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Sample records for deposited silicon nitride

  1. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  2. Silicon nitride films deposited with an electron beam created plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, D. C.; Emery, K. A.; Rocca, J. J.; Thompson, L. R.; Zamani, H.; Collins, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    The electron beam assisted chemical vapor deposition (EBCVD) of silicon nitride films using NH3, N2, and SiH4 as the reactant gases is reported. The films have been deposited on aluminum, SiO2, and polysilicon film substrates as well as on crystalline silicon substrates. The range of experimental conditions under which silicon nitrides have been deposited includes substrate temperatures from 50 to 400 C, electron beam currents of 2-40 mA, electron beam energies of 1-5 keV, total ambient pressures of 0.1-0.4 Torr, and NH3/SiH4 mass flow ratios of 1-80. The physical, electrical, and chemical properties of the EBCVD films are discussed.

  3. Frequency effects and properties of plasma deposited fluorinated silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.; Flamm, D.L.; Ibbotson, D.E.; Mucha, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of low-hydrogen, fluorinated plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride films grown using NF 3 /SiH 4 /N 2 feed mixtures in 200 kHz and 14 MHz discharges were compared. High-energy ion bombardment at 200 kHz is expected to enhance surface diffusion and chemical reconstruction. Compared to fluorinated silicon nitride deposited at 14 MHz under otherwise comparable conditions, the 200 kHz films had a lower Si--H bond concentration (approx. 21 cm -3 ), lower total hydrogen content (5--8 x 10 21 cm -3 ), better resistance to oxidation, lower compressive stress (-0.7 to -1.5 Gdyne/cm), and higher density (3.1 g/cm 3 ). The dielectric constant of better low-frequency Class I films was constant to 500 MHz, while that of high-frequency films fell up to 15% between 100 Hz and 10 MHz. The absorption edges of low-frequency PECVD fluorinated silicon nitride films were between 5.0 and 6.1 eV, which compare with 4.4 to 5.6 eV for the high-excitation frequency fluorinated material and 3 to 4 eV for conventional PECVD nitride. However high-frequency films may have fewer trap centers and a lower dielectric constant. 14 MHz p-SiN:F films grown with NH 3 as an auxiliary nitrogen source showed absorption edges similar to low-frequency material grown from NF 3 /SiH 4 /N 2 , but they have substantially more N--H bonding. The dielectric constant and absorption edge of these films were comparable to those of low-frequency p-SiN:F from NF 3 /SiH 4 /N 2

  4. The deposition of silicon nitride films under low pressure on wafers up to 200 mm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalivaiko O. Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of silicon nitride deposition condition on parameters of the obtained films has been investigated. It has been found that the deposition rate of silicon nitride films decreases with deposition temperature decreasing, and at the same time the within wafer thickness uniformity improves. It allows performing the reproducible deposition of silicon nitride films with thickness of less than 10 nm. It has been found that in order to decrease the oxidation depth of silicon nitride, it is appropriate to carry out the oxidation under 850—900°C. The developed process of silicon nitride deposition made it possible to obtain reservoir capacitors with specific capacitance of 3,8—3,9 fF/μm2 at film thickness of 7,0 nm.

  5. Annealing and deposition effects of the chemical composition of silicon rich nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karin Nordström; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Stimpel-Lindner, T.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon-rich nitride, deposited by LPCVD, is a low stress amorphous material with a high refractive index. After deposition the silicon-rich nitride thin film is annealed at temperatures above 1100 oC to break N-H bonds, which have absorption peaks in the wavelength band important for optical...... telecommunication. However, silicon clustering appears in the thin films when annealing above 1150 oC. Clustering is undesirable in waveguide materials because the localized variations of the refractive index associated with the clusters lead to Raleigh scattering, which can cause significant propagation loss...... in optical waveguides. This means that the annealing temperature must be high enough to break the N-H bonds, but no so high as to produce clusters. Therefore, the process window for an annealing step lies between 1100 and 1150 oC. The chemical composition of amorphous silicon-rich nitride has been...

  6. Annealing and deposition effects of the chemical composition of silicon rich nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karin Nordström; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Stimpel-Lindner, T.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon-rich nitride, deposited by LPCVD, is a low stress amorphous material with a high refractive index. After deposition the silicon-rich nitride thin film is annealed at temperatures above 1100 oC to break N-H bonds, which have absorption peaks in the wavelength band important for optical...... telecommunication. However, silicon clustering appears in the thin films when annealing above 1150 oC. Clustering is undesirable in waveguide materials because the localized variations of the refractive index associated with the clusters lead to Raleigh scattering, which can cause significant propagation loss...... investigated by Rutherford back scattering (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The influence of deposition parameters and annealing temperatures on the stoichiometry and the chemical bonds will be discussed. The origin of the clusters has been found to be silicon due to severe silicon out...

  7. Si Passivation and Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Nitride: Final Technical Report, March 18, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwater, H. A.

    2007-11-01

    This report investigated chemical and physical methods for Si surface passivation for application in crystalline Si and thin Si film photovoltaic devices. Overall, our efforts during the project were focused in three areas: i) synthesis of silicon nitride thin films with high hydrogen content by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition; ii) investigation of the role of hydrogen passivation of defects in crystalline Si and Si solar cells by out diffusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride films; iii) investigation of the growth kinetics and passivation of hydrogenated polycrystalline. Silicon nitride films were grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and film properties have been characterized as a function of SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It was demonstrated that hot-wire chemical vapor deposition leads to growth of SiNx films with controllable stoichiometry and hydrogen.

  8. On the intrinsic moisture permeation rate of remote microwave plasma-deposited silicon nitride layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Assche, F. J. H.; Unnikrishnan, S.; Michels, J. J.; van Mol, A. M. B.; van de Weijer, P.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a low substrate temperature (110 °C) remote microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process of silicon nitride barrier layers against moisture permeation for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and other moisture sensitive devices such as organic

  9. On the intrinsic moisture permeation rate of remote microwave plasma-deposited silicon nitride layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assche, F.J.H. Van; Unnikrishnan, S.; Michels, J.J.; Mol, A.M.B. van; Weijer, P. van de; Sanden, M.C.M. van de; Creatore, M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a low substrate temperature (110°C) remote microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process of silicon nitride barrier layers against moisture permeation for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and other moisture sensitive devices such as organic photovoltaic cells

  10. Effects of plasma-deposited silicon nitride passivation on the radiation hardness of CMOS integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of plasma-deposited silicon nitride as a final passivation over metal-gate CMOS integrated circuits degrades the radiation hardness of these devices. The hardness degradation is manifested by increased radiation-induced threshold voltage shifts caused principally by the charging of new interface states and, to a lesser extent, by the trapping of holes created upon exposure to ionizing radiation. The threshold voltage shifts are a strong function of the deposition temperature, and show very little dependence on thickness for films deposited at 300 0 C. There is some correlation between the threshold voltage shifts and the hydrogen content of the PECVD silicon nitride films used as the final passivation layer as a function of deposition temperature. The mechanism by which the hydrogen contained in these films may react with the Si/SiO 2 interface is not clear at this point

  11. High quality plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotler, T.J.; Chapple-Sokol, J. (IBM General Technology Division, Hopewell Junction, NY (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The qualities of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride films can be improved by increasing the deposition temperature. This report compares PECVD silicon nitride films to low pressure chemical vapor deposited (LPCVD) films. The dependence of the film properties on process parameters, specifically power and temperature, are investigated. The stress is shown to shift from tensile to compressive with increasing temperature and power. The deposition rate, uniformity, wet etch rate, index of refraction, composition, stress, hydrogen content, and conformality are considered to evaluate the film properties. Temperature affects the hydrogen content in the films by causing decreased incorporation of N-H containing species whereas the dependence on power is due to changes in the gas-phase precursors. All PECVD film properties, with the exception of conformality, are comparable to those of LPCVD films.

