C after only 20 ALD cycles. A continuous and uniform amorphous layer formed on the SLG after 180 cycles at 60 °C can be converted to a polycrystalline layer containing domains of anatase TiO2 after a postdeposition annealing at 400 °C under vacuum. Using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM), characterization of the structure and chemistry was performed on an atomic scale and provided insight into understanding the nucleation and growth. AC-TEM imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that rocksalt TiO nanocrystals were occasionally formed at the early stage of nucleation after only 20 ALD cycles. Understanding and controlling nucleation and growth of the hybrid nanomaterial are crucial to achieving novel properties and enhanced performance for a wide range of applications that exploit the synergetic functionalities of the ensemble.

  6. From greening to browning: Catchment vegetation development and reduced S-deposition promote organic carbon load on decadal time scales in Nordic lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finstad, Anders G.; Andersen, Tom; Larsen, Søren; Tominaga, Koji; Blumentrath, Stefan; de Wit, Heleen A.; Tømmervik, Hans; Hessen, Dag Olav

    2016-08-01

    Increased concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), often labelled “browning”, is a current trend in northern, particularly boreal, freshwaters. The browning has been attributed to the recent reduction in sulphate (S) deposition during the last 2 to 3 decades. Over the last century, climate and land use change have also caused an increasing trend in vegetation cover (“greening”), and this terrestrially fixed carbon represents another potential source for export of organic carbon to lakes and rivers. The impact of this greening on the observed browning of lakes and rivers on decadal time scales remains poorly investigated, however. Here, we explore time-series both on water chemistry and catchment vegetation cover (using NDVI as proxy) from 70 Norwegian lakes and catchments over a 30-year period. We show that the increase in terrestrial vegetation as well as temperature and runoff significantly adds to the reduced SO4-deposition as a driver of freshwater DOC concentration. Over extended periods (centuries), climate mediated changes in vegetation cover may cause major browning of northern surface waters, with severe impact on ecosystem productivity and functioning.

  7. Detailed deposition density maps constructed by large-scale soil sampling for gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kimiaki; Tanihata, Isao; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Saito, Takashi; Shimoura, Susumu; Otsuka, Takaharu; Onda, Yuichi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Saegusa, Jun; Seki, Akiyuki; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Shibata, Tokushi

    2015-01-01

    Soil deposition density maps of gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident were constructed on the basis of results from large-scale soil sampling. In total 10,915 soil samples were collected at 2168 locations. Gamma rays emitted from the samples were measured by Ge detectors and analyzed using a reliable unified method. The determined radioactivity was corrected to that of June 14, 2011 by considering the intrinsic decay constant of each nuclide. Finally the deposition maps were created for (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (131)I, (129m)Te and (110m)Ag. The radioactivity ratio of (134)Cs-(137)Cs was almost constant at 0.91 regardless of the locations of soil sampling. The radioactivity ratios of (131)I and (129m)Te-(137)Cs were relatively high in the regions south of the Fukushima NPP site. Effective doses for 50 y after the accident were evaluated for external and inhalation exposures due to the observed radioactive nuclides. The radiation doses from radioactive cesium were found to be much higher than those from the other radioactive nuclides.

  8. AAO-assisted synthesis of highly ordered, large-scale TiO2 nanowire arrays via sputtering and atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhao; Wang, Cong; Li, Yang; Kim, Nam-Young

    2015-01-01

    Highly ordered nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) thin films were fabricated in oxalic acid under a constant voltage via a two-step anodization process. To investigate the high-aspect-ratio (7.5:1) filling process, both sputtering and atomic layer deposition (ALD) were used to form TiO2 nanowires. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images indicated that mushroom-like TiO2 structures were sputtered onto the AAO template surface, and the ALD-coated TiO2 exhibited fine filling results and clear crystal grain boundaries. Large-scale and free-standing TiO2 nanowire arrays were liberated by selectively removing the aluminum substrate and AAO template via a wet etching process with no collapsing or agglomeration after the drying process. ALD-deposited TiO2 nanowire arrays that were 67 nm in diameter and 400 nm high were transferred from the AAO template. The ALD process enabled the rapid, simple synthesis of highly ordered TiO2 nanowire arrays with desired parameters such as diameter, density, and thickness determined using diverse AAO templates.

  9. Supermassive Black Holes with High Accretion Rates in Active Galactic Nuclei. V. A New Size-Luminosity Scaling Relation for the Broad-Line Region

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Pu; Zhang, Zhi-Xiang; Huang, Ying-Ke; Wang, Kai; Hu, Chen; Qiu, Jie; Li, Yan-Rong; Fan, Xu-Liang; Fang, Xiang-Er; Bai, Jin-Ming; Bian, Wei-Hao; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Ho, Luis C; Wang, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports results of the third-year campaign of monitoring super-Eddington accreting massive black holes (SEAMBHs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) between 2014-2015. Ten new targets were selected from quasar sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), which are generally more luminous than the SEAMBH candidates in last two years. H$\\beta$ lags ($\\tau_{_{\\rm H\\beta}}$) in five of the 10 quasars have been successfully measured in this monitoring season. We find that the lags are generally shorter, by large factors, than those of objects with same optical luminosity, in light of the well-known $R_{_{\\rm H\\beta}}-L_{5100}$ relation. The five quasars have dimensionless accretion rates of $\\dot{\\mathscr{M}}=10-10^3$. Combining measurements of the previous SEAMBHs, we find that the reduction of H$\\beta$ lags tightly depends on accretion rates, $\\tau_{_{\\rm H\\beta}}/\\tau_{_{R-L}}\\propto\\dot{\\mathscr{M}}^{-0.42}$, where $\\tau_{_{R-L}}$ is the H$\\beta$ lag from the normal $R_{_{\\rm H\\beta}}-L_{5100}$ relation....

  10. Constraining the Rate of Primordial Black-Hole Explosions and Extra Dimension Scale using a Low-Frequency Radio Antenna Array

    CERN Document Server

    Cutchin, Sean E; Ellingson, Steven W; Larracuente, Amanda S; Kavic, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    An exploding primordial black-hole (PBH) may produce a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation detectable at the low-frequency end of the radio spectrum. Furthermore, a radio transient from an exploding PBH could be a signature of an extra spatial dimension. We describe here an approach for searching for PBH explosions using a low-frequency radio antenna array, and as a practical example, the results of a such a search using the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA). No compelling astrophysical signal was detected in $\\approx 4$ hours of data implying an observational upper limit on the rate of exploding PBHs is $2.3 \\times 10^{-7} \\,\\rm{pc}^{-3}\\,\\rm{yr}^{-1}$ for an exploding PBH with a fireball Lorentz factor of $10^{4.3}$ for the standard scenario of Page and Hawking. This rate is an order of magnitude higher than that set using the Arecibo Observatory during $\\sim 300$~hours of observations, but implies a considerably lower limit can be established with more observing time and a larger number of...

  11. Atomic-Scale Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of {100}-Oriented Diamond Film Growth in C-H and C-H-Cl Systems by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安希忠; 张禹; 刘国权; 秦湘阁; 王辅忠; 刘胜新

    2002-01-01

    We simulate the { 100}-oriented diamond film growth of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) under different modelsin C-H and C-H-CI systems in an atomic scale by using the revised kinetic Monte Carlo method. The sirnulationresults show that: (1) the CVD diamond flm growth in the C-H system is suitable for high substrate temperature,and the flm surface roughness is very coarse; (2) the CVD diamond film can grow in the C-H-C1 system eitherat high temperature or at low temperature, and the film quality is outstanding; (3) atomic CI takes ala activerole for the growth of diamond film, especially at low temperatures. The concentration of atomic C1 should becontrolled in a proper range.

  12. Geodynamic settings of Mesozoic large-scale mineralization in North China and adjacent areas--Implication from the highly precise and accurate ages of metal deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO; Jingwen; (毛景文); WANG; Yitian; (王义天); ZHANG; Zuoheng; (张作衡); YU; Jinjie; (余金杰); NIU; Baogui; (牛宝贵)

    2003-01-01

    Based on the summary of the highly precise datings of the metal deposits and related granitic rocks in North China craton and adjacent areas, such as the molybdenite Re-Os datings, 40Ar-39Ar datings of mica, K-feldspar and quartz, some Rb-Sr isochrons, and the SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating and single grain zircon U-Pb dating, we suggest that the large-scale mineralization in North China craton and adjacent areas take place in three periods of 200-160Ma, 140Ma±, and 130-110Ma. Their corresponding geodynamic settings are proposed to be the collision orogenic process, transformation of the tectonic regime, and delamination of the lithosphere, respectively, in light of analyzing the Mesozoic geodynamic evolution in the North China craton.

  13. Black hole foraging: feedback drives feeding

    CERN Document Server

    Dehnen, Walter

    2013-01-01

    We suggest a new picture of supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth in galaxy centers. Momentum-driven feedback from an accreting hole gives significant orbital energy but little angular momentum to the surrounding gas. Once central accretion drops, the feedback weakens and swept-up gas falls back towards the SMBH on near-parabolic orbits. These intersect near the black hole with partially opposed specific angular momenta, causing further infall and ultimately the formation of a small-scale accretion disk. The feeding rates into the disk typically exceed Eddington by factors of a few, growing the hole on the Salpeter timescale and stimulating further feedback. Natural consequences of this picture include (i) the formation and maintenance of a roughly toroidal distribution of obscuring matter near the hole; (ii) random orientations of successive accretion disk episodes; (iii) the possibility of rapid SMBH growth; (iv) tidal disruption of stars and close binaries formed from infalling gas, resulting in visible fl...

  14. Cosmological production of noncommutative black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Robert B

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the pair creation of noncommutative black holes in a background with positive cosmological constant. As a first step we derive the noncommutative geometry inspired Schwarzschild deSitter solution. By varying the mass and the cosmological constant parameters, we find several spacetimes compatible with the new solution: positive mass spacetimes admit one cosmological horizon and two, one or no black hole horizons, while negative mass spacetimes have just a cosmological horizon. All these manifolds are everywhere regular, since the noncommutative fluctuations at the origin improve the curvature singularity. On the thermodynamic side, the black hole temperature, instead of a divergent behavior for small length scales, admits a maximum value. Then the black hole evaporation proceeds until an equilibrium configuration with the deSitter background temperature. On the other hand, the cosmological horizon is thermalized by the presence of the black hole and has a temperature higher than that of the conv...

  15. On Quantum Contributions to Black Hole Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Spaans, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Wheeler's quantum foam on black hole growth are explored from an astrophysical perspective. Quantum fluctuations in the form of mini (10^-5 g) black holes can couple to macroscopic black holes and allow the latter to grow exponentially in mass on a time scale of ~10^9 years. Consequently, supermassive black holes can acquire a lot of their mass through these quantum contributions over the life time of the universe. This alleviates the need for very efficient forms of baryonic matter accretion more recent than a redshift z~6. Sgr A* in the Milky Way center is a candidate to verify this quantum space-time effect, with a predicted mass growth rate of 4x10^-3 Mo yr^-1. A few comments on the possibility and consequences of dark matter as quantum grown black holes are made, with a big crunch fate of the universe.

  16. Electrodynamics of Black Holes in STU Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cvetic, M; Pope, C N; Saleem, Z H

    2013-01-01

    External magnetic fields can probe the composite structure of black holes in string theory. With this motivation we study magnetised four-charge black holes in the STU model, a consistent truncation of maximally supersymmetric supergravity with four types of electromagnetic fields. We employ solution generating techniques to obtain Melvin backgrounds, and black holes in these backgrounds. For an initially electrically charged static black hole immersed in magnetic fields, we calculate the resultant angular momenta and analyse their global structure. Examples are given for which the ergoregion does not extend to infinity. We calculate magnetic moments and gyromagnetic ratios via Larmor's formula. Our results are consistent with earlier special cases. A scaling limit and associated subtracted geometry in a single surviving magnetic field is shown to lift to $AdS_3\\times S^2$. Magnetizing magnetically charged black holes give static solutions with conical singularities representing strings or struts holding the ...

  17. Higher spin black holes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutperle, Michael; Kraus, Per

    2011-01-01

    .... We find solutions that generalize the BTZ black hole and carry spin-3 charge. The black hole entropy formula yields a result for the asymptotic growth of the partition function at finite spin-3 chemical potential...

  18. Black hole hair removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Mandal, Ipsita; Sen, Ashoke

    2009-07-01

    Macroscopic entropy of an extremal black hole is expected to be determined completely by its near horizon geometry. Thus two black holes with identical near horizon geometries should have identical macroscopic entropy, and the expected equality between macroscopic and microscopic entropies will then imply that they have identical degeneracies of microstates. An apparent counterexample is provided by the 4D-5D lift relating BMPV black hole to a four dimensional black hole. The two black holes have identical near horizon geometries but different microscopic spectrum. We suggest that this discrepancy can be accounted for by black hole hair — degrees of freedom living outside the horizon and contributing to the degeneracies. We identify these degrees of freedom for both the four and the five dimensional black holes and show that after their contributions are removed from the microscopic degeneracies of the respective systems, the result for the four and five dimensional black holes match exactly.

  19. Black Hole Hair Removal

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Sen, Ashoke

    2009-01-01

    Macroscopic entropy of an extremal black hole is expected to be determined completely by its near horizon geometry. Thus two black holes with identical near horizon geometries should have identical macroscopic entropy, and the expected equality between macroscopic and microscopic entropies will then imply that they have identical degeneracies of microstates. An apparent counterexample is provided by the 4D-5D lift relating BMPV black hole to a four dimensional black hole. The two black holes have identical near horizon geometries but different microscopic spectrum. We suggest that this discrepancy can be accounted for by black hole hair, -- degrees of freedom living outside the horizon and contributing to the degeneracies. We identify these degrees of freedom for both the four and the five dimensional black holes and show that after their contributions are removed from the microscopic degeneracies of the respective systems, the result for the four and five dimensional black holes match exactly.

  20. Noncommutative black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-DomInguez, J C [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico); Obregon, O [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico); RamIrez, C [Facultad de Ciencias FIsico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, PO Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Sabido, M [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato PO Box E-143, 37150 Leoen Gto. (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    We study noncommutative black holes, by using a diffeomorphism between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model, which is generalized to noncommutative minisuperspace. Through the use of the Feynman-Hibbs procedure we are able to study the thermodynamics of the black hole, in particular, we calculate Hawking's temperature and entropy for the 'noncommutative' Schwarzschild black hole.

  1. Black Hole Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Werner

    This chapter reviews the conceptual developments on black hole thermodynamics and the attempts to determine the origin of black hole entropy in terms of their horizon area. The brick wall model and an operational approach are discussed. An attempt to understand at the microlevel how the quantum black hole acquires its thermal properties is included. The chapter concludes with some remarks on the extension of these techniques to describing the dynamical process of black hole evaporation.

  2. Monopole black hole skyrmions

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, I. G.; Shiiki, N.; Winstanley, E.

