WorldWideScience

Sample records for deposition cvd techniques

  1. Improved CVD Techniques for Depositing Passivation Layers of ICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    went into compressive stress of 1.3 x 10 dynes/cm2. Results NX • thus show that room-temperature stress in CVD films can be reduced to nearly 35 -4 0...fluorescence working curves. X-ray fluorescence radiation measurements were carried out using a Siemens Crystalloflex 4 x-ray generator with a chromium target x...ray tube (2000 W) and a Siemens Vacuum X-Ray Spectrometer Model VRS. Sample area of measurement was usually 0.50 cm2 . 2= Experimental results will be

  2. An economic CVD technique for pure SnO2 thin films deposition: Temperature effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Maleki; S M Rozati

    2013-04-01

    A modified new method of CVD for formation of pure layers of tin oxide films was developed. This method is very simple and inexpensive and produces films with good electrical properties. The effect of substrate temperature on the sheet resistance, resistivity, mobility, carrier concentration and transparency of the films has been studied. The best sheet resistance obtained at substrate temperature of 500 ◦C was about 27 /cm2. X-ray diffraction showed that the structure of deposited films was polycrystalline with a grain size between 150–300 Å. The preferred orientation was (211) for films deposited at substrate temperature of about 500 °C. FESEM micrographs revealed that substrate temperature is an important factor for increasing grain size and modifies electrical parameters. UV-visible measurement showed reduction of transparency and bandgap of the layers with increasing substrate temperature.

  3. Deposition and Coating Properties on CVD Tungsten

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ji-hong; LI Zheng-xiang; LIU Gao-jian; ZHOU Hui-Huang; CHUN liang

    2004-01-01

    Surface characterization and microstructure studies are performed on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten coating. There is about 2 μm thickness diffusion layer of tungsten in the molybdenum substrate. The thermal shock test shows tungsten coating has good adhesion with molybdenum substrate, but the elements of oxygen and carbon in the tungsten coating have the bad affection to the adhesion. The result of high-temperature diffusion experiment is the diffusion rate from molybdenum substrate to tungsten coating is faster.

  4. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    a,b , Paul N. Barnes c , Chakrapani V. Varanasi e , Jack Burke d , Bang -Hung Tsao d , and Sharmila M. Mukhopadhyay b a. Air Force Research...catalysts play a big role in the structure and properties of the resulting CNTs. The three different techniques compared here have two different approaches...catalysts at the interface suggests the silica nanolayer keeps them anchored and prevents them from migrating during CNT growth. Figure 5: Cross

  5. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of uranium for alpha spectrometry; Deposicion quimica de vapor (CVD) de uranio para espectrometria alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez V, M. L.; Rios M, C.; Ramirez O, J.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: luisalawliet@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The uranium determination through radiometric techniques as alpha spectrometry requires for its proper analysis, preparation methods of the source to analyze and procedures for the deposit of this on a surface or substrate. Given the characteristics of alpha particles (small penetration distance and great loss of energy during their journey or its interaction with the matter), is important to ensure that the prepared sources are thin, to avoid problems of self-absorption. The routine methods used for this are the cathodic electro deposition and the direct evaporation, among others. In this paper the use of technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the preparation of uranium sources is investigated; because by this, is possible to obtain thin films (much thinner than those resulting from electro deposition or evaporation) on a substrate and comprises reacting a precursor with a gas, which in turn serves as a carrier of the reaction products to achieve deposition. Preliminary results of the chemical vapor deposition of uranium are presented, synthesizing and using as precursor molecule the uranyl acetylacetonate, using oxygen as carrier gas for the deposition reaction on a glass substrate. The uranium films obtained were found suitable for alpha spectrometry. The variables taken into account were the precursor sublimation temperatures and deposition temperature, the reaction time and the type and flow of carrier gas. Of the investigated conditions, two depositions with encouraging results that can serve as reference for further work to improve the technique presented here were selected. Alpha spectra obtained for these depositions and the characterization of the representative samples by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are also presented. (Author)

  6. High-rate diamond deposition by microwave plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglin

    In this dissertation, the growth of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The goal of this research is to deposit high quality HOD (Highly Oriented Diamond) films with a growth rate greater than 1 mum/hr. For the (100)-oriented HOD films, the growth rate achieved by the traditional process is only 0.3 mum/hr while the theoretical limit is ˜0.45 mum/hr. This research increases the growth rate up to 5.3 mum/hr (with a theoretical limit of ˜7 mum/hr) while preserving the crystal quality. This work builds a connection between the theoretical study of the CVD process and the experimental research. The study is extended from the growth of regular polycrystalline diamond to highly oriented diamond (HOD) films. For the increase of the growth rate of regular polycrystalline diamond thin films, a scaling growth model developed by Goodwin is introduced in details to assist in the understanding of the MPCVD (Microwave Plasma CVD) process. Within the Goodwin's scaling model, there are only four important sub-processes for the growth of diamond: surface modification, adsorption, desorption, and incorporation. The factors determining the diamond growth rate and film quality are discussed following the description of the experimental setup and process parameters. Growth rate and crystal quality models are reviewed to predict and understand the experimental results. It is shown that the growth rate of diamond can be increased with methane input concentration and the amount of atomic hydrogen (by changing the total pressure). It is crucial to provide enough atomic hydrogen to conserve crystal quality of the deposited diamond film. The experimental results demonstrate that for a fixed methane concentration, there is a minimum pressure for growth of good diamond. Similarly, for a fixed total pressure, there is a maximum methane concentration for growth of good diamond, and this maximum methane concentration increases

  7. Oxidation Resistance of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    carbonaceous residuoe were overcome, and dense, iadherent, coat-ings which :ýtop oxidat-ion Of the substrate art! reliably produced. The iridium deposition...flow, pressure and geometry within the reaction chamber, and substrate material. For the coating to have high integrity and adhesion to the substrate...entirely produced by Ultramet using chemical vapor deposition and a novel integrated fabrication technique. Coating the inside of a long chamber presents

  8. Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) Polymer Thin Films: Structure-Property Effects on Thermal Degradation and Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharamaiah Jeevendrakumar, Vijay Jain

    Opportunities and challenges for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polymer thin films stems from their applications in electronics, sensors, and adhesives with demands for control over film composition, conformity and stability. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a subset of the CVD technique that conjoins bulk free-radical polymerization chemistry with gas-phase processing. The novelty of iCVD technique stems from the use of an initiator that can be activated at low energies (150 -- 300 °C) to react with surface adsorbed monomer to form a polymer film. This reduces risk for potential unwarranted side-reactions. Until recently, majority of iCVD research was limited to understanding the deposition kinetics with monomer properties being the principal parameters. However, there is a lack of study on the properties of deposited films which is critical for utilizing the technique in any real-world applications. The work presented here aims to advance investigation in this direction by characterizing the thermal properties of iCVD polymer films with primary focus on the initiators. A detailed characterization of custom-built iCVD system served as ground work for following investigations. Poly(neopentyl methacrylate) (PnPMA) thin films were deposited with tert-butyl peroxide (TBPO) initiators and their Tg, CTE and thermal degradation properties were investigated. iCVD PnPMA films presented low-temperature degradation peaks attributed to weak linkages from H-abstraction and beta-scission reactions of TBPO. To test this hypothesis, PnPMA films were deposited with tert-butyl peroxybenzoate (TBPOB) which is selective towards vinyl addition. Contrary to expected results, TBPOB initiated films showed degradation at lower temperatures compared to TBPO initiated films. It is postulated that with TBPOB, the surface initiator concentration is higher and consequently small oligomeric molecules were formed that degraded easily. Following these investigations, poly

  9. EFFECTS OF OPERATING CONDITIONS ON THE DEPOSITION OF GaAs IN A VERTICAL CVD REACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    JAE-SANG BAEK; JIN-HYO BOO; YOUN-JEA KIM

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study is needed to gain insight into the growth mechanism and improve the reactor design or optimize the deposition condition in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In this study, we have performed a numerical analysis of the deposition of gallium arsenide (GaAs) from trimethyl gallium (TMG) and arsine in a vertical CVD reactor. The effects of operating parameters, such as the rotation velocity of susceptor, inlet velocity, and inlet TMG fraction, are investigated and presented. The ...

  10. Rare earth-doped alumina thin films deposited by liquid source CVD processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschanvres, J.L.; Meffre, W.; Joubert, J.C.; Senateur, J.P. [Ecole Nat. Superieure de Phys. de Grenoble, St. Martin d`Heres (France). Lab. des Materiaux et du Genie Phys.; Robaut, F. [Consortium des Moyens Technologiques Communs, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, BP 75, 38402 St Martin d`Heres (France); Broquin, J.E.; Rimet, R. [Laboratoire d`Electromagnetisme, Microondes et Optoelectronique, CNRS-Ecole Nationale Superieure d`Electronique et Radioelectricite de Grenoble, BP 257, 38016 Grenoble, Cedex (France)

    1998-07-24

    Two types of liquid-source CVD processes are proposed for the growth of rare earth-doped alumina thin films suitable as amplifying media for integrated optic applications. Amorphous, transparent, pure and erbium- or neodymium-doped alumina films were deposited between 573 and 833 K by atmospheric pressure aerosol CVD. The rare earth doping concentration increases by decreasing the deposition temperature. The refractive index of the alumina films increases as a function of the deposition temperature from 1.53 at 573 K to 1.61 at 813 K. Neodymium-doped films were also obtained at low pressure by liquid source injection CVD. (orig.) 7 refs.

  11. Optical and mechanical properties of diamond like carbon films deposited by microwave ECR plasma CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S B Singh; M Pandey; N Chand; A Biswas; D Bhattacharya; S Dash; A K Tyagi; R M Dey; S K Kulkarni; D S Patil

    2008-10-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on Si (111) substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process using plasma of argon and methane gases. During deposition, a d.c. self-bias was applied to the substrates by application of 13.56 MHz rf power. DLC films deposited at three different bias voltages (–60 V, –100 V and –150 V) were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry to study the variation in the bonding and optical properties of the deposited coatings with process parameters. The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus were measured by load depth sensing indentation technique. The DLC film deposited at –100 V bias exhibit high hardness (∼ 19 GPa), high elastic modulus (∼ 160 GPa) and high refractive index (∼ 2.16–2.26) as compared to films deposited at –60 V and –150 V substrate bias. This study clearly shows the significance of substrate bias in controlling the optical and mechanical properties of DLC films.

  12. Tantalum Coating of Steel, Copper, Aluminum, and Titanium by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Bjerrum, Niels

    1998-01-01

    Tantalum coatings ranging from 0.5 to 120 mm has been deposited by CVD at 625-1000 C using tantalum pentachloride as precursor. Deposition rates range from 1 to 80mm/h and an activation energy of 103 kJ/mole is calculated. Well adhering deposits has been obtained on stainless steel, carbon steels...

  13. Purification of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by a Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) grown by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon monooxide has been developed. Based on the result from TGA/DTA of as-prepared sample, the oxidation temperature was determined. The process included sonication, oxidation and acid washing steps. The purity and yield after purification were determined and estimated by TEM. Moreover, for the first time, a loop structure for CVD SWNTs has been observed.

  14. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ceramic coatings. The influence of several process steps on the deposition rate and surface morphology is discussed. The deposition of SiO2 at atmospheric pressure is kinetically limited below 833 K ...

  15. A Study on Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) Technology and Super Coating Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian; LI Jian-ping; ZENG Xiang-cai; MA Wen-cun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the dense and columnar crystalline TiCN coating layers with very good bonding strength between a layer and another layer was deposited using Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) where CH3CN organic composite with C/N atomic clusters etc. was utilized at 700 ~ 900 ℃. Effect of coating processing parameters, such as coating temperature, pressure and different gas flow quantity on structures and properties of TiCN coating layers were investigated. The super coating mechanis mand structures were analyzed. The new coating processing parameters and properties of carbide inserts with super coating layers were gained by using the improved high temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD) equipment and HT-CVD, in combination with MT-CVD technology.

  16. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ce

  17. Thin film zinc oxide deposited by CVD and PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelmann, Frank U.

    2016-10-01

    Zinc oxide is known as a mineral since 1810, but it came to scientific interest after its optoelectronic properties found to be tuneable by p-type doping. Since the late 1980’s the number of publications increased exponentially. All thin film deposition technologies, including sol-gel and spray pyrolysis, are able to produce ZnO films. However, for outstanding properties and specific doping, only chemical vapor deposition and physical vapor deposition have shown so far satisfying results in terms of high conductivity and high transparency. In this paper the different possibilities for doping will be discussed, some important applications of doped ZnO thin films will be presented. The deposition technologies used for industrial applications are shown in this paper. Especially sputtering of aluminium doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO:Al or AZO) and LPCVD of boron doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO:B or BZO) are used for the commercial production of transparent conductive oxide films on glass used for thin film photovoltaic cells. For this special application the typical process development for large area deposition is presented, with the important trade-off between optical properties (transparency and ability for light scattering) and electrical properties (conductivity). Also, the long term stability of doped ZnO films is important for applications, humidity in the ambient is often the reason for degradation of the films. The differences between the mentioned materials are presented.

  18. Synthesis of crystalline Ge nanoclusters in PE-CVD-deposited SiO2 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leervad Pedersen, T.P.; Skov Jensen, J.; Chevallier, J.

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of evenly distributed Ge nanoclusters in plasma-enhanced chemical-vapour-deposited (PE-CVD) SiO2 thin films containing 8 at. % Ge is reported. This is of importance for the application of nanoclusters in semiconductor technology. The average diameter of the Ge nanoclusters can...

  19. Advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Tantalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Christensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of tantalum in hot acidic media has made it a key material in the protection of industrial equipment from corrosion under such conditions. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of tantalum to achieve such thin corrosion resistant coatings is one of the most widely mentioned examples...

  20. Numerical modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in a horizontal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Jasinski, T.; Fretz, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    In the present numerical prediction of the deposition rate of silicon from silane in a CVD process, the conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species are solved on a staggered grid using the SIMPLE algorithm, while the rate of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the susceptor surface is obtained from an Arrhenius rate equation. Predicted deposition rates as a function of position along the susceptor with and without the gas phase chemical reaction are compared with the available experimental and numerical data; agreement is excellent except at the leading edge of the susceptor, where the deposition rate is overpredicted.

  1. Abnormal Crystallization of Silicon Thin Films Deposited by ICP-CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun-Shuai; YIN Min; WANG Jin-Xiao; HE De-Yan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Silicon thin films are deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) at a low temperature of 350℃ using a mixture of SiH4 and H2. The structures of the films are characterized by x-ray diffraction and Raman spectra. Under the optimum experimental conditions, we observe that the crystallinity of Si films becomes more excellent and the preferred orientation changes from (111) to (220) with the decreasing dilution of SiH4 in H2. Such an abnormal crystallization is tentatively interpreted in term of the high density,low electron temperature and spatial confinement of the plasma in the process of ICP-CVD.

  2. Low temperature back-surface-field contacts deposited by hot-wire CVD for heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, D. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)], E-mail: delfina@eel.upc.edu; Voz, C.; Martin, I.; Orpella, A.; Alcubilla, R. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Villar, F.; Bertomeu, J.; Andreu, J. [CeRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Roca-i-Cabarrocas, P. [LPICM-Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2008-08-30

    The growing interest in using thinner wafers (< 200 {mu}m) requires the development of low temperature passivation strategies for the back contact of heterojunction solar cells. In this work, we investigate low temperature deposited back contacts based on boron-doped amorphous silicon films obtained by Hot-Wire CVD. The influence of the deposition parameters and the use of an intrinsic buffer layer have been considered. The microstructure of the deposited thin films has been comprehensively studied by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry in the UV-visible range. The effective recombination velocity at the back surface has been measured by the Quasi-Steady-State Photoconductance technique. Complete double-side heterojunction solar cells (1 cm{sup 2}) have been fabricated and characterized by External Quantum Efficiency and current-voltage measurements. Total-area conversion efficiencies up to 14.5% were achieved in a fully low temperature process (< 200 deg. C)

  3. Deposition of device quality silicon nitride with ultra high deposition rate (> 7 nm/s) using hot-wire CVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.; Houweling, Z.S.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Romijn, I.G.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Goldbach, H.D.

    2008-01-01

    The application of hot-wire (HW) CVD deposited silicon nitride (SiNx) as passivating anti-reflection coating on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells is investigated. The highest efficiency reached is 15.7% for SiNx layers with an N/Si ratio of 1.20 and a high mass density of 2.9 g/cm3. These

  4. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kundrát

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42 substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo – tungsten (W interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  5. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundrát, Vojtěch; Sullivan, John; Ye, Haitao, E-mail: h.ye@aston.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham, B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Zhang, Xiaoling; Cooke, Kevin; Sun, Hailin [Miba Coating Group: Teer Coatings Ltd, West-Stone-House, West-Stone, Berry-Hill-Industrial-Estate, WR9 9AS, Droitwich (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42) substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo) – tungsten (W) interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  6. Stable dropwise condensation for enhancing heat transfer via the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) of grafted polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Adam T; Yagüe, Jose L; Gleason, Karen K; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2014-01-22

    Ultra-thin copolymer films are deposited by initiated chemical deposition (iCVD) to investigate their performance under the condensation of water vapor. By forming a grafted interface between the coating and the substrate, the films exhibit stable dropwise condensation even when subjected to 100 °C steam. The applicability of the iCVD to complex substrate geometries is demonstrated on a copper condenser coil.

  7. Effect of substrate bias on deposition behaviour of charged silicon nanoparticles in ICP-CVD process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung-Wan; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Seong, Dae-Jin; Seo, Byong-Hoon; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a substrate bias on the deposition behaviour of crystalline silicon films during inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) was analysed by consideration of non-classical crystallization, in which the building block is a nanoparticle rather than an individual atom or molecule. The coexistence of positively and negatively charged nanoparticles in the plasma and their role in Si film deposition are confirmed by applying bias voltages to the substrate, which is sufficiently small as not to affect the plasma potential. The sizes of positively and negatively charged nanoparticles captured on a carbon membrane and imaged using TEM are, respectively, 2.7-5.5 nm and 6-13 nm. The film deposited by positively charged nanoparticles has a typical columnar structure. In contrast, the film deposited by negatively charged nanoparticles has a structure like a powdery compact with the deposition rate about three times higher than that for positively charged nanoparticles. All the films exhibit crystallinity even though the substrate is at room temperature, which is attributed to the deposition of crystalline nanoparticles formed in the plasma. The film deposited by negatively charged nanoparticles has the highest crystalline fraction of 0.84.

  8. Zirconium influence on microstructure of aluminide coatings deposited on nickel substrate by CVD method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jolanta Romanowska; Maryana Zagula-Yavorska; Jan Sieniawski

    2013-11-01

    Influence of Zr on the microstructure and phase characteristics of aluminide diffusion coatings deposited on the nickel substrate has been investigated in this study. The coatings with and without zirconium were deposited by CVD method. The cross-section chemical composition investigations revealed that during the coatings formation, there is an inward aluminum diffusion and outward nickel diffusion in both types of coatings (with and without zirconium), whereas zirconium is located far below the coating surface, at a depth of ∼17 m, between -NiAl phase and '-Ni3Al phase. XRD examinations showed that -NiAl, -NiAl and '-Ni3Al were the main components of the deposited coatings. -NiAl phase is on the surface of the coatings, whereas -NiAl and '-Ni3Al form deeper parts of the coatings. Zirconium is dissolved in NiAl on the border between -NiAl and '-Ni3Al.

  9. Deposition of ZnO Films on Freestanding CVD Thick Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jian; BAI Yi-Zhen; YANG Tian-Peng; XU Yi-Bin; WANG Xin-Sheng; DU Guo-Tong; WU Han-Hua

    2006-01-01

    @@ For ZnO/diamond structured surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters, performance is sensitively dependent on the quality of the ZnO films. In this paper, we prepare highly-oriented and fine grained polycrystalline ZnO thin films with excellent surface smoothness on the smooth nucleation surfaces of freestanding CVD diamond films by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The properties of the ZnO films are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The influences of the deposition conditions on the quality of ZnO films are discussed briefly. ZnO/freestanding thick-diamond-film layered SAW devices with high response frequencies are expected to be developed.

  10. Field emission from carbon films deposited by VHF CVD on difference substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, A A; Andronov, A N; Felter, T E; Ioffe, A F; Kosarev, A I; Shotov, M V; Vinogradov, A J

    1999-04-01

    As previously demonstrated, non-diamond carbon (NDC) films deposited at low temperatures 200-300 C on silicon tips reduced the threshold of field emission. In this paper we will present the results of the study of field emission from flat NDC films prepared by VHF CVD. Emission measurements were performed in a diode configuration at approximately 10{sup {minus}10} Torr. NDC films were deposited on ceramic and on c-Si substrates sputter coated with layers of Ti, Cu, Ni and Pt. The back contact material influences the emission characteristics but not as a direct correlation to work function. A model of field emission from metal-NDC film structures will be discussed.

  11. Metallic/semiconducting ratio of carbon nanotubes in a bundle prepared using CVD technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Khurshed Ahmad Shah; S S Islam; H S Mavi; A K Shukla; Harsh

    2006-08-01

    We present an investigation of the nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a bundle by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The calculation has been done for the three peak positions in radial breathing mode (RBM) spectra obtained by using a laser excitation wavelength () of 633 nm from He–Ne laser on SWNT bundle sample prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique using iron catalyst at 800° C. The detailed analysis in the present study is focused on peak positions 162 cm-1, 186 cm-1, and 216 cm-1. The first step of the analysis is to construct a list of possible (, ) pairs from the diameters calculated from the RBM peak positions. The parameters of SWNTs studied gives in-depth understanding of many symmetry, resonance and characteristic properties of SWNT bundles. Our results indicate that the contribution of metallic SWNTs in the bundle is small at RBM peak positions 162 cm-1, 186 cm-1 and in agreement with pervious results at peak position 216 cm-1.

  12. CVD diamond coatings on titanium : Characterisation by XRD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappuccio, G. [CNR, Frascati, Rome (Italy). Istituto di Strutturistica Chimica]|[INFN-LNF, Frascati, Rome (Italy). Laboratorio Dafne Luce

    1996-09-01

    Here, the authors report an analysis carried out on diamond coatings on titanium substrates to show the potentially of x-ray diffraction techniques in the structural characterisation both of diamond thin films and of the other phases (TiC and TiH{sub 2}) present in the interfacial layer. It should be noted that the composition and microstructure of the interface layers strongly affect the characteristics of the diamond films, particularly adhesion, which is one of the most important elements determining the final quality of the coating.

  13. Simultaneous synthesis of nanodiamonds and graphene via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW PE-CVD) on copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Steven; Wöhrl, Nicolas; Schulz, Stephan; Buck, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous growth of both nanodiamonds and graphene on copper samples is described for the first time. A PE-CVD process is used to synthesize graphene layers and nanodiamond clusters from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture as it is typically done successfully in thermal CVD processes for graphene synthesis. However, the standard thermal CVD process is not without problems since the deposition of graphene is affected by the evaporation of a notable amount of copper caused by the slow temperature increase typical for thermal CVD resulting in a long process time. In sharp contrast, the synthesis of graphene by PE-CVD can circumvent this problem by substantially shortening the process time at holding out the prospect of a lower substrate temperature. The reduced thermal load and the possibility to industrially scale-up the PE-CVD process makes it a very attractive alternative to the thermal CVD process with respect to the graphene production in the future. Nanodiamonds are synthesized in PE-CVD reactors for a long time because these processes offer a high degree of control over the film's nanostructure and simultaneously providing a significant high deposition rate. To model the co-deposition process, the three relevant macroscopic parameters (pressure, gas mixture and microwave power) are correlated with three relevant process properties (plasma ball size, substrate temperature and C2/Hα-ratio) and the influence on the quality of the deposited carbon allotropes is investigated. For the evaluation of the graphene as well as the nanodiamond quality, Raman spectroscopy used whereas the plasma properties are measured by optical methods. It is found that the diamond nucleation can be influenced by the C2/Hα-ratio in the plasma, while the graphene quality remains mostly unchanged by this parameter. Moreover it is derived from the experimental data that the direct plasma contact with the copper surface is beneficial for the nucleation of the diamond while the growth and

  14. High-speed deposition of titanium carbide coatings by laser-assisted metal–organic CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yansheng [Faculty of Materials Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tu, Rong, E-mail: turong@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Goto, Takashi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A semiconductor laser was first used to prepare wide-area LCVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. • The effect of laser power for the deposition of TiC{sub x} coatings was discussed. • TiC{sub x} coatings showed a columnar cross section and a dense surface texture. • TiC{sub x} coatings had a 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous reports. • This study gives the possibility of LCVD applying on the preparation of TiC{sub x} coating. - Abstract: A semiconductor laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of titanium carbide (TiC{sub x}) coatings on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate using tetrakis (diethylamido) titanium (TDEAT) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as source materials were investigated. The influences of laser power (P{sub L}) and pre-heating temperature (T{sub pre}) on the microstructure and deposition rate of TiC{sub x} coatings were examined. Single phase of TiC{sub x} coatings were obtained at P{sub L} = 100–200 W. TiC{sub x} coatings had a cauliflower-like surface and columnar cross section. TiC{sub x} coatings in the present study had the highest R{sub dep} (54 μm/h) at a relative low T{sub dep} than those of conventional CVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. The highest volume deposition rate (V{sub dep}) of TiC{sub x} coatings was about 4.7 × 10{sup −12} m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, which had 3–10{sup 5} times larger deposition area and 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous LCVD using CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG and argon ion laser.

  15. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) yields better Hydrolytical Stability of Biocompatible SiOx Thin Films on Implant Alumina Ceramics compared to Rapid Thermal Evaporation Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böke, Frederik; Giner, Ignacio; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Fischer, Horst

    2016-07-20

    Densely sintered aluminum oxide (α-Al2O3) is chemically and biologically inert. To improve the interaction with biomolecules and cells, its surface has to be modified prior to use in biomedical applications. In this study, we compared two deposition techniques for adhesion promoting SiOx films to facilitate the coupling of stable organosilane monolayers on monolithic α-alumina; physical vapor deposition (PVD) by thermal evaporation and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD). We also investigated the influence of etching on the formation of silanol surface groups using hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid solutions. The film characteristics, that is, surface morphology and surface chemistry, as well as the film stability and its adhesion properties under accelerated aging conditions were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and tensile strength tests. Differences in surface functionalization were investigated via two model organosilanes as well as the cell-cytotoxicity and viability on murine fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC). We found that both SiOx interfaces did not affect the cell viability of both cell types. No significant differences between both films with regard to their interfacial tensile strength were detected, although failure mode analyses revealed a higher interfacial stability of the PE-CVD films compared to the PVD films. Twenty-eight day exposure to simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C revealed a partial delamination of the thermally deposited PVD films whereas the PE-CVD films stayed largely intact. SiOx layers deposited by both PVD and PE-CVD may thus serve as viable adhesion-promoters for subsequent organosilane coupling agent binding to α-alumina. However, PE-CVD appears to be favorable for long-term direct film exposure to aqueous

  16. The optoelectronic properties of silicon films deposited by inductively coupled plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin Yanli; Yan Hengqing; Li Fei; Qiao Li; Liu Qiming [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); He Deyan, E-mail: hedy@lzu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films were deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) at low substrate temperatures using H{sub 2}-diluted SiH{sub 4} as a source gas. High-density plasma generated by inductively coupled excitation facilitates the crystallization of silicon films at low temperatures, and microcrystalline silicon films were obtained at the substrate temperature as low as 180 deg. C. The columnar structure of the films becomes more and more compact with an increase of their crystallinity. The reduction of hydrogen content in the films causes a narrowing of the optical bandgap and an enhancement of the absorption with increasing the substrate temperature. The microcrystalline silicon films show two electronic transport mechanisms: one is related to the density of state distribution in the temperature region near room temperature and the other is the variable range hopping between localized electronic states close to the Fermi level below 170 K. A reasonable explanation is presented for the dependence of the optoelectronic properties on the microstructure of the silicon films. The films prepared at a substrate temperature of 300 deg. C have highly crystalline and compact columnar structure, high optical absorption coefficient and electrical conductivity, and a low hydrogen content of 3.8%.

  17. Field emissions of graphene films deposited on different substrates by CVD system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiao-Ping; Liu Xiao-Fei; Liu Xin-Xin; Wang Li-Jun; Yang Can; Jing Long-Wei; Li Song-Kun; Pan Xiu-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Graphene films are deposited on copper (Cu) and aluminum (A1) substrates,respectively,by using a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition technique.Furthermore,these graphene films are characterized by a field emission type scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM),Raman spectra,and field emission (FE) I-V measurements.It is found that the surface morphologies of the films deposited on Cu and Al substrates are different:the field emission property of graphene film deposited on the Cu substrate is better than that on the Al substrate,and the lowest turn-on field of 2.4 V/μm is obtained for graphene film deposited on the Cu substrate.The macroscopic areas of the graphene samples are all above 400 mm2.

  18. Hot wire CVD deposition of nanocrystalline silicon solar cells on rough substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongbo B.T., E-mail: h.li@uu.n [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Werf, Karine H.M. van der; Rath, Jatin K.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-04-30

    In silicon thin film solar cell technology, frequently rough or textured substrates are used to scatter the light and enhance its absorption. The important issue of the influence of substrate roughness on silicon nanocrystal growth has been investigated through a series of nc-Si:H single junction p-i-n solar cells containing i-layers deposited with Hot-wire CVD. It is shown that silicon grown on the surface of an unoptimized rough substrate contains structural defects, which deteriorate solar cell performance. By introducing parameter v, voids/substrate area ratio, we could define a criterion for the morphology of light trapping substrates for thin film silicon solar cells: a preferred substrate should have a v value of less than around 1 x 10{sup -6}, correlated to a substrate surface rms value of lower than around 50 nm. Our Ag/ZnO substrates with rms roughness less than this value typically do not contain microvalleys with opening angles smaller than {approx} 110{sup o}, resulting in solar cells with improved output performance. We suggest a void-formation model based on selective etching of strained Si-Si atoms due to the collision of growing silicon film surface near the valleys of the substrate.

  19. Properties of Boron-dopedμc-Ge:H Films Deposited by Hot-wire CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Haibin; SHEN Honglie; WU Tianru; LU Linfeng; TANG Zhengxia; SHEN Jiancang

    2015-01-01

    Boron-doped hydrogenated microcrystalline Germanium (μc-Ge:H)fi lms were deposited by hot-wire CVD. H2 diluted GeH4 and B2H6 were used as precursors and the substrate temperature was kept at 300ć. The properties of the samples were analyzed by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and Hall Effect measurement with Van der Pauw method. It is found that thefi lms are partially crystallized, with crystalline fractions larger than 45% and grain sizes smaller than 50 nm. The B-doping can enhance the crystallization but reduce the grain sizes, and also enhance the preferential growth of Ge (220). The conductivity of thefi lms increases and tends to be saturated with increasingdiborane-to-germane ratio . All the Hall mobilities of the samples are larger than 3.8 cm2·V-1·s-1. A high conductivity of 41.3Ω-1ίcm-1 is gained at=6.7%.

  20. Evaluating electrically insulating films deposited on V-4% Cr-4% Ti by reactive CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.H.; Cho, W.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Previous CaO coatings on V-4%Cr-4%Ti exhibited high-ohmic insulator behavior even though a small amount of vanadium from the alloy was incorporated in the coating. However, when the vanadium concentration in the coatings is > 15 wt%, the coating becomes conductive. When the vanadium concentration is high in localized areas, a calcium vanadate phase that exhibits semiconductor behavior can form. To explore this situation, CaO and Ca-V-O coatings were produced on vanadium alloys by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and by a metallic-vapor process to investigate the electrical resistance of the coatings. Initially, the vanadium alloy specimens were either charged with oxygen in argon that contained trace levels of oxygen, or oxidized for 1.5-3 h in a 1% CO-CO{sub 2} gas mixture or in air to form vanadium oxide at 625-650{degrees}C. Most of the specimens were exposed to calcium vapor at 800-850{degrees}C. Initial and final weights were obtained to monitor each step, and surveillance samples were removed for examination by optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron-energy-dispersive and X-ray diffraction analysis; the electrical resistivity was also measured. The authors found that Ca-V-O films exhibited insulator behavior when the ratio of calcium concentration to vanadium concentration R in the film was > 0.9, and semiconductor or conductor behavior for R < 0.8. However, in some cases, semiconductor behavior was observed when CaO-coated samples with R > 0.98 were exposed in liquid lithium. Based on these studies, the authors conclude that semiconductor behavior occurs if a conductive calcium vanadate phase is present in localized regions in the CaO coating.

  1. Silicon doping techniques using chemical vapor dopant deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popadic, M.

    2009-11-12

    Ultrashallow junctions are essential for the achievement of superior transistor performance, both in MOSFET and bipolar transistors. The stringent demands require state-of-the-art fabrication techniques. At the same time, in a different context, the accurate fabrication of various n type doping profiles by low-temperature Si epitaxy is a challenge due to autodoping. In this thesis, these two, apparently unrelated, problems are both addressed as the layer of CVD surface-deposited dopant atoms is used as a doping source. It is demonstrated that a layer of dopants deposited on the Si surface can be used as a doping source by either thermal or laser drive-in for the fabrication of both deep and ultrashallow defect-free junctions. In low-temperature CVD epitaxy, autodoping is a consequence of dopant surface segregation and doping from the surface layer. This process has been characterized, and consequently excellent controllability is achieved. In addition, new results related to the CVD of dopants itself are obtained, and two theoretical achievements are made: the analytical model of arbitrarily shallow junctions is derived, and a new C-V profiling technique suitable for the characterization of ultrashallow junctions is developed.

  2. Deposition of TiC film on titanium for abrasion resistant implant material by ion-enhanced triode plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Yuhe, E-mail: zyh1120@hotmail.co.jp [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Wang Wei; Jia Xingya [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Akasaka, Tsukasa [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Liao, Susan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Watari, Fumio [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deposition of Titanium Carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. - Abstract: Deposition of titanium carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using a TiCl{sub 4} + CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2} gas mixture. Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the specimen was consisted of TiC and Ti. Carbide layer of about 6 {mu}m thickness was observed on the cross section of the specimen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance.

  3. Fabrication of Ultrasensitive Field-Effect Transistor DNA Biosensors by a Directional Transfer Technique Based on CVD-Grown Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chao; Huang, Le; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Zhongyue; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-08-12

    Most graphene field-effect transistor (G-FET) biosensors are fabricated through a routine process, in which graphene is transferred onto a Si/SiO2 substrate and then devices are subsequently produced by micromanufacture processes. However, such a fabrication approach can introduce contamination onto the graphene surface during the lithographic process, resulting in interference for the subsequent biosensing. In this work, we have developed a novel directional transfer technique to fabricate G-FET biosensors based on chemical-vapor-deposition- (CVD-) grown single-layer graphene (SLG) and applied this biosensor for the sensitive detection of DNA. A FET device with six individual array sensors was first fabricated, and SLG obtained by the CVD-growth method was transferred onto the sensor surface in a directional manner. Afterward, peptide nucleic acid (PNA) was covalently immobilized on the graphene surface, and DNA detection was realized by applying specific target DNA to the PNA-functionalized G-FET biosensor. The developed G-FET biosensor was able to detect target DNA at concentrations as low as 10 fM, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than those reported in a previous work. In addition, the biosensor was capable of distinguishing the complementary DNA from one-base-mismatched DNA and noncomplementary DNA. The directional transfer technique for the fabrication of G-FET biosensors is simple, and the as-constructed G-FET DNA biosensor shows ultrasensitivity and high specificity, indicating its potential application in disease diagnostics as a point-of-care tool.

  4. Diamond like carbon coatings deposited by microwave plasma CVD: XPS and ellipsometric studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R M Dey; M Pandey; D Bhattacharyya; D S Patil; S K Kulkarni

    2007-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by microwave assisted chemical vapour deposition system using d.c. bias voltage ranging from –100 V to –300 V. These films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry techniques for estimating 3/2 ratio. The 3/2 ratio obtained by XPS is found to have an opposite trend to that obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry. These results are explained using sub-plantation picture of DLC growth. Our results clearly indicate that the film is composed of two different layers, having entirely different properties in terms of void percentage and 3/2 ratio. The upper layer is relatively thinner as compared to the bottom layer.

  5. Efficient strategy to Cu/Si catalyst into vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with bamboo shape by CVD technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V MOHANA KRISHNA; T SOMANATHAN

    2016-08-01

    Bamboo-shaped vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (bs-VACNTs) were fabricated on Cu/Si catalyst by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique under the atmospheric pressure. The catalytic material (Cu/Si) playeda vital role in attaining bs-VACNTs, which is synthesized by drop cast method in a cost-effective manner. Using this catalytic support, we have achieved the tip growth bs-VACNTs at low temperature with well graphitization. The as-grown carbon material was then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyzer, high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. XRD technique confirms the formation of hexagonal graphitic carbon planes of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The surface morphology of the material was characterized by SEM, which clearly infervertically aligned CNTs. The nature, diameter and crystallinity were noticed by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Further, we have also studied the electrochemical properties of the bs-VACNTs and it seems to be proved as highly electroconductive when compared to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs).

  6. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power electronic devices. The CNTs and diamond substrates have a significantly higher specific thermal conductivity than traditional heat sink/spreader materials making them good replacement candidates. Only limited research has been performed on these CNT/diamond structures and their suitability of different growth methods. This study investigates three potential chemical vapor deposition (CVD techniques for growing CNTs on diamond: thermal CVD (T-CVD, microwave plasma-enhanced CVD (MPE-CVD, and floating catalyst thermal CVD (FCT-CVD. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to analyze the morphology and topology of the CNTs. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the quality of the CNTs by determining the ID/IG peak intensity ratios. Additionally, the CNT/diamond samples were sonicated for qualitative comparisons of the durability of the CNT forests. T-CVD provided the largest diameter tubes, with catalysts residing mainly at the CNT/diamond interface. The MPE-CVD process yielded non uniform defective CNTs, and FCT-CVD resulted in the smallest diameter CNTs with catalyst particles imbedded throughout the length of the nanotubes.

  7. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mengdi, E-mail: M.Yang@utwente.nl; Aarnink, Antonius A. I.; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J.; Wolters, Rob A. M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 °C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), which reacted with WF{sub 6} at the substrate to deposit W. The growth behavior was monitored in real time by an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer. In this work, the authors compare samples with tungsten grown by either HWALD or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in terms of growth kinetics and properties. For CVD, the samples were made in a mixture of WF{sub 6} and molecular or atomic hydrogen. Resistivity of the WF{sub 6}-H{sub 2} CVD layers was 20 μΩ·cm, whereas for the WF{sub 6}-at-H-CVD layers, it was 28 μΩ·cm. Interestingly, the resistivity was as high as 100 μΩ·cm for the HWALD films, although the tungsten films were 99% pure according to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction reveals that the HWALD W was crystallized as β-W, whereas both CVD films were in the α-W phase.

  8. Deposition rate and morphology of carbon nanotubes at different positions in a CVD reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized through the catalytic decomposition of a ferroeene-xylene mixture in a horizontal chemical vapor deposition reactor.The deposition rate of CNTs along the axial direction was measured.The morphology of CNTs was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The results showed that the deposition rate of CNTs along the axial direction first increased and later decreased,the position achieving the maximum deposition rate was influenced by the operating conditions.The morphologies of CNTs also changed along the axial direction.

  9. Filament poisoning at typical carbon nanotube deposition conditions by hot-filament CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the poisoning of tungsten filaments during the hot-filament chemical vapour deposition process at typical carbon nanotube (CNT) deposition conditions and filament temperatures ranging from 1400 to 2000 °C. The morphological...

  10. Structural and optical characterization of thick and thin polycrystalline diamond films deposited by microwave plasma activated CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Pradhan; B Satpati; B P Bag; T Sharda

    2012-02-01

    Preliminary results of growth of thin diamond film in a recently installed 3 kW capacity microwave plasma activated CVD (MW-PACVD) system are being reported. The films were deposited on Si (100) substrate at 850°C using methane and hydrogen mixture at 1.5 kW MW power. The grown polycrystalline films were characterized by micro-Raman, transmission electron microscope (TEM), spectrophotometer and atomic force microscope (AFM). The results were compared with that of a thicker diamond film grown elsewhere in a same make MWPACVD system at relatively higher power densities. The presence of a sharp Raman peak at 1332 cm-1 confirmed the growth of diamond, and transmission spectra showed typical diamond film characteristics in both the samples. Typical twin bands and also a quintuplet twinned crystal were observed in TEM, further it was found that the twinned region in thin sample composed of very fine platelet like structure.

  11. Development Status of a CVD System to Deposit Tungsten onto UO2 Powder via the WCI6 Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, O. R.; Kimberlin, A.; Broadway, J.; Hickman, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is under development for deep space exploration. NTP's high specific impulse (> 850 second) enables a large range of destinations, shorter trip durations, and improved reliability. W-60vol%UO2 CERMET fuel development efforts emphasize fabrication, performance testing and process optimization to meet service life requirements. Fuel elements must be able to survive operation in excess of 2850 K, exposure to flowing hydrogen (H2), vibration, acoustic, and radiation conditions. CTE mismatch between W and UO2 result in high thermal stresses and lead to mechanical failure as a result UO2 reduction by hot hydrogen (H2) [1]. Improved powder metallurgy fabrication process control and mitigated fuel loss can be attained by coating UO2 starting powders within a layer of high density tungsten [2]. This paper discusses the advances of a fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system that utilizes the H2-WCl6 reduction process.

  12. Effect of surface irradiation during the photo-CVD deposition of a-Si:H thin films. Hikari CVD ho ni yoru amorphous silicon sakuseiji no kiban hikari reiki koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasaka, K.; Doering, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Fujishima, A. (The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-06

    This paper shows the impact of the irradiation from an additional light source during the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by photo-CVD deposition. Using a mercury sensitized photo-CVD process from Disilan (Si {sub 2} H {sub 6}) and hydrogen, silicon was deposited. A 40W low pressure mercury lamp was applied as the light source. A portion of the substrate was in addition irradiated using an Xg-He lamp through a thermal filter. Irradiation of the substrate using only Xg-He lamp produced no deposition, since this light has a wavelength which is too long to produce the SiH {sub 3}-radicals needed for Si deposition. The additional Xg-He light source was discovered to cause an increased thickness of deposited a-Si:H film and a transmission of the band structure. The reasons of these are considered that the influence of irradiation is not limited to film thickness, but that irradiation also impacts the composition of the a-Si:H film so as to cause a reduction in the hydrogen content. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Epitaxial thin film GaAs solar cells using OM-CVD techniques. [Organometallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirn, R. J.; Wang, K. L.; Yeh, Y. C. M.

    1981-01-01

    A new approach has been initiated at JPL to fabricate thin-film, high efficiency GaAs solar cells on low-cost, single-crystal Si substrates having a thin CVD interlayer of Ge to minimize the lattice and thermal expansion mismatch. For initial experiments, n(+)/p GaAs cells were grown by OM-CVD on single-crystal GaAs and Ge wafers. Details of the growths and performance results will be presented. Subsequently, a combined epitaxial structure of OM-CVD GaAs on a strongly adherent Ge interlayer on (100) Si was grown. This is the first report of the successful growth of this composite structure. Low module costs projected by JPL SAMICS methodology calculations and the potential for 400-600W/kg space solar arrays will be discussed.

  14. Effect of PbI2 deposition rate on two-step PVD/CVD all-vacuum prepared perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioakeimidis, Apostolos; Christodoulou, Christos; Lux-Steiner, Martha; Fostiropoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-12-01

    In this work we fabricate all-vacuum processed methyl ammonium lead halide perovskite by a sequence of physical vapour deposition of PbI2 and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of CH3NH3I under a static atmosphere. We demonstrate that for higher deposition rate the (001) planes of PbI2 film show a higher degree of alignment parallel to the sample's surface. From X-ray diffraction data of the resulted perovskite film we derive that the intercalation rate of CH3NH3I is fostered for PbI2 films with higher degree of (001) planes alignment. The stoichiometry of the produced perovskite film is also studied by Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Complete all-vacuum perovskite solar cells were fabricated on glass/ITO substrates coated by an ultra-thin (5 nm) Zn-phthalocyanine film as hole selective layer. A dependence of residual PbI2 on the solar cells performance is displayed, while photovoltaic devices with efficiency up to η=11.6% were achieved.

  15. Silicon-Germanium Films Deposited by Low Frequency PE CVD: Effect of H2 and Ar Dilution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosarev, A; Torres, A; Hernandez, Y; Ambrosio, R; Zuniga, C; Felter, T E; Asomoza, R R; Kudriavtsev, Y; Silva-Gonzalez, R; Gomez-Barojas, E; Ilinski, A; Abramov, A S

    2005-09-22

    We have studied structure and electrical properties of Si{sub 1-Y}Ge{sub Y}:H films deposited by low frequency PE CVD over the entire composition range from Y=0 to Y=1. The deposition rate of the films and their structural and electrical properties were measured for various ratios of the germane/silane feed gases and with and without dilution by Ar and by H{sub 2}. Structure and composition was studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Surface morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We found: (1) The deposition rate increased with Y maximizing at Y=1 without dilution. (2) The relative rate of Ge and Si incorporation is affected by dilution. (3) Hydrogen preferentially bonds to silicon. (4) Hydrogen content decreases for increasing Y. In addition, optical measurements showed that as Y goes for 0 to 1, the Fermi level moves from mid gap to the conduction band edge, i.e. the films become more n-type. No correlation was found between the pre-exponential and the activation energy of conductivity. The behavior of the conductivity {gamma}-factor suggests a local minimum in the density of states at E {approx} 0.33 eV for the films grown with or without H-dilution and E {approx} 0.25 eV for the films with Ar dilution.

  16. Influence of deposition rate on the structural properties of plasma-enhanced CVD epitaxial silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanghua; Cariou, Romain; Hamon, Gwenaëlle; Léal, Ronan; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i

    2017-01-01

    Solar cells based on epitaxial silicon layers as the absorber attract increasing attention because of the potential cost reduction. In this work, we studied the influence of the deposition rate on the structural properties of epitaxial silicon layers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (epi-PECVD) using silane as a precursor and hydrogen as a carrier gas. We found that the crystalline quality of epi-PECVD layers depends on their thickness and deposition rate. Moreover, increasing the deposition rate may lead to epitaxy breakdown. In that case, we observe the formation of embedded amorphous silicon cones in the epi-PECVD layer. To explain this phenomenon, we develop a model based on the coupling of hydrogen and built-in strain. By optimizing the deposition conditions to avoid epitaxy breakdown, including substrate temperatures and plasma potential, we have been able to synthesize epi-PECVD layers up to a deposition rate of 8.3 Å/s. In such case, we found that the incorporation of hydrogen in the hydrogenated crystalline silicon can reach 4 at. % at a substrate temperature of 350 °C. PMID:28262840

  17. Thin Film Deposition Techniques (PVD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeiss, E.

    The most interesting materials for spin electronic devices are thin films of magnetic transition metals and magnetic perovskites, mainly the doped La-manganites [1] as well as several oxides and metals for passivating and contacting the magnetic films. The most suitable methods for the preparation of such films are the physical vapor deposition methods (PVD). Therefore this report will be restricted to these deposition methods.

  18. The effects of flow multiplicity on GaN deposition in a rotating disk CVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkinis, P. A.; Aviziotis, I. G.; Koronaki, E. D.; Gakis, G. P.; Boudouvis, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of gas flow multiplicity, i.e. the possibility of two very different flow regimes prevailing at random in a rotating disk metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, on the deposited GaN film is investigated. A transport model coupled with a system of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the wafer where the film is formed, is implemented in the parameter regions where multiple flows are possible. In the region of multiplicity where either plug flow, imposed by forced convection, or buoyancy-dominated flow is possible, the results in the latter case indicate high deposition rate and decreased uniformity. In the former case, increasing the pressure and the rotation rate has a favorable effect on the deposition rate without sacrificing uniformity. In the parameter window of multiplicity where either rotation or combined rotation/buoyancy may prevail, the effects of buoyancy lead to higher deposition rate at the center of the wafer and reduced uniformity. The Arrhenius plots in the regions of multiplicity for exactly the same operating conditions reveal that the system operates in a diffusion-limited regime in the plug flow and in the rotation-dominated flow, in the first and second region of multiplicity respectively. In contrast, in the buoyancy-dominated flow and the combined rotation/buoyancy flow (first and second region of multiplicity respectively) the process shifts into the kinetics-limited regime.

  19. TiAlN and TiAlCN deposition in an industrial PaCVD-plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heim, D.; Hochreiter, R. [Ruebig GmbH, Co., Wels (Austria)

    1998-01-01

    An industrial PaCVD-plant was equipped with an AlCl{sub 3}-generator. By using Ar, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, TiCl{sub 4} and AlCl{sub 3}, TiAlN- and TiAlCN-films could be deposited on hard metal and steel substrates. The plasma was generated by a DC-pulse power supply with frequencies up to 50 kHz. The reactor size was 350 mm in diameter and 900 mm in height. During one batch 1200 indexable inserts could be coated. The growth rates were about 1-3 {mu}m h{sup -1}. The deposited films show a fine structure and Cl-concentrations below 3%. The measured critical loads were between 30 and 40 N. Wear test results show an increase in tool life up to several 100% compared with uncoated or TiN-coated tools. (orig.) 7 refs.

  20. The Formation of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coating on WC Deposited by Microwave Assisted Plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toff, M. R. M.; Hamzah, E.; Purniawan, A.

    2010-03-01

    Diamond is one form of carbon structure. The extreme hardness and high chemical resistant of diamond coatings determined that many works on this area relate to coated materials for tribological applications in biomedicine, as mechanical seals or cutting tools for hard machining operations. In the work, nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coated tungsten carbide (WC) have been deposited by microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition (MAPCVD) from CH4/H2 mixtures. Morphology of NCD was investigated by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The quality of NCD is defined as ratio between diamond and non diamond and also full width at half maximum (FWHM) was determined using Raman spectra. The result found that the NCD structure can be deposited on WC surface using CH4/H2 gas mixture with grain size ˜20 nm to 100 nm. Increase %CH4 concentration due to increase the nucleation of NCD whereas decrease the quality of diamond. Based on Raman spectra, the quality of NCD is in the range ˜98.82-99.01% and 99.56-99.75% for NCD and microcrystalline (MCD), respectively. In addition, FWHM of NCD is high than MCD in the range of 8.664-62.24 cm-1 and 4.24-5.05 cm-1 for NCD and MCD respectively that indicate the crystallineity of NCD is smaller than MCD.

  1. Structural and optical properties of tellurium films obtained by chemical vapor deposition(CVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yu-tian; GONG Zhu-Qing; XU Wei-Hong; HUANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    Tellurium thin films were prepared by the chemical vapor deposition method. The structure, surface morphology and optical properties of the Te thin films were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, FTIR transmission,UV/VIS/NIR transmission and reflectance. The results show that the films structural and optical properties are influenced by many factors such as film thickness, crystallite size and substrate temperature. The films as thick as 111-133 nm have high IR transmission across the full 8-13 μm band and highly blocking in the solar spectral region elsewhere, which indicates that Te films thickness in this region can be used as good solar radiation shields in radiative cooling devices.

  2. The effectiveness of Ti implants as barriers to carbon diffusion in Ti implanted steel under CVD diamond deposition conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Hoffman, A. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Chemistry; Evan, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Paterson, P.J.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    The growth of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond onto iron based substrates complicated by preferential soot formation and carbon diffusion into the substrate [1], leading to poor quality films and poor adhesion. In the initial stages of exposure to a microwave plasma, a layer of graphite is rapidly formed on an untreated Fe based substrate. Once this graphite layer reaches a certain thickness, reasonable quality diamond nucleates and grows upon it. However, the diamond film easily delaminates from the substrate, the weak link being the graphitic layer. Following an initial success in using a TiN barrier layer to inhibit the formation of such a graphitic layer the authors report on attempts to use an implanted Ti layer for the same purpose. This work was prompted by observation that, although the TiN proved to be an extremely effective diffusion barrier, adhesion may be further enhanced by the formation of a TiC interface layer between the diamond film and the Fe substrate. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Investigation of phonon modes in gallium nitride nanowires deposited by thermal CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizal, Umesh, E-mail: umeshrizal680@gmail.com; Swain, Bibhu P., E-mail: bibhu.s@smit.smu.edu.in [Nano Processing Laboratory, Centre for Material Science and Nanotechnology, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East Sikkim, India-737136 (India); Swain, Bhabani S., E-mail: bsswain@kookmin.ac.kr [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Sungbuk-gu, Jeongnung-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-13

    Gallium nitride nanowires (GaN-NWs) of diameters ranging from 20 to 80 nm were grown on the p-type Si substrate by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using Iron (Fe) catalyst via VLS mechanism. Raman and FTIR spectra reveal the presence of broad transverse optic (TO) and longitudinal optic (LO) phonon peak spreads over 500-600 cm{sup −1} and 720 cm{sup −1} respectively. The detail deconvolution of integrated transverse and longitudinal phonon analysis reveals phonon confinement brought out by incorporation of hydrogen atom. The red shifts of TO and LO phonon peak position indicates nanosized effect. I{sub A1(LO)}/I{sub A1(TO)} increases from 0.073 to 1.0 and their respective fwhm{sub A1(LO)}/fwhm{sub A1(TO)} also increases from 0.71 to 1.31 with increasing H{sub 2} flow rate. E{sub 1}(LO) - E{sub 1}(TO) and A{sub 1}(LO) - A{sub 1}(TO) increases from 173.83 to 190.73 and 184.89 to 193.22 respectively. Apart from this usual TO and LO phonon, we have found Surface Optic (SO) phonon at 671 cm{sup −1} in FTIR spectra. The intensity of PL peak increases with increasing H{sub 2} dilution reveals efficient passivation of defect centre at surface of GaN-NWs.

  4. The deposition characteristics of copper(I) compounds for CVD by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, F.D.; Peden, C.H.F.; Omstead, T.R.; Blewer, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farkas, J.; Hampden-Smith, M.J.; Kodas, T.T. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to investigate the adsorption and thermally-induced decomposition of copper (I) {beta}-diketonate precursors of the type (hfac)CuL, where hfac is the hexafluoroacetylacetonate bidentate ligand and L is trimethylphosphine or 1,5-cyclooctadiene. The (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} precursor desorbs from the surface at very low temperatures whereas the (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD) dissociates on adsorption, liberating 1,5-COD and leaving a surface(hfac)Cu complex which can subsequently disproportionate. Evidence is provided for hydrogen-bonding between the hfac ligand and the surface silanols for (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3}, but not for (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD). These results are consistent with the selective behavior of these precursors for copper deposition and suggest that the selectivity of the (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} and (hfac)Cu(1, 5-COD) precursors may be due to the ability of the hfac ligand to hydrogen bond to the surface silanol groups.

  5. The deposition characteristics of copper(I) compounds for CVD by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, F.D.; Peden, C.H.F.; Omstead, T.R.; Blewer, R.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Farkas, J.; Hampden-Smith, M.J.; Kodas, T.T. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to investigate the adsorption and thermally-induced decomposition of copper (I) {beta}-diketonate precursors of the type (hfac)CuL, where hfac is the hexafluoroacetylacetonate bidentate ligand and L is trimethylphosphine or 1,5-cyclooctadiene. The (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} precursor desorbs from the surface at very low temperatures whereas the (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD) dissociates on adsorption, liberating 1,5-COD and leaving a surface(hfac)Cu complex which can subsequently disproportionate. Evidence is provided for hydrogen-bonding between the hfac ligand and the surface silanols for (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3}, but not for (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD). These results are consistent with the selective behavior of these precursors for copper deposition and suggest that the selectivity of the (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} and (hfac)Cu(1, 5-COD) precursors may be due to the ability of the hfac ligand to hydrogen bond to the surface silanol groups.

  6. CVD polymers fabrication of organic surfaces and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gleason, Karen K

    2015-01-01

    The method of CVD (chemical vapor deposition) is a versatile technique to fabricate high-quality thin films and structured surfaces in the nanometer regime from the vapor phase. Already widely used for the deposition of inorganic materials in the semiconductor industry, CVD has become the method of choice in many applications to process polymers as well. This highly scalable technique allows for synthesizing high-purity, defect-free films and for systematically tuning their chemical, mechanical and physical properties. In addition, vapor phase processing is critical for the deposition of insol

  7. Growth and Characterization of Silicon Carbide (SiC) Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) for Electronic Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karina

    In recent years nanowires have gained a generous amount of interest because of the possible application of nanowires within electronic devices. A nanowire is a one dimensional semiconductor nanostructure with a diameter less than 100 nm. Nanowires have the potential to be a replacement for the present day complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology; it is believed by 2020, a 5--6 nm gate length within field effect transistors (FET) would be realized and cease further miniaturization of electronic devices. SiC processes several unique chemical and physical properties that make it an attractive alternative to Si as a semiconductor material. Silicon carbide's properties make it a perfect candidate for applications such as high temperature sensors, x-ray emitters and high radiation sensors. The main objective of this thesis is to successfully grow silicon carbide nanowires on silicon substrates with the assistance of a metal catalyst, by the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The contributions made by the work carried out in this thesis are broad. This is the first study that has carried out a comprehensive investigation into a wide range of metal catalyst for the growth of SiC nanowires by the process of chemical vapor deposition. The study proved that the surface tension interactions between the silicon substrate and the metal catalyst are the controlling factor in the determination of the diameter of the nanowires grown. This study also proved that the silicon substrate orientation has no impact on the growth of the nanowires, similar growth patterns occurred on both Si and Si substrates. The nanowires grown were characterized by a variety of different methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and raman spectroscopy. The effect of temperature, growth temperature, growth time and the catalyst type used are investigated to determine the most suitable conditions necessary for SiC nanowire

  8. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition: recent progress, present state of the art and competitive opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.