  12. Optical and passivating properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition for application on silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, Daniel Nilsen

    2008-07-01

    Within this thesis, several important subjects related to the use of amorphous silicon nitride made by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition as an anti-reflective coating on silicon solar cells are presented. The first part of the thesis covers optical simulations to optimise single and double layer anti-reflective coatings with respect to optical performance when situated on a silicon solar cell. The second part investigates the relationship between important physical properties of silicon nitride films when deposited under different conditions. The optical simulations were either based on minimising the reflectance off a silicon nitride/silicon wafer stack or maximising the transmittance through the silicon nitride into the silicon wafer. The former method allowed consideration of the reflectance off the back surface of the wafer, which occurs typically at wavelengths above 1000 nm due to the transparency of silicon at these wavelengths. However, this method does not take into consideration the absorption occurring in the silicon nitride, which is negligible at low refractive indexes but quite significant when the refractive index increases above 2.1. For high-index silicon nitride films, the latter method is more accurate as it considers both reflectance and absorbance in the film to calculate the transmittance into the Si wafer. Both methods reach similar values for film thickness and refractive index for optimised single layer anti-reflective coatings, due to the negligible absorption occurring in these films. For double layer coatings, though, the reflectance based simulations overestimated the optimum refractive index for the bottom layer, which would have lead to excessive absorption if applied to real anti-reflective coatings. The experimental study on physical properties for silicon nitride films deposited under varying conditions concentrated on the estimation of properties important for its applications, such as optical properties, passivation

  13. Buckling Morphologies and Interfacial Properties of Silicon Nitride Films Deposited on Float Glass Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ya-Dong; Chen, Qi-Xiang; Feng, Yu-Fei; Chen, Jun; Yu, Sen-Jiang

    2015-04-01

    We report on the buckling morphologies and interfacial properties of silicon nitride films deposited on float glass substrates. The coexistence of straight-sided and telephone cord buckles can be observed in the silicon nitride films after annealing at a high temperature. The straight-sided structure is metastable and can spontaneously evolve into the telephone cord structure accompanied by the increase in the buckle width and height. The geometric parameters of various buckling structures (including the straight blister, telephone cord and their transition state) have been measured by optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The internal stress and interfacial adhesion of the films are evaluated and analyzed based on the continuum elastic theory. It is valid to measure the interfacial properties of thin films by simplifying the telephone cord buckle as a straight-sided structure. This measurement technique is suitable for all the film systems provided that the buckles can form in the film.

  14. Processing Research on Chemically Vapor Deposited Silicon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    34 sea urchins ") predominated, suggesting that formation was primarily from the vapor phase with little of the nodular growths seen at only slightly...deposition parameters on crystallite size, morphology and deposition rate. Geometries include a cold-wall, flat plate reactor (CW) and 4-inch and 1-inch...typical crossections of banded deposits and deposits which showed transitions from amorphous to crystalline morphologies , respectively. Figure 2-5

  15. PECVD silicon nitride diaphragms for condenser microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeper, P.R.; Scheeper, P.R.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Bergveld, Piet

    1991-01-01

    The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride as a diaphragm material for condenser microphones has been investigated. By means of adjusting the SiH4/NH3 gas-flow composition, silicon-rich silicon nitride films have been obtained with a relatively low tensile

  16. Silicon nitride-fabrication, forming and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yehezkel, O.

    1983-01-01

    This article, which is a literature survey of the recent years, includes description of several methods for the formation of silicone nitride, and five methods of forming: Reaction-bonded silicon nitride, sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing and chemical vapour deposition. Herein are also included data about mechanical and physical properties of silicon nitride and the relationship between the forming method and the properties. (author)

  17. Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride from Bis(tert-butylamino)silane and N2 Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoops, Harm C M; Braeken, Eline M J; de Peuter, Koen; Potts, Stephen E; Haukka, Suvi; Pore, Viljami; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-09-09

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx) is deemed essential for a variety of applications in nanoelectronics, such as gate spacer layers in transistors. In this work an ALD process using bis(tert-butylamino)silane (BTBAS) and N2 plasma was developed and studied. The process exhibited a wide temperature window starting from room temperature up to 500 °C. The material properties and wet-etch rates were investigated as a function of plasma exposure time, plasma pressure, and substrate table temperature. Table temperatures of 300-500 °C yielded a high material quality and a composition close to Si3N4 was obtained at 500 °C (N/Si=1.4±0.1, mass density=2.9±0.1 g/cm3, refractive index=1.96±0.03). Low wet-etch rates of ∼1 nm/min were obtained for films deposited at table temperatures of 400 °C and higher, similar to that achieved in the literature using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of SiNx at >700 °C. For novel applications requiring significantly lower temperatures, the temperature window from room temperature to 200 °C can be a solution, where relatively high material quality was obtained when operating at low plasma pressures or long plasma exposure times.

  18. Synthesis and corrosion properties of silicon nitride films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.; Emmerich, R.; Enders, B.; Wolf, G. K.

    1995-12-01

    Silicon nitride films SiN x were deposited on 316L austenitic stainless steel substrates by silicon evaporation and simultaneous nitrogen ion irradiation with an acceleration voltage of 2 kV. In order to study the influence of the nitrogen content on changes in stoichiometry, structure, morphology, thermal oxidation behaviour and corrosion behaviour, the atom to ion transport ratio was systematically varied. The changes of binding states and the stoichiometry were evaluated with XPS and AES analysis. A maximum nitrogen content was reached with a {Si}/{N} transport ratio lower than 2. The films are chemically inert when exposed to laboratory atmosphere up to a temperature of more than 1000°C. XRD and SEM measurements show amorphous and featureless films for transport ratios {Si}/{N} from 1 up to 10. The variation of the corrosion behaviour of coated stainless steel substrates in sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid shows a minimum at medium transport ratios. This goes parallel with changes in porosity and adhesion. Additional investigations showed that titanium implantation as an intermediate step improves the corrosion resistance considerably.

  19. Deposition of thin layers of boron nitrides and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon assisted by high current direct current arc plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, D.