    2000-01-01

    Charged black hole solutions with pion hair are discussed. These can be\\ud used to study monopole black hole catalysis of proton decay.\\ud There also exist\\ud multi-black hole skyrmion solutions with BPS monopole behaviour.

  3. Monopole Black Hole Skyrmions

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, I. G.; Shiiki, N.; Winstanley, E.

    2000-01-01

    Charged black hole solutions with pion hair are discussed. These can be\\ud used to study monopole black hole catalysis of proton decay.\\ud There also exist\\ud multi-black hole skyrmion solutions with BPS monopole behaviour.

  4. Ballistic hole magnetic microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haq, E.; Banerjee, T.; Siekman, M.H.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to study nanoscale spin transport of holes is presented: ballistic hole magnetic microscopy. The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is used to inject hot electrons into a ferromagnetic heterostructure, where inelastic decay creates a distribution of electron-hole pairs. Spin-dependen

  5. Ballistic hole magnetic microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haq, E.; Banerjee, T.; Siekman, M.H.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to study nanoscale spin transport of holes is presented: ballistic hole magnetic microscopy. The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is used to inject hot electrons into a ferromagnetic heterostructure, where inelastic decay creates a distribution of electron-hole pairs.

  6. Rλ3-inspired black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováčik, Samuel

    2017-08-01

    We study a black hole with a blurred mass density instead of a singular one, which is caused by the noncommutativity of three-space. Depending on its mass, such object has either none, one or two event horizons. It possesses properties, which become important on a microscopic scale, in particular, the Hawking temperature does not increase indefinitely as the mass goes to zero, but vanishes instead. Such frozen and extremely dense pieces of matter are good dark matter candidates.

  7. Dielectric strength of voidless BaTiO{sub 3} films with nano-scale grains fabricated by aerosol deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Lee, Young-Hie, E-mail: yhlee@kw.ac.kr [Department of Electronics Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Hwan [Department of Electronics Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); R and D Center, Samwha Capacitor, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); In Kim, Soo; Woo Lee, Chang [Department of Nano and Electronic Physics, Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rag Yoon, Jung [R and D Center, Samwha Capacitor, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Gap [Department of Ceramic Engineering, Engineering Research Institute, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-07

    In order to investigate the dielectric strength properties of the BaTiO{sub 3} films with nano-scale grains with uniform grain size and no voids, BaTiO{sub 3} films were fabricated with a thickness of 1 μm by an AD process, and the fabricated films were sintered at 800, 900, and 1000 °C in air and reducing atmosphere. The films have superior dielectric strength properties due to their uniform grain size and high density without any voids. In addition, based on investigation of the leakage current (intrinsic) properties, it was confirmed that the sintering conditions of the reducing atmosphere largely increase leakage currents due to generated electrons and doubly ionized oxygen vacancies following the Poole-Frenkel emission mechanism, and increased leakage currents flow at grain boundary regions. Therefore, we conclude that the extrinsic breakdown factors should be eliminated for superior dielectric strength properties, and it is important to enhance grain boundaries by doping acceptors and rare-earth elements.

  8. Black hole formation in a contracting universe

    CERN Document Server

    Quintin, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    We study the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a contracting universe. We aim to determine under which conditions density perturbations grow to form large inhomogeneities and collapse into black holes. Our method consists in solving the cosmological perturbation equations in complete generality for a hydrodynamical fluid. We then describe the evolution of the fluctuations over the different length scales of interest and as a function of the equation of state for the fluid, and we explore two different types of initial conditions: quantum vacuum and thermal fluctuations. We also derive a general requirement for black hole collapse on sub-Hubble scales, and we use the Press-Schechter formalism to describe the black hole formation probability. For a fluid with a small sound speed (e.g., dust), we find that both quantum and thermal initial fluctuations grow in a contracting universe, and the largest inhomogeneities that first collapse into black holes are of Hubble size and the collapse occurs well befor...

  9. Exact Results for the BTZ Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Birmingham, Daniel; Sen, S; Birmingham, Danny; Sachs, Ivo; Sen, Siddhartha

    2001-01-01

    In this review, we summarize exact results for the three-dimensional BTZ black hole. We use rigorous mathematical results to clarify the general structure and properties of this black hole spacetime and its microscopic description. In particular, we study the formation of the black hole by point particle collisions, leading to an exact analytic determination of the Choptuik scaling parameter. We also show that a `No Hair Theorem' follows immediately from a mathematical theorem of hyperbolic geometry, due to Sullivan. A microscopic understanding of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, and decay rate for massless scalars, is shown to follow from standard results of conformal field theory.

  10. Three-Dimensional, Multi-scale, and Multi-variance Dispersivity Upscaling for Hierarchical Sedimentary Deposit using Parallel Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Lichtner, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    A high-resolution non-stationary hydraulic conductivity (K) model, or a fully heterogeneous (FHM), is generated from an experimental stratigraphy which exhibits realistic sedimentary heterogeneity at multiple scales. Based on this model, a set of hierarchical hydrostratigraphic models (HSMs) with decreasing heterogeneity resolutions are created. These models contain 8, 3, and 1 stratigraphic unit(s), respectively, that are irregular in shape and hierarchical in structure. For all models, increasing system ln(K) variances - 0.1, 1.0, 4.5 - are tested, leading to a suite of 12 conceptual aquifer models. Using a numerical upscaling technique, equivalent K tensors are first computed for each unit of the HSMs. For all the variances tested, significant accuracy is achieved with the upscaled K in terms of capturing both the hydraulic head and flow connectivity of the FHM, i.e., mean relative error in head predictions ranging from 1% to 10% (higher error correlates to higher variances). Among the HSMs, the 8-unit model, given its higher stratigraphic resolution, is always the most accurate flow predictor. The same suite of HSMs is then subject to a novel dispersivity scaling analysis whereas upscaled dispersivities are computed with both stochastic and deterministic methods. For this analysis, a parallel random walk particle tracking code (RWPT), which accounts for the divergence of the dispersion tensors, is developed and verified with 100,000 particles (Zhang & Zhang, 2013). This new code leads to significantly improved accuracy and efficiency in modeling transport. Interestingly, for all the HSMs, at all the variances tested, the effect of divergence of the dispersion coefficient on solute plume migration and its spatial moments is negligible, suggesting that this term can be neglected in future simulations. When comparing the transport prediction of the FHM against those of the HSMs with upscaled dispersivities, plume trajectory, breakthrough curve, and the arrival

  11. Black holes in binary stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction Distinguishing neutron stars and black holes Optical companions and dynamical masses X-ray signatures of the nature of a compact object Structure and evolution of black-hole binaries High-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black holes Formation of black holes

  12. On Accelerated Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Letelier, P S; Letelier, Patricio S.; Oliveira, Samuel R.

    1998-01-01

    The C-metric is revisited and global interpretation of some associated spacetimes are studied in some detail. Specially those with two event horizons, one for the black hole and another for the acceleration. We found that the spacetime fo an accelerated Schwarzschild black hole is plagued by either conical singularities or lack of smoothness and compactness of the black hole horizon. By using standard black hole thermodynamics we show that accelerated black holes have higher Hawking temperature than Unruh temperature. We also show that the usual upper bound on the product of the mass and acceleration parameters (<1/sqrt(27)) is just a coordinate artifact. The main results are extended to accelerated Kerr black holes. We found that they are not changed by the black hole rotation.

  13. Highly uniform hole spacing micro brushes based on aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Zhu, Xingzhong; Huang, Xiaolu; Cheng, Yingwu; Liu, Yun; Geng, Huijuan; Wu, Yue; Su, Yanjie; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Yafei

    2013-11-01

    Highly uniform hole spacing micro brushes were fabricated based on aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method with the assistance of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. Different micro brushes from CNT arrays were constructed on silicon, glass, and polyimide substrates, respectively. The micro brushes had highly uniform hole spacing originating from the regularly periodic pore structure of AAO template. The CNT arrays, serving as bristles, were firmly grafted on the substrates. The brushes can easily clean particles with scale of micrometer on the surface of silicon wafer and from the narrow spaces between the electrodes in a series of cleaning experiments. The results show the potential application of the CNT micro brushes as a cleaning tool in microelectronics manufacture field.

  14. Nonthermal WIMPs and primordial black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georg, Julian; Şengör, Gizem; Watson, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal histories for the early universe have received notable attention as they are a rich source of phenomenology, while also being well motivated by top-down approaches to beyond the Standard Model physics. The early (pre-big bang nucleosynthesis) matter phase in these models leads to enhanced growth of density perturbations on sub-Hubble scales. Here, we consider whether primordial black hole formation associated with the enhanced growth is in conflict with existing observations. Such constraints depend on the tilt of the primordial power spectrum, and we find that nonthermal histories are tightly constrained in the case of a significantly blue spectrum. Alternatively, if dark matter is taken to be of nonthermal origin, we can restrict the primordial power spectrum on scales inaccessible to cosmic microwave background and large scale structure observations. We establish constraints for a wide range of scalar masses (reheat temperatures) with the most stringent bounds resulting from the formation of 1015 g black holes. These black holes would be evaporating today and are constrained by FERMI observations. We also consider whether the breakdown of the coherence of the scalar oscillations on subhorizon scales can lead to a Jean's pressure preventing black hole formation and relaxing our constraints. Our main conclusion is that primordial black hole constraints, combined with existing constraints on nonthermal weakly interacting massive particles, favor a primordial spectrum closer to scale invariance or a red tilted spectrum.

  15. Surfing a Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    wavebands between 1.6 and 3.5 µm. The compact objects are stars and their colours indicate their temperature (blue = "hot", red = "cool"). There is also diffuse infrared emission from interstellar dust between the stars. The two yellow arrows mark the position of the black hole candidate "SgrA*" at the very centre of the Milky Way galaxy. The scale is indicated; the 1 light-year bar subtends an angle of 8 arcsec in the sky. The centre of our Milky Way galaxy is located in the southern constallation Sagittarius (The Archer) and is "only" 26,000 light-years away [5]. On high-resolution images, it is possible to discern thousands of individual stars within the central, one light-year wide region (this corresponds to about one-quarter of the distance to "Proxima Centauri", the star nearest to the solar system). Using the motions of these stars to probe the gravitational field, observations with the 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) (and subsequently at the 10-m Keck telescope , Hawaii, USA) over the last decade have shown that a mass of about 3 million times that of the Sun is concentrated within a radius of only 10 light-days [5] of the compact radio and X-ray source SgrA* ("Sagittarius A") at the center of the star cluster. This means that SgrA* is the most likely counterpart of the putative black hole and, at the same time, it makes the Galactic Center the best piece of evidence for the existence of such supermassive black holes . However, those earlier investigations could not exclude several other, non-black hole configurations. "We then needed even sharper images to settle the issue of whether any configuration other than a black hole is possible and we counted on the ESO VLT telescope to provide those" , explains Reinhard Genzel , Director at the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Garching near Munich (Germany) and member of the present team. "The new NAOS-CONICA (NACO) instrument, built in a close

  16. Large-area bi-component processing of organic semiconductors by spray deposition and spin coating with orthogonal solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treossi, Emanuele; Liscio, Andrea; Palermo, Vincenzo [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e la Fotoreattivita, Bologna (Italy); Feng, Xinliang; Muellen, Klaus [Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Samori, Paolo [Universite Louis Pasteur, Nanochemistry Laboratory, ISIS-CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e la Fotoreattivita, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-04-15

    Micrometre-thick uniform layers of a polymeric semiconductor (poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT) have been fabricated from solution by spray deposition making use of a commercial airbrush. Multi-scale characterization by optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of smooth layers featuring reproducible patterns of spatially correlated micron-sized holes. This morphology was found to be uniform over the whole sample surface, on millimetre scale. On this micro-patterned P3HT layer an orthogonal solvent (i.e. a solvent which does not dissolve the P3HT) has been employed to deposit either by spin coating or by drop casting a second organic semiconductor. While spin-coated films exhibited nano-crystals of an alkylated perylene tetracarboxy diimide (PDI) preferentially grown into the micro-fabricated holes, drop-cast films displayed crystalline PDI fibres adsorbed on the patterned surface in random positions. (orig.)

  17. Large-area bi-component processing of organic semiconductors by spray deposition and spin coating with orthogonal solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treossi, Emanuele; Liscio, Andrea; Feng, Xinliang; Palermo, Vincenzo; Müllen, Klaus; Samorì, Paolo

    2009-04-01

    Micrometre-thick uniform layers of a polymeric semiconductor (poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT) have been fabricated from solution by spray deposition making use of a commercial airbrush. Multi-scale characterization by optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of smooth layers featuring reproducible patterns of spatially correlated micron-sized holes. This morphology was found to be uniform over the whole sample surface, on millimetre scale. On this micro-patterned P3HT layer an orthogonal solvent (i.e. a solvent which does not dissolve the P3HT) has been employed to deposit either by spin coating or by drop casting a second organic semiconductor. While spin-coated films exhibited nano-crystals of an alkylated perylene tetracarboxy diimide (PDI) preferentially grown into the micro-fabricated holes, drop-cast films displayed crystalline PDI fibres adsorbed on the patterned surface in random positions.