    2009-01-01

    Hot Wire CVD (also called Catalytic CVD or initiated CVD) is an elegant low pressure deposition technique for the deposition of functional films, both inorganic and organic, based on the decomposition of precursor sources at a heated metallic surface. The conformal deposition of thin films on rigid

  9. Sputtering. [as deposition technique in mechanical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1976-01-01

    This paper primarily reviews the potential of using the sputtering process as a deposition technique; however, the manufacturing and sputter etching aspects are also discussed. Since sputtering is not regulated by classical thermodynamics, new multicomponent materials can be developed in any possible chemical composition. The basic mechanism for dc and rf sputtering is described. Sputter-deposition is described in terms of the unique advantageous features it offers such as versatility, momentum transfer, stoichiometry, sputter-etching, target geometry (coating complex surfaces), precise controls, flexibility, ecology, and sputtering rates. Sputtered film characteristics, such as strong adherence and coherence and film morphology, are briefly evaluated in terms of varying the sputtering parameters. Also described are some of the specific industrial areas which are turning to sputter-deposition techniques.

  10. Sputtering. [as deposition technique in mechanical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1976-01-01

    This paper primarily reviews the potential of using the sputtering process as a deposition technique; however, the manufacturing and sputter etching aspects are also discussed. Since sputtering is not regulated by classical thermodynamics, new multicomponent materials can be developed in any possible chemical composition. The basic mechanism for dc and rf sputtering is described. Sputter-deposition is described in terms of the unique advantageous features it offers such as versatility, momentum transfer, stoichiometry, sputter-etching, target geometry (coating complex surfaces), precise controls, flexibility, ecology, and sputtering rates. Sputtered film characteristics, such as strong adherence and coherence and film morphology, are briefly evaluated in terms of varying the sputtering parameters. Also described are some of the specific industrial areas which are turning to sputter-deposition techniques.

  11. Diagnosis of gas phase near the substrate surface in diamond film deposition by high-power DC arc plasma jet CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuyuan Zhou; Guangchao Chen; Bin Li; Weizhong Tang; Fanxiu Lv

    2007-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to study the gas phase composition near the substrate surface during diamond deposition by high-power DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (CVD). C2 radical was determined as the main carbon radical in this plasma atmosphere. The deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature, anode-substrate distance, methane concentration, and gas flow rate, were inspected to find out the influence on the gas phase. A strong dependence of the concentrations and distribution of radicals on substrate temperature was confirmed by the design of experiments (DOE). An explanation for this dependence could be that radicals near the substrate surface may have additional ionization or dissociation and also have recombination,or are consumed on the substrate surface where chemical reactions occur.

  12. Synthesis of few-layer graphene on a Ni substrate by using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hyuk; Castro, Edward Joseph; Hwang, Yong Gyoo; Lee, Choong Hun [Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    In this work, few-layer graphene (FLG) was successfully grown on polycrystalline Ni a large scale by using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC PE-CVD), which may serve as an alternative route in large-scale graphene synthesis. The synthesis time had an effect on the quality of the graphene produced. The applied DC voltage, on the other hand, influenced the minimization of the defect densities in the graphene grown. We also present a method of producing a free-standing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)/graphene membrane on a FeCl{sub 3(aq)} solution, which could then be transferred to the desired substrate.

  13. Recent advances in controlled synthesis of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides via vapour deposition techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yumeng

    2014-10-20

    In recent years there have been many breakthroughs in two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, among which the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) attract significant attention owing to their unusual properties associated with their strictly defined dimensionalities. TMD materials with a generalized formula of MX2, where M is a transition metal and X is a chalcogen, represent a diverse and largely untapped source of 2D systems. Semiconducting TMD monolayers such as MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and WS2 have been demonstrated to be feasible for future electronics and optoelectronics. The exotic electronic properties and high specific surface areas of 2D TMDs offer unlimited potential in various fields including sensing, catalysis, and energy storage applications. Very recently, the chemical vapour deposition technique (CVD) has shown great promise to generate high-quality TMD layers with a scalable size, controllable thickness and excellent electronic properties. Wafer-scale deposition of mono to few layer TMD films has been obtained. Despite the initial success in the CVD synthesis of TMDs, substantial research studies on extending the methodology open up a new way for substitution doping, formation of monolayer alloys and producing TMD stacking structures or superlattices. In this tutorial review, we will introduce the latest development of the synthesis of monolayer TMDs by CVD approaches.

  14. AFM Morphology Study of Si1-Y GeY:H Films Deposited by LF PE CVD from Silane-Germane with Different

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, L; Kosarev, A

    2005-03-28

    The morphology of Si{sub 1-Y} Ge{sub Y}:H films in the range of Y=0.23 to 0.9 has been studied by AFM. The films were deposited by Low Frequency (LF) PE CVD at substrate temperature T{sub s}=300 C and discharge frequency f=110 kHz from silane+germane mixture with and without, Ar and H{sub 2} dilution. The films were deposited on silicon and glass substrates. AFM images were taken and analyzed for 2 x 2 mm{sup 2} area. All the images demonstrated ''grain'' like structure, which was characterized by the height distribution function F(H) average roughness , standard height deviation Rq, lateral correlation length L{sub c} area distribution function F(s), mean grain area , diameter distribution function F(d), and mean grain diameter . The roughness of the films monotonically increases with Y for all dilutions, but more significantly in the films deposited without dilution. L{sub c} continuously grows with Y in the films deposited without dilution, while more complex behavior L{sub c}(Y) is observed in the films deposited with H- or Ar dilution. The sharpness of F(H) characterized by curtosis {gamma} depends on dilution and the sharpest F(H) are for the films deposited with Ar ({gamma}=5.30,Y=0.23) and without dilution ({gamma}=4.3, Y=0.45). Isothermal annealing caused increase of , L{sub c} in the films deposited with H- and Ar dilutions, while in the films prepared without dilution the behavior was more complex, depending on the substrates. Significant narrowing of the height distribution was observed in the films deposited with H dilution or without dilution.

  15. Deposition of low stress, high transmittance SiC as an x-ray mask membrane using ECR plasma CVD

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S Y; Lim, S T; Ahn, J H

    1998-01-01

    SiC for x-ray mask membrane is deposited by Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition from SiH sub 4 /CH sub 4 Ar mixtures. Stoichiometric SiC is deposited at SiH sub 4 /CH sub 4 ratio of 0.4, deposition temperature of 600.deg.C and microwave power of 500 W with +- 5% thickness uniformity, As-deposited film has compressive residual stress, very smooth surface (31 A rms) and high optical transmittance of 90% at 633 nm wavelength. The microstructure of this film consists of the nanocrystalline particle (100 A approx 200A) embedded in amorphous matrix. Residual stress can be turned to tensile stress via Rapid Thermal Annealing in N sub 2 atmosphere, while suppressing structural change during annealing, As a result, smooth (37 A rms) SiC film with moderate tensile stress and high optical transmittance (85% at 633 nm wavelength) is obtained.

  16. Microfabrication of Tungsten, Molybdenum and Tungsten Carbide Rods by Laser-Assisted CVD

    OpenAIRE

    Björklund, Kajsa

    2001-01-01

    Thin films of refractory metals and carbides have been studied extensively over many years because of their wide range of application. The two major techniques used are Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD). These can result in the deposition of two-dimensional blanket or patterned thin films. Laser-assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (LCVD) can provide a maskless alternative for localised deposition in two and three dimensions. This thesis describes LCVD of mi...

  17. Isotropic metal deposition technique for metamaterials fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    In this work we will present the first steps taken towards isotropic deposition of thin metallic layers on dielectric substrates. The deposition takes place in aqueous environment thus making it both cheap and easy to be implemented....

  18. Isotropic metal deposition technique for metamaterials fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    In this work we will present the first steps taken towards isotropic deposition of thin metallic layers on dielectric substrates. The deposition takes place in aqueous environment thus making it both cheap and easy to be implemented....

  19. Comparative evaluation of CVD diamond technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, T.R. [General Electric Corporate Research & Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds occurs from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures in the presence of atomic hydrogen at subatmospheric pressures. Most CVD methods are based on different means of generating and transporting atomic hydrogen in a particular system. Evaluation of these different techniques involves their capital costs, material costs, energy costs, labor costs and the type and quality of diamond that they produce. Currently, there is no universal agreement on which is the best technique and technique selection has been largely driven by the professional background of the user as well as the particular application of interest. This article discusses the criteria for evaluating a process for low-pressure deposition of diamond. Next, a brief history of low-pressure diamond synthesis is reviewed. Several specific processes are addressed, including the hot filament process, hot filament electron-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and plasma generation of atomic hydrogen by glow discharge, microwave discharge, low pressure radio frequency discharge, high pressure DC discharge, high pressure microwave discharge jets, high pressure RF discharge, and high and low pressure flames. Other types of diamond deposition methods are also evaluated. 101 refs., 15 figs.

  20. Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) of Highly Cross-Linked Polymer Films for Advanced Lithium-Ion Battery Separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Youngmin; Kim, Byung Gon; Pak, Kwanyong; Han, Sung Jae; Song, Heon-Sik; Choi, Jang Wook; Im, Sung Gap

    2015-08-26

    We report an initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) process to coat polyethylene (PE) separators in Li-ion batteries with a highly cross-linked, mechanically strong polymer, namely, polyhexavinyldisiloxane (pHVDS). The highly cross-linked but ultrathin pHVDS films can only be obtained by a vapor-phase process, because the pHVDS is insoluble in most solvents and thus infeasible with conventional solution-based methods. Moreover, even after the pHVDS coating, the initial porous structure of the separator is well preserved owing to the conformal vapor-phase deposition. The coating thickness is delicately controlled by deposition time to the level that the pore size decreases to below 7% compared to the original dimension. The pHVDS-coated PE shows substantially improved thermal stability and electrolyte wettability. After incubation at 140 °C for 30 min, the pHVDS-coated PE causes only a 12% areal shrinkage (versus 90% of the pristine separator). The superior wettability results in increased electrolyte uptake and ionic conductivity, leading to significantly improved rate performance. The current approach is applicable to a wide range of porous polymeric separators that suffer from thermal shrinkage and poor electrolyte wetting.

  1. Epitaxial Growth of beta-Silicon Carbide (SiC) on a Compliant Substrate via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharanda L.

    1996-01-01

    Many lattice defects have been attributed to the lattice mismatch and the difference in the thermal coefficient of expansion between SiC and silicon (Si). Stacking faults, twins and antiphase boundaries are some of the lattice defects found in these SiC films. These defects may be a partial cause of the disappointing performance reported for the prototype devices fabricated from beta-SiC films. The objective of this research is to relieve some of the thermal stress due to lattice mismatch when SiC is epitaxially grown on Si. The compliant substrate is a silicon membrane 2-4 microns thick. The CVD process includes the buffer layer which is grown at 1360 C followed by a very thin epitaxial growth of SiC. Then the temperature is raised to 1500 C for the subsequent growth of SiC. Since silicon melts at 1415 C, the SiC will be grown on molten Silicon which is absorbed by a porous graphite susceptor eliminating the SiC/Si interface. We suspect that this buffer layer will yield less stressed material to help in the epitaxial growth of SiC.

  2. On the development of single and multijunction solar cells with hot-wire CVD deposited active layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; Schuttauf, J.A.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of the scientific challenges and achievements during the development of thin film silicon based single and multijunction solar cells with hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of the active silicon layers. The highlights discussed include the development of Ag/ZnO coating

  3. Interlayer utilization (including metal borides) for subsequent deposition of NSD films via microwave plasma CVD on 316 and 440C stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Jared

    . Surface boriding was implemented using the novel method of microwave plasma CVD with a mixture of hydrogen and diborane gases. On 440C bearings, dual phase boride layers of Fe2B and FeB were formed which supported adhered nanostructured diamond films. Continuity of the films was not seamless with limited regions remaining uncoated potentially corresponding to delamination of the film as evidenced by the presence of tubular structures presumably composed of sp2 bonded carbon. Surface boriding of 316 stainless steel discs was conducted at various powers and pressures to achieve temperatures ranging from 550-800 °C. The substrate boriding temperature was found to substantially influence the resultant interlayer by altering the metal boride(s) present. The lowest temperatures produced an interlayer where CrB was the single detected phase, higher temperatures yielded the presence of only Fe2B, and a combination of the two phases resulted from an intermediate boriding temperature. Compared with the more common, commercialized boriding methods, this a profound result given the problems posed by the FeB phase in addition to other advantages offered by CVD processes and microwave generated plasmas in general. Indentation testing of the boride layers revealed excellent adhesion strength for all borided interlayers, and above all, no evidence of cracking was observed for a sole Fe2B phase. As with boriding of 440C bearings, subsequent diamond deposition was achieved on these interlayers with substantially improved adhesion strength relative to diamond coated TiN interlayers. Both XRD and Raman spectroscopy confirmed a nanostructured diamond film with interfacial chromium carbides responsible for enhanced adhesion strength. Interlayers consisting solely of Fe2B have displayed an ability to support fully continuous nanostructured diamond films, yet additional study is required for consistent reproduction. This is in good agreement with initial work on pack borided high alloy steels

  4. Microcrystalline silicon from very high frequency plasma deposition and hot-wire CVD for ``micromorph`` tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brummack, H.; Brueggemann, R.; Wanka, H.N.; Hierzenberger, A.; Schubert, M.B. [Univ. Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Elektronik

    1997-12-31

    The authors have grown microcrystalline silicon from a glow discharge at very high frequencies of 55 MHz and 170 MHz with high hydrogen dilution, and also, at more than 10 times higher growth rates, similar films by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. Both kinds of materials have extensively been characterized and compared in terms of structural, optical and electronic properties, which greatly improve by deposition in a multi- instead of a single-chamber system. Incorporation of these different materials into pin solar cells results in open circuit voltages of about 400 mV as long as the doped layers are microcrystalline and rise to more than 870 mV if amorphous p- and n-layers are used. Quantum efficiencies and fill factors are still poor but leave room for further improvement, as clearly demonstrated by a remarkable reverse bias quantum efficiency gain.

  5. Temperature programmed CVD: a novel technique to investigate carbon nanotube synthesis on FeMo/MgO catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Ana Paula C; Lemos, Bruno R S; Magalhães, Leandro A; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M; Furtado, Clascídia A; Santos, Adelina P

    2012-03-01

    In this work, it is demonstrated how a novel technique based on temperature-programmed chemical vapor deposition (TPCVD) can be used to investigate the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from methane on a classic catalyst FeMo(x)/MgO (x = 0.07, 0.35 and 1.00). TPCVD monitors carbon deposition by measuring H2 formed during CH4 decomposition and affords information on the different catalytic species, deactivation process, reaction kinetics and carbon yields. The obtained results showed for FeMgO catalyst a simple TPCVD peak related to the production of carbon beginning at 760 degrees C with maximum at 800 degrees C followed by a rapid deactivation resulting in a low carbon yield. The addition of Mo to Fe/MgO catalyst completely changes the TPCVD profile with the formation of a new catalytic species active at temperatures higher than 900 degrees C, which is stable and continuously decomposes CH4 to produce high carbon yields. Raman, TG/DTG, Mössbauer, SEM, TEM, XRD and TPR analyses suggested that this active catalytic phase is likely related to Fe-Mo and Fe-Mo-C phases active to produce single wall and mainly multiwall carbon nanotubes.

  6. Structural Properties of Zn-ZnO Core-Shell Microspheres Grown by Hot-Filament CVD Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. López

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD growth of Zn-ZnO core-shell microspheres in the temperature range of 350–650°C only using ZnO pellets as raw material. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. SEM micrographs showed the presence of solid microspheres and a Zn-ZnO layer in all samples. The observed heterogeneous morphology on each sample suggested two different growth mechanisms. On the one hand, solid microspheres were formed by means of gas phase nucleation of Zn atoms. The Zn-ZnO layer was formed on the substrate as result of surface reactions. It is possible that Zn microspheres condensed during the natural cooling of the HFCVD reactor as they were observed on the Zn-ZnO layer.

  7. Leakage current measurements of a pixelated polycrystalline CVD diamond detector

    OpenAIRE

    Zain, R.M.; Maneuski, D.; O'Shea, V.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Cunnigham, L.; Stehl, C.; Berderman, E.; Rahim, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Diamond has several desirable features when used as a material for radiation detection. With the invention of synthetic growth techniques, it has become feasible to look at developing diamond radiation detectors with reasonable surface areas. Polycrystalline diamond has been grown using a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique by the University of Augsburg and detector structures fabricated at the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (JWNC) in the University of Glasgow in order to produce pi...

  8. Optical spectroscopic analyses of CVD plasmas used in the deposition of transparent and conductive ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Espinos, J.P.; Yubero, F.; Barranco, A.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R. [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Cotrino, J. [Universidad de Sevilla, Facultad de Fisica, Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Transparent conducting ZnO:A1 thin films have been prepared by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Emission line profiles were recorded as a function of different plasma gas composition (oxygen and hydrogen mixtures) and different rates of precursors (Zn(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2} and A1(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) in the downstream zone of the plasma reactor. Optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the oxygen/hydrogen plasma as a function of hydrogen flow rate. The variation of plasma hydrogen content has an important influence in the resistivity of the films. (authors)

  9. Diagnostic Techniques Used to Study Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    The advantages and utility of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond as an industrial ceramic can only be realized if the price and quality are right. Until recently, this technology was of interest only to the academic and basic research community. However, interest has grown because of advances made by leading CVD diamond suppliers: 1) Reduction of the cost of CVD polycrystalline diamond deposition below $5/carat ($8/sq cm); 2) Installation of production capacity; 3) Epitaxial growth of CVD single-crystal diamond. Thus, CVD diamond applications and business are an industrial reality. At present, CVD diamond is produced in the form of coatings or wafers. CVD diamond film technology offers a broader technological potential than do natural and high-pressure synthetic diamonds because size, geometry, and eventually cost will not be as limiting. Now that they are cost effective, diamond coatings - with their extreme properties - can be used in a variety of applications. Diamond coatings can improve many of the surface properties of engineering substrate materials, including erosion, corrosion, and wear resistance. Examples of actual and potential applications, from microelectromechanical systems to the wear parts of diamond coatings and related superhard coatings are described. For example, diamond coatings can be used as a chemical and mechanical barrier for the space shuttles check valves, particularly on the guide pins and seat assemblies.

  10. Bond dissociation mechanism of ethanol during carbon nanotube synthesis via alcohol catalytic CVD technique: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Tomoya; Shimamura, Kohei; Shibuta, Yasushi; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Yamaguchi, Shu

    2014-03-01

    supergrowth CVD technique) [26]. Recently, several experimental studies have been carried out in an attempt to understand these complicated dissociation processes. For example, Tomie et al. [27] performed in situ mass spectroscopic analysis during CNT synthesis by the ACCVD technique and revealed that ethylene molecules are formed by the dissociation of ethanol, which means that C-O bonds in the ethanol molecules are dissociated during CNT synthesis. Moreover, Xiang et al. [28] employed isotopically labeled ethanol (i.e., 12CH3-13CH2-OH, 13CH3-12CH2-OH, and so forth) to trace the carbon atoms during CNT synthesis and revealed that the carbon further away from the hydroxyl group in the ethanol is preferentially incorporated into the SNWT structure, which was confirmed from the different G band peaks of the Raman spectra. This experimental finding shows that the C-C bonds in ethanol molecules are dissociated during CNT synthesis. Although many experimental studies [29-32] have revealed part of the dissociation process during CNT growth, it is not yet well understood how the initial dissociation of carbon source molecules affects the subsequent formation process of CNTs.In parallel with the many experimental studies, there has been numerous computational works focusing on the formation process of CNTs. However, most of these studies [9-16] did not take the dissociation of carbon source molecules into account and examined the cap formation process starting from isolated carbon atoms. This is mainly due to the fact that a low-impact interatomic potential appropriately describing the dissociation of carbon source molecules has not been established for classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Meanwhile, several classical MD simulations using the ReaxFF potential [33], which describes chemical reactions with a reasonable degree of accuracy but has a high computational cost, have demonstrated the dissociation of hydrocarbons on a nickel cluster [34] and a flat metal surface [35

  11. Thermally Induced Nano-Structural and Optical Changes of nc-Si:H Deposited by Hot-Wire CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller TFG

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on the thermally induced changes of the nano-structural and optical properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon in the temperature range 200–700 °C. The as-deposited sample has a high crystalline volume fraction of 53% with an average crystallite size of ~3.9 nm, where 66% of the total hydrogen is bonded as ≡Si–H monohydrides on the nano-crystallite surface. A growth in the native crystallite size and crystalline volume fraction occurs at annealing temperatures ≥400 °C, where hydrogen is initially removed from the crystallite grain boundaries followed by its removal from the amorphous network. The nucleation of smaller nano-crystallites at higher temperatures accounts for the enhanced porous structure and the increase in the optical band gap and average gap.

  12. Thermally Induced Nano-Structural and Optical Changes of nc-Si:H Deposited by Hot-Wire CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendse, C J; Malgas, G F; Muller, T F G; Knoesen, D; Oliphant, C J; Motaung, D E; Halindintwali, S; Mwakikunga, B W

    2009-01-21

    We report on the thermally induced changes of the nano-structural and optical properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon in the temperature range 200-700 degrees C. The as-deposited sample has a high crystalline volume fraction of 53% with an average crystallite size of ~3.9 nm, where 66% of the total hydrogen is bonded as identical withSi-H monohydrides on the nano-crystallite surface. A growth in the native crystallite size and crystalline volume fraction occurs at annealing temperatures >/=400 degrees C, where hydrogen is initially removed from the crystallite grain boundaries followed by its removal from the amorphous network. The nucleation of smaller nano-crystallites at higher temperatures accounts for the enhanced porous structure and the increase in the optical band gap and average gap.

  13. Dosimetric characterization of CVD diamonds irradiated with 62 MeV proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G.A.P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy)]. E-mail: cirrone@lns.infn.it; Cuttone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Lo Nigro, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); CSFNSM Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della MAteria, Catania (Italy); Mongelli, V. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Scuola di Specializzazione in Fisica Sanitaria, Universita di Catania (Italy); CSFNSM Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della MAteria, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Sabini, M.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera Cannizzaro, Catania (Italy); Valastro, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Scuola di Specializzazione in Fisica Sanitaria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita di Florence (Italy); Onori, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    2005-10-21

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as on-line radiation dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of polycrystalline diamond by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have produced material with electronic properties suitable for dosimetry applications. In this work the possibility to use a segmented commercial CVD detector in the dosimetry of proton beams has been investigated. The response as function of dose, dose rate, the priming and the rise time have been investigated thoroughly. This study shows the suitability of CVD diamond for dosimetry of clinical 62 MeV proton beams.

  14. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using the cobalt nanocatalyst by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, S.S. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, K. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salar Elahi, A., E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-05

    The three main synthesis methods of Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the arc discharge, the laser ablation and the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) with a special regard to the latter one. CNTs were produced on a silicon wafer by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using acetylene as a carbon source, cobalt as a catalyst and ammonia as a reactive gas. The DC-sputtering system was used to prepare cobalt thin films on Si substrates. A series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effects of reaction temperature and deposition time on the synthesis of the nanotubes. The deposition time was selected as 15 and 25 min for all growth temperatures. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements were used to investigate the elemental composition of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface topography of the Co nanocatalyst deposited on Si substrates. The as-grown CNTs were characterized under Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) to study the morphological properties of CNTs. Also, the grown CNTs have been investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that increasing the temperature leads to increasing the diameter of CNTs. The ideal reaction temperature was 850 °C and the deposition time was 15 min. - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of CNTs grown on the cobalt catalyst at growth temperatures of (a) 850 °C, (b) 900 °C, (c) 950 °C and (d) 1000 °C during the deposition time of 15 min. - Highlights: • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were produced on a silicon wafer by TCVD technique. • EDX and AFM were used to investigate the elemental composition and surface topography. • FESEM was used to study the morphological properties of CNTs. • The grown CNTs have been investigated by HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Designing polymer surfaces via vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Asatekin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD methods significantly augment the capabilities of traditional surface modification techniques for designing polymeric surfaces. In CVD polymerization, the monomer(s are delivered to the surface through the vapor phase and then undergo simultaneous polymerization and thin film formation. By eliminating the need to dissolve macromolecules, CVD enables insoluble polymers to be coated and prevents solvent damage to the substrate. Since de-wetting and surface tension effects are absent, CVD coatings conform to the geometry of the underlying substrate. Hence, CVD polymers can be readily applied to virtually any substrate: organic, inorganic, rigid, flexible, planar, three-dimensional, dense, or porous. CVD methods integrate readily with other vacuum processes used to fabricate patterned surfaces and devices. CVD film growth proceeds from the substrate up, allowing for interfacial engineering, real-time monitoring, thickness control, and the synthesis of films with graded composition. This article focuses on two CVD polymerization methods that closely translate solution chemistry to vapor deposition; initiated CVD and oxidative CVD. The basic concepts underlying these methods and the resultant advantages over other thin film coating techniques are described, along with selected applications where CVD polymers are an enabling technology.

  16. Molecular fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic initiated chemically vapor-deposited (iCVD) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R; Goktekin, E; Wang, MH; Gleason, KK

    2014-08-08

    Biofouling is a universal problem in various applications ranging from water purification to implantable biomedical devices. Recent advances in surface modification have created a rich library of antifouling surface chemistries, many of which can be categorized into one of the two groups: hydrophilic surfaces or amphiphilic surfaces. We report the straightforward preparation of antifouling thin film coatings in both categories via initiated chemical vapor deposition. A molecular force spectroscopy-based method is demonstrated as a rapid and quantitative assessment tool for comparing the differences in antifouling characteristics. The fouling propensity of single molecules, as opposed to bulk protein solution or bacterial culture, is assessed. This method allows for the interrogation of molecular interaction without the complication resulted from protein conformational change or micro-organism group interactions. The molecular interaction follows the same trend as bacterial adhesion results obtained previously, demonstrating that molecular force probe is a valid method for the quantification and mechanistic examination of fouling. In addition, the molecular force spectroscopy-based method is able to distinguish differences in antifouling capability that is not resolvable by traditional static protein adsorption tests. To lend further insight into the intrinsic fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic surface chemistries, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, advancing and receding water contact angles, and atomic force microscopy are used to elucidate the film properties that are relevant to their antifouling capabilities.

  17. Present limitations of CVD diamond detectors for IMRT applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, C. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Viale regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: cinzia.deangelis@iss.it; Casati, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Onori, S. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Viale regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    The aim of the work was to test the suitability of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond detectors for dosimetry in IMRT fields. We used in-house CVD detectors prepared with state-of-the-art polycrystalline diamond films (Element Six Ltd., UK). The parameters considered were time stability, dynamic response, dose-rate dependence and energy dependence. Output factors and TPR were measured in conventional photon fields and dose measurements were performed in IMRT fields using the step-and-shoot technique. Results prove that CVD diamond detectors are suitable for dosimetry in conventional treatments, but they still do not fit the IMRT dosimetry requirements, mainly because of their slow dynamic response. In particular, the slow dynamics affects linearity at low Monitor Units and renders it impossible to follow the sharp transients of IMRT fields. Time stability and dose-rate dependence as well must be improved to reduce their influence on dose assessment.

  18. Comparison of different experimental techniques used for wax deposition testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allenson, Stephen; Johnston, Angela [Nalco Energy Services, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Crude oils consist of various fractions of hydrocarbons, including n-paraffins. The paraffins precipitate out of oil below the temperature called WAT (wax appearance temperature) and accumulate in flow lines and pipelines causing major transport problems. Prediction of paraffin deposition is, therefore, a key element of flow assurance programs. The purpose of this study was to develop a general and reliable approach to prediction of wax deposition based on a critical comparison of several practical lab techniques. Wax deposition study was conducted on five separate crude oils by using a varying protocols and equipment. One experimental technique was a cold stress test of wax deposition combined with ketone precipitation of waxy paraffin crystals. Another set of experiments were carried out for wax deposits formed on the surface of U-tubes and cold fingers of different designs. A comparison of the effectiveness of several wax inhibitors was conducted for these crude oils by using the selected deposition techniques. In each test method the amount of precipitated wax was recorded and compared. The deposits were characterized by melting point, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the wax components using DSC, SARA and HTGC analyses. Efficiency of paraffin inhibitors was correlated with a profile of n-paraffins distribution in the deposits. The limitations and advantages of different deposition techniques were analyzed and discussed. (author)

  19. Characterization of wax deposition by different experimental techniques - a comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindeman, Olga; Allenson, Steve

    2006-03-15

    Crude oils consist of various fractions of hydrocarbons, including n-paraffins. The paraffins precipitate out of oil below the temperature called WAT (wax appearance temperature) and accumulate in flow lines causing major transport problems. Prediction of paraffin deposition is, therefore, a key element of flow assurance programs. The purpose of this study was to develop a general and reliable approach to prediction of wax deposition based on a critical comparison of several practical lab techniques. Wax deposition study was conducted on multiple crude oils using various testing protocols and equipment. One experimental technique was a cold stress test of wax deposition combined with ketone precipitation of waxy paraffin crystals. Another set of experiments was carried out for wax deposits formed on the surface of U-tubes and cold fingers of different designs. A comparison of the effectiveness of several wax inhibitors was conducted for these crude oils by using the selected deposition techniques. In each test method the amount of precipitated wax was recorded and compared. The deposits were characterized by melting point, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the wax components using DSC, SARA and HTGC analyses. Efficiency of paraffin inhibitors was correlated with a profile of n-paraffins distribution in the deposits. The limitations and advantages of different deposition techniques were analyzed and discussed. A new test design designated ''cold tube'' is proposed. (Author) (tk)

  20. Deposition of silicon nitride thin films by hot-wire CVD at 100 {sup o}C and 250 {sup o}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpuim, P., E-mail: palpuim@fisica.uminho.p [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Goncalves, L.M. [Departamento de Electronica Industrial, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Marins, E.S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Viseu, T.M.R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Ferdov, S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Bouree, J.E. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS UMR 7647, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2009-04-30

    Silicon nitride thin films for use as passivation layers in solar cells and organic electronics or as gate dielectrics in thin-film transistors were deposited by the Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique at a high deposition rate (1-3 A/s) and at low substrate temperature. Films were deposited using NH{sub 3}/SiH{sub 4} flow rate ratios between 1 and 70 and substrate temperatures of 100 {sup o}C and 250 {sup o}C. For NH{sub 3}/SiH{sub 4} ratios between 40 and 70, highly transparent (T {approx} 90%), dense films (2.56-2.74 g/cm{sup 3}) with good dielectric properties and refractive index between 1.93 and 2.08 were deposited on glass substrates. Etch rates in BHF of 2.7 A/s and < 0.5 A/s were obtained for films deposited at 100 {sup o}C and 250 {sup o}C, respectively. Films deposited at both substrate temperatures showed electrical conductivity {approx} 10{sup -14} {Omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1} and breakdown fields > 10 MV cm{sup -1}.

  1. Simulation and experimental study of CVD process for low temperature nanocrystalline silicon carbide coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushal, Amit; Prakash, Jyoti, E-mail: jprakash@barc.gov.in; Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Chakravartty, Jayanta K.

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Parametric simulation was carried out for specially designed CVD reactor. • Effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration were studied in CVD reactor. • Coating study carried out using low temperature and environmental safe CVD process. • Dense and uniform nanocrystalline SiC film was coated on zircaloy substrate. - Abstract: There is a huge requirement for development of a coating technique in nuclear industry, which is environmentally safe, economical and applicable to large scale components. In this view, simulation of gas-phase behavior in specially designed CVD reactor was carried out using computational tool, COMSOL. There were two important zones in CVD reactor first one is precursor vaporization zone and second one is coating zone. Optimized parameters for coating were derived from the simulation of gas phase dynamics in both zone of CVD reactor. The overall effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration profile showed that Re = 54 is the optimum reaction condition for uniform coating in CVD system. In CVD coating experiments a synthesized halogen free, non-toxic and non-corrosive silicon carbide precursor was used. Uniform coating of SiC was obtained on zircaloy substrate at 900 °C using as synthesized organosilicon precursor. The X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis show that dense nano crystalline SiC film was deposited on zircaloy substrate.

  2. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronne, Antonio [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Bloisi, Francesco, E-mail: bloisi@na.infn.it [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Fanelli, Esther [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy); Federici, Stefania [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Massoli, Patrizio [Istituto Motori – CNR, Naples (Italy); Vicari, Luciano R.M. [SPIN – CNR, Naples (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • A lipase film was deposited with Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique. • FTIR spectra show that laser irradiation do not damage lipase molecule. • Laser fluence controls the characteristics of complex structure generated by MAPLE. - Abstract: Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  3. SnS thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition, dip coating and SILAR techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Sunil H.; Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2016-05-01

    The SnS thin films were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD), dip coating and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) techniques. In them, the CBD thin films were deposited at two temperatures: ambient and 70 °C. The energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the thin films. The electrical transport properties studies on the as-deposited thin films were done by measuring the I-V characteristics, DC electrical resistivity variation with temperature and the room temperature Hall effect. The obtained results are deliberated in this paper.

  4. Investigation of the Millimeter-Wave Plasma Assisted CVD Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikharev, A; Gorbachev, A; Kozlov, A; Litvak, A; Bykov, Y; Caplan, M

    2005-07-21

    A polycrystalline diamond grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique is recognized as a unique material for high power electronic devices owing to unrivaled combination of properties such as ultra-low microwave absorption, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength and chemical stability. Microwave vacuum windows for modern high power sources and transmission lines operating at the megawatt power level require high quality diamond disks with a diameter of several centimeters and a thickness of a few millimeters. The microwave plasma-assisted CVD technique exploited today to produce such disks has low deposition rate, which limits the availability of large size diamond disk windows. High-electron-density plasma generated by the millimeter-wave power was suggested for enhanced-growth-rate CVD. In this paper a general description of the 30 GHz gyrotron-based facility is presented. The output radiation of the gyrotron is converted into four wave-beams. Free localized plasma in the shape of a disk with diameter much larger than the wavelength of the radiation is formed in the intersection area of the wave-beams. The results of investigation of the plasma parameters, as well as the first results of diamond film deposition are presented. The prospects for commercially producing vacuum window diamond disks for high power microwave devices at much lower costs and processing times than currently available are outlined.

  5. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  6. The novel chamber hardware design to improve the thin film deposition quality in both 12″ (300 mm and 18″ (450 mm wafers with the development of 3D full chamber modeling and experimental visual technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-H. Liao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The thin film deposition property and the process difference during the wafer size migration from 12″ (300 mm to 18″ (450 mm in the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD equipment is improved and reduced, respectively, when the chamber hardware is designed with the help of 3D full chamber modeling and 3D experimental visual technique developed in this work. The accuracy of 3D chamber simulation model is demonstrated with the experimental visual technique measurement. With the CVD chamber hardware design of placing the inlet position and optimizing the distance between the susceptor edge and the reactor wall, the better thin film deposition property and the larger process compatibility during the wafer size migration from 12″ (300 mm to 18″ (450 mm for the industry cost reduction can be achieved. Non-dimensional Nusselt parameter is also found to be the effective indicator to monitor the thin film deposition property.

  7. CVD Diamond Detector Stability Issues for Operation at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, G J; Koch, J A; Moran, M J; Lerche, R A; Izumi, N; Phillips, T W; Glebov, V Y; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2003-08-22

    Synthetic diamond crystals produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique can serve as fast, radiation hard, neutron sensors for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Here we explore the stability issues, such as charge trapping and high-flux saturation, that will be relevant to operation at the NIF.

  8. FTIR monitoring of industrial scale CVD processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfe, V.; Mosebach, H.; Meyer, M.; Sheel, D.; Grählert, W.; Throl, O.; Dresler, B.

    1998-06-01

    The goal is to improve chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and infiltration (CVI) process control by a multipurpose, knowledge based feedback system. For monitoring the CVD/CVI process in-situ FTIR spectroscopic data has been identified as input information. In the presentation, three commonly used, and distinctly different, types of industrial CVD/CVI processes are taken as test cases: (i) a thermal high capacity CVI batch process for manufacturing carbon fibre reinforced SiC composites for high temperature applications, (ii) a continuously driven CVD thermal process for coating float glass for energy protection, and (iii) a laser stimulated CVD process for continuously coating bundles of thin ceramic fibers. The feasibility of the concept with FTIR in-situ monitoring as a core technology has been demonstrated. FTIR monitoring sensibly reflects process conditions.

  9. CVD diamond - fundamental phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbrough, W.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams addresses the basic physical processes involved in the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Different methods of deposition are illustrated. For each method, observations are made of the prominent advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Chemical mechanisms of nucleation are introduced.

  10. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronne, Antonio; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Depero, Laura E.; Fanelli, Esther; Federici, Stefania; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  11. Characterization of copper selenide thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mamun; Islam, A. B. M. O.

    2004-11-01

    A low-cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique has been used for the preparation of Cu2-xSe thin films onto glass substrates and deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Good quality thin films of smooth surface of copper selenide thin films were deposited using sodium selenosulfate as a source of selenide ions. The structural and optical behaviour of the films are discussed in the light of the observed data.

  12. Fused Deposition Technique for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Paolo; Alitta, Gianluca; Sala, Giuseppe; Di Landro, Luca

    2017-02-01

    A simple technique for the production of continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic by fused deposition modeling, which involves a common 3D printer with quite limited modifications, is presented. An adequate setting of processing parameters and deposition path allows to obtain components with well-enhanced mechanical characteristics compared to conventional 3D printed items. The most relevant problems related to the simultaneous feeding of fibers and polymer are discussed. The properties of obtained aramid fiber reinforced polylactic acid (PLA) in terms of impregnation quality and of mechanical response are measured.

  13. Fused Deposition Technique for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Paolo; Alitta, Gianluca; Sala, Giuseppe; Di Landro, Luca

    2016-12-01

    A simple technique for the production of continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic by fused deposition modeling, which involves a common 3D printer with quite limited modifications, is presented. An adequate setting of processing parameters and deposition path allows to obtain components with well-enhanced mechanical characteristics compared to conventional 3D printed items. The most relevant problems related to the simultaneous feeding of fibers and polymer are discussed. The properties of obtained aramid fiber reinforced polylactic acid (PLA) in terms of impregnation quality and of mechanical response are measured.

  14. Fabrication of Titanium Dioxide Thin Films by DBD-CVD Under Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xi-wen; GUO Yu; HAN Gao-rong

    2007-01-01

    Titanium dioxide films were firstly deposited on glass substrate by DBD-CVD (dielectric barrier discharge enhanced chemical vapor deposition) technique.The structure of the films was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM).TiO2 films deposited under atmosphere pressure show preferred orientation,and exhibit columnar-like structure,while TiO2 films deposited under low gas pressure show no preferred orientation.The columnar-like structure with preferred orientation exhibits higher photocatalytic efficiency,since the columnar structure has larger surface area.However,it contributes little to the improvement of hydrophilicity. DBD-CVD is an alternative method to prepare photocatalytic TiO2 for its well-controllable property.

  15. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Mengdi; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H2), which reacted with WF6 at the substrate to deposit W. The

  16. Photochemical CVD of Ru on functionalized self-assembled monolayers from organometallic precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelsea R.; Arevalo Rodriguez, Paul; Brewer, Christopher R.; Brannaka, Joseph A.; Shi, Zhiwei; Yang, Jing; Salazar, Bryan; McElwee-White, Lisa; Walker, Amy V.

    2017-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is an attractive technique for the metallization of organic thin films because it is selective and the thickness of the deposited film can easily be controlled. However, thermal CVD processes often require high temperatures which are generally incompatible with organic films. In this paper, we perform proof-of-concept studies of photochemical CVD to metallize organic thin films. In this method, a precursor undergoes photolytic decomposition to generate thermally labile intermediates prior to adsorption on the sample. Three readily available Ru precursors, CpRu(CO)2Me, (η3-allyl)Ru(CO)3Br, and (COT)Ru(CO)3, were employed to investigate the role of precursor quantum yield, ligand chemistry, and the Ru oxidation state on the deposition. To investigate the role of the substrate chemistry on deposition, carboxylic acid-, hydroxyl-, and methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers were used. The data indicate that moderate quantum yields for ligand loss (φ ≥ 0.4) are required for ruthenium deposition, and the deposition is wavelength dependent. Second, anionic polyhapto ligands such as cyclopentadienyl and allyl are more difficult to remove than carbonyls, halides, and alkyls. Third, in contrast to the atomic layer deposition, acid-base reactions between the precursor and the substrate are more effective for deposition than nucleophilic reactions. Finally, the data suggest that selective deposition can be achieved on organic thin films by judicious choice of precursor and functional groups present on the substrate. These studies thus provide guidelines for the rational design of new precursors specifically for selective photochemical CVD on organic substrates.

  17. FY1995 development of a clean CVD process by evaluation and control of gas phase nucleation phenomena; 1995 nendo kisokaku seisei gensho no hyoka to seigyo ni yoru clean CVD process no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a high-rate and clean chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process as a breakthrough technique to overcome the problems that particles generated in the gas phase during CVD process for preparation of functional thin films cause reduced product yield and deterioration of the films. In the CVD process proposed here, reactant gas and generated particles are electrically charged to control the motion of them with an electric field. In this study, gas-phase nucleation phenomena are evaluated both theoretically and experimentally. A high-rate, ionized CVD method is first developed, in which reactant gas and generated particles are charged with negative ions generated from a radioisotope source and the UV/photoelectron method, and the motion of the charged gas and particles is controlled with an electric field. Charging and transport processes of fine particles are then investigated experimentally and theoretically to develop a clean CVD method in which generated particles are removed with the electric forces. As a result, quantitative evaluation of the charging and transport process was made possible. We also developed devices for measuring the size distribution and concentration of fine particles in low pressure gas such as those found in plasma CVD processes. In addition, numerical simulation and experiments in this study for a TEOS/O{sub 3} CVD process to prepare thin films could determine reaction rates which have not been known so far and give information on selecting good operation conditions for the process. (NEDO)

  18. Chromized Layers Produced on Steel Surface by Means of CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KASPRZYCKA Ewa; BOGDA(N)SKI Bogdan; JEZIORSKI Leopold; JASI(N)SKI J(o)zef; TORBUS Roman

    2004-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition of chromium on the surface of carbon steel has been investigated using a novel CVD method that combines the low cost of pack cementation method with advantages of vacuum technique. The processes have been performed in chromium chlorides atmosphere at a low pressure range from 1 to 800 hPa, the treatment temperature 800 to 950℃. Studies of the layers thickness, the phase composition, Cr, C and Fe depth profiles in diffusion zone have been conducted. The effect of the vacuum level during the process and the process parameters such as time and temperature on layer diffusion growth on the carbon steel surface has been investigated.

  19. Heat transfer model of an iCVD reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.; Verlaan, V.; Verkerk, A.D.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; van Dijk, L.; Rudolph, H.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2009-01-01

    Contrary to conventional HWCVD, the power consumption in the iCVD process is dominated by heat conduction rather than radiation. This is due to the fact that while the typical wire temperature for HWCVD is about 1750–2200 °C, for iCVD the temperature is only 250–500 °C. Typical deposition pressures

  20. Study of indium tin oxide thin films deposited on acrylics substrates by Ion beam assisted deposition technique

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Lijian; Liang Erjun; Gao Jinsong; Teixeira, Vasco M. P.; Santos, M. P. dos

    2009-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films have been deposited onto acrylics (PMMA) substrates by ion beam assisted deposition technique at different oxygen flows. The structural, optical and electrical properties of the deposited films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmittance, FTIR, ellipometry and Hall effect measurements. The optical constants of the deposited films have been calculated by fitting the ellipsometric spectra. The effects of the oxygen flow on the properties of the ...

  1. Atmospheric pressure plasma-initiated chemical vapor deposition (AP-PiCVD) of poly(diethylallylphosphate) coating: a char-forming protective coating for cellulosic textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilt, Florian; Boscher, Nicolas D; Duday, David; Desbenoit, Nicolas; Levalois-Grützmacher, Joëlle; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    An innovative atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method toward the deposition of polymeric layers has been developed. This latter involves the use of a nanopulsed plasma discharge to initiate the free-radical polymerization of an allyl monomer containing phosphorus (diethylallylphosphate, DEAP) at atmospheric pressure. The polymeric structure of the film is evidence by mass spectrometry. The method, highly suitable for the treatment of natural biopolymer substrate, has been carried out on cotton textile to perform the deposition of an efficient and conformal protective coating.

  2. Effect of active screen plasma nitriding pretreatment on wear behavior of TiN coating deposited by PACVD technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raoufi, M., E-mail: raoufi@iust.ac.ir [School of Metallurgical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirdamadi, Sh. [School of Metallurgical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboubi, F. [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahangarani, Sh. [Advanced Materials and Renewable Energies Dep., Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdipoor, M.S. [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Elmkhah, H. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-08-01

    Titanium based alloys are used extensively for improving wear properties of different parts due to their high hardness contents. Titanium nitride (TiN) is among these coatings which can be deposited on surface using various techniques such as CVD, PVD and PACVD. Their weak interface with substrate is one major drawback which can increase the total wear in spite of favorite wear behavior of TiN. Disc shaped samples from AISI H13 (DIN 1.2344) steel were prepared in this study. Single TiN coating was deposited on some of them while others have experienced a TiN deposition by active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN). Hardness at the surface and depth of samples was measured through Vickers micro hardness test which revealed 1810 Hv hardness as the maximum values for a dual-layered ASPN-TiN. Pin-on-disc wear test was done in order to study the wear mechanism. In this regard, the wear behavior of samples was investigated against pins from 100Cr6 (Din 1.3505) bearing steel and tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) steel. It was evidenced that the dual-layer ASPN-TiN coating has shown the least weight loss with the best wearing behavior because of its high hardness values, stable interface and acceptable resistance against peeling during wearing period.

  3. Hot Wire CVD for thin film triple junction cells and for ultrafast deposition of the SiN passivation layer on polycrystalline Si solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; Franken, R.H.; Goldbach, H.D.; Houweling, Z.S.; Li, H. B. T.; Rath, J.K.; Schuttauf, J.A.; Stolk, R.L.; Verlaan, V.; van der Werf, C.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    We present recent progress on hot-wire deposited thin film solar cells and applications of silicon nitride. The cell efficiency reached for μc-Si:H n–i–p solar cells on textured Ag/ZnO presently is 8.5%, in line with the state-of-the-art level for μc-Si:H n–i–p's for any method of deposition. Such c

  4. X-Ray structural and gas phase studies of silver(i) perfluorinated carboxylate complexes with 2,2'-bipyridyl as potential precursors for chemical vapour deposition (CVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szłyk, Edward; Szczesny, Robert; Wojtczak, Andrzej

    2010-02-21

    [Ag(CF(3)COO)(bpy)] (), [Ag(2)(C(2)F(5)COO)(2)(bpy)] () and [Ag(2)(C(3)F(7)COO)(2)(bpy)] () were prepared and characterized by MS-EI, (1)H, (13)C NMR, variable-temperature IR (VT-IR) spectroscopy (solid sample and evolved volatile species) and thermal analysis. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed the polymeric structure for [Ag(2)(C(2)F(5)COO)(2)(bpy)] and [Ag(6)(C(3)F(7)COO)(6)(bpy)(4)], with bridging bpy ligand, whereas for [Ag(CF(3)COO)(bpy)] the dimeric system with monodentately linked carboxylate was noted. Mass spectra analysis of () over 30-300 degrees C indicates the presence of binuclear ions [(RCOO)Ag(2)](+) as a main volatile particles, which can be transported in CVD process. VT-IR studies of gases evolved during the thermal decomposition process, demonstrate the presence of fluorocarbon species and CO(2) as the most abundant molecules. Thermal analysis of () revealed a multi-stage decomposition mechanism resulting in Ag(0) formation below 290 degrees C. Compounds were tested for silver metal spray pyrolysis and obtained layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and XRD.

  5. High-Productivity Ultraprecise Polishing Technique of CVD Diamond Film%CVD金刚石膜高效超精密抛光技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苑泽伟; 金洙吉; 王坤; 温泉

    2011-01-01

    CVD diamond film, as the material for optical transmission windows and new-generation computer chips, is required to be fine polished. However, there is so far no individual method which can polish CVD diamond film with both high efficiency and fine polishing quality. This paper attempted to polish CVD diamond film by combining chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) method and mechanical polishing method. CVD diamond film was first polished by fixed abrasive and free diamond abrasive to remove course asperities, and subsequently polished by CMP to achieve fine surface. According to the experimental results, the material removal rate achieved by free diamond abrasive is much higher than that by fixed abrasive. The surface roughness of CVD diamond film polished by free diamond abrasive is about 42. 2 nm. Fine surface quality of CVD diamond film was achieved by CMP and the surface roughness is about 4. 551 nm.%CVD金刚石膜作为光学透射窗口和新一代计算机芯片的材料,其表面必须得到高质量抛光,但是现存方法难以满足既高效又超精密的加工要求.本文提出机械抛光与化学机械抛光相结合的方法.首先,采用固结金刚石磨料抛光盘和游离金刚石磨料两种机械抛光方法对CVD金刚石膜进行粗加工,然后采用化学机械抛光的方法对CVD金刚石膜进行精加工.结果表明,采用游离磨料抛光时材料去除率远比固结磨料高,表面粗糙度最低达到42.2 nm.化学机械抛光方法在CVD金刚石膜的超精密抛光中表现出较大的优势,CVD金刚石膜的表面粗糙度为4.551 nm.

  6. Study of nickel silicide formation by physical vapor deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancharatnam, Shanti

    Metal silicides are used as contacts to the highly n-doped emitter in photovoltaic devices. Thin films of nickel silicide (NiSi) are of particular interest for Si-based solar cells, as they form at lower temperature and consume less silicon. However, interfacial oxide limits the reduction in sheet resistance. Hence, different diffusion barriers were investigated with regard to optimizing the conductivity and thermal stability. The formation of NiSi, and if it can be doped to have good contact with the n-side of a p-n junction were studied. Reduction of the interfacial oxide by the interfacial Ti layer to allow the formation of NiSi was observed. Silicon was treated in dilute hydrofluoric acid for removing the surface oxide layer. Ni and a Ti diffusion barrier were deposited on Si by physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods - electron beam evaporation and sputtering. The annealing temperature and time were varied to observe the stability of the deposited film. The films were then etched to observe the retention of the silicide. Characterization was done using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford back scattering (RBS). Sheet resistance was measured using the four-point probe technique. Annealing temperatures from 300°C showed films began to agglomerate indicating some diffusion between Ni and Si in the Ti layer, also supported by the compositional analysis in the Auger spectra. Films obtained by evaporation and sputtering were of high quality in terms of coverage over substrate area and uniformity. Thicknesses of Ni and Ti were optimized to 20 nm and 10 nm respectively. Resistivity was low at these thicknesses, and reduced by about half post annealing at 300°C for 8 hours. Thus a low resistivity contact was obtained at optimized thicknesses of the metal layers. It was also shown that some silicide formation occurs at temperatures starting from 300°C and can thus be used to make good silicide contacts.

  7. Nanocrystalline sp 2 and sp 3 carbons: CVD synthesis and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, M. L.; Rossi, M.; Tamburri, E.

    2016-11-01

    The design and production of innovative materials based on nanocrystalline sp 2- and sp 3-coordinated carbons is presently a focus of the scientific community. We present a review of the nanostructures obtained in our labs using a series of synthetic routes, which make use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the selective production of non-planar graphitic nanostructures, nanocrystalline diamonds, and hybrid two-phase nanostructures.

  8. Metallic Tungsten Nanostructures and Highly Nanostructured Thin Films by Deposition of Tungsten Oxide and Subsequent Reduction in a Single Hot-Wire CVD Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; Houweling, Z.S.; de Jong, M.M.; Kuang, Y; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of metallic tungsten nanostructures and highly nanostructured thin films is presented. Crystalline tungsten oxide nanostructures are deposited on glassy carbon substrates kept at 700 100 8C by oxidizing resistively heated tungsten filaments in an air flow under subatmospheric pressures

  9. Influence of hydrogen dilution on structural, electrical and optical properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PE-CVD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funde, A.M.; Bakr, Nabeel Ali; Kamble, D.K. [School of Energy Studies, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Hawaldar, R.R.; Amalnerkar, D.P. [Center for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchawati, Pune 411 008 (India); Jadkar, S.R. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind Road, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2008-10-15

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin films were deposited from pure silane (SiH{sub 4}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas mixture by conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PE-CVD) method at low temperature (200 C) using high rf power. The structural, optical and electrical properties of these films are carefully and systematically investigated as a function of hydrogen dilution of silane (R). Characterization of these films with low angle X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the crystallite size in the films tends to decrease and at same time the volume fraction of crystallites increases with increase in R. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis showed at low values of R, the hydrogen is predominantly incorporated in the nc-Si:H films in the mono-hydrogen (Si-H) bonding configuration. However, with increasing R the hydrogen bonding in nc-Si:H films shifts from mono-hydrogen (Si-H) to di-hydrogen (Si-H{sub 2}) and (Si-H{sub 2}){sub n} complexes. The hydrogen content in the nc-Si:H films decreases with increase in R and was found less than 10 at% over the entire studied range of R. On the other hand, the Tauc's optical band gap remains as high as 2 eV or much higher. The quantum size effect may responsible for higher band gap in nc-Si:H films. A correlation between electrical and structural properties has been found. For optimized deposition conditions, nc-Si:H films with crystallite size {proportional_to}7.67 nm having good degree of crystallinity ({proportional_to}84%) and high band gap (2.25 eV) were obtained with a low hydrogen content (6.5 at%). However, for these optimized conditions, the deposition rate was quite small (1.6 Aa/s). (author)

  10. On the origin of self-organization of SiO2 nanodots deposited by CVD enhanced by atmospheric pressure remote microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoult, G.; Belmonte, T.; Kosior, F.; Dossot, M.; Henrion, G.

    2011-05-01

    The origin of organization of nanostructured silica coatings deposited on stainless steel substrates by remote microplasma at atmospheric pressure is investigated. We show by resorting to thermal camera measurements coupled with modelling that deposition, limited to a few seconds in time, occurs at low temperature (~below 420 K) although the gas temperature may reach 1400 K. Raman analyses of deposited films with thicknesses below 1 µm show the presence of oxidized silicon bonded to the metallic surface. The origin of nanodots is explained as follows. Close to the microplasma nozzle, the concentration of oxidizing species and/or the temperature being high enough, a silica thin film is obtained, leading to ceramic-metallic oxide interface that leads to a Volmer-Weber growth mode and to the synthesis of 3D structures over long treatment times. Far from the nozzle, the reactivity decreasing, thin films get a plasma-polymer like behaviour which leads to a Franck-Van der Merwe growth mode and films with a higher density. Other nanostructures, made of hexagonal cells, are observed but remain unexplained.

  11. On the origin of self-organization of SiO{sub 2} nanodots deposited by CVD enhanced by atmospheric pressure remote microplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnoult, G; Belmonte, T; Kosior, F; Henrion, G [Institut Jean Lamour, Department of Physics and Chemistry of Solids and Surfaces, UMR 7198 CNRS, Nancy-Universite, Parc de Saurupt, CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Dossot, M, E-mail: thierry.belmonte@mines.inpl-nancy.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement, UMR 7564 CNRS - Universite Henri Poincare, Nancy-Universite, 405, rue de Vandoeuvre, F-54600 Villers-les-Nancy (France)

    2011-05-04

    The origin of organization of nanostructured silica coatings deposited on stainless steel substrates by remote microplasma at atmospheric pressure is investigated. We show by resorting to thermal camera measurements coupled with modelling that deposition, limited to a few seconds in time, occurs at low temperature ({approx}below 420 K) although the gas temperature may reach 1400 K. Raman analyses of deposited films with thicknesses below 1 {mu}m show the presence of oxidized silicon bonded to the metallic surface. The origin of nanodots is explained as follows. Close to the microplasma nozzle, the concentration of oxidizing species and/or the temperature being high enough, a silica thin film is obtained, leading to ceramic-metallic oxide interface that leads to a Volmer-Weber growth mode and to the synthesis of 3D structures over long treatment times. Far from the nozzle, the reactivity decreasing, thin films get a plasma-polymer like behaviour which leads to a Franck-Van der Merwe growth mode and films with a higher density. Other nanostructures, made of hexagonal cells, are observed but remain unexplained.

  12. XPS analysis and luminescence properties of thin films deposited by the pulsed laser deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolo, J. J.; Swart, H. C.; Coetsee, E.; Terblans, J. J.; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Dejene, B. F.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the effect of substrate temperature and oxygen partial pressure on the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of the Gd2O2S:Tb3 + thin films that were grown by using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The PL intensity increased with an increase in the oxygen partial pressure and substrate temperature. The thin film deposited at an oxygen pressure of 900 mTorr and substrate temperature of 900°C was found to be the best in terms of the PL intensity of the Gd2O2S:Tb3 + emission. The main emission peak due to the 5D4-7F5 transition of Tb was measured at a wavelength of 545 nm. The stability of these thin films under prolonged electron bombardment was tested with a combination of techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. It was shown that the main reason for the degradation in luminescence intensity under electron bombardment is the formation of a non-luminescent Gd2O3 layer, with small amounts of Gd2S3, on the surface.