    1999-09-01

    In the frame of this thesis, a high current direct current arc (HCDCA) used for the industrial deposition of diamond, has been adapted to study the deposition of two types of coatings: a) boron nitride, whose cubic phase is similar to diamond, for tribological applications, b) hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon, for applications in the semiconductor fields (flat panel displays, solar cells,...). For the deposition of these coatings, the substrates were placed in the diffusion region of the arc. The substrate heating is mainly due to atomic species recombining on its surface. The deposition temperature, varying from 300 to 900 o C according to the films deposited, is determined by the substrate position, the arc power and the injected gas fluxes, without the use of any external heating or cooling system. Measurements performed on the arc plasma show that the electronic temperature is around 2 eV (23'000 K) while the gas temperature is lower than 5500 K. Typical electronic densities are in the range of 10 12 -10 1' 3 cm -3 . For the deposition of boron nitride films, different boron precursors were used and a wide parameter range was investigated. The extreme difficulty of synthesising cubic boron nitride films by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) did not allow to stabilize the cubic phase of boron nitride in HCDCA. Coatings resulted in hexagonal or amorphous boron nitride with a chemical composition close to stoichiometric. The presence of hydrogen leads to the deposition of rough and porous films. Negative biasing of the samples, for positive ion bombardment, is commonly used to stabilize the cubic phase. In HCDCA and in our biasing range, only a densification of the films could be observed. A boron nitride deposition plasma study by infrared absorption spectroscopy in a capacitive radio frequency reactor has demonstrated the usefulness of this diagnostic for the understanding of the various chemical reactions which occur in this kind of plasma. Diborane

  20. Preparation and characterization of electrochemically deposited carbon nitride films on silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Xingbin; Xu Tao; Chen Gang; Yang Shengrong; Liu Huiwen; Xue Qunji

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nitride films (CN x films) were deposited on Si(100) substrates by the electrolysis of methanol-urea solution at high voltage, atmospheric pressure, and low temperature. The microstructure and morphology of the resulting CN x films were analysed by means of Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force microscopy. The tribological properties of the CN x films were examined on an UMT-2MT friction and wear test rig. The Raman spectrum showed two characteristic bands: a graphite G band and a disordered D band of carbon, which suggested the presence of an amorphous carbon matrix. XPS and FTIR measurements suggested the existence of both single and double carbon-nitride bonds in the film and the hydrogenation of the carbon nitride phase. The XRD spectrum showed various peaks of different d values, which could confirm the existence of the polycrystalline carbon nitride phase. The hydrogenated CN x films were compact and uniform, with a root mean square roughness of about 18 nm. The films showed excellent friction-reduction and wear-resistance, with the friction coefficient in the stable phase being about 0.08. In addition, the growth mechanism of the CN x films in liquid phase electro-deposition was discussed as well. It was assumed that the molecules of CH 3 OH and CO(NH 2 ) 2 were polarized under high electric field, and the CN x film was formed on the substrate through the reaction of the -CH 3 and -NH 2 groups on the cathode

  1. Silicon nitride films fabricated by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method for coatings of the laser interferometer gravitational wave detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huang-Wei; Kuo, Ling-Chi; Huang, Shu-Yu; Wu, Meng-Yun; Juang, Yu-Hang; Lee, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Chieh; Wen, Ting Ting; Chao, Shiuh

    2018-01-01

    Silicon is a potential substrate material for the large-areal-size mirrors of the next-generation laser interferometer gravitational wave detector operated in cryogenics. Silicon nitride thin films uniformly deposited by a chemical vapor deposition method on large-size silicon wafers is a common practice in the silicon integrated circuit industry. We used plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to deposit silicon nitride films on silicon and studied the physical properties of the films that are pertinent to application of mirror coatings for laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors. We measured and analyzed the structure, optical properties, stress, Young's modulus, and mechanical loss of the films, at both room and cryogenic temperatures. Optical extinction coefficients of the films were in the 10-5 range at 1550-nm wavelength. Room-temperature mechanical loss of the films varied in the range from low 10-4 to low 10-5 within the frequency range of interest. The existence of a cryogenic mechanical loss peak depended on the composition of the films. We measured the bond concentrations of N - H , Si - H , Si - N , and Si - Si bonds in the films and analyzed the correlations between bond concentrations and cryogenic mechanical losses. We proposed three possible two-level systems associated with the N - H , Si - H , and Si - N bonds in the film. We inferred that the dominant source of the cryogenic mechanical loss for the silicon nitride films is the two-level system of exchanging position between a H+ and electron lone pair associated with the N - H bond. Under our deposition conditions, superior properties in terms of high refractive index with a large adjustable range, low optical absorption, and low mechanical loss were achieved for films with lower nitrogen content and lower N - H bond concentration. Possible pairing of the silicon nitride films with other materials in the quarter-wave stack is discussed.

  2. The improvement of wave-absorbing ability of silicon carbide fibers by depositing boron nitride coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fang; Zhang, Litong; Yin, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongsheng; Cheng, Laifei

    2013-04-01

    This work investigated electromagnetic wave (EMW) absorption and mechanical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) fibers with and without boron nitride (BN) coating by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). The dielectric property and EM shielding effectiveness of SiC fiber bundles before and after being coated by BN were measured by wave guide method. The EM reflection coefficient of SiC fiber laminates with and without BN coating was determined by model calculation and NRL-arc method, respectively. Tensile properties of SiC fiber bundles with and without BN coating were tested at room temperature. Results show that SiC fibers with BN coating had a great improvement of EMW absorbing property because the composites achieved the impedance matching. BN with the low permittivity and dielectric loss contributed to the enhancive introduction and reduced reflection of EMW. The tensile strength and Weibull modulus of SiC fiber bundles coated by BN increased owing to the decrease of defects in SiC fibers and the protection of coating during loading.

  3. Photoluminescence and electrical properties of silicon oxide and silicon nitride superlattices containing silicon nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuleiko, D V; Ilin, A S

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescence and electrical properties of superlattices with thin (1 to 5 nm) alternating silicon-rich silicon oxide or silicon-rich silicon nitride, and silicon oxide or silicon nitride layers containing silicon nanocrystals prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with subsequent annealing were investigated. The entirely silicon oxide based superlattices demonstrated photoluminescence peak shift due to quantum confinement effect. Electrical measurements showed the hysteresis effect in the vicinity of zero voltage due to structural features of the superlattices from SiOa 93 /Si 3 N 4 and SiN 0 . 8 /Si 3 N 4 layers. The entirely silicon nitride based samples demonstrated resistive switching effect, comprising an abrupt conductivity change at about 5 to 6 V with current-voltage characteristic hysteresis. The samples also demonstrated efficient photoluminescence with maximum at ∼1.4 eV, due to exiton recombination in silicon nanocrystals. (paper)

  4. Novel Cyclosilazane-Type Silicon Precursor and Two-Step Plasma for Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Min; Jang, Se Jin; Lee, Sang-Ick; Lee, Won-Jun

    2018-03-02

    We designed cyclosilazane-type silicon precursors and proposed a three-step plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process to prepare silicon nitride films with high quality and excellent step coverage. The cyclosilazane-type precursor, 1,3-di-isopropylamino-2,4-dimethylcyclosilazane (CSN-2), has a closed ring structure for good thermal stability and high reactivity. CSN-2 showed thermal stability up to 450 °C and a sufficient vapor pressure of 4 Torr at 60 °C. The energy for the chemisorption of CSN-2 on the undercoordinated silicon nitride surface as calculated by density functional theory method was -7.38 eV. The PEALD process window was between 200 and 500 °C, with a growth rate of 0.43 Å/cycle. The best film quality was obtained at 500 °C, with hydrogen impurity of ∼7 atom %, oxygen impurity less than 2 atom %, low wet etching rate, and excellent step coverage of ∼95%. At 300 °C and lower temperatures, the wet etching rate was high especially at the lower sidewall of the trench pattern. We introduced the three-step PEALD process to improve the film quality and the step coverage on the lower sidewall. The sequence of the three-step PEALD process consists of the CSN-2 feeding step, the NH 3 /N 2 plasma step, and the N 2 plasma step. The H radicals in NH 3 /N 2 plasma efficiently remove the ligands from the precursor, and the N 2 plasma after the NH 3 plasma removes the surface hydrogen atoms to activate the adsorption of the precursor. The films deposited at 300 °C using the novel precursor and the three-step PEALD process showed a significantly improved step coverage of ∼95% and an excellent wet etching resistance at the lower sidewall, which is only twice as high as that of the blanket film prepared by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition.