  18. An Introduction to Black Holes, Information and the String Theory Revolution: The Holographic Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel, W [University of Victoria (Canada)

    2006-07-21

    The evaporation of a black hole formed by the collapse of matter is a nonunitary process involving loss of information. At least, this is how it appears in Hawking's semiclassical description, in which gravity is not quantized and the emergent radiation appears thermal. Since unitarity is one of the pillars of quantum mechanics there has been an understandable reluctance to accept this as an ironclad conclusion. Conformal field theories in flat space are manifestly unitary, and the AdS/CFT correspondence therefore suggests that the information trapped in the depths of the hole must find some way to escape-a conclusion almost universally accepted today, at least among particle theorists. Just how it could escape remains a mystery, however, since nothing can escape without violating causality until the black hole has shrunk too far to hold much information. Gerard 't Hooft and the senior author of this book, Leonard Susskind, have been vocal advocates of the view that the information paradox poses a real crisis for physics requiring significant paradigm shifts. They suggest that locality must be given up as an objective property of physical phenomena (even on large scales) and replaced by a new principle of 'black hole complementarity'. Specifically, there are two very different ways to view the process of collapse and evaporation. To a free-falling observer, nothing unusual happens at the horizon and matter and information fall deep into the hole. To a stationary observer hovering just outside the hole it appears instead that the matter and information are deposited on the horizon (which he experiences as very hot because of his large acceleration), to be eventually re-emitted from there as Hawking radiation. According to 't Hooft and Susskind, these must be viewed as equally valid, 'complementary' descriptions of the same process. Black hole complementarity is essentially the statement (supported by operational arguments) that

  19. Kinetics of hole nucleation in biomembrane rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Evan [Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Smith, Benjamin A, E-mail: evanse@bu.edu [Departments of Physics and Pathology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A6 (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    The core component of a biological membrane is a fluid-lipid bilayer held together by interfacial-hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions, which are balanced for the most part by acyl chain entropy confinement. If biomembranes are subjected to persistent tensions, an unstable (nanoscale) hole will emerge at some time to cause rupture. Because of the large energy required to create a hole, thermal activation appears to be requisite for initiating a hole and the activation energy is expected to depend significantly on mechanical tension. Although models exist for the kinetic process of hole nucleation in tense membranes, studies of membrane survival have failed to cover the ranges of tension and lifetime needed to critically examine nucleation theory. Hence, rupturing giant ({approx}20 {mu}m) membrane vesicles ultra-slowly to ultra-quickly with slow to fast ramps of tension, we demonstrate a method to directly quantify kinetic rates at which unstable holes form in fluid membranes, at the same time providing a range of kinetic rates from <0.01 to >100 s{sup -1}. Measuring lifetimes of many hundreds of vesicles, each tensed by precision control of micropipette suction, we have determined the rates of failure for vesicles made from several synthetic phospholipids plus 1:1 mixtures of phospho- and sphingo-lipids with cholesterol, all of which represent prominent constituents of eukaryotic cell membranes. Plotted on a logarithmic scale, the failure rates for vesicles are found to rise dramatically with an increase in tension. Converting the experimental profiles of kinetic rates into changes of activation energy versus tension, we show that the results closely match expressions for thermal activation derived from a combination of meso-scale theory and molecular-scale simulations of hole formation. Moreover, we demonstrate a generic approach to transform analytical fits of activation energies obtained from rupture experiments into energy landscapes characterizing the

  20. Material design of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition SiCH films for low-k cap layers in the further scaling of ultra-large-scale integrated devices-Cu interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideharu Shimizu, Shuji Nagano, Akira Uedono, Nobuo Tajima, Takeshi Momose and Yukihiro Shimogaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cap layers for Cu interconnects in ultra-large-scale integrated devices (ULSIs, with a low dielectric constant (k-value and strong barrier properties against Cu and moisture diffusion, are required for the future further scaling of ULSIs. There is a trade-off, however, between reducing the k-value and maintaining strong barrier properties. Using quantum mechanical simulations and other theoretical computations, we have designed ideal dielectrics: SiCH films with Si–C2H4–Si networks. Such films were estimated to have low porosity and low k; thus they are the key to realizing a cap layer with a low k and strong barrier properties against diffusion. For fabricating these ideal SiCH films, we designed four novel precursors: isobutyl trimethylsilane, diisobutyl dimethylsilane, 1, 1-divinylsilacyclopentane and 5-silaspiro [4,4] noname, based on quantum chemical calculations, because such fabrication is difficult by controlling only the process conditions in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD using conventional precursors. We demonstrated that SiCH films prepared using these newly designed precursors had large amounts of Si–C2H4–Si networks and strong barrier properties. The pore structure of these films was then analyzed by positron annihilation spectroscopy, revealing that these SiCH films actually had low porosity, as we designed. These results validate our material and precursor design concepts for developing a PECVD process capable of fabricating a low-k cap layer.

  1. Braneworld Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Whisker, Richard

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate black holes in the Randall-Sundrum braneworld scenario. We begin with an overview of extra-dimensional physics, from the original proposal of Kaluza and Klein up to the modern braneworld picture of extra dimensions. A detailed description of braneworld gravity is given, with particular emphasis on its compatibility with experimental tests of gravity. We then move on to a discussion of static, spherically symmetric braneworld black hole solutions. Assuming an equation of state for the ``Weyl term'', which encodes the effects of the extra dimension, we are able to classify the general behaviour of these solutions. We then use the strong field limit approach to investigate the gravitational lensing properties of some candidate braneworld black hole solutions. It is found that braneworld black holes could have significantly different observational signatures to the Schwarzschild black hole of standard general relativity. Rotating braneworld black hole solutions are also discussed, an...

  2. Astrophysical black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, Vittorio; Moschella, Ugo; Treves, Aldo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Based on graduate school lectures in contemporary relativity and gravitational physics, this book gives a complete and unified picture of the present status of theoretical and observational properties of astrophysical black holes. The chapters are written by internationally recognized specialists. They cover general theoretical aspects of black hole astrophysics, the theory of accretion and ejection of gas and jets, stellar-sized black holes observed in the Milky Way, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in galactic centers and quasars as well as their influence on the dynamics in galactic nuclei. The final chapter addresses analytical relativity of black holes supporting theoretical understanding of the coalescence of black holes as well as being of great relevance in identifying gravitational wave signals. With its introductory chapters the book is aimed at advanced graduate and post-graduate students, but it will also be useful for specialists.

  3. Extremal Hairy Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, P A; Saavedra, Joel; Vasquez, Yerko

    2014-01-01

    We consider a gravitating system consisting of a scalar field minimally coupled to gravity with a self-interacting potential and an U(1) electromagnetic field. Solving the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-scalar system we find exact hairy charged black hole solutions with the scalar field regular everywhere. We go to the zero temperature limit and we study the effect of the scalar field on the near horizon geometry of an extremal black hole. We find that except a critical value of the charge of the black hole there is also a critical value of the charge of the scalar field beyond of which the extremal black hole is destabilized. We study the thermodynamics of these solutions and we find that if the space is flat then at low temperature the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black hole is thermodynamically preferred, while if the space is AdS the hairy charged black hole is thermodynamically preferred at low temperature.

  4. Black Hole with Quantum Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate black hole (BH) physics in the context of quantum corrections. These quantum corrections were introduced recently by replacing classical geodesics with quantal (Bohmian) trajectories and hence form a quantum Raychaudhuri equation (QRE). From the QRE, we derive a modified Schwarzschild metric, and use that metric to investigate BH singularity and thermodynamics. We find that these quantum corrections change the picture of Hawking radiation greatly when the size of BH approaches the Planck scale. They prevent the BH from total evaporation, predicting the existence of a quantum BH remnant, which introduces a possible resolution for the catastrophic behavior of Hawking radiation as the BH mass approaches zero. It also ameliorates the black hole singularity and the information loss problem.

  5. Black hole with quantum potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Farag Ali

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigate black hole (BH physics in the context of quantum corrections. These quantum corrections were introduced recently by replacing classical geodesics with quantal (Bohmian trajectories and hence form a quantum Raychaudhuri equation (QRE. From the QRE, we derive a modified Schwarzschild metric, and use that metric to investigate BH singularity and thermodynamics. We find that these quantum corrections change the picture of Hawking radiation greatly when the size of BH approaches the Planck scale. They prevent the BH from total evaporation, predicting the existence of a quantum BH remnant, which may introduce a possible resolution for the catastrophic behavior of Hawking radiation as the BH mass approaches zero. Those corrections also turn the spacelike singularity of the black hole to be timelike, and hence this may ameliorate the information loss problem.

  6. Black hole with quantum potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed Farag, E-mail: ahmed.ali@fsc.bu.edu.eg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Benha University, Benha 13518 (Egypt); Khalil, Mohammed M., E-mail: moh.m.khalil@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Alexandria University, Alexandria 12544 (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    In this work, we investigate black hole (BH) physics in the context of quantum corrections. These quantum corrections were introduced recently by replacing classical geodesics with quantal (Bohmian) trajectories and hence form a quantum Raychaudhuri equation (QRE). From the QRE, we derive a modified Schwarzschild metric, and use that metric to investigate BH singularity and thermodynamics. We find that these quantum corrections change the picture of Hawking radiation greatly when the size of BH approaches the Planck scale. They prevent the BH from total evaporation, predicting the existence of a quantum BH remnant, which may introduce a possible resolution for the catastrophic behavior of Hawking radiation as the BH mass approaches zero. Those corrections also turn the spacelike singularity of the black hole to be timelike, and hence this may ameliorate the information loss problem.

  7. The fuzzball proposal for black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skenderis, Kostas [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: skenderi@science.uva.nl; Taylor, Marika [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: taylor@science.uva.nl

    2008-10-15

    The fuzzball proposal states that associated with a black hole of entropy S, there are expShorizon-free non-singular solutions that asymptotically look like the black hole but generically differ from the black hole up to the horizon scale. These solutions, the fuzzballs, are considered to be the black hole microstates, while the original black hole represents the average description of the system. The purpose of this report is to review current evidence for the fuzzball proposal, emphasizing the use of AdS/CFT methods in developing and testing the proposal. In particular, we discuss the status of the proposal for 2 and 3 charge black holes in the D1-D5 system, presenting new derivations and streamlining the discussion of their properties. Results to date support the fuzzball proposal, but further progress is likely to require going beyond the supergravity approximation and sharpening the definition of a 'stringy fuzzball'. We outline how the fuzzball proposal could resolve longstanding issues in black hole physics, such as Hawking radiation and information loss. Our emphasis throughout is on connecting different developments and identifying open problems and directions for future research.

  8. Phenomenological loop quantum geometry of the Schwarzschild black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2008-01-01

    The interior of a Schwarzschild black hole is investigated at the level of phenomenological dynamics with the discreteness corrections of loop quantum geometry implemented in two different improved quantization schemes. In one scheme, the classical black hole singularity is resolved by the quantum bounce, which bridges the black hole interior with a white hole interior. In the other scheme, the classical singularity is resolved and the event horizon is also diffused by the quantum bounce. Jumping over the quantum bounce, the black hole gives birth to a baby black hole with a much smaller mass. This lineage continues as each classical black hole brings forth its own descendant in the consecutive classical cycle, giving the whole extended spacetime fractal structure, until the solution eventually descends into deep Planck regime, signaling a breakdown of the semiclassical description. The issues of scaling symmetry and no-hair theorem are also discussed.

  9. Primordial Universe Inside the Black Hole and Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    We speculate that the early Universe was inside a primordial black hole. The interior of the the black hole is a dS background and the two spacetimes are separated on the surface of black hole's event horizon. We argue that this picture provides a natural realization of inflation without invoking the inflaton field. The black hole evaporation by Hawking radiation provides a natural mechanism for terminating inflation so reheating and the hot big bang cosmology starts from the evaporation of black hole to relativistic particles. The quantum gravitational fluctuations at the boundary of black hole generate the nearly scale invariant scalar and tensor perturbations with the ratio of tensor to scalar power spectra at the order of $10^{-3}$. As the black hole evaporates, the radius of its event horizon shrinks and the Hubble expansion rate during inflation increases slowly so the quantum Hawking radiation provides a novel mechanism for the violation of null energy condition in cosmology.

  10. Varying fine structure "constant" and charged black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Bekenstein, Jacob D

    2009-01-01

    Tension between varying fine-structure "constant'' alpha and charged black hole properties has been invoked in the past to place constraints on cosmological variability of alpha. However, the properties used are those of the standard Reissner-Nordstrom black holes; this ignores modifications of black hole structure that must result from alpha variability. To elucidate this issue we have derived, in 4-D general relativity, and using isotropic coordinates, the solution for a charged spherical black hole according to the framework for dynamical variability of alpha which does not fix its overall scale. This solution coincides with a known one-parameter extension of the dilatonic black hole family. Among the notable properties of varying alpha charged black holes are adherence to the "no hair'' principle, the absence of the inner (Cauchy) horizon, the nonexistence of precisely extremal black holes, and the appearance of naked singularities in a separate sector of the relevant metric. This last hints at the possib...

  11. Charged Lifshitz Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghani, M. H.; Pourhasan, R.; Mann, R. B.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate modifications of the Lifshitz black hole solutions due to the presence of Maxwell charge in higher dimensions for arbitrary $z$ and any topology. We find that the behaviour of large black holes is insensitive to the topology of the solutions, whereas for small black holes significant differences emerge. We generalize a relation previously obtained for neutral Lifshitz black branes, and study more generally the thermodynamic relationship between energy, entropy, and chemical pot...

  12. Perturbations around black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, B

    2005-01-01

    Perturbations around black holes have been an intriguing topic in the last few decades. They are particularly important today, since they relate to the gravitational wave observations which may provide the unique fingerprint of black holes' existence. Besides the astrophysical interest, theoretically perturbations around black holes can be used as testing grounds to examine the proposed AdS/CFT and dS/CFT correspondence.

  13. Physics of black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, Kip S.

    1982-01-01

    The activity at the galactic center might be fuelled by energy release near a large black hole. In this talk I describe some relativistic effects which may be relevant to this process. I use Newtonian language so far as possible and illustrate the effects with simple  analogies. Specifically, I describe the gravitational field near a black hole, Lens‐Thirring and geodetic precession, electro‐magnetic energy extraction of the spin energy of a black hole and the structure of accretion tori arou...

  14. Atomic scale modelling of nanosize Ni sub 3 Al cluster beam deposition on Al, Ni and Ni sub 3 Al (1 1 1) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kharlamov, V S; Hou, M

    2002-01-01

    The slowing down of Ni sub 3 Al clusters on a Al, Ni and Ni sub 3 Al (1 1 1) surfaces is studied by atomic scale modelling. The semi-grand canonical metropolis Monte Carlo is used for the preparation of isolated clusters at thermodynamic equilibrium. The cluster deposition on the surface is studied in detail by classical Molecular Dynamics simulations that include a model to account for electron-phonon coupling. Long- and short-range orders in the cluster are evaluated as functions of temperature in an impact energy range between 0 and 1.5 eV/atom. The interaction between the Ni sub 3 Al cluster and an Al surface is characterised low short range (chemical) disorder. No sizeable epitaxy is found, subsequent to the impact. In contrast, in the case of Ni and Ni sub 3 Al substrates, which are harder materials than aluminium, the chemical disorder is higher and epitaxial accommodation is possible. With these substrates, chemical disorder in the cluster is an increasing function of the impact energy, as well as of ...

  15. A deposit scale mineral prospectivity analysis: A comparison of various knowledge-driven approaches for porphyry copper targeting in Seridune, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Maysam; Mostafavi Kashani, Seyed Bagher; Norouzi, Gholam-Hossain; Yousefi, Mahyar

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, an application of a knowledge-driven mineral prospectivity mapping (MPM) approach so-called ;the evidential belief functions (EBFs) using Dempster-Shafer's rule of combination; is proposed. This technique is used to weight and integrate a large scale exploration dataset in order to localize prospects for definition of further exploration drilling sites. In this study, exploration datasets of Seridune copper deposit in the Kerman province, SE Iran used for the methodology. In this regard, geophysical evidence layers extracted from interpretation of magnetic and electrical surveys, geological evidence layers derived via the geological datasets (i.e. lithology, fault and alteration), and geochemical evidence maps were generated and integrated for MPM. Furthermore, various MPM approaches including outranking, index overlay and fuzzy logic methods were examined for comparison with the introduced method. To evaluate and compare the efficiency of the methods, the productivity of the drilled boreholes (Cu concentration multiplied by its ore thickness along each drilled borehole) was used to validate the generated prospectivity models. The results showed higher efficiency of the Dempster-Shafer's model in comparison with the prospectivity models generated using other MPM approaches.