  13. Electrochemically assisted deposition of hydroxyapatite on Ti6Al4V substrates covered by CVD diamond films — Coating characterization and first cell biological results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strąkowska, Paulina [Gdańsk University of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Faculty (Poland); Gdańsk University of Technology, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications, and Informatics (Poland); Beutner, René [Max Bergmann Center, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany); Gnyba, Marcin [Gdańsk University of Technology, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications, and Informatics (Poland); Zielinski, Andrzej [Gdańsk University of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Faculty (Poland); Scharnweber, Dieter, E-mail: Dieter.Scharnweber@tu-dresden.de [Max Bergmann Center, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Although titanium and its alloys are widely used as implant material for orthopedic and dental applications they show only limited corrosion stability and osseointegration in different cases. The aim of the presented research was to develop and characterize a novel surface modification system from a thin diamond base layer and a hydroxyapatite (HAp) top coating deposited on the alloy Ti6Al4V widely used for implants in contact with bone. This coating system is expected to improve both the long-term corrosion behavior and the biocompatibility and bioactivity of respective surfaces. The diamond base films were obtained by Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PACVD); the HAp coatings were formed in aqueous solutions by electrochemically assisted deposition (ECAD) at varying polarization parameters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman microscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements were applied to characterize the generated surface states; the calcium phosphate coatings were additionally chemically analyzed for their composition. The biological properties of the coating system were assessed using hMSC cells analyzing for cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. Varying MW-PACVD process conditions resulted in composite coatings containing microcrystalline diamond (MCD/Ti-C), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) with the NCD coatings being dense and homogeneous and the B-NCD coatings showing increased electrical conductivity. The ECAD process resulted in calcium phosphate coatings from stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric HAp. The deposition of HAp on the B-NCD films run at lower cathodic potentials and resulted both in the highest coating mass and the most homogenous appearance. Initial cell biological investigations showed an improved cell adhesion in the order B-NCD > HAp/B-NCD > uncoated substrate. Cell proliferation was improved for both investigated coatings whereas ALP

  14. Photocatalytic ability of TiO2 porous film prepared by modified spray pyrolysis deposition technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SUGIYAMA, Osamu; OKUYA, Masayuki; KANEKO, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    In a spray pyrolysis deposition (SPD) technique, deposition of film material and formation of surface structure are simultaneously occur, therefore, it is suitable for the preparation of microstructure-controlled thin films...

  15. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

  16. Investigation of chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors by X- ray micro-beam induced current and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Olivero, P; Vittone, E; Fizzotti, F; Paolini, C; Lo Giudice, A; Barrett, R; Tucoulou, R

    2004-01-01

    Tracking detectors have become an important ingredient in high-energy physics experiments. In order to survive the harsh detection environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), trackers need to have special properties. They must be radiation hard, provide fast collection of charge, be as thin as possible and remove heat from readout electronics. The unique properties of diamond allow it to fulfill these requirements. In this work we present an investigation of the charge transport and luminescence properties of "detector grade" artificial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond devices developed within the CERN RD42 collaboration, performed by means of X-ray micro-beam induced current collection (XBICC) and X-ray micro- beam induced luminescence (XBIL) techniques. XBICC technique allows quantitative estimates of the transport parameters of the material to be evaluated and mapped with micrometric spatial resolution. In particular, the high resolution and sensitivity of the technique has allowed a quantitati...

  17. Study of CVD diamond layers with amorphous carbon admixture by Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is a most often used standard technique for characterization of different carbon materials. In this work we present the Raman spectra of polycrystalline diamond layers of different quality, synthesized by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition method (HF CVD. We show how to use Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of the Raman bands to determine the structure of diamond films as well as the structure of amorphous carbon admixture. Raman spectroscopy has become an important technique for the analysis of CVD diamond films. The first-order diamond Raman peak at ca. 1332 cm−1 is an unambiguous evidence for the presence of diamond phase in the deposited layer. However, the existence of non-diamond carbon components in a CVD diamond layer produces several overlapping peaks in the same wavenumber region as the first order diamond peak. The intensities, wavenumber, full width at half maximum (FWHM of these bands are dependent on quality of diamond layer which is dependent on the deposition conditions. The aim of the present work is to relate the features of diamond Raman spectra to the features of Raman spectra of non-diamond phase admixture and occurrence of other carbon structures in the obtained diamond thin films.

  18. Developing the Beijing CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU JINGXIAN

    2006-01-01

    @@ Slowly but surely, the high-end villa property in Beijing is gaining new momentum. Limited amounts of new properties, rising prices and increasing demand will be the trend in the villa market in 2006, real estate experts predict. Among them, the exclusive Central Villa District(CVD), a top-tier villa area along the Wenyu River in northeast Beijing, has emerged as a hot spot of the market.

  19. Structure and spectroscopic analysis of the graphene monolayer film directly grown on the quartz substrate via the HF-CVD technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Waleed E.; Al-Hazmi, Farag S.; Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Shokr, F. S.; Beall, Gary W.; Bronstein, Lyudmila M.

    2016-08-01

    Direct growth of a monolayer graphene film on a quartz substrate by a hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique is reported. The monolayer graphene film prepared was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The optical properties were studied by spectroscopic elliposmetry. The experimental data were fitted by the Forouhi-Bloomer model to estimate the extinction coefficient and the refractive index of the monolayer graphene film. The refractive index spectrum in the visible region was studied based on the harmonic oscillator model. The lattice dielectric constant, real and imaginary dielectric constants and the ratio of the charge carrier number to the effective mass were determined. The surface and volume energy loss parameters were also found and showed that the value of the surface energy loss is greater than the volume energy loss. The determination of these optical constants will open new avenue for novel applications of graphene films in the field of wave plates, light modulators, ultrahigh-frequency signal processing and LCDs.

  20. Determination of the optical parameters of a-Si:H thin films deposited by hot wire–chemical vapour deposition technique using transmission spectrum only

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nabeel A Bakr; A M Funde; V S Waman; M M Kamble; R R Hawaldar; D P Amalnerkar; S W Gosavi; S R Jadkar

    2011-03-01

    Three demonstration samples of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were deposited using hot wire–chemical vapour deposition (HW–CVD) technique. The optical parameters and the thickness were determined from the extremes of the interference fringes of transmission spectrum in the range of 400–2500 nm using the envelope method. The calculated values of the refractive index () were fitted using the two-term Cauchy dispersion relation and the static refractive index values (0) obtained were 2.799, 2.629 and 3.043 which were in the range of the reported values. The calculated thicknesses for all samples were cross-checked with Taly-Step profilometer and found to be almost equal. Detailed analysis was carried out to obtain the optical band gap (g) using Tauc’s method and the estimated values were 1.99, 2.01 and 1.75 eV. The optical band gap values were correlated with the hydrogen content (H) in the samples calculated from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. An attempt was made to apply Wemple–DiDomenico single-effective oscillator model to the a-Si:H samples to calculate the optical parameters. The optical band gap obtained by Tauc’s method and the static refractive index calculated from Cauchy fitting are in good agreement with those obtained by the single-effective oscillator model. The real and the imaginary parts of dielectric constant (r, ), and the optical conductivity () were also calculated.

  1. ZrN coatings deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purandare, Yashodhan, E-mail: Y.Purandare@shu.ac.uk; Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken [Nanotechnology Centre for PVD Research, Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Santana, Antonio [Ionbond AG Olten, Industriestrasse 211, CH-4600 Olten (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on 1 μm finish high speed steel and 316L stainless steel test coupons. Cathodic Arc (CA) and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) + Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering (UBM) techniques were utilized to deposit coatings. CA plasmas are known to be rich in metal and gas ions of the depositing species as well as macroparticles (droplets) emitted from the arc sports. Combining HIPIMS technique with UBM in the same deposition process facilitated increased ion bombardment on the depositing species during coating growth maintaining high deposition rate. Prior to coating deposition, substrates were pretreated with Zr{sup +} rich plasma, for both arc deposited and HIPIMS deposited coatings, which led to a very high scratch adhesion value (L{sub C2}) of 100 N. Characterization results revealed the overall thickness of the coatings in the range of 2.5 μm with hardness in the range of 30–40 GPa depending on the deposition technique. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and tribological experiments such as dry sliding wear tests and corrosion studies have been utilized to study the effects of ion bombardment on the structure and properties of these coatings. In all the cases, HIPIMS assisted UBM deposited coating fared equal or better than the arc deposited coatings, the reasons being discussed in this paper. Thus H+U coatings provide a good alternative to arc deposited where smooth, dense coatings are required and macrodroplets cannot be tolerated.

  2. Correlation between optical emission spectra and the process parameters of a 915 MHz microwave plasma CVD reactor used for depositing polycrystalline diamond coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Awadesh Kumar Mallik; Sandip Bysakh; Someswar Dutta; Debabrata Basu

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen and hydrogen-methane mixed plasma have been generated inside a 33 cm diameter quartz bell jar with a low power (9 KW) and lower frequency 915 MHz microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. The reactor is being used for growing polycrystalline diamond (PCD) over large area (100 mm). The generated plasma is diagnosed by in situ optical emission spectroscopy method with wave length ranging from 200 to 900 nm. The effects of microwave power, chamber pressure and gas concentration on plasma characteristics have been studied in this work. Within the optical range, Balmer H, H, C2swan band and CH lines have been detected at the wavelengths of 655.95, 485.7, 515.82 and 430.17 nm, respectively. It has been observed that for hydrogen plasma, the amount of transition from hydrogen atom inner shell 3 to 2 (H) is almost constant with increasing microwave (MW) power (from 2000 to 2800 W) and pressure (from 15 to 30 Torr) initially, after that it increases with further increase of MW power and pressure, whereas, the transition from 4 to 2 (H) is slowly increased with increasing MW power and pressure. For hydrogen-methane plasma, intensities of C2 swan band, i.e., the transitions from D$^3\\Pi_\\text{g}$ to A$^3\\Pi_{\\mu}$ energy levels, are also increased with the increasing microwave power and reactor pressure. It has been observed that the radicals present in the plasma are affected by variation of different reactor parameters like pressure, MW power, CH4 concentration, etc.

  3. Initiated-chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon layers: Monomer adsorption, bulk growth, and process window definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresta, G.; Palmans, J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Organosilicon layers have been deposited from 1,3,5-trivinyl-1,3,5-trimethylcyclotrisiloxane (V3D3) by means of the initiated-chemical vapor deposition (i-CVD) technique in a deposition setup, ad hoc designed for the engineering of multilayer moisture permeation barriers. The application of Fourier

  4. Comparison of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with a chemical vapour deposition bur and conventional techniques for cavity preparation: a microleakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A Rüya; Yıldırım, Zeren; Antonson, Sibel A; Kilinc, Evren; Koch, Daniele; Antonson, Donald E; Dayangaç, Berrin; Ozgünaltay, Gül

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) bur cavity preparation with conventional preparation methods including a diamond bur and a carbide bur on the microleakage with two different adhesive systems. A total of 40 extracted human premolars were randomly assigned to four experimental groups according to the cavity preparation technique: group I diamond bur (Diatech); group II carbide bur (Diatech); group III Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Biolase Millennium II); and group IV CVD bur (CVDentUS). Using the different preparation techniques, Class V standardized preparations were performed on the buccal and lingual surfaces with gingival margins on the dentin and occlusal margins on the enamel. Each preparation group was randomly assigned to two subgroups (five teeth, ten preparations) according to the type of adhesive: an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond), and a single-step self-etch adhesive (AdheSE One). All preparations were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin in a single increment. Following thermocycling (×500; 5-55°C), the teeth were immersed in basic fuchsin and sectioned in the orovestibular direction. Dye penetration was evaluated under a light microscope by two blinded examiners. Data were statistically analysed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests (p0.05). Comparing the enamel and dentin leakage scores within each group, no statistically significant differences were found (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser cavity preparation did not differ from preparation with CVD, diamond or carbide bur in terms of microleakage with the different adhesive systems.

  5. Metallization on FDM Parts Using the Chemical Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Equbal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallization of ABS (acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene parts has been studied on flat part surfaces. These parts are fabricated on an FDM (fused deposition modeling machine using the layer-wise deposition principle using ABS as a part material. Electroless copper deposition on ABS parts was performed using two different surface preparation processes, namely ABS parts prepared using chromic acid for etching and ABS parts prepared using a solution mixture of sulphuric acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2SO4/H2O2 for etching. After surface preparations using these routes, copper (Cu is deposited electrolessly using four different acidic baths. The acidic baths used are 5 wt% CuSO4 (copper sulfate with 15 wt% of individual acids, namely HF (hydrofluoric acid, H2SO4 (sulphuric acid, H3PO4 (phosphoric acid and CH3COOH (acetic acid. Cu deposition under different acidic baths used for both the routes is presented and compared based on their electrical performance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS. The result shows that chromic acid etched samples show better electrical performance and Cu deposition in comparison to samples etched via H2SO4/H2O2.

  6. Achieving Thin Films with Micro/Nano-Scale Controllable Morphology by Glancing Angle Deposition Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Shao-Ji; WANG Chao-Yi; TANG Ji-Jia; HU Lin-Xin

    2008-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate that thin films with micro/nanometre controllable morphology can be fabricated by the glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique which is a physical vapour deposition technique.In this technique, there are parameters which determine the morphology of the thin films: the incident angle, ratio of the deposition rate with respect to the substrate rotation rate, nature of the material being deposited, etc.We fabricate the morphology of column, pillar, helices, zigzag and study the parameters which determine morphology by given some examples of SEM.

  7. Comparison of the properties of Pb thin films deposited on Nb substrate using thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone, A., E-mail: alessio.perrone@unisalento.it [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); INFN-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare e Università del Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gontad, F. [INFN-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare e Università del Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Lorusso, A.; Di Giulio, M. [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Broitman, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Ferrario, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2013-11-21

    Pb thin films were prepared at room temperature and in high vacuum by thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition techniques. Films deposited by both the techniques were investigated by scanning electron microscopy to determine their surface topology. The structure of the films was studied by X-ray diffraction in θ–2θ geometry. The photoelectron performances in terms of quantum efficiency were deduced by a high vacuum photodiode cell before and after laser cleaning procedures. Relatively high quantum efficiency (>10{sup −5}) was obtained for all the deposited films, comparable to that of corresponding bulk. Finally, film to substrate adhesion was also evaluated using the Daimler–Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test method. Weak and strong points of these two competitive techniques are illustrated and discussed. -- Highlights: •Comparison of Pb thin films deposited on Nb substrate by thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). •Photoelectron performances of Pb thin films. •Good quality of adhesion strength of Pb films deposited by PLD.

  8. Comparison of the properties of Pb thin films deposited on Nb substrate using thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, A.; Gontad, F.; Lorusso, A.; Di Giulio, M.; Broitman, E.; Ferrario, M.

    2013-11-01

    Pb thin films were prepared at room temperature and in high vacuum by thermal evaporation and pulsed laser deposition techniques. Films deposited by both the techniques were investigated by scanning electron microscopy to determine their surface topology. The structure of the films was studied by X-ray diffraction in θ-2θ geometry. The photoelectron performances in terms of quantum efficiency were deduced by a high vacuum photodiode cell before and after laser cleaning procedures. Relatively high quantum efficiency (>10-5) was obtained for all the deposited films, comparable to that of corresponding bulk. Finally, film to substrate adhesion was also evaluated using the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test method. Weak and strong points of these two competitive techniques are illustrated and discussed.

  9. Crystalline Indium Sulphide thin film by photo accelerated deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanya, A. C.; Preetha, K. C.; Deepa, K.; Remadevi, T. L.

    2015-02-01

    Indium sulfide thin films deserve special attention because of its potential application as buffer layers in CIGS based solar cells. Highly transparent indium sulfide (InS) thin films were prepared using a novel method called photo accelerated chemical deposition (PCD). Ultraviolet source of 150 W was used to irradiate the solution. Compared to all other chemical methods, PCD scores its advantage for its low cost, flexible substrate and capable of large area of deposition. Reports on deposition of high quality InS thin films at room temperature are very rare in literature. The precursor solution was initially heated to 90°C for ten minutes and then deposition was carried out at room temperature for two hours. The appearance of the film changed from lemon yellow to bright yellow as the deposition time increased. The sample was characterized for its structural and optical properties. XRD profile showed the polycrystalline behavior of the film with mixed phases having crystallite size of 17 nm. The surface morphology of the films exhibited uniformly distributed honey comb like structures. The film appeared to be smooth and the value of extinction coefficient was negligible. Optical measurements showed that the film has more than 80% transmission in the visible region. The direct band gap energy was 2.47eV. This method is highly suitable for the synthesis of crystalline and transparent indium sulfide thin films and can be used for various photo voltaic applications.

  10. Analysis of Residual Thermal Stress in CVD-W Coating as Plasma Facing Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱大焕; 王坤; 王先平; 陈俊凌; 方前锋

    2012-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition-tungsten (CVD-W) coating covering the surface of the plasma facing component (PFC) is an effective method to implement the tungsten material as plasma facing material (PFM) in fusion devices. Residual thermal stress in CVD-W coating due to thermal mismatch between coating and substrate was successfully simulated by using a finite element method (ANSYS 10.0 code). The deposition parametric effects, i.e., coating thickness and deposition temperature, and interlayer were investigated to get a description of the residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating-substrate system. And the influence of the substrate materials on the generation of residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating was analyzed with respect to the CVD-W coating application as PFM. This analysis is beneficial for the preparation and application of CVD-W coating.

  11. Analysis of Residual Thermal Stress in CVD-W Coating as Plasma Facing Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dahuan; Wang, Kun; Wang, Xianping; Chen, Junling; Fang, Qianfeng

    2012-07-01

    Chemical vapor deposition-tungsten (CVD-W) coating covering the surface of the plasma facing component (PFC) is an effective method to implement the tungsten material as plasma facing material (PFM) in fusion devices. Residual thermal stress in CVD-W coating due to thermal mismatch between coating and substrate was successfully simulated by using a finite element method (ANSYS 10.0 code). The deposition parametric effects, i.e., coating thickness and deposition temperature, and interlayer were investigated to get a description of the residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating-substrate system. And the influence of the substrate materials on the generation of residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating was analyzed with respect to the CVD-W coating application as PFM. This analysis is beneficial for the preparation and application of CVD-W coating.

  12. Modeling for CVD of Solid Oxide Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.

    2002-09-18

    Because of its low thermal conductivity, high thermal expansion and high oxygen ion conductivity yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the material of choice for high temperature electrolyte applications. Current coating fabrication methods have their drawbacks, however. Air plasma spray (APS) is a relatively low-cost process and is suitable for large and relatively complex shapes. it is difficult to produce uniform, relatively thin coatings with this process, however, and the coatings do not exhibit the columnar microstructure that is needed for reliable, long-term performance. The electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process does produce the desirable microstructure, however, the capital cost of these systems is very high and the line-of-sight nature of the process limits coating uniformity and the ability to coat large and complex shapes. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process also produces the desirable columnar microstructure and--under proper conditions--can produce uniform coatings over complex shapes. CVD has been used for many materials but is relatively undeveloped for oxides, in general, and for zirconia, in particular. The overall goal of this project--a joint effort of the University of Louisville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)--is to develop the YSZ CVD process for high temperature electrolyte applications. This report describes the modeling effort at the University of Louisville, which supports the experimental work at ORNL. Early work on CVD of zirconia and yttria used metal chlorides, which react with water vapor to form solid oxide. Because of this rapid gas-phase reaction the water generally is formed in-situ using the reverse water-gas-shift reaction or a microwave plasma. Even with these arrangements gas-phase nucleation and powder formation are problems when using these precursors. Recent efforts on CVD of zirconia and YSZ have focused on use of metal-organic precursors (MOCVD). These are more stable in the gas

  13. Differential Deposition Technique for Figure Corrections in Grazing Incidence X-ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    A differential deposition technique is being developed to correct the low- and mid-spatial-frequency deviations in the axial figure profile of Wolter type grazing incidence X-ray optics. These deviations arise due to various factors in the fabrication process and they degrade the performance of the optics by limiting the achievable angular resolution. In the differential deposition technique, material of varying thickness is selectively deposited along the length of the optic to minimize these deviations, thereby improving the overall figure. High resolution focusing optics being developed at MSFC for small animal radionuclide imaging are being coated to test the differential deposition technique. The required spatial resolution for these optics is 100 m. This base resolution is achievable with the regular electroform-nickel-replication fabrication technique used at MSFC. However, by improving the figure quality of the optics through differential deposition, we aim at significantly improving the resolution beyond this value.

  14. Mechanics-driven patterning of CVD graphene for roll-based manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Min; Jang, Bongkyun; Jo, Kyungmin; Kim, Donghyuk; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Kyung-Shik; Lee, Seung-Mo; Lee, Hak-Joo; Han, Seung Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Graphene is considered as a promising material for flexible and transparent electrodes due to its outstanding electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. Efforts to mass-produce graphene electrodes led to the development of roll-to-roll chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene growth and transfer, and the only remaining obstacle to the mass-production of CVD graphene electrodes is a cost-effective patterning technique that is compatible with the roll-to-roll manufacturing. Herein, we propose a mechanics-driven technique for patterning graphene synthesized on copper foil (commonly used in roll-to-roll manufacturing). The copper foil is exposed to high temperature for a prolonged period during the CVD growth of graphene, and thus can result in recrystallization and grain growth of the copper foil and thereby reducing to the yield strength. This softening behavior of the copper was carefully controlled to allow simple stamp patterning of the graphene. The strength of the underlying substrate was controlled for the accuracy of the residual patterns. The proposed stamp patterning technique is mask-less and photoresist-free, and can be performed at room temperature without high-energy sources such as lasers or plasma. To demonstrate the capability of this process to produce a continuous electrode, a transparent in-plane supercapacitor was fabricated using the proposed patterning technique.

  15. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Large Area Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Benjamin Barbour Spanget

    be eliminated. Further opportunities arise when exchanging the copper foil for copper thin film on a wafer e.g. better integration with current cleanroom processing of devices and better control over the copper crystallinity. Typical strategies for controlling the temperature during CVD fabrication of graphene...... of thermocouples leads to large variations in the grown graphene. This was solved by controlling the temperature through applying a set power to the heat source, resulting in a more stable temperature from process to process. Micro Raman spectroscopy is used to characterize the structural quality of the grown......Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) is a viable technique for fabrication of large areas of graphene. CVD fabrication is the most prominent and common way of fabricating graphene in industry. In this thesis I have attempted to optimize a growth recipe and catalyst layer for CVD fabrication of uniform...

  16. Bismuth coatings deposited by the pulsed dc sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, M. F.; Olaya, J. J.; Alfonso, J. E., E-mail: jealfonsoo@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales y Superficies, Carrera 45 No. 26-85, Edif. Uriel Gutierrez, Bogota D. C. (Colombia)

    2013-08-01

    In this work we present the results obtained from the deposition of nano-structured bismuth coatings through Dc pulsed unbalanced magnetron sputtering. The coatings were grown on two substrates: silicon and AISI steel 316 L. The microstructure of the Bi coatings grown on silicon and the corrosion resistance of the Bi coatings grown on AISI steel were evaluated. The microstructure was evaluated by X-ray diffraction and the corrosion resistance was characterized by means of polarization potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Finally the morphology of the coatings was evaluated through scanning electronic microscopy. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the coatings are polycrystalline; the corrosion resistance tests indicate that the films with better corrosion resistance were deposited at 40 khz. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs show that the coatings are grown as granular form. (Author)

  17. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C.

  18. An assessment of radiotherapy dosimeters based on CVD grown diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Ramkumar, S; Conway, J; Whitehead, A J; Sussman, R S; Hill, G; Walker, S

    2001-01-01

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as a dosimeter for radiotherapy. Its radiation hardness, the near tissue equivalence and chemical inertness are some of the characteristics of diamond, which make it well suited for its application as a dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technology have resulted in the improvement in the quality of material and increased its suitability for radiotherapy applications. We report in this paper, the response of prototype dosimeters based on two different types (CVD1 and CVD2) of CVD diamond to X-rays. The diamond devices were assessed for sensitivity, dependence of response on dose and dose rate, and compared with a Scanditronix silicon photon diode and a PTW natural diamond dosimeter. The diamond devices of CVD1 type showed an initial increase in response with dose, which saturates after approx 6 Gy. The diamond devices of CVD2 type had a response at low fields (1162.8 V/cm), the CVD2-type devices show...

  19. Aluminum and aluminum/silicon coatings on ferritic steels by CVD-FBR technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, F.J. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: fjperez@quim.ucm.es; Hierro, M.P. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Trilleros, J.A. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Carpintero, M.C. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, L. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bolivar, F.J. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-05-10

    The use of chemical vapor deposition by fluidized bed reactors (CVD-FBR) offers some advantages in comparison to other coating techniques such as pack cementation, because it allows coating deposition at lower temperatures than pack cementation and at atmospheric pressure without affecting the mechanical properties of material due to heat treatments of the bulk during coating process. Aluminum and aluminum/silicon coatings have been obtained on two different ferritics steels (P-91 and P-92). The coatings were analyzed using several techniques like SEM/EDX and XRD. The results indicated that both coatings were form by Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} intermetallic compound, and in the co-deposition the Si was incorporated to the Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} structure in small amounts.

  20. Effect of Different Catalyst Deposition Technique on Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed Saheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported the investigation of the substrate preparation technique involving deposition of iron catalyst by electron beam evaporation and ferrocene vaporization in order to produce vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array needed for fabrication of tailored devices. Prior to the growth at 700°C in ethylene, silicon dioxide coated silicon substrate was prepared by depositing alumina followed by iron using two different methods as described earlier. Characterization analysis revealed that aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes array of 107.9 µm thickness grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique can only be achieved for the sample with iron deposited using ferrocene vaporization. The thick layer of partially oxidized iron film can prevent the deactivation of catalyst and thus is able to sustain the growth. It also increases the rate of permeation of the hydrocarbon gas into the catalyst particles and prevents agglomeration at the growth temperature. Combination of alumina-iron layer provides an efficient growth of high density multiwalled carbon nanotubes array with the steady growth rate of 3.6 µm per minute for the first 12 minutes and dropped by half after 40 minutes. Thicker and uniform iron catalyst film obtained from ferrocene vaporization is attributed to the multidirectional deposition of particles in the gaseous form.

  1. The Development of a Differential Deposition Technique for Figure Correction in Grazing Incidence Optics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of a physical-vapor-deposition coating technique to correct residual figure errors in grazing-incidence optics. The process involves...

  2. Nanophotonic Fabrication Self-Assembly and Deposition Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsui, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Nanophotonics, a novel optical technology, utilizes the local interaction between nanometric particles via optical near fields. The optical near fields are the elementary surface excitations on nanometric particles, i.e. dressed photons that carry material energy. Of the variety of qualitative innovations in optical technology realized by nanophotonics, this books focuses on fabrication. To fabricate nano-scale photonic devices with nanometer-scale controllability in size and position, we developed a self-assembly method for size- and position-controlled ultra-long nanodot chains using a novel effect of near-field optical desorption. A novel deposition and etching scheme under nonresonant conditions is also demonstrated and its origin is reviewed.

  3. Note: Large area deposition of Rh single and Rh/W/Cu multilayer thin films on stainless steel substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostako, A. T. T.; Khare, Alika, E-mail: alika@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2014-04-15

    Mirror like thin films of single layer Rh and multilayer Rh/W/Cu are deposited on highly polished 50 mm diameter stainless steel substrate by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique for first mirror application in fusion reactors. For this, the conventional PLD technique has been modified by incorporating substrate rastering stage for large area deposition via PLD. Process optimization to achieve uniformity of deposition as estimated from fringe visibility and thickness is also discussed.

  4. Mo-C Multilayered CVD Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sagalovych

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Production processes of multi-layered Mo-C coatings by the method of chemical vapor deposition (CVD with the use of organometallic compounds were developed. Coatings are applied on technical purpose steel DIN 1.2379 (H12F1 and DIN 1.7709 (25H2MF (ÉI10 heat-treated ball with the high class of surface roughness (> 10. The average deposition rate was 50 μm / h. The optimal conditions of deposition coatings for different technological schemas were defined. Metallographic investigations of the obtained coatings were carried out. Tribological studies of the friction and wear characteristics of sliding friction in conditions of boundary lubrication of Ï-S multilayered CVD coatings shows, that coatings have low friction coefficients (0075-0095 at loads up to 2.0 kN, showed high resistance to wear and are effective in increasing the stability of the pair for precision friction pairs of hydraulical units.

  5. A hybrid sequential deposition fabrication technique for micro fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Kevin G.; Czyzewska, Eva K.; Vanderhoek, Tom P. K.; Fan, Lilian L. Y.; Abel, Keith A.; Wu, Q. M. Jonathan; Parameswaran, M. Ash

    2005-10-01

    Micro fuel cell systems have elicited significant interest due to their promise for instantly rechargeable, longer duration and portable power. Most micro fuel cell systems are either built as miniaturized plate-and-frame or silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Plate-and-frame systems are difficult to fabricate smaller than 20 cm3. Existing micro fuel cell designs cannot meet the cost, scale and power requirements of some portable power markets. Traditional MEMS scaling advantages do not apply to fuel cells because the minimum area for the fuel cell is fixed by the catalyst area required for a given power output, and minimum volume set by mass transport limitations. We have developed a new hybrid technique that borrows from both micro and macro machining techniques to create fuel cells in the 1-20 cm3 range, suitable for cell phones, PDAs and smaller devices.

  6. Using hot wire and initiated chemical vapor deposition for gas barrier thin film encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spee, D.A., E-mail: diederickspee@gmail.com; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2015-01-30

    Hot wire CVD (HWCVD) and initiated CVD (iCVD) are very well suited deposition techniques for the fabrication of transparent thin film gas barriers. Single inorganic or organic layers, however, face challenges, which are hard to overcome: unavoidable defects and low intrinsic barrier function. We demonstrate that by combining inorganic HWCVD films and organic iCVD films, a water vapor transmission rate a low as 5 ∗ 10{sup −6} g/m{sup 2}/day at 60 °C and 90% RH for a simple pinhole free three layer structure is obtained even with non-optimized individual layers. Given the 100 °C deposition temperature, the layer stacks can be deposited on any sensitive electronic device.

  7. A review of basic phenomena and techniques for sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auciello, O. (Microelectronics Center of North Carolina, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA) North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Ameen, M.S.; Kingon, A.I.; Lichtenwalner, D.J. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Krauss, A.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The processes involved in plasma and ion beam sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting thin films are critically reviewed. Recent advances in the development of these techniques are discussed in relation to basic physical phenomena, specific to each technique, which must be understood before high quality films can be produced. Control of film composition is a major issue in sputter-deposition of multicomponent materials. Low temperature processing of films is a common goal for each technique, particularly in relation to integrating high temperature superconducting films with the current microelectronics technology. It has been understood for some time that for Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} deposition, the most intensely studied high-{Tc} compound, incorporation of sufficient oxygen into the film during deposition is necessary to produce as-deposited superconducting films at relatively substrate temperatures. Recent results have shown that with the use of suitable buffer layers, high quality Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} sputtered films can be obtained on Si substrates without the need for post-deposition anneal processing. This review is mainly focussed on issues related to sputter-deposition of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films, although representative results concerning the bismuth and thallium based compounds are included. 143 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Recent Advances in Atmospheric Vapor-Phase Deposition of Transparent and Conductive Zinc Oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Poodt, P.; Roozeboom, F.

    2014-01-01

    The industrial need for high-throughput and low-cost ZnO deposition processes has triggered the development of atmospheric vapor-phase deposition techniques which can be easily applied to continuous, in-line manufacturing. While atmospheric CVD is a mature technology, new processes for the growth of

  9. CVD Diamond Sensors In Detectors For High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00334150; Trischuk, William

    At the end of the next decade an upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is planned which requires the development of new radiation tolerant sensor technology. Diamond is an interesting material for use as a particle detector in high radiation environments. The large band gap ($5.47\\,\\text{eV}$) and the large displacement energy suggest that diamond is a radiation tolerant detector material. In this Thesis the capability of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond as such a sensor technology is investigated. The radiation damage constant for $800\\,\\text{MeV}$ protons is measured using single crystalline CVD (scCVD) and polycrystalline CVD (pCVD) diamonds irradiated to particle fluences up to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$. In addition the signal response of a pCVD diamond detector after an irradiation to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$ is investigated to determine if such a detector can be operated efficiently in the expected HL-LHC environment. By using electrodes em...

  10. Near room-temperature direct encapsulation of organic photovoltaics by plasma-based deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Alberto; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Khan, Talha M.; Kippelen, Bernard; Creatore, Mariadriana; Graham, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) is used for the deposition of environmental barriers directly onto organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs) at near room temperature (30 °C). To study the effect of the ALD process on the organic materials forming the device, the precursor diffusion and intermixing at the interface during the growth of different plasma-assisted ALD inorganic barriers (i.e. Al2O3 and TiO2) onto the organic photoactive layer (P3HT:ICBA) was investigated. Depth profile x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the composition of the organic/inorganic interface to investigate the infiltration of the plasma-assisted ALD precursors into the photoactive layer as a function of the precursor dimension, the process temperature, and organic layer morphology. The free volume in the photoactive layer accessible to the ALD precursor was characterized by means of ellipsometric porosimetry (EP) and spectroscopic ellipsometry as a function of temperature. The organic layer is shown to exhibit free volume broadening at high temperatures, increasing the infiltration depth of the ALD precursor into the photoactive layer. Furthermore, based on previous investigations, the intrinsic permeation properties of the inorganic layers deposited by plasma-assisted ALD were predicted from the nano-porosity content as measured by EP and found to be in the 10-6 gm-2 d-1 range. Insight from our studies was used to design and fabricate multilayer barriers synthesized at near-room temperature by plasma-assisted ALD in combination with plasma-enhanced CVD onto organic photovoltaic (OPVs) devices. Encapsulated OPVs displayed shelf-lifetimes up to 1400 h at ambient conditions.

  11. Fast method for reactor and feature scale coupling in ALD and CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2017-08-08

    Transport and surface chemistry of certain deposition techniques is modeled. Methods provide a model of the transport inside nanostructures as a single-particle discrete Markov chain process. This approach decouples the complexity of the surface chemistry from the transport model, thus allowing its application under general surface chemistry conditions, including atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Methods provide for determination of determine statistical information of the trajectory of individual molecules, such as the average interaction time or the number of wall collisions for molecules entering the nanostructures as well as to track the relative contributions to thin-film growth of different independent reaction pathways at each point of the feature.

  12. CO{sub 2} laser-induced plasma CVD synthesis of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konov, V.I.; Prokhorov, A.M.; Uglov, S.A.; Bolshakov, A.P.; Leontiev, I.A. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Obshchej Fiziki; Dausinger, F.; Huegel, H.; Angstenberger, B. [Institute of High Power Beam Technology (IFSW), Stuttgart University, Pfaffenwaldring 43, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Sepold, G.; Metev, S. [Bremen Institute of Applied Beam Technology, D-28800 Bremen 33, Klagenfurter Str. 2 (Germany)

    1998-05-01

    A novel technique for CVD synthesis of materials that does not demand a vacuum chamber and provides high deposition rates has been developed. It is based on CO{sub 2} laser maintenance of a stationary optical discharge in a gas stream, exhausting over a substrate into the air (laser plasmatron). Nano- and polycrystalline-diamond films were deposited on tungsten substrates from atmospheric-pressure Xe(Ar):H{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} gas mixtures at flow rates of 2 l/min. A 2.5-kW CO{sub 2} laser focused beam produced plasma. The deposition area was about 1 cm{sup 2} and growth rates were up to 30-50 {mu}m/h. Peculiarities and advantages of laser plasmatrons are discussed. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 refs.

  13. Development of atmospheric pressure CVD processes for highquality transparent conductive oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, A. de; Deelen, J. van; Poodt, P.W.G.; Mol, A.M.B. van; Spee, C.I.M.A.; Grob, F.; Kuypers, A.

    2010-01-01

    For the past decade TNO has been involved in the research and development of atmospheric pressure CVD (APCVD) and plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD) processes for deposition of transparent conductive oxides (TCO), such as tin oxide and zinc oxide. It is shown that by combining precursor development, fundam

  14. Surface analysis of CVD diamond exposed to fusion plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porro, S.; De Temmerman, G.; MacLaren, D. A.; Lisgo, S.; Rudakov, D. L.; Westerhout, J.; Wiora, M.; John, P.; Villalpando, I.; Wilson, J. I. B.

    2010-01-01

    Microcrystalline undoped and heavily boron-doped polycrystalline diamond layers have been deposited on various substrates by hot filament CVD and exposed to hydrogen plasma in a linear plasma reactor (Pilot-PSI, The Netherlands) that simulates the high flux and high density plasma conditions of toka

  15. Atmospheric pressure CVD of SNO2 and ZNO:AL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Kniknie, B.J.; Steijvers, H.L.A.H.; Mannie, G.; Thune, P.; Illiberi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure CVD (APCVD) is a highly cost effective method of depositing transparent conductive oxides (TCOs). In this work, insights in alcohol addition in the widely applied SnO2 process are discussed, including high resolution TEM images. Furthermore, the APCVD process of ZnO:Al was demon

  16. High collection efficiency CVD diamond alpha detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergonzo, P.; Foulon, F.; Marshall, R.D.; Jany, C.; Brambilla, A. [CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); McKeag, R.D.; Jackman, R.B. [University College London (United Kingdom). Electronic and Electrical Engineering Dept.

    1998-06-01

    Advances in Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond have enabled the routine use of this material for sensor device fabrication, allowing exploitation of its unique combination of physical properties (low temperature susceptibility (> 500 C), high resistance to radiation damage (> 100 Mrad) and to corrosive media). A consequence of CVD diamond growth on silicon is the formation of polycrystalline films which has a profound influence on the physical and electronic properties with respect to those measured on monocrystalline diamond. The authors report the optimization of physical and geometrical device parameters for radiation detection in the counting mode. Sandwich and co-planar electrode geometries are tested and their performances evaluated with regard to the nature of the field profile and drift distances inherent in such devices. The carrier drift length before trapping was measured under alpha particles and values as high as 40% of the overall film thickness are reported. Further, by optimizing the device geometry, they show that a gain in collection efficiency, defined as the induced charge divided by the deposited charge within the material, can be achieved even though lower bias values are used.

  17. Characterisation of Pb thin films prepared by the nanosecond pulsed laser deposition technique for photocathode application

    OpenAIRE

    Lorusso, Antonella; Gontad, F.; Broitman, Esteban; Chiadroni, E.; Perrone, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Pb thin films were prepared by the nanosecond pulsed laser deposition technique on Si (100) and polycrystalline Nb substrates for photocathode application. As the photoemission performances of a cathode are strongly affected by its surface characteristics, the Pb films were grown at different substrate temperatures with the aim of modifying the morphology and structure of thin films. An evident morphological modification in the deposited films with the formation of spherical grains at higher ...

  18. Faraday effect of bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist CVD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Situ; Sato, Takafumi; Kaneko, Kentaro; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Metastable bismuth iron garnet (BIG, an abbreviation of Bi3Fe5O12), one kind of garnet-type ferrites, is known to manifest very large Faraday rotation as well as low optical absorption in the visible to infrared region. We report on successful synthesis of thin film composed of single-phase BIG epitaxially grown on single-crystalline gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd3Ga5O12, GGG) substrate by using mist chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, which is an emerging technique for preparation of thin films. The crystal structure, surface morphology, and magnetic, optical and magneto-optical properties of the resultant thin films have been explored. The BIG thin film has a relatively flat surface free from roughness compared to those prepared by other vapor deposition methods. Saturation magnetization is about 1620 G at room temperature, which is close to that expected from the ideal magnetic structure of BIG. The maximum value of Faraday rotation angle reaches 54.3 deg/µm at a wavelength of 424 nm. This value is rather large when compared with those reported for BIG thin films prepared by other techniques. The wavelength dependence of Faraday rotation angle is analyzed well in terms of the crystal electric field (CEF) level schema. Our result suggests that the mist CVD method is a simple and effective technique to synthesize BIG thin film with excellent magneto-optical properties.

  19. Radio Frequency Transistors and Circuits Based on CVD MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanne, Atresh; Ghosh, Rudresh; Rai, Amritesh; Yogeesh, Maruthi Nagavalli; Shin, Seung Heon; Sharma, Ankit; Jarvis, Karalee; Mathew, Leo; Rao, Rajesh; Akinwande, Deji; Banerjee, Sanjay

    2015-08-12

    We report on the gigahertz radio frequency (RF) performance of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) monolayer MoS2 field-effect transistors (FETs). Initial DC characterizations of fabricated MoS2 FETs yielded current densities exceeding 200 μA/μm and maximum transconductance of 38 μS/μm. A contact resistance corrected low-field mobility of 55 cm(2)/(V s) was achieved. Radio frequency FETs were fabricated in the ground-signal-ground (GSG) layout, and standard de-embedding techniques were applied. Operating at the peak transconductance, we obtain short-circuit current-gain intrinsic cutoff frequency, fT, of 6.7 GHz and maximum intrinsic oscillation frequency, fmax, of 5.3 GHz for a device with a gate length of 250 nm. The MoS2 device afforded an extrinsic voltage gain Av of 6 dB at 100 MHz with voltage amplification until 3 GHz. With the as-measured frequency performance of CVD MoS2, we provide the first demonstration of a common-source (CS) amplifier with voltage gain of 14 dB and an active frequency mixer with conversion gain of -15 dB. Our results of gigahertz frequency performance as well as analog circuit operation show that large area CVD MoS2 may be suitable for industrial-scale electronic applications.

  20. Synthesis of Different Layers of Graphene on Stainless Steel Using the CVD Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Ferial; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Tahir, Paridah Md; Yunus, Robiah

    2016-12-01

    In this study, different types of graphene, including single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene, were grown on a stainless steel (SS) mesh coated with Cu catalyst by using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Even though the SS mesh consisted of different types of metals, such as Fe, Ni, and Cr, which can also be used as catalysts, the reason for coating Cu catalyst on the SS surface had been related to the nature of the Cu, which promotes the growth of graphene with high quality and quantity at low temperature and time. The reaction temperature and run time, as the most important parameters of the CVD method, were varied, and thus led to the synthesis of different layers of graphene. Moreover, the presence of single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene was confirmed by employing two techniques, namely transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. On top of that, electron dispersive X-ray (EDX) was further applied to establish the influence of the CVD parameters on the growth of graphene.

  1. Synthesis of Different Layers of Graphene on Stainless Steel Using the CVD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Ferial; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Tahir, Paridah Md; Yunus, Robiah

    2016-11-01

    In this study, different types of graphene, including single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene, were grown on a stainless steel (SS) mesh coated with Cu catalyst by using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Even though the SS mesh consisted of different types of metals, such as Fe, Ni, and Cr, which can also be used as catalysts, the reason for coating Cu catalyst on the SS surface had been related to the nature of the Cu, which promotes the growth of graphene with high quality and quantity at low temperature and time. The reaction temperature and run time, as the most important parameters of the CVD method, were varied, and thus led to the synthesis of different layers of graphene. Moreover, the presence of single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene was confirmed by employing two techniques, namely transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. On top of that, electron dispersive X-ray (EDX) was further applied to establish the influence of the CVD parameters on the growth of graphene.

  2. A novel electron beam evaporation technique for the deposition of superconducting thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, M. G.; Muralidhar, G. K.; Rao, K. N.; Rao, G. M.; Mohan, S.

    1991-05-01

    Superconducting thin films of BiSrCaCuO have been deposited using a novel electron beam evaporation technique. In this technique the crucible has a groove around its circumference and rotates continuously during deposition. The source material is loaded in the form of pellets of the composite. Both oxides as well as flourides have been used in the starting material and a comparison of the film properties has been made. The best film was obtained on a MgO(100) substrate with a Tc onset at 85 K and Tc zero at 77 K using calcium flouride in the source material.

  3. PZT thin film deposition techniques, properties and its application in ultrasonic MEMS sensors: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpa, G. D.; Sreelakshmi, K.; Ananthaprasad, M. G.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes an overview of the state of art in PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT)ferroelectric thin films and its applications in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). First, the deposition techniques and then the important properties of PZT films such as surface morphology polarization and ferroelectric properties are reviewed. Two major deposition techniques such as sol-gel and Magnetron sputtering are given and compared for the film surface morphology and ferroelectric properties. Finally, the application of PZT thin film in MEMS ultrasonic sensors is discussed.

  4. A Comparison between Thin-Film Transistors Deposited by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition and PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Zarchi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of new growth techniques on the mobility and stability of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H thin film transistors (TFTs has been studied. It was suggested that the key parameter controlling the field-effect mobility and stability is the intrinsic stress in the a-Si:H layer. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films were deposited by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD at 100 ºC and 25 ºC. Structural properties of these films were measured by Raman Spectroscopy. Electronic properties were measured by dark conductivity, σd, and photoconductivity, σph. For amorphous silicon films deposited by RF-PECVD on PET, photosensitivity's of >105 were obtained at both 100 º C and 25 ºC. For amorphous silicon films deposited by HW-CVD, a photosensitivity of > 105 was obtained at 100 ºC. Microcrystalline silicon films deposited by HW-CVD at 95% hydrogen dilution show σph~ 10-4 Ω-1cm-1, while maintaining a photosensitivity of ~102 at both 100 ºC and 25 ºC. Microcrystalline silicon films with a large crystalline fraction (> 50% can be deposited by HW-CVD all the way down to room temperature.

  5. Engineered CVD Diamond Coatings for Machining and Tribological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumpala, Ravikumar; Chandran, Maneesh; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2015-07-01

    Diamond is an allotropes of carbon and is unique because of its extreme hardness (~100 GPa), low friction coefficient (fracture toughness can be tuned by controlling the grain size of the coatings from a few microns to a few nanometers. In this review, characteristics and performance of the CVD diamond coatings deposited on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates were discussed with an emphasis on WC-Co grade selection, substrate pretreatment, nanocrystallinity and microcrystallinity of the coating, mechanical and tribological characteristics, coating architecture, and interfacial adhesion integrity. Engineered coating substrate architecture is essential for CVD diamond coatings to perform well under harsh and highly abrasive machining and tribological conditions.

  6. Clean diffusion coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnes, B.M.; Punola, D.C. [Howmet Thermatech Coatings, Whitehall, MI (United States)

    1997-10-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify diffusion coating impurities introduced by standard aluminizing processes and to evaluate the impact of those impurities on oxidation resistance of the resultant Pt aluminide coating. IN-738 tabs and foils were platinum-electroplated, and then aluminized using three different processes: high-activity pack cementation, high-activity CVD and low-activity CVD. The results suggest that aluminizing processes which involve aluminum bearing alloys in the coating retort with H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}/HCl gas at high temperature can contaminate the diffusion coating during deposition. CVD low-activity aluminizing (coating gas generated at low temperature outside the coating chamber from 99.999% Al) did not introduce any coating impurities. In addition, the data indicates that harmful impurities from the IN-738 substrate (sulfur, boron and tungsten) and the electroplating process (phosphorus) were removed from the coating during deposition. The CVD low-activity Pt aluminide coating was the `cleanest` in the study, and it exhibited the best high-temperature oxidation resistance of the coatings considered. It can be concluded that trace elements in diffusion coatings from the superalloy substrate and/or the aluminizing process can adversely effect the oxidation resistance of those coatings, and that CVD low-activity aluminizing yields cleaner coatings than other commercially available aluminizing techniques. (orig.) 10 refs.

  7. Laser-Directed CVD 3D Printing of Refractory Metal Rocket Propulsion Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project, Ultramet will develop a three-dimensional (3D) laser-directed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) additive manufacturing system to build free-form...

  8. Handbook of thin film deposition processes and techniques principles, methods, equipment and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Seshan, Krishna

    2002-01-01

    New second edition of the popular book on deposition (first edition by Klaus Schruegraf) for engineers, technicians, and plant personnel in the semiconductor and related industries. This book traces the technology behind the spectacular growth in the silicon semiconductor industry and the continued trend in miniaturization over the last 20 years. This growth has been fueled in large part by improved thin film deposition techniques and the development of highly specialized equipment to enable this deposition. The book includes much cutting-edge material. Entirely new chapters on contamination and contamination control describe the basics and the issues-as feature sizes shrink to sub-micron dimensions, cleanliness and particle elimination has to keep pace. A new chapter on metrology explains the growth of sophisticated, automatic tools capable of measuring thickness and spacing of sub-micron dimensions. The book also covers PVD, laser and e-beam assisted deposition, MBE, and ion beam methods to bring together a...

  9. Atomic layer deposition (ALD): A versatile technique for plasmonics and nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyungsoon; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Lindquist, Nathan C; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-02-28

    While atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been used for many years as an industrial manufacturing method for microprocessors and displays, this versatile technique is finding increased use in the emerging fields of plasmonics and nanobiotechnology. In particular, ALD coatings can modify metallic surfaces to tune their optical and plasmonic properties, to protect them against unwanted oxidation and contamination, or to create biocompatible surfaces. Furthermore, ALD is unique among thin-film deposition techniques in its ability to meet the processing demands for engineering nanoplasmonic devices, offering conformal deposition of dense and ultra-thin films on high-aspect-ratio nanostructures at temperatures below 100 °C. In this review, we present key features of ALD and describe how it could benefit future applications in plasmonics, nanosciences, and biotechnology.

  10. STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES INVESTIGATION ON MICROCRYSTALLINE SILICON FILMS DEPOSITED WITH VHF-PECVD TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.D. Yang

    2005-01-01

    Raman scattering spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were used to determine the structural properties of two typical series of microcrystalline silicon(μc-Si:H) films deposited at different VHF plasma power and different working gas pressure by very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF-PECVD) technique. Raman spectra measurements show that both crystalline volume fraction Xc and average grain size d of μc-Si: H films are strongly affected by the two deposition conditions and are more sensitive to working gas pressure than VHF plasma power. SEM characterizations have further confirmed that VHF plasma power and working gas pressure could clearly enhance the surface roughness of μc-Si: H films ascribing to polymerization reactions, which is also more sensitive to working gas pressure than VHF plasma power.

  11. Synthesis of CVD-graphene on rapidly heated copper foils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Hwangbo, Yun; Yoon, Jong-Hyuk; Lee, Eun-Kyu; Ryu, Jaechul; Lee, Hak-Joo; Cho, Seungmin; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-05-07

    Most chemical vapor deposition (CVD) systems used for graphene growth mainly employ convection and radiation heat transfer between the heating source and the metal catalyst in order to reach the activation temperature of the reaction, which in general leads to a long synthesis time and poor energy efficiency. Here, we report a highly time- and energy-efficient CVD setup, in which the metal catalyst (Cu) is designed to be physically contacted with a heating source to give quick heat transfer by conduction. The induced conduction heating enabled the usual effects of the pretreatment and annealing of Cu (i.e., annihilation of surface defects, impurities and contaminants) to be achieved in a significantly shorter time compared to conventional CVD. Notably, the rapid heating was observed to lead to larger grains of Cu with high uniformity as compared to the Cu annealed by conventional CVD, which are believed to be beneficial for the growth of high quality graphene. Through this CVD setup, bundles of high quality (∼252 Ω per square) and large area (over 16 inch) graphenes were able to be readily synthesized in 40 min in a significantly efficient way. When considering ease of scalability, high energy effectiveness and considerable productivity, our method is expected to be welcomed by industrialists.

  12. ZnO films deposited by optimized PLD technique with bias voltages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Shitara, Tamae; Komiyama, Takao; Chonan, Yasunori; Aoyama, Takashi [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Akita Prefectural University, 84-4 Tsuchiya Ebinokuchi, 015-0055 Yuri-Honjo (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    The pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique with bias voltage application for formation of high quality ZnO films was investigated. Oxygen ambient in the PLD chamber significantly decreased the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of near band edge (NBE) emission. Then, instead of using oxygen ambient, the PLD technique with bias voltage application was optimized to attain the stoichiometric composition of the ZnO films. As the deposition temperature was increased, the X-ray spectrum width diffracted from the (0002) planes was decreased and it showed a minimum value at 700 C. The PL intensity of the NBE emission also had its maximum value for the film deposited at 700 C. For the ZnO films deposited at 700 C, the X-ray spectrum width showed the minimum value under a bias voltage of -50 V. The PL intensity of the NBE emission also had a maximum value under the same bias voltage. Thus, ZnO films deposited under a bias voltage of -50 V at 700 C had strong NBE emission intensities. These results could be explained not only by attaining the stoichiometric composition of the ZnO film but also by decreasing the number of high energy O{sup 2-} ions which caused non-radiative recombination centers in the film. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. A comparative study of CdS thin films deposited by different techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Hernández, G., E-mail: german.perez@ujat.mx [Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Avenida Universidad s/n, Col. Magisterial, Villahermosa, Tabasco 86040 (Mexico); Pantoja-Enríquez, J. [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo Tecnológico en Energías Renovables, UNICACH, Libramiento Norte No 1150, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas 29039 (Mexico); Escobar-Morales, B. [Instituto Tecnológico de Cancún, Avenida Kábah Km 3, Cancún, Quintana Roo 77500 (Mexico); Martinez-Hernández, D.; Díaz-Flores, L.L.; Ricardez-Jiménez, C. [Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Avenida Universidad s/n, Col. Magisterial, Villahermosa, Tabasco 86040 (Mexico); Mathews, N.R.; Mathew, X. [Centro de Investigación en Energía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico)

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium sulfide thin-films were deposited on glass slides and SnO{sub 2}:F coated glass substrates by chemical bath deposition, sputtering and close-spaced sublimation techniques. The films were studied for the structural and opto-electronic properties after annealing in an ambient identical to that employed in the fabrication of CdTe/CdS devices. Quantum efficiency of the CdTe/CdS solar cells fabricated with CdS buffer films prepared by the three methods were investigated to understand the role of CdS film preparation method on the blue response of the devices. The higher blue response observed for the devices fabricated with chemical bath deposited CdS film is discussed. - Highlights: ► CdS films were prepared by different techniques. ► Role of CdS on the blue response of device was studied. ► Structural and optical properties of CdS were analyzed. ► Chemically deposited CdS has high blue transmittance. ► CdS deposition method influences diffusion of S and Te.

  14. Characterisation of Pb thin films prepared by the nanosecond pulsed laser deposition technique for photocathode application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorusso, A., E-mail: antonella.lorusso@le.infn.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi” and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università del Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy); Gontad, F. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi” and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università del Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy); Broitman, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 83 (Sweden); Chiadroni, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati 00044 (Italy); Perrone, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi” and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università del Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy)

    2015-03-31

    Pb thin films were prepared by the nanosecond pulsed laser deposition technique on Si (100) and polycrystalline Nb substrates for photocathode application. As the photoemission performances of a cathode are strongly affected by its surface characteristics, the Pb films were grown at different substrate temperatures with the aim of modifying the morphology and structure of thin films. An evident morphological modification in the deposited films with the formation of spherical grains at higher temperatures has been observed. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that a preferred orientation of Pb (111) normal to the substrate was achieved at 30 °C while the Pb (200) plane became strongly pronounced with the increase in the substrate temperature. Finally, a Pb thin film deposited on Nb substrate at 30 °C and tested as the photocathode showed interesting results for the application of such a device in superconducting radio frequency guns. - Highlights: • Pb thin films obtained by the nanosecond pulsed laser deposition technique at different substrate temperature. • The substrate temperature modifies the morphology and structure of Pb films. • Pb thin film was deposited at room temperature for photocathode application. • The Pb thin film photocathode was tested and the quantum efficiency of the device improved after laser cleaning treatment of the film surface.

  15. Differential deposition technique for figure corrections in grazing-incidence x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Gregory, Don A.

    2011-10-01

    A differential deposition technique was investigated as a way to minimize axial figure errors in full-shell, grazing-incidence, reflective x-ray optics. These types of optics use a combination of off-axis conic segments--hyperbolic, parabolic, and/or elliptical, to reflect and image x-rays. Several such mirrors or ``shells'' of decreasing diameter are typically concentrically nested to form a single focusing unit. Individual mirrors are currently produced at Marshall Space Flight Center using an electroforming technique, in which the shells are replicated off figured and superpolished mandrels. Several factors in this fabrication process lead to low- and mid-spatial frequency deviations in the surface profile of the shell that degrade the imaging quality of the optics. A differential deposition technique, discussed in this paper, seeks to improve the achievable resolution of the optics by correcting the surface profile deviations of the shells after fabrication. As a proof of concept, the technique was implemented on small-animal radionuclide-imaging x-ray optics being considered for medical applications. This paper discusses the deposition technique, its implementation, and the experimental results obtained to date.