  5. Improving optical properties of silicon nitride films to be applied in the middle infrared optics by a combined high-power impulse/unbalanced magnetron sputtering deposition technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Bo-Huei; Hsiao, Chien-Nan

    2014-02-01

    Silicon nitride films are prepared by a combined high-power impulse/unbalanced magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS/UBMS) deposition technique. Different unbalance coefficients and pulse on/off ratios are applied to improve the optical properties of the silicon nitride films. The refractive indices of the Si3N4 films vary from 2.17 to 2.02 in the wavelength ranges of 400-700 nm, and all the extinction coefficients are smaller than 1×10(-4). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray diffractometry measurements reveal the amorphous structure of the Si3N4 films with extremely low hydrogen content and very low absorption between the near IR and middle IR ranges. Compared to other deposition techniques, Si3N4 films deposited by the combined HIPIMS/UBMS deposition technique possess the highest refractive index, the lowest extinction coefficient, and excellent structural properties. Finally a four-layer coating is deposited on both sides of a silicon substrate. The average transmittance from 3200 to 4800 nm is 99.0%, and the highest transmittance is 99.97% around 4200 nm.

  6. Plasma assisted chemical vapor deposited tantalum silicon nitride thin films for applications in nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wanxue

    The scaling issues resulting from diminishing device feature sizes have prompted the investigation of alternative materials and deposition techniques for copper diffusion barrier applications. As device sizes shrink to sub 100-nm technology nodes, the allowable copper diffusion barrier thickness falls to less than 10 nm. In this respect, novel materials are needed to stop copper diffusion into surrounding materials. TaSiN has been regarded as one of the most promising materials for copper diffusion barrier applications, owing to its excellent thermal stability, amorphous structure, and low resistivity. In this respect, a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) process using TaF5, SiI4, N2, H2, and in-situ radio frequency (RF) plasma was optimized for depositing ultrathin TaSiN films, employing a design of experiments (DOE) approach. Film properties were characterized using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), four-point resistivity probe, and cross-section scanning electron microscopy (CS-SEM). The TaSiN films, deposited via optimized process conditions, exhibited low resistivity, low contamination levels, smooth surface morphology, good step coverage, excellent thermal stability, and amorphous structure. The copper diffusion barrier performance of optimized PACVD TaSiN films was assessed in Cu/TaSiN/Si structures using traditional high temperature annealing methods and in Cu/TaSiN/SiO2/Si structures using a triangular voltage sweep (TVS) method. The results from the former technique show that the diffusion barrier performance of TaSiN films with higher silicon concentration, corresponding to a more prevalent amorphous structure, leads to worse Cu diffusion barrier performance. The results from the TaSiN barrier testing also show that thinner TaSiN films (≤5 nm) performed better as Cu diffusion barriers than thicker Ta

  7. Compositional analysis of silicon oxide/silicon nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meziani Samir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen, amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx:H abbreviated SiNx films were grown on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD in parallel configuration using NH3/SiH4 gas mixtures. The mc-Si wafers were taken from the same column of Si cast ingot. After the deposition process, the layers were oxidized (thermal oxidation in dry oxygen ambient environment at 950 °C to get oxide/nitride (ON structure. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were employed for analyzing quantitatively the chemical composition and stoichiometry in the oxide-nitride stacked films. The effect of annealing temperature on the chemical composition of ON structure has been investigated. Some species, O, N, Si were redistributed in this structure during the thermal oxidation of SiNx. Indeed, oxygen diffused to the nitride layer into Si2O2N during dry oxidation.

  8. High temperature and low pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride on AlGaN: Band offsets and passivation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Pramod; Washiyama, Shun; Kaess, Felix; Hernandez-Balderrama, Luis H.; Haidet, Brian B.; Alden, Dorian; Franke, Alexander; Sarkar, Biplab; Kohn, Erhard; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7919 (United States); Hayden Breckenridge, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7919 (United States); REU, Physics Department at Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina 29303 (United States)

    2016-04-14

    In this work, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the band offsets and interface Fermi level at the heterojunction formed by stoichiometric silicon nitride deposited on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (of varying Al composition “x”) via low pressure chemical vapor deposition. Silicon nitride is found to form a type II staggered band alignment with AlGaN for all Al compositions (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) and present an electron barrier into AlGaN even at higher Al compositions, where E{sub g}(AlGaN) > E{sub g}(Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). Further, no band bending is observed in AlGaN for x ≤ 0.6 and a reduced band bending (by ∼1 eV in comparison to that at free surface) is observed for x > 0.6. The Fermi level in silicon nitride is found to be at 3 eV with respect to its valence band, which is likely due to silicon (≡Si{sup 0/−1}) dangling bonds. The presence of band bending for x > 0.6 is seen as a likely consequence of Fermi level alignment at Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/AlGaN hetero-interface and not due to interface states. Photoelectron spectroscopy results are corroborated by current-voltage-temperature and capacitance-voltage measurements. A shift in the interface Fermi level (before band bending at equilibrium) from the conduction band in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/n-GaN to the valence band in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/p-GaN is observed, which strongly indicates a reduction in mid-gap interface states. Hence, stoichiometric silicon nitride is found to be a feasible passivation and dielectric insulation material for AlGaN at any composition.

  9. Shock Response of Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandekar, D. P.; Casem, D. T.; Motoyashiki, Y.; Sato, E.

    2009-06-01

    Silicon nitride is suitable for varied applications. The properties of silicon nitride have been tailored through processing and doping. The current work presents shock response of silicon nitride marketed as SN282. The density of this material, 3.4 Mg/m^3, exceeds its single crystal density due to the presence of lutetium oxide as an additive in ca. 5% by weight in the material. While the average grain size is 3.4 microns, aspect ratio of the grains exceed 3. Preliminary results of shock wave experiments may be summarized as follows: (1) The Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) of SN282 is 11.2 GPa. (2) The magnitude of the inelastic wave velocity just above the HEL is 8.73 km/s, suggesting that inelastic deformation above the HEL is due to shock induced plasticity in the material. (3) The estimated value of the spall strength is 0.5 GPa. The spall strength of SN282 remains unchanged even when shocked beyond the HEL. The non-vanishing spall strength suggests that doping plays a role in the retention of spall strength of SN282. The role of doping needs to be further investigated.

  10. Zirconia doped silicon nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekstroem, T.; Falk, L.K.L.; Knutson-Wedel, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation is concerned with the value added to silicon nitride ceramics by doping with smaller amounts of zirconia. The effects which the different sintering additives ZrO 2 , Y 2 O 3 stabilized ZrO 2 , Y 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 and AIN have upon densification, α- to β-Si 3 N 4 phase transformation and final microstructure are discussed. Silicon nitride ceramics containing these additives have been formed either by pressureless sintering or by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at temperatures in the range 1550 to 1775 deg C. The fine scale microstructures of the densified materials, characterized by analytical electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry, have been related to mechanical properties viz. strength, hardness and indentation fracture toughness. The most pronounced value added by ZrO 2 doping is that a properly adjusted combination of sintering aids makes it possible to substantially reduce the volume fraction of residual intergranular glass through formation of crystalline ZrO 2 (Y 2 O 3 ) solid solutions. This behaviours opens the possibility of developing new silicon nitride ceramics for high temperature applications. 25 refs., 4 figs

  11. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  12. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...