  16. Asymptotic black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Following earlier works on the KMY model of black-hole formation and evaporation, we construct the metric for a matter sphere in gravitational collapse, with the back-reaction of pre-Hawking radiation taken into consideration. The mass distribution and collapsing velocity of the matter sphere are allowed to have an arbitrary radial dependence. We find that a generic gravitational collapse asymptote to a universal configuration which resembles a black hole but without horizon. This approach clarifies several misunderstandings about black-hole formation and evaporation, and provides a new model for black-hole-like objects in the universe.

  17. Asymptotic Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Following earlier works on the KMY model of black-hole formation and evaporation, we construct the metric for a matter sphere in gravitational collapse, with the back-reaction of pre-Hawking radiation taken into consideration. The mass distribution and collapsing velocity of the matter sphere are allowed to have an arbitrary radial dependence. We find that a generic gravitational collapse asymptote to a universal configuration which resembles a black hole but without horizon. This approach clarifies several misunderstandings about black-hole formation and evaporation, and provides a new model for black-hole-like objects in the universe.

  18. Bouncing cosmology inspired by regular black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, J. C. S.

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we present a bouncing cosmology inspired by a family of regular black holes. This scale-dependent cosmology deviates from the cosmological principle by means of a scale factor which depends on the time and the radial coordinate as well. The model is isotropic but not perfectly homogeneous. That is, this cosmology describes a universe almost homogeneous only for large scales, such as our observable universe.

  19. Black holes and asymptotically safe gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Falls, Kevin; Raghuraman, Aarti

    2010-01-01

    Quantum gravitational corrections to black holes are studied in four and higher dimensions using a renormalisation group improvement of the metric. The quantum effects are worked out in detail for asymptotically safe gravity, where the short distance physics is characterized by a non-trivial fixed point of the gravitational coupling. We find that a weakening of gravity implies a decrease of the event horizon, and the existence of a Planck-size black hole remnant with vanishing temperature and vanishing heat capacity. The absence of curvature singularities is generic and discussed together with the conformal structure and the Penrose diagram of asymptotically safe black holes. The production cross section of mini-black holes in energetic particle collisions, such as those at the Large Hadron Collider, is analysed within low-scale quantum gravity models. Quantum gravity corrections imply that cross sections display a threshold, are suppressed in the Planckian, and reproduce the semi-classical result in the deep...

  20. Spherical Boson Stars as Black Hole mimickers

    CERN Document Server

    Guzman, F S; 10.1103/PhysRevD.80.084023

    2010-01-01

    We present spherically symmetric boson stars as black hole mimickers based on the power spectrum of a simple accretion disk model. The free parameters of the boson star are the mass of the boson and the fourth order self-interaction coefficient in the scalar field potential. We show that even if the mass of the boson is the only free parameter it is possible to find a configuration that mimics the power spectrum of the disk due to a black hole of the same mass. We also show that for each value of the self-interaction a single boson star configuration can mimic a black hole at very different astrophysical scales in terms of the mass of the object and the accretion rate. In order to show that it is possible to distinguish one of our mimickers from a black hole we also study the deflection of light.

  1. Black-hole evaporation and ultrashort distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, T. (Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland (USA))

    1991-09-15

    The role played by ultrahigh frequencies of ultrashort distances in the usual derivations of the Hawking effect is discussed and criticized. The question would a blackhole radiate if there were a Planck scale cutoff in the rest frame of the hole '' is posed. Guidance is sought from Unruh's fluid-flow analogue of black-hole radiation, by taking into account the atomic nature of the fluid. Two arguments for black-hole radiation are given which assume a Planck length cutoff. One involves the response of static accelerated detectors outside the horizon, and the other involves conservation of the expectation value of the stress tensor. Neither argument is conclusive, but they do strongly suggest that, in spite of reasonable doubt about the usual derivations of black-hole radiation, a safe'' derivation which avoids our ignorance of ultrashort-distance physics can likely be formulated. Remaining open questions are discussed.

  2. Novel Solvent-free Perovskite Deposition in Fabrication of Normal and Inverted Architectures of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejand, Bahram Abdollahi; Gharibzadeh, Saba; Ahmadi, Vahid; Shahverdi, H Reza

    2016-09-19

    We introduced a new approach to deposit perovskite layer with no need for dissolving perovskite precursors. Deposition of Solution-free perovskite (SFP) layer is a key method for deposition of perovskite layer on the hole or electron transport layers that are strongly sensitive to perovskite precursors. Using deposition of SFP layer in the perovskite solar cells would extend possibility of using many electron and hole transport materials in both normal and invert architectures of perovskite solar cells. In the present work, we synthesized crystalline perovskite powder followed by successful deposition on TiO2 and cuprous iodide as the non-sensitve and sensitive charge transport layers to PbI2 and CH3NH3I solution in DMF. The post compressing step enhanced the efficiency of the devices by increasing the interface area between perovskite and charge transport layers. The 9.07% and 7.71% cell efficiencies of the device prepared by SFP layer was achieved in respective normal (using TiO2 as a deposition substrate) and inverted structure (using CuI as deposition substrate) of perovskite solar cell. This method can be efficient in large-scale and low cost fabrication of new generation perovskite solar cells.

  3. Novel Solvent-free Perovskite Deposition in Fabrication of Normal and Inverted Architectures of Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejand, Bahram Abdollahi; Gharibzadeh, Saba; Ahmadi, Vahid; Shahverdi, H. Reza

    2016-09-01

    We introduced a new approach to deposit perovskite layer with no need for dissolving perovskite precursors. Deposition of Solution-free perovskite (SFP) layer is a key method for deposition of perovskite layer on the hole or electron transport layers that are strongly sensitive to perovskite precursors. Using deposition of SFP layer in the perovskite solar cells would extend possibility of using many electron and hole transport materials in both normal and invert architectures of perovskite solar cells. In the present work, we synthesized crystalline perovskite powder followed by successful deposition on TiO2 and cuprous iodide as the non-sensitve and sensitive charge transport layers to PbI2 and CH3NH3I solution in DMF. The post compressing step enhanced the efficiency of the devices by increasing the interface area between perovskite and charge transport layers. The 9.07% and 7.71% cell efficiencies of the device prepared by SFP layer was achieved in respective normal (using TiO2 as a deposition substrate) and inverted structure (using CuI as deposition substrate) of perovskite solar cell. This method can be efficient in large-scale and low cost fabrication of new generation perovskite solar cells.

  4. Black hole as a wormhole factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Won Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There have been lots of debates about the final fate of an evaporating black hole and the singularity hidden by an event horizon in quantum gravity. However, on general grounds, one may argue that a black hole stops radiation at the Planck mass (ħc/G1/2∼10−5 g, where the radiated energy is comparable to the black hole's mass. And also, it has been argued that there would be a wormhole-like structure, known as “spacetime foam”, due to large fluctuations below the Planck length (ħG/c31/2∼10−33 cm. In this paper, as an explicit example, we consider an exact classical solution which represents nicely those two properties in a recently proposed quantum gravity model based on different scaling dimensions between space and time coordinates. The solution, called “Black Wormhole”, consists of two different states, depending on its mass parameter M and an IR parameter ω: For the black hole state (with ωM2>1/2, a non-traversable wormhole occupies the interior region of the black hole around the singularity at the origin, whereas for the wormhole state (with ωM2<1/2, the interior wormhole is exposed to an outside observer as the black hole horizon is disappearing from evaporation. The black hole state becomes thermodynamically stable as it approaches the merging point where the interior wormhole throat and the black hole horizon merges, and the Hawking temperature vanishes at the exact merge point (with ωM2=1/2. This solution suggests the “Generalized Cosmic Censorship” by the existence of a wormhole-like structure which protects the naked singularity even after the black hole evaporation. One could understand the would-be wormhole inside the black hole horizon as the result of microscopic wormholes created by “negative” energy quanta which have entered the black hole horizon in Hawking radiation process; the quantum black hole could be a wormhole factory! It is found that this speculative picture may be consistent with the

  5. CFD simulation for atomic layer deposition on large scale ceramic membranes%大尺寸陶瓷膜原子层沉积过程的CFD模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱明; 汪勇

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic membranes are widely used in liquid filtration for their superior chemical resistance, temperature stability and mechanical robustness. Their performance can be further improved by surface modifications, such as liquid phase reactions, which are typically too complicated to control. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), a deposition technique of self-limiting gas/solid phase chemical reactions for growing atomic scale thin films, has been extremely useful for precisely regulating nanoscale pore structures, especially modification and functionalization of porous separation membranes. Most existing ALD equipment are designed for silicon wafer substrate in semiconductor industry, thus design optimization on ALD processes of both precursor flow and surface reactions are needed for application in large-scale ceramic membranes. Computerized fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to investigate ALD process on 1-meter-long single-channeled ceramic membrane by considering both boundary conditions and surface chemical reactions of two precursors pulsed alternatively into the channel. The simulations fitted well with the experimental data at average difference of 1.69% and thus an ALD model for two-way alternatively pulsed rotation was proposed, which would be very helpful in equipment design and process optimization of ALD for large scale ceramic membranes.%陶瓷膜具有耐高温、耐酸碱、强度高等优点,在液体分离领域得到了广泛应用。对陶瓷膜进行表面改性,可进一步提升其性能,但基于表面化学反应的改性方法工艺过程复杂,难于控制。原子层沉积(atomic layer deposition,ALD)是基于表面自限制化学反应过程的气固相薄膜沉积技术,可以在纳米尺度精确调控孔道结构,特别适用于多孔分离膜的改性和功能化。目前尚无适用于大尺寸陶瓷膜的ALD设备,需要对ALD过程进行专门的优化设计。通过CFD模型对1 m长的单通道陶瓷膜的ALD

  6. Universality of black hole quantum computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvali, Gia [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); New York Univ., NY (United States). Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics; Gomez, Cesar [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica UAM-CSIC; Luest, Dieter [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Omar, Yasser [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes (Portugal). Physics of Information and Quantum Technologies Group; Lisboa Univ. (Portugal). Inst. Superior Tecnico; Richter, Benedikt [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics; Instituto de Telecomunicacoes (Portugal). Physics of Information and Quantum Technologies Group; Lisboa Univ. (Portugal). Inst. Superior Tecnico

    2017-01-15

    By analyzing the key properties of black holes from the point of view of quantum information, we derive a model-independent picture of black hole quantum computing. It has been noticed that this picture exhibits striking similarities with quantum critical condensates, allowing the use of a common language to describe quantum computing in both systems. We analyze such quantum computing by allowing coupling to external modes, under the condition that the external influence must be soft-enough in order not to offset the basic properties of the system. We derive model-independent bounds on some crucial time-scales, such as the times of gate operation, decoherence, maximal entanglement and total scrambling. We show that for black hole type quantum computers all these time-scales are of the order of the black hole half-life time. Furthermore, we construct explicitly a set of Hamiltonians that generates a universal set of quantum gates for the black hole type computer. We find that the gates work at maximal energy efficiency. Furthermore, we establish a fundamental bound on the complexity of quantum circuits encoded on these systems, and characterize the unitary operations that are implementable. It becomes apparent that the computational power is very limited due to the fact that the black hole life-time is of the same order of the gate operation time. As a consequence, it is impossible to retrieve its information, within the life-time of a black hole, by externally coupling to the black hole qubits. However, we show that, in principle, coupling to some of the internal degrees of freedom allows acquiring knowledge about the micro-state. Still, due to the trivial complexity of operations that can be performed, there is no time advantage over the collection of Hawking radiation and subsequent decoding. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Kerr black holes as particle accelerators to arbitrarily high energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañados, Máximo; Silk, Joseph; West, Stephen M

    2009-09-11

    We show that intermediate mass black holes conjectured to be the early precursors of supermassive black holes and surrounded by relic cold dark matter density spikes can act as particle accelerators with collisions, in principle, at arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies in the case of Kerr black holes. While the ejecta from such interactions will be highly redshifted, we may anticipate the possibility of a unique probe of Planck-scale physics.

  8. Full-scale ash deposition measurements at Avedøre Power Plant unit 2 during suspension-firing of wood with and without coal ash addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    The formation of deposits during suspension-firing of wood at Avedøre Power Plant unit 2 (AVV2) was studied by using an advanced deposit probe system. The tests were conducted both with and without coal ash addition, and at two different locations with flue gas temperatures of 1250-1300 oC and 750......-800 oC respectively. The deposit formation process was studied quantitatively though the mass uptake data from the load-cell of the probe, while camera pictures were used to qualitatively verify the obtained mass uptake data and to explain the deposit buildup/shedding mechanisms. The collected deposits...... along with the fly ash and bottom ash from the plant were characterized extensively by SEM-EDS, ICP-OES/IC and XRD. Based on the results from the present work, the deposit formation and shedding mechanisms under different operational conditions were proposed and discussed. The influence of coal ash...

  9. Black hole clustering and duty cycles in the Illustris simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraf, C.; Sijacki, D.

    2017-04-01

    We use the high-resolution cosmological simulation Illustris to investigate the clustering of supermassive black holes across cosmic time, the link between black hole clustering and host halo masses, and the implications for black hole duty cycles. Our predicted black hole correlation length and bias match the observational data very well across the full redshift range probed. Black hole clustering is strongly luminosity dependent on small, 1-halo scales, with some moderate dependence on larger scales of a few Mpc at intermediate redshifts. We find black hole clustering to evolve only weakly with redshift, initially following the behaviour of their hosts. However, below z ∼ 2 black hole clustering increases faster than that of their hosts, which leads to a significant overestimate of the clustering-predicted host halo mass. The full distribution of host halo masses is very wide, including a low-mass tail extending up to an order of magnitude below the naive prediction for minimum host mass. Our black hole duty cycles, fduty, follow a power-law dependence on black hole mass and decrease with redshift, and we provide accurate analytic fits to these. The increase in clustering amplitude at late times, however, means that duty cycle estimates based on black hole clustering can overestimate fduty substantially, by more than two orders of magnitude. We find the best agreement when the minimum host mass is assumed to be 1011.2 M⊙, which provides an accurate measure across all redshifts and luminosity ranges probed by our simulation.

  10. Magnetic fields threading black holes: restrictions from general relativity and implications for astrophysical black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, David

    2017-07-01

    The idea that black hole spin is instrumental in the generation of powerful jets in active galactic nuclei and X-ray binaries is arguably the most contentious claim in black hole astrophysics. Because jets are thought to originate in the context of electromagnetism, and the modeling of Maxwell fields in curved spacetime around black holes is challenging, various approximations are made in numerical simulations that fall under the guise of `ideal magnetohydrodynamics'. But the simplifications of this framework may struggle to capture relevant details of real astrophysical environments near black holes. In this work, we highlight tension between analytic and numerical results, specifically between the analytically derived conserved Noether currents for rotating black hole spacetimes and the results of general relativistic numerical simulations (GRMHD). While we cannot definitively attribute the issue to any specific approximation used in the numerical schemes, there seem to be natural candidates, which we explore. GRMHD notwithstanding, if electromagnetic fields around rotating black holes are brought to the hole by accretion, we show from first principles that prograde accreting disks likely experience weaker large-scale black hole-threading fields, implying weaker jets than in retrograde configurations.