  16. SUBSTRATE EFFECT ON HYDROGENATED MICROCRYSTALLINE SILICON FILMS DEPOSITED WITH VHF-PECVD TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.D. Yang

    2006-01-01

    Raman spectra and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques were used to determine the structural properties of microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films deposited on different substrates with the very high frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition ( VHF-PECVD )technique. Using the Raman spectra, the values of crystalline volume fraction Xc and average grain size d are 86%, 12.3nm; 65%, 5.45nm; and 38%, 4.05nm, for single crystalline silicon wafer,corning 7059 glass, and general optical glass substrates, respectively. The SEM images further demonstrate the substrate effect on the film surface roughness. For the single crystalline silicon wafer and Corning 7059 glass, the surfaces of the μc-Si:H films are fairly smooth because of the homogenous growth or little lattice mismatch. But for general optical glass, the surface of the μc-Si:H film is very rough, thus the growing surface roughness affects the crystallization process and determines the average grain size of the deposited material. Moreover, with the measurements of thickness, photo and dark conductivity, photosensitivity and activation energy, the substrate effect on the deposition rate, optical and electrical properties of the μc-Si:H thin films have also been investigated. On the basis of the above results, it can be concluded that the substrates affect the initial growing layers acting as a seed for the formation of a crystalline-like material, and then the deposition rates, optical and electrical properties are also strongly influenced, hence,deposition parameter optimization is the key method that can be used to obtain a good initial growing layer, to realize the deposition of μc-Si:H films with device-grade quality on cheap substrates such as general glass.

  17. Development of plasma assisted thermal vapor deposition technique for high-quality thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Il; Choi, Yong Sup; Park, Hyun Jae

    2016-12-01

    The novel technique of Plasma-Assisted Vapor Deposition (PAVD) is developed as a new deposition method for thin metal films. The PAVD technique yields a high-quality thin film without any heating of the substrate because evaporated particles acquire energy from plasma that is confined to the inside of the evaporation source. Experiments of silver thin film deposition have been carried out in conditions of pressure lower than 10-3 Pa. Pure silver plasma generation is verified by the measurement of the Ag-I peak using optical emission spectroscopy. A four point probe and a UV-VIS spectrophotometer are used to measure the electrical and optical properties of the silver film that is deposited by PAVD. For an ultra-thin silver film with a thickness of 6.5 nm, we obtain the result of high-performance silver film properties, including a sheet resistance 75%. The PAVD-film properties show a low sheet resistance of 30% and the same transmittance with conventional thermal evaporation film. In the PAVD source, highly energetic particles and UV from plasma do not reach the substrate because the plasma is completely shielded by the optimized nozzle of the crucible. This new PAVD technique could be a realistic solution to improve the qualities of transparent electrodes for organic light emission device fabrication without causing damage to the organic layers.

  18. Polymer Layers by Initiated CVD for Thin Film Gas Barrier Encapsulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, D.A.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter a thorough description of the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) process will be given, concentrating on molecular weight and deposition rate of the deposited polymer, which are essential for largescale application in hybrid gas barriers. Practical applications of coatings by

  19. Effect of substrate roughness on growth of diamond by hot filament CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Awadesh K Mallik; S R Binu; L N Satapathy; Chandrabhas Narayana; Md Motin Seikh; S A Shivashankar; S K Biswas

    2010-06-01

    Polycrystalline diamond coatings are grown on Si (100) substrate by hot filament CVD technique. We investigate here the effect of substrate roughening on the substrate temperature and methane concentration required to maintain high quality, high growth rate and faceted morphology of the diamond coatings. It has been shown that as we increase the substrate roughness from 0.05 m to 0.91 m (centre line average or CLA) there is enhancement in deposited film quality (Raman peak intensity ratio of 3 to non-3 content increases from 1.65 to 7.13) and the substrate temperature can be brought down to 640°C without any additional substrate heating. The coatings grown at adverse conditions for 3 deposition has cauliflower morphology with nanocrystalline grains and coatings grown under favourable 3 condition gives clear faceted grains.

  20. CVD-grown Fe2+:ZnSe polycrystals for laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsov, K. N.; Gavrishchuk, E. M.; Ikonnikov, V. B.; Kazantsev, S. Yu; Kononov, I. G.; Rodin, S. A.; Savin, D. V.; Sirotkin, A. A.; Timofeeva, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    A technique for growing bulk zinc selenide polycrystals, doped with iron ions, by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), has been developed. It has been shown that iron is embedded in the crystal lattice of deposited zinc selenide in the optically active state of Fe2+. To improve the optical quality, the grown material was subjected to postgrowth hot isostatic pressing (HIP) treatment. It was experimentally demonstrated that the synthesised bulk crystals can be used as the active media of Fe2+:ZnSe lasers and as the passive Q-switches for three-micron lasers. The letter goes on to discuss the prospect of extending the proposed method to the synthesis of zinc sulphide doped with iron ions.

  1. A platform for large-scale graphene electronics--CVD growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Jang, Sung Kyu; Jang, Won-Jun; Kim, Minwoo; Park, Seong-Yong; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kahng, Se-Jong; Choi, Jae-Young; Ruoff, Rodney S; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2013-05-21

    Direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) film can suggest a large-scale and high-quality graphene/h-BN film hybrid structure with a defect-free interface. This sequentially grown graphene/h-BN film shows better electronic properties than that of graphene/SiO2 or graphene transferred on h-BN film, and suggests a new promising template for graphene device fabrication.

  2. Rectifying properties of ZnO thin films deposited on FTO by electrodeposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jianguo; Sun, Yue; Zhao, Min; Cao, Li; Xu, Jiayuan; He, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Sun, Zhaoqi

    2016-03-01

    ZnO thin films were successfully grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass by electrodeposition technique. The crystal structure, surface morphology and optical properties of the thin films were investigated. The average crystallite size and intensity of A1(LO) mode increase with improving the absolute value of deposition potential. The best preferential orientation along c-axis and the richest oxygen interstitial defects have been observed in the sample deposited at -0.8 V. A heterojunction device consisting of ZnO thin film and n-type fluorine-doped tin oxide was fabricated. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of the p-n heterojunction device deposited at -0.8 V shows the best rectifying diode behavior. The p-type conductivity of the ZnO thin film could be attributed to complex defect of unintentional impurity and interstitial oxygen.

  3. Thin Film Formation of Gallium Nitride Using Plasma-Sputter Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Flauta

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of gallium nitride (GaN thin film using plasma-sputter deposition technique has beenconfirmed. The GaN film deposited on a glass substrate at an optimum plasma condition has shown x-raydiffraction (XRD peaks at angles corresponding to that of (002 and (101 reflections of GaN. The remainingmaterial on the sputtering target exhibited XRD reflections corresponding to that of bulk GaN powder. Toimprove the system’s base pressure, a new UHV compatible system is being developed to minimize theimpurities in residual gases during deposition. The sputtering target configuration was altered to allow themonitoring of target temperature using a molybdenum (Mo holder, which is more stable against Gaamalgam formation than stainless steel.

  4. Study of SnS2 thin film deposited by spin coating technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Sunil H.; Joshi, Hardikkumar J.; Tailor, Jiten P.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2017-07-01

    Thin film deposition of SnS2 was done by spin coating technique at ambient temperature. Deposition was done for different spin speed and spin time. The film thickness dependence on spin speed and spin time was studied. The spin speed was varied from 1000 rpm to 2000 rpm and spin time from 2 s to 6 s for constant speed of 1000 rpm. The elemental composition and crystal structure along with the phase of the as-deposited thin film was determined by the energy dispersive analysis of x-ray (EDAX) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques respectively. The as-deposited thin film was found to be near stoichiometric and possess hexagonal crystal structure with determined lattice parameters in good agreement with the reported values. The crystallite size calculated from the XRD data using Scherrer’s formula and Hall-Williamson relation came out to be 9.77 nm and 6.49 nm, respectively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of spin deposited thin films showed the film to be continuous. Surface study of the as-deposited thin film was done by simple optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The study showed that the deposited thin film to be flat and uniform without visible cracks and pores. The optical spectroscopy study of the as-deposited thin film showed that the optical bandgap value decreases with increase in film thickness. The d.c. electrical resistivity variation with temperature for spin coating as-deposited SnS2 film showed that the resistivity decreases with increase in temperature corroborating the semiconducting nature. The resistivity variation plot possesses two slopes. The temperature ranges showing two slopes lay between 300 to 383 K and 384 to 423 K having activation energy values for the two temperature ranges as 0.072 eV and 0.633 eV, respectively. The achieved results are deliberated in details.

  5. Thin films and coatings deposited by vacuum techniques; Capas delgadas y recubrimientos obtenidos mediante tecnicas de vacio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albella, J. M.; Endrino, J. L.

    2010-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of the various aspects associated with the development of coatings and thin films in all its aspects, from the preparation techniques to the technological applications. It addresses such important issues, such as the comparison of some techniques with others, or the choice of a deposition method to achieve certain characteristics in the deposited layer. (Author) 8 refs.

  6. Influence of CdS deposition technique for CdS/CdTe solar cells applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Sandra; Plaza, José Luis; Diéguez, Ernesto

    2014-09-01

    The manufacturing of an optimal window layer is essential for a high efficiency solar cell. CdS thin films were deposited on FTO commercial substrates by two different techniques: Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD), and Closed Space Sublimation (CSS) using SiC rods as electrical heating elements. The composition, morphology, and crystalline structure of the CdS thin films were analyzed by Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). CdS layers obtained by CSS have shown good stoichiometries of 51.07(Cd at %), and 48.93(S at %), with the presence of disordered microrods of hexagonal shape. The CdS films obtained by CBD exhibited certain contamination from the bath chemical components and a poor defined structure. In conclusion, the layers deposited by electric heating based CSS present a better morphology and crystal structure than the layers deposited by CBD. The CdTe absorber layer deposited by CSS electric heating also shows good cubic structure and morphology.

  7. Lipase immobilization for catalytic applications obtained using fumed silica deposited with MAPLE technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloisi, Francesco; Califano, Valeria; Perretta, Giuseppe; Nasti, Libera; Aronne, Antonio; Di Girolamo, Rocco; Auriemma, Finizia; De Rosa, Claudio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2016-06-01

    Lipases are enzymes used for catalyzing reactions of acylglycerides in biodiesel production from lipids, where enzyme immobilization on a substrate is required. Silica nanoparticles in different morphologies and configurations are currently used in conjunction with biological molecules for drug delivery and catalysis applications, but up to date their use for triglycerides has been limited by the large size of long-chain lipid molecules. Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE), a laser deposition technique using a frozen solution/suspension as a target, is widely used for deposition of biomaterials and other delicate molecules. We have carried out a MAPLE deposition starting from a frozen mixture containing fumed silica and lipase in water. Deposition parameters were chosen in order to increase surface roughness and to promote the formation of complex structures. Both the target (a frozen thickened mixture of nanoparticles/catalyst in water) and the deposition configuration (a small target to substrate distance) are unusual and have been adopted in order to increase surface contact of catalyst and to facilitate access to long-chain molecules. The resulting innovative film morphology (fumed silica/lipase cluster level aggregation) and the lipase functionality (for catalytic biodiesel production) have been studied by FESEM, FTIR and transesterification tests.

  8. Status of Plasma Physics Techniques for the Deposition of Tribological Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1984-01-01

    The plasma physics deposition techniques of sputtering and ion-plating are reviewed. Their characteristics and potentials are discussed in terms of synthesis or deposition of tribological coatings. Since the glow discharge or plasma generated in the conventional sputtering and ion-plating techniques has a low ionization efficiency, rapid advances have been made in equipment design to further increase the ionization efficiency. The enhanced ionization favorably affects the nucleation and growth sequence of the coating. This leads to improved adherence and coherence, higher density, favorable morphological growth, and reduced internal stresses in the coatings. As a result, desirable coating characteristics can be precision tailored. Tribological coating characteristics of sputtered solid film lubricants such as MoS2, ion-plated soft gold and lead metallic films, and sputtered and ion-plated wear-resistant refractory compound films such as nitrides and carbides are discussed.

  9. Synthesis of nanocrystalline silicon thin films using the increase of the deposition pressure in the hot-wire chemical vapour deposition technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Rath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured thin silicon-based films have been deposited using the hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD technique at the University of the Western Cape. A variety of techniques including optical and infrared spectroscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy, X-rays diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM have been used for characterisation of the films. The electrical measurements show that the films have good values of photoresponse, and the photocurrent remains stable after several hours of light soaking. This contribution will discuss the characteristics of the hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited using increased process chamber pressure at a fixed hydrogen dilution ratio in monosilane gas.

  10. Effect of deposition technique of Ni on the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Co/Ni multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbulut, S., E-mail: sakbulut@gtu.edu.tr [Gebze Technical University, Physics Department, Istanbul Cad, PK 41400 Gebze/Kocaeli (Turkey); Akbulut, A. [Gebze Technical University, Physics Department, Istanbul Cad, PK 41400 Gebze/Kocaeli (Turkey); Özdemir, M. [Marmara University, Physics Department, Göztepe, Istanbul (Turkey); Yildiz, F., E-mail: fyildiz@gtu.edu.tr [Gebze Technical University, Physics Department, Istanbul Cad, PK 41400 Gebze/Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2015-09-15

    The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of Si/Pt 3.5/(Co 0.3/Ni 0.6){sub n} /Co 0.3/ Pt 3 (all thicknesses are nm) multilayers were investigated for two different sample sets by using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and magnetooptic Kerr effect (MOKE) techniques. In the first sample set all layers (buffer, cap, Co and Ni) were grown by magnetron sputtering technique while in the second sample set Ni sub-layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at high vacuum. Apart from deposition technique of Ni, all other parameters like thicknesses and growth rates of each layers are same for both sample sets. Multilayers in these two sample sets display PMA in the as grown state until a certain value of bilayer repetition (n) and the strength of PMA decreases with increasing n. Magnetic easy axis's of the multilayered samples switched from film normal to the film plane when n is 9 and 5 for the first and second sample sets, respectively. The reason for that, PMA was decreased due to increasing roughness with increasing n. This was confirmed by X Ray Reflectivity (XRR) measurements for both sample sets. Moreover, in the first sample set coercive field values are smaller than the second sample set, which means magnetic anisotropy is lower than the latter one. This stronger PMA is arising due to existence of stronger Pt (111) and Co/Ni (111) textures in the second sample set. - Highlights: • Effect of deposition techniques for Ni sub-layers on magnetic properties in [Co/Ni]{sub n} multilayered films was studied. • Ni sub-layers were deposited by two different techniques, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and magnetron sputtering. • Spin reorientation thickness and magnitude of the anisotropy are strongly depending on growing techniques.

  11. Drastically Enhanced High-Rate Performance of Carbon-Coated LiFePO4 Nanorods Using a Green Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Method for Lithium Ion Battery: A Selective Carbon Coating Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ruiyuan; Liu, Haiqiang; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Jiankun; Tan, Xinghua; Liu, Guangyao; Zhang, Lina; Gu, Xiaohua; Guo, Yanjun; Wang, Hanfu; Sun, Lianfeng; Chu, Weiguo

    2015-06-03

    Application of LiFePO4 (LFP) to large current power supplies is greatly hindered by its poor electrical conductivity (10(-9) S cm(-1)) and sluggish Li+ transport. Carbon coating is considered to be necessary for improving its interparticle electronic conductivity and thus electrochemical performance. Here, we proposed a novel, green, low cost and controllable CVD approach using solid glucose as carbon source which can be extended to most cathode and anode materials in need of carbon coating. Hydrothermally synthesized LFP nanorods with optimized thickness of carbon coated by this recipe are shown to have superb high-rate performance, high energy, and power densities, as well as long high-rate cycle lifetime. For 200 C (18s) charge and discharge, the discharge capacity and voltage are 89.69 mAh g(-1) and 3.030 V, respectively, and the energy and power densities are 271.80 Wh kg(-1) and 54.36 kW kg(-1), respectively. The capacity retention of 93.0%, and the energy and power density retention of 93.6% after 500 cycles at 100 C were achieved. Compared to the conventional carbon coating through direct mixing with glucose (or other organic substances) followed by annealing (DMGA), the carbon phase coated using this CVD recipe is of higher quality and better uniformity. Undoubtedly, this approach enhances significantly the electrochemical performance of high power LFP and thus broadens greatly the prospect of its applications to large current power supplies such as electric and hybrid electric vehicles.

  12. Facile Route to NiO Nanostructured Electrode Grown by Oblique Angle Deposition Technique for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Vasudevan; Inamdar, Akbar I; Pawar, Sambaji M; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Park, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik; Chae, Yeon Sik

    2016-07-13

    We report an efficient method for growing NiO nanostructures by oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique in an e-beam evaporator for supercapacitor applications. This facile physical vapor deposition technique combined with OAD presents a unique, direct, and economical route for obtaining high width-to-height ratio nanorods for supercapacitor electrodes. The NiO nanostructure essentially consists of nanorods with varying dimensions. The sample deposited at OAD 75° showed highest supercapacitance value of 344 F/g. NiO nanorod electrodes exhibits excellent electrochemical stability with no degradation in capacitance after 5000 charge-discharge cycles. The nanostructured film adhered well to the substrate and had 131% capacity retention. Peak energy density and power density of the NiO nanorods were 8.78 Wh/kg and 2.5 kW/kg, respectively. This technique has potential to be expanded for growing nanostructured films of other interesting metal/metal oxide candidates for supercapacitor applications.

  13. Catalytic CVD of SWCNTs at Low Temperatures and SWCNT Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Robert; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Graham, Andrew P.; Duesberg, Georg S.; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang; Pompe, Wolfgang

    2004-09-01

    New results on the planar growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at low temperatures will be reported. Optimizing catalyst, catalyst support, and growth parameters yields SWCNTs at temperatures as low as 600 °C. Growth at such low temperatures largely affects the diameter distribution since coalescence of the catalyst is suppressed. A phenomenological growth model will be suggested for CVD growth at low temperatures. The model takes into account surface diffusion and is an alternative to the bulk diffusion based vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) model. Furthermore, carbon nanotubes field effect transistors based on substrate grown SWCNTs will be presented. In these devices good contact resistances could be achieved by electroless metal deposition or metal evaporation of the contacts.

  14. Nano-yttria dispersed stainless steel composites composed by the 3 dimensional fiber deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhiest, K., E-mail: Katelijne.Verhiest@ArcelorMittal.com [ArcelorMittal Gent, Hot Strip Mill Department, J. Kennedylaan 51, 9042 Ghent (Belgium); Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Ghent University, UGent, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE), Technologiepark 903, 9052 Ghent (Belgium); Mullens, S. [Flemish Institute for Technological Research, VITO, Materials Technology, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); De Wispelaere, N.; Claessens, S. [ArcelorMittal Research Industry Gent, OCAS, J. Kennedylaan 3, 9060 Zelzate (Belgium); DeBremaecker, A. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Verbeken, K. [Ghent University, UGent, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE), Technologiepark 903, 9052 Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-09-15

    In this study, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) 316L steel samples were manufactured by the 3 dimensional fiber deposition (3DFD) technique. The performance of 3DFD as colloidal consolidation technique to obtain porous green bodies based on yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nano-slurries or paste, is discussed within this experimental work. The influence of the sintering temperature and time on sample densification and grain growth was investigated in this study. Hot consolidation was performed to obtain final product quality in terms of residual porosity reduction and final dispersion homogeneity.

  15. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  16. HiPIMS: a New Generation of Film Deposition Techniques for SRF Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie [JLAB

    2013-09-01

    Over the years, Nb/Cu technology, despite its shortcomings due to the commonly used magnetron sputtering, has positioned itself as an alternative route for the future of accelerator superconducting structures. Avenues for the production of thin films tailored for Superconducting RF (SRF) applications are showing promise with recent developments in ionized PVD coating techniques, i.e. vacuum deposition techniques using energetic ions. Among these techniques, High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is a promising emerging technique which combines magnetron sputtering with a pulsed power approach. This contribution describes the benefits of energetic condensation for SRF films and the characteristics of the HiPIMS technology. It describes the on-going efforts pursued in different institutions to exploit the potential of this technology to produce bulk-like Nb films and go beyond Nb performance with the development of film systems, based on other superconducting materials and multilayer structures.

  17. Electrocatalysts with platinum, cobalt and nickel preparations by mechanical alloyed and CVD for the reaction of oxygen reduction; Electrocatalizadores a base de platino, cobalto y niquel preparados por aleado mecanico y CVD para la reaccion de reduccion de oxigeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia C, M. A. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    In this research, the molecular oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated on electrocatalysts of Co, Ni, Pt and their alloys CoNi, PtCo, PtNi and PtCoNi by using H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 0.5 and KOH 0.5 M solutions as electrolytes. The electrocatalysts were synthesized by Mechanical Alloying (MA) and Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) processes. For MA, metallic powders were processed during 20 h of milling in a high energy SPEX 8000 mill. For CVD, a hot-wall reactor was utilized and Co, Ni and Pt acetilactetonates were used as precursors. Films were deposited at a total pressure of 1 torr and temperatures of 400-450 C. Electrocatalysts were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Electrocatalysts prepared by mechanical alloying showed a homogeneously dispersed agglomeration of particles with nano metric size. Electrocatalysts obtained by CVD showed, in some cases, non uniform films, with particles of nano metric size, as well. The electrocatalytic performance was evaluated by using the Rotating Disk Electrode technique (RDE). Electrocatalysts prepared by MA showed higher activity than those obtained by CVD. All electrocatalysts were evaluated in alkaline media. Only electrocatalysts containing Pt were evaluated in acid media, because those materials with Co, Ni and their alloys showed instability in acidic media. Most electrocatalysts followed a mechanism for the ORR producing a certain proportion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. All electrocatalysts, exhibited a fair or good electrocatalytic activity in comparison with other similar reported materials. It was found that MA and CVD are appropriate processes to prepare electrocatalysts for the ORR with particles of nano metric size and performing with an acceptable catalytic activity. PtCoNi 70-23-7% by MA and PtCoNi-CVD electrocatalysts showed the highest activity in alkaline media, while in acidic

  18. THz-conductivity of CVD graphene on different substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Cortés, Daniel; Sempere, Bernat; Colominas, Carles; Ferrer Anglada, Núria

    2015-01-01

    Optoelectronic properties of CVD graphene are charac-terized over a wide frequency range: THz, IR, visible and near-UV. We used Raman spectroscopy to characterize the synthesized graphene films. All graphene layers were deposited on various substrates, some ones transparent or flexible, such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), quartz and silicon. Transmission Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) method, in the range from 100 GHz to 3 THz, is used to an...

  19. Crystallographic analysis of CVD films using x-ray polychromatic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavelle, B. [CNRS, Toulouse (France). Centre d`Elaboration de Materiaux et d`Etudes Structurales; Brissonneau, L.; Baggot, E.; Vahlas, C. [INPT-CNRS, Toulouse (France). Lab. Materiaux et Interfaces

    1998-12-31

    The Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffractometry (EDXD) technique was tested for in-situ crystallographic characterization of nickel films processed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The diffracted beam at low Bragg angle was analyzed in energy by a solid state detector. A nickel reference sample was used to face the problems of EDXD background signal and uncertainty of sample location. The relative accuracy on lattice parameters measurements is 1.5.10{sup {minus}3}, to be compared to 0.5.10{sup {minus}3} for classical (monochromatic) X-ray diffraction. Texture measurements yields results in agreement with those obtained form recent texture goniometer. Finally, an estimation of the thickness was obtained from the intensity of nickel fluorescence peak. In view of the obtained results, EDXD appears to be a promising technique for in-situ studies. Although less powerful compared to the synchrotron facility, it is more flexible and can be applied at lower cost.

  20. Synthesis and Optimization of MWCNTs on Co-Ni/MgO by Thermal CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ryu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were prepared by the thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD technique. Monometallic and bimetallic Co and Ni combinations were used as a catalyst on MgO support. The mixer of H2/C2H2 was used as a carbon source. The prepared CNTs were found to possess different shapes, morphologies, and sizes. Maximum yield was found for 50% Co (MgO: 50% and Ni: 0% catalyst at 600°C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM techniques were used for structural analysis. Raman spectra were taken to investigate the quality and crystalline perfection of the prepared CNTs. The ratio of D- and G-bands (ID/IG was measured from these spectra.

  1. Investigation on the priming effect of a CVD diamond microdosimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond microdosimeter is an ideal substitute of common Si.GaAs detector for extremely strong radiation experimental environment due to its high band gap energy, fast charge collection, low dielectric constant and hardness. In order to improve its character, a CVD diamond microdosimeter was irradiated by a proton dose of 46 Gy, and a lateral micro-ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique was utilized to characterize it in low beam current (~fA). It was clearly shown that charge collection efficiency and energy resolution were greatly improved after proton irradiation of that dose. Moreover, the homogeneities of both its counting performance and collection efficiency were enhanced. Proton irradiation of 46 Gy has been proved to be an effective way to prime a CVD diamond.

  2. Investigation on the priming effect of a CVD diamond microdosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Rong Rong; Jiang Da; Li Xiao Lin; Zhu Jie Qing

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond microdosimeter is an ideal substitute of common Si, GaAs detector for extremely strong radiation experimental environmental due to its high band gap energy, fast charge collection, low dielectric constant and hardness. In order to improve its character, a CVD diamond microdosimeter was irradiated by a proton dose of 46 Gy, and a lateral micro-ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique was utilized to characterize it in low beam current (approx fA). It was clearly shown that charge collection efficiency and energy resolution were greatly improved after proton irradiation of that dose. Moreover, the homogeneities of both its counting performance and collection efficiency were enhanced. Proton irradiation of 46 Gy has been proved to be an effective way to prime a CVD diamond

  3. A lithium depth-marker technique for rapid erosion and deposition measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, R.M., E-mail: rsulli@psfc.mit.edu; Pang, A.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Whyte, D.G.

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to determine the change in depth. • Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to determine the change in depth. • Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to determine the change in depth. -- Abstract: A novel, high-resolution technique has been developed for the measurement of erosion and deposition in solid material surfaces. The technique uses a combination of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to determine the change in depth of a previously implanted marker layer consisting of {sup 7}Li. A scoping study shows that {sup 7}Li is an ideal marker candidate due to a high Q (∼18 MeV) nuclear reaction, {sup 7}Li(p,α){sup 4}He. Net erosion or deposition is measured by NRA of modified alpha energy passing through the bulk material. The reaction’s high cross-section provides for the fast time resolution needed to measure erosion from high flux plasmas, and a highly penetrating proton beam provides for a large range of erosion/deposition measurements. Additionally, the implantation of low-Z Li leads to relatively low vacancy concentrations in the solid material due to implantation. This technique thus provides greater assurance that the measured erosion rate is indicative of the solid material: due to both the low vacancy production and the fact that no films or deposits are involved. Validation was performed by comparing the measured and predicted amount of erosion based on previously measured sputtering yields; the two were found to agree, within the uncertainty of the experiment. The depth resolution of the techniques is ∼60 nm at a net erosion depth of about 1 μm. The benefits of this technique are summarized as: short time scales (minutes) to obtain results, the marker layer can be used in any solid material, greater assurance that the measured erosion is indicative of the unperturbed solid material, and the continuous monitoring of the

  4. Synthesis of Colloidal ZnO Nanoparticles and Deposit of Thin Films by Spin Coating Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Alberto Alvarado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO colloidal nanoparticles were synthesized, the average size of these nanoparticles is around 25 nm with hexagonal form. It was noted that stabilization depends directly on the purifying process; in this work we do not change the nature of the solution as a difference from Meulekamp's method, and we do not use any alkanes to remove the byproducts; only a centrifuge to remove those ones was used, thereby the stabilization increases up to 24 days. It is observed from the results that only three times of washing is enough to prevent the rapid aging process. The effect of annealing process on the composition, size, and geometrical shape of ZnO nanoparticles was studied in order to know whether the annealing process affects the crystallization and growth of the nanoparticles. After the synthesis, the colloidal nanoparticles were deposited by spin coating technique showing that the formed nanoparticles have no uniformly deposition pattern. But is possible to deposit those ones in glass substrates. A possible deposition process of the nanoparticles is proposed.

  5. Cold-walled UHV/CVD batch reactor for the growth of Si1_x/Gex layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Christensen, Carsten; Andersen, C.R.;

    1997-01-01

    A novel cold-walled, lamp-heated, ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) batch system for the growth of SiGe layers is presented. This system combines the batch capability of the standard UHV/CVD furnace with the temperature processing available in rapid thermal processing (Rm) equi...

  6. CVD carbon powders modified by ball milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazmierczak Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon powders produced using a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD methods are an interesting subject of research. One of the most interesting methods of synthesizing these powders is using radio frequency plasma. This method, originally used in deposition of carbon films containing different sp2/sp3 ratios, also makes possible to produce carbon structures in the form of powder. Results of research related to the mechanical modification of these powders have been presented. The powders were modified using a planetary ball mill with varying parameters, such as milling speed, time, ball/powder mass ratio and additional liquids. Changes in morphology and particle sizes were measured using scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Phase composition was analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The influence of individual parameters on the modification outcome was estimated using statistical method. The research proved that the size of obtained powders is mostly influenced by the milling speed and the amount of balls. Powders tend to form conglomerates sized up to hundreds of micrometers. Additionally, it is possible to obtain nanopowders with the size around 100 nm. Furthermore, application of additional liquid, i.e. water in the process reduces the graphitization of the powder, which takes place during dry milling.

  7. Magnetic and optical properties of the nickel thin film deposited by GLAD technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potočnik Jelena M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, nickel thin film was deposited on glass sample using Glancing Angle Deposition (GLAD technique, to a thickness of 1 μm. Glass sample was positioned 15 degrees with respect to the nickel vapor flux. The nickel thin film was characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, Magneto- Optical Kerr effect Microscopy and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. According to an AFM cross-section imaging, it was found that the nickel thin film has a columnar structure. The values of the coercively, obtained from the magnetic hysteresis loops, were analyzed as a function of the sample rotation in the magnetic field. It was found that the direction of magnetization easy axis lies toward the structure growth. Optical properties of the nickel thin film were studied at the wavelength of 455 nm. From the shape of the refractive index and the extinction coefficient diagrams could be concluded that the nickel thin film has an optical anisotropy.

  8. Multifunctional thin films of lactoferrin for biochemical use deposited by MAPLE technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Catalin; Palla-Papavlu, Alexandra; Rotaru, Andrei; Florian, Paula; Chelu, Florica; Icriverzi, Madalina; Nedelcea, Anca; Dinca, Valentina; Roseanu, Anca; Dinescu, Maria

    2009-03-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is an iron-binding glycoprotein present in almost all mammalian secretions which plays an important role in host defense against microbial and viral infections. The protein has been reported to also have anti-inflammatory activity and antitumoral effects in vitro and in vivo. Thin films of Lf were deposited on silicon, quartz and Thermanox plastic coverslip substrates by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique, using a Nd:YAG laser working at 266 nm, at different laser fluences (0.1-0.8 J cm -2). The deposited layers have been characterized by Fourier Transformed Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR), and the morphology of the various substrates was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The biocompatibility of lactoferrin thin films was evaluated for each substrate, by in vitro biochemical tests.

  9. Modulating the Optoelectronic Properties of Silver Nanowires Films: Effect of Capping Agent and Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lopez-Diaz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanowires 90 nm in diameter and 9 µm in length have been synthesized using different capping agents: polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP and alkyl thiol of different chain lengths. The nanowire structure is not influenced by the displacement of PVP by alkyl thiols, although alkyl thiols modify the lateral aggregation of nanowires. We examined the effect of the capping agent and the deposition method on the optical and electrical properties of films prepared by Spray and the Langmuir-Schaefer methodologies. Our results revealed that nanowires capped with PVP and C8-thiol present the best optoelectronic properties. By using different deposition techniques and by modifying the nanowire surface density, we can modulate the optoelectronic properties of films. This strategy allows obtaining films with the optoelectronic properties required to manufacture touch screens and electromagnetic shielding.

  10. Factors affecting the superconductivity in the process of depositing Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4-δ by the pulsed electron deposition technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; YanFeng

    2007-01-01

    On SrTiO3 single crystal substrate, by using the pulsed electron deposition technique, the high-quality electron doped Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4-δsuperconducting film was successfully fabricated. After careful study on the R-T curves of the obtained samples deposited with different substrate temperatures, thicknesses, annealing methods and pulse frequencies, the effects of them on the superconductivity of the films were found, and the reasons were also analyzed. Additionally, by using the same model of the pulsed laser deposition technique, the relation between the target-to-substrate distance and the deposition pressure was drawn out as a quantitative one.  ……

  11. Synthesis of conductive semi-transparent silver films deposited by a Pneumatically-Assisted Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaleta-Alejandre, E.; Balderas-Xicoténcatl, R. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados-IPN, Departamento de Física, , Apdo. Postal 14-470, Del, Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07000, México, D.F. (Mexico); Arrieta, M.L. Pérez [Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Académica de Física, Calzada Solidaridad esq. Paseo, La Bufa s/n, C.P. 98060, Zacatecas, México (Mexico); Meza-Rocha, A.N.; Rivera-Álvarez, Z. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados-IPN, Departamento de Física, , Apdo. Postal 14-470, Del, Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07000, México, D.F. (Mexico); Falcony, C., E-mail: cfalcony@fis.cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados-IPN, Departamento de Física, , Apdo. Postal 14-470, Del, Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07000, México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-01

    Highlights: • We deposited metallic silver films without post-deposition annealing. • The spray pyrolysis technique is of low cost and scalable for industrial applications. • We obtained deposition rate of 60 nm min{sup −1} at 300 °C. • The average resistivity was 1E−7 Ω m. • Semi-transparent silver films were obtained at 350 °C and deposition time of 45 s. -- Abstract: The synthesis and characterization of nanostructured silver films deposited on corning glass by a deposition technique called Pneumatically-Assisted Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis are reported. Silver nitrate and triethanolamine were used as silver precursor and reducer agent, respectively. The substrate temperatures during deposition were in the range of 300–450 °C and the deposition times from 30 to 240 s. The deposited films are polycrystalline with cubic face-centered structure, and crystalline grain size less than 30 nm. Deposition rates up to 600 Å min{sup −1} were obtained at substrate temperature as low as 300 °C. The electrical, optical, and morphological properties of these films are also reported. Semi-transparent conductive silver films were obtained at 350 °C with a deposition time of 45 s.

  12. Detection of Atmospheric Water Deposits in Porous Media Using the TDR Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nakonieczna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the intensity of atmospheric water deposition and its diurnal distribution is essential from the ecological perspective, especially regarding dry geographic regions. It is also important in the context of monitoring the amount of moisture present within building materials in order to protect them from excessive humidity. The objective of this study was to test a constructed sensor and determine whether it could detect and track changes in the intensity of atmospheric water deposition. An operating principle of the device is based on the time-domain reflectometry technique. Two sensors of different plate volumes were manufactured. They were calibrated at several temperatures and tested during field measurements. The calibration turned out to be temperature independent. The outdoor measurements indicated that the upper limits of the measurement ranges of the sensors depended on the volumes of the plates and were equal to 1:2 and 2:8 mm H2O. The respective sensitivities were equal to 3.2 x 10-3 and 7.5 x 10-3 g∙ps-1. The conducted experiments showed that the construction of the designed device and the time-domain reflectometry technique were appropriate for detecting and tracing the dynamics of atmospheric water deposition. The obtained outcomes were also collated with the readings taken in an actual soil sample. For this purpose, an open container sensor, which allows investigating atmospheric water deposition in soil, was manufactured. It turned out that the readings taken by the porous ceramic plate sensor reflected the outcomes of the measurements performed in a soil sample.

  13. Radiation Hardness and Linearity Studies of CVD Diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Ghodbane, N; Imhof, A

    2003-01-01

    We report on the behavior of CVD diamonds under intense electromagnetic radiation and on the response of the detector to high density of deposited energy. Diamonds have been found to remain unaffected after doses of 10 MGy of MeV-range photons and the diamond response to energy depositions of up to 250 GeV/cm^3 has been found to be linear to better than 2 %. These observations make diamond an attractive detector material for a calorimeter in the very forward region of the detector proposed for TESLA.

  14. CVD of pure copper films from amidinate precursor

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Copper(I) amidinate [Cu(i-Pr-Me-AMD)]2 was investigated to produce copper films in conventional low pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using hydrogen as reducing gas-reagent. Copper films were deposited on steel, silicon, and SiO2/Si substrates in the temperature range 200–350°C at a total pressure of 1333 Pa. The growth rate on steel follows the surface reaction between atomic hydrogen and the entire precursor molecule up to 240°C. A significant increase of the growth rate at tempera...

  15. Influence of process pressure on β-SiC growth by CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A. A.; Sultanov, A. O.; Gusev, A. S.; Kargin, N. I.; Pavlova, E. P.

    2014-10-01

    3C-SiC films grown on Si (100) substrates by CVD method using silane-propane- hydrogen system were analyzed for crystallinity at various process pressures. The deposition experiments were carried out in a shower-head type cold-wall CVD reactor. The influence of growth conditions on a structural modification of experimental samples was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE).

  16. FABRICATION OF CNTS BY TOLUENE DECOMPOSITION IN A NEW REACTOR BASED ON AN ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE PLASMA JET COUPLED TO A CVD SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELIPE RAMÍREZ-HERNÁNDEZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a method to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs based on the coupling between two conventional techniques used for the preparation of nanostructures: an arc-jet as a source of plasma and a chemical vapour deposition (CVD system. We call this system as an “atmospheric pressure plasma (APP-enhanced CVD” (APPE-CVD. This reactor was used to grow CNTs on non-flat aluminosilicate substrates by the decomposition of toluene (carbon source in the presence of ferrocene (as a catalyst. Both, CNTs and by-products of carbon were collected at three different temperatures (780, 820 and 860 °C in different regions of the APPE-CVD system. These samples were analysed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and DTG, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Raman spectroscopy in order to determine the effect of APP on the thermal stability of the as-grown CNTs. It was found that the amount of metal catalyst in the synthesised CNTs is reduced by applying APP, being 820 °C the optimal temperature to produce CNTs with a high yield and carbon purity (95 wt. %. In contrast, when the synthesis temperature was fixed at 780 °C or 860 °C, amorphous carbon or CNTs with different structural defects, respectively, was formed through APEE-CVD reactor. We recommended the use of non-flat aluminosilicate particles as supports to increase CNT yield and facilitate the removal of deposits from the substrate surface. The approach that we implemented (to synthesise CNTs by using the APPE-CVD reactor may be useful to produce these nanostructures on a gram-scale for use in basic studies. The approach may also be scaled up for mass production.

  17. Effect of CVD-diamond coatings on the tribological performance of cemented tungsten carbide substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleem Ahmad Najar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison has been documented between nanocrystalline diamond (NCD and microcrystalline diamond (MCD coatings deposited on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co substrates with architectures of WC-Co/NCD & WC-Co/MCD, using hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique. In the present work, the frictional characteristics were studied using ball-on-disc type linear reciprocating micro-tribometer, under the application of 1–10N normal loads, when sliding against smooth alumina (Al2O3 ceramic ball for the total duration of 15min, under dry sliding conditions. Nanoindentation tests were also conducted using Berkovich nanoindenter for the purpose of measurement of hardness and elastic modulus values. The average coefficients of friction of MCD and NCD coatings decrease from 0.37 – 0.32 and 0.3 – 0.27 respectively, when the load is increased from 1–10N. However, for conventional WC-Co substrate the average coefficient of friction increases from 0.60–0.75, under the same input operating conditions. The wear tracks formed on the surfaces of CVD-diamond coatings and WC-Co substrate, after friction measurement were characterised using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. However, the compositional analysis for the formation of tribo-layer observed on the wear tracks of CVD-diamond coatings was confirmed using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS technique. Therefore, maintaining an appropriate level of normal load and using appropriate type of diamond coating, friction may be kept to some lower value to improve mechanical processes.

  18. The "Hoover" (vacuum cleaner) technique for calcifying tendonitis deposits excision and removal of the calcific debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehud, Atoun; Ehud, Rath; Alexander, Van Tongel; Ali, Narvani; Giusseppe, Sforza; Ofer, Levy

    2012-07-01

    A new technical tip for the improvement of the arthroscopic treatment of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis is described. Arthroscopic excision of calcifying tendonitis may result with multiple minute calcific debris in the subacromial bursa, causing severe post operative pain due to chemical irritation of the bursa. We suggest the use of a bladeless shaver barrel as a "Hoover" (vacuum cleaner) for arthroscopic clearance of these miniature calcific debris from the subacromial space after resection of the major deposits. The use of this technique resulted in good clinical outcome with improved post operative pain.

  19. High T(sub c) superconductors fabricated by plasma aerosol mist deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. W.; Vuong, K. D.; Leone, A.; Shen, C. Q.; Williams, J.; Coy, M.

    1995-01-01

    We report new results on high T(sub c) superconductors fabricated by a plasma aerosol mist deposition technique, in atmospheric environment. Materials fabricated are YBaCuO, BiPbSrCaCuO, BaCaCuO precursor films for TlBaCaCuO, and other buffers such as YSZ. Depending on processing conditions, sizes of crystallites and/or particles are between dozens of nano-meters and several micrometers. Superconductive properties and other material characteristics can also be tailored.

  20. The "Hoover" (vacuum cleaner technique for calcifying tendonitis deposits excision and removal of the calcific debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atoun Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new technical tip for the improvement of the arthroscopic treatment of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis is described. Arthroscopic excision of calcifying tendonitis may result with multiple minute calcific debris in the subacromial bursa, causing severe post operative pain due to chemical irritation of the bursa. We suggest the use of a bladeless shaver barrel as a "Hoover" (vacuum cleaner for arthroscopic clearance of these miniature calcific debris from the subacromial space after resection of the major deposits. The use of this technique resulted in good clinical outcome with improved post operative pain.

  1. The effect of alkaline doped catalysts on the CVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemeth, Krisztian; Nemeth, Zoltan; Fejes, Dora;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop new doped catalysts for chemical vapour deposition (CVD) synthesis in order to increase the quantity and quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Doping compounds such as CsBr, CsCl, KBr and KCl were used to reach higher carbon deposit and carbon yield. The amount o...

  2. CVD of solid oxides in porous substrates for ceramic membrane modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y.S.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of yttria-doped zirconia has been experimented systematically in various types of porous ceramic substrates by a modified chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process operating in an opposing reactant geometry using water vapor and corresponding metal chloride vapors as reactants. The effe

  3. Surface morphology, growth rate and quality of diamond films synthesized in hot filament CVD system under various methane concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2011-08-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has been used to deposit diamond films on silicon substrate. In the present study, diamond films were grown at various vol.% CH 4 in H 2 from 0.5% to 3.5%, at substrate temperature and pressure of 850 °C and 80 torr, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the properties of deposited films. The formation of methyl radicals as a function of vol.% CH 4 not only changes film morphology but also increase film growth rate. At low, intermediate and high vol.% CH 4, cluster, faceted cubes and pyramidal features growth, were dominant. By increasing vol.% CH 4 from 0.5% to 3.5%, as the growth rate improved from ˜0.25 μm/h to ˜2.0 μm/h. Raman studies features revealed high purity diamond films at intermediate range of vol.% CH 4 and grain density increased by increasing CH 4 concentration. The present study represents experimentally surface morphology, growth rate and quality of diamond films grown in hot filament CVD system at various CH 4 concentrations.

  4. CVD of polymeric thin films: applications in sensors, biotechnology, microelectronics/organic electronics, microfluidics, MEMS, composites and membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde; Coclite, Anna Maria; Gleason, Karen K

    2012-01-01

    Polymers with their tunable functionalities offer the ability to rationally design micro- and nano-engineered materials. Their synthesis as thin films have significant advantages due to the reduced amounts of materials used, faster processing times and the ability to modify the surface while preserving the structural properties of the bulk. Furthermore, their low cost, ease of fabrication and the ability to be easily integrated into processing lines, make them attractive alternatives to their inorganic thin film counterparts. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as a polymer thin-film deposition technique offers a versatile platform for fabrication of a wide range of polymer thin films preserving all the functionalities. Solventless, vapor-phase deposition enable the integration of polymer thin films or nanostructures into micro- and nanodevices for improved performance. In this review, CVD of functional polymer thin films and the polymerization mechanisms are introduced. The properties of the polymer thin films that determine their behavior are discussed and their technological advances and applications are reviewed.

  5. Application of silver nanodendrites deposited on silicon in SERS technique for the trace analysis of paraquat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao Dao, Tran; Quynh Ngan Luong, Truc; Cao, Tuan Anh; Kieu, Ngoc Minh; Le, Van Vu

    2016-03-01

    In order to detect trace concentrations of organic or biological molecules by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique, the SERS-active substrates with high enhancement factor are required. The silver nanodendrites (AgNDs) are a growing class of such SERS-active substrates. This report presents the preliminary results of the trace detection of paraquat (PQ), a commonly used herbicide, with the use of SERS-active substrates, which have been made from AgNDs deposited on silicon. The AgNDs were produced either by electroless deposition, or by electrodeposition onto a silicon wafer, using aqueous solution of HF and AgNO3. It was observed that the silver dendrites are formed only when AgNO3 concentration is high enough. Next, it was found that with the additional assistance of an electric potential in the electrodeposition, the dendrites have grown up with the more perfect ramification. The AgNDs with more perfect branching gave the Raman spectrum of PQ with higher enhancement factor. More specifically, while the SERS-active substrates prepared from electrodeposited AgNDs were able to detect PQ with concentration as low as 0.01 ppm, the ones made from electroless deposited AgNDs could only detect PQ at concentration of hundreds times higher.

  6. Effect of thickness on optical properties of nickel vertical posts deposited by GLAD technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potočnik, J.; Nenadović, M.; Bundaleski, N.; Popović, M.; Rakočević, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Nickel (Ni) thin films of different thicknesses (25 nm to 150 nm) were deposited on glass substrates using Glancing Angle Deposition technique. Characterization of obtained Ni films was performed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and by four-point probe method. Variations in optical parameters with thickness correlated with structural, chemical and electrical properties of nanostructured nickel thin films were studied. The results showed that deposit is porous and consists of nano-scaled columns, which grow perpendicular to the substrate. It was found that the size of the columns and the surface roughness change with film thickness. Spectroscopic ellipsometry revealed that the refractive index and extinction coefficient varied with thickness, which can be correlated with changes in microstructure of Ni films. Additionally, the relationship between the film microstructure and its resistivity was also analyzed. It was found that the variations in Ni films resistivity could be attributed to the changes in the width of the columns. The increasing of layer thickness leads to overall decrease of optical resistivity of nickel thin films.

  7. Strengthening of 3D printed fused deposition manufactured parts using the fill compositing technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T Belter

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries. By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively. We discuss the process parameters necessary to use this strengthening technique and the theoretically possible strength improvements to bending beam members. We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

  8. Detecting salt deposition on a wind turbine blade using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiesh Kumar, V.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Sarathi, R.

    2013-07-01

    The study of pollution performance on a wind turbine blade due to lightning is important, as it can cause major damage to wind turbine blades. In the present work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) technique is used to understand the influence of pollutant deposited on a wind turbine blade in an off-shore environment. A methodical experimental study was carried out by adopting IEC 60507 standards, and it was observed that the lightning discharge propagates at the interface between the pollutant and the glass fiber reinforced plastic (Material used in manufacturing of wind turbine blades). In addition, as a diagnostic condition monitoring technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is proposed and demonstrated to rank the severity of pollutant on the wind turbine blades from a remote area. Optical emission spectra observed during surface discharge process induced by lightning impulse voltage is in agreement with the spectra observed during LIBS.

  9. 3D fibre deposition and stereolithography techniques for the design of multifunctional nanocomposite magnetic scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Roberto; D'Amora, Ugo; Russo, Teresa; Ronca, Alfredo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds based on poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) were fabricated by 3D fibre deposition modelling (FDM) and stereolithography techniques. In addition, hybrid coaxial and bilayer magnetic scaffolds were produced by combining such techniques. The aim of the current research was to analyse some structural and functional features of 3D magnetic scaffolds obtained by the 3D fibre deposition technique and by stereolithography as well as features of multimaterial scaffolds in the form of coaxial and bilayer structures obtained by the proper integration of such methods. The compressive mechanical behaviour of these scaffolds was investigated in a wet environment at 37 °C, and the morphological features were analysed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray micro-computed tomography. The capability of a magnetic scaffold to absorb magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in water solution was also assessed. confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess the in vitro biological behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on 3D structures. Results showed that a wide range of mechanical properties, covering those spanning hard and soft tissues, can be obtained by 3D FDM and stereolithography techniques. 3D virtual reconstruction and SEM showed the precision with which the scaffolds were fabricated, and a good-quality interface between poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) based scaffolds was observed for bilayer and coaxial scaffolds. Magnetised scaffolds are capable of absorbing water solution of MNPs, and a preliminary information on cell adhesion and spreading of hMSCs was obtained without the application of an external magnetic field.

  10. Application of different techniques to obtain spatial estimates of debris flows erosion and deposition depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreggio, Mauro; Gregoretti, Carlo; Degetto, Massimo; Bernard, Martino

    2016-04-01

    In Alpine regions, debris flows endanger settlements and human life. Danger mitigation strategies based on the preparation of hazard maps are necessary tools for the current land planning. To date, hazard maps are obtained by using one- or two-dimensional numerical models that are able to forecast the potential inundated areas, after careful calibration of those input parameters that directly affect the flow motion and its interaction with the ground surface (sediments entrainment or deposition). In principle, the reliability of these numerical models can be tested by flume experiments in laboratory using, for example, particles and water mixtures. However, for more realistic materials including coarse particles, the scaling effects are still difficult to account for. In some cases, where there are enough data (for example, point measures of flow depths and velocities or spatial estimation of erosion and deposition depths), these models can be tested against field observations. As it regards the spatial estimates of debris flows erosion and deposition depths, different approaches can be followed to obtain them, mainly depending on both the type and accuracy of the available initial data. In this work, we explain the methods that have been employed to obtain the maps of erosion and deposition depths for three occurred debris flows in the Dolomites area (North-Eastern Italian Alps). The three events are those occurred at Rio Lazer (Trento) on the 4th of November 1966, at Fiames (Belluno) on the 5th of July 2006 and at Rio Val Molinara (Trento) on the 15th of August 2010. For each case study, we present the available initial data and the related problems, the techniques that have been used to overcome them and finally the results obtained.

  11. Designed nanostructured pt film for electrocatalytic activities by underpotential deposition combined chemical replacement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minghua; Jin, Yongdong; Jiang, Heqing; Sun, Xuping; Chen, Hongjun; Liu, Baifeng; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2005-08-18

    Multiple-deposited Pt overlayer modified Pt nanoparticle (MD-Pt overlayer/PtNPs) films were deliberately constructed on glassy carbon electrodes through alternately multiple underpotential deposition (UPD) of Ag followed redox replacement reaction by Pt (II) cations. The linear and regular growth of the films characterized by cyclic voltammetry was observed. Atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) provides the surface morphology of the nanostructured Pt films. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) voltammetry demonstrate that the MD-Pt overlayer/PtNPs films can catalyze an almost four-electron reduction of O(2) to H(2)O in air-saturated 0.1 M H(2)SO(4). Thus-prepared Pt films behave as novel nanostructured electrocatalysts for dioxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with enhanced electrocatalytic activities, in terms of both reduction peak potential and peak current, when compared to that of the bulk polycrystalline Pt electrode. Additionally, it is noted that after multiple replacement cycles, the electrocatalytic activities improved remarkably, although the increased amount of Pt is very low in comparison to that of pre-modified PtNPs due to the intrinsic feature of the UPD-redox replacement technique. In other words, the electrocatalytic activities could be improved markedly without using very much Pt by the technique of tailoring the catalytic surface. These features may provide an interesting way to produce Pt catalysts with a reliable catalytic performance as well as a reduction in cost.

  12. X-ray sensitivity measurements on CVD diamond film detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulon, F.; Pochet, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Electronique et d`Instrumentation Nucleaire; Gheeraert, E. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1993-12-31

    Microwave chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films have been used to fabricate radiation detectors. The polycrystalline diamond films have a resistivity of 10{sup 12} ohm.cm and carrier mobility and lifetime of about 280 cm{sup 2}/V.s and 530 ps. The detector response to laser pulses (355, 532 and 1064 nm), X-ray flux (15-50 keV) and alpha particles ({sup 241}Am, 5.49 MeV) has been investigated. The response speed of the detector is in the 100 ps range. A sensitivity of about 3 x 10{sup -10} A/V.Gy.s was measured under 50 keV X-ray flux. The detector current response to X-ray flux is almost linear. It is also shown that CVD diamond detectors can be used for alpha particle counting. (authors). 9 figs., 25 refs.

  13. Development of CVD diamond detectors for clinical dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliero, M. A.; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Ryde, S. J. S.; Oliver, K.

    2014-11-01

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) methods for the manufacture of diamonds could lead to detectors for high-resolution radiotherapy dosimetry that are cheaper and more reproducible than detectors based on natural diamonds. In this work two prototype designs (Diamond Detectors Ltd, Poole) of CVD diamond detectors were considered. The detectors were encapsulated in a water-proof housing in a form-factor that would be suitable for dosimetry measurements in water, as well as solid material phantoms. Stability of the dosimeter over time, the dose-response, dose-rate response and angular-response were examined. The study demonstrated that the detector behaviour conformed with theory in terms of the dose-rate response and had acceptable properties for use in the clinic.

  14. Simulation and experimental approach to CVD-FBR aluminide coatings on ferritic steels under steam oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alcala, G. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: galcades@yahoo.es; Bolivar, F.J.; Sanchez, L.; Hierro, M.P.; Perez, F.J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    The ferritic steels used to produce structural components for steam turbines are susceptible to strong corrosion and creep damage due to the extreme working conditions pushed to increase the process efficiency and to reduce pollutants release. The response of aluminide coatings on the P-92 ferritic steel, deposited by CVD-FBR, during oxidation in a simulated steam environment was studied. The analyses were performed at 650 deg. C in order to simulate the working conditions of a steam turbine, and 800 deg. C in order to produce a critical accelerated oxidation test. The Thermo-Calc software was used to predict the different solid phases that could be generated during the oxidation process, in both, coated and uncoated samples. In order to validate the thermodynamic results, the oxides scales produced during steam tests were characterized by different techniques such as XRD, SEM and EDS. The preliminary results obtained are discussed in the present work.

  15. A Bayesian method to estimate the neutron response matrix of a single crystal CVD diamond detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginatto, Marcel; Araque, Jorge Guerrero; Nolte, Ralf; Zbořil, Miroslav; Zimbal, Andreas [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Gagnon-Moisan, Francis [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-01-13

    Detectors made from artificial chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single crystal diamond are very promising candidates for applications where high resolution neutron spectrometry in very high neutron fluxes is required, for example in fusion research. We propose a Bayesian method to estimate the neutron response function of the detector for a continuous range of neutron energies (in our case, 10 MeV ≤ E{sub n} ≤ 16 MeV) based on a few measurements with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. This method is needed because a complete set of measurements is not available and the alternative approach of using responses based on Monte Carlo calculations is not feasible. Our approach uses Bayesian signal-background separation techniques and radial basis function interpolation methods. We present the analysis of data measured at the PTB accelerator facility PIAF. The method is quite general and it can be applied to other particle detectors with similar characteristics.

  16. Computation of flow and thermal fields in a model CVD reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vishwadeep Saxena; K Muralidhar; V Eswaran

    2002-12-01

    Mixing of coaxial jets within a tube in the presence of blockage has been numerically studied. This configuration is encountered during the modelling of flow and heat transfer in CVD (chemical vapour deposition) reactors. For the conditions prevailing in the reactor, the Reynolds numbers are low and flow can be taken to be laminar and incompressible. The unsteady forms of the governing equations have been solved by a finite volume method that can treat complex three-dimensional geometries. The algorithm is a two-step procedure, wherein the first step predicts the velocity field using an assumed pressure field. The second step corrects the fields using a Poisson equation to obtain the pressure corrections. Advection terms have been treated by a hybrid upwind-central difference technique. The computer code developed is fully three-dimensional, though most computations of the present study have been carried out for two-dimensional geometry. Results have been obtained in the form of velocity vector plots, wall shear stress variation on the block and the tube wall, isotherms and temperature profiles. The flow and heat transfer characteristics of jet mixing have been explored in terms of the Reynolds number, the jet velocity ratio, the axial position of the block, and the blockage ratio. The results obtained show that a proper combination of the process parameters can lead to an improved performance of the CVD reactor.

  17. A large-scale NEMS light-emitting array based on CVD graphene (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungsik; Kim, Young Duck; Lee, Changhyuk; Lee, Sunwoo; Seo, Dong-jea; Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Chun, Seung-Hyun; Hone, James; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2017-02-01

    Graphene has received much interest from optical communities largely owing to its photon-like linear energy band structure called Dirac cone. While majority of the recent research has dealt with plasmon and polariton of the two-dimensional material, a recently reported graphene light emitter could render a new dimension of applications, particularly in high-speed optical communication. Moreover chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth technique for graphene is available today providing means for scalable high quality graphene. The reported graphene emitter provides broadband light emission from visible to mid-infrared which could be instrumental in multi-color display units and optical communications, however a truly large scale implementation has not previously been achieved. Here we demonstrate a CMOS-compatible 262,144 light-emitting pixels array (10 x 10 mm2) based on suspended CVD graphene nano-electro-mechanical systems (GNEMS). A single photoemission area is 19.6 µm2 and a unit pixel is consisting of 512 photoemission devices (16 x 16) where a multiplexer and a digital to analog converter (DAC) are used to control each pixel. This work clearly demonstrates scalability of multi-channel GNEMS light-emitting array, an atomically thin electro-optical module, and further paves a path for its commercial implementation transparent display or high-speed optical communication.