  13. Silicon oxide nanoimprint stamp fabrication by edge lithography reinforced with silicon nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiping; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, Meint J.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2007-01-01

    The fabrication of silicon oxide nanoimprint stamp employing edge lithography in combination with silicon nitride deposition is presented. The fabrication process is based on conventional photolithography an weg etching methods. Nanoridges with width dimension of sub-20 nm were fabricated by edge

  14. Compressive creep of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.R.M. da; Melo, F.C.L. de; Cairo, C.A.; Piorino Neto, F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon nitride samples were formed by pressureless sintering process, using neodymium oxide and a mixture of neodymium oxide and yttrio oxide as sintering aids. The short term compressive creep behaviour was evaluated over a stress range of 50-300 MPa and temperature range 1200 - 1350 0 C. Post-sintering heat treatments in nitrogen with a stepwise decremental variation of temperature were performed in some samples and microstructural analysis by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the secondary crystalline phase which form from the remnant glass are dependent upon composition and percentage of aditives. Stress exponent values near to unity were obtained for materials with low glass content suggesting grain boundary diffusion accommodation processes. Cavitation will thereby become prevalent with increase in stress, temperature and decrease in the degree of crystallization of the grain boundary phase. (author) [pt

  15. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 µm and. 25 µm, and a sintered silicon ... the sintered silicon carbide was found out to be linked to its previous thermal history. Keywords. Indentation fatigue .... This presence of a grain size effect in the RIF behaviour of the ...

  16. A novel passivation process of silicon nanowires by a low-cost PECVD technique for deposition of hydrogenated silicon nitride using SiH4 and N2 as precursor gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaziz, Lamia; Dridi, Donia; Karyaoui, Mokhtar; Angelova, Todora; Sanchez Plaza, Guillermo; Chtourou, Radhouane

    2017-03-01

    In this work, a different SiNx passivation process of silicon nanowires has been opted for the deposition of a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiNx:H) by a low-cost plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using silane ( SiH4 and nitrogen ( N2 as reactive gases. This study is focused on the effect of the gas flow ratio on chemical composition, morphological, optical and optoelectronic properties of silicon nanowires. The existence of Si-N and Si-H bonds was proven by the Fourier transmission infrared (FTIR) spectrum. Morphological structures were shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the roughness was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A low reflectivity less than 6% in the wavelength range 250-1200nm has been shown by UV-visible spectroscopy. Furthermore, the thickness and the refractive index of the passivation layer is determined by ellipsometry measurements. As a result, an improvement in minority carrier lifetime has been obtained by reducing surface recombination of silicon nanowires.

  17. Post deposition annealing temperature effect on silicon quantum dots embedded in silicon nitride dielectric multilayer prepared by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchal, A.K., E-mail: ashishpanchal@me.iitb.ac.i [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Solanki, C.S. [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2009-04-30

    The preparations of the 20-period of a Si quantum dot (QD)/SiN{sub x} multilayer in a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) chamber is presented in this paper. The changes in the properties of Si-QDs after the post deposition annealing treatment are studied in detail. Alternate a-Si:H and SiN{sub x} layers are grown in a single SiN{sub x} deposition chamber by cracking SiH{sub 4}, and SiH{sub 4} + NH{sub 3}, respectively at 250 {sup o}C. The as-deposited samples are annealed in the temperature range of 800 {sup o}C to 950 {sup o}C to grow Si-QDs. All the samples are characterized by confocal micro Raman, transmission electron microscope (TEM), and photoluminescence (PL) to study the changes in the film structures after the annealing treatment. The micro Raman analysis of the samples shows the frequency line shifting from 482 cm{sup -1} to 500 cm{sup -1} indicating the Si transition from an amorphous to a crystalline phase. The TEM micrograph inspection indicates the formation of Si-QDs of size 3 to 5 nm and a density of 5 x 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}. The high resolution TEM micrographs show an agglomeration of Si-QDs with an increase in the annealing temperature. The PL spectra show a peak shifting from 459 nm to 532 nm with increasing the annealing temperature of the film.

  18. Synthesis Of A Precursor Of Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Warren H.; Cornell, Linda; Lin, Y. C.

    1994-01-01

    Promising route toward production of highly pure, finely divided, easily sinterable silicon nitride (Si3N4) involves thermal decomposition of silicon diimide {Si(NH)2} prepared by ammonolysis of Si(SCN)4 in CH3CN and purified by complete extraction of byproduct NH4SCN by use of ammonia at temperature and pressure above critical point.

  19. Dynamic behavior of hydrogen in silicon nitride and oxynitride films made by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldbik, W. M.; Marée, C. H. M.; Maas, A. J. H.; van den Boogaard, M. J.; Habraken, F. H. P. M.; Kuiper, A. E. T.

    1993-08-01

    The diffusion and reactivity of hydrogen, incorporated in silicon oxynitride films during low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) at 800 °C, has been studied using elastic recoil detection and infrared spectroscopy for temperatures ranging from 700 to 1000 °C. The experiments are based on the determination of the hydrogen and deuterium depth profiles in layer structures in which H and D have been incorporated in different layers. This was achieved in two ways. Double layers have been produced directly during deposition or through exchange of incorporated hydrogen with gas-phase deuterium. The diffusion coefficient of hydrogen (or deuterium) is in the range between 3×1018 and 1×10-13 cm2/s, at temperatures between 700 and 1000 °C, and is characterized by a single activation energy of 3 eV, for [O]/([O]+[N]) values up to 0.45. The diffusion coefficient and hence the rate of the exchange of incorporated hydrogen and gas-phase deuterium increases with [O]/([O]+[N]) in the oxynitrides for [O]/([O]+[N]) >0.3. As a result we propose a model in which the rate-limiting step in the process of the diffusion of hydrogen in the LPCVD oxynitrides is the breaking of N-H bonds. Subsequent to the bond breaking, the hydrogen atom becomes trapped in a nitrogen-related trapping site or exchanges with a nitrogen-bonded hydrogen (deuterium) atom. If the bond breaking occurs within a distance of about 10 nm from the immediate surface, the hydrogen atom is able to desorb into the gas phase. A SiO2 capping layer is not able to prevent the desorption.

  20. Evanescent field phase shifting in a silicon nitride waveguide using a coupled silicon slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Asger Sellerup; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Green, William M. J.

    2015-01-01

    An approach for electrical modulation of low-loss silicon nitride waveguides is proposed, using a silicon nitride waveguide evanescently loaded with a thin silicon slab. The thermooptic phase-shift characteristics are investigated in a racetrack resonator configuration....

  1. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bulk...... and thin-film glasses were used in the bonding experiments. Bond quality was evaluated using a tensile test on structured dies. The effect of oxygen-based pre-treatments of the nitride surface on the bond quality has been evaluated. Bond strengths up to 35 Nrmm2 and yields up to 100% were obtained....

  2. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker's ...

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of silicon nitride structural ceramics of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohaecker, T.R.; Nobrega, M.C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The utilization of direct evaluation technic of tenacity for fracturing by hardness impact in silicon nitride ceramics is described. The microstructure were analysied, by Scanning Electron Microscopy, equiped with a microanalysis acessory by X ray energy dispersion. The difference between the values of K IC measure for two silicon nitride ceramics is discussed, in function of the microstructures and the fracture surfaces of the samples studied. (C.G.C.) [pt

  4. Dynamic Characterization of Silicon Nitride Cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babaei Gavan, K.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments on dynamical characterization of silicon nitride cantilevers. These devices play an important role in micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). They consist of a mechanical part, a sensor or actuator, and an electronic part for readout and

  5. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  6. Charge decay characteristics of silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon structure at elevated temperatures and extraction of the nitride trap density distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hun; Sim, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Duk; Shin, Hyung Cheol; Park, Byung-Gook

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the charge decay characteristics of a silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon type nonvolatile memory at elevated temperatures. Based on the amphoteric trap model and the thermal emission model of the trapped charge, we propose an advanced charge decay model which includes the effect of the bottom oxide, and apply it to extraction of the trap density distribution in energy levels of the nitride layer. The samples prepared have nitride films deposited simultaneously and are classified into two groups according to the thickness of the bottom oxide. The trap density distributions extracted from two groups showed good consistency.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of nano silicon and titanium nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synthesis and characterization of nano silicon and titanium nitride powders using atmospheric microwave plasma technique ... nucleation of silicon vapour produced by the radial injection of silicon tetrachloride vapour and nano titanium nitride was synthesized by using liquid titanium tetrachloride as the precursor.