  11. Black Hole Dynamic Potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koustubh Ajit Kabe

    2012-09-01

    In the following paper, certain black hole dynamic potentials have been developed definitively on the lines of classical thermodynamics. These potentials have been refined in view of the small differences in the equations of the laws of black hole dynamics as given by Bekenstein and those of thermodynamics. Nine fundamental black hole dynamical relations have been developed akin to the four fundamental thermodynamic relations of Maxwell. The specific heats , and , have been defined. For a black hole, these quantities are negative. The d equation has been obtained as an application of these fundamental relations. Time reversible processes observing constancy of surface gravity are considered and an equation connecting the internal energy of the black hole , the additional available energy defined as the first free energy function , and the surface gravity , has been obtained. Finally as a further application of the fundamental relations, it has been proved for a homogeneous gravitational field in black hole space times or a de Sitter black hole that $C_{\\Omega,\\Phi}-C_{J,Q}=\\kappa \\left[\\left(\\dfrac{\\partial J}{\\partial \\kappa}\\right)_{\\Omega,\\Phi}\\left(\\dfrac{\\partial \\Omega}{\\partial \\kappa}\\right)_{J,Q}+\\left(\\dfrac{\\partial Q}{\\partial \\kappa}\\right)_{\\Omega,\\Phi}\\left(\\dfrac{\\partial\\Phi}{\\partial \\kappa}\\right)_{J,Q}\\right]$. This is dubbed as the homogeneous fluid approximation in context of the black holes.

  12. Black holes matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge Stjernholm

    2016-01-01

    Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).......Review essay, Marcia Bartusiak, Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled On by Hawking Became Loved (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015)....

  13. Perturbing supersymmetric black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Onozawa, H; Mishima, T; Ishihara, H; Onozawa, Hisashi; Okamura, Takashi; Mishima, Takashi; Ishihara, Hideki

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of the perturbations of the Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole in the N=2 supergravity is presented. In the extreme case, the black hole responds to the perturbation of each field in the same manner. This is possibly because we can match the modes of the graviton, gravitino, and photon using supersymmetry transformations.

  14. Black hole levitron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsiwalla, X.D.; Verlinde, E.P.

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of spatially stabilizing four dimensional extremal black holes in background electric/magnetic fields. Whilst looking for stationary stable solutions describing black holes placed in external fields we find that taking a continuum limit of Denef et al.’s multicenter

  15. Newborn Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Swift satellite say they have found newborn black holes, just seconds old, in a confused state of existence. The holes are consuming material falling into them while somehow propelling other material away at great speeds. "First comes a blast of gamma rays followed by intense pulses of x-rays. The energies involved are much…

  16. Scattering by Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, N

    2000-01-01

    This is a chapter on Black-hole Scattering that was commissioned for an Encyclopaedia on Scattering edited by Pike and Sabatier, to be published by Academic Press. The chapter surveys wave propagation in black-hole spacetimes, diffraction effects in wave scattering, resonances, quasinormal modes and related topics.

  17. Disregarding the 'Hole Argument'

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Bryan W

    2014-01-01

    Jim Weatherall has suggested that Einstein's hole argument, as presented by Earman and Norton (1987), is based on a misleading use of mathematics. I argue on the contrary that Weatherall demands an implausible restriction on how mathematics is used. The hole argument, on the other hand, is in no new danger at all.

  18. Lifshitz Topological Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, R B

    2009-01-01

    I find a class of black hole solutions to a (3+1) dimensional theory gravity coupled to abelian gauge fields with negative cosmological constant that has been proposed as the dual theory to a Lifshitz theory describing critical phenomena in (2+1) dimensions. These black holes are all asymptotic to a Lifshitz fixed point geometry and depend on a single parameter that determines both their area (or size) and their charge. Most of the solutions are obtained numerically, but an exact solution is also obtained for a particular value of this parameter. The thermodynamic behaviour of large black holes is almost the same regardless of genus, but differs considerably for small black holes. Screening behaviour is exhibited in the dual theory for any genus, but the critical length at which it sets in is genus-dependent for small black holes.

  19. Cosmological Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Stornaiolo, C

    2002-01-01

    In this letter we propose the existence of low density black holes and discuss its compatibility with the cosmological observations. The origin of these black holes can be traced back to the collapse of long wavelength cosmological perturbations during the matter dominated era, when the densities are low enough to neglect any internal and thermal pressure. By introducing a threshold density $\\hat{\\rho}$ above which pressure and non-gravitational interactions become effective, we find the highest wavelength for the perturbations that can reach an equilibrium state instead of collapsing to a black hole. The low density black holes introduced here, if they exist, can be observed through weak and strong gravitational lensing effects. Finally we observe that we obtained here a cosmological model which is capable to explain in a qualitative way the void formation together with the value $\\Omega=1$. But we remark that it needs to be improved by considering non spherical symmetric black holes.

  20. Primordial Black Hole Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, D; Turok, N G; Baumann, Daniel; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2007-01-01

    We reconsider the possibility that the observed baryon asymmetry was generated by the evaporation of primordial black holes that dominated the early universe. We present a simple derivation showing that the baryon asymmetry is insensitive to the initial black hole density and the cosmological model but is sensitive to the temperature-dependence of the CP and baryon-violating (or lepton-violating) interactions. We also consider the possibility that black holes stop evaporating and form Planck-mass remnants that act as dark matter. We show that primordial black holes cannot simultaneously account for both the observed baryon asymmetry and the (remnant) dark matter density unless the magnitude of CP violation is much greater than expected from most particle physics models. Finally, we apply these results to ekpyrotic/cyclic models, in which primordial black holes may form when branes collide. We find that obtaining the observed baryon asymmetry is compatible with the other known constraints on parameters.

  1. Black Holes and Random Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Cotler, Jordan S; Hanada, Masanori; Polchinski, Joseph; Saad, Phil; Shenker, Stephen H; Stanford, Douglas; Streicher, Alexandre; Tezuka, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    We argue that the late time behavior of horizon fluctuations in large anti-de Sitter (AdS) black holes is governed by the random matrix dynamics characteristic of quantum chaotic systems. Our main tool is the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model, which we use as a simple model of a black hole. We use an analytically continued partition function $|Z(\\beta +it)|^2$ as well as correlation functions as diagnostics. Using numerical techniques we establish random matrix behavior at late times. We determine the early time behavior exactly in a double scaling limit, giving us a plausible estimate for the crossover time to random matrix behavior. We use these ideas to formulate a conjecture about general large AdS black holes, like those dual to 4D super-Yang-Mills theory, giving a provisional estimate of the crossover time. We make some preliminary comments about challenges to understanding the late time dynamics from a bulk point of view.

  2. Black Holes as Effective Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Balasubramanian, Vijay; El-Showk, Sheer; Messamah, Ilies

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational entropy arises in string theory via coarse graining over an underlying space of microstates. In this review we would like to address the question of how the classical black hole geometry itself arises as an effective or approximate description of a pure state, in a closed string theory, which semiclassical observers are unable to distinguish from the "naive" geometry. In cases with enough supersymmetry it has been possible to explicitly construct these microstates in spacetime, and understand how coarse-graining of non-singular, horizon-free objects can lead to an effective description as an extremal black hole. We discuss how these results arise for examples in Type II string theory on AdS_5 x S^5 and on AdS_3 x S^3 x T^4 that preserve 16 and 8 supercharges respectively. For such a picture of black holes as effective geometries to extend to cases with finite horizon area the scale of quantum effects in gravity would have to extend well beyond the vicinity of the singularities in the effective t...

  3. Gram-scale synthesis of catalytic Co9S8 nanocrystal ink as a cathode material for spray-deposited, large-area dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Hao; Lu, Ming-De; Tung, Yung-Liang; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2013-10-22

    We report the development of Co9S8 nanocrystals as a cost-effective cathode material that can be readily combined with spraying techniques to fabricate large-area dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) devices and can be further connected with series or parallel cell architectures to obtain a relatively high output voltage or current. A gram-scale synthesis of Co9S8 nanocrystal is carried out via a noninjection reaction by mixing anhydrous CoCl2 with trioctylphosphine (TOP), dodecanethiol and oleylamine (OLA) at 250 °C. The Co9S8 nanocrystals possess excellent catalytic ability with respect to I(-)/I3(-) redox reactions. The Co9S8 nanocrystals are prepared as nanoinks to fabricate uniform, crack-free Co9S8 thin films on different substrates by using a spray deposition technique. These Co9S8 films are used as counter electrodes assembled with dye-adsorbed TiO2 photoanodes to fabricate DSSC devices having a working area of 2 cm(2) and an average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.02 ± 0.18% under AM 1.5 solar illumination, which is comparable with the PCE of 7.2 ± 0.12% obtained using a Pt cathode. Furthermore, six 2 cm(2)-sized DSSC devices connected in series output an open-circuit voltage of 4.2 V that can power a wide range of electronic devices such as LED arrays and can charge commercial lithium ion batteries.

  4. Black Hole as a Wormhole Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sung-Won

    2015-01-01

    On general grounds, one may argue that a black hole stops radiation at the Planck mass, where the radiated energy is comparable to the black hole's mass. And also, it has been argued that there would be a "wormhole-like" structure, known as "space-time foam", due to large fluctuations below the Planck length. In this paper, we show that there is actually an exact classical solution which represents nicely those two properties in a recently proposed quantum gravity model based on different scaling dimensions between space and time coordinates. The solution, called "Black Wormhole", consists of two different states, depending on its mass M and an IR parameter omega: For the black hole state, a wormhole occupies the interior region of the black hole around the singularity at the origin, whereas for the wormhole state, the interior wormhole is exposed to an outside observer as the black hole horizon is disappeared from evaporation. The black hole state becomes thermodynamically stable as it approaches to the merg...

  5. Micro Black Holes and the Democratic Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    Unitarity implies that the evaporation of microscopic quasi-classical black holes cannot be universal in different particle species. This creates a puzzle, since it conflicts with the thermal nature of quasi-classical black holes, according to which all the species should see the same horizon and be produced with the same Hawking temperatures. We resolve this puzzle by showing that for the microscopic black holes, on top the usual quantum evaporation time, there is a new time-scale which characterizes a purely classical process during which the black hole looses the ability to differentiate among the species, and becomes democratic. We demonstrate this phenomenon in a well-understood framework of large extra dimensions, with a number of parallel branes. An initially non-democratic black hole is the one localized on one of the branes, with its high-dimensional Schwarzschild radius being much shorter than the interbrane distance. Such a black hole seemingly cannot evaporate into the species localized on the oth...

  6. Black holes, quasars, and the universe /2nd edition/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Topics of astronomy are discussed in terms of black holes, galaxies, quasars, and models of the universe. Black holes are approached through consideration of stellar evolution, white dwarfs, supernovae, neutron stars, pulsars, the event horizon, Cygnus X-1, white holes, and worm holes. Attention is also given to radio waves from high speed electrons, the radiation emitted by quasars, active galaxies, galactic energy sources, and interpretations of the redshift. Finally, the life cycle of the universe is deliberated, along with the cosmic time scale, evidence for the Big Bang, and the future of the universe.

  7. Scalarized Hairy Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho

    2015-01-01

    In the presence of a complex scalar field scalar-tensor theory allows for scalarized rotating hairy black holes. We exhibit the domain of existence for these scalarized black holes, which is bounded by scalarized rotating boson stars and ordinary hairy black holes. We discuss the global properties of these solutions. Like their counterparts in general relativity, their angular momentum may exceed the Kerr bound, and their ergosurfaces may consist of a sphere and a ring, i.e., form an ergo-Saturn.

  8. Primordial Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    MacGibbon, Jane H; Linnemann, J T; Marinelli, S S; Stump, D; Tollefson, K

    2015-01-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are of interest in many cosmological contexts. PBHs lighter than about 1012 kg are predicted to be directly detectable by their Hawking radiation. This radiation should produce both a diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background from the cosmologically-averaged distribution of PBHs and gamma-ray burst signals from individual light black holes. The Fermi, Milagro, Veritas, HESS and HAWC observatories, in combination with new burst recognition methodologies, offer the greatest sensitivity for the detection of such black holes or placing limits on their existence.

  9. Black Hole Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    P. Mitra

    1994-01-01

    In the talk different definitions of the black hole entropy are discussed and compared. It is shown that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy $S^{BH}$ (defined by the response of the free energy of a system containing a black hole on the change of the temperature) differs from the statistical- mechanical entropy $S^{SM}=-\\mbox{Tr}(\\hat{\\rho}\\ln \\hat{\\rho})$ (defined by counting internal degrees of freedom of a black hole). A simple explanation of the universality of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy (...

  10. Black hole entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, V

    1994-01-01

    In the talk different definitions of the black hole entropy are discussed and compared. It is shown that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy S^{BH} (defined by the response of the free energy of a system containing a black hole on the change of the temperature) differs from the statistical- mechanical entropy S^{SM}=-\\mbox{Tr}(\\hat{\\rho}\\ln \\hat{\\rho}) (defined by counting internal degrees of freedom of a black hole). A simple explanation of the universality of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy (i.e. its independence of the number and properties of the fields which might contribute to S^{SM}) is given.

  11. Scalarized hairy black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard, E-mail: b.kleihaus@uni-oldenburg.de [Institut für Physik, Universität Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Kunz, Jutta [Institut für Physik, Universität Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Yazadjiev, Stoytcho [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria)

    2015-05-11

    In the presence of a complex scalar field scalar–tensor theory allows for scalarized rotating hairy black holes. We exhibit the domain of existence for these scalarized black holes, which is bounded by scalarized rotating boson stars and hairy black holes of General Relativity. We discuss the global properties of these solutions. Like their counterparts in general relativity, their angular momentum may exceed the Kerr bound, and their ergosurfaces may consist of a sphere and a ring, i.e., form an ergo-Saturn.

  12. Scalarized hairy black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Kleihaus

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of a complex scalar field scalar–tensor theory allows for scalarized rotating hairy black holes. We exhibit the domain of existence for these scalarized black holes, which is bounded by scalarized rotating boson stars and hairy black holes of General Relativity. We discuss the global properties of these solutions. Like their counterparts in general relativity, their angular momentum may exceed the Kerr bound, and their ergosurfaces may consist of a sphere and a ring, i.e., form an ergo-Saturn.