  18. Optimization of process parameters in a large-area hot-wire CVD reactor for the deposition of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) for solar cell application with highly uniform material quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflueger, A.; Mukherjee, C.; Schroeder, B. [Department of Physics, Center of Materials Science, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, D-67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Scale-up of a-Si:H-based thin film applications such as solar cells, entirely or partly prepared by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), requires research on the deposition process in a large-area HWCVD system. The influence of gas supply and filament geometry on thickness uniformity has already been reported, but their influence on material quality is systematically studied for the first time. The optimization of deposition parameters for obtaining best material quality in our large-area HWCVD system resulted in an optimum filament temperature, T{sub fil}{approx}1600C, pressure, p=8mTorr and silane flow, F(SiH{sub 4})=100sccm, keeping the substrate temperature at T{sub S}=200C. A special gas supply (gas shower with tiny holes of uniform size) and a filament grid, consisting of six filaments with an interfilament distance, d{sub fil}=4cm were used. The optimum filament-to-substrate distance was found to be d{sub fil-S}=8.4cm. While studying the influence of different d{sub fil} and gas supply configurations on the material quality, the above-mentioned setup and parameters yield best results for both uniformity and material quality. With the setup mentioned, we could achieve device quality a-Si:H films with a thickness uniformity of {+-}2.5% on a circular area of 20cm in diameter. The material, grown at a deposition rate of r{sub d}{approx}4A/s, was characterized on nine positions of the 30cmx30cm substrate area, and revealed reasonable uniformity of the opto-electronic properties, e.g photosensitivity, {sigma}{sub Ph}/{sigma}{sub D}=(2.46{+-}0.7)x10{sup 5}, microstructure factor, R=0.17{+-}0.05, defect densities, N{sub d(PDS)}=(2.06{+-}0.6)x10{sup 17}cm{sup -3} and N{sub d(CPM)}=(2.05{+-}0.5)x10{sup 16}cm{sup -3} (film properties are given as mean values and standard deviations). Finally, we fabricated pin solar cells, with the i-layer deposited on small-area p-substrates distributed over an area of 20cmx20cm in this large-area deposition system, and

  19. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  20. Experimental techniques to determine salt formation and deposition in supercritical water oxidation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J.P.C.; LaJeunesse, C.A.; Rice, S.F.

    1994-08-01

    Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for destroying aqueous organic waste. Feed material, containing organic waste at concentrations typically less than 10 wt % in water, is pressurized and heated to conditions above water`s critical point where the ability of water to dissolve hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals is greatly enhanced. An oxidizer, is then added to the feed. Given adequate residence time and reaction temperature, the SCWO process rapidly produces innocuous combustion products. Organic carbon and nitrogen in the feed emerge as CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}; metals, heteroatoms, and halides appear in the effluent as inorganic salts and acids. The oxidation of organic material containing heteroatoms, such as sulfur or phosphorous, forms acid anions. In the presence of metal ions, salts are formed and precipitate out of the supercritical fluid. In a tubular configured reactor, these salts agglomerate, adhere to the reactor wall, and eventually interfere by causing a flow restriction in the reactor leading to an increase in pressure. This rapid precipitation is due to an extreme drop in salt solubility that occurs as the feed stream becomes supercritical. To design a system that can accommodate the formation of these salts, it is important to understand the deposition process quantitatively. A phenomenological model is developed in this paper to predict the time that reactor pressure begins to rise as a function of the fluid axial temperature profile and effective solubility curve. The experimental techniques used to generate effective solubility curves for one salt of interest, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, are described, and data is generated for comparison. Good correlation between the model and experiment is shown. An operational technique is also discussed that allows the deposited salt to be redissolved in a single phase and removed from the affected portion of the reactor. This technique is demonstrated experimentally.

  1. Flexible a-Si:H/nc-Si:H tandem thin film silicon solar cells on plastic substrates with i-layers made by hot-wire CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongbo; Werf, C.H.M. van der; Rath, J.K. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, SID - Physics of Devices, Utrecht (Netherlands); Borreman, A. [Helianthos b.v., Arnhem (Netherlands); Schropp, Ruud E.I.

    2008-08-15

    In this letter we report the result of an a-Si:H/nc-Si:H tandem thin film silicon solar mini-module fabricated on plastic foil containing intrinsic silicon layers made by hot-wire CVD (efficiency 7.4%, monolithically series-connected, aperture area 25 cm{sup 2}). We used the Helianthos cell transfer process. The cells were first deposited on a temporary aluminum foil carrier, which allows the use of the optimal processing temperatures, and then transferred to a plastic foil. This letter reports the characteristics of the flexible solar cells obtained in this manner, and compares the results with those obtained on reference glass substrates. The research focus for implementation of the hot-wire CVD technique for the roll-to-roll process is also discussed. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Investigation on vanadium oxide thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margoni, Mudaliar Mahesh; Mathuri, S.; Ramamurthi, K., E-mail: krmurthin@yahoo.co.in, E-mail: ramamurthi.k@ktr.srmuniv.ac.in [Crystal Growth and Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, SRM University, Kattankulathur – 603 203, Kancheepuram Dt., Tamil Nadu (India); Babu, R. Ramesh [Crystal Growth and Thin Film Laboratory, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli – 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Sethuraman, K. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai – 625 021, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-05-06

    Vanadium oxide thin films were deposited at 400 °C by spray pyrolysis technique using 0.1 M aqueous precursor solution of ammonium meta vanadate (AMV) with two different pH values. X-ray diffraction results showed that the film prepared using aqueous precursor AMV solution (solution A; pH 7) is amorphous in nature and the film prepared by adding HNO{sub 3} in the AMV aqua solution A (solution B; pH 3) is polycrystalline in nature. Vanadium oxide film prepared from the precursor solution B is in the mixed phases of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and V{sub 4}O{sub 7}. Crystallinity is improved for the film prepared using solution B when compared to film prepared from solution A. Crystallite size, strain and dislocation density calculated for the film prepared from solution B is respectively 72.1 nm, 0.4554 × 10{sup −3} lin.{sup −2}m{sup −4} and 1.7263 × 10{sup 14} lin.m{sup −2}. Morphology study revealed that the size of the flakes formed on the surface of the films is influenced by the pH of the precursor solution. Average Visible Transmittance and maximum transmittance of the deposited films exceed 70% and the direct optical band gap value calculated for the films deposited from A and B solution is 1.91 eV and 2.08 eV respectively.

  3. Using 137Cs Tracer Technique to Evaluate Erosion and Deposition of Black Soil in Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Soil and water losses through erosion have been serious in the black soil region of Northeast China. Therefore, a sloping cultivated land in Songnen Plain was selected as a case study to: 1) determine the 137Cs reference inventory in the study area; 2) calculate erosion and deposition rates of black soil on different slope locations; 3) conduct a sensitivity analysis of some model parameters; and 4) compare overall outputs using four different models. Three transects were set in the field with five slope locations for each transect, including summit, shoulder-slope, back-slope, foot-slope, and toe-slope. Field measurements and model simulation were used to estimate a bomb-derived 137Cs reference inventory in the study area.Soil erosion and deposition rates were estimated using four 137Cs models and percentage of 137Cs loss/gain. The 137Cs reference value in the study area was 2 232.8 Bq m-2 with 137Cs showing a clear topographic pattern, decreasing from the summit to shoulder-slope, then increasing again at the foot-slope and reaching a maximum at the toe-slope. Predicted soil redistribution rates for different slope locations varied. Among models, the Yang Model (YANG-M) overestimated erosion loss but underestimated deposition. However, the standard mass balance model (MBM1) gave predictions similar to a mass balance model incorporating soil movement by tillage (MBM2). Sensitivity analysis of the proportion factor γand distribution pattern of 137Cs in the surface layer demonstrated the impact of 137Cs enrichment on calculation of the soil erosion rate. Factors influencing the redistribution of fallout 137Cs in landscape should be fully considered as calculating soil redistribution rate using 137Cs technique.

  4. Thickness effect on properties of titanium film deposited by d.c. magnetron sputtering and electron beam evaporation techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nishat Arshi; Junqing Lu; Chan Gyu Lee; Jae Hong Yoon; Bon Heun Koo; Faheem Ahmed

    2013-10-01

    This paper reports effect of thickness on the properties of titanium (Ti) film deposited on Si/SiO2 (100) substrate using two different methods: d.c. magnetron sputtering and electron beam (e-beam) evaporation technique. The structural and morphological characterization of Ti film were performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). XRD pattern revealed that the films deposited using d.c. magnetron sputtering have HCP symmetry with preferred orientation along (002) plane, while those deposited with e-beam evaporation possessed fcc symmetry with preferred orientation along (200) plane. The presence of metallic Ti was also confirmed by XPS analysis. FESEM images depicted that the finite sized grains were uniformly distributed on the surface and AFM micrographs revealed roughness of the film. The electrical resistivity measured using four-point probe showed that the film deposited using d.c. magnetron sputtering has lower resistivity of ∼13 cm than the film deposited using e-beam evaporation technique, i.e. ∼60 cm. The hardness of Ti films deposited using d.c. magnetron sputtering has lower value (∼7.9 GPa) than the film deposited using e-beam technique (∼9.4 GPa).

  5. [An investigation of HAP/organic polymer composite coatings prepared by electrochemical co-deposition technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haobing; Lin, Changjian; Leng, Yang

    2003-03-01

    An electrochemical co-deposition technique has been developed to prepare a hydroxyapatite (HAP)/organic polymer composite coatings on Ti surface as new biomaterial of hard tissue. The composite coating of organic polymer and calcium phosphate is formed by adding a water soluble polymer of the ethylene series to NH4H2PO4-Ca (NO3)2 solution when conducting an appropriate electrochemical co-deposition experiment. The XRD, SEM, XPS, SIMS and nano indent measurements were performed to characterize the morphology, composition, structure and surface stiffness of the composite coating. It was found that the morphology and surface hardness of the coatings showed a remarkable modification when introducing a minor polymer to HAP coating, and the bonding force between the coating and metal substrate was distinctly increased. The incorporation of minor organic polymer into the HAP compound at molecular level will improve the mechanical properties and morphology of the composite coatings, and this may be helpful to raising its bio-activity.

  6. Kinetics of niobium carbide coating produced on AISI 1040 steel by thermo-reactive deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ugur

    2004-07-15

    There are a lot of technologically interesting characteristics of niobium carbide coating deposited by pack method which is the production of hard, wear-resistant, oxidation and corrosion resistant coating layer on the steel substrates. In the present study, the growth kinetics of niobium carbide layer deposited by thermo-reactive diffusion techniques in a solid medium on steel samples was reported. Niobium carbide coating treatment was performed on AISI 1040 steels in the powder mixture consisting of ferro-niobium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1073, 1173 and 1273 K for 1-4 h. The presence of NbC and Nb{sub 2}C phases formed on the surface of the steel substrates was confirmed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analyses. Niobium carbide layer thickness ranges from 3.42{+-}0.52 to 11.78{+-}2.29 {mu}m depending upon the treatment time and temperature. Layer growth kinetics was analyzed by measuring the depth of niobium carbide layer as a function of time and temperature. The kinetics of niobium carbide coating by pack method shows a parabolic relationship between carbide layer thickness and treatment time, and the activation energy for the process is estimated to be 91.257 kJ mol{sup -1}. Moreover, an attempt was made to investigate the possibility of predicting the contour diagram of niobium carbide layer variation and to establish some empirical relationships between process parameters and niobium carbide layer thickness.

  7. Polyethylene-Carbon Nanotube Composite Film Deposited by Cold Spray Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Nobuhisa; Ohtake, Naoto; Akasaka, Hiroki

    2017-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are high-performance materials because of their superior electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and self-lubrication, and they have been studied for application to polymer composite materials as fillers. However, the methods of fabricating polymer composites with CNTs, such as injection molding, are too complicated for industrial applications. We propose a simple cold spray (CS) technique to obtain a polymer composite of polyethylene (PE) and CNTs. The composite films were deposited by CS on polypropylene and nano-porous structured aluminum substrates. The maximum thickness of the composite film was approximately 1 mm. Peaks at G and D bands were observed in the Raman spectra of the films. Scanning electron microscopy images of the film surface revealed that PE particles were melted by the acceleration gas and CNTs were attached with melted PE. The PE particles solidified after contact with the substrate. These results indicate that PE-CNT composite films were successfully deposited on polypropylene and nano-porous structured aluminum substrates by CS.

  8. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors: Consideration of cost and chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zheng; Weizhong Qian; Chaojie Cui; Guanghui Xu; Mengqiang Zhao; Guili Tian; Fei Wei

    2012-01-01

    In this topic,we first discussed the requirement and performance of supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the electrode,including specific surface area,purity and cost.Then we reviewed the preparation technique of single walled CNTs (SWNTs) in relatively large scale by chemical vapor deposition method.Its catalysis on the decomposition of methane and other carbon source,the reactor type and the process control strategies were discussed.Special focus was concentrated on how to increase the yield,selectivity,and purity of SWNTs and how to inhibit the formation of impurities,including amorphous carbon,multiwalled CNTs and the carbon encapsulated metal particles,since these impurities seriously influenced the performance of SWNTs in supercapacitors.Wish it be helpful to further decrease its product cost and for the commercial use in supercapacitors.

  9. Depositing nanoparticles on a silicon substrate using a freeze drying technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigehuzi, Tomoo

    2017-08-01

    For the microscopic observation of nanoparticles, an adequate sample preparation is an essential part of this task. Much research has been performed for usable preparation methods that will yield aggregate-free samples. A freeze drying technique, which only requires a -80 °C freezer and a freeze dryer, is shown to provide an on-substrate dispersion of mostly isolated nanoparticles. The particle density could be made sufficiently high for efficient observations using atomic force microscopy. Since this sandwich method is purely physical, it could be applied to deposit various nanoparticles independent of their surface chemical properties. Suspension film thickness, or the dimensionality of the suspension film, was shown to be crucial for the isolation of the particles. Silica nanoparticles were dispersed on a silicon substrate using this method and the sample properties were examined using atomic force microscopy.

  10. Tight comparison of Mg and Y thin film photocathodes obtained by the pulsed laser deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, A.; Gontad, F.; Solombrino, L.; Chiadroni, E.; Broitman, E.; Perrone, A.

    2016-11-01

    In this work Magnesium (Mg) and Yttrium (Y) thin films have been deposited on Copper (Cu) polycrystalline substrates by the pulsed laser ablation technique for photocathode application. Such metallic materials are studied for their interesting photoemission properties and are proposed as a good alternative to the Cu photocathode, which is generally used in radio-frequency guns. Mg and Y films were uniform with no substantial differences in morphology; a polycrystalline structure was found for both of them. Photoemission measurements of such cathodes based on thin films were performed, revealing a quantum efficiency higher than Cu bulk. Photoemission theory according to the three-step model of Spicer is invoked to explain the superior photoemission performance of Mg with respect to Y.

  11. Optical characteristics of transparent samarium oxide thin films deposited by the radio-frequency sputtering technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A A ATTA; M M EL-NAHASS; KHALED M ELSABAWY; M M ABD EL-RAHEEM; A M HASSANIEN; A ALHUTHALI; ALI BADAWI; AMAR MERAZGA

    2016-11-01

    Transparent metal oxide thin films of samarium oxide (Sm$_2$O$_3$) were prepared on pre-cleaned fused optically flat quartz substrates by radio-frequency (RF) sputtering technique. The as-deposited thin films were annealed at different temperatures (873, 973 and 1073 K) for 4 h in air under normal atmospheric pressure. The topological morphology of the film surface was characterized by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The optical properties of the as-prepared and annealed thin films were studied using their reflectance and transmittance spectra at nearly normal incident light. The estimated direct optical band gap energy (E$^{d}_{g}$ ) values were found to increase by increasing the annealing temperatures. The dispersion curves of the refractive index of Sm$_2$O$_3$ thin films were found to obey the single oscillator model.

  12. Structural and optical properties of CdO thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, G. Anil, E-mail: anilhcu@gmail.com; Reddy, M. V. Ramana, E-mail: anilhcu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad-500007 (India); Reddy, Katta Narasimha, E-mail: anilhcu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Nalgonda-508003 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Cadmium oxide (CdO) thin films were deposited on glass substrate by r.f. magnetron sputtering technique using a high purity (99.99%) Cd target of 2-inch diameter and 3 mm thickness in an Argon and oxygen mixed atmosphere with sputtering power of 50W and sputtering pressure of 2×10{sup −2} mbar. The prepared films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD analysis reveals that the films were polycrystalline with cubic structure. The visible range transmittance was found to be over 70%. The optical band gap increased from 2.7 eV to2.84 eV with decrease of film thickness.

  13. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  14. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  15. Synthesis of designed materials by laser-based direct metal deposition technique: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huan

    Direct metal deposition (DMD), a laser-cladding based solid freeform fabrication technique, is capable of depositing multiple materials at desired composition which makes this technique a flexible method to fabricate heterogeneous components or functionally-graded structures. The inherently rapid cooling rate associated with the laser cladding process enables extended solid solubility in nonequilibrium phases, offering the possibility of tailoring new materials with advanced properties. This technical advantage opens the area of synthesizing a new class of materials designed by topology optimization method which have performance-based material properties. For better understanding of the fundamental phenomena occurring in multi-material laser cladding with coaxial powder injection, a self-consistent 3-D transient model was developed. Physical phenomena including laser-powder interaction, heat transfer, melting, solidification, mass addition, liquid metal flow, and species transportation were modeled and solved with a controlled-volume finite difference method. Level-set method was used to track the evolution of liquid free surface. The distribution of species concentration in cladding layer was obtained using a nonequilibrium partition coefficient model. Simulation results were compared with experimental observations and found to be reasonably matched. Multi-phase material microstructures which have negative coefficients of thermal expansion were studied for their DMD manufacturability. The pixel-based topology-optimal designs are boundary-smoothed by Bezier functions to facilitate toolpath design. It is found that the inevitable diffusion interface between different material-phases degrades the negative thermal expansion property of the whole microstructure. A new design method is proposed for DMD manufacturing. Experimental approaches include identification of laser beam characteristics during different laser-powder-substrate interaction conditions, an

  16. Deposition uniformity inspection in IC wafer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W. C.; Lin, Y. T.; Jeng, J. J.; Chang, C. L.

    2014-03-01

    This paper focuses on the task of automatic visual inspection of color uniformity on the surface of integrated circuits (IC) wafers arising from the layering process. The oxide thickness uniformity within a given wafer with a desired target thickness is of great importance for modern semiconductor circuits with small oxide thickness. The non-uniform chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a wafer surface will proceed to fail testing in Wafer Acceptance Test (WAT). Early detection of non-uniform deposition in a wafer surface can reduce material waste and improve production yields. The fastest and most low-priced inspection method is a machine vision-based inspection system. In this paper, the proposed visual inspection system is based on the color representations which were reflected from wafer surface. The regions of non-uniform deposition present different colors from the uniform background in a wafer surface. The proposed inspection technique first learns the color data via color space transformation from uniform deposition of normal wafer surfaces. The individual small region statistical comparison scheme then proceeds to the testing wafers. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively detect the non-uniform deposition regions on the wafer surface. The inspection time of the deposited wafers is quite compatible with the atmospheric pressure CVD time.

  17. Mass production of CNTs using CVD multi-quartz tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, Samy; Mohamed, Alaa [Dept. of Production Engineering and Printing Technology, Akhbar Elyom Academy, Giza (Egypt)

    2016-11-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become the backbone of modern industries, including lightweight and heavy-duty industrial applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is considered as the most common method used to synthesize high yield CNTs. This work aims to develop the traditional CVD for the mass production of more economical CNTs, meeting the growing CNT demands among consumers by increasing the number of three particular reactors. All reactors housing is connected by small channels to provide the heat exchange possibility between the chambers, thereby decreasing synthesis time and reducing heat losses inside the ceramic body of the furnace. The novel design is simple and cheap with a lower reacting time and heat loss compared with the traditional CVD design. Methane, hydrogen, argon, and catalyzed iron nanoparticles were used as a carbon source and catalyst during the synthesis process. In addition, CNTs were produced using only a single quartz tube for comparison. The produced samples were examined using XRD, TEM, SEM, FTIR, and TGA. The results showed that the yield of CNTs increases by 287 % compared with those synthesized with a single quartz tube. Moreover, the total synthesis time of CNTs decreases by 37 % because of decreased heat leakage.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  19. Regular growth combined with lateral etching in diamond deposited over silicon substrate by using hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2013-05-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition has proved to be an attractive method for growing diamond films with good quality and higher growth rate. Diamond films were produced at deposition parameters under which, it is possible to have regular growth combined with lateral etching (RGCLE). Fracture cross-section SEM images showed that RGCLE initiated over polycrystalline diamond film and proceeded by the growth of consecutive steps in each crystallite, which terminated with square/rectangle shaped facets. All the diamond films exhibit RGCLE but with different type of growth behavior. Present work discusses the cyclic formation of the steps in diamond crystallites and RGCLE modes. RGCLE in diamond film may find important applications where heat absorption and dissipation are key issues.

  20. PE-CVD fabrication of germanium nanoclusters for memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerkop, T. [Institut fuer Materialien und Bauelemente der Elektronik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 11a, 30167 Hannover (Germany)], E-mail: duerkop@mbe.uni-hannover.de; Bugiel, E. [Institut fuer Materialien und Bauelemente der Elektronik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 11a, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Costina, I. [IHP GmbH, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Ott, A.; Peibst, R.; Hofmann, K.R. [Institut fuer Materialien und Bauelemente der Elektronik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 11a, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    We have investigated Ge nanoclusters (Ge-NC) embedded in silicon dioxide, whose fundamental properties promise improved characteristics in NC flash memory devices as compared to Si nanoclusters. We present a simple new method, based on plasma-enhanced CVD (PE-CVD) deposition of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) onto SiO{sub 2}, to create gate stacks with embedded Ge-NC at vertically well-controlled positions suitable for use in flash memory devices. This process minimizes the exposure of Ge to environmental influences by depositing a-Ge as well as a SiO{sub 2} cap layer in situ within the same deposition chamber. Subsequent high-temperature anneals compatible with the temperature budget of CMOS processing are used for the actual cluster formation. Variation of annealing temperature and duration of this step as well as the thickness of the initial Ge layer controls the average cluster radius and density, as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Measurements of electrical properties show the capability of samples with NC to store charge.

  1. High Quality SiGe Layer Deposited by a New Ultrahigh Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) system is developed and the details of its construction and operation are reported. Using high purity SiH4 and GeH4 reactant gases,the Si0.82Ge0.18 layer is deposited at 550℃. With the measurements by double crystal X-ray diffraction (DCXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) techniques, it is shown that the crystalline quality of the SiGe layer is good,and the underlying SiGe/Si heterointerface is sharply defined.

  2. Urchin-like artificial gallium oxide nanowires grown by a novel MOCVD/CVD-based route for random laser application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Ronaldo P. de [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Colégio Militar do Recife, Exército Brasileiro, Recife PE 50730-120 (Brazil); Oliveira, Nathalia Talita C. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Dominguez, Christian Tolentino; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Araújo, Cid B. de [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife (Brazil); Falcão, Eduardo H. L.; Alves, Severino; Luz, Leonis L. da [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife (Brazil); Chassagnon, Remi [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Sacilotti, Marco [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife (Brazil); Nanoform Group, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon (France)

    2016-04-28

    A novel procedure based on a two-step method was developed to obtain β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The first step consists in the gallium micro-spheres growth inside a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition environment, using an organometallic precursor. Nanoscale spheres covering the microspheres were obtained. The second step involves the CVD oxidization of the gallium micro-spheres, which allow the formation of β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires on the micro-sphere surface, with the final result being a nanostructure mimicking nature's sea urchin morphology. The grown nanomaterial is characterized by several techniques, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. A discussion about the growth mechanism and the optical properties of the β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} material is presented considering its unknown true bandgap value (extending from 4.4 to 5.68 eV). As an application, the scattering properties of the nanomaterial are exploited to demonstrate random laser emission (around 570 nm) when it is permeated with a laser dye liquid solution.

  3. CVD growth and processing of graphene for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Shishir; Rezvani, Ehsan; Nolan, Hugo; Duesberg, Georg S. [School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); McEvoy, Niall; Kim, Hye-Young; Lee, Kangho; Peltekis, Nikos; Weidlich, Anne; Daly, Ronan [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-11-15

    The remarkable properties of graphene have potential for numerous applications; however, their exploitation depends on its reliable production. The chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth of graphene on metal surfaces has become one of the most promising strategies for the production of high quality graphene in a scaleable manner. Here, we discuss graphene growth on nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu) directly from both gaseous hydrocarbons and solid carbon precursors. Further, we discuss in detail the transfer of graphene films to insulating substrates, by direct and polymer supported transfer methods. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Ultratough CVD single crystal diamond and three dimensional growth thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, Russell J [Washington, DC; Mao, Ho-kwang [Washington, DC; Yan, Chih-shiue [Washington, DC

    2009-09-29

    The invention relates to a single-crystal diamond grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition that has a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention also relates to a method of producing a single-crystal diamond with a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a process for producing a single crystal CVD diamond in three dimensions on a single crystal diamond substrate.

  5. CVD diamond resistor as heater and temperature sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.S.; Aslam, M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Heat generation and temperature control, essential for most heater applications, require different components in a conventional system. We achieve the heat generation and temperature measurement simultaneously by using a single diamond resistor. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) p-type diamond resistors with different dimensions were fabricated on polycrystalline diamond or oxidized Si substrates using diamond film technology compatible with integrated circuit (IC) processing. The temperature response of the resistors was characterized in the temperature range of 25 - 500{degrees}C. Power densities in access of 600 watt/in{sup 2} were achieved.

  6. Development of CVD Mullite Coatings for SiC Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarin, V.K.; Varadarajan, S.

    2000-03-15

    A process for depositing CVD mullite coatings on SiC fibers for enhanced oxidation and corrosion, and/or act as an interfacial protective barrier has been developed. Process optimization via systematic investigation of system parameters yielded uniform crystalline mullite coatings on SiC fibers. Structural characterization has allowed for tailoring of coating structure and therefore properties. High temperature oxidation/corrosion testing of the optimized coatings has shown that the coatings remain adherent and protective for extended periods. However, preliminary tests of coated fibers showed considerable degradation in tensile strength.

  7. CVD diamond sensor for UV-photon detection

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Gervino, G; Lamarina, A M; Palmisano, C; Periale, R; Picchi, P

    2012-01-01

    A new generation of UV photosensors, based on single crystal Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamonds to work optically coupled with large volume two-phase liquid-Ar (LAr) or liquid-Xe (LXe) detectors nowadays under design for the next generation of WIMPs experiments, is under development. Preliminary tests and first calibrations show these devices can have better performance than the existing UV sensitive detectors (higher photosensitivity and better signal-to-noise ratio). I-V characteristics, dark current measurements, linearity response to X-ray irradiation, and alpha-particle energy resolution are reported and discussed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heavy Metals and Trace Elements Atmospheric Deposition Studies in Tula Region Using Moss Biomonitors Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Ermakova, E V; Steinnes, E

    2002-01-01

    For the first time the moss biomonitors technique was used in air pollution studies in Tula Region (Central Russia), applying NAA, AAS. Moss samples were collected at 83 sites in accordance with the sampling strategy adopted in European projects on biomonitoring atmospheric deposition. A wide set of trace elements in mosses was determined. The method of epithermal neutron activation at IBR-2 reactor of FLNP JINR has made it possible to identify 33 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Mo, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Sm, Tb, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Th, U) in the large-scale concentration range - from 10000 ppm for K to 0,001 ppm for Tb and Ta. Cu, Cd and Pb were determined by the flame AAS in the Norwegian Institute of Science and Technology. Using the graphical technique and principal component analysis allowed to separate plant, crustal and general pollution components in the moss. The obtained data will be used for constructing coloured maps of the distribution of elements over t...

  9. Surface properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by CVD and PVD methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dong-Ping; Liu Yan-Hong; Chen Bao-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited using three different techniques: (a) electron cyclotron resonance-plasma source ion implantation, (b) low-pressure dielectric barrier discharge, (c) filtered-pulsed cathodic arc discharge. The surface and mechanical properties of these films are compared using atomic force microscopebased tests. The experimental results show that hydrogenated DLC films are covered with soft surface layers enriched with hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon while the soft surface layers of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films have graphite-like structure. The formation of soft surface layers can be associated with the surface diffusion and growth induced by the low-energy deposition process. For typical CVD methods, the atomic hydrogen in the plasmas can contribute to the formation of hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon enriched surface layers. The high-energy ion implantation causes the rearrangement of atoms beneath the surface layer and leads to an increase in film density. The ta-C films can be deposited using the medium energy carbon ions in the highly-ionized plasma.

  10. A review of hydroxyapatite-based coating techniques: Sol-gel and electrochemical depositions on biocompatible metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asri, R I M; Harun, W S W; Hassan, M A; Ghani, S A C; Buyong, Z

    2016-04-01

    New promising techniques for depositing biocompatible hydroxyapatite-based coatings on biocompatible metal substrates for biomedical applications have continuously been exploited for more than two decades. Currently, various experimental deposition processes have been employed. In this review, the two most frequently used deposition processes will be discussed: a sol-gel dip coating and an electrochemical deposition. This study deliberates the surface morphologies and chemical composition, mechanical performance and biological responses of sol-gel dip coating as well as the electrochemical deposition for two different sample conditions, with and without coating. The review shows that sol-gel dip coatings and electrochemical deposition were able to obtain the uniform and homogeneous coating thickness and high adherent biocompatible coatings even in complex shapes. It has been accepted that both coating techniques improve bone strength and initial osseointegration rate. The main advantages and limitations of those techniques of hydroxyapatite-based coatings are presented. Furthermore, the most significant challenges and critical issues are also highlighted.

  11. Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth. Final Report, December 29, 1975 -- August 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array (LSSA) Project. The results of 20 months of experimental work are summarized. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures by OCLI, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques, supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n exp + /p/p exp + sheet structures subsquently processed into experimental cells. The principal CVD process used was silane (SiH sub 4 ) pyrolysis, although a few experiments were done with the dichlorosilane (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 ) process for Si deposition. The evaluation of various possiblesubstrate materials, the CVD parameter investigations, and the experimental solar cell fabrication and characterization are described in considerable detail. Specific conclusions of the work are discussed, and recommendations for continued investigations in certain areas are given.

  12. Fracture Characteristics of Monolayer CVD-Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwangbo, Yun; Lee, Choong-Kwang; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Jang, Bongkyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Su; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-03-01

    We have observed and analyzed the fracture characteristics of the monolayer CVD-graphene using pressure bulge testing setup. The monolayer CVD-graphene has appeared to undergo environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth in room condition, i.e. stress corrosion cracking arising from the adsorption of water vapor on the graphene and the subsequent chemical reactions. The crack propagation in graphene has appeared to be able to be reasonably tamed by adjusting applied humidity and stress. The fracture toughness, describing the ability of a material containing inherent flaws to resist catastrophic failure, of the CVD-graphene has turned out to be exceptionally high, as compared to other carbon based 3D materials. These results imply that the CVD-graphene could be an ideal candidate as a structural material notwithstanding environmental susceptibility. In addition, the measurements reported here suggest that specific non-continuum fracture behaviors occurring in 2D monoatomic structures can be macroscopically well visualized and characterized.

  13. Non-classical crystallization of thin films and nanostructures in CVD and PVD processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Nong Moon

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to a recently-developed approach to the growth mechanism of thin films and nanostructures via chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Starting from the underlying principles of the low pressure synthesis of diamond films, it is shown that diamond growth occurs not by individual atoms but by charged nanoparticles. This newly-discovered growth mechanism turns out to be general to many CVD and some physical vapor deposition (PVD) processes. This non-classical crystallization is a new paradigm of crystal growth, with active research taking place on growth in solution, especially in biomineralization processes. Established understanding of the growth of thin films and nanostructures is based around processes involving individual atoms or molecules. According to the author’s research over the last two decades, however, the generation of charged gas phase nuclei is shown to be the rule rather than the exception in the CVD process, and charged gas phase nuclei are actively ...

  14. iCVD Cyclic Polysiloxane and Polysilazane as Nanoscale Thin-Film Electrolyte: Synthesis and Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Reeja-Jayan, B; Liu, Andong; Lau, Jonathan; Dunn, Bruce; Gleason, Karen K

    2016-03-01

    A group of crosslinked cyclic siloxane (Si-O) and silazane (Si-N) polymers are synthesized via solvent-free initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Notably, this is the first report of cyclic polysilazanes synthesized via the gas-phase iCVD method. The deposited nanoscale thin films are thermally stable and chemically inert. By iCVD, they can uniformly and conformally cover nonplanar surfaces having complex geometry. Although polysiloxanes are traditionally utilized as dielectric materials and insulators, our research shows these cyclic organosilicon polymers can conduct lithium ions (Li(+) ) at room temperature. The conformal coating and the room temperature ionic conductivity make these cyclic organosilicon polymers attractive for use as thin-film electrolytes in solid-state batteries. Also, their synthesis process and properties have been systemically studied and discussed.

  15. Fracture Characteristics of Monolayer CVD-Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Hwangbo, Yun; Lee, Choong-Kwang; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Jang, Bongkyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Su; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-01-01

    We have observed and analyzed the fracture characteristics of the monolayer CVD-graphene using pressure bulge testing setup. The monolayer CVD-graphene has appeared to undergo environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth in room condition, i.e. stress corrosion cracking arising from the adsorption of water vapor on the graphene and the subsequent chemical reactions. The crack propagation in graphene has appeared to be able to be reasonably tamed by adjusting applied humidity and stress. ...

  16. Large-Scale Graphene Film Deposition for Monolithic Device Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-shurman, Khaled

    Since 1958, the concept of integrated circuit (IC) has achieved great technological developments and helped in shrinking electronic devices. Nowadays, an IC consists of more than a million of compacted transistors. The majority of current ICs use silicon as a semiconductor material. According to Moore's law, the number of transistors built-in on a microchip can be double every two years. However, silicon device manufacturing reaches its physical limits. To explain, there is a new trend to shrinking circuitry to seven nanometers where a lot of unknown quantum effects such as tunneling effect can not be controlled. Hence, there is an urgent need for a new platform material to replace Si. Graphene is considered a promising material with enormous potential applications in many electronic and optoelectronics devices due to its superior properties. There are several techniques to produce graphene films. Among these techniques, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) offers a very convenient method to fabricate films for large-scale graphene films. Though CVD method is suitable for large area growth of graphene, the need for transferring a graphene film to silicon-based substrates is required. Furthermore, the graphene films thus achieved are, in fact, not single crystalline. Also, graphene fabrication utilizing Cu and Ni at high growth temperature contaminates the substrate that holds Si CMOS circuitry and CVD chamber as well. So, lowering the deposition temperature is another technological milestone for the successful adoption of graphene in integrated circuits fabrication. In this research, direct large-scale graphene film fabrication on silicon based platform (i.e. SiO2 and Si3N4) at low temperature was achieved. With a focus on low-temperature graphene growth, hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) was utilized to synthesize graphene film using 200 nm thick nickel film. Raman spectroscopy was utilized to examine graphene formation on the bottom side of the Ni film

  17. Chemical vapour deposition of tungsten and tungsten silicide layers for applications in novel silicon technology

    CERN Document Server

    Li, F X

    2002-01-01

    This work was a detailed investigation into the Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) of tungsten and tungsten silicide for potential applications in integrated circuit (IC) and other microelectronic devices. These materials may find novel applications in contact schemes for transistors in advanced ICs, buried high conductivity layers in novel Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology and in power electronic devices. The CVD techniques developed may also be used for metal coating of recessed or enclosed features which may occur in novel electronic or electromechanical devices. CVD of tungsten was investigated using the silicon reduction reaction of WF sub 6. W layers with an optimum self-limiting thickness of 100 nm and resistivity 20 mu OMEGA centre dot cm were produced self-aligned to silicon. A hydrogen passivation technique was developed as part of the wafer pre-clean schedule and proved essential in achieving optimum layer thickness. Layers produced by this approach are ideal for intimate contact to shallow junct...

  18. Ultrahigh-mobility graphene devices from chemical vapor deposition on reusable copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banszerus, Luca; Schmitz, Michael; Engels, Stephan; Dauber, Jan; Oellers, Martin; Haupt, Federica; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Beschoten, Bernd; Stampfer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Graphene research has prospered impressively in the past few years, and promising applications such as high-frequency transistors, magnetic field sensors, and flexible optoelectronics are just waiting for a scalable and cost-efficient fabrication technology to produce high-mobility graphene. Although significant progress has been made in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and epitaxial growth of graphene, the carrier mobility obtained with these techniques is still significantly lower than what is achieved using exfoliated graphene. We show that the quality of CVD-grown graphene depends critically on the used transfer process, and we report on an advanced transfer technique that allows both reusing the copper substrate of the CVD growth and making devices with mobilities as high as 350,000 cm2 V–1 s–1, thus rivaling exfoliated graphene. PMID:26601221

  19. High-purity cobalt thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ootera, Yasuaki; Shimada, Takuya; Kado, Masaki; Quinsat, Michael; Morise, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Shiho; Kondo, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A study of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of high-purity cobalt thin films is described. The Co layer prepared by a thermal CVD technique with a Pt/Ta underlayer and a Pt cap layer shows a saturation magnetization (Ms) of ∼1.8 T and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with an anisotropy energy (Ku) of ∼105 J/m3. The cobalt thickness dependence of Ku reveals that the interfacial anisotropy at the Pt/Co interface is most likely the origin of the obtained PMA.

  20. Synthesize of N-doped Carbon nanotube according to gas flow rate by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. B.; Kim, C. D.; Kong, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Min, B. K.; Jung, W. S.; Lee, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been prepared by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). As doping accompanies with the recombination of carbon atoms into CNTs in the CVD process, N atoms can be substitutionally doped into the CNTs lattice, which is hard to realize by other synthetic methods. The synthesis technique and the characteristic analysis of N-doped CNT will move up the industrialization and the basic study of CNT. We will elucidate the basic properties of CNT such as the structural characteristics of the N-doped CNT material and study for the industrial application of the N-doped CNTs to the electrode of fuel cell.

  1. Investigation of defects in ultra-thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited on pure copper by the atomic layer deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, M.L.; Wang, L.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lin, H.C., E-mail: hclinntu@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, M.J., E-mail: mjchen@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, No. 100, Wenhwa Road, Seatwen, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: Some residual OH ligands originating from incomplete reaction between TMA and surface species of OH* during ALD process induce the defects in deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. Three possible types of defects are suggested. The analytic results indicate the defects are Type-I and/or Type-II but do not directly expose the substrate, like pinholes (Type-III). - Highlights: • Oxidation trials were conducted to investigate the defects in ultra-thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited ALD technique on pure copper. • The residual OH ligands in the deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films induce looser micro-structure which has worse oxidation resistance. • Superficial contamination particles on substrate surface are confirmed to be one of nucleation sites of the defects. - Abstract: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films with various thicknesses were deposited by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique on pure copper at temperatures of 100–200 °C. Oxidation trials were conducted in air at 200 °C to investigate the defects in these films. The analytic results show that the defects have a looser micro-structure compared to their surroundings, but do not directly expose the substrate, like pinholes. The film's crystallinity, mechanical properties and oxidation resistance could also be affected by these defects. Superficial contamination particles on the substrate surface are confirmed to be nucleation sites of the defects. A model for the mechanism of defect formation is proposed in this study.

  2. Recent Results from Beam Tests of 3D and Pad pCVD Diamond Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wallny, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Results from prototypes of a detector using chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond with embedded resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond device are presented. A detector system consisting of 3D devices based on poly-crystalline CVD (pCVD) diamond was connected to a multi-channel readout and successfully tested in a 120 GeV/c proton beam at CERN proving for the first time the feasibility of the 3D detector concept in pCVD for particle tracking applications. We also present beam test results on the dependence of signal size on incident particle rate in charged particle detectors based on poly-crystalline CVD diamond. The detectors were tested in a 260 MeV/c pion beam over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2 . The pulse height of the sensors was measured with pad readout electronics at a peaking time of 7 ns. Our data from the 2015 beam tests at PSI indicate that the pulse height of poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensor irradiated to 5×1014 neq/cm2 is independent of particle flux...

  3. CdTe deposition by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique onto ZnO nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, Raul; Delamoreanu, Alexandru; Saidi, Bilel; Ivanova, Valentina [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054, Grenoble (France); Levy-Clement, Claude [CNRS, Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux de Paris-Est, 94320, Thiais (France)

    2014-09-15

    In this study is reported CdTe deposition by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and reaction (SILAR) at room temperature onto ZnO nanowires (NWs). The as-deposited CdTe layer exhibits poor crystalline quality and not well defined optical transition which is probably result of its amorphous nature. The implementation of an annealing step and chemical treatment by CdCl{sub 2} to the classical SILAR technique improved significantly the CdTe film quality. The XRD analysis showed that the as treated layers are crystallized in the cubic zinc blende structure. The full coverage of ZnO nanowires and thickness of the CdTe shell, composed of small crystallites, was confirmed by STEM and TEM analysis. The layer thickness could be controlled by the number of SILAR cycles. The sharper optical transitions for the annealed and CdCl{sub 2} treated heterostructures additionally proves the enhancement of the layer crystalline quality. For comparison CdTe was also deposited by close space sublimation (CSS) method onto ZnO nanowires. It is shown that the SILAR deposited CdTe exhibits equal crystalline and optical properties to that prepared by CSS. These results demonstrate that SILAR technique is more suitable for conformal thin film deposition on nanostructures. CdTe extremely thin film deposited by SILAR method onto ZnO nanowire. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Organo-layered double hydroxides composite thin films deposited by laser techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birjega, R. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Vlad, A., E-mail: angela.vlad@gmail.com [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Matei, A.; Dumitru, M.; Stokker-Cheregi, F.; Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Str., 77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Zavoianu, R. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Chemical Technology and Catalysis, 4-12 Regina Elisabeta Bd., Bucharest 030018 (Romania); Raditoiu, V.; Corobea, M.C. [National R.& D. Institute for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, ICECHIM, 202 Splaiul Independentei Str., CP-35-274, 060021 Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • PLD and MAPLE was successfully used to produce organo-layered double hydroxides. • The organic anions (dodecyl sulfate-DS) were intercalated in co-precipitation step. • Zn2.5Al-LDH (Zn/Al = 2.5) and Zn2.5Al-DS thin films obtained in this work could be suitable for further applications as hydrophobic surfaces. - Abstract: We used laser techniques to create hydrophobic thin films of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and organo-modified LDHs. A LDH based on Zn-Al with Zn{sup 2+}/Al{sup 3+} ratio of 2.5 was used as host material, while dodecyl sulfate (DS), which is an organic surfactant, acted as guest material. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) were employed for the growth of the films. The organic anions were intercalated in co-precipitation step. The powders were subsequently used either as materials for MAPLE, or they were pressed and used as targets for PLD. The surface topography of the thin films was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the crystallographic structure of the powders and films was checked by X-ray diffraction. FTIR spectroscopy was used to evidence DS interlayer intercalation, both for powders and the derived films. Contact angle measurements were performed in order to establish the wettability properties of the as-prepared thin films, in view of functionalization applications as hydrophobic surfaces, owing to the effect of DS intercalation.

  5. Characterizations of multilayer ZnO thin films deposited by sol-gel spin coating technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. I.; Bhatti, K. A.; Qindeel, Rabia; Alonizan, Norah; Althobaiti, Hayat Saeed

    In this work, zinc oxide (ZnO) multilayer thin films are deposited on glass substrate using sol-gel spin coating technique and the effect of these multilayer films on optical, electrical and structural properties are investigated. It is observed that these multilayer films have great impact on the properties of ZnO. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) confirms that ZnO has hexagonal wurtzite structure. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed the crack-free films which have uniformly distributed grains structures. Both micro and nano particles of ZnO are present on thin films. Four point probe measured the electrical properties showed the decreasing trend between the average resistivity and the number of layers. The optical absorption spectra measured using UV-Vis. showed the average transmittance in the visible region of all films is 80% which is good for solar spectra. The performance of the multilayer as transparent conducting material is better than the single layer of ZnO. This work provides a low cost, environment friendly and well abandoned material for solar cells applications.

  6. Preparation and properties of ZnO thin films deposited by sol-gel technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Wei; PENG Xingping; LIU Xueqin; HE Zhiwei; WANG Yinyue

    2007-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on (100) Si substrates by sol-gel technique.Zinc acetate was used as the precursor material.The effect of different anneal-ing atmospheres and annealing temperatures on composition, structural and optical properties of ZnO thin films was inves-tigated by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction,atomic force microscopy and photolumi-nescence (PL),respectively.At an annealing temperature of 400℃ in N2 for 2 h,dried gel films were propitious to undergo structural relaxation and grow ZnO grains.ZnO thin film annealed at 400℃ in N2 for 2 h exhibited the optimal structure and PL property,and the grain size and the lattice constants of the film were calculated (41.6 nm,a = 3.253 A and c=5.210A).Moreover,a green emission around 495 nm was observed in the PL spectra owing to the oxygen vacancies located at the surface of ZnO grains.With increas- ing annealing temperature,both the amount of the grown ZnO and the specific surface area of the grains decrease,which jointly weaken the green emission.

  7. Organo-layered double hydroxides composite thin films deposited by laser techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjega, R.; Vlad, A.; Matei, A.; Dumitru, M.; Stokker-Cheregi, F.; Dinescu, M.; Zavoianu, R.; Raditoiu, V.; Corobea, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    We used laser techniques to create hydrophobic thin films of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and organo-modified LDHs. A LDH based on Zn-Al with Zn2+/Al3+ ratio of 2.5 was used as host material, while dodecyl sulfate (DS), which is an organic surfactant, acted as guest material. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) were employed for the growth of the films. The organic anions were intercalated in co-precipitation step. The powders were subsequently used either as materials for MAPLE, or they were pressed and used as targets for PLD. The surface topography of the thin films was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the crystallographic structure of the powders and films was checked by X-ray diffraction. FTIR spectroscopy was used to evidence DS interlayer intercalation, both for powders and the derived films. Contact angle measurements were performed in order to establish the wettability properties of the as-prepared thin films, in view of functionalization applications as hydrophobic surfaces, owing to the effect of DS intercalation.

  8. Optical and Surface Characteristics of Mg-Doped GaAs Nanocrystalline Thin Film Deposited by Thermionic Vacuum Arc Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat, Suat; Özen, Soner; Şenay, Volkan; Korkmaz, Şadan

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is the most promising p-type dopant for gallium arsenide (GaAs) semiconductor technology. Mg-doped GaAs nanocrystalline thin film has been deposited at room temperature by the thermionic vacuum arc technique, a rapid deposition method for production of doped GaAs material. The microstructure and surface and optical properties of the deposited sample were investigated by x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, and interferometry. The crystalline direction of the deposited sample was determined to be (220) plane and (331) plane at 44.53° and 72.30°, respectively. The Mg-doped GaAs nanocrystalline sample showed high transmittance.

  9. Controlling the resistivity gradient in chemical vapor deposition-deposited aluminum-doped zinc oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarev, M. V.; Verheijen, M. A.; Keuning, W.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) generally exhibit a major drawback, i.e., a gradient in resistivity extending over a large range of film thickness. The present contribution addresses the plasma-enhanced CVD deposition of ZnO: Al layers by focusing on the control

  10. Modelling and analysis of CVD processes in porous media for ceramic composite preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y.S.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    A continuum phenomenological model is presented to describe chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of solid product inside porous substrate media for the preparation of reinforced ceramic-matrix composites [by the chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) process] and ceramic membrane composites (by a modified C

  11. Control of Reaction Surface in Low Temperature CVD to Enhance Nucleation and Conformal Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navneet

    2009-01-01

    The Holy Grail in CVD community is to find precursors that can afford the following: good nucleation on a desired substrate and conformal deposition in high AR features. Good nucleation is not only necessary for getting ultra-thin films at low thicknesses; it also offers films that are smooth at higher thickness values. On the other hand,…

  12. Hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films by high-temperature annealing at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, V.; Ullien, D.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Sachdeva, S.; Murthy, D.H.K.; Savenije, T.J.; Ahmad, H.A.; Nunney, T.S.; Janssens, S.D.; Haenen, K.; Nesládek, M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; De Smet, L.C.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    A high-temperature procedure to hydrogenate diamond films using molecular hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was explored. Undoped and doped chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films were treated according to our annealing method using a H2 gas flow down to ∼50 ml/min (STP) at ∼850

  13. Trimethyl(phenylsilane — a precursor for gas phase processes of SiCx:H film deposition: Synthesis and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya N. Ermakova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The technique of synthesis and purification of trimethyl(phenylsilane PhSiMe3, allowing to obtain the product with high yield. Individuality of the product was confirmed by elemental analysis for C, H, Si was developed. IR, UV and 1H NMR-spectroscopic studies were used to define its spectral characteristics. Complex thermal analysis and thermogravimetry defined thermoanalytical behavior of PhSiMe3 in an inert atmosphere. Tensimetric studies have shown that the compound has sufficient volatility and thermal stability for use as a precursor in the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD. The composition and temperature limits of the possible crystalline phase complexes in equilibrium with the gas phase of different composition has been determined by method of thermodynamic modeling. Calculated CVD diagrams allow us to select the optimal conditions of film deposition. The possibility of using trimethyl(phenylsilane in CVD processes for producing dielectric films of hydrogenated silicon carbide has been demonstrated.

  14. Yb2Si2O7 Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited by Various Thermal Spray Techniques: A Preliminary Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Emine; Marcano, Diana; Zhou, Dapeng; Sohn, Yoo Jung; Mauer, Georg; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Dense, crack-free, uniform, and well-adhered environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) are required to enhance the environmental durability of silicon (Si)-based ceramic matrix composites in high pressure, high gas velocity combustion atmospheres. This paper represents an assessment of different thermal spray techniques for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 EBCs. The Yb2Si2O7 coatings were deposited by means of atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF), suspension plasma spraying (SPS), and very low-pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS) techniques. The initial feedstock, as well as the deposited coatings, were characterized and compared in terms of their phase composition. The as-sprayed amorphous content, microstructure, and porosity of the coatings were further analyzed. Based on this preliminary investigation, the HVOF process stood out from the other techniques as it enabled the production of vertical crack-free coatings with higher crystallinity in comparison with the APS and SPS techniques in atmospheric conditions. Nevertheless, VLPPS was found to be the preferred process for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 coatings with desired characteristics in a controlled-atmosphere chamber.

  15. Yb2Si2O7 Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited by Various Thermal Spray Techniques: A Preliminary Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Emine; Marcano, Diana; Zhou, Dapeng; Sohn, Yoo Jung; Mauer, Georg; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Dense, crack-free, uniform, and well-adhered environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) are required to enhance the environmental durability of silicon (Si)-based ceramic matrix composites in high pressure, high gas velocity combustion atmospheres. This paper represents an assessment of different thermal spray techniques for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 EBCs. The Yb2Si2O7 coatings were deposited by means of atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF), suspension plasma spraying (SPS), and very low-pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS) techniques. The initial feedstock, as well as the deposited coatings, were characterized and compared in terms of their phase composition. The as-sprayed amorphous content, microstructure, and porosity of the coatings were further analyzed. Based on this preliminary investigation, the HVOF process stood out from the other techniques as it enabled the production of vertical crack-free coatings with higher crystallinity in comparison with the APS and SPS techniques in atmospheric conditions. Nevertheless, VLPPS was found to be the preferred process for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 coatings with desired characteristics in a controlled-atmosphere chamber.

  16. Progress in the development of deposition prevention and cleaning techniques of in-vessel optics in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, E.; Vukolov, K.; Semenov, V.; Tolstyakov, S.; Kochergin, M.; Kurskiev, G.; Podushnikova, K.; Razdobarin, A.; Gorodetsky, A.; Zalavutdinov, R.; Bukhovets, V.; Zakharov, A.; Bulovich, S.; Veiko, V.; Shakshno, E.

    2009-08-01

    The lifetime of front optical components unprotected from reactor grade plasmas may be very short due to intensive contamination with carbon and beryllium-based materials eroded by the plasma from beryllium walls and carbon tiles. Deposits result in a significant reduction and spectral alterations of optical transmission. In addition, even rather thin and transparent deposits can dramatically change the shape of reflectance spectra, especially for mirrors with rather low reflectivity, such as W or Mo. The distortion of data obtained with various optical diagnostics may affect the safe operation of ITER. Therefore, the development of optics-cleaning and deposition-mitigating techniques is a key factor in the construction and operation of optical diagnostics in ITER. The problem is of particular concern for optical elements positioned in the divertor region. The latest achievements in protection of in-vessel optics are presented using the example of deposition prevention/cleaning techniques for in-machine components of the Thomson scattering system in the divertor. Careful consideration of well-known and novel protection approaches shows that neither of them alone provides guaranteed survivability of the first in-vessel optics in the divertor. Only a set of complementary prevention/cleaning techniques, which include special materials for mirrors and inhibition additives for plasma, is able to manage the challenging task. The essential issue, which needs to be addressed in the immediate future, is an extensive development of techniques tested under experimental conditions (exposure time and contamination fluxes) similar to those expected in ITER.

  17. CVD 908, CVD 908-htrA, and CVD 909 live oral typhoid vaccines: a logical progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacket, Carol O; Levine, Myron M

    2007-07-15

    Typhoid fever remains an important public health problem in many parts of the world. Despite the availability of oral Ty21a (Vivotif; Berna Biotech) and parenteral Vi polysaccharide vaccine (Typhim Vi; Aventis Pasteur), improved typhoid fever vaccines have been sought. These include a series of vaccine candidates developed at the Center for Vaccine Development, University of Maryland, based on attenuation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi by deletions in the aroC, aroD, and htrA genes. These vaccine candidates, designated "CVD 908," "CVD 908-htrA," and "CVD 909," have been developed and tested in volunteers with variable success. This review summarizes the clinical data that directed the logical progression of this vaccine development strategy.

  18. Studies of CdS/CdTe interface: Comparison of CdS films deposited by close space sublimation and chemical bath deposition techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jun-feng, E-mail: pkuhjf@bit.edu.cn [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, UMR CNRS 6502, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Fu, Gan-hua; Krishnakumar, V.; Schimper, Hermann-Josef [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Liao, Cheng [Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jaegermann, Wolfram [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Besland, M.P. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, UMR CNRS 6502, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2015-05-01

    The CdS layers were deposited by two different methods, close space sublimation (CSS) and chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The CdS/CdTe interface properties were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The TEM images showed a large CSS-CdS grain size in the range of 70-80 nm. The interface between CSS-CdS and CdTe were clear and sharp, indicating an abrupt hetero-junction. On the other hand, CBD-CdS layer had much smaller grain size in the 5-10 nm range. The interface between CBD-CdS and CdTe was not as clear as CSS-CdS. With the stepwise coverage of CdTe layer, the XPS core levels of Cd 3d and S 2p in CSS-CdS had a sudden shift to lower binding energies, while those core levels shifted gradually in CBD-CdS. In addition, XPS depth profile analyses indicated a strong diffusion in the interface between CBD-CdS and CdTe. The solar cells prepared using CSS-CdS yielded better device performance than the CBD-CdS layer. The relationships between the solar cell performances and properties of CdS/CdTe interfaces were discussed. - Highlights: • Studies of CdS deposited by close space sublimation and chemical bath deposition • An observation of CdS/CdTe interface by transmission electron microscope • A careful investigation of CdS/CdTe interface by X ray photoelectron spectra • An easier diffusion at the chemical bath deposition CdS and CdTe interface.

  19. Parametric investigation of substrate temperatures on the properties of Zinc oxide deposited over a flexible polymeric substrate via spray technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, P.; Gagrani, Rohit; Nakamura, Daisuke; Okada, Tatsuo; Singh, Vipul; Palani, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    Here we report the influence of substrate temperature (300-500 °C) on the deposition and growth of ZnO over a Flexible polyimide film. Owing to its simplicity, large area deposition capability and Cost effectivity Spray Pyrolysis technique was used. We have modified the conventional process of Spray pyrolysis by spraying for shorter durations and repeating the process which in turn reduced the Island formation of ZnO. Moreover, this technique helped in maintaining the constant temperature and uniformity during the deposition as prolonged spraying reduces the temperature of the heating plate drastically. Photoluminescence (PL) reveals that at 350 and 400° C the defect have reduced. XRD reveals the crystallinity and Impurities present. FE-SEM reveals the structure morphology changes with the change in the substrate temperature. TGA was done to ensure that substrate does not undergoes dissociation at high temperature. It was observed at the film deposited at 400 °C was found to be more uniform, defect free and crystalline. Hence, IV characterization of the film deposited at 400 °C was done which showed good rectification behaviour of the Schottky diodes.

  20. A lidar technique to quantify surface deposition from atmospheric releases of bulk liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Madison J.; Glaes, Thomas; Matta, Joseph; Sommerville, Douglas; Einfeld, Wayne

    We show that a scanning, pulsed lidar can be used to quantify the time history and areal concentration of mass deposited on the ground from an elevated release of bulk liquid. Aircraft measurements, witness car depositions and evaporative modelling crudely support results from analysed lidar data.