  8. High temperature corrosion of silicon carbide and silicon nitride in the presence of chloride compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNallan, M.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon carbide and silicon nitride are resistant to oxidation because a protective silicon dioxide films on their surfaces in most oxidizing environments. Chloride compounds can attack the surface in two ways: 1) chlorine can attack the silicon directly to form a volatile silicon chloride compound or 2) alkali compounds combined with the chlorine can be transported to the surface where they flux the silica layer by forming stable alkali silicates. Alkali halides have enough vapor pressure that a sufficient quantity of alkali species to cause accelerated corrosion can be transported to the ceramic surface without the formation of a chloride deposit. When silicon carbide is attacked simultaneously by chlorine and oxygen, the corrosion products include both volatile and condensed spices. Silicon nitride is much more resistance to this type of attack than silicon carbide. Silicon based ceramics are exposed to oxidizing gases in the presence of alkali chloride vapors, the rate of corrosion is controlled primarily by the driving force for the formation of alkali silicate, which can be quantified as the activity of the alkali oxide in equilibrium with the corrosive gas mixture. In a gas mixture containing a fixed partial pressure of KCl, the rate of corrosion is accelerated by increasing the concentration of water vapor and inhibited by increasing the concentration of HCl. Similar results have been obtained for mixtures containing other alkalis and halogens. (Orig./A.B.)

  9. Ion beam induces nitridation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Conway, M.

    1998-01-01

    High dose ion bombardment of silicon with reactive species, such as oxygen and nitrogen, has attracted considerable interest due to possible applications of beam-induced chemical compounds with silicon. For example, high energy oxygen bombardment of Si is now routinely used to form buried oxide layers for device purposes, the so called SIMOX structures. On the other hand, Si nitrides, formed by low energy ( 100 keV) nitrogen beam bombardment of Si, are attractive as oxidation barriers or gate insulators, primarily due to the low diffusivity of many species in Si nitrides. However, little data exists on silicon nitride formation during bombardment and its angle dependence, in particular for N 2 + bombardment in the 10 keV range, which is of interest for analytical techniques such as SIMS. In SIMS, low energy oxygen ions are more commonly used as bombarding species, as oxygen provides stable ion yields and enhances the positive secondary ion yield. Therefore, a large body of data can be found in the literature on oxide formation during low energy oxygen bombardment. Nitrogen bombardment of Si may cause similar effects to oxygen bombardment, as nitrogen and oxygen have similar masses and ranges in Si, show similar sputtering effects and both have the ability to form chemical compounds with Si. In this work we explore this possibility in some detail. We compare oxide and nitride formation during oxygen and nitrogen ion bombardment of Si under similar conditions. Despite the expected similar behaviour, some large differences in compound formation were found. These differences are explained in terms of different atomic diffusivities in oxides and nitrides, film structural differences and thermodynamic properties. (author)

  10. Apparatus for silicon nitride precursor solids recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Gary M.; Predmesky, Ronald L.; Nicholson, John M.

    1995-04-04

    Method and apparatus are provided for collecting reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow from a reaction situs, wherein the gaseous outflow includes a condensable vapor. A condensate is formed of the condensable vapor on static mixer surfaces within a static mixer heat exchanger. The entrained reaction product solids are captured in the condensate which can be collected for further processing, such as return to the reaction situs. In production of silicon imide, optionally integrated into a production process for making silicon nitride caramic, wherein reactant feed gas comprising silicon halide and substantially inert carrier gas is reacted with liquid ammonia in a reaction vessel, silicon imide reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow comprising residual carrier gas and vaporized ammonia can be captured by forming a condensate of the ammonia vapor on static mixer surfaces of a static mixer heat exchanger.

  11. Method for silicon nitride precursor solids recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Gary M.; Predmesky, Ronald L.; Nicholson, John M.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus are provided for collecting reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow from a reaction situs, wherein the gaseous outflow includes a condensable vapor. A condensate is formed of the condensable vapor on static mixer surfaces within a static mixer heat exchanger. The entrained reaction product solids are captured in the condensate which can be collected for further processing, such as return to the reaction situs. In production of silicon imide, optionally integrated into a production process for making silicon nitride caramic, wherein reactant feed gas comprising silicon halide and substantially inert carrier gas is reacted with liquid ammonia in a reaction vessel, silicon imide reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow comprising residual carrier gas and vaporized ammonia can be captured by forming a condensate of the ammonia vapor on static mixer surfaces of a static mixer heat exchanger.

  12. Bonding silicon nitride using glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobedoe, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon nitride has been successfully bonded to itself using magnesium-aluminosilicate glass and glass-ceramic. For some samples, bonding was achieved using a diffusion bonder, but in other instances, following an initial degassing hold, higher temperatures were used in a nitrogen atmosphere with no applied load. For diffusion bonding, a small applied pressure at a temperature below which crystallisation occurs resulted in intimate contact. At slightly higher temperatures, the extent of the reaction at the interface and the microstructure of the glass-ceramic joint was highly sensitive to the bonding temperature. Bonding in a nitrogen atmosphere resulted in a solution-reprecipitation reaction. A thin layer of glass produced a ''dry'', glass-free joint, whilst a thicker layer resulted in a continuous glassy join across the interface. The chromium silicide impurities within the silicon nitride react with the nucleating agent in the glass ceramic, which may lead to difficulty in producing a fine glass-ceramic microstructure. Slightly lower temperatures in nitrogen resulted in a polycrystalline join but the interfacial contact was poor. It is hoped that one of the bonds produced may be developed to eventually form part of a graded joint between silicon nitride and a high temperature nickel alloy. (orig.)