  13. Black holes new horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Hayward, Sean Alan

    2013-01-01

    Black holes, once just fascinating theoretical predictions of how gravity warps space-time according to Einstein's theory, are now generally accepted as astrophysical realities, formed by post-supernova collapse, or as supermassive black holes mysteriously found at the cores of most galaxies, powering active galactic nuclei, the most powerful objects in the universe. Theoretical understanding has progressed in recent decades with a wider realization that local concepts should characterize black holes, rather than the global concepts found in textbooks. In particular, notions such as trapping h

  14. Black Hole Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carlip, S

    2014-01-01

    The discovery in the early 1970s that black holes radiate as black bodies has radically affected our understanding of general relativity, and offered us some early hints about the nature of quantum gravity. In this chapter I will review the discovery of black hole thermodynamics and summarize the many independent ways of obtaining the thermodynamic and (perhaps) statistical mechanical properties of black holes. I will then describe some of the remaining puzzles, including the nature of the quantum microstates, the problem of universality, and the information loss paradox.

  15. Black Hole Shadows and VSOP-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, R.

    2009-08-01

    The radio images in the galactic center with micro-arcsecond resolution will be obtained by the radio interferometer VSOP-2. The apparent sizes of the direct images of the black holes in the nearby massive galaxies such as M87 and Sgr A* also have micro-arcsecond scales, and such black holes will be seen as the shadows in the luminous accreting matter around the black holes. At 43 GHz where VSOP-2 has the highest spatial resolution (38 μarcseconds), the observed images of Sgr A* are smeared out by the interstellar scattering. Therefore, the shadow of Sgr A* will not be resolved at this frequency. In the case of M87, the observed values of the black hole mass and the distance are not precisely determined. The possible minimum angular size of the highest spatial resolution of VSOP-2 corresponds to 12.5 GMBH/c^2 which is smaller than the shadow size of the slowly rotating black hole in the accretion flow with the inner edge of the marginally stable orbit. On the other hand, the possible maximum angular size of the highest spatial resolution of VSOP-2 corresponds to 38.1 GMBH/c^2. In this case, for any value of the black hole spin and the observed inclination angle, the size of the black hole shadow is smaller than the highest spatial resolution of VSOP-2. On the other hand, the observed energy spectrum of the accretion flow in M87 is consistent with the radiatively inefficient accretion flow where the electron temperature is higher than the detection temperature of VSOP-2. This means that the photons from the accretion flow around the black hole in M87 can be detected by VSOP-2. Other related issues are also discussed.

  16. Black-hole masses of distant quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview of the methods commonly used to determine or estimate the black hole mass in quiescent or active galaxies is presented and it is argued that the use of mass-scaling relations is both a reliable and the preferred method to apply to large samples of distant quasars. The method uses...

  17. Universality of Black Hole Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia; Lust, Dieter; Omar, Yasser; Richter, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing the key properties of black holes from the point of view of quantum information, we derive a model-independent picture of black hole quantum computing. It has been noticed that this picture exhibits striking similarities with quantum critical condensates, allowing the use of a common language to describe quantum computing in both systems. We analyze such quantum computing by allowing coupling to external modes, under the condition that the external influence must be soft-enough in order not to offset the basic properties of the system. We derive model-independent bounds on some crucial time-scales, such as the times of gate operation, decoherence, maximal entanglement and total scrambling. We show that for black hole type quantum computers all these time-scales are of the order of the black hole half-life time. Furthermore, we construct explicitly a set of Hamiltonians that generates a universal set of quantum gates for the black hole type computer. We find that the gates work at maximal energy e...

  18. Black Holes and other exotica at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava; Cavaglia, Marco

    2009-05-01

    If the fundamental scale of gravity is of the order of 1 TeV, black holes might be produced at the Large Hadron Collider. We present simulations of black holes and other exotic predictions of physics beyond the Standard Model - supersymmetry and string theory. Black hole events are simulated using the CATFISH Monte Carlo generator, simulations of string resonances use PYTHIA and supersymmetric simulations use a combination of ISAJET and PYTHIA. Our analysis shows that black holes can be discriminated from supersymmetry and string resonances. Isolated leptons with high transverse momentum can be used to distinguish black holes and supersymmetry. Z bosons and photons with high transverse momentum allow the discrimination of black holes and string resonances. The analysis of visible and missing energy /momenta, event-shape variables and multilepton events complement these techniques.

  19. Galaxy bulges and their massive black holes: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Alister W

    2015-01-01

    With references to both key and oft-forgotten pioneering works, this article starts by presenting a review into how we came to believe in the existence of massive black holes at the centres of galaxies. It then presents the historical development of the near-linear (black hole)-(host spheroid) mass relation, before explaining why this has recently been dramatically revised. Past disagreement over the slope of the (black hole)-(velocity dispersion) relation is also explained, and the discovery of sub-structure within the (black hole)-(velocity dispersion) diagram is discussed. As the search for the fundamental connection between massive black holes and their host galaxies continues, the competing array of additional black hole mass scaling relations for samples of predominantly inactive galaxies are presented.

  20. Quasi-evaporating black holes and cold dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Larena, Julien

    2009-01-01

    Vilkovisky has claimed to have solved the black hole back reaction problem and finds that black holes lose only ten percent of their mass to Hawking radiation before evaporation ceases. We examine the implications of this scenario for cold dark matter, assuming that primordial black holes are created from a scale- invariant perturbation spectrum during the reheating period after inflation. The mass spectrum is expected to be dominated by 10-gram black holes. We find that nucleosynthesis constraints and the requirement that the earth presently exist do not come close to ruling out such black holes as dark matter candidates. They also evade the demand that the photon density produced by evaporating primordial black holes does not exceed the present cosmic radiation background by a factor of about one thousand.

  1. Gravitational Tension, Spacetime Pressure and Black Hole Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Armas, Jay; Sanchioni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We study the first law of black hole thermodynamics in the presence of surrounding gravitational fields and argue that variations of these fields are naturally incorporated in the first law by defining gravitational tension or gravitational binding energy. We demonstrate that this notion can also be applied in Anti-de Sitter spacetime, in which the surrounding gravitational field is sourced by a cosmological fluid, therefore showing that spacetime volume and gravitational tension encode the same physics as spacetime pressure and black hole volume. We furthermore show that it is possible to introduce a definition of spacetime pressure and black hole volume for any spacetime with characteristic length scales which does not necessarily require a cosmological constant sourcing Einstein equations. However, we show that black hole volume is non-universal in the flat spacetime limit, questioning its significance. We illustrate these ideas by studying the resulting black hole volume of Kaluza-Klein black holes and of...

  2. Gravitational torque-driven black hole growth and feedback in cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglés-Alcázar, Daniel; Davé, Romeel; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Özel, Feryal; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate black hole-host galaxy scaling relations in cosmological simulations with a self-consistent black hole growth and feedback model. Our sub-grid accretion model captures the key scalings governing angular momentum transport by gravitational torques from galactic scales down to parsec scales, while our kinetic feedback implementation enables the injection of outflows with properties chosen to match observed nuclear outflows (star formation-driven winds are not included to isolate the effects of black hole feedback). We show that `quasar mode' feedback can have a large impact on the thermal properties of the intergalactic medium and the growth of galaxies and massive black holes for kinetic feedback efficiencies as low as 0.1 per cent relative to the bolometric luminosity. None the less, our simulations indicate that the black hole-host scaling relations are only weakly dependent on the effects of black hole feedback on galactic scales, since black hole feedback suppresses the growth of galaxies and massive black holes by a similar amount. In contrast, the rate at which gravitational torques feed the central black hole relative to the host galaxy star formation rate governs the slope and normalization of the black hole-host correlations. Our results suggest that a common gas supply regulated by gravitational torques is the primary driver of the observed co-evolution of black holes and galaxies.

  3. 碳酸钙在流动过冷沸腾条件下的结垢机理研究%Mechanism of Calcium Carbonate Scale Deposition under Subcooled Flow Boiling Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢晓凯; 马重芳; 陈永昌

    2005-01-01

    Fouling of heat transfer surfaces during subcooled flow boiling is a frequent engineering problem in process industries. It has been generally observed that the deposits in such industrial systems consist mainly of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), which has inverse solubility characteristics. This investigation focused on the mechanism to control deposition and the morphology of crystalline deposits. A series of experiments were carried out at different surface and bulk temperatures, fluid velocities and salt ion concentrations. It is shown that the deposition rate is controlled by different mechanism in the range of experimental parameters, depending on salt ion concentration. At higher ion concentration, the fouling rate increases linearly with surface temperature and the effect of flow velocity on deposition rate is quite strong, suggesting that mass diffusion controls the fouling process.On the contrary, at lower ion concentration, the fouling rate increases exponentially with surface temperature and is independent of the velocity, illustrating that surface reaction controls the fouling process. By analysis of the morphology of scale, two types of crystal (calcite and aragonite) are formed. The lower the temperature and ion concentration, the longer the induction period and the higher the percentage of calcite precipitated.

  4. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070291 Gong Ping (Northern Fujian Geological Party, Shaozou 354000) Discussion on Geological Characteristics and Control Factors of the Shimen Au-polymetallic Deposit in Zhenghe County, Fujian Province (Geology of Fujian, ISSN1001-3970, CN38-1080/P, 25(1), 2006, p.18-24, 2 illus., 2 tables, 1 ref.) Key words: gold deposits, polymetallic deposits, Fujian Province

  5. Black hole quantum spectrum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corda, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Introducing a black hole (BH) effective temperature, which takes into account both the non-strictly thermal character of Hawking radiation and the countable behavior of emissions of subsequent Hawking quanta, we recently re...

  6. Holographic black hole chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karch, Andreas; Robinson, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic quantities associated with black holes in Anti-de Sitter space obey an interesting identity when the cosmological constant is included as one of the dynamical variables, the generalized Smarr relation...

  7. Multi scale study of carbon deposits collected in Tore-Supra and TEXTOR tokamaks; Etude multi echelle des depots carbones collectes dans les tokamaks Tore Supra et TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richou, M

    2007-06-15

    Tokamaks are devices aimed at studying magnetic fusion. They operate with high temperature plasmas containing hydrogen, deuterium or tritium. One of the major issue is to control the plasma-wall interaction. The plasma facing components are most often in carbon. The major drawback of carbon is the existence of carbon deposits and dust, due to erosion. Dust is potentially reactive in case of an accidental opening of the device. These deposits also contain H, D or T and induce major safety problems when tritium is used, which will be the case in ITER. Therefore, the understanding of the deposit formation and structure has become a main issue for fusion researches. To clarify the role of the deposits in the retention phenomenon, we have done different complementary characterizations for deposits collected on similar places (neutralizers) in tokamaks Tore Supra (France) and TEXTOR (Germany). Accessible microporous volume and pore size distribution of deposits has been determined with the analysis of nitrogen and methane adsorption isotherms using the BET, Dubinin-Radushkevich and {alpha}{sub s} methods and the Density Functional Theory (DFT). To understand growth mechanisms, we have studied the deposit structure and morphology. We have shown using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Raman micro-spectrometry that these deposits are non amorphous and disordered. We have also shown the presence of nano-particles (diameter between 4 and 70 nm) which are similar to carbon blacks: nano-particle growth occurs in homogeneous phase in the edge plasma. We have emphasised a dual growth process: a homogenous and a heterogeneous one. (author)

  8. Braneworld black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    In these lectures, I give an introduction to and overview of braneworlds and black holes in the context of warped compactifications. I first describe the general paradigm of braneworlds, and introduce the Randall-Sundrum model. I discuss braneworld gravity, both using perturbation theory, and also non perturbative results. I then discuss black holes on the brane, the obstructions to finding exact solutions, and ways of tackling these difficulties. I describe some known solutions, and conclude with some open questions and controversies.

  9. Holes in Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang

    1990-05-01

    In this Brief Report we show that a recent model proposed by Shankar [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 203 (1989)], describing the motion of holes in quantum antiferromagnets is equivalent to the Schwinger model [Phys. Rev. 128, 2425 (1962)] in 1+1 dimensions. Some exact results are deduced. In addition to the superconducting long-range order found by Shankar, it is shown that there is a 2pF hole density wave existing with the superconducting pairing instability.

  10. Life Inside Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokuchaev, Vyacheslav

    2013-11-01

    It is considered the test planet and photon orbits of the third kind inside the black hole (BH), which are stable, periodic and neither come out the BH nor terminate at the central singularity. Interiors of the supermassive BHs may be inhabited by advanced civilizations living on the planets with the third kind orbits. In principle, one can get information from the interiors of BHs by observing their white hole counterparts.

  11. Modelling quantum black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Govindarajan, T R

    2016-01-01

    Novel bound states are obtained for manifolds with singular potentials. These singular potentials require proper boundary conditions across boundaries. The number of bound states match nicely with what we would expect for black holes. Also they serve to model membrane mechanism for the black hole horizons in simpler contexts. The singular potentials can also mimic expanding boundaries elegantly, there by obtaining appropriately tuned radiation rates.

  12. Hydrodynamics and black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Oz, Yaron

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how the AdS/CFT correspondence (the Holographic Principle) relates field theory hydrodynamics to perturbations of black hole (brane) gravitational backgrounds. The hydrodynamics framework is first presented from the field theory point of view, after which the dual gravitational description is outlined, first for relativistic fluids and then for the nonrelativistic case. Further details of the fluid/gravity correspondence are then discussed, including the bulk geometry and the dynamics of the black hole horizon.

  13. Black hole geometrothermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Hernando

    2017-03-01

    We review the main aspects of geometrothermodynamics which is a geometric formalism to describe thermodynamic systems, taking into account the invariance of classical thermodynamics with respect to Legendre transformations. We focus on the particular case of black holes, and present a Riemannian metric which describes the corresponding space of equilibrium states. We show that this metric can be used to describe the stability properties and phase transition structure of black holes in different gravity theories.

  14. Black Hole Induced Ejections

    OpenAIRE

    Pelletier, G.

    2004-01-01

    Black Holes generate a particular kind of environments dominated by an accretion flow which concentrates a magnetic field. The interplay of gravity and magnetism creates this paradoxical situation where relativistic ejection is allowed and consequently high energy phenomena take place. Therefore Black Holes, which are very likely at the origin of powerfull astrophysical phenomena such as AGNs, micro- quasars and GRBs where relativistic ejections are observed, are at the heart of high energy a...

  15. Charged Galileon black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  16. Quantum Gravity Effects On Charged Micro Black Holes Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasvandi, N; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdullah, W A T Wan

    2016-01-01

    The charged black hole thermodynamics is corrected in terms of the quantum gravity effects. Most of the quantum gravity theories support the idea that near the Planck scale, the standard Heisenberg uncertainty principle should be reformulated by the so-called Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) which provides a perturbation framework to perform required modifications of the black hole quantities. In this paper, we consider the effects of the minimal length and maximal momentum as GUP type I and the minimal length, minimal momentum, and maximal momentum as GUP type II on thermodynamics of the charged TeV-scale black holes. We also generalized our study to the universe with the extra dimensions based on the ADD model. In this framework, the effect of the electrical charge on thermodynamics of the black hole and existence of the charged black hole remnants as a potential candidate for the dark matter particles are discussed.