  1. Fabrication and Properties of Organic-Inorganic Nanolaminates Using Molecular and Atomic Layer Deposition Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    55, 1030-1039 (2009).* 2. B.B. Burton, D.N. Goldstein and S.M. George, "Atomic Layer Deposition of MgO Using Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl) magnesium ...Atomic Layer Deposition Using Tin 2,4-Pentanedionate and Hydrogen Sulfide , J. Phys. Chem. C 114, 17597-17603 (2010).* 28. L.A. Riley, A.S

  2. Ac conductivity and dielectric spectroscopy studies on tin oxide thin films formed by spray deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barış, Behzad, E-mail: behzadbaris@gmail.com

    2014-04-01

    Au/tin oxide/n-Si (1 0 0) structure has been created by forming a tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) on n-type Si by using the spray deposition technique. The ac electrical conductivity (σ{sub ac}) and dielectric properties of the structure have been investigated between 30 kHz and 1 MHz at room temperature. The values of ε', ε″, tanδ, σ{sub ac}, M' and M″ were determined as 1.404, 0.357, 0.253, 1.99×10{sup −7} S/cm, 0.665 and 0.168 for 1 MHz and 6.377, 6.411, 1.005, 1.07×10{sup −7} S/cm, 0.077 and 0.078 for 30 kHz at zero bias, respectively. These changes were attributed to variation of the charge carriers from the interface traps located between semiconductor and metal in the band gap. It is concluded that the values of the ε', ε″ and tanδ increase with decreasing frequency while a decrease is seen in σ{sub ac} and the real (M') and imaginary (M″) components of the electrical modulus. The M″ parameter of the structure has a relaxation peak as a function of frequency for each examined voltage. The relaxation time of M″(τ{sub M″}) varies from 0.053 ns to 0.018 ns with increasing voltage. The variation of Cole–Cole plots of the sample shows that there is one relaxation.

  3. Influences of gas adsorption and Au nanoparticles on the electrical properties of CVD-grown MoS2 thin films(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yunae; Sohn, Ahrum; Kim, Sujung; Kim, Dong-Wook; Cho, Byungjin; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Kim, Dong-Ho

    2016-10-01

    Recently, extraordinary physical properties of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have attracted great attention for various device applications, including photodetectors, field effect transistors, and chemical sensors. There have been intensive research efforts to grow high-quality and large area TMD thin films, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques enable scalable growth of layered MoS2 films. We investigated the roles of Au nanoparticles (NPs) on the transport and photoresponse of the CVD-grown MoS2 thin films. The Au NPs increased conductivity and enabled fast photoresponse of MoS2 thin films. These results showed that decoration of metal NPs were useful means to tailor the physical properties of CVD-grown MoS2 thin films. To clarify the roles of the metal particles, we compared the transport characteristics of MoS2 thin films with and without the Au NPs in different gas ambient conditions (N2, O2, and H2/N2). The ambient-dependence of the MoS2 thin films allowed us to discuss possible scenarios to explain our results based on considerations of band bending near the Au NPs, gas adsorption/desorption and subsequent charge transfer, and charge scattering/trapping by defect states.

  4. Thermal stability and thermal expansion behaviour of ZrO{sub 2}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} multilayers deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Maneesha, E-mail: pkigcar@gmail.com [Materials Synthesis and Structural Characterisation Division, Physical Metallurgy Group, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kuppusami, P. [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sathyabama University, Chennai, 600119 Tamil Nadu (India); Murugesan, S.; Ghosh, Chanchal; Divakar, R.; Singh, Akash; Mohandas, E. [Materials Synthesis and Structural Characterisation Division, Physical Metallurgy Group, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2015-07-15

    Multilayers of ZrO{sub 2}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique with variation in the ZrO{sub 2} layer thickness from 5 to 30 nm keeping the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness constant (∼10 nm). The stability, phase evolution and thermal expansion behaviour of the multilayers were analyzed by high temperature x-ray diffraction technique, in the temperature range of 300–1373 K. Unlike the single layer of ZrO{sub 2} film, which shows a mixture of tetragonal and monoclinic phase, the ZrO{sub 2} layers in multilayers show tetragonal phase in case of all the multilayers investigated in the present work. The values of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) decrease with increase in the ZrO{sub 2} layer thickness. The CTE of both ZrO{sub 2} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} are found to be influenced by their mutual solubility as well as due to interdiffusion of these oxides taking place along the interfaces of the multilayers, especially during high temperature heat-treatment. - Highlights: • ZrO{sub 2}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} multilayers were deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique. • Formation of tetragonal phase of ZrO{sub 2} and cubic phase of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were observed. • The multilayers films show good thermal stability upto temperature 1373 K. • The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of t-ZrO{sub 2} decreases with increase in ZrO{sub 2} layer thickness.

  5. Techniques of Electrode Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Li, Xinyong; Chen, Guohua

    Electrochemical applications using many kinds of electrode materials as an advanced oxidation/reduction technique have been a focus of research by a number of groups during the last two decades. The electrochemical approach has been adopted successfully to develop various environmental applications, mainly including water and wastewater treatment, aqueous system monitoring, and solid surface analysis. In this chapter, a number of methods for the fabrication of film-structured electrode materials were selectively reviewed. Firstly, the thermal decomposition method is briefly described, followed by introducing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) strategy. Especially, much attention was focused on introducing the methods to produce diamond novel film electrode owing to its unique physical and chemical properties. The principle and influence factors of hot filament CVD and plasma enhanced CVD preparation were interpreted by refereeing recent reports. Finally, recent developments that address electro-oxidation/reduction issues and novel electrodes such as nano-electrode and boron-doped diamond electrode (BDD) are presented in the overview.

  6. Hg1-xCdxTe vapor deposition on CdZnTe substrates by Closed Space Sublimation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Sandra; Sochinskii, Nikolai V.; Repiso, Eva; Tsybrii, Zinoviia; Sizov, Fiodor; Plaza, Jose Luis; Diéguez, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Closed Space Sublimation (CSS) technique has been studied to deposit Hg1-xCdxTe polycrystalline films on CdZnTe substrates at the improved pressure-temperature conditions. The experimental results on film characterization suggest that the CSS optimal conditions are the argon atmospheric pressure (1013 mbar) and the deposition temperature in the range of 500-550 °C. These conditions provide macro-defect free Hg1-xCdxTe films with the uniform size and surface distribution of polycrystals.

  7. High-temperature CVD for crystalline-silicon thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, F.R.; Hurrle, A.

    1999-10-01

    The fundamentals of thermal CVD for the deposition of silicon at high temperatures are briefly discussed and applied to the conditions in the CVD system that the authors have constructed and characterized. The system fulfills basic requirements to be met for solar cell application; solar cells made from epitaxial layers on various substrates were fabricated. The high-quality cells achieved 17.6% efficiency proving the excellent performance of the system, the cells on economically relevant substrates achieved 8% efficiency which still needs improvement.

  8. Electrical phase change of CVD-grown Ge-Sb-Te thin film device

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, C.C.; B. Gholipour; Ou, J.Y.; Knight, K.J.; Hewak, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    A prototype Ge-Sb-Te thin film phase-change memory device has been fabricated and reversible threshold and phase change switching demonstrated electrically, with a threshold voltage of 1.5 – 1.7 V. The Ge-Sb-Te thin film was fabricated by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) at atmospheric pressure using GeCl4, SbCl5, and Te precursors with reactive gas H2 at reaction temperature 780 °C and substrate temperature 250 °C. The surface morphology and composition of the CVD-grown Ge-Sb-Te thin film ha...

  9. Aligned carbon nanotubes catalytically grown on iron-based nanoparticles obtained by laser-induced CVD

    OpenAIRE

    Le Normand, Francois; Cojocaru, Costel Sorin; Ersen, Ovidiu; Legagneux, Pierre; Gangloff, Laurent; Fleaca, C.; Alexandrescu, Rodica; Dumitrache, Florin; Morjan, Ion

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Iron-based nanoparticles are prepared by a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. They are characterized as body-centered Fe and Fe2O3 (maghemite/magnetite) particles with sizes ::;5 and 10 nm, respectively. The Fe particles are embedded in a protective carbon matrix. Both kind of particles are dispersed by spin-coating on SiO2/Si(1 0 0) flat substrates. They are used as catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes by a plasma- and filaments-assisted catalytic CVD...

  10. Knowledge of risk factors for diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) is poor among individuals with risk factors for CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilkenny, Monique F; Dunstan, Libby; Busingye, Doreen; Purvis, Tara; Reyneke, Megan; Orgill, Mary; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2017-01-01

    There is limited evidence on whether having pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) or risk factors for CVD such as diabetes, ensures greater knowledge of risk factors important for motivating preventative behaviours. Our objective was to compare knowledge among the Australian public participating in a health check program and their risk status. Data from the Stroke Foundation 'Know your numbers' program were used. Staff in community pharmacies provided opportunistic health checks (measurement of blood pressure and diabetes risk assessment) among their customers. Participants were categorised: 1) CVD ± risk of CVD: history of stroke, heart disease or kidney disease, and may have risk factors; 2) risk of CVD only: reported having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or atrial fibrillation; and 3) CVD risk free (no CVD or risk of CVD). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed including adjustment for age and sex. Among 4,647 participants, 12% had CVD (55% male, 85% aged 55+ years), 47% were at risk of CVD (40% male, 72% 55+ years) and 41% were CVD risk free (33% male, 27% 55+ years). Participants with CVD (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.55, 0.80) or risk factors for CVD (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.57, 0.73) had poorer knowledge of the risk factors for diabetes/CVD compared to those who were CVD risk free. After adjustment, only participants with risk factors for CVD (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.93) had poorer knowledge. Older participants (55+ years) and men had poorer knowledge of diabetes/CVD risk factors and complications of diabetes. Participants with poorer knowledge of risk factors were older, more often male or were at risk of developing CVD compared with those who were CVD risk free. Health education in these high risk groups should be a priority, as diabetes and CVD are increasing in prevalence throughout the world.

  11. Growth and photoluminescence of Si-SiOx nanowires by catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yue [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Luo, Ruiying, E-mail: ryluo@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanxi University of Technology, Hanzhong 723000 (China); Shang, Haidong [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The Si-SiOx NWs were successfully synthesized via a one-step catalyst-free CVD method using TEOS as the precursor. • The Si-SiOx NWs had a core–shell structure with Si as the inner crystalline cores and SiOx as the outer amorphous layer. • The formation of Si-SiOx NWs was implemented by the non-classical crystallization mechanism. • The Si-SiOx NWs spontaneously self-assembled from the building block of charged nanoparticles. • The Si-SiOx NWs showed their potential applications in UV emission and visible light emission devices. - Abstract: We developed a one-step catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition process to synthesize Si-SiOx nanowires using tetraethoxysilane as the precursor. Observations using scanning electron microscopy showed that the Si-SiOx nanowires were 20–50 nm in diameter and tens of microns in length. The high-resolution transmission electron microscope analysis and X-ray diffraction demonstrated that the nanowires consisted of crystal silicon and amorphous SiOx. The Si and O with an atomic ratio of the Si-SiOx NWs were 1:1.2 according to the energy dispersion X-ray spectroscope. A systematic study on the effect of the growth conditions, such as reaction temperature, the reaction time, and the TEOS vapor flow rate was performed. The formation of Si-SiOx nanowires was implemented by the non-classical crystallization mechanism. The charged nanoparticles acting as building blocks self-assembled into nanowires. The photoluminescence measurements were carried out and showed that the Si-SiOx nanowires emitted stable ultraviolet and green luminescence excited by ultraviolet light.

  12. Síntesis de materiales cerámicos mediante técnicas químicas en fase vapor (CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Aleixandre, C.

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Chemical vapour deposition (CVD has been successfully used for the synthesis of a large variety of compounds. Initially the technique was developed for microelectronic applications and then was widespread used for the preparation of hard coatings, optoelectronic and superconductor materials. Among the characteristics inherent to the CVD technique it is worth mentioning the preparation of homogeneous deposits at relatively low temperatures mostly when the reaction is electrically or laser plasma or photon activated. New materials with given characteristics can be produced by properly choosing the reactant gas mixture as well as its relative composition. The presentation will be also focussed onto the deposition of different materials, such as carbon films (both crystalline, and amorphous with diamond-like properties, deposited by plasma assisted CVD techniques using methane and hydrogen gas mixtures. Also, the deposition of binary compounds, as boron nitride will be reviewed. Finally, the experimental requirements for obtaining new ternary compounds from the system Si-B-N-C (i.e.: CBN, SiBN will be discussed. The properties of these materials strongly depend on their composition and structure. Therefore, by adequate selection of the experimental parameters, it is possible to obtain ternary compounds with tailored characteristics.

    Actualmente, la técnica de CVD está siendo utilizada en la síntesis de una gran variedad de compuestos cerámicos, generalmente en forma de capa delgada. La técnica, desarrollada inicialmente para su aplicación en microelectrónica, ha sido después utilizada con éxito en otras áreas de gran actividad científica y tecnológica (recubrimientos duros, dispositivos optoelectrónicos, materiales superconductores, etc.. Entre las características más positivas de las técnicas de CVD, cabe destacar la obtención de depósitos homogéneos a temperaturas relativamente bajas, sobre todo cuando la activación de

  13. The Charge Collection Properties of CVD Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Oh, A; Steuerer, J; Wagner, A; Zeuner, W; Behnke, Ties; Hüntemeyer, Petra; Oh, Alexander; Steuerer, Johannes; Wagner, Albrecht; Zeuner, Wolfram

    1998-01-01

    The charge collection properties of CVD diamond have been investigated with ionising radiation. In this study two CVD diamond samples, prepared with electrical contacts have been used as solid state ionisation chambers. The diamonds have been studied with beta particles and 10 keV photons, providing a homogeneous ionisation density and with protons and alpha particles which are absorbed in a thin surface layer. For the latter case a strong decrease of the signal as function of time is observed, which is attributed to polarisation effects inside the diamond. Spatially resolved measurements with protons show a large variation of the charge collection efficiency, whereas for photons and minimum ionising particles the response is much more uniform and in the order of 18%. These results indicate that the applicability of CVD diamond as a position sensitive particle detector depends on the ionisation type and appears to be promising for homogeneous ionisation densities as provided by relativistic charged particles.

  14. Substrate Strengthening of CVD Coated Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    O.Kessler; M.Heidkamp; F.Hoffmann; P.Mayr

    2004-01-01

    Properties of components and tools can be improved by the combination of coating and heat treatment processes due to the addition of single process advantages and due to the utilization of process interactions. Several low and high alloyed, structural and tool steels (AISI 4140, 52100, H13, A2, D2, etc.) have been treated by CVD-TiN-coating plus laser beam hardening respectively carburizing plus CVD-TiN-coating. Homogeneous, dense TiN-coatings with high hardness,high compressive residual stresses and good adhesion were supported by high strength substrate surfaces. Especially CVD plus laser beam hardening offers the possibility to reduce distortion due to the small heated surface volume.

  15. Comparative study of CdTe sources used for deposition of CdTe thin films by close spaced sublimation technique

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro,Wagner Anacleto; Falcão, Vivienne Denise; Cruz,Leila Rosa de Oliveira; Ferreira,Carlos Luiz

    2006-01-01

    Unlike other thin film deposition techniques, close spaced sublimation (CSS) requires a short source-substrate distance. The kind of source used in this technique strongly affects the control of the deposition parameters, especially the deposition rate. When depositing CdTe thin films by CSS, the most common CdTe sources are: single-crystal or polycrystalline wafers, powders, pellets or pieces, a thick CdTe film deposited onto glass or molybdenum substrate (CdTe source-plate) and a sintered C...

  16. Functional materials - Study of process for CVD SiC/C composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Doo Jin; Wang, Chae Chyun; Lee, Young Jin; Oh, Byung Jun [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    The CVD SiC coating techniques are the one of high functional material manufactures that improve the thermal, wear, oxidization and infiltration resistance of the surface of raw materials and extend the life of material. Silicon carbide films have been grown onto graphite substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition using MTS(CH{sub 3}SiCl{sub 3}) as a source precursor and H{sub 2} or N{sub 2} as a diluent gas. The experiments for temperature and diluent gas addition changes were performed. The effect of temperature from 900 deg. C to 1350 deg. C and the alteration of diluent gas species on the growth rate and structure of deposits have been studied. The experimental results showed that the deposition rate increased with increasing deposition temperature irrespective of diluent gases and reactant depletion effect increased especially at H{sub 2} diluent gas ambient. As the diluent gas added, the growth rate decreased parabolically. For N{sub 2} addition, surface morphology of leaf-like structure appeared, and for H{sub 2}, faceted structure at 1350 deg. C. The observed features were involved by crystalline phase of {beta}-SiC and surface composition with different gas ambient. We also compared the experimental results of the effect of partial pressure on the growth rate with the results of theoretical approach based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. C/SiC composites were prepared by isothermal chemical vapor infiltration (ICVI). In order to fabricate the more dense C/SiC composites, a novel process of the in-situ whisker growing and filling during ICVI was devised, which was manipulated by alternating dilute gas species. The denser C/SiC composites were successfully prepared by the novel process comparing with the conventional ICVI process. 64 refs., 36 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  17. Influence of solution deposition rate on properties of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd–Alghafour, N. M., E-mail: na2013bil@gmail.com [Iraqi Ministry of Education, Anbar (Iraq); Ahmed, Naser M.; Hassan, Zai; Mohammad, Sabah M. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, University Sains Malaysia,11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    Vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by using a cost-efficient spray pyrolysis technique. The films were grown at 350° through thermal decomposition of VCl{sub 3} in deionized water with different solution spray rates. The high resolution X-ray diffraction results revealed the formation of nanocrystalline films having orthorhombic structures with preferential orientation along (101) direction. The spray rate influenced the surface morphology and crystallite size of the films. The crystallite size was found to increase whereas the micro-strain was decreased by increasing the spray deposition rates. The increase in crystallite size and decrease in the macrostrain resulted in an improvement in the films’ crystallinity. The UV-Visible spectroscopy analysis indicated that the average transmittance of all films lies in the range 75-80 %. The band gap of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} film was decreased from 2.65 to 2.46 eV with increase of the spray deposition rate from 5 ml/min to 10 ml/min. first, second, and third level headings (first level heading).

  18. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Optical Spectra of CdS Thin Films Deposited at Low Solution Concentrations by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Rizwan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Two different concentrations of CdCl2 and (NH22CS were used to prepare CdS thin films, to be deposited on glass substrate by chemical bath deposition (CBD technique. CdCl2 (0.000312 M and 0.000625 M was employed as a source of Cd2+ while (NH22CS (0.00125 M and 0.000625 M for S2− at a constant bath temperature of 70 °C. Adhesion of the deposited films was found to be very good for all the solution concentrations of both reagents. The films were air-annealed at a temperature between 200 °C to 360 °C for one hour. The minimum thickness was observed to be 33.6 nm for film annealed at 320 °C. XRD analyses reveal that the films were cubic along with peaks of hexagonal phase for all film samples. The crystallite size of the films decreased from 41.4 nm to 7.4 nm with the increase of annealing temperature for the CdCl2 (0.000312 M. Optical energy band gap (Eg, Urbach energy (Eu and absorption coefficient (α have been calculated from the transmission spectral data. These parameters have been discussed as a function of annealing temperature and solution concentration. The best transmission (about 97% was obtained for the air-annealed films at higher temperature at CdCl2 (0.000312 M.

  19. Atmospheric deposition of particles at a sensitive alpine lake: Size-segregated daily and annual fluxes from passive sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Anna Y-C; Chen, L-W Antony; Wang, Xiaoliang; Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G

    2017-02-01

    Lake Tahoe, a North American alpine lake long appreciated for its clear water and geographic setting, has experienced a trend of declining water clarity due to increasing nutrient and particle inputs. Contributions from atmospheric deposition of particulate matter (PM) could be important, yet they are inadequately quantified. This study established a yearlong deposition monitoring network in the northern Lake Tahoe Basin. Dry deposition was quantified on surrogate surfaces while wet deposition was based on particles suspended in precipitation at 24-hour resolution. The particle size ranges by these passive techniques were 1-64μm and 0.5-20μm in diameter for dry and wet deposition, respectively. Dry deposition of submicrometer (0.5-1μm) particles was also estimated by extrapolation of a lognormal size distribution. Higher daily number deposition fluxes (NDFdry and NDFwet) were found at a near-shore site, confirming substantial impacts of commercial and tourist activities. The two more isolated sites indicated a uniform regional background. On average, daily NDFdry is about one order of magnitude lower than daily NDFwet. Dry deposition velocities increased rapidly with particle size, as evidenced by collocated measurements of NDFdry and ambient particle number concentrations, though it seems less so for wet deposition due to different scavenging mechanisms. Despite fewer "wet" days than "dry" days during the monitoring period, wet processes dominated seasonal particle deposition, particularly in winter and spring when most precipitation occurred. Adopting sediment (insoluble, inorganic) particle fraction estimates from the literature, this study reports an annual particle flux of 2.9-5.2×10(10)#m(-2)yr(-1) for sediment particles with 1-20μm diameter and 6.1-11×10(10)#m(-2)yr(-1) for those with 0.5-20μm diameter. Implications of these findings to the current knowledge of atmospheric deposition in the Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) are discussed

  20. Formation of High-quality Advanced High-k Oxide Layers at Low Temperature by Excimer UV Lamp-assisted Photo-CVD and Sol-gel Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU J. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated that high quality and high dielectric constant layers can be fabricated by low temperature photo-induced or -assisted processing. Ta2O5 and ZrO2 have been deposited at t<400 ℃by means of a UV photo-CVD technique and HfO2 by photo-assisted sol-gel processing with the aid of excimer lamps. The UV annealing of as-grown layers was found to significantly improve their electrical properties.Low leakage current densities on the order of 10-8 A/cm2 at 1 MV/cm for deposited ultrathin Ta2O5 films and ca. 10-6 A/cm2 for the photo-CVD ZrO2 layers and photo-irradiated sol-gel HfO2 layers have been readily achieved. The improvement in the leakage properties of these layers is attributed to the UV-generated active oxygen species O(1D) which strongly oxidize any suboxides to form more stoichiometric oxides on removing certain defects, oxygen vacancies and impurities present in the as-prepared layers. The photo-CVD Ta2O5films deposited across 10. 16-cm Si wafers exhibit a high thickness uniformity with a variation of less than ±2.0% being obtained for ultrathin ca. 10 nm thick films. The lamp technology can in principle be extended to larger area wafers, providing a promising low temperature route to the fabrication of a range of high quality thin films for future ULSI technology.

  1. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  2. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  3. Cutting characteristics of dental diamond burs made with CVD technology Características de corte de pontas odontológicas diamantadas obtidas pela tecnologia CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Monti Lima

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the cutting ability of chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond burs coupled to an ultrasonic dental unit handpiece for minimally invasive cavity preparation. One standard cavity was prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 40 extracted human third molars either with cylindrical or with spherical CVD burs. The cutting ability was compared regarding type of substrate (enamel and dentin and direction of handpiece motion. The morphological characteristics, width and depth of the cavities were analyzed and measured using scanning electron micrographs. Statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test (p O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a habilidade de corte das pontas de diamante obtidas pelo processo de deposição química a vapor (CVD associadas ao aparelho de ultra-som no preparo cavitário minimamente invasivo. Uma cavidade padronizada foi preparada nas faces mesial e distal de 40 terceiros molares, utilizando-se pontas de diamante CVD cilíndrica e esférica. A habilidade de corte foi comparada quanto ao tipo de substrato (esmalte e dentina e quanto à direção do movimento realizado com a ponta. As características morfológicas, a largura e profundidade das cavidades foram analisadas e medidas em microscopia eletrônica de varredura. A análise estatística pelo teste de Kruskal-Wallis (p < 0,05 revelou que a largura e profundidade das cavidades foram significativamente maiores em dentina. Cavidades mais largas foram obtidas quando se utilizou a ponta de diamante CVD cilíndrica, e mais profundas quando a ponta esférica foi empregada. A direção do movimento da ponta não influenciou o tamanho das cavidades, sendo os cortes produzidos pelas pontas de diamante CVD precisos e conservadores.

  4. Evaluation of Co-rich manganese deposits by image analysis and photogrammetric techniques

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Yamazaki, T.; Sharma, R.; Tsurusaki, K.

    Stereo-seabed photographs of Co-rich manganese deposits on a mid-Pacific seamount, were analysed using an image analysis software for coverage estimation and size classification of nodules, and a photogrammetric software for calculation of height...

  5. Investigation of physical vapor deposition techniques of conformal shell coating for core/shell structures by Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cansizoglu, H., E-mail: hxis@ualr.edu; Yurukcu, M.; Cansizoglu, M.F.; Karabacak, T.

    2015-05-29

    Vertically aligned core/shell nanowire (nanorod) arrays are favorable candidates in many nano-scale devices such as solar cells, detectors, and integrated circuits. The quality of the shell coating around nanowire arrays is as crucial as the quality of the nanowires in device applications. For this reason, we worked on different physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques and conducted Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the best deposition technique for a conformal shell coating. Our results show that a small angle (≤ 45°) between incoming flux of particles and the substrate surface normal is necessary for PVD techniques with a directional incoming flux (e.g. thermal or e-beam evaporation) for a reasonable conformal coating. On the other hand, PVD techniques with an angular flux distribution (e.g. sputtering) can provide a fairly conformal shell coating around nanowire arrays without a need of small angle deposition. We also studied the shape effect of the arrays on the conformality of the coating and discovered that arrays of the tapered-top nanorods and the pyramids can be coated with a more conformal and thicker coating compared to the coating on the arrays of flat-top nanowires due to their larger openings in between structures. Our results indicate that conventional PVD techniques, which offer low cost and large scale thin film fabrication, can be utilized for highly conformal and uniform shell coating formation in core/shell nanowire device applications. - Highlights: • We examined the shell coating growth in core/shell nanostructures. • We investigated the effect of physical vapor deposition method on the conformality of the shell. • We used Monte Carlo simulations to simulate the shell growth on nanowire templates. • Angular atomic flux (i.e., sputtering at high pressure) leads to conformal and uniform coatings. • A small angle (< 45°) to the directional flux needs to be introduced for conformal coatings.

  6. Antibacterial efficacy of advanced silver-amorphous carbon coatings deposited using the pulsed dual cathodic arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrino, J L; Anders, A; Albella, J M; Horton, J A; Horton, T H; Ayyalasomayajula, P R; Allen, M, E-mail: jlendrino@icmm.csic.es

    2010-11-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) also referred as diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are well known to be a biocompatible material with good chemical in ertness; this makes it a strong candidate to be used as a matrix that embeds metallic elements with an antimicrobial effect. We have deposited as et of a-C:Ag films using a dual-cathode pulsed filtered cathodic arc source, the arc pulse frequency of the silver and graphite cathodes was controlled in order to obtain samples with various silver contents. In this study, we show the deposition of silver and carbon ions using this technique and analyze the advantages of incorporating silver into a-C by studying the antimicrobial properties against staphylococcus of samples deposited on Ti{sub 6}Al{sub 4}V coupons and evaluated using 24-well tissue culture plates.

  7. Atmospheric Deposition of Trace Elements Around Ulan-Bator City Studied by Moss and Lichen Biomonitoring Technique and INAA

    CERN Document Server

    Ganbold, G; Gundorina, S F; Frontasyeva, M V; Ostrovnaya, T M; Pavlov, S S; Tsendeekhuu, T

    2005-01-01

    For the first time the moss and lichen biomonitoring technique has been applied to air pollution in Mongolia (Ulan-Bator, the capital city). INAA at the IBR-2 reactor has made it possible to determine the content of 35 elements in moss and lichen biomonitors. Samples collected at sites located 10-15 km from the center of Ulan-Bator were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using epithermal neutrons. The mosses (\\textit{Rhytidium rugosum}, \\textit{Thuidium abietinum}, \\textit{Entodon concinnus}) and lichens (\\textit{Cladonia stellaris}, \\textit{Parmelia separata}) were used to study the atmospheric deposition of trace elements. It was shown that the suggested types of mosses could be used as suitable biomonitors to estimate the concentration levels of heavy metals and trace elements in Ulan-Bator atmospheric deposition. The results are compared to the data of atmospheric deposition of some European countries.

  8. Combined sonochemical/CVD method for preparation of nanostructured carbon-doped TiO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulnezhad, Hossein; Kavei, Ghassem; Ahmadi, Kamran; Rahimipour, Mohammad Reza

    2017-06-01

    The present work reports the successful synthesis of the nanostructured carbon-doped TiO2 thin films on glass substrate by combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and ultrasonic methods, for the first time. In this method the ultrasound waves act as nebulizer for converting of sonochemically prepared TiO2 sol to the mist particles. These mist particles were thermally decomposed in subsequent CVD chamber at 320 °C to produce the carbon-doped TiO2 thin films. The obtained thin films were characterized by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that the prepared thin films have anatase crystal structure and nanorod morphology, which calcination of them at 800 °C results in the conversion of nanorods to nanoparticles. In addition, the prepared samples have high transparency, monodispersity and homogeneity. The presence of the carbon element in the structure of the thin films causes the narrowing of the band-gap energy of TiO2 to about 2.8 eV, which results in the improvement of visible light absorption capabilities of the thin film.

  9. Strain Release Induced Novel Fluorescence Variation in CVD-Grown Monolayer WS2 Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shanghuai; Yang, Ruilong; Jia, Zhiyan; Xiang, Jianyong; Wen, Fusheng; Mu, Congpu; Nie, Anmin; Zhao, Zhisheng; Xu, Bo; Tao, Chenggang; Tian, Yongjun; Liu, Zhongyuan

    2017-10-04

    Tensile strain is intrinsic to monolayer crystals of transition metal disulfides such as Mo(W)S2 grown on oxidized silicon substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) owing to the much larger thermal expansion coefficient of Mo(W)S2 than that of silica. Here we report fascinating fluorescent variation in intensity with aging time in CVD-grown triangular monolayer WS2 crystals on SiO2 (300 nm)/Si substrates and formation of interesting concentric triangular fluorescence patterns in monolayer crystals of large size. The novel fluorescence aging behavior is recognized to be induced by the partial release of intrinsic tensile strain after CVD growth and the induced localized variations or gradients of strain in the monolayer crystals. The results demonstrate that strain has a dramatic impact on the fluorescence and photoluminescence of monolayer WS2 crystals and thus could potentially be utilized to tune electronic and optoelectronic properties of monolayer transition metal disulfides.

  10. Response of CVD Diamond Detectors to 14 MeV Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, C; Gagnon-Moisan, F; Kasper, A; Lucke, A; Schuhmacher, H; Weierganz, M; Zimba, A

    2012-01-01

    A series of measurements was taken at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) Braunschweig [1] using the 14 MeV neutron beam at the Van der Graaf accelerator with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond detectors, in preparation of an upcoming (n, ) cross-section measurement [2] at the CERN-n TOF experiment [3, 4]. A single-crystal (sCVD) as well as a poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond detector were used for the measurements. The response of both materials to the mono-energetic neutron beam was studied, also with the prospect for future applications in plasma diagnostics for fusion research. The results of the measurements are presented in this report.

  11. Relationship between texture and residual macro-strain in CVD diamond films based on phenomenological analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin Mao; Hongxi Zhu; Leng Chen; Huiping Feng

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between texture and elastic properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films was analyzed based on the phenomenological theory, which reveals the influence of crystalline orientation and texture on the residual macro-strain and macro-stress. The phenomenological calculations indicated that the difference in Young's modulus could be 15% in single dia- mond crystals and 5% in diamond films with homogeneously distributed strong fiber texture. The experimentally measured residual strains of free-standing CVD diamond films were in good agreement with the correspondingly calculated Young's modulus in con- nection with the multi-fiber textures in the fills, though the difference in Young's modulus induced by texture was only around 1%. It is believed that texture should be one of the important factors influencing the residual stress and strain of CVD diamond films.

  12. Friction Properties of Polished Cvd Diamond Films Sliding against Different Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zichao; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties, like the well-known extreme hardness, low coefficient of friction and high chemical inertness, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have found applications as a hard coating for drawing dies. The surface roughness of the diamond films is one of the most important attributes to the drawing dies. In this paper, the effects of different surface roughnesses on the friction properties of diamond films have been experimentally studied. Diamond films were fabricated using hot filament CVD. The WC-Co (Co 6wt.%) drawing dies were used as substrates. A gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen gas was used as the feedstock gas. The CVD diamond films were polished using mechanical polishing. Polished diamond films with three different surface roughnesses, as well as the unpolished diamond film, were fabricated in order to study the tribological performance between the CVD diamond films and different metals with oil lubrication. The unpolished and polished CVD diamond films are characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), surface profilometer, Raman spectrum and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The friction examinations were carried out by using a ball-on-plate type reciprocating friction tester. Low carbide steel, stainless steel, copper and aluminum materials were used as counterpart balls. Based on this study, the results presented the friction coefficients between the polished CVD films and different metals. The friction tests demonstrate that the smooth surface finish of CVD diamond films is beneficial for reducing their friction coefficients. The diamond films exhibit low friction coefficients when slid against the stainless steel balls and low carbide steel ball, lower than that slid against copper ball and aluminum ball, attributed to the higher ductility of copper and aluminum causing larger amount of wear debris adhering to the sliding interface and higher adhesive

  13. Controlling the quality of nanocrystalline silicon made by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition by using a reverse H2 profiling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen profiling, i.e., decreasing the H2 dilution during deposition, is a well-known technique to maintain a proper crystalline ratio of the nanocrystalline (nc-Si:H) absorber layers of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited (PECVD) thin film solar cells. With this technique a large increase in

  14. Controlling the quality of nanocrystalline silicon made by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition by using a reverse H2 profiling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen profiling, i.e., decreasing the H2 dilution during deposition, is a well-known technique to maintain a proper crystalline ratio of the nanocrystalline (nc-Si:H) absorber layers of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited (PECVD) thin film solar cells. With this technique a large increase in

  15. Effect of technique parameters on characteristics of hydrogen-free DLC films deposited by surface wave-sustained plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqi; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Umehara, Noritsugu; Diao, Dongfeng

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by a new-type surface wave-sustained plasma physical vapor deposition (SWP-PVD) system under various technique conditions. Electron density was measured by a Langmuir probe, while the film thickness and hardness were characterized using a surface profilometer and a nanoindenter, respectively. Surface morphology was investigated by an atomic force microscope (AFM). It was found that the electron density and deposition rate increased following the increase in microwave power, target voltage, or gas pressure. The typical electron density and deposition rate were about 1.87-2.04×10 11 cm -3 and 1.61-14.32 nm/min respectively. AFM images indicated that the grains of films changes as the technique parameters vary. The optical constants, refractive index n and extinction coefficient k, were obtained using an optical ellipsometry. With the increase in microwave power from 150 to 270 W, the extinction coefficient of DLC films increased from 0.05 to 0.27 while the refractive index decreased from 2.31 to 2.18.

  16. Thermodynamic study of CVD-ZrO{sub 2} phase diagrams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Huerta, A.M., E-mail: atorresh@ipn.m [Research Center for Applied Science and Advanced Technology, Altamira-IPN, Altamira C.P.89600 Tamaulipas (Mexico); Vargas-Garcia, J.R. [Dept of Metallurgical Eng., ESIQIE-IPN, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. [Research Center for Applied Science and Advanced Technology, Altamira-IPN, Altamira C.P.89600 Tamaulipas (Mexico); Romero-Serrano, J.A. [Dept of Metallurgical Eng., ESIQIE-IPN, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-08-26

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) from zirconium acetylacetonate Zr(acac){sub 4} has been thermodynamically investigated using the Gibbs' free energy minimization method and the FACTSAGE program. Thermodynamic data Cp{sup o}, DELTAH{sup o} and S{sup o} for Zr(acac){sub 4} have been estimated using the Meghreblian-Crawford-Parr and Benson methods because they are not available in the literature. The effect of deposition parameters, such as temperature and pressure, on the extension of the region where pure ZrO{sub 2} can be deposited was analyzed. The results are presented as calculated CVD stability diagrams. The phase diagrams showed two zones, one of them corresponds to pure monoclinic phase of ZrO{sub 2} and the other one corresponds to a mix of monoclinic phase of ZrO{sub 2} and graphite carbon.

  17. Epitaxial nucleation of CVD bilayer graphene on copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yenan; Zhuang, Jianing; Song, Meng; Yin, Shaoqian; Cheng, Yu; Zhang, Xuewei; Wang, Miao; Xiang, Rong; Xia, Yang; Maruyama, Shigeo; Zhao, Pei; Ding, Feng; Wang, Hongtao

    2016-12-08

    Bilayer graphene (BLG) has emerged as a promising candidate for next-generation electronic applications, especially when it exists in the Bernal-stacked form, but its large-scale production remains a challenge. Here we present an experimental and first-principles calculation study of the epitaxial chemical vapor deposition (CVD) nucleation process for Bernal-stacked BLG growth on Cu using ethanol as a precursor. Results show that a carefully adjusted flow rate of ethanol can yield a uniform BLG film with a surface coverage of nearly 90% and a Bernal-stacking ratio of nearly 100% on ordinary flat Cu substrates, and its epitaxial nucleation of the second layer is mainly due to the active CH3 radicals with the presence of a monolayer-graphene-covered Cu surface. We believe that this nucleation mechanism will help clarify the formation of BLG by the epitaxial CVD process, and lead to many new strategies for scalable synthesis of graphene with more controllable structures and numbers of layers.

  18. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  19. Organic solar cells using CVD-grown graphene electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hobeom; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Han, Tae-Hee; Lim, Kyung-Geun; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development of flexible organic solar cells (OSCs) incorporating graphene sheets synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as transparent conducting electrodes on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. A key barrier that must be overcome for the successful fabrication of OSCs with graphene electrodes is the poor-film properties of water-based poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) when coated onto hydrophobic graphene surfaces. To form a uniform PEDOT:PSS film on a graphene surface, we added perfluorinated ionomers (PFI) to pristine PEDOT:PSS to create ‘GraHEL’, which we then successfully spin coated onto the graphene surface. We systematically investigated the effect of number of layers in layer-by-layer stacked graphene anode of an OSC on the performance parameters including the open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current (Jsc), and fill factor (FF). As the number of graphene layers increased, the FF tended to increase owing to lower sheet resistance, while Jsc tended to decrease owing to the lower light absorption. In light of this trade-off between sheet resistance and transmittance, we determined that three-layer graphene (3LG) represents the best configuration for obtaining the optimal power conversion efficiency (PCE) in OSC anodes, even at suboptimal sheet resistances. We finally developed efficient, flexible OSCs with a PCE of 4.33%, which is the highest efficiency attained so far by an OSC with CVD-grown graphene electrodes to the best of our knowledge.

  20. CVD Rhenium Engines for Solar-Thermal Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Duffy, Andrew J.; Tucker, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Solar-thermal upper-stage propulsion systems have the potential to provide specific impulse approaching 900 seconds, with 760 seconds already demonstrated in ground testing. Such performance levels offer a 100% increase in payload capability compared to state-of-the-art chemical upper-stage systems, at lower cost. Although alternatives such as electric propulsion offer even greater performance, the 6- to 18- month orbital transfer time is a far greater deviation from the state of the art than the one to two months required for solar propulsion. Rhenium metal is the only material that is capable of withstanding the predicted thermal, mechanical, and chemical environment of a solar-thermal propulsion device. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most well-established and cost-effective process for the fabrication of complex rhenium structures. CVD rhenium engines have been successfully constructed for the Air Force ISUS program (bimodal thrust/electricity) and the NASA Shooting Star program (thrust only), as well as under an Air Force SBIR project (thrust only). The bimodal engine represents a more long-term and versatile approach to solar-thermal propulsion, while the thrust-only engines provide a potentially lower weight/lower cost and more near-term replacement for current upper-stage propulsion systems.

  1. CVD-graphene growth on different polycrystalline transition metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Lavin-Lopez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical vapor deposition (CVD graphene growth on two polycrystalline transition metals (Ni and Cu was investigated in detail using Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy as a way to synthesize graphene of the highest quality (i.e. uniform growth of monolayer graphene, which is considered a key issue for electronic devices. Key CVD process parameters (reaction temperature, CH4/H2flow rate ratio, total flow of gases (CH4+H2, reaction time were optimized for both metals in order to obtain the highest graphene uniformity and quality. The conclusions previously reported in literature about the performance of low and high carbon solubility metals in the synthesis of graphene and their associated reaction mechanisms, i.e. surface depositionand precipitation on cooling, respectively, was not corroborated by the results obtained in this work. Under the optimal reaction conditions, a large percentage of monolayer graphene was obtained over the Ni foil since the carbon saturation was not complete, allowing carbon atoms to be stored in the bulk metal, which could diffuse forming high quality monolayer graphene at the surface. However, under the optimal reaction conditions, the formation of a non-uniform mixture of few layers and multilayer graphene on the Cu foil was related to the presence of an excess of active carbon atoms on the Cu surface.

  2. Enhanced cold wall CVD reactor growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Kwak, Eun-Hye; Chen, Bingan; Huang, Shirong; Edwards, Michael; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Teo, Kenneth; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Liu, Johan

    2016-05-01

    HASynthesis of horizontally-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (HA-SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) directly on quartz seems very promising for the fabrication of future nanoelectronic devices. In comparison to hot-wall CVD, synthesis of HA-SWCNTs in a cold-wall CVD chamber not only means shorter heating, cooling and growth periods, but also prevents contamination of the chamber. However, since most synthesis of HA-SWCNTs is performed in hot-wall reactors, adapting this well-established process to a cold-wall chamber becomes extremely crucial. Here, in order to transfer the CVD growth technology from a hot-wall to a cold-wall chamber, a systematic investigation has been conducted to determine the influence of process parameters on the HA-SWCNT's growth. For two reasons, the cold-wall CVD chamber was upgraded with a top heater to complement the bottom substrate heater; the first reason to maintain a more uniform temperature profile during HA-SWCNTs growth, and the second reason to preheat the precursor gas flow before projecting it onto the catalyst. Our results show that the addition of a top heater had a significant effect on the synthesis. Characterization of the CNTs shows that the average density of HA-SWCNTs is around 1 - 2 tubes/ μm with high growth quality as shown by Raman analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Can surface preparation with CVD diamond tip influence on bonding to dental tissues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecido Kawaguchi, Fernando; Brossi Botta, Sergio; Nilo Vieira, Samuel; Steagall Júnior, Washington; Bona Matos, Adriana

    2008-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) tips surface treatments of enamel and dentin on bonding resistance of two adhesive systems. Thirty embedded samples were divided in 12 groups ( n = 10), according to factors: substrate (enamel and dentin), adhesive system [etch-and-rinse (SB) and self-etch]; and the surface treatments (paper discs, impact CVD tips and tangential CVD tip). When CVD tip was used in the impact mode the tip was applied perpendicular to dental surface, while at tangential mode, the tip worked parallel to dental surface. Specimens were tested in tension after 24 h at 0.5 mm/min of cross-head speed. ANOVA results, in MPa showed that in enamel, only adhesive system factor was statistically significant ( p = 0.015) under tested conditions, with higher bond strength observed for SB groups. However, in dentin the best bonding performance was obtained in SE groups ( p = 0.00). In both tested substrates, results did not show statistically significant difference for factors treatment and its interactions. ConclusionsIt may be concluded that CVD-tip surface treatment, in both tested modes, did not influence on adhesion to enamel and dentin. But, it is important to choose adhesive system according to the tissue available to bonding.

  4. CVD diamond pixel detectors for LHC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedenig, R.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; Blanquart, L.; Breugnion, P.; Charles, E.; Ciocio, A.; Clemens, J.C.; Dao, K.; Einsweiler, K.; Fasching, D.; Fischer, P.; Joshi, A.; Keil, M.; Klasen, V.; Kleinfelder, S.; Laugier, D.; Meuser, S.; Milgrome, O.; Mouthuy, T.; Richardson, J.; Sinervo, P.; Treis, J.; Wermes, N

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the development of CVD diamond pixel detectors. The preparation of the diamond pixel sensors for bump-bonding to the pixel readout electronics for the LHC and the results from beam tests carried out at CERN are described.

  5. Assessment of multiple geophysical techniques for the characterization of municipal waste deposit sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaël, Dumont; Tanguy, Robert; Nicolas, Marck; Frédéric, Nguyen

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we tested the ability of geophysical methods to characterize a large technical landfill installed in a former sand quarry. The geophysical surveys specifically aimed at delimitating the deposit site horizontal extension, at estimating its thickness and at characterizing the waste material composition (the moisture content in the present case). The site delimitation was conducted with electromagnetic (in-phase and out-of-phase) and magnetic (vertical gradient and total field) methods that clearly showed the transition between the waste deposit and the host formation. Regarding waste deposit thickness evaluation, electrical resistivity tomography appeared inefficient on this particularly thick deposit site. Thus, we propose a combination of horizontal to vertical noise spectral ratio (HVNSR) and multichannel analysis of the surface waves (MASW), which successfully determined the approximate waste deposit thickness in our test landfill. However, ERT appeared to be an appropriate tool to characterize the moisture content of the waste, which is of prior information for the organic waste biodegradation process. The global multi-scale and multi-method geophysical survey offers precious information for site rehabilitation studies, water content mitigation processes for enhanced biodegradation or landfill mining operation planning.

  6. Elemental analysis of limestone samples from Obajana and Mfamosing limestone deposits, Nigeria, using nuclear techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akpan, I.O. [Department of Physics, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross River State (Nigeria); Amodu, A.E. [Science Laboratory Technology Department, Federal Polytechnic, Idah, Kogi State (Nigeria); Akpan, A.E., E-mail: anthonyakpan@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross River State (Nigeria)

    2011-10-15

    Six limestone samples were picked from three different points at the Obajana and Mfamosing limestone deposits. The limestone samples were subjected to elemental analysis by Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) analysis. The samples were irradiated by a 4 mm diameter beam of protons with energy of 2.5 MeV and beam current of 0.2 nA for 0.9 ms. The analysis was carried out with the 1.7 MV Tandem accelerator at the Centre for Energy Research and Development (CERD), Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria. The NIST geology standard NIST 278 was analysed for quality assurance. The elemental composition and concentration of 14 elements were determined in the two locations. Ten elements were found at the Obajana deposit while 13 elements were found at the Mfamosing deposits. The elements: Mg, Al, Ca and Mn do not differ much at both deposits while others differ. The major elements (Ca, Fe, Al, Si and K) present in the limestones were also found in airborne particulate matter studied by earlier researchers. These observations suggest that all particulate emissions and wastes from the Limestone deposit should be closely monitored to reduce their cumulative effects on both health and the environment

  7. Elemental analysis of limestone samples from Obajana and Mfamosing limestone deposits, Nigeria, using nuclear techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, I O; Amodu, A E; Akpan, A E

    2011-10-01

    Six limestone samples were picked from three different points at the Obajana and Mfamosing limestone deposits. The limestone samples were subjected to elemental analysis by Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) analysis. The samples were irradiated by a 4mm diameter beam of protons with energy of 2.5 MeV and beam current of 0.2nA for 0.9 ms. The analysis was carried out with the 1.7MV Tandem accelerator at the Centre for Energy Research and Development (CERD), Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria. The NIST geology standard NIST 278 was analysed for quality assurance. The elemental composition and concentration of 14 elements were determined in the two locations. Ten elements were found at the Obajana deposit while 13 elements were found at the Mfamosing deposits. The elements: Mg, Al, Ca and Mn do not differ much at both deposits while others differ. The major elements (Ca, Fe, Al, Si and K) present in the limestones were also found in airborne particulate matter studied by earlier researchers. These observations suggest that all particulate emissions and wastes from the Limestone deposit should be closely monitored to reduce their cumulative effects on both health and the environment.

  8. Structural and electrical characterizations of BiFeO{sub 3} capacitors deposited by sol–gel dip coating technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetinkaya, Ali Osman, E-mail: cetinkayaaliosman@gmail.com [Physics Department, Abant Izzet Baysal University, 14280 Bolu (Turkey); Center for Nuclear Radiation Detector Research and Applications, 14280 Bolu (Turkey); Kaya, Senol; Aktag, Aliekber [Physics Department, Abant Izzet Baysal University, 14280 Bolu (Turkey); Center for Nuclear Radiation Detector Research and Applications, 14280 Bolu (Turkey); Budak, Erhan [Chemistry Department, Abant Izzet Baysal University, 14280 Bolu (Turkey); Yilmaz, Ercan [Physics Department, Abant Izzet Baysal University, 14280 Bolu (Turkey); Center for Nuclear Radiation Detector Research and Applications, 14280 Bolu (Turkey)

    2015-09-01

    Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO{sub 3}) thin films were deposited by sol–gel dip coating (SGDC) technique on Si-P(100) and glass substrates to investigate the structural and electrical characteristics. The aluminum (Al) metal contacts were formed on the samples deposited on the Si-P(100) to fabricate metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. The fabricated MOS structures were characterized electrically by capacitance–voltage (C–V) and conductance–voltage (G/ω–V) measurements. The structural characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction technique and scanning electron microscopy. The compositions of the films were investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results exhibit that pure rhombohedral perovskite phase films were fabricated without any elemental contamination. Average grain sizes of the BiFeO{sub 3} deposited on silicon and glass wafers were found to be about 34,50 and 30,00 nm, respectively. In addition, while the thin films deposited on glass substrate exhibit porous surface, those deposited on Si-P(100) wafers exhibit dense microstructure with a homogenous surface. Moreover, the C–V and G/ω–V characteristics are sensitive to applied voltage frequency due to frequency dependent charges (N{sub ss}) and series resistance (R{sub s}). The peak values of R{sub s} have been decreased from 2,6 kΩ to 40 Ω, while N{sub ss} is varied from 6,57 × 10{sup 12} to 3,68 × 10{sup 12} eV{sup −1} cm{sup −2} with increasing in frequency. Consequently, pure phase polycrystalline BiFeO{sub 3} thin films were fabricated successfully by SGDC technique and BiFeO{sub 3} dielectric layer exhibits stable insulation characteristics. - Highlights: • Bismuth ferrite thin films were deposited onto silicon and glass substrates by sol–gel. • Structural and electrical properties of fabricated films have been investigated. • Pure rhombohedral perovskite phase films without any contamination were deposited. • Series resistance and interface

  9. Research Update: Large-area deposition, coating, printing, and processing techniques for the upscaling of perovskite solar cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razza, Stefano; Castro-Hermosa, Sergio; Di Carlo, Aldo; Brown, Thomas M.

    2016-09-01

    To bring perovskite solar cells to the industrial world, performance must be maintained at the photovoltaic module scale. Here we present large-area manufacturing and processing options applicable to large-area cells and modules. Printing and coating techniques, such as blade coating, slot-die coating, spray coating, screen printing, inkjet printing, and gravure printing (as alternatives to spin coating), as well as vacuum or vapor based deposition and laser patterning techniques are being developed for an effective scale-up of the technology. The latter also enables the manufacture of solar modules on flexible substrates, an option beneficial for many applications and for roll-to-roll production.

  10. Synthesis of dense nano cobalt-hydroxyapatite by modified electroless deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Zaheruddin, K.; Rahmat, A.; Shamsul, J. B.; Mohd Nazree, B. D.; Aimi Noorliyana, H.

    2016-07-01

    Cobalt-hydroxyapatite (Co-HA) composites was successfully prepared by simple electroless deposition process of Co on the surface of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles. Co deposition was carried out in an alkaline bath with sodium hypophosphite as a reducing agent. The electroless process was carried out without sensitization and activation steps. The deposition of Co onto HA was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The Co-HA composite powder was compacted and sintered at 1250°C. The Co particles were homogeneously dispersed in the HA matrix after sintering and the mechanical properties of composites was enhanced to 100 % with 3 % wt Co and gradually decreased at higher Co content.

  11. Deposition of gold nanoparticles on silica spheres by electroless metal plating technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Tadaki, Yohei; Nagao, Daisuke; Konno, Mikio

    2005-03-15

    A previously proposed method for metal deposition with silver [Kobayashi et al., Chem. Mater. 13 (2001) 1630] was extended to uniform deposition of gold nanoparticles on submicrometer-sized silica spheres. The present method consisted of three steps: (1) the adsorption of Sn(2+) ions took place on surface of silica particles, (2) Ag(+) ions added were reduced and simultaneously adsorbed to the surface, while Sn(2+) was oxidized to Sn(4+), and (3) Au(+) ions added were reduced and deposited on the Ag surface. TEM observation, X-ray diffractometry, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy revealed that gold metal nanoparticles with an average particle size of 13 nm and a crystal size of 5.1 nm were formed on the silica spheres with a size of 273 nm at an Au concentration of 0.77 M.

  12. Synthesis of dense nano cobalt-hydroxyapatite by modified electroless deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Zaheruddin, K., E-mail: zaheruddin@unimap.edu.my; Rahmat, A., E-mail: azmirahmat@unimap.edu.my; Shamsul, J. B., E-mail: sbaharin@unimap.edu.my; Mohd Nazree, B. D., E-mail: nazree@unimap.edu.my; Aimi Noorliyana, H., E-mail: aimiliyana@unimap.edu.my [School of Materials Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Kompleks Pusat Pengajian Jejawi Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Taman Muhibbah, Jejawi 02600 Arau Perlis (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    Cobalt-hydroxyapatite (Co-HA) composites was successfully prepared by simple electroless deposition process of Co on the surface of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles. Co deposition was carried out in an alkaline bath with sodium hypophosphite as a reducing agent. The electroless process was carried out without sensitization and activation steps. The deposition of Co onto HA was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The Co-HA composite powder was compacted and sintered at 1250°C. The Co particles were homogeneously dispersed in the HA matrix after sintering and the mechanical properties of composites was enhanced to 100 % with 3 % wt Co and gradually decreased at higher Co content.

  13. Development of ITER relevant laser techniques for deposited layer characterisation and tritium inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaquias, A., E-mail: artur.malaquias@jet.efda.org [Associação EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal); EFDA-CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Philipps, V.; Huber, A. [Institute for Energy Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ (Germany); Hakola, A.; Likonen, J. [VTT, Association EURATOM-TEKES, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Kolehmainen, J.; Tervakangas, S. [DIARC-Technology Inc., Kattilalaaksontie 1, 02330 Espoo (Finland); Aints, M.; Paris, P.; Laan, M.; Lissovski, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Association EURATOM-TEKES, Tahe 4, Tartu 51010 (Estonia); Almaviva, S.; Caneve, L.; Colao, F. [ENEA, UTAPRAD-DIM, C.R. Frascati, P.O. Box 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Maddaluno, G. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C. R. Frascati, P.O. Box 65, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Kubkowska, M.; Gasior, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Association EURATOM/IPPLM, 00-908 Warsaw, P.O. Box 49, Hery St. 23 (Poland); Meiden, H.J. van der; Lof, A.R.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); and others

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a potential candidate to monitor the layer composition and fuel retention during and after plasma shots on specific locations of the main chamber and divertor of ITER. This method is being investigated in a cooperative research programme on plasma devices such as TEXTOR, FTU, MAGNUM-PSI and in other various laboratorial experiments. In this paper LIBS results from targets of D–H-rich carbon films and mixed W–Al–C deposits on bulk tungsten substrates are reported (simulating ITER-like deposits with Al as proxy for Be). Two independent methods, one to determine the relative elemental composition and the other the absolute contents of the target based on the experimental LIBS signals are proposed. The results show that LIBS has the capability to provide the relative concentrations of the elements on the deposited layer when the experimental conditions on the targets surface are identical to the calibration samples.

  14. Deposition of TiN Films by Novel Filter Cathodic Arc Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Er-Wu; FAN Song-Hua; LI Li; L(U) Guo-Hua; FENG Wen-Ran; ZHANG Gu-Ling; YANG Si-Ze

    2006-01-01

    A straight magnetic filtering arc source is used to deposit thin films of titanium nitride.The properties of thefilms depend strongly on the deposition process.TiN films can be deposited directly onto heated substrates in anitrogen atmosphere or onto unbiased substrates by condensing the Ti+ ion beam in about 300 eV N2+ nitrogen ionbombardment.In the latter case.the film stoichiometry is varied from an N:Ti ratio of 0.6-1.1 by controlling thearrival rates of Ti and nitrogen ions.Meanwhile,simple models are used to describe the evolution of compressivestress as function of the arrival ratio and the composition of the ion-assisted TiN films.