  13. PECVD low stress silicon nitride analysis and optimization for the fabrication of CMUT devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagolini, Alvise; Picciotto, Antonino; Boscardin, Maurizio; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Caliano, Giosuè; Lamberti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Two technological options to achieve a high deposition rate, low stress plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride to be used in capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUT) fabrication are investigated and presented. Both options are developed and implemented on standard production line PECVD equipment in the framework of a CMUT technology transfer from R and D to production. A tradeoff between deposition rate, residual stress and electrical properties is showed. The first option consists in a double layer of silicon nitride with a relatively high deposition rate of ∼100 nm min −1 and low compressive residual stress, which is suitable for the fabrication of the thick nitride layer used as a mechanical support of the CMUTs. The second option involves the use of a mixed frequency low-stress silicon nitride with outstanding electrical insulation capability, providing improved mechanical and electrical integrity of the CMUT active layers. The behavior of the nitride is analyzed as a function of deposition parameters and subsequent annealing. The nitride layer characterization is reported in terms of interfaces density influence on residual stress, refractive index, deposition rate, and thickness variation both as deposited and after thermal treatment. A sweet spot for stress stability is identified at an interfaces density of 0.1 nm −1 , yielding 87 MPa residual stress after annealing. A complete CMUT device fabrication is reported using the optimized nitrides. The CMUT performance is tested, demonstrating full functionality in ultrasound imaging applications and an overall performance improvement with respect to previous devices fabricated with non-optimized silicon nitride. (paper)

  14. PECVD low stress silicon nitride analysis and optimization for the fabrication of CMUT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagolini, Alvise; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Picciotto, Antonino; Boscardin, Maurizio; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Lamberti, Nicola; Caliano, Giosuè

    2015-01-01

    Two technological options to achieve a high deposition rate, low stress plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride to be used in capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUT) fabrication are investigated and presented. Both options are developed and implemented on standard production line PECVD equipment in the framework of a CMUT technology transfer from R & D to production. A tradeoff between deposition rate, residual stress and electrical properties is showed. The first option consists in a double layer of silicon nitride with a relatively high deposition rate of ~100 nm min-1 and low compressive residual stress, which is suitable for the fabrication of the thick nitride layer used as a mechanical support of the CMUTs. The second option involves the use of a mixed frequency low-stress silicon nitride with outstanding electrical insulation capability, providing improved mechanical and electrical integrity of the CMUT active layers. The behavior of the nitride is analyzed as a function of deposition parameters and subsequent annealing. The nitride layer characterization is reported in terms of interfaces density influence on residual stress, refractive index, deposition rate, and thickness variation both as deposited and after thermal treatment. A sweet spot for stress stability is identified at an interfaces density of 0.1 nm-1, yielding 87 MPa residual stress after annealing. A complete CMUT device fabrication is reported using the optimized nitrides. The CMUT performance is tested, demonstrating full functionality in ultrasound imaging applications and an overall performance improvement with respect to previous devices fabricated with non-optimized silicon nitride.

  15. The Effect of Polymer Char on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Rickmond C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of polymer char on nitridation kinetics of attrition milled silicon powder have been investigated from 1200 to 1350 C. Results indicate that at and above 1250 C, the silicon compacts containing 3.5 wt percent polymer char were fully converted to Si3N4 after 24 hr exposure in nitrogen. In contrast, the silicon compacts without polymer char could not be fully converted to Si3N4 at 1350 C under similar exposure conditions. At 1250 and 1350 C, the silicon compacts with polymer char showed faster nitridation kinetics than those without the polymer char. As the polymer char content is increased, the amount of SiC in the nitrided material is also increased. By adding small amounts (approx. 2.5 wt percent) of NiO, the silicon compacts containing polymer char can be completely nitrided at 1200 C. The probable mechanism for the accelerated nitridation of silicon containing polymer char is discussed.

  16. Graphene metallization of high-stress silicon nitride resonators for electrical integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunwoo; Adiga, Vivekananda P; Barton, Robert A; van der Zande, Arend M; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Ilic, B Rob; Gondarenko, Alexander; Parpia, Jeevak M; Craighead, Harold G; Hone, James

    2013-09-11

    High stress stoichiometric silicon nitride resonators, whose quality factors exceed one million, have shown promise for applications in sensing, signal processing, and optomechanics. Yet, electrical integration of the insulating silicon nitride resonators has been challenging, as depositing even a thin layer of metal degrades the quality factor significantly. In this work, we show that graphene used as a conductive coating for Si3N4 membranes reduces the quality factor by less than 30% on average, which is minimal when compared to the effect of conventional metallization layers such as chromium or aluminum. The electrical integration of Si3N4-Graphene (SiNG) heterostructure resonators is demonstrated with electrical readout and electrostatic tuning of the frequency by up to 0.3% per volt. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of hybrid graphene/nitride mechanical resonators in which the electrical properties of graphene are combined with the superior mechanical performance of silicon nitride.

  17. Argon plasma treatment of silicon nitride (SiN) for improved antireflection coating on c-Si solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Hemanta; Mitra, Suchismita; Saha, Hiranmay; Datta, Swapan Kumar; Banerjee, Chandan, E-mail: chandanbanerjee74@gmail.com

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Antireflection properties of argon plasma treated silicon nitride layer and its effect on crystalline silicon solar cell. • The reduction in reflection due to the formation of a silicon oxynitride/silicon nitride double layer. • EQE reveals a relative increase of 2.72% in J{sub sc} and 4.46% in conversion efficiency. - Abstract: Antireflection properties of argon plasma treated silicon nitride layer and its effect on crystalline silicon solar cell is presented here. Hydrogenated silicon nitride (a-SiN:H) layer has been deposited on a silicon substrate by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) using a mixture of silane (SiH{sub 4}), ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gases followed by a argon plasma treatment. Optical analysis reveals a significant reduction in reflectance after argon plasma treatment of silicon nitride layer. While FESEM shows nanostructures on the surface of the silicon nitride film, FTIR reveals a change in Si−N, Si−O and N−H bonds. On the other hand, ellipsometry shows the variation of refractive index and formation of double layer. Finally, a c-Si solar cell has been fabricated with the said anti-reflection coating. External quantum efficiency reveals a relative increase of 2.72% in the short circuit current density and 4.46% in conversion efficiency over a baseline efficiency of 16.58%.

  18. Mid-infrared optical properties of thin films of aluminum oxide, titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide, aluminum nitride, and silicon nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kischkat, Jan; Peters, Sven; Gruska, Bernd; Semtsiv, Mykhaylo; Chashnikova, Mikaela; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Fedosenko, Oliana; Machulik, Stephan; Aleksandrova, Anna; Monastyrskyi, Gregorii; Flores, Yuri; Masselink, W Ted

    2012-10-01

    The complex refractive index components, n and k, have been studied for thin films of several common dielectric materials with a low to medium refractive index as functions of wavelength and stoichiometry for mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths within the range 1.54-14.29 μm (700-6500 cm(-1)). The materials silicon oxide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and titanium oxide are prepared using room temperature reactive sputter deposition and are characterized using MIR variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. The investigation shows how sensitive the refractive index functions are to the O2 and N2 flow rates, and for which growth conditions the materials deposit homogeneously. It also allows conclusions to be drawn on the degree of amorphousness and roughness. To facilitate comparison of the materials deposited in this work with others, the index of refraction was also determined and provided for the near-IR and visible ranges of the spectrum. The results presented here should serve as a useful information base for designing optical coatings for the MIR part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The results are parameterized to allow them to be easily used for coating design.