  17. The Early Growth of the First Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jarrett L.; Haardt, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    With detections of quasars powered by increasingly massive black holes at increasingly early times in cosmic history over the past decade, there has been correspondingly rapid progress made on the theory of early black hole formation and growth. Here, we review the emerging picture of how the first massive black holes formed from the primordial gas and then grew to supermassive scales. We discuss the initial conditions for the formation of the progenitors of these seed black holes, the factors dictating the initial masses with which they form, and their initial stages of growth via accretion, which may occur at super-Eddington rates. Finally, we briefly discuss how these results connect to large-scale simulations of the growth of supermassive black holes in the first billion years after the Big Bang.

  18. Scalar cosmological perturbations from inflationary black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Reska, Paul, E-mail: t.prokopec@uu.nl, E-mail: p.m.reska@uu.nl [Spinoza Institute and Institute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, 3584 CE Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-03-01

    We study the correction to the scale invariant power spectrum of a scalar field on de Sitter space from small black holes that formed during a pre-inflationary matter dominated era. The formation probability of such black holes is estimated from primordial Gaussian density fluctuations. We determine the correction to the spectrum of scalar cosmological perturbations from the Keldysh propagator of a massless scalar field on Schwarzschild-de Sitter space. Our results suggest that the effect is strong enough to be tested — and possibly even ruled out — by observations.

  19. Charged black holes in colored Lifshitz spacetimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Ying Fan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider Einstein gravities coupled to a cosmological constant and SU(2 Yang–Mills fields in four and five dimensions. We find that the theories admit colored Lifshitz solutions with dynamic exponents z>1. We study the wave equations of the SU(2 scalar triplet in the bulk, and find that the vacuum color modifies the scaling dimensions of the dual operators. We also introduce a Maxwell field and construct exact solutions of electrically-charged black holes that approach the D=4, z=3 and D=5, z=4 colored Lifshitz spacetimes. We derive the thermodynamical first law for general colored and charged Lifshitz black holes.

  20. Formation of the First Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Bromm, V; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    We consider the physical conditions under which supermassive black holes could have formed inside the first galaxies. Our SPH simulations indicate that metal-free galaxies with a virial temperature ~10^4 K and with suppressed H2 formation (due to an intergalactic UV background) tend to form a binary black hole system which contains a substantial fraction (>10%) of the total baryonic mass of the host galaxy. Fragmentation into stars is suppressed without substantial H2 cooling. Our simulations follow the condensation of ~5x10^6 M_sun around the two centers of the binary down to a scale of 10 that would be detectable by LISA.

  1. Cosmic censorship inside black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Thorlacius, L

    2006-01-01

    A simple argument is given that a traversable Cauchy horizon inside a black hole is incompatible with unitary black hole evolution. The argument assumes the validity of black hole complementarity and applies to a generic black hole carrying angular momentum and/or charge. In the second part of the paper we review recent work on the semiclassical geometry of two-dimensional charged black holes.

  2. Evolution of Primordial Black Holes in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. Dwivedee; B. Nayak; M. Jamil; L. P. Singh; R. Myrzakulov

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we study the evolution of primordial black holes within the context of loop quantum cosmology. First we calculate the scale factor and energy density of the Universe for different cosmic era and then taking these as inputs, we study evolution of primordial black holes. From our estimation it is found that accretion of radiation does not affect evolution of primordial black holes in loop quantum cosmology. We also conclude that due to slow variation of scale factor, the upper bound on initial mass fraction of presently evaporating PBHs are much greater in loop quantum cosmology than the standard case.

  3. Black holes and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    Belief in the existence of black holes is the ultimate act of faith for a physicist. First suggested by the English clergyman John Michell in the year 1784, the gravitational pull of a black hole is so strong that nothing - not even light - can escape. Gravity might be the weakest of the fundamental forces but black-hole physics is not for the faint-hearted. Black holes present obvious problems for would-be observers because they cannot, by definition, be seen with conventional telescopes - although before the end of the decade gravitational-wave detectors should be able to study collisions between black holes. Until then astronomers can only infer the existence of a black hole from its gravitational influence on other matter, or from the X-rays emitted by gas and dust as they are dragged into the black hole. However, once this material passes through the 'event horizon' that surrounds the black hole, we will never see it again - not even with X-ray specs. Despite these observational problems, most physicists and astronomers believe that black holes do exist. Small black holes a few kilometres across are thought to form when stars weighing more than about two solar masses collapse under the weight of their own gravity, while supermassive black holes weighing millions of solar masses appear to be present at the centre of most galaxies. Moreover, some brave physicists have proposed ways to make black holes - or at least event horizons - in the laboratory. The basic idea behind these 'artificial black holes' is not to compress a large amount of mass into a small volume, but to reduce the speed of light in a moving medium to less than the speed of the medium and so create an event horizon. The parallels with real black holes are not exact but the experiments could shed new light on a variety of phenomena. The first challenge, however, is to get money for the research. One year on from a high-profile meeting on artificial black holes in London, for

  4. Up-scaled Teer-UDP850/4 Unbalanced Magnetron Deposition System Used for Mass-Production of CrTiAlN Hard Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGGuo-jun; YANGShi-cai; JIANGBai-ling; BAILi-jing; CHENDi-chum; WENXiao-bin; TEERD.G.

    2004-01-01

    Up-sca]ed deposition process of Teer-UDP850/4 has been established and used for massive production of CrTiAlN hard coatings in applications of anti-wear, cutting and forming tools. This deposition system uses four magnetrons that are arranged by unbalanced magnets to fomt closed magnetic field enabling the system running in high current density. Elemental metals of Cr, Ti and Al are used as the target materials which are co-deposited with nitrogen forming nlultialloy nitride, nanoscale multi-layer or superlattice hard coatings. The stthstrate turntable is designed as planet rotation mechanism with three folds so that components or tools with complicate geometry can be uniformly coated onto all their surfaces and cutting edges. The pawer units for the magnetrons are straight dc whilst the substrate is biased by pulsed de. Two solid heaters are installed in the system to enable running a wide range of deposition temperature from 200℃ to 500℃. The pumping system is powerful that incorporated with a polycold to pump the system to a good vacuum in a very shori time. A front door and a movable substrate table are available to benefit easily loading and unloading. Deposition procedure. properties and performance of the coatings is also presented in this paper.

  5. The Merging History of Massive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, M; Madau, P; Sesana, A

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a hierarchical structure formation scenario describing the evolution of a Super Massive Black Holes (SMBHs) population. The seeds of the local SMBHs are assumed to be 'pregalactic' black holes, remnants of the first POPIII stars. As these pregalactic holes become incorporated through a series of mergers into larger and larger halos, they sink to the center owing to dynamical friction, accrete a fraction of the gas in the merger remnant to become supermassive, form a binary system, and eventually coalesce. A simple model in which the damage done to a stellar cusps by decaying BH pairs is cumulative is able to reproduce the observed scaling relation between galaxy luminosity and core size. An accretion model connecting quasar activity with major mergers and the observed BH mass-velocity dispersion correlation reproduces remarkably well the observed luminosity function of optically-selected quasars in the redshift range 1

  6. Supersymmetry versus black holes at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Arunava

    2007-01-01

    Supersymmetry and extra dimensions are the two most promising candidates for new physics at the TeV scale. Supersymmetric particles or extra-dimensional effects could soon be observed at the Large Hadron Collider. We propose a simple but powerful method to discriminate the two models: the analysis of isolated leptons with high transverse momentum. Black hole events are simulated with the CATFISH black hole generator. Supersymmetry simulations use a combination of PYTHIA and ISAJET, the latter providing the mass spectrum. Our results show the measure of the dilepton invariant mass provides a strong signature to differentiate supersymmetry and black hole events at the Large Hadron Collider. Analysis of event-shape variables and multilepton events complement and strengthen this conclusion.

  7. Supersymmetry Versus Black Holes at the Lhc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arunava; Cavaglià, Marco

    Supersymmetry and extra dimensions are the two most promising candidates for new physics at the TeV scale. Supersymmetric particles or extra-dimensional effects could soon be observed at the Large Hadron Collider. We propose a simple but effective method to discriminate the two models: the analysis of isolated leptons with high transverse momentum. Black hole events are simulated with the CATFISH black hole generator. Supersymmetry simulations use a combination of PYTHIA and ISAJET, the latter providing the mass spectrum. Our results show that the measure of the dilepton invariant mass provides a promising signature to differentiate supersymmetry and black hole events at the Large Hadron Collider. Analysis of event-shape variables and multilepton events complement and strengthen this conclusion.

  8. Black hole feedback from thick accretion discs

    CERN Document Server

    Sadowski, Aleksander; Abramowicz, Marek A; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    We study energy flows in geometrically thick accretion discs, both optically thick and thin, using general relativistic, three-dimensional simulations of black hole accretion flows. We find that for non-rotating black holes the efficiency of the total feedback from thick accretion discs is $3\\%$ - roughly half of the thin disc efficiency. This amount of energy is ultimately distributed between outflow and radiation, the latter scaling weakly with the accretion rate for super-critical accretion rates, and returned to the interstellar medium. Accretion on to rotating black holes is more efficient because of the additional extraction of rotational energy. However, the jet component is collimated and likely to interact only weakly with the environment, whereas the outflow and radiation components cover a wide solid angle.

  9. Probing General Relativity with Accreting Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Fabian, A C

    2012-01-01

    Most of the X-ray emission from luminous accreting black holes emerges from within 20 gravitational radii. The effective emission radius is several times smaller if the black hole is rapidly spinning. General Relativistic effects can then be very important. Large spacetime curvature causes strong lightbending and large gravitational redshifts. The hard X-ray, power-law-emitting corona irradiates the accretion disc generating an X-ray reflection component. Atomic features in the reflection spectrum allow gravitational redshifts to be measured. Time delays between observed variations in the power-law and the reflection spectrum (reverberation) enable the physical scale of the reflecting region to be determined. The relative strength of the reflection and power-law continuum depends on light bending. All of these observed effects enable the immediate environment of the black hole where the effects of General Relativity are on display to be probed and explored.

  10. Black hole thermodynamics under the microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Falls, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    A coarse-grained version of the effective action is used to study the thermodynamics of black holes, interpolating from largest to smallest masses. The physical parameter of the black hole are linked to the running couplings by thermodynamics, and the corresponding equation of state includes quantum corrections for temperature, specific heat, and entropy. If quantum gravity becomes asymptotically safe, the state function predicts conformal scaling in the limit of small horizon area, and bounds on black hole mass and temperature. A metric-based derivation for the equation of state, and quantum corrections to the thermodynamical, statistical, and phenomenological definition of entropy are also given. Further implications and limitations of our study are discussed.

  11. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  12. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  13. Aggregate and Mineral Resources, PhosphateDeposits1988-This data set represents phosphate deposit areas in Utah., Published in 2001, Smaller than 1:100000 scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aggregate and Mineral Resources dataset, published at Smaller than 1:100000 scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2001. It is...

  14. Charged Galileon black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Babichev, Eugeny; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematic...

  15. Merging Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2009-05-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  16. Unscreening scalarons with a black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Andrei V.; Gálvez Ghersi, José T.; Zucca, Alex

    2017-05-01

    It is typically believed that the additional degrees of freedom in any modification of gravity are completely suppressed by the large energy densities coexisting with an astrophysical black hole. In this paper, we find that this might not always be the case. This belief holds for black holes formed via gravitational collapse in very dense environments, whereas the black holes with sufficiently low accretion rates that have low matter densities inside innermost stable circular orbit will generally unscreen chameleons. We develop a novel technique to study the dynamics of accretion of a scalar field onto a Schwarzschild-like black hole which is accurate on both short and long time scales. In particular, we study the behavior of the extra scalar degree of freedom in the Starobinsky and Hu-Sawicki f (R ) theories, for the symmetron model, and for the Ratra-Peebles model. Aside from calculating nontrivial static field profiles outside the black hole, we provide the tools to study the (in)stability and evolution towards the equilibrium solution for any generic well behaved set of parameters and initial conditions. Our code is made publicly available for further research and modifications to study other models.

  17. BLACK HOLE FORAGING: FEEDBACK DRIVES FEEDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnen, Walter; King, Andrew, E-mail: wd11@leicester.ac.uk, E-mail: ark@astro.le.ac.uk [Theoretical Astrophysics Group, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-10

    We suggest a new picture of supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth in galaxy centers. Momentum-driven feedback from an accreting hole gives significant orbital energy, but little angular momentum to the surrounding gas. Once central accretion drops, the feedback weakens and swept-up gas falls back toward the SMBH on near-parabolic orbits. These intersect near the black hole with partially opposed specific angular momenta, causing further infall and ultimately the formation of a small-scale accretion disk. The feeding rates into the disk typically exceed Eddington by factors of a few, growing the hole on the Salpeter timescale and stimulating further feedback. Natural consequences of this picture include (1) the formation and maintenance of a roughly toroidal distribution of obscuring matter near the hole; (2) random orientations of successive accretion disk episodes; (3) the possibility of rapid SMBH growth; (4) tidal disruption of stars and close binaries formed from infalling gas, resulting in visible flares and ejection of hypervelocity stars; (5) super-solar abundances of the matter accreting on to the SMBH; and (6) a lower central dark-matter density, and hence annihilation signal, than adiabatic SMBH growth implies. We also suggest a simple subgrid recipe for implementing this process in numerical simulations.

  18. How fast black holes spin in quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Maio, Umberto; Petkova, Margarita; Perego, Albino; Volonteri, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Mass and spin are often referred to as the two `hairs' of astrophysical black holes, as they are the only two parameters needed to completely characterize them in General Relativity. The interaction between black holes and their environment is where complexity lies, as the relevant physical processes occur over a large range of scales. This is particularly relevant in the case of super-massive black holes (SMBHs), hosted in galaxy centers and surrounded by swirling gas and various generations of stars, that compete with the SMBH for gas consumption, and affect the thermodynamics of the gas itself. How dynamics and thermodynamics in such fiery environment affect the angular momentum of the gas accreted onto SMBHs, and hence black hole spins is uncertain. We explore the interaction between SMBHs and their environment during active phases through simulations of circum-nuclear discs (CND) around black holes in quasars hosted in the remnants of galaxy mergers. These are the first 3D (sub-)parsec resolution simulat...

  19. Black Holes at IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, L A; Parker, L; Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Glenz, Matthew M.; Parker, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    If the fundamental Planck scale is about a TeV and the cosmic neutrino flux is at the Waxman-Bahcall level, quantum black holes are created daily in the Antarctic ice-cap. We re-examine the prospects for observing such black holes with the IceCube neutrino-detection experiment. To this end, we first revise the black hole production rate by incorporating the effects of inelasticty, i.e., the energy radiated in gravitational waves by the multipole moments of the incoming shock waves. After that we study in detail the process of Hawking evaporation accounting for the black hole's large momentum in the lab system. We derive the energy spectrum of the Planckian cloud which is swept forward with a large, O (10^6), Lorentz factor. (It is noteworthy that the boosted thermal spectrum is also relevant for the study of near-extremal supersymmetric black holes, which could be copiously produced at the LHC.) In the semiclassical regime, we estimate the average energy of the boosted particles to be less than 20% the energy...