  15. The Effect of Excess Carbon on the Crystallographic, Microstructural, and Mechanical Properties of CVD Silicon Carbide Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzik, J V; Croft, W J; Staples, R J; MoberlyChan, W J

    2006-12-05

    Silicon carbide (SiC) fibers made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are of interest for organic, ceramic, and metal matrix composite materials due their high strength, high elastic modulus, and retention of mechanical properties at elevated processing and operating temperatures. The properties of SCS-6{trademark} silicon carbide fibers, which are made by a commercial process and consist largely of stoichiometric SiC, were compared with an experimental carbon-rich CVD SiC fiber, to which excess carbon was added during the CVD process. The concentration, homogeneity, and distribution of carbon were measured using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The effect of excess carbon on the tensile strength, elastic modulus, and the crystallographic and microstructural properties of CVD silicon carbide fibers was investigated using tensile testing, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  16. Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coscia, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNISM Unita' di Napoli, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosone, G., E-mail: ambrosone@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Basa, D.K. [Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India); Rigato, V. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Ferrero, S.; Virga, A. [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films, composed of Si nanocrystallites embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon matrix, have been prepared by varying rf power in ultra high vacuum plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system using silane and methane gas mixtures diluted in hydrogen. In this paper we have studied the compositional, structural and electrical properties of these films as a function of rf power. It is shown that with increasing rf power the atomic densities of carbon and hydrogen increase while the atomic density of silicon decreases, resulting in a reduction in the mass density. Further, it is demonstrated that carbon is incorporated into amorphous matrix and it is mainly bonded to silicon. The study has also revealed that the crystalline volume fraction decreases with increase in rf power and that the films deposited with low rf power have a size distribution of large and small crystallites while the films deposited with relatively high power have only small crystallites. Finally, the enhanced transport properties of the nanostructured silicon carbon films, as compared to amorphous counterpart, have been attributed to the presence of Si nanocrystallites. - Highlights: • The mass density of silicon carbon films decreases from 2.3 to 2 g/cm{sup 3}. • Carbon is incorporated in the amorphous phase and it is mainly bonded to silicon. • Nanostructured silicon carbon films are deposited at rf power > 40 W. • Si nanocrystallites in amorphous silicon carbon enhance the electrical properties.

  17. Creating pure nanostructures from electron-beam-induced deposition using purification techniques: a technology perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botman, A.; Mulders, J.J.L.; Hagen, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    The creation of functional nanostructures by electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) is becoming more widespread. The benefits of the technology include fast ‘point-and-shoot’ creation of three-dimensional nanostructures at predefined locations directly within a scanning electron microscope. One sig

  18. Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Alumina Films Created Using the Atomic Layer Deposition Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    23 (9) (2008) 2443–2457. [32] G.G. Stoney, The tension ofmetallic films deposited by electrolysis , Proc. R. Soc. A82 (553) (1909) 172–175. [33] M...Springer-Verlag, New York, 2006. [37] R.M. Keller, S.P. Baker, E. Arzt, Stress–temperature behavior of unpassivated thin copper films, Acta Mater. 47 (2

  19. Optimisation des paramètres de dépôt de a-Si:H dans la technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Hg-photo-CVD technique, known for its use in eveloping thin film of semiconductor ... of the mercury and temperature of the post-deposition annealing. ... silicon is streamlined and the large amount of hydrogen formed, for security reasons, ...

  20. Effect of annealing temperature on the optical spectra of CdS thin films deposited at low solution concentrations by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Zahid; Zakaria, Azmi; Mohd Ghazali, Mohd Sabri; Jafari, Atefeh; Din, Fasih Ud; Zamiri, Reza

    2011-02-22

    Two different concentrations of CdCl(2) and (NH(2))(2)CS were used to prepare CdS thin films, to be deposited on glass substrate by chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. CdCl(2) (0.000312 M and 0.000625 M) was employed as a source of Cd(2+) while (NH(2))(2)CS (0.00125 M and 0.000625 M) for S(2-) at a constant bath temperature of 70 °C. Adhesion of the deposited films was found to be very good for all the solution concentrations of both reagents. The films were air-annealed at a temperature between 200 °C to 360 °C for one hour. The minimum thickness was observed to be 33.6 nm for film annealed at 320 °C. XRD analyses reveal that the films were cubic along with peaks of hexagonal phase for all film samples. The crystallite size of the films decreased from 41.4 nm to 7.4 nm with the increase of annealing temperature for the CdCl(2) (0.000312 M). Optical energy band gap (E(g)), Urbach energy (E(u)) and absorption coefficient (α) have been calculated from the transmission spectral data. These parameters have been discussed as a function of annealing temperature and solution concentration. The best transmission (about 97%) was obtained for the air-annealed films at higher temperature at CdCl(2) (0.000312 M).

  1. CVD Lu(2)O(3):Eu coatings For Advanced Scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Stephen G; Sarin, V K

    2009-03-01

    Currently Lu(2)O(3):Eu(3+) scintillators can only be fabricated via hot-pressing and pixelization, which is commercially not viable, thus restricting their use. Chemical vapor deposition is being developed as an alternative manufacturing process. Columnar coatings of Lu(2)O(3):Eu(3+) have been achieved using the halide-CO(2)-H(2) system, clearly signifying feasibility of the CVD process. Characterization of the coatings using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis have been used as an aid to optimize process parameters and attain highly oriented and engineered coating structures. These results have clearly demonstrated that this process can be successfully used to tailor sub-micron columnar growth of Lu(2)O(3):Eu(3+), with the potential of ultra high resolution x-ray imaging.

  2. CVD synthesis of carbon-based metallic photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zakhidov, A A; Baughman, R H; Iqbal, Z

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensionally periodic nanostructures on the scale of hundreds of nanometers, known as photonic crystals, are attracting increasing interest because of a number of exciting predicted properties. In particular, interesting behavior should be obtainable for carbon- based structures having a dimensional scale larger than fullerenes and nanotubes, but smaller than graphitic microfibers. We show here how templating of porous opals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) allows us to obtain novel types of graphitic nanostructures. We describe the synthesis of new cubic forms of carbon having extended covalent connectivity in three dimensions, which provide high electrical conductivity and unit cell dimensions comparable to optical wavelengths. Such materials are metallic photonic crystals that show intense Bragg diffraction. (14 refs).

  3. Towards a general growth model for graphene CVD on transition metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Weatherup, Robert S.; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Caneva, Sabina; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene on three polycrystalline transition metal catalysts, Co, Ni and Cu, is systematically compared and a first-order growth model is proposed which can serve as a reference to optimize graphene growth on any elemental or alloy catalyst system. Simple thermodynamic considerations of carbon solubility are insufficient to capture even basic growth behaviour on these most commonly used catalyst materials, and it is shown that kinetic aspects such as carbon permeation have to be taken into account. Key CVD process parameters are discussed in this context and the results are anticipated to be highly useful for the design of future strategies for integrated graphene manufacture.The chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene on three polycrystalline transition metal catalysts, Co, Ni and Cu, is systematically compared and a first-order growth model is proposed which can serve as a reference to optimize graphene growth on any elemental or alloy catalyst system. Simple thermodynamic considerations of carbon solubility are insufficient to capture even basic growth behaviour on these most commonly used catalyst materials, and it is shown that kinetic aspects such as carbon permeation have to be taken into account. Key CVD process parameters are discussed in this context and the results are anticipated to be highly useful for the design of future strategies for integrated graphene manufacture. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06873h

  4. Superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces: Wetting and wear properties of different CVD-generated coating types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, M.; Streller, F.; Simon, F.; Frenzel, R.; White, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    In view of generating superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces, this work presents further results for the combination of anodic oxidation as the primary pretreatment method and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) variants for chemical modification producing coatings of 250-1000 nm thickness. In detail, CVD involved the utilisation of i - hexafluoropropylene oxide as precursor within the hot filament CVD process for the deposition of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) coatings at alternative conditions (PTFE-AC) and ii - 1,3,5-trivinyltrimethylcyclotrisiloxane for the deposition of polysiloxane coatings (PSi) by initiated CVD. The substrate material was Al Mg1 subjected to usual or intensified sulphuric acid anodisation pretreatments (SAAu, SAAi, respectively) affording various degrees of surface micro-roughness (SAAu weathering and/or mild wear testing. Superhydrophobicity (SH) was observed with the system SAAi + PTFE-AC similarly to former findings with the standard hot filament CVD PTFE coating variant (SAAi + PTFE-SC). The results indicated that the specific coating morphology made an important contribution to the water-repellency, because even some of the SAAu-based samples tended to reveal SH. Subjecting samples to weathering treatment resulted in a general worsening of the wetting behaviour, primarily limited to the receding contact angles. These tendencies were correlated with the chemical composition of the sample surfaces as analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wear tests showed, as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurement, that the PTFE coatings were relatively sensitive to friction. This was connected with a dramatic deterioration of the water-repelling properties. PSi-coated surfaces generally showed rather poor water-repellency, but this coating type was surprisingly resistant towards the applied friction test. From these findings it may be concluded that the combination of hydrophobic fluorine containing structure

  5. Oxidation Resistance of Turbine Blades Made of ŻS6K Superalloy after Aluminizing by Low-Activity CVD and VPA Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, M.; Kocurek, P.; Pytel, M.; Sieniawski, J.

    2016-05-01

    Two aluminide layers (additive and interdiffusion) were deposited on a turbine blade made of ŻS6K superalloy by means of VPA and CVD methods. The additive and interdiffusion layers obtained by the VPA method consist of the NiAl phase and some carbides, while the additive layer deposited by the CVD method consists of the NiAl phase only. The residual stresses in the aluminide coating at the lock, suction side, and pressure side of the blade were tensile. The aluminide coating deposited by the CVD method has an oxidation resistance about 7 times better than that deposited by the VPA method. Al2O3 + HfO2 + NiAl2O4 phases were revealed on the surface of the aluminide coating deposited by the VPA method after 240 h oxidation. Al2O3 + TiO2 oxides were found on the surface of the aluminide coating deposited by the CVD method after 240 h oxidation. Increasing the time of oxidation from 240 to 720 h led to the formation of the NiO oxide on the surface of the coating deposited by the VPA method. Al2O3 oxide is still visible on the surface of the coating deposited by the CVD method. The residual stresses in the aluminide coating after 30 cycles of oxidation at the lock, suction side and pressure side of the turbine blade are compressive.

  6. Fabrication and evaluation of CdS/PbS thin film solar cell by chemical bath deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikia, Dulen, E-mail: dulen.s@rediffmail.com; Phukan, Pallabi

    2014-07-01

    A solar cell with the structure glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS/PbS/HgTe has been fabricated where both window (CdS) and absorber (PbS) layers were deposited by a chemical bath deposition technique which is completely free from any complexing agents. The films were prepared by in-situ thermolysis of precursors confined in polyvinyl alcohol matrix (PVA). As the method is free of any complexing agent, hence no need to control the pH of the solution. The as-prepared films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy. The surface morphology clearly shows that as synthesized CdS/PVA and PbS/PVA thin films were nanostructured, almost homogeneous, without any pinholes or cracks and covered the substrate well. The photovoltaic parameters of the cell were measured with the Keithley 2400 source meter under one sun illumination and efficiency of the cell was found to be 1.668%. - Highlights: • Polyvinyl alcohol matrix-capped PbS thin film from a complexing agent free system • Fabrication of CdS/PbS solar cell based on chemical bath deposition technique • An efficiency of 1.668% is achieved under one SUN illumination.

  7. Electronic properties of embedded graphene: doped amorphous silicon/CVD graphene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arezki, Hakim; Boutchich, Mohamed; Alamarguy, David; Madouri, Ali; Alvarez, José; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Kleider, Jean-Paul; Yao, Fei; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-10-01

    Large-area graphene film is of great interest for a wide spectrum of electronic applications, such as field effect devices, displays, and solar cells, among many others. Here, we fabricated heterostructures composed of graphene (Gr) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper substrate and transferred to SiO2/Si substrates, capped by n- or p-type doped amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Using Raman scattering we show that despite the mechanical strain induced by the a-Si:H deposition, the structural integrity of the graphene is preserved. Moreover, Hall effect measurements directly on the embedded graphene show that the electronic properties of CVD graphene can be modulated according to the doping type of the a-Si:H as well as its phase i.e. amorphous or nanocrystalline. The sheet resistance varies from 360 Ω sq-1 to 1260 Ω sq-1 for the (p)-a-Si:H/Gr (n)-a-Si:H/Gr, respectively. We observed a temperature independent hole mobility of up to 1400 cm2 V-1 s-1 indicating that charge impurity is the principal mechanism limiting the transport in this heterostructure. We have demonstrated that embedding CVD graphene under a-Si:H is a viable route for large scale graphene based solar cells or display applications.

  8. Metal oxide growth, spin precession measurements and Raman spectroscopy of CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Akitomo

    quality on each step through the device fabrication process. The direct interface formation between the ferromagnetic transition metal and graphene indicated the strong interaction at the interface which could lead spin scattering. Fabricating metal oxide layers prior to metal deposition on CVD graphene significantly reduces the interfacial interactions induced by the transition metals. This knowledge is beneficial for the fabrication of future graphene based spintronic devices as well as other types of graphene based devices.

  9. Lipids, atherosclerosis and CVD risk: is CRP an innocent bystander?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, B G; Zacho, J

    2009-01-01

    exclude that genetically elevated CRP cause CVD. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that elevated CRP per se does not cause CVD; however, inflammation per se possibly contributes to CVD. Elevated CRP levels more likely is a marker for the extent of atherosclerosis or for the inflammatory activity...

  10. Higher lung deposition with Respimat® Soft Mist™ Inhaler than HFA-MDI in COPD patients with poor technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Brand

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Peter Brand1, Bettina Hederer2, George Austen3, Helen Dewberry3, Thomas Meyer41RWTH, Aachen, Germany; 2Boehringer Ingelheim, Ingelheim, Germany; 3Boehringer Ingelheim, Bracknell, UK; 4Inamed Research, Gauting, GermanyAbstract: Aerosols delivered by Respimat® Soft Mist™ Inhaler (SMI are slower-moving and longer-lasting than those from pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs, improving the efficiency of pulmonary drug delivery to patients. In this four-way cross-over study, adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and with poor pMDI technique received radiolabelled Berodual® (fenoterol hydrobromide 50 µg/ipratropium bromide 20 µg via Respimat® SMI or hydrofluoroalkane (HFA-MDI (randomized order on test days 1 and 2, with no inhaler technique training. The procedure was repeated on test days 3 and 4 after training. Deposition was measured by gamma scintigraphy. All 13 patients entered (9 males, mean age 62 years; FEV1 46% of predicted inhaled too fast at screening (peak inspiratory flow rate [IF]: 69–161 L/min. Whole lung deposition was higher with Respimat® SMI than with pMDI for untrained (37% of delivered dose vs 21% of metered dose and trained patients (53% of delivered vs 21% of metered dose (pSign-Test = 0.15; pANOVA< 0.05. Training also improved inhalation profiles (slower average and peak IF as well as longer breath-hold time. Drug delivery to the lungs with Respimat® SMI is more efficient than with pMDI, even with poor inhaler technique. Teaching patients to hold their breath as well as to inhale slowly and deeply increased further lung deposition using Respimat® SMI.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, drug delivery, inhalation, metered-dose inhaler, poor inhalation technique, training

  11. Chalcogenide-based thin film sensors prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, J.; Schöning, M. J.; Schmidt, C.; Siegert, M.; Mesters, St.; Zander, W.; Kordos, P.; Lüth, H.; Legin, A.; Mourzina, Yu. G.; Seleznev, B.; Vlasov, Yu. G.

    One advantage of the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method is the stoichiometric transfer of multi-component target material to a given substrate. This advantage of the PLD determined the choice to prepare chalco-genide-based thin films with an off-axis geometry PLD. Ag-As-S and Cu-Ag-As-Se-Tetargets were used to deposit thin films on Si substrates for an application as a heavy metal sensing device. The films were characterized by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electrochemical measurements. The same stoichiometry of the films and the targets was confirmed by RBS measurements. We observed a good long-term stability of more than 60 days and a nearly Nernstian sensitivity towards Pb and Cu, which is comparable to bulk sensors.

  12. Optimization of the Automated Spray Layer-by-Layer Technique for Thin Film Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    she was extremely busy running our household of five, homeschooling our son and volunteering. She amazes me every single day. I know that her... benefit to using solutions in excess of 80 mmol of PAA. However, at concentrations less than 80 mmol for the other standard parameter values it is...maximum film thickness. These results demonstrate that faster film deposition time is not the only benefit of Spray-LbL’s shorter polyelectrolyte to

  13. Chemical vapour deposited diamonds for dosimetry of radiotherapeutical beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucciolini, M.; Mazzocchi, S. [Firenze Univ., Firenze (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica; INFN, Firenze (Italy); Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pini, S.; Sciortino, S. [Firenze Univ., Firenze (Italy). Dipartimento di Energetica; INFN, Firenze (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Guttone, G.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M.G. [INFN, Catania (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali del Sud

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the application of synthetic diamond detectors to the clinical dosimetry of photon and electron beams. It has been developed in the frame of INFN CANDIDO project and MURST Cofin. Diamonds grown with CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition) technique have been studied; some of them are commercial samples while others have been locally synthesised. Experiments have been formed using both on-line and off-line approaches. For the off-line measurements, TL (thermoluminescent) and TSC (thermally stimulated current) techniques have been used.

  14. Thick CrN/NbN multilayer coating deposited by cathodic arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Juliano Avelar; Tschiptschin, Andre Paulo; Souza, Roberto Martins, E-mail: antschip@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Lima, Nelson Batista de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    The production of tribological nanoscale multilayer CrN/NbN coatings up to 6 μm thick by Sputtering/HIPIMS has been reported in literature. However, high demanding applications, such as internal combustion engine parts, need thicker coatings (>30 μm). The production of such parts by sputtering would be economically restrictive due to low deposition rates. In this work, nanoscale multilayer CrN/NbN coatings were produced in a high-deposition rate, industrial-size, Cathodic Arc Physical Vapor Deposition (ARC-PVD) chamber, containing three cathodes in alternate positions (Cr/ Nb/Cr). Four 30 μm thick NbN/CrN multilayer coatings with different periodicities (20, 10, 7.5 and 4 nm) were produced. The coatings were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The multilayer coating system was composed of alternate cubic rock salt CrN and NbN layers, coherently strained due to lattice mismatch. The film grew with columnar morphology through the entire stratified structure. The periodicities adopted were maintained throughout the entire coating. The 20 nm periodicity coating showed separate NbN and CrN peaks in the XRD patterns, while for the lower periodicity (≤10nm) coatings, just one intermediate lattice (d-spacing) was detected. An almost linear increase of hardness with decreasing bilayer period indicates that interfacial effects can dominate the hardening mechanisms. (author)

  15. Adhesion improvement of carbon-based coatings through a high ionization deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Hultman, L.

    2012-06-01

    The deposition of highly adherent carbon nitride (CNx) films using a pretreatment with two high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) power supplies in a master-slave configuration is reviewed. SKF3 (AISI 52100) steel substrates were pretreated in the environment of a high ionized Cr+Ar plasma in order to sputter clean the surface and implant Cr metal ions. CNx films were subsequently deposited at room temperature by DC magnetron sputtering from a high purity C target in a N2/Ar plasma discharge. All processing was done in an industrial-scale CemeCon CC800 coating system. A series of depositions were obtained with samples pretreated at different bias voltages (DC and pulsed). The adhesion of CNx films, evaluated by the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C test, reaches strength quality HF1. Adhesion results are correlated to high resolution transmission electron microscopy observations confirming the formation of an optimal interfacial mixing layer of Cr and steel. The throwing power increase for HIPIMS coatings is associated to the higher ionization in the plasma discharge.

  16. Wetting behaviour of carbon nitride nanostructures grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Kamal, Shafarina Azlinda; Ritikos, Richard; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2015-02-01

    Tuning the wettability of various coating materials by simply controlling the deposition parameters is essential for various specific applications. In this work, carbon nitride (CNx) films were deposited on silicon (1 1 1) substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition employing parallel plate electrode configuration. Effects of varying the electrode distance (DE) on the films' structure and bonding properties were investigated using Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The wettability of the films was analyzed using water contact angle measurements. At high DE, the CNx films' surface was smooth and uniform. This changed into fibrous nanostructures when DE was decreased. Surface roughness of the films increased with this morphological transformation. Nitrogen incorporation increased with decrease in DE which manifested the increase in both relative intensities of Cdbnd N to Cdbnd C and Nsbnd H to Osbnd H bonds. sp2-C to sp3-C ratio increased as DE decreased due to greater deformation of sp2 bonded carbon at lower DE. The films' characteristics changed from hydrophilic to super-hydrophobic with the decrease in DE. Roughness ratio, surface porosity and surface energy calculated from contact angle measurements were strongly dependent on the morphology, surface roughness and bonding properties of the films.

  17. Influence of surface morphology and microstructure on performance of CVD tungsten coating under fusion transient thermal loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Jianbao; Feng, Fan; Lv, Yanwei; Song, Jiupeng; Chen, Jiming

    2016-12-01

    Thick tungsten coatings have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a rapid growth rate. A series of tungsten coatings with different thickness and surface morphology were prepared. The surface morphology, microstructure and preferred orientation of the CVD tungsten coatings were investigated. Thermal shock analyses were performed by using an electron beam facility to study the influence of the surface morphology and the microstructure on the thermal shock resistance of the CVD tungsten coatings. Repetitive (100 pulses) ELMs-like thermal shock loads were applied at various temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C with pulse duration of 1 ms and an absorbed power density of up to 1 GW/m2. The results of the tests demonstrated that the specific surface morphology and columnar crystal structure of the CVD tungsten have significant influence on the surface cracking threshold and crack propagation of the materials. The CVD tungsten coatings with a polished surface show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings with a rough surface.

  18. N-doped ZnO films grown from hybrid target by the pulsed laser deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Tovar, E. A.; Chan y Díaz, E.; Acosta, M.; Castro-Rodríguez, R.; Iribarren, A.

    2016-10-01

    ZnO thin films were grown by the pulsed laser deposition technique on glass substrate using a hybrid target composed of ZnO powder embedded into a poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate) matrix. The resulting thin film presented ZnO wurtzite structure with very low stress and diffractogram very similar to that of the powder pattern. From comparing with ZnO thin films grown from traditional sintered target, it is suggested that the use of this hybrid target with a soft matrix led to ejection of ZnO clusters that conveniently disposed and adhered to substrate and previous deposited layers. Chemical measurements showed the presence of Zn-N bonds, besides Zn-O ones. Optical absorption profile confirmed the presence of low-polymerized zinc oxynitride molecular subunits, besides ZnO.

  19. Solution Layer Deposition: A Technique for the Growth of Ultra-Pure Manganese Oxides on Silica at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cure, Jérémy; Piettre, Kilian; Coppel, Yannick; Beche, Eric; Esvan, Jérôme; Collière, Vincent; Chaudret, Bruno; Fau, Pierre

    2016-02-24

    With the ever increasing miniaturization in microelectronic devices, new deposition techniques are required to form high-purity metal oxide layers. Herein, we report a liquid route to specifically produce thin and conformal amorphous manganese oxide layers on silicon substrate, which can be transformed into a manganese silicate layer. The undesired insertion of carbon into the functional layers is avoided through a solution metal-organic chemistry approach named Solution Layer Deposition (SLD). The growth of a pure manganese oxide film by SLD takes place through the decoordination of ligands from a metal-organic complex in mild conditions, and coordination of the resulting metal atoms on a silica surface. The mechanism of this chemical liquid route has been elucidated by solid-state (29) Si MAS NMR, XPS, SIMS, and HRTEM.

  20. CdS thin films obtained by thermal treatment of cadmium(II) complex precursor deposited by MAPLE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotaru, Andrei [INFLPR - National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PPAM - Lasers Department, 409 Atomistilor Bvd., Magurele RO-077125, Bucharest (Romania); Mietlarek-Kropidlowska, Anna [Gdansk University of Technology, Chemistry Faculty, 11/12 G. Narutowicza Str., PL-90-233 Gdansk (Poland); Constantinescu, Catalin, E-mail: catalin.constantinescu@inflpr.ro [INFLPR - National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PPAM - Lasers Department, 409 Atomistilor Bvd., Magurele RO-077125, Bucharest (Romania); Scarisoreanu, Nicu; Dumitru, Marius [INFLPR - National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PPAM - Lasers Department, 409 Atomistilor Bvd., Magurele RO-077125, Bucharest (Romania); Strankowski, Michal [Gdansk University of Technology, Chemistry Faculty, 11/12 G. Narutowicza Str., PL-90-233 Gdansk (Poland); Rotaru, Petre [University of Craiova, Faculty of Physics, 13 A.I. Cuza St., Craiova RO-200585, Dolj (Romania); Ion, Valentin [INFLPR - National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PPAM - Lasers Department, 409 Atomistilor Bvd., Magurele RO-077125, Bucharest (Romania); Vasiliu, Cristina [INOE 2000 - National Institute for Optoelectronics, 1 Atomistilor Bvd., Magurele RO-077125, Bucharest (Romania); Becker, Barbara [Gdansk University of Technology, Chemistry Faculty, 11/12 G. Narutowicza Str., PL-90-233 Gdansk (Poland); Dinescu, Maria [INFLPR - National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PPAM - Lasers Department, 409 Atomistilor Bvd., Magurele RO-077125, Bucharest (Romania)

    2009-05-15

    Thin films of [Cd{l_brace}SSi(O-Bu{sup t}){sub 3}{r_brace}(S{sub 2}CNEt{sub 2})]{sub 2}, precursor for semiconducting CdS layers, were deposited on silicon substrates by Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique. Structural analysis of the obtained films by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the viability of the procedure. After the deposition of the coordination complex, the layers are manufactured by appropriate thermal treatment of the system (thin film and substrate), according to the thermal analysis of the compound. Surface morphology of the thin films was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopic-ellipsometry (SE) measurements.

  1. Photoinitiated chemical vapor deposition of polymeric thin films using a volatile photoinitiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kelvin; Gleason, Karen K

    2005-12-06

    Photoinitiated chemical vapor deposition (piCVD) is an evolutionary CVD technique for depositing polymeric thin films in one step without using any solvents. The technique requires no pre- or post-treatment and uses a volatile photoinitiator to initiate free-radical polymerization of gaseous monomers under UV irradiation. Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) was used as a test monomer for its ability to undergo free-radical polymerization, and 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropane) (ABMP) was used as the photoinitiator, as it is known to produce radicals when excited by photons. GMA and ABMP vapors were fed into a vacuum chamber in which film growth was observed on a substrate exposed to UV irradiation. The resulting poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) thin films were comprised of linear chains and had high structural resemblance to conventionally polymerized PGMA, as shown by the high solubility in tetrahydrofuran and the infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The introduction of ABMP into the vacuum chamber significantly increased growth rates. The maximum growth rate achieved was approximately 140 nm/min and represents a 7-fold enhancement over the case without ABMP. The molecular weight was found to increase with increasing monomer-to-initiator (M/I) feed ratio, and the polydispersity indexes (PDIs) of the samples were between 1.8 and 2.2, lower than the values obtained in conventional batch polymerization but in agreement with the theoretical expressions developed for low-conversion solution-phase polymerization, which are applicable to continuous processes such as piCVD. Molecular-weight distributions can be narrowed by filtering out wavelengths shorter than 300 nm, which induce branching and/or cross-linking. The strong dependence of the molecular weight on the M/I ratio, the rate enhancement due to the use of a radical photoinitiator, the good agreement between the experimental, and the theoretical PDIs provide evidence of a free-radical mechanism in piCVD

  2. TPR system: a powerful technique to monitor carbon nanotube formation during chemical vapour deposition; Sistema RTP: uma tecnica poderosa para o monitoramento da formacao de nanotubos de carbono durante o processo por deposicao de vapor quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tristao, Juliana Cristina; Moura, Flavia Cristina Camilo; Lago, Rochel Montero, E-mail: rochel@ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DQ/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Sapag, Karim [Universidade Nacional de San Luis (Argentina). Lab. de Ciencias de Superficies y Medios Porosos

    2010-07-01

    In this work, a TPR (Temperature Programmed Reduction) system is used as a powerful tool to monitor carbon nanotubes production during CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition), The experiments were carried out using catalyst precursors based on Fe-Mo supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and methane as carbon source. As methane reacts on the Fe metal surface, carbon is deposited and H2 is produced. TPR is very sensitive to the presence of H2 and affords information on the temperature where catalyst is active to form different forms of carbon, the reaction kinetics, the catalyst deactivation and carbon yields. (author)

  3. Scalable ZnO nanotube arrays grown on CVD-graphene films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Park

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the growth of wafer-scale arrays of individually position-controlled and vertically aligned ZnO nanotube arrays on graphene deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD-graphene. Introducing two-dimensional layered materials such as graphene as a growth buffer has recently been suggested for growing nanomaterials on traditionally incompatible substrates. However, their growth has been restricted to small areas or had limited controllability. Here, we study the distinct growth behavior of ZnO on CVD-graphene that makes the selective area growth of individual nanostructures on its surface difficult, and propose a set of methods to overcome this. The resulting nanotube arrays, as examined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, exhibited uniform morphologies and high structural quality over a large area and could be prepared on a broad variety of substrates, including amorphous, metallic, or flexible substrates.

  4. Pulse-height defect in single-crystal CVD diamond detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliuskina, O.; Imai, N. [The University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Strekalovsky, A.O.; Aleksandrov, A.A.; Aleksandrova, I.A.; Ilich, S.; Kamanin, D.V.; Knyazheva, G.N.; Kuznetsova, E.A.; Mishinsky, G.V.; Pyatkov, Yu.V.; Strekalovsky, O.V.; Zhuchko, V.E. [JINR, Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Devaraja, H.M. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Heinz, C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); Heinz, S. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Hofmann, S.; Kis, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Maurer, J.; Traeger, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Pomorski, M. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensor Laboratory, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-02-15

    The pulse-height versus deposited energy response of a single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector was measured for ions of Ti, Cu, Nb, Ag, Xe, Au, and of fission fragments of {sup 252} Cf at different energies. For the fission fragments, data were also measured at different electric field strengths of the detector. Heavy ions have a significant pulse-height defect in CVD diamond material, which increases with increasing energy of the ions. It also depends on the electrical field strength applied at the detector. The measured pulse-height defects were explained in the framework of recombination models. Calibration methods known from silicon detectors were modified and applied. A comparison with data for the pulse-height defect in silicon detectors was performed. (orig.)

  5. Investigation of Non-Vacuum Deposition Techniques in Fabrication of Chalcogenide-Based Solar Cell Absorbers

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaggaf, Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    The environmental challenges are increasing, and so is the need for renewable energy. For photovoltaic applications, thin film Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGS) and CuIn(S,Se)2 (CIS) solar cells are attractive with conversion efficiencies of more than 20%. However, the high-efficiency cells are fabricated using vacuum technologies such as sputtering or thermal co-evaporation, which are very costly and unfeasible at industrial level. The fabrication involves the uses of highly toxic gases such as H2Se, adding complexity to the fabrication process. The work described here focused on non-vacuum deposition methods such as printing. Special attention has been given to printing designed in a moving Roll-to-Roll (R2R) fashion. The results show potential of such technology to replace the vacuum processes. Conversion efficiencies for such non-vacuum deposition of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 solar cells have exceeded 15% using hazardous chemicals such as hydrazine, which is unsuitable for industrial scale up. In an effort to simplify the process, non-toxic suspensions of Cu(In,Ga)S2 molecular-based precursors achieved efficiencies of ~7-15%. Attempts to further simplify the selenization step, deposition of CuIn(S,Se)2 particulate solutions without the Ga doping and non-toxic suspensions of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 quaternary precursors achieved efficiencies (~1-8%). The contribution of this research was to provide a new method to monitor printed structures through spectral-domain optical coherence tomography SD-OCT in a moving fashion simulating R2R process design at speeds up to 1.05 m/min. The research clarified morphological and compositional impacts of Nd:YAG laser heat-treatment on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorber layer to simplify the annealing step in non-vacuum environment compatible to R2R. Finally, the research further simplified development methods for CIGS solar cells based on suspensions of quaternary Cu(In,Ga)Se2 precursors and ternary CuInS2 precursors. The methods consisted of post deposition reactive

  6. The High performance of nanocrystalline CVD diamond coated hip joints in wear simulator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, M M; Amaral, M; Rodrigues, S P; Santos, R; Gouvea, C P; Archanjo, B S; Trommer, R M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F; Achete, C A

    2015-09-01

    The superior biotribological performance of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was already shown to demonstrate high wear resistance in ball on plate experiments under physiological liquid lubrication. However, tests with a close-to-real approach were missing and this constitutes the aim of the present work. Hip joint wear simulator tests were performed with cups and heads made of silicon nitride coated with NCD of ~10 μm in thickness. Five million testing cycles (Mc) were run, which represent nearly five years of hip joint implant activity in a patient. For the wear analysis, gravimetry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used. After 0.5 Mc of wear test, truncation of the protruded regions of the NCD film happened as a result of a fine-scale abrasive wear mechanism, evolving to extensive plateau regions and highly polished surface condition (Ra<10nm). Such surface modification took place without any catastrophic features as cracking, grain pullouts or delamination of the coatings. A steady state volumetric wear rate of 0.02 mm(3)/Mc, equivalent to a linear wear of 0.27 μm/Mc favorably compares with the best performance reported in the literature for the fourth generation alumina ceramic (0.05 mm(3)/Mc). Also, squeaking, quite common phenomenon in hard-on-hard systems, was absent in the present all-NCD system.

  7. Characterization of ZnO:SnO2 (50:50) thin film deposited by RF magnetron sputtering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia, S. R.; Sivakumar, R.; Sanjeeviraja, C.; Ponmudi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and tin oxide (SnO2) thin films have attracted significant interest recently for use in optoelectronic application such as solar cells, flat panel displays, photonic devices, laser diodes and gas sensors because of their desirable electrical and optical properties and wide band gap. In the present study, thin films of ZnO:SnO2 (50:50) were deposited on pre-cleaned microscopic glass substrate by RF magnetron sputtering technique. The substrate temperature and RF power induced changes in structural, surface morphological, compositional and optical properties of the films have been studied.

  8. Terahertz and M4PP conductivity mapping of large area CVD grown graphene films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bøggild, Peter;

    We demonstrate mapping of magnitude and variation of the electrical conductance of large area CVD graphene films by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and micro four-point-probe (M4PP). Non-trivial correlations between results obtained with the two techniques are discussed in relation...

  9. Significance of vapor phase chemical reactions on CVD rates predicted by chemically frozen and local thermochemical equilibrium boundary layer theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the role played by vapor-phase chemical reactions on CVD rates by comparing the results of two extreme theories developed to predict CVD mass transport rates in the absence of interfacial kinetic barrier: one based on chemically frozen boundary layer and the other based on local thermochemical equilibrium. Both theories consider laminar convective-diffusion boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers and include thermal (Soret) diffusion and variable property effects. As an example, Na2SO4 deposition was studied. It was found that gas phase reactions have no important role on Na2SO4 deposition rates and on the predictions of the theories. The implications of the predictions of the two theories to other CVD systems are discussed.

  10. Investigation of multilayer domains in large-scale CVD monolayer graphene by optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuanfang; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Wenhui; Guo, Xitao; Jiang, Jie; Nan, Haiyan; Ni, Zhenhua

    2017-03-01

    CVD graphene is a promising candidate for optoelectronic applications due to its high quality and high yield. However, multi-layer domains could inevitably form at the nucleation centers during the growth. Here, we propose an optical imaging technique to precisely identify the multilayer domains and also the ratio of their coverage in large-scale CVD monolayer graphene. We have also shown that the stacking disorder in twisted bilayer graphene as well as the impurities on the graphene surface could be distinguished by optical imaging. Finally, we investigated the effects of bilayer domains on the optical and electrical properties of CVD graphene, and found that the carrier mobility of CVD graphene is seriously limited by scattering from bilayer domains. Our results could be useful for guiding future optoelectronic applications of large-scale CVD graphene. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61422503, 61376104), the Open Research Funds of Key Laboratory of MEMS of Ministry of Education (SEU, China), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities.

  11. Measurement of LHCD edge power deposition through modulation techniques on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faust, I. C.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Parker, R. R.; Baek, S. G.; Chilenksi, M. A.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Terry, J. L.; Shiraiwa, S.; Walk, J. R.; Wallace, G. M.; Whyte, D. G. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA USA (United States); Edlund, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ USA (United States)

    2015-12-10

    The efficiency of LHCD on Alcator C-Mod drops exponentially with line average density. At reactor relevant densities (> 1 · 1020 [m{sup −3}]) no measurable current is driven. While a number of causes have been suggested, no specific mechanism has been shown to be responsible for the loss of current drive at high density. Fast modulation of the LH power was used to isolate and quantify the LHCD deposition within the plasma. Measurements from these plasmas provide unique evidence for determining a root cause. Modulation of LH power in steady plasmas exhibited no correlated change in the core temperature. A correlated, prompt response in the edge suggests that the loss in efficiency is related to a edge absorption mechanism. This follows previous results which found the generation of n{sub ||}-independent SOL currents. Multiple Langmuir probe array measurements of the conducted heat conclude that the lost power is deposited near the last closed flux surface. The heat flux induced by LH waves onto the outer divertor is calculated. Changes in the neutral pressure, ionization and hard X-ray emission at high density highlight the importance of the active divertor in the loss of efficiency. Results of this study implicate a mechanism which may occur over multiple passes, leading to power absorption near the LCFS.

  12. In Situ Synthesis and Characterization of Fe-Based Metallic Glass Coatings by Electrospark Deposition Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, Alexander A.; Pyachin, S. A.; Ermakov, M. A.; Syuy, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    Crystalline FeWMoCrBC electrode materials were prepared by conventional powder metallurgy. Metallic glass (MG) coatings were produced by electrospark deposition onto AISI 1035 steel in argon atmosphere. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy verified the amorphous structure of the as-deposited coatings. The coatings have a thickness of about 40 microns and a uniform structure. The results of dry sliding wear tests against high-speed steel demonstrated that Fe-based MG coatings had a lower friction coefficient and more than twice the wear resistance for 20 km sliding distance with respect to AISI 1035 steel. High-temperature oxidation treatment of the metal glass coatings at 1073 K in air for 12 h revealed that the oxidation resistance of the best coating was 36 times higher than that for bare AISI 1035 steel. These findings are expected to broaden the applications of electrospark Fe-based MG as highly protective and anticorrosive coatings for mild steel.

  13. Tribological Testing of Some Potential PVD and CVD Coatings for Steel Wire Drawing Dies

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Maria; Olsson, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Cemented carbide is today the most frequently used drawing die material in steel wire drawing applications. This is mainly due to the possibility to obtain a broad combination of hardness and toughness thus meeting the requirements concerning strength, crack resistance and wear resistance set by the wire drawing process. However, the increasing cost of cemented carbide in combination with the possibility to increase the wear resistance of steel through the deposition of wear resistant CVD and...

  14. A 3D tomographic EBSD analysis of a CVD diamond thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu, Dierk Raabe and Stefan Zaefferer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the nucleation and growth processes in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond film using a tomographic electron backscattering diffraction method (3D EBSD. The approach is based on the combination of a focused ion beam (FIB unit for serial sectioning in conjunction with high-resolution EBSD. Individual diamond grains were investigated in 3-dimensions particularly with regard to the role of twinning.

  15. Comparison of Straight and Helical Nanotube Production in a Swirled Fluid CVD Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bathgate, Graham; Iyuke, Sunny; Kavishe, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Research into Carbon Nanotubes and their applications is fast becoming an extremely popular topic, and any means to greatly improve the synthesis process has a huge marketability. While investigating the feasibility of continuous production of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a vertical Swirled Fluid Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) reactor, it was discovered that helical nanotubes were lifted from the reactor by the gas current while straight tubes remained behind. Investigation into the me...

  16. Chemical vapor deposition synthesis of tunable unsubstituted polythiophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Siamak; Lau, Kenneth K S

    2011-12-20

    Despite having exceptional electroactive properties, applications of unsubstituted polythiophene (PTh) have been limited due to its insolubility. To overcome this challenge, we have employed oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) as a unique liquid-free technique to enable the oxidative polymerization of PTh using thiophene as the starting monomer and vanadium oxytrichloride as an effective vaporizable oxidant initiator. Vibrational and phototelectron spectroscopy indicated the formation of unsubstituted polythiophene. Cyclic voltammetry revealed its electrochromic behavior in solution. Significantly, polymer conjugation length and electrical conductivity can be tuned by controlling oCVD process variables. Polymerization is found to be adsorption-limited, so by providing sufficient monomer and limiting the amount of initiator at the growth surface, PTh is believed to be formed through α-α thiophene linkages.

  17. Superhydrophobic Copper Surfaces with Anticorrosion Properties Fabricated by Solventless CVD Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaró, Ignasi; Yagüe, Jose L; Borrós, Salvador

    2017-01-11

    Due to continuous miniaturization and increasing number of electrical components in electronics, copper interconnections have become critical for the design of 3D integrated circuits. However, corrosion attack on the copper metal can affect the electronic performance of the material. Superhydrophobic coatings are a commonly used strategy to prevent this undesired effect. In this work, a solventless two-steps process was developed to fabricate superhydrophobic copper surfaces using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods. The superhydrophobic state was achieved through the design of a hierarchical structure, combining micro-/nanoscale domains. In the first step, O2- and Ar-plasma etchings were performed on the copper substrate to generate microroughness. Afterward, a conformal copolymer, 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate-ethylene glycol diacrylate [p(PFDA-co-EGDA)], was deposited on top of the metal via initiated CVD (iCVD) to lower the surface energy of the surface. The copolymer topography exhibited a very characteristic and unique nanoworm-like structure. The combination of the nanofeatures of the polymer with the microroughness of the copper led to achievement of the superhydrophobic state. AFM, SEM, and XPS were used to characterize the evolution in topography and chemical composition during the CVD processes. The modified copper showed water contact angles as high as 163° and hysteresis as low as 1°. The coating withstood exposure to aggressive media for extended periods of time. Tafel analysis was used to compare the corrosion rates between bare and modified copper. Results indicated that iCVD-coated copper corrodes 3 orders of magnitude slower than untreated copper. The surface modification process yielded repeatable and robust superhydrophobic coatings with remarkable anticorrosion properties.

  18. Effect of indium doping level on certain physical properties of CdS films deposited using an improved SILAR technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravichandran, K., E-mail: kkr1365@yahoo.com [P.G. and Research Department of Physics, AVVM Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous), Poondi, Thanjavur-613 503, Tamil Nadu (India); Senthamilselvi, V. [P.G. and Research Department of Physics, AVVM Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous), Poondi, Thanjavur-613 503, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Physics, Kunthavai Naachiyaar Government College for Women (Autonomous), Thanjavur-613 007, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-04-01

    The influence of indium (In) doping levels (0, 2, …, 8 at.%) on certain physical properties of cadmium sulphide (CdS) thin films deposited using an improved successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (ISILAR) method has been studied. In this improved SILAR technique, a fresh anionic solution was introduced after a particular number of dipping cycles in order to achieve good stoichiometry. All the deposited films exhibited cubic phase with (1 1 1) plane as preferential orientation. The calculated crystallite size values are found to be decreased from 54.80 nm to 23.65 nm with the increase in In doping level. The optical study confirmed the good transparency (80%) of the film. A most compact and pinhole free smooth surface was observed for the CdS films with 8 at.% of In doping level. The perceived photoluminescence (PL) bands endorsed the lesser defect crystalline nature of the obtained CdS:In films. The chemical composition analysis (EDAX) showed the near stoichiometric nature of this ISILAR deposited CdS:In films.

  19. Characterization and photocatalytic activity of boron-doped TiO2 thin films prepared by liquid phase deposition technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Noor Shahina Begum; H M Farveez Ahmed; O M Hussain

    2008-10-01

    Boron doped TiO2 thin films have been successfully deposited on glass substrate and silicon wafer at 30°C from an aqueous solution of ammonium hexa-fluoro titanate and boron trifluoride by liquid phase deposition technique. The boric acid was used as an – scavenger. The resultant films were characterized by XRD, EDAX, UV and microstructures by SEM. The result shows the deposited film to be amorphous which becomes crystalline between 400 and 500°C. The EDAX and XRD data confirm the existence of boron atom in TiO2 matrix and a small peak corresponding to rutile phase was also found. Boron doped TiO2 thin films can be used as photocatalyst for the photodegradation of chlorobenzene which is a great environmental hazard. It was found that chlorobenzene undergoes degradation efficiently in presence of boron doped TiO2 thin films by exposing its aqueous solution to visible light. The photocatalytic activity increases with increase in the concentration of boron.

  20. Using wire shaping techniques and holographic optics to optimize deposition characteristics in wire-based laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, N. J.; Higginson, R. L.; Tyrer, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    In laser cladding, the potential benefits of wire feeding are considerable. Typical problems with the use of powder, such as gas entrapment, sub-100% material density and low deposition rate are all avoided with the use of wire. However, the use of a powder-based source material is the industry standard, with wire-based deposition generally regarded as an academic curiosity. This is because, although wire-based methods have been shown to be capable of superior quality results, the wire-based process is more difficult to control. In this work, the potential for wire shaping techniques, combined with existing holographic optical element knowledge, is investigated in order to further improve the processing characteristics. Experiments with pre-placed wire showed the ability of shaped wire to provide uniformity of wire melting compared with standard round wire, giving reduced power density requirements and superior control of clad track dilution. When feeding with flat wire, the resulting clad tracks showed a greater level of quality consistency and became less sensitive to alterations in processing conditions. In addition, a 22% increase in deposition rate was achieved. Stacking of multiple layers demonstrated the ability to create fully dense, three-dimensional structures, with directional metallurgical grain growth and uniform chemical structure.

  1. Effects of Thermal Annealing on the Optical Properties of Titanium Oxide Thin Films Prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.U. Igwe

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A titanium oxide thin film was prepared by chemical bath deposition technique, deposited on glass substrates using TiO2 and NaOH solution with triethanolamine (TEA as the complexing agent. The films w ere subjected to post deposition annealing under various temperatures, 100, 150, 200, 300 and 399ºC. The thermal treatment streamlined the properties of the oxide films. The films are transparent in the entire regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, firmly adhered to the substrate and resistant to chemicals. The transmittance is between 20 and 95% while the reflectance is between 0.95 and 1%. The band gaps obtained under various thermal treatments are between 2.50 and 3.0 ev. The refractive index is between 1.52 and 2.55. The thickness achieved is in the range of 0.12-0.14 :m.These properties of the oxide film make it suitable for application in solar cells: Liquid and solid dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical solar cells, photo induced water splitting, dye synthesized solar cells, environmental purifications, gas sensors, display devices, batteries, as well as, solar cells with an organic or inorganic extremely thin absorber. These thin films are also of interest for the photooxidation of water, photocatalysis, electro chromic devices and other uses.

  2. A Novel Technique for the Deposition of Bismuth Tungstate onto Titania Nanoparticulates for Enhancing the Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ratova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel powder handling technique was used to allow the deposition of bismuth tungstate coatings onto commercial titanium dioxide photocatalytic nanoparticles. The coatings were deposited by reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering in an argon/oxygen atmosphere. The use of an oscillating bowl with rotary particle propagation, positioned beneath two closed-field planar magnetrons, provided uniform coverage of the titania particle surfaces. The bismuth/tungsten atomic ratio of the coatings was controlled by varying the power applied to each target. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET surface area measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Photocatalytic properties under visible light irradiation were assessed using an acetone degradation test. It was found that deposition of bismuth tungstate onto titania nanoparticles resulted in significant increases in visible light photocatalytic activity, compared to uncoated titania. Of the coatings studied, the highest photocatalytic activity was measured for the sample with a Bi/W atomic ratio of 2/1.

  3. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarin, V.; Mulpuri, R.; Auger, M. [Boston University, Boston, MA (United States) Manufacturing Engineering

    1996-04-20

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can withstand the rigorous requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being developed as a potential solution. Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}- SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  4. Evaluation and study of advanced optical contamination, deposition, measurement, and removal techniques. [including computer programs and ultraviolet reflection analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, R. M. F.; Allen, T. H.; Dillow, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program is described to design, fabricate and install an experimental work chamber assembly (WCA) to provide a wide range of experimental capability. The WCA incorporates several techniques for studying the kinetics of contaminant films and their effect on optical surfaces. It incorporates the capability for depositing both optical and contaminant films on temperature-controlled samples, and for in-situ measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet reflectance. Ellipsometer optics are mounted on the chamber for film thickness determinations, and other features include access ports for radiation sources and instrumentation. Several supporting studies were conducted to define specific chamber requirements, to determine the sensitivity of the measurement techniques to be incorporated in the chamber, and to establish procedures for handling samples prior to their installation in the chamber. A bibliography and literature survey of contamination-related articles is included.

  5. Research Update: Large-area deposition, coating, printing, and processing techniques for the upscaling of perovskite solar cell technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Razza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To bring perovskite solar cells to the industrial world, performance must be maintained at the photovoltaic module scale. Here we present large-area manufacturing and processing options applicable to large-area cells and modules. Printing and coating techniques, such as blade coating, slot-die coating, spray coating, screen printing, inkjet printing, and gravure printing (as alternatives to spin coating, as well as vacuum or vapor based deposition and laser patterning techniques are being developed for an effective scale-up of the technology. The latter also enables the manufacture of solar modules on flexible substrates, an option beneficial for many applications and for roll-to-roll production.

  6. Effects of Ni doping on photocatalytic activity of TiO2 thin films prepared by liquid phase deposition technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Noor Shahina Begum; H M Farveez Ahmed; K R Gunashekar

    2008-10-01

    The TiO2 thin films doped by Ni uniformly and non-uniformly were prepared on glass substrate from an aqueous solution of ammonium hexa-fluoro titanate and NiF2 by liquid phase deposition technique. The addition of boric acid as an – scavenger will shift the equilibrium to one side and thereby deposition of the film is progressed. The rate of the reaction and the nature of deposition depend on growing time and temperature. The resultant films were characterized by XRD, EDAX, UV and SEM. The result shows that the deposited films have amorphous background, which becomes crystalline at 500°C. The EDAX data confirms the existence of Ni atoms in TiO2 matrix. XRD analysis reveals the peaks corresponding to Ni but no peak of crystalline NiO was found. The transmittance spectra of Ni uniformly and non-uniformly doped TiO2 thin films show `blue shift and red shift’, respectively. Ni-doped TiO2 thin films can be used as photocatalyst for the photodegradation of methyl orange dye. It was found that, organic dye undergoes degradation efficiently in presence of non-uniformly Ni-doped TiO2 thin films when compared to uniformly doped films and pure TiO2 films under visible light. The photocatalytic activity increases with increase in the concentration of Ni in case of nonuniformly doped thin films but decreases with the concentration when uniformly doped thin films were used.

  7. Dry deposition of acidic air pollutants to tree leaves, determined by a modified leaf-washing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mirai; Takamatsu, Takejiro; Koshikawa, Masami K.; Yamamura, Shigeki; Inubushi, Kazuyuki

    Dry deposition fluxes ( FL) of NO 3- and SO 42- to leaf surfaces were measured for Japanese red pine ( Pinus densiflora), Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria japonica), Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa), and Japanese white oak ( Quercus myrsinaefolia), together with atmospheric concentrations ( CL) of NO x (NO + NO 2), T-NO 3 (gaseous HNO 3 + particulate NO 3-) and SO x (gaseous SO 2 + particulate SO 42-) around the leaves in a suburban area of Japan, using a modified leaf-washing technique. FL of NO 3- and SO 42- decreased as follows: pine >> cedar > cypress ≥ oak and pine >> cedar > oak ≥ cypress, respectively. FL of NO 3- for all tree species fluctuated synchronously with CL of T-NO 3. FL of SO 42- fluctuated with CL of SO x, but the dominant pollutant deposited (SO 2 or SO 42-) appeared to differ for different tree species. Dry deposition conductance ( KL) of T-NO 3 and SO x was derived as an FL/ CL ratio. Seasonal variations of KL likely reflect the gas/particle ratios of T-NO 3 and SO x, which were affected by meteorological conditions such as temperature. Dry deposition velocities ( Vd) of T-NO 3 and SO x were obtained as the mathematical product of annual mean KL and the total leaf surface areas in the forests. The comparison of Vd among tree species indicated that the loads of acidic air pollutants were higher to coniferous forests than broad-leaved forest because of the higher KL and/or larger leaf surface areas.

  8. ELECTRICAL FURNACE FOR PRODUCING CARBIDE COATINGS USING THE THERMOREACTIVE DEPOSITION/DIFFUSION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FABIO CASTILLEJO

    2011-01-01

    the presence of VC and NbC, and as MEB results clearly show, the formation of regular thickness coatings. The results obtained allow for assessing that the designed and built furnace fulfills the requirements of the TRD technique for obtaining different types of hard coatings.

  9. Q-factors of CVD monolayer graphene and graphite inductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zidong; Zhang, Qingping; Peng, Pei; Tian, Zhongzheng; Ren, Liming; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Ru; Wen, Jincai; Fu, Yunyi

    2017-08-01

    A carbon-based inductor may serve as an important passive component in a carbon-based radio-frequency (RF) integrated circuit (IC). In this work, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesized monolayer graphene and graphite inductors are fabricated and their Q-factors are investigated. We find that the large series resistance of signal path (including coil resistance and contact resistance) in monolayer graphene inductors causes negative Q-factors at the whole frequency range in measurement. Comparatively, some of the graphite inductors have all of their Q-factors above zero, due to their small signal path resistance. We also note that some other graphite inductors have negative Q-factor values at low frequency regions, but positive Q-factor values at high frequency regions. With an equivalent circuit model, we confirm that the negative Q-factors of some graphite inductors at low frequency regions are related to their relatively large contact resistances, and we are able to eliminate these negative Q-factors by improving the graphite-metal contact. Furthermore, the peak Q-factor (Q p) can be enhanced by lowering down the resistance of graphite coil. For an optimized 3/4-turn graphite inductor, the measured maximum Q-factor (Q m) can reach 2.36 and the peak Q-factor is theoretically predicted by the equivalent circuit to be as high as 6.46 at a high resonant frequency, which is beyond the testing frequency range. This research indicates that CVD synthesized graphite thin film is more suitable than graphene for fabricating inductors in carbon-based RF IC in the future.

  10. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; Nihtianov, S.

    2016-01-01

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, LB, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition(CVD) using diborane (B2H6) is reported. The value of LB is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and co

  11. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; Nihtianov, S.

    2016-01-01

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, LB, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition(CVD) using diborane (B2H6) is reported. The value of LB is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and co

  12. Effect of mixture ratios and nitrogen carrier gas flow rates on the morphology of carbon nanotube structures grown by CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malgas, GF

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and investigates the effects of nitrogen carrier gas flow rates and mixture ratios on the morphology of CNTs on a silicon substrate by vaporizing...

  13. The conductivity of high-fluence noble gas ion irradiated CVD polycrystalline diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, A. M.; Kazakov, V. A.; Mashkova, E. S.; Ovchinnikov, M. A.; Shemukhin, A. A.; Sigalaev, S. K.

    2017-09-01

    The conductivity of surface layer of polycrystalline CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond has been studied experimentally after high-fluence 30 keV Ne+, 20 and 30 keV Ar+ ion irradiation at target temperature range from 30 to 400 °C. The hot ion irradiation of CVD diamond may be described as ion-stimulated heat graphitization in which an exponential resistance decrease with increasing of the irradiation temperature is much faster than at the heat treatment. Under ion irradiation of CVD diamond the graphite-like materials resistivity is achieved at temperatures not exceeding 200 °C. The graphite phase in a heterogeneous structure of diamond irradiated layer is in dynamic equilibrium. In the temperature range from RT to 400 °C, the proportion of graphite phase increases so that at temperatures 200 < Tir < 400 °C it is dominant. The Raman spectra of ion-induced conductive layer created on CVD diamond reflect the processes of nanostructural ordering - disordering of sp2-bonded carbon.

  14. THE EFFECT OF DEPOSITION PARAMETERS ON THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND CORROSION RESISTANCE OF TICXNY COATINGS PRODUCED ON HIGH-SPEED STEEL SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senna L.F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available TiCxNy coatings deposited on high-speed steel substrates have been used to enhance the tribological properties of cutting tools (hardness, wear resistance, etc. as well as their corrosion resistance in an aggressive environment. These layers are usually produced by plasma deposition techniques (PVD or CVD, and different coating properties can be obtained with each method. In this work, TiCxNy films were deposited on AISI M2 high-speed steel substrates by the reactive magnetron sputtering technique. A series of samples with a variety of reactive gas mixtures (nitrogen and methane, substrate biases, and deposition temperatures was produced. As a result, coatings with different chemical compositions were deposited for each group of deposition parameters. Gas mixture composition and substrate bias directly affected the chemical composition of the coating, while deposition temperature influenced the chemical composition of TiCxNy layers to a very low extent.

  15. Comparative study of CdTe sources used for deposition of CdTe thin films by close spaced sublimation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Anacleto Pinheiro

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other thin film deposition techniques, close spaced sublimation (CSS requires a short source-substrate distance. The kind of source used in this technique strongly affects the control of the deposition parameters, especially the deposition rate. When depositing CdTe thin films by CSS, the most common CdTe sources are: single-crystal or polycrystalline wafers, powders, pellets or pieces, a thick CdTe film deposited onto glass or molybdenum substrate (CdTe source-plate and a sintered CdTe powder. In this work, CdTe thin films were deposited by CSS technique from different CdTe sources: particles, powder, compact powder, a paste made of CdTe and propylene glycol and source-plates (CdTe/Mo and CdTe/glass. The largest deposition rate was achieved when a paste made of CdTe and propylene glycol was used as the source. CdTe source-plates led to lower rates, probably due to the poor heat transmission, caused by the introduction of the plate substrate. The results also showed that compacting the powder the deposition rate increases due to the better thermal contact between powder particles.