  20. Oxidative trends of TiO2—hole trapping at anatase and rutile surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zawadzki, Pawel; Laursen, Anders B.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel;

    2012-01-01

    position is dependent on the type of surface termination. Such variations in hole state energies can lead to differences in photocatalytic activity among rutile and anatase surface facets. We find that the calculated hole state energies correlate with photo-deposition and photo-etching rates. We...

  1. Black hole clustering and duty cycles in the Illustris simulation

    CERN Document Server

    DeGraf, Colin

    2016-01-01

    We use the high-resolution cosmological simulation Illustris to investigate the clustering of supermassive black holes across cosmic time, the link between black hole clustering and host halo masses, and the implications for black hole duty cycles. Our predicted black hole correlation length and bias match the observational data very well across the full redshift range probed. Black hole clustering is strongly luminosity-dependent on small, 1-halo scales, with some moderate dependence on larger scales of a few Mpc at intermediate redshifts. We find black hole clustering to evolve only weakly with redshift, initially following the behaviour of their hosts. However below z ~ 2 black hole clustering increases faster than that of their hosts, which leads to a significant overestimate of the clustering-predicted host halo mass. The full distribution of host halo masses is very wide, including a low-mass tail extending up to an order of magnitude below the naive prediction for minimum host mass. Our black hole duty...

  2. Gravitational tension, spacetime pressure and black hole volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jay; Obers, Niels A.; Sanchioni, Marco

    2016-09-01

    We study the first law of black hole thermodynamics in the presence of surrounding gravitational fields and argue that variations of these fields are naturally incorporated in the first law by defining gravitational tension or gravitational binding energy. We demonstrate that this notion can also be applied in Anti-de Sitter spacetime, in which the surrounding gravitational field is sourced by a cosmological fluid, therefore showing that spacetime volume and gravitational tension encode the same physics as spacetime pressure and black hole volume. We furthermore show that it is possible to introduce a definition of spacetime pressure and black hole volume for any spacetime with characteristic length scales which does not necessarily require a cosmological constant sourcing Einstein equations. However, we show that black hole volume is non-universal in the flat spacetime limit, questioning its significance. We illustrate these ideas by studying the resulting black hole volume of Kaluza-Klein black holes and of a toy model for a black hole binary system in five spacetime dimensions (the black saturn solution) as well as of several novel perturbative black hole solutions. These include the higher-dimensional Kerr-Newman solution in Anti-de Sitter spacetime as well as other black holes in plane wave and Lifshitz spacetimes.

  3. Advanced hole patterning technology using soft spacer materials (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Keun; Hustad, Phillip D.; Aqad, Emad; Valeri, David; Wagner, Mike D.; Li, Mingqi

    2017-03-01

    A continuing goal in integrated circuit industry is to increase density of features within patterned masks. One pathway being used by the device manufacturers for patterning beyond the 80nm pitch limitation of 193 immersion lithography is the self-aligned spacer double patterning (SADP). Two orthogonal line space patterns with subsequent SADP can be used for contact holes multiplication. However, a combination of two immersion exposures, two spacer deposition processes, and two etch processes to reach the desired dimensions makes this process expensive and complicated. One alternative technique for contact hole multiplication is the use of an array of pillar patterns. Pillars, imaged with 193 immersion photolithography, can be uniformly deposited with spacer materials until a hole is formed in the center of 4 pillars. Selective removal of the pillar core gives a reversal of phases, a contact hole where there was once a pillar. However, the highly conformal nature of conventional spacer materials causes a problem with this application. The new holes, formed between 4 pillars, by this method have a tendency to be imperfect and not circular. To improve the contact hole circularity, this paper presents the use of both conventional spacer material and soft spacer materials. Application of soft spacer materials can be achieved by an existing coating track without additional cost burden to the device manufacturers.

  4. Planck Scale to Hubble Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Sidharth, B G

    1998-01-01

    Within the context of the usual semi classical investigation of Planck scale Schwarzchild Black Holes, as in Quantum Gravity, and later attempts at a full Quantum Mechanical description in terms of a Kerr-Newman metric including the spinorial behaviour, we attempt to present a formulation that extends from the Planck scale to the Hubble scale. In the process the so called large number coincidences as also the hitherto inexplicable relations between the pion mass and the Hubble Constant, pointed out by Weinberg, turn out to be natural consequences in a consistent description.

  5. BLACK HOLE-GALAXY CORRELATIONS WITHOUT SELF-REGULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angles-Alcazar, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Oezel, Feryal; Dave, Romeel, E-mail: anglesd@email.arizona.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    Recent models of black hole growth in a cosmological context have forwarded a paradigm in which the growth is self-regulated by feedback from the black hole itself. Here we use cosmological zoom simulations of galaxy formation down to z = 2 to show that such strong self-regulation is required in the popular spherical Bondi accretion model, but that a plausible alternative model in which black hole growth is limited by galaxy-scale torques does not require self-regulation. Instead, this torque-limited accretion model yields black holes and galaxies evolving on average along the observed scaling relations by relying only on a fixed, 5% mass retention rate onto the black hole from the radius at which the accretion flow is fed. Feedback from the black hole may (and likely does) occur, but does not need to couple to galaxy-scale gas in order to regulate black hole growth. We show that this result is insensitive to variations in the initial black hole mass, stellar feedback, or other implementation details. The torque-limited model allows for high accretion rates at very early epochs (unlike the Bondi case), which if viable can help explain the rapid early growth of black holes, while by z {approx} 2 it yields Eddington factors of {approx}1%-10%. This model also yields a less direct correspondence between major merger events and rapid phases of black hole growth. Instead, growth is more closely tied to cosmological disk feeding, which may help explain observational studies showing that, at least at z {approx}> 1, active galaxies do not preferentially show merger signatures.

  6. Black hole entropy quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Corichi, A; Fernandez-Borja, E; Corichi, Alejandro; Diaz-Polo, Jacobo; Fernandez-Borja, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Ever since the pioneer works of Bekenstein and Hawking, black hole entropy has been known to have a quantum origin. Furthermore, it has long been argued by Bekenstein that entropy should be quantized in discrete (equidistant) steps given its identification with horizon area in (semi-)classical general relativity and the properties of area as an adiabatic invariant. This lead to the suggestion that black hole area should also be quantized in equidistant steps to account for the discrete black hole entropy. Here we shall show that loop quantum gravity, in which area is not quantized in equidistant steps can nevertheless be consistent with Bekenstein's equidistant entropy proposal in a subtle way. For that we perform a detailed analysis of the number of microstates compatible with a given area and show that an observed oscillatory behavior in the entropy-area relation, when properly interpreted yields an entropy that has discrete, equidistant values that are consistent with the Bekenstein framework.

  7. The closest black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Fender, Rob; Heywood, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the assumption that there is a large population (> 10^8) of isolated, stellar-mass black holes (IBH) distributed throughout our galaxy, we consider the detectable signatures of accretion from the interstellar medium (ISM) that may be associated with such a population. We simulate the nearby (radius 250 pc) part of this population, corresponding to the closest ~35 000 black holes, using current best estimates of the mass distribution of stellar mass black holes combined with two models for the velocity distribution of stellar-mass IBH which bracket likely possibilities. We distribute this population of objects appropriately within the different phases of the ISM and calculate the Bondi-Hoyle accretion rate, modified by a further dimensionless efficiency parameter \\lambda. Assuming a simple prescription for radiatively inefficient accretion at low Eddington ratios, we calculate the X-ray luminosity of these objects, and similarly estimate the radio luminosity from relations found empirically for b...

  8. Turbulent black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  9. Merging Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as future. space-based detectors. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For many years, numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued by a host of instabilities. However, recent breakthroughs have conquered these instabilities and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on.the resulting 'gold rush' of new results that is revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics

  10. Janus black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Dongsu; Gutperle, Michael; Janik, Romuald A.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper Janus black holes in A dS 3 are considered. These are static solutions of an Einstein-scalar system with broken translation symmetry along the horizon. These solutions are dual to interface conformal field theories at finite temperature. An approximate solution is first constructed using perturbation theory around a planar BTZ blackhole. Numerical and exact solutions valid for all sets of parameters are then found and compared. Using the exact solution the thermodynamics of the system is analyzed. The entropy associated with the Janus black hole is calculated and it is found that the entropy of the black Janus is the sum of the undeformed black hole entropy and the entanglement entropy associated with the defect.

  11. Black Hole Induced Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Pelletier, G

    2004-01-01

    Black Holes generate a particular kind of environments dominated by an accretion flow which concentrates a magnetic field. The interplay of gravity and magnetism creates this paradoxical situation where relativistic ejection is allowed and consequently high energy phenomena take place. Therefore Black Holes, which are very likely at the origin of powerfull astrophysical phenomena such as AGNs, micro- quasars and GRBs where relativistic ejections are observed, are at the heart of high energy astrophysics. The combination of General Relativity and Magneto-HydroDynamics (MHD) makes theory difficult; however great pionneers opened beautiful tracks in the seventies and left important problems to be solved for the next decades. These lectures will present the status of these issues. They have a tutorial aspect together with critical review aspect and contain also some new issues. Most of these lectures has been presented at the "School on Black Hole in the Universe" at Cargese, in May 2003.

  12. Black hole accretion discs

    CERN Document Server

    Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This is an introduction to models of accretion discs around black holes. After a presentation of the non-relativistic equations describing the structure and evolution of geometrically thin accretion discs we discuss their steady-state solutions and compare them to observation. Next we describe in detail the thermal-viscous disc instability model and its application to dwarf novae for which it was designed and its X-ray irradiated-disc version which explains the soft X--ray transients, i.e. outbursting black-hole low-mass X-ray binaries. We then turn to the role of advection in accretion flow onto black holes illustrating its action and importance with a toy model describing both ADAFs and slim discs. We conclude with a presentation of the general-relativistic formalism describing accretion discs in the Kerr space-time.

  13. Slant hole completion test. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    One of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategies and Objectives in the Natural Gas Program is to conduct activities to transfer technology from R&D programs to potential users. The Slant Hole Completion Test has achieved exactly this objective. The Slant Hole site is essentially the same as the Multiwell site and is located in the southeastern portion of the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. The Piceance Basin is typical of the Western low permeability basins that contain thick sequences of sands, silts and coals deposited during the Cretaceous period. These sequences contain vast amounts of natural gas but have proven to be resistant to commercial production because of the low permeability of the host rocks. Using the knowledge gained from the DOE`s earlier Multiwell experiment, the SHCT-1 was drilled to demonstrate that by intersecting the natural fractures found in these ``tight rocks,`` commercial gas production can be obtained.

  14. Over spinning a black hole?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam; Cardoso, Vitor; Nerozzi, Andrea; Rocha, Jorge V, E-mail: mariam.bouhmadi@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: vitor.cardoso@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: andrea.nerozzi@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: jorge.v.rocha@ist.utl.pt [CENTRA, Department de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-09-22

    A possible process to destroy a black hole consists on throwing point particles with sufficiently large angular momentum into the black hole. In the case of Kerr black holes, it was shown by Wald that particles with dangerously large angular momentum are simply not captured by the hole, and thus the event horizon is not destroyed. Here we reconsider this gedanken experiment for black holes in higher dimensions. We show that this particular way of destroying a black hole does not succeed and that Cosmic Censorship is preserved.

  15. Superfluid Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hennigar, Robie A; Tjoa, Erickson

    2016-01-01

    We present what we believe is the first example of a "$\\lambda$-line" phase transition in black hole thermodynamics. This is a line of (continuous) second order phase transitions which in the case of liquid $^4$He marks the onset of superfluidity. The phase transition occurs for a class of asymptotically AdS hairy black holes in Lovelock gravity where a real scalar field is conformally coupled to gravity. We discuss the origin of this phase transition and outline the circumstances under which it (or generalizations of it) could occur.

  16. Correlated Multiphoton Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Afek, Itai; Silberberg, Yaron

    2010-01-01

    We generate bipartite states of light which exhibit an absence of multiphoton coincidence events between two modes amid a constant background flux. These `correlated photon holes' are produced by mixing a coherent state and relatively weak spontaneous parametric down-conversion using a balanced beamsplitter. Correlated holes with arbitrarily high photon numbers may be obtained by adjusting the relative phase and amplitude of the inputs. We measure states of up to five photons and verify their nonclassicality. The scheme provides a route for observation of high-photon-number nonclassical correlations without requiring intense quantum resources.

  17. Are Black Holes Springy?

    OpenAIRE

    Good, Michael R. R.; Ong, Yen Chin

    2014-01-01

    A $(3+1)$-dimensional asymptotically flat Kerr black hole angular speed $\\Omega_+$ can be used to define an effective spring constant, $k=m\\Omega_+^2$. Its maximum value is the Schwarzschild surface gravity, $k = \\kappa $, which rapidly weakens as the black hole spins down and the temperature increases. The Hawking temperature is expressed in terms of the spring constant: $2\\pi T = \\kappa - k$. Hooke's law, in the extremal limit, provides the force $F = 1/4$, which is consistent with the conj...

  18. Are Black Holes Springy?

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Michael R R

    2014-01-01

    A $(3+1)$-dimensional asymptotically flat Kerr black hole angular speed $\\Omega_+$ can be used to define an effective spring constant, $k=m\\Omega_+^2$. Its maximum value is the Schwarzschild surface gravity, $k = \\kappa $, which rapidly weakens as the black hole spins down and the temperature increases. The Hawking temperature is expressed in terms of the spring constant: $2\\pi T = \\kappa - k$. Hooke's law, in the extremal limit, provides the force $F = 1/4$, which is consistent with the conjecture of maximum force in general relativity.

  19. Characterizing Black Hole Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John; Boggs, William Darian; Kelly, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Binary black hole mergers are a promising source of gravitational waves for interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Recent advances in numerical relativity have revealed the predictions of General Relativity for the strong burst of radiation generated in the final moments of binary coalescence. We explore features in the merger radiation which characterize the final moments of merger and ringdown. Interpreting the waveforms in terms of an rotating implicit radiation source allows a unified phenomenological description of the system from inspiral through ringdown. Common features in the waveforms allow quantitative description of the merger signal which may provide insights for observations large-mass black hole binaries.

  20. Magnonic Black Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Molina, A; Nunez, Alvaro S; Duine, R A

    2017-02-10

    We show that the interaction between the spin-polarized current and the magnetization dynamics can be used to implement black-hole and white-hole horizons for magnons-the quanta of oscillations in the magnetization direction in magnets. We consider three different systems: easy-plane ferromagnetic metals, isotropic antiferromagnetic metals, and easy-plane magnetic insulators. Based on available experimental data, we estimate that the Hawking temperature can be as large as 1 K. We comment on the implications of magnonic horizons for spin-wave scattering and transport experiments, and for magnon entanglement.