  16. Electric characterization of GaAs deposited on porous silicon by electrodeposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lajnef, M., E-mail: Mohamed.lajnef@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique et de Semi-conducteurs, Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Chtourou, R.; Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique et de Semi-conducteurs, Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2010-03-01

    GaAs thin films were synthesized on porous Si substrate by the electrodeposition technique. The X-ray diffraction studies showed that the as-grown films were crystallised in mixed phase nature orthorhombic and cubic of GaAs. The GaAs film was then electrically characterized using current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) techniques by the way of Al/GaAs Schottky junctions. The electric analysis allowed us to determine the n factor and the barrier height {phi}{sub b0} parameters of Al/GaAs Schottky junctions. The (C-V) characteristics were recorded at frequency signal 1 MHz in order to identify the effect of the surface states on the behaviour of the capacitance of the device.

  17. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle films deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anita Swami; Ashavani Kumar; Murali Sastry

    2003-06-01

    Organization of hexadecylaniline (HDA)-modified colloidal gold particles at the air-water interface and the formation thereafter of lamellar, multilayer films of gold nanoparticles by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique is described in this paper. Formation of HDA-capped gold nanoparticles is accomplished by a simple biphasic mixture experiment wherein the molecule hexadecylaniline present in the organic phase leads to electrostatic complexation and reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions, capping of the gold nanoparticles thus formed and phase transfer of the now hydrophobic particles into the organic phase. Organization of gold nanoparticles at the air-water interface is followed by surface pressure-area isotherm measurements while the formation of multilayer films of the nanoparticles by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique is monitored by quartz crystal microgravimetry, UVVis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  18. Photocatalytic efficiency of reusable ZnO thin films deposited by sputtering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada-Lazo, R.; Torres-Martínez, L. M.; Ruíz-Gómez, M. A.; Vega-Becerra, O. E.; Figueroa-Torres, M. Z.

    2014-12-01

    The photocatalytic activity of ZnO thin films with different physicochemical characteristics deposited by RF magnetron sputtering on glass substrate was tested for the decolorization of orange G dye aqueous solution (OG). The crystalline phase, surface morphology, surface roughness and the optical properties of these ZnO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), respectively. The dye photodecolorization process was studied at acid, neutral and basic pH media under UV irradiation of 365 nm. Results showed that ZnO films grow with an orientation along the c-axis of the substrate and exhibit a wurtzite crystal structure with a (002) preferential crystalline orientation. A clear relationship between surface morphology and photocatalytic activity was observed for ZnO films. Additionally, the recycling photocatalytic abilities of the films were also evaluated. A promising photocatalytic performance has been found with a very low variation of the decolorization degree after five consecutive cycles at a wide range of pH media.

  19. CVD elaboration of nanostructured TiO2-Ag thin films with efficient antibacterial properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mungkalasiri, Jitti; Bedel, Laurent; Emieux, Fabrice; Dore, Jeanne; Renaud, François N. R.; Sarantopoulos, Christos; Maury, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructured TiO2-Ag composite coatings are deposited by direct liquid injection metal-organic (DLI-MO) CVD at 683K in a one-step process. Silver pivalate (AgPiv) and titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP) are used as Ag and Ti molecular precursors, respectively. Metallic silver nanoparticles are co-deposited with anatase TiO2 on stainless steel, glass, and silicon wafers. The silver particles are uniformly embedded in the oxide matrix through the entire film thickness. The influence of the gr...

  20. Fabricating Large-Area Sheets of Single-Layer Graphene by CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronikowski, Michael; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    This innovation consists of a set of methodologies for preparing large area (greater than 1 cm(exp 2)) domains of single-atomic-layer graphite, also called graphene, in single (two-dimensional) crystal form. To fabricate a single graphene layer using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the process begins with an atomically flat surface of an appropriate substrate and an appropriate precursor molecule containing carbon atoms attached to substituent atoms or groups. These molecules will be brought into contact with the substrate surface by being flowed over, or sprayed onto, the substrate, under CVD conditions of low pressure and elevated temperature. Upon contact with the surface, the precursor molecules will decompose. The substituent groups detach from the carbon atoms and form gas-phase species, leaving the unfunctionalized carbon atoms attached to the substrate surface. These carbon atoms will diffuse upon this surface and encounter and bond to other carbon atoms. If conditions are chosen carefully, the surface carbon atoms will arrange to form the lowest energy single-layer structure available, which is the graphene lattice that is sought. Another method for creating the graphene lattice includes metal-catalyzed CVD, in which the decomposition of the precursor molecules is initiated by the catalytic action of a catalytic metal upon the substrate surface. Another type of metal-catalyzed CVD has the entire substrate composed of catalytic metal, or other material, either as a bulk crystal or as a think layer of catalyst deposited upon another surface. In this case, the precursor molecules decompose directly upon contact with the substrate, releasing their atoms and forming the graphene sheet. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can also be used. In this method, a substrate surface at low temperature is covered with exactly one monolayer of precursor molecules (which may be of more than one type). This is heated up so that the precursor molecules decompose and form one

  1. Simple Method to Synthesize Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes Employing Cobalt Nitrate and Acetone by Using Spray Pyrolysis Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently alcohols and ketones have been employed to sensitize CNT by CVD. A study has shown the importance of the chemical nature of those carbon precursors on the characteristics of the CNT (carbon nanotubes obtained. In the present work we show the influence of the catalyst employed on the synthesis of functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs utilizing acetone as carbon source and cobalt nitrate Co(NO32 as catalyst.

  2. Hydrocarbon oxidation over catalysts prepared by the molecular layer deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koltsov, S.I.; Smirnov, V.M.; Postnov, V.N.; Postnova, A.M.; Aleskovskii, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    By depositing consecutive uniform monolayers of phosphorus pentoxide and vanadium pentoxide on a large-surface-area (240 sq m/g) silica gel, active and selective catalysts for hydrocarbon oxidation were obtained. Thus, in piperylene oxidation by air at 330/sup 0/-430/sup 0/C and 2000-18,000/hr space velocity, a productive capacity of 220 g/l./hr with 41 mole % each maleic anhydride yield and selectivity was achieved over a SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst (120 sq cm/g surface area), compared with 80 g/l./hr for a P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst prepared by impregnation. In benzene oxidation, maleic anhydride yields of 52 and 60% and selectivities of 63 and 79% were achieved over SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalysts, respectively, compared with a 6% yield and very low selectivity over the impregnated P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst. The molecular-layer catalysts retained their total activity for 100 hr on stream and permitted to reduce the oxidation temperature by 50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/C.

  3. Photocatalytic efficiency of reusable ZnO thin films deposited by sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahumada-Lazo, R.; Torres-Martínez, L.M. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Civil, Departamento de Ecomateriales y Energía, Av. Universidad S/N Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66450, México (Mexico); Ruíz-Gómez, M.A. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Civil, Departamento de Ecomateriales y Energía, Av. Universidad S/N Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66450, México (Mexico); Departmento de Física Aplicada, CINVESTAV-IPN, Antigua Carretera a Progreso km 6, Mérida, Yucatán 97310, México (Mexico); Vega-Becerra, O.E. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C, Alianza norte 202, Parque de Investigación e Innovación Tecnológica, C.P. 66600 Apodaca Nuevo León, México (Mexico); and others

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Decolorization of Orange G dye using highly c-axis-oriented ZnO thin films. • The flake-shaped film shows superior and stable photoactivity at a wide range of pH. • The highest photodecolorization was achieved at pH of 7. • The exposure of (101) and (100) facets enhanced the photoactivity. • ZnO thin films exhibit a promising performance as recyclable photocatalysts. - Abstract: The photocatalytic activity of ZnO thin films with different physicochemical characteristics deposited by RF magnetron sputtering on glass substrate was tested for the decolorization of orange G dye aqueous solution (OG). The crystalline phase, surface morphology, surface roughness and the optical properties of these ZnO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV–visible spectroscopy (UV–Vis), respectively. The dye photodecolorization process was studied at acid, neutral and basic pH media under UV irradiation of 365 nm. Results showed that ZnO films grow with an orientation along the c-axis of the substrate and exhibit a wurtzite crystal structure with a (002) preferential crystalline orientation. A clear relationship between surface morphology and photocatalytic activity was observed for ZnO films. Additionally, the recycling photocatalytic abilities of the films were also evaluated. A promising photocatalytic performance has been found with a very low variation of the decolorization degree after five consecutive cycles at a wide range of pH media.

  4. TSC response of irradiated CVD diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Borchi, E; Bucciolini, M; Guasti, A; Mazzocchi, S; Pirollo, S; Sciortino, S

    1999-01-01

    CVD diamond films have been irradiated with electrons, sup 6 sup 0 Co photons and protons in order to study the dose response to exposure to different particles and energies and to investigate linearity with dose. The Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) has been studied as a function of the dose delivered to polymethilmetacrilate (PMMA) in the range from 1 to 12 Gy with 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. The TSC spectrum has revealed the presence of two components with peak temperatures of about 470 and 520 K, corresponding to levels lying in the diamond band gap with activation energies of the order of 0.7 - 1 eV. After the subtraction of the exponential background the charge emitted during the heating scan has been evaluated and has been found to depend linearly on the dose. The thermally emitted charge of the CVD diamond films has also been studied using different particles. The samples have been irradiated with the same PMMA dose of about 2 Gy with 6 and 20 MeV electrons from a Linac, sup 6 sup 0 ...

  5. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  6. Thermoluminescent properties of CVD diamond: applications to ionising radiation dosimetry; Proprietes thermoluminescentes du diamant CVD: applications a la dosimetrie des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitfils, A

    2007-09-15

    Remarkable properties of synthetic diamond (human soft tissue equivalence, chemical stability, non-toxicity) make this material suitable for medical application as thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). This work highlights the interest of this material as radiotherapy TLD. In the first stage of this work, we looked after thermoluminescent (TL) and dosimetric properties of polycrystalline diamond made by Chemically Vapor Deposited (CVD) synthesis. Dosimetric characteristics are satisfactory as TLD for medical application. Luminescence thermal quenching on diamond has been investigated. This phenomenon leads to a decrease of dosimetric TL peak sensitivity when the heating rate increases. The second part of this work analyses the use of synthetic diamond as TLD in radiotherapy. Dose profiles, depth dose distributions and the cartography of an electron beam obtained with our samples are in very good agreement with results from an ionisation chamber. It is clearly shown that CVD) diamond is of interest to check beams of treatment accelerators. The use of these samples in a control of treatment with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy underlines good response of synthetic diamond in high dose gradient areas. These results indicate that CVD diamond is a promising material for radiotherapy dosimetry. (author)

  7. Room Temperature Growth of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Enhanced CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yu; ZHANG Xiwen; HAN Gaorong

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were deposited on Si (100) and glass substrates by dielectric barrier discharge enhanced chemical vapour deposition (DBD-CVD)in (SiH4+H2) atmosphere at room temperature.Results of the thickness measurement,SEM (scanning electron microscope),Raman,and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) show that with the increase in the applied peak voltage,the deposition rate and network order of the films increase,and the hydrogen bonding configurations mainly in di-hydrogen (Si-H2) and poly hydrogen (SiH2)n are introduced into the films.The UV-visible transmission spectra show that with the decrease in Sill4/ (SiH4+H2) the thin films'band gap shifts from 1.92 eV to 2.17 eV.These experimental results are in agreement with the theoretic analysis of the DBD discharge.The deposition of a-Si:H films by the DBD-CVD method as reported here for the first time is attractive because it allows fast deposition of a-Si:H films on large-area low-melting-point substrates and requires only a low cost of production without additional heating or pumping equipment.

  8. Copper phthalocyanine films deposited by liquid-liquid interface recrystallization technique (LLIRCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, K R; Sathaye, S D; Hawaldar, R; Sathe, B R; Mandale, A B; Mitra, A

    2007-11-15

    The simple recrystallization process is innovatively used to obtain the nanoparticles of copper phthalocyanine by a simple method. Liquid-liquid interface recrystallization technique (LLIRCT) has been employed successfully to produce small sized copper phthalocyanine nanoparticles with diameter between 3-5 nm. The TEM-SAED studies revealed the formation of 3-5 nm sized with beta-phase dominated mixture of alpha and beta copper phthalocyanine nanoparticles. The XRD, SEM, and the UV-vis studies were further carried out to confirm the formation of copper phthalocyanine thin films. The cyclic voltametry (CV) studies conclude that redox reaction is totally reversible one electron transfer process. The process is attributed to Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox reaction.

  9. Micro-Structures of Hard Coatings Deposited on Titanium Alloys by Laser Alloying Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Wang, Diangang; Weng, Fei

    2013-01-01

    This work is based on micro-structural performance of the Ti-B4C-C laser alloying coatings on Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. The test results indicated that laser alloying of the Ti-B4C-C pre-placed powders on the Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrate can form the ceramics reinforced hard alloying coatings, which increased the micro-hardness and wear resistance of substrate. The test result also indicated that the TiB phase was produced in alloying coating, which corresponded to its (101) crystal plane. In addition, yttria has a refining effect on micro-structures of the laser alloying coating, and its refinement mechanism was analyzed. This research provided essential experimental and theoretical basis to promote the applications of the laser alloying technique in manufacturing and repairing of the aerospace parts.

  10. 3D printing of high-resolution PLA-based structures by hybrid electrohydrodynamic and fused deposition modeling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Seong, Baekhoon; Nguyen, VuDat; Byun, Doyoung

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has received much attention for shape forming and manufacturing. The fused deposition modeling (FDM) printer is one of the various 3D printers available and has become widely used due to its simplicity, low-cost, and easy operation. However, the FDM technique has a limitation whereby its patterning resolution is too low at around 200 μm. In this paper, we first present a hybrid mechanism of electrohydrodynamic jet printing with the FDM technique, which we name E-FDM. We then develop a novel high-resolution 3D printer based on the E-FDM process. To determine the optimal condition for structuring, we also investigated the effect of several printing parameters, such as temperature, applied voltage, working height, printing speed, flow-rate, and acceleration on the patterning results. This method was capable of fabricating both high resolution 2D and 3D structures with the use of polylactic acid (PLA). PLA has been used to fabricate scaffold structures for tissue engineering, which has different hierarchical structure sizes. The fabrication speed was up to 40 mm/s and the pattern resolution could be improved to 10 μm.

  11. A generic strategy for co-presentation of heparin-binding growth factors based on CVD polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaopei; Lahann, Joerg

    2012-09-14

    A multifunctional copolymer with both aldehyde and alkyne groups is synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for orthogonal co-immobilization of biomolecules. Surface analytical methods including FTIR and XPS are used to confirm the surface modification. Heparin-binding growth factors [basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in this study] can be immobilized through interaction with heparin, which was covalently attached to the CVD surface through an aldehyde-hydrazide reaction. In parallel, an alkyne-azide reaction is used to orthogonally co-immobilize an adhesion peptide as the second biomolecule.

  12. Modification of the morphology and optical properties of SnS films using glancing angle deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazideh, M. R.; Dizaji, H. Rezagholipour; Ehsani, M. H.; Moghadam, R. Zarei

    2017-05-01

    Tin sulfide (SnS) films were prepared by thermal evaporation method using Glancing Angle Deposition (GLAD) technique at zero and different oblique incident flux angles (α = 45°, 55°, 65°, 75° and 85°). The physical properties of prepared films were systematically investigated. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the film deposited at α = 0° formed as single phase with an orthorhombic structure. However, the layers became amorphous at α = 45°, 55°, 65°, 75° and 85°. Beside the appearance of amorphous feature in the film prepared at α higher than zero, Sn2S3 phase was also observed. The top and cross-sectional field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images of the samples showed noticeable changes in the structure and morphology of individual nano-plates as a function of incident angle. The band gap and refractive index values of the films were calculated by optical transmission measurements. The optical band-gap values were observed to increase with increasing the incident flux angle. This can be due to presence of Sn2S3 phase observed in the samples produced at α values other than zero. The effective refractive index and porosity exhibit an opposite evolution as the incident angle α rises. At α = 85° the layers show a considerable change in effective refractive index (Δn = 1.7) at near-IR spectral range.

  13. Microstructural, nanomechanical, and microtribological properties of Pb thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition and thermal evaporation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broitman, Esteban, E-mail: esbro@ifm.liu.se [Thin Film Physics Division, IFM, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Flores-Ruiz, Francisco J. [Thin Film Physics Division, IFM, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden and Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., Unidad Querétaro, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Di Giulio, Massimo [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gontad, Francisco; Lorusso, Antonella; Perrone, Alessio [Università del Salento, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, 73100 Lecce, Italy and INFN-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, the authors compare the morphological, structural, nanomechanical, and microtribological properties of Pb films deposited by thermal evaporation (TE) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques onto Si (111) substrates. Films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, surface probe microscopy, and x-ray diffraction in θ-2θ geometry to determine their morphology, root-mean-square (RMS) roughness, and microstructure, respectively. TE films showed a percolated morphology with densely packed fibrous grains while PLD films had a granular morphology with a columnar and tightly packed structure in accordance with the zone growth model of Thornton. Moreover, PLD films presented a more polycrystalline structure with respect to TE films, with RMS roughness of 14 and 10 nm, respectively. Hardness and elastic modulus vary from 2.1 to 0.8 GPa and from 14 to 10 GPa for PLD and TE films, respectively. A reciprocal friction test has shown that PLD films have lower friction coefficient and wear rate than TE films. Our study has demonstrated for first time that, at the microscale, Pb films do not show the same simple lubricious properties measured at the macroscale.

  14. Structure and sliding wear behavior of 321 stainless steel/Al composite coating deposited by high velocity arc spraying technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-xiong; XU Bin-shi; LIU Yan; LIANG Xiu-bing; XU Yi

    2008-01-01

    A typical 321 stainless steel/aluminum composite coating (321/Al coating) was prepared by high velocity arc spraying technique (HVAS) with 321 stainless steel wire as the anode and aluminum wire as the cathode.The traditional 321 stainless steel coating was also prepared for comparison.Tribological properties of the coatings were evaluated with the ring-block wear tester under different conditions.The structure and worn surface of the coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS).The results show that,except for aluminum phase addition in tne 321/Al coating,no other phases are created compared with the 321 coating.However,due to the addition of aluminum,the 321/Al coating forms a type of "ductile/hard phases inter-deposited" structure and performs quite different tribological behavior.Under the dry sliding condition,the anti-wear property of 321/Al coating is about 42% lower than that of 321 coating.Butunder the oil lubricated conditions with or without 32h oil-dipping pretreatment,the anti-wear property of 321/Al coating is about 9% and 5% higher than that of 321 coating,respectively.The anti-wear mechanism of the composite coating is mainly relevant to the decrease of oxide impurities and the strengthening action resulted from the "ductile/hard phases inter-deposited" coating structure.

  15. The Characteristics of an Antibacterial TiAgN Thin Film Coated by Physical Vapor Deposition Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byeong-Mo; Jeong, Woon-Jo; Park, Gye-Choon; Yoon, Dong-Joo; Ahn, Ho-Geun; Lim, Yeong-Seog

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we found the characteristics of an antibacterial TiAgN thin film coated on the pure titanium specimen via the physical vapor deposition process (PVD). TiAgN thin films were coated using TiAg alloy targets by arc ion plating method. Changing the process parameters, the surface analysis of TiAgN thin film was observed by FE-SEM and the force of adhesion was measured with Scratch Tester. The proliferation of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells was examined by XTT test assay and the antibacterial properties were investigated by culturing Streptococus Mutans (KCTC 3065) using paper disk techniques. At the result of experiment, cytotoxic effects were not found and the antibacterial effects against Streptococus Mutans were appeared over 5 wt% TiAgN specimens.

  16. Preparation of Bioactive Calcium Phosphate Coating on Porous C/C Substrate by a Novel Deposition Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Xinbo; ZENG Xierong; LI Xiaohua; Xie Shenghui; ZOU Chunli

    2008-01-01

    A novel heat substrate technique,high frequency inductive heat deposition(IHD),was introduced to coat porous carbon materials,C/C and carbon felt to improve their bioactivity.The morphologies,composition and microstructure of the resulting coatings were examined by scanning electron microscopy(SEM),energy dispersive spectra(EDS),X-ray diffractometer(XRD)and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).The results show that,the calcium phosphate consisted of non-stoichiometric,CO3-containing and plate-like octacalcium phosphate(Ca8-xH2(PO4)6,OCP)could uniformly cover the entire porous surfaces of carbon materials.Good adhesion of the coating to carbon material substrates was observed.

  17. Photoluminescence and diode characteristic of ZnO thin films/junctions fabricated by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Komiyama, Takao; Chonan, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Aoyama, Takashi [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Akita Prefectural University, 84-4 Ebinokuchi, Tsuchiya, Yuri-honjo, Akita 015-0055 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    ZnO:Ga and ZnO:P films were grown by a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique changing the dopant concentrations, and their photoluminescence (PL) spectra were obtained. Then, ZnO:P/ZnO:Ga junctions were fabricated and their junction characteristics were evaluated. As the Ga concentration increased in the films, the PL intensity was decreased while as the P concentration increased, the PL intensity was increased. The maximum PL intensities were obtained for the films of 0.5%(Ga) and 7.0% (P), respectively. Rectifying junction characteristics were observed only for the combination of 0.5-1.0% (Ga) and 5.0% (P) films. Mutual dopant diffusion is supposed to explain the relation between the PL and the junction characteristics. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Top gate ZnO-Al2O3 thin film transistors fabricated using a chemical bath deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Paragjyoti; Saikia, Rajib; Changmai, Sanjib

    2015-04-01

    ZnO thin films were prepared by a simple chemical bath deposition technique using an inorganic solution mixture of ZnCl2 and NH3 on glass substrates and then were used as the active material in thin film transistors (TFTs). The TFTs were fabricated in a top gate coplanar electrode structure with high-k Al2O3 as the gate insulator and Al as the source, drain and gate electrodes. The TFTs were annealed in air at 500 °C for 1 h. The TFTs with a 50 μm channel length exhibited a high field-effect mobility of 0.45 cm2/(V·s) and a low threshold voltage of 1.8 V. The sub-threshold swing and drain current ON-OFF ratio were found to be 0.6 V/dec and 106, respectively.

  19. Annealing effects on the structural and optical properties of vanadium oxide film obtained by the hot-filament metal oxide deposition technique (HFMOD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarminio, Jair; Silva, Paulo Rogerio Catarini da, E-mail: scarmini@uel.br, E-mail: prcsilva@uel.br [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica; Gelamo, Rogerio Valentim, E-mail: rogelamo@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (UFTM), Uberaba, MG (Brazil); Moraes, Mario Antonio Bica de, E-mail: bmoraes@mailhost.ifi.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Vanadium oxide films amorphous, nonstoichiometric and highly absorbing in the optical region were deposited on ITO-coated glass and on silicon substrates, by the hot-filament metal oxide deposition technique (HFMOD) and oxidized by ex-situ annealing in a furnace at 200, 300, 400 and 500 deg C, under an atmosphere of argon and rarefied oxygen. X-ray diffraction, Raman and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy as well as optical transmission were employed to characterize the amorphous and annealed films. When annealed at 200 and 300 deg C the as-deposited opaque films become transparent but still amorphous. Under treatments at 400 and 500 deg C a crystalline nonstoichiometric V{sub 2}O{sub 5} structure is formed. All the annealed films became semiconducting, with their optical absorption coefficients changing with the annealing temperature. An optical gap of 2.25 eV was measured for the films annealed at 400 and 500 deg C. The annealing in rarefied oxygen atmosphere proved to be a useful and simple ex-situ method to modulate the structural and optical properties of vanadium oxide films deposited by HFMOD technique. This technique could be applied to other amorphous and non-absorbing oxide films, replacing the conventional and sometimes expensive method of modulate desirable film properties by controlling the film deposition parameters. Even more, the HFMOD technique can be an inexpensive alternative to deposit metal oxide films. (author)

  20. Method of Monitoring the Corrosion Behavior the Surface Treated FMS and CVD Coated Specimen in Liquid Sodium Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Gr.92 and HT9 (Ferritic/martensitic steels) are considered as candidates of cladding materials of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs). HT9 and Gr.92 are known as compatible in sodium environment because the usual refueling time of SFRs is designed about 54 months. In the Ultra-long Cycle Fast Reactor (UCFR) which is developed in UNIST, however, cladding is exposed long-term in high temperature liquid sodium environment. So, it is very important to investigate the corrosion-related behavior such as surface corrosion rate, carburization, decarburization and mechanical properties for its operation time. The decarburization process where dissolved carbon near the specimen surface diffused in to the liquid sodium. This process can originate from the difference between dissolved carbon activity in the material and liquid sodium. A compatibility test the cladding tube revealed that a decrease of the mechanical property instigated by the aging proves governed the whole mechanical property. SiC and Si3N4 Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) coating for decarburization barrier on the surface of FMS is considered in this study. The CVD coated specimens are experiment for compatibility of high temperature liquid sodium. To monitor the corrosion behavior of these candidate materials in sodium environment, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) method is first introduced and investigated in this study. The use of the technique of impedance spectroscopy to measure the electrical impedance response of any oxide layers, SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} that may be present may be a solution to this monitoring problem.

  1. The Effect of Annealing at 1500 C on Migration and Release of Ion Implanted Silver in CVD Silicon Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HJ MacLean; RG Ballinger; LE Kolaya; SA Simonson; N Lewis; M Hanson

    2004-10-07

    The transport of silver in CVD {beta}-SiC has been studied using ion implantation. Silver ions were implanted in {beta}-SiC using the ATLAS accelerator facility at the Argonne National Laboratory. Ion beams with energies of 93 and 161 MeV were used to achieve deposition with peak concentrations at depths of approximately 9 and 13 {micro}m, respectively. As-implanted samples were then annealed at 1500 C for 210 or 480 hours. XPS, SEM, TEM, STEM, and optical methods were used to analyze the material before and after annealing. Silver concentration profiles were determined using XPS before and after annealing. STEM and SEM equipped with quantitative chemical analysis capability were used to more fully characterize the location and morphology of the silver before and after annealing. The results show that, within the uncertainty of measurement techniques, there is no silver migration, via either inter- or intragrannular paths, for the times and temperature studied. Additionally, the silver was observed to phase separate within the SiC after annealing. The irradiation damage from the implantation process resulted in a three-layer morphology in the as-implanted condition: (1) a layer of unaltered SiC, followed by (2) a layer of crystallized SiC, followed by (3) an amorphized layer which contained essentially all of the implanted silver. After annealing the layer structure changed. Layer 1 was unaltered. The grains in layer 2 recrystallized to form an epitaxial (columnar) layer. Layer 3 recrystallized to form a fine grain equiaxed layer. The results of this work do not support the long held assumption that silver release from CVD SiC, used for gas-reactor coated particle fuel, is dominated by grain boundary diffusion.

  2. Raman Spectroscopy of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Technique Overview and Application to Carbon Deposition Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Maher, R. C.

    2013-07-30

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful characterization tool for improving the understanding of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), capable of providing direct, molecularly specific information regarding the physical and chemical processes occurring within functional SOFCs in real time. In this paper we give a summary of the technique itself and highlight ex situ and in situ studies that are particularly relevant for SOFCs. This is followed by a case study of carbon formation on SOFC Ni-based anodes exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) using both ex situ and in situ Raman spectroscopy combined with computational simulations. In situ measurements clearly show that carbon formation is significantly reduced for polarized SOFCs compared to those held at open circuit potential (OCP). Ex situ Raman mapping of the surfaces showed clear variations in the rate of carbon formation across the surface of polarized anodes. Computational simulations describing the geometry of the cell showed that this is due to variations in gas access. These results demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy in combination with traditional characterization tools, to provide detailed understanding of critical processes occurring within functional SOFCs. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. pplication of Fractal Technique for Analysis of Geophysical - Geochemical Databases in Tekieh Pb-Zn Ore Deposit (SE of Arak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Mehrnia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Tekieh Lead-Zinc ore deposit that is located in the Sanandaj-Sirjan structural zone has been recognized as one of the most important mineralized regions in Malayer-Isfahan metallogenic sub-state, south east of Arak (Momenzadeh and Ziseman, 1981. Carbonate host units have been developed along (or across the Vishan-Tekieh anticline as the main structure extended in NW-SE trends (Annells et al, 1985. According to geochemical investigations (Salehi, 2004, the element content of the mineralized regions has originated from Alpine post-volcanisms and subsequently it has migrated toward early Cretaceous formations (dolomitic limestones among several hypogenic stages (Torkashvand et a.2009. Also echelon type structures consisting of folded systems and inversed faulting of structures are the most common features in western and eastern parts of ore deposit regions (Annells et al, 1985. Syngenetic enrichments beside limited (rarely developed epigenetic mineralization have been known as two main phases which are closely relevant to ore forming processes in the massive lenses and vein type occurrences, respectively (Momenzadeh and Ziseman, 1981. Material and Methods In this research, two statistical techniques that consist of classical and fractal equations (Mandelbrot, 2005 were applied in geochemical (Torkashvand et al., 2009 and geophysical (Jafari, 2007 databases for obtaining the linear and nonlinear distributions of geochemical elements (Tekieh Pb-Zn content in association with resistivity variations and induction polarization measurements (Calagari, 2010. According to linear statistical techniques (Torkashvand et al., 2009, the main central parameters such as mean, median and mode in addition to variances and standard deviations as distribution tendencies could be used for obtaining the regression coefficients of the databases. However, in fractal statistics, a reliable regression between geoelectrical - geochemical anomalies should be

  4. In situ study of key material and process reliability issues in the chemical vapor deposition of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Ishing

    With the limitations of current aluminum based metallization schemes used in microelectronics, the development of a manufacturable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for copper metallization schemes is crucial to meet the stringent requirements of sub-quarter micron device technology and beyond. The work presented herein focused on investigating key material and process reliability issues pertaining to Cu CVD processing. In particular, a unique combination of in-situ gas phase Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was employed to study the role of hydrogen in thermal CVD of copper using (tmvs)Cusp{I}(hfac). These studies showed that hydrogen provides significant enhancement in the deposition rate of copper interconnects. Based on the QMS and FTIR data, this enhancement could be attributed to the role of hydrogen in assisting in the removal of tmvs from (tmvs)Cusp{I}(hfac), thus enhancing the conversion of Cusp{I}(hfac) intermediates to Cusp{o} and Cusp{II}(hfac)sb2 and providing a wider process window with higher conversion efficiency. In addition, in-situ real time QMS studies were performed of the gas phase evolution and decomposition pathways of (tmvs)Cusp{I}(hfac) during thermal CVD of copper. The QMS investigations focused on determining the ionization efficiency curves and appearance potentials of (tmvs)Cusp{I}(hfac) under real CVD processing conditions. The resulting curves and associated potentials were then employed to identify the most likely precursor decomposition pathways and examine relevant implications for thermal CVD of copper from (tmvs)Cusp{I}(hfac). Finally, a hydrogen-plasma assisted CVD (PACVD) process was developed for the growth of device quality gold for incorporation as dopant in emerging Cu CVD based metallization interconnects. In particular, it was demonstrated that the PACVD gold process window identified can maintain very low gold deposition rates (gold is a promising in-situ Cu doping technique

  5. Enhancement of the Electrical Properties of CVD-Grown Graphene with Ascorbic Acid Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chunmiao; Chen, Zhiying; Zhang, Haoran; Zhang, Yaqian; Zhang, Yanhui; Sui, Yanping; Yu, Guanghui; Cao, Yijiang

    2016-02-01

    Ascorbic acid was used to modify to chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene films transferred onto SiO2 substrate. Residual polymer (polymethyl methacrylate), Fe3+, Cl-, H2O, and O2 affected the electrical and thermal properties on graphene during the transfer or device fabrication processes. Exposure of transferred graphene to ascorbic acid resulted in significantly enhanced electrical properties with increased charge carrier mobility. All devices exhibited more than 30% improvement in room temperature carrier mobility in air. The carrier mobility of the treated graphene did not significantly decrease in 21 days. This result can be attributed to electron donation to graphene through the -OH functional group in ascorbic acid that is absorbed in graphene. This work provides a method to enhance the electrical properties of CVD-grown graphene.

  6. A Review of the Properties and CVD Synthesis of Coiled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dóra Fejes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The CVD route for carbon nanotube production has become a popular method to make large amounts of multiwall carbon nanotubes. The structure, morphology and size of carbon materials depend critically on the catalyst preparation and deposition conditions. According to current knowledge, CVD method is the only process which can produce carbon nanocoils. These nanocoils are perfect candidates for nanotechnology applications. One might indeed hope that these coils would have the extraordinary stiffness displayed by straight nanotubes. Based on theoretical studies, regular coiled nanotubes exhibit exceptional mechanical, electrical, and magnetic properties due to the combination of their peculiar helical morphology and the fascinating properties of nanotubes. In spite of its technological interest, relatively low attention has been paid to this special field. In this paper we attempt to summarize results obtained until now.

  7. Synthesis of Few-Layer Graphene Using DC PE-CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Hyuk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Hwang, Yong Gyoo; Lee, Choong Hun

    2011-12-01

    Few layer graphene (FLG) had been successfully grown on polycrystalline Ni films or foils on a large scale using DC Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (DC PE-CVD) as a result of the Raman spectra drawn out of the sample. The size of graphene films is dependent on the area of the Ni film as well as the DC PE-CVD chamber size. Synthesis time has an effect on the quality of graphene produced. However, further analysis and experiments must be pursued to further identify the optimum settings and conditions of producing better quality graphene. Applied plasma voltage on the other hand, had an influence on the minimization of defects in the graphene grown. It has also presented a method of producing a free standing PMMA/graphene membrane on a FeCl3(aq) solution which could then be transferred to a desired substrate.

  8. Chemical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared Using Camphoric Carbon by Thermal-CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azira, A. A.; Rusop, M.

    2010-03-01

    Chemical properties and surface study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The chemical properties of the CNTs were conducted using FTIR spectroscopy and PXRD analysis. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs.

  9. Electronic properties and strain sensitivity of CVD-grown graphene with acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Sasaki, Shinichirou; Ohnishi, Masato; Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have shown that large-area monolayer graphene can be formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using methane gas, the growth of monolayer graphene using highly reactive acetylene gas remains a big challenge. In this study, we synthesized a uniform monolayer graphene film by low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) with acetylene gas. On the base of Raman spectroscopy measurements, it was found that up to 95% of the as-grown graphene is monolayer. The electronic properties and strain sensitivity of the LPCVD-grown graphene with acetylene were also evaluated by testing the fabricated field-effect transistors (FETs) and strain sensors. The derived carrier mobility and gauge factor are 862-1150 cm2/(V·s) and 3.4, respectively, revealing the potential for high-speed FETs and strain sensor applications. We also investigated the relationship between the electronic properties and the graphene domain size.

  10. Aligned carbon nanotubes catalytically grown on iron-based nanoparticles obtained by laser-induced CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Normand, F. [Groupe Surfaces and Interfaces, IPCMS, UMR 7504 CNRS, Bat 70, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francois.Le-Normand@ipcms.u-strasbg.fr; Cojocaru, C.S.; Ersen, O. [Groupe Surfaces and Interfaces, IPCMS, UMR 7504 CNRS, Bat 70, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Legagneux, P.; Gangloff, L. [THALES R and T, Departementale 128, 91747 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Fleaca, C. [Groupe Surfaces and Interfaces, IPCMS, UMR 7504 CNRS, Bat 70, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, P.O. Box MG-36, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania); Alexandrescu, R.; Dumitrache, F.; Morjan, I. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, P.O. Box MG-36, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-12-15

    Iron-based nanoparticles are prepared by a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. They are characterized as body-centered Fe and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (maghemite/magnetite) particles with sizes {<=}5 and 10 nm, respectively. The Fe particles are embedded in a protective carbon matrix. Both kind of particles are dispersed by spin-coating on SiO{sub 2}/Si(1 0 0) flat substrates. They are used as catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes by a plasma- and filaments-assisted catalytic CVD process (PE-HF-CCVD). Vertically oriented and thin carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown with few differences between the two samples, except the diameter in relation to the initial size of the iron particles, and the density. The electron field emission of these samples exhibit quite interesting behavior with a low turn-on voltage at around 1 V/{mu}m.

  11. Aligned carbon nanotubes catalytically grown on iron-based nanoparticles obtained by laser-induced CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Normand, F.; Cojocaru, C. S.; Ersen, O.; Legagneux, P.; Gangloff, L.; Fleaca, C.; Alexandrescu, R.; Dumitrache, F.; Morjan, I.

    2007-12-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles are prepared by a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. They are characterized as body-centered Fe and Fe 2O 3 (maghemite/magnetite) particles with sizes ≤5 and 10 nm, respectively. The Fe particles are embedded in a protective carbon matrix. Both kind of particles are dispersed by spin-coating on SiO 2/Si(1 0 0) flat substrates. They are used as catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes by a plasma- and filaments-assisted catalytic CVD process (PE-HF-CCVD). Vertically oriented and thin carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown with few differences between the two samples, except the diameter in relation to the initial size of the iron particles, and the density. The electron field emission of these samples exhibit quite interesting behavior with a low turn-on voltage at around 1 V/μm.

  12. Direct growth of doping-density-controlled hexagonal graphene on SiO2 substrate by rapid-heating plasma CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Toshiaki; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2012-10-23

    A transfer-free method for growing carrier-density-controlled graphene directly on a SiO(2) substrate has been realized for the first time by rapid-heating plasma chemical vapor deposition (RH-PCVD). Using this method, high-quality single-layer graphene sheets with a hexagonal domain can be selectively grown between a Ni film and a SiO(2) substrate. Systematic investigations reveal that the relatively thin Ni layer, rapid heating, and plasma CVD are critical to the success of this unique method of graphene growth. By applying this technique, an easy and scalable graphene-based field effect transistor (FET) fabrication is also demonstrated. The electrical transport type of the graphene-based FET can be precisely tuned by adjusting the NH(3) gas concentration during the RH-PCVD process.

  13. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part Ⅰ Simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition)diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge (J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC (Kinetic Monte Carlo) method. The results show that: (1) under Joe's model, the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature; (2) the deposition rate and surface roughness () under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature ()and not evident bymass fraction of atom chlorine; (3)the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate, i.e. the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature, in agreement with Grujicic's prediction; (4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.

  14. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part I simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe—Badgwell—Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xizhong; YuZhang; 等

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD( Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge(J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC(Kinetic Monte Carlo)method.The results show that:(1) under Joe's model,the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature;(2) the deposition rate and surface roughness(Rq) under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature(Ts) and not evident bymass fraction Wc1 of atom chlorine;(3) the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate.i.e.the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature,in agreement with Grujicic's prediction;(4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.

  15. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Set Point Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PHILIPP, B.L.

    2000-01-12

    This document provides the calculations used to determine the error of safety class signals used for the CVD process These errors are used with the Parameter limits to arrive at the initial set point. The Safety Class Instrumentation and Control (SCIC) system provides active detection and response to process anomalies that, if unmitigated would result in a safety event. Specifically actuation of the SCIC system includes two portions. The portion which isolates the MCO and initiates the safety-class helium (SCHe) purge, and the portion which detects and stops excessive heat input to the MCO on high tempered water MCO inlet temperature. For the MCO isolation and purge the SCIC receives signals from MCO pressure (both positive pressure and vacuum) helium flow rate, bay high temperature switches, seismic trips and time under vacuum trips.

  16. CVD diamond sensors for charged particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Krammer, Manfred; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Dencuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetstein, M; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zöller, M

    2001-01-01

    CVD diamond material was used to build position-sensitive detectors for single-charged particles to be employed in high-intensity physics experiments. To obtain position information, metal contacts shaped as strips or pixels are applied to the detector surface for one- or two- dimensional coordinate measurement. Strip detectors 2*4 cm/sup 2/ in size with a strip distance of 50 mu m were tested. Pixel detectors of various pixel sizes were bump bonded to electronics chips and investigated. A key issue for the use of these sensors in high intensity experiments is the radiation hardness. Several irradiation experiments were carried out with pions, protons and neutrons exceeding a fluence of 10/sup 15/ particles/cm/sup 2/. The paper presents an overview of the results obtained with strip and pixel detectors in high-energy test beams and summarises the irradiation studies. (8 refs).

  17. Ultrafast deposition of silicon nitride and semiconductor silicon thin films by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Verlaan, V.; Rath, J.K.; Li, H. B. T.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) or Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition (Cat-CVD) has made great progress during the last couple of years. This review discusses examples of significant progress. Specifically, silicon nitride deposition by HWCVD (HW-SiNx) is highlighted, a

  18. Premature menopause linked to CVD and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Claire; Overton, Caroline

    2010-03-01

    Premature menopause affects 1% of women under the age of 40, the usual age of the menopause is 51. Most women will present with irregular periods or no periods at all with or without climacteric symptoms. Around 10% of women present with primary amenorrhoea. A careful history and examination are required. It is important to ask specifically about previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy and to look for signs of androgen excess e.g. polycystic ovarian syndrome, adrenal problems e.g. galactorrhoea and thyroid goitres. Once pregnancy has been excluded, a progestagen challenge test can be performed in primary care. Norethisterone 5 mg tds po for ten days or alternatively medroxyprogesterone acetate 10 mg daily for ten days is prescribed. A withdrawal bleed within a few days of stopping the norethisterone indicates the presence of oestrogen and bleeding more than a few drops is considered a positive withdrawal bleed. The absence of a bleed indicates low levels of oestrogen, putting the woman at risk of CVD and osteoporosis. FSH levels above 30 IU/l are an indicator that the ovaries are failing and the menopause is approaching or has occurred. It should be remembered that FSH levels fluctuate during the month and from one month to the next, so a minimum of two measurements should be made at least four to six weeks apart. The presence of a bleed should not exclude premature menopause as part of the differential diagnosis as there can be varying and unpredictable ovarian function remaining. The progestagen challenge test should not be used alone, but in conjunction with FSH, LH and oestradiol. There is no treatment for premature menopause. Women desiring pregnancy should be referred to a fertility clinic and discussion of egg donation. Women not wishing to become pregnant should be prescribed HRT until the age of 50 to control symptoms of oestrogen deficiency and reduce the risks of osteoporosis and CVD.

  19. Characterization of an array of Love-wave gas sensors developed using electrospinning technique to deposit nanofibers as sensitive layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matatagui, D; Fernández, M J; Fontecha, J; Sayago, I; Gràcia, I; Cané, C; Horrillo, M C; Santos, J P

    2014-03-01

    The electrospinning technique has allowed that very different materials are deposited as sensitive layers on Love-wave devices forming a low cost and successful sensor array. Their excellent sensitivity, good linearity and short response time are reported in this paper. Several materials have been used to produce the nanofibers: polymers as Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and Polystirene (PS); composites with polymers as PVA+SnCl4; combined polymers as PS+Poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PS+PSMA) and metal oxides (SnO2). In order to test the array, well-known chemical warfare agent simulants (CWAs) have been chosen among the volatile organic compounds due to their importance in the security field. Very low concentrations of these compounds have been detected by the array, such as 0.2 ppm of DMMP, a simulant of sarin nerve gas, and 1 ppm of DPGME, a simulant of nitrogen mustard. Additionally, the CWA simulants used in the experiment have been discriminated and classified using pattern recognition techniques, such as principal component analysis and artificial neural networks.

  20. Recent Advances in the Deposition of Diamond Coatings on Co-Cemented Tungsten Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Polini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-cemented tungsten carbides, namely, hard metals are largely used to manufacture high wear resistant components in several manufacturing segments. Coating hard metals with superhard materials like diamond is of utmost interest as it can further extend their useful lifespan. The deposition of diamond coatings onto WC-Co can be extremely complicated as a result of poor adhesion. This can be essentially ascribed to (i the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients between diamond and WC-Co, at the typical high temperatures inside the chemical vapour deposition (CVD chamber, generates large residual stresses at the interface; (ii the role of surface Co inside the WC-Co matrix during diamond CVD, which promotes carbon dissolution and diffusion. The present investigation reviews the techniques by which Co-cemented tungsten carbides can be treated to make them prone to receive diamond coatings by CVD. Further, it proposes interesting ecofriendly and sustainable alternatives to further improve the diamond deposition process as well as the overall performance of the coated hard metals.

  1. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  2. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers' traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers' capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  3. Contact resistance study of various metal electrodes with CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahoi, Amit; Wagner, Stefan; Bablich, Andreas; Kataria, Satender; Passi, Vikram; Lemme, Max C.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the contact resistance of various metals to chemical vapor deposited (CVD) monolayer graphene is investigated. Transfer length method (TLM) structures with varying channel widths and separation between contacts have been fabricated and electrically characterized in ambient air and vacuum condition. Electrical contacts are made with five metals: gold, nickel, nickel/gold, palladium and platinum/gold. The lowest value of 92 Ω μm is observed for the contact resistance between graphene and gold, extracted from back-gated devices at an applied back-gate bias of -40 V. Measurements carried out under vacuum show larger contact resistance values when compared with measurements carried out in ambient conditions. Post processing annealing at 450 °C for 1 h in argon-95%/hydrogen-5% atmosphere results in lowering the contact resistance value which is attributed to the enhancement of the adhesion between metal and graphene. The results presented in this work provide an overview for potential contact engineering for high performance graphene-based electronic devices.

  4. Thermoelectric properties of CVD grown large area graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherehiy, Andriy; Jayasinghe, Ruwantha; Stallard, Robert; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Sidorov, Anton; Benjamin, Daniel; Jiang, Zhigang; Yu, Qingkai; Wu, Wei; Bao, Jiming; Liu, Zhihong; Pei, Steven; Chen, Yong

    2010-03-01

    The thermoelectric power (TEP) of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) grown large area graphene transferred onto a Si/SiO2 substrate was measured by simply attaching two miniature thermocouples and a resistive heater. Availability of such large area graphene facilitates straight forward TEP measurement without the use of any microfabrication processes. All investigated graphene samples showed a positive TEP ˜ + 30 μV/K in ambient conditions and saturated at a negative value as low as ˜ -75 μV/K after vacuum-annealing at 500 K in a vacuum of ˜10-7 Torr. The observed p-type behavior under ambient conditions is attributed to the oxygen doping, while the n-type behavior under degassed conditions is due to electron doping from SiO2 surface states. It was observed that the sign of the TEP switched from negative to positive for the degassed graphene when exposed to acceptor gases. Conversely, the TEP of vacuum-annealed graphene exposed to the donor gases became even more negative than the TEP of vacuum-annealed sample.

  5. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grilj, V., E-mail: vgrilj@irb.hr [Division for Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M. [Division for Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pomorski, M. [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Kada, W. [Division of Electronics and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers’ traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers’ capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  6. A Fast CVD Diamond Beam Loss Monitor for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Griesmayer, E; Dobos, D; Effinger, E; Pernegger, H

    2011-01-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond detectors were installed in the collimation area of the CERN LHC to study their feasibility as Fast Beam Loss Monitors in a high-radiation environment. The detectors were configured with a fast, radiation-hard pre-amplifier with a bandwidth of 2 GHz. The readout was via an oscilloscope with a bandwidth of 1 GHz and a sampling rate of 5 GSPS. Despite the 250 m cable run from the detectors to the oscilloscope, single MIPs were resolved with a 2 ns rise time, a pulse width of 10 ns and a time resolution of less than 1 ns. Two modes of operation were applied. For the analysis of unexpected beam aborts, the loss profile was recorded in a 1 ms buffer and, for nominal operation, the histogram of the time structure of the losses was recorded in synchronism with the LHC period of 89.2 μs. Measurements during the LHC start-up (February to December 2010) are presented. The Diamond Monitors gave an unprecedented insight into the time structure of the beam losses resolving the 400...

  7. Rare genetic variants associated with early onset CVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiwald, S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in Western societies. CVD is mainly triggered by atherosclerosis. A combination of lipid accumulation, inflammation at the vessel wall and thrombotic reactions are underlying its pathobiology. Despite improvements in the ther

  8. Prevention: Reducing the risk of CVD in patients with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genco, Robert J; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2010-09-01

    The association between periodontitis and other chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus, could be related to systemic inflammation initiated by a local inflammatory challenge. Oliveira et al. have added lack of oral hygiene, and its link with systemic inflammation, to the spectrum of risk factors for CVD.

  9. Superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces: Wetting and wear properties of different CVD-generated coating types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, M., E-mail: michael.thieme@tu-dresden.de [Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Streller, F., E-mail: streller@seas.upenn.edu [Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Simon, F., E-mail: frsimon@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Postfach 120 411, 01005 Dresden (Germany); Frenzel, R., E-mail: frenzelr@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Postfach 120 411, 01005 Dresden (Germany); White, A.J. [GVD Corporation, 45 Spinelli Place, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    In view of generating superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces, this work presents further results for the combination of anodic oxidation as the primary pretreatment method and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) variants for chemical modification producing coatings of 250–1000 nm thickness. In detail, CVD involved the utilisation of i – hexafluoropropylene oxide as precursor within the hot filament CVD process for the deposition of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) coatings at alternative conditions (PTFE-AC) and ii – 1,3,5-trivinyltrimethylcyclotrisiloxane for the deposition of polysiloxane coatings (PSi) by initiated CVD. The substrate material was Al Mg1 subjected to usual or intensified sulphuric acid anodisation pretreatments (SAAu, SAAi, respectively) affording various degrees of surface micro-roughness (SAAu < SAAi) to the oxidic layers. Performance characteristics were evaluated in the original as-coated states and after standardised artificial weathering and/or mild wear testing. Superhydrophobicity (SH) was observed with the system SAAi + PTFE-AC similarly to former findings with the standard hot filament CVD PTFE coating variant (SAAi + PTFE-SC). The results indicated that the specific coating morphology made an important contribution to the water-repellency, because even some of the SAAu-based samples tended to reveal SH. Subjecting samples to weathering treatment resulted in a general worsening of the wetting behaviour, primarily limited to the receding contact angles. These tendencies were correlated with the chemical composition of the sample surfaces as analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wear tests showed, as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurement, that the PTFE coatings were relatively sensitive to friction. This was connected with a dramatic deterioration of the water-repelling properties. PSi-coated surfaces generally showed rather poor water-repellency, but this coating type was surprisingly

  10. Handbook of chemical vapor deposition principles, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pierson, Hugh O

    1999-01-01

    Turn to this new second edition for an understanding of the latest advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. CVD technology has recently grown at a rapid rate, and the number and scope of its applications and their impact on the market have increased considerably. The market is now estimated to be at least double that of a mere seven years ago when the first edition of this book was published. The second edition is an update with a considerably expanded and revised scope. Plasma CVD and metallo-organic CVD are two major factors in this rapid growth. Readers will find the latest

  11. Novel photochemical vapor deposition reactor for amorphous silicon solar cell deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.; Hegedus, Steven S.; Buchanan, Wayne A.; Jackson, Scott C.

    1987-07-01

    A novel photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) reactor having a flexible ultraviolet-transparent Teflon curtain and a secondary gas flow to eliminate deposition on the window has been used to deposit amorphous silicon films and p-i-n solar cells. The background levels of atmospheric contaminants (H2O, CO2, N2) depend strongly on the vacuum procedures but not on the presence of a Teflon curtain in the reactor. Intrinsic films with a midgap density of states of 3×1015 eV-1 cm-3 and all-photo-CVD pin solar cells with efficiencies of 8.5% have been deposited.

  12. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  13. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnOx-CVD layers.

  14. Colorimetry Technique for Scalable Characterization of Suspended Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago J.; Steeneken, Peter G.; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Houri, Samer

    2016-11-01

    Previous statistical studies on the mechanical properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) suspended graphene membranes have been performed by means of measuring individual devices or with techniques that affect the material. Here, we present a colorimetry technique as a parallel, non-invasive, and affordable way of characterizing suspended graphene devices. We exploit Newton rings interference patterns to study the deformation of a double-layer graphene drum 13.2 micrometer in diameter when a pressure step is applied. By studying the time evolution of the deformation, we find that filling the drum cavity with air is 2-5 times slower than when it is purged.

  15. Colorimetry Technique for Scalable Characterization of Suspended Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartamil-Bueno, Santiago J; Steeneken, Peter G; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; van der Zant, Herre S J; Houri, Samer

    2016-11-09

    Previous statistical studies on the mechanical properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) suspended graphene membranes have been performed by means of measuring individual devices or with techniques that affect the material. Here, we present a colorimetry technique as a parallel, noninvasive, and affordable way of characterizing suspended graphene devices. We exploit Newton's rings interference patterns to study the deformation of a double-layer graphene drum 13.2 μm in diameter when a pressure step is applied. By studying the time evolution of the deformation, we find that filling the drum cavity with air is 2-5 times slower than when it is purged.

  16. Structural, morphological, and optical properties of TiO2 thin films synthesized by the electro phoretic deposition technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrairi, Najla; Bouaicha, Mongi

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we report the structural, morphological, and optical properties of TiO2 thin films synthesized by the electro phoretic deposition technique. The TiO2 film was formed on a doped fluorine tin oxide (SnO2:F, i.e., FTO) layer and used as a photo electrode in a dye solar cell (DSC). Using spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements in the 200 to 800 nm wavelengths domain, we obtain a thickness of the TiO2 film in the range of 70 to 80 nm. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy (AFM) show a polycrystalline film. In addition, AFM investigation shows no cracks in the formed layer. Using an ultraviolet-visible near-infrared spectrophotometer, we found that the transmittance of the TiO2 film in the visible domain reaches 75%. From the measured current-voltage or I-V characteristic under AM1.5 illumination of the formed DSC, we obtain an open circuit voltage Voc = 628 mV and a short circuit current Isc = 22.6 μA, where the surface of the formed cell is 3.14 cm2.

  17. [XPS characterization of TiN layer on bearing steel surface treated by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-xi; Jiang, Ye-hua; Zhan, Zhao-lin; Tang, Bao-yin

    2009-09-01

    Titanium nitride (TIN) hard protective films were fabricated on AISI52100 bearing steel surface employing plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) technique. The TiN films were characterized using a variety of test methods. Atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed that the titanium nitride film has extremely smooth surface, very high uniformity and efficiency of space filling over large areas. X-ray diffraction (XRD) result indicated that (200) crystal face of titanium nitride phase is the preferred orientation and three kinds of titanium components exist in the surface modified layer. Tailor fitting analysis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with Ar ion etching proved that Ti2p(1/2) and Ti2p(3/2) have two peaks in the titanium nitride film layer, respectively. It is shown that different chemical state exists in titanium compound. N(1s) bond energy of XPS has also three fitting peaks at 396.51, 397. 22 and 399.01 eV, corresponding to the nitrogen atom in TiNxOy, TiN and N--N, respectively. Combined with the XPS Tailor fitting analysis results of O(1s) bond energy, it was shown that there is a large amount of titanium nitride phase in addition to a small amount of simple substance nitrogen and oxide of titanium in the surface layer. The whole film system is made up of TiN, TiO2, N--N and Ti--O--N compound.

  18. Growth of InAs Quantum Dots on Germanium Substrate Using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Renu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs were grown on germanium substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique. Effects of growth temperature and InAs coverage on the size, density, and height of quantum dots were investigated. Growth temperature was varied from 400 to 450 °C and InAs coverage was varied between 1.40 and 2.35 monolayers (MLs. The surface morphology and structural characteristics of the quantum dots analyzed by atomic force microscope revealed that the density of the InAs quantum dots first increased and then decreased with the amount of InAs coverage; whereas density decreased with increase in growth temperature. It was observed that the size and height of InAs quantum dots increased with increase in both temperature and InAs coverage. The density of QDs was effectively controlled by growth temperature and InAs coverage on GaAs buffer layer.

  19. Deposition of LaMO3 (M=Ni,Co,Cr,Al)-Oriented Films by Spray Combustion Flame Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Hiromichi; Shiwa, Yuzo; Nagano, Masamitsu

    1994-10-01

    LaMO3 (M=Ni,Co,Cr,Al) films were prepared on sintered alumina, sapphire (001) and MgO(100) at 500 900°C by spraying ultrasonically atomized aqueous solutions of nitrates into a combustion flame (spray combustion flame technique). LaNiO3 and LaCoO3 on MgO(100) crystallized in high-temperature phases (cubic) while LaCrO3 and LaAlO3 crystallized in room-temperature phases. LaMO3 (M=Ni,Co,Cr,Al) films on MgO(100) were highly oriented to (100), (100), (001) and (100), respectively, while the films on sintered alumina and sapphire were not. The electric resistivities of the dense LaMO3 (M=Ni,Co,Cr) films were as low as those of bulk ceramics. LaNiO3 film deposited on MgO above 700°C showed the lowest resistivity of about 6×10-6 Ω m. It was suggested that the reactivities of the constituent metal atoms with OH in the flame are associated with the preferred phase and the morphology of the films.

  20. Preparation of SrIrO{sub 3} thin films by using metal-organic aerosol deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, Sebastian; Schneider, Melanie; Moshnyaga, Vasily; Gegenwart, Philipp [1. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The interplay between spin-orbit coupling and electronic correlations could lead to interesting novel states in iridium oxide materials. We focus on the perovskite phase of SrIrO{sub 3} because Moon et al. [1] showed by using optical spectroscopy and first-principles calculations that the last member of the Ruddlesden-Popper series Sr{sub n+1}Ir{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} (n = ∞) is close to the Mott transition. By using metal-organic aerosol deposition technique we have grown SrIrO{sub 3} thin films on (111)-oriented SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. The cubic symmetry of the SrTiO{sub 3} substrate ensured that the SrIrO{sub 3} thin film grew in the monoclinic perovskite phase. The X-ray diffraction results suggest that SrIrO{sub 3} thin films in perovskite structure were obtained and these show out of plane epitaxy with monoclinic (002){sub m}-orientation. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of these SrIrO{sub 3} thin films were investigated and metallic behavior was observed down to 50 K.