  19. Deposition of thin layers of boron nitrides and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon assisted by high current direct current arc plasma; Deposition assistee par un plasma a arc a haut courant continu de couches minces de Nitrure de Bore et de Silicium microcristallin hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, D. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1999-09-01

    In the frame of this thesis, a high current direct current arc (HCDCA) used for the industrial deposition of diamond, has been adapted to study the deposition of two types of coatings: a) boron nitride, whose cubic phase is similar to diamond, for tribological applications, b) hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon, for applications in the semiconductor fields (flat panel displays, solar cells,...). For the deposition of these coatings, the substrates were placed in the diffusion region of the arc. The substrate heating is mainly due to atomic species recombining on its surface. The deposition temperature, varying from 300 to 900 {sup o}C according to the films deposited, is determined by the substrate position, the arc power and the injected gas fluxes, without the use of any external heating or cooling system. Measurements performed on the arc plasma show that the electronic temperature is around 2 eV (23'000 K) while the gas temperature is lower than 5500 K. Typical electronic densities are in the range of 10{sup 12}-10{sup 1'}3 cm{sup -3}. For the deposition of boron nitride films, different boron precursors were used and a wide parameter range was investigated. The extreme difficulty of synthesising cubic boron nitride films by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) did not allow to stabilize the cubic phase of boron nitride in HCDCA. Coatings resulted in hexagonal or amorphous boron nitride with a chemical composition close to stoichiometric. The presence of hydrogen leads to the deposition of rough and porous films. Negative biasing of the samples, for positive ion bombardment, is commonly used to stabilize the cubic phase. In HCDCA and in our biasing range, only a densification of the films could be observed. A boron nitride deposition plasma study by infrared absorption spectroscopy in a capacitive radio frequency reactor has demonstrated the usefulness of this diagnostic for the understanding of the various chemical reactions which occur in this kind

  20. Direct bonding of ALD Al2O3 to silicon nitride thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laganà, Simone; Mikkelsen, E. K.; Marie, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    microscopy (TEM) by improving low temperature annealing bonding strength when using atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide. We have investigated and characterized bonding of Al2O3-SixNy (low stress silicon rich nitride) and Al2O3-Si3N4 (stoichiometric nitride) thin films annealed from room temperature up......, the current bonding method can be also used for further MEMS applications. ...

  1. Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Carbide to Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride to Silicon Nitride for Advanced Heat Engine Applications Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Techniques were developed to produce reliable silicon nitride to silicon nitride (NCX-5101) curved joins which were used to manufacture spin test specimens as a proof of concept to simulate parts such as a simple rotor. Specimens were machined from the curved joins to measure the following properties of the join interlayer: tensile strength, shear strength, 22 C flexure strength and 1370 C flexure strength. In parallel, extensive silicon nitride tensile creep evaluation of planar butt joins provided a sufficient data base to develop models with accurate predictive capability for different geometries. Analytical models applied satisfactorily to the silicon nitride joins were Norton's Law for creep strain, a modified Norton's Law internal variable model and the Monkman-Grant relationship for failure modeling. The Theta Projection method was less successful. Attempts were also made to develop planar butt joins of siliconized silicon carbide (NT230).

  2. Enhanced Electroluminescence from Silicon Quantum Dots Embedded in Silicon Nitride Thin Films Coupled with Gold Nanoparticles in Light Emitting Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Rosas, Ana Luz; Rodríguez-Gómez, Arturo; Alonso-Huitrón, Juan Carlos

    2018-03-22

    Nowadays, the use of plasmonic metal layers to improve the photonic emission characteristics of several semiconductor quantum dots is a booming tool. In this work, we report the use of silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) embedded in a silicon nitride thin film coupled with an ultra-thin gold film (AuNPs) to fabricate light emitting devices. We used the remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (RPECVD) in order to grow two types of silicon nitride thin films. One with an almost stoichiometric composition, acting as non-radiative spacer; the other one, with a silicon excess in its chemical composition, which causes the formation of silicon quantum dots imbibed in the silicon nitride thin film. The ultra-thin gold film was deposited by the direct current (DC)-sputtering technique, and an aluminum doped zinc oxide thin film (AZO) which was deposited by means of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis, plays the role of the ohmic metal-like electrode. We found that there is a maximum electroluminescence (EL) enhancement when the appropriate AuNPs-spacer-SiQDs configuration is used. This EL is achieved at a moderate turn-on voltage of 11 V, and the EL enhancement is around four times bigger than the photoluminescence (PL) enhancement of the same AuNPs-spacer-SiQDs configuration. From our experimental results, we surmise that EL enhancement may indeed be due to a plasmonic coupling. This kind of silicon-based LEDs has the potential for technology transfer.

  3. Enhanced Electroluminescence from Silicon Quantum Dots Embedded in Silicon Nitride Thin Films Coupled with Gold Nanoparticles in Light Emitting Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luz Muñoz-Rosas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the use of plasmonic metal layers to improve the photonic emission characteristics of several semiconductor quantum dots is a booming tool. In this work, we report the use of silicon quantum dots (SiQDs embedded in a silicon nitride thin film coupled with an ultra-thin gold film (AuNPs to fabricate light emitting devices. We used the remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (RPECVD in order to grow two types of silicon nitride thin films. One with an almost stoichiometric composition, acting as non-radiative spacer; the other one, with a silicon excess in its chemical composition, which causes the formation of silicon quantum dots imbibed in the silicon nitride thin film. The ultra-thin gold film was deposited by the direct current (DC-sputtering technique, and an aluminum doped zinc oxide thin film (AZO which was deposited by means of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis, plays the role of the ohmic metal-like electrode. We found that there is a maximum electroluminescence (EL enhancement when the appropriate AuNPs-spacer-SiQDs configuration is used. This EL is achieved at a moderate turn-on voltage of 11 V, and the EL enhancement is around four times bigger than the photoluminescence (PL enhancement of the same AuNPs-spacer-SiQDs configuration. From our experimental results, we surmise that EL enhancement may indeed be due to a plasmonic coupling. This kind of silicon-based LEDs has the potential for technology transfer.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of refractory ternary nitrides for advanced diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custer, Jonathan S.; Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth; Smith, Paul Martin

    1998-09-22

    Refractory ternary nitride films for diffusion barriers in microelectronics have been grown using chemical vapor deposition. Thin films of titanium-silicon-nitride, tungsten-boron-nitride, and tungsten-silicon-nitride of various compositions have been deposited on 150 mm Si wafers. The microstructure of the films are either fully amorphous for the tungsten based films, or nauocrystalline TiN in an amorphous matrix for titanium-silicon-nitride. All films exhibit step coverages suitable for use in future microelectronics generations. Selected films have been tested as diffusion barriers between copper and silicon, and generally perform extremely weH. These fiIms are promising candidates for advanced diffusion barriers for microelectronics applications. The manufacturing of silicon wafers into integrated circuits uses many different process and materials. The manufacturing process is usually divided into two parts: the front end of line (FEOL) and the back end of line (BEOL). In the FEOL the individual transistors that are the heart of an integrated circuit are made on the silicon wafer. The responsibility of the BEOL is to wire all the transistors together to make a complete circuit. The transistors are fabricated in the silicon itself. The wiring is made out of metal, currently aluminum and tungsten, insulated by silicon dioxide, see Figure 1. Unfortunately, silicon will diffuse into aluminum, causing aluminum spiking of junctions, killing transistors. Similarly, during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tungsten from ~fj, the reactivity of the fluorine can cause "worn-holes" in the silicon, also destroying transistors. The solution to these problems is a so-called diffusion barrier, which will allow current to pass from the transistors to the wiring, but will prevent reactions between silicon and the metal.

  5. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed

  6. Absorption edge and ion bombardment of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The optical absorption edge for chemical-vapor-deposited silicon nitride films on sapphire substrates has been measured for different deposition conditions, and as a function of ion bombardment and subsequent annealing. An exponential form for the absorption edge, consistent with a disorder-limited edge, is observed for all films. While the slope of the absorption edge is independent of the measurement temperature, the energy for the edge decreases with increasing temperature by (2--4) x 10 -4 eV/degreeC. The energy and slope of the absorption edge are lower for films deposited at 760 degreeC than for films deposited at 1000 degreeC, and displacement damage introduced by ion bombardment causes a decrease in both the slope and energy for the edge. Ion-bombardment-induced changes saturate when the energy deposition into damage processes is approx.10 eV/atom. The effects of a lower deposition temperature and of ion bombardment upon the absorption edge are attributed to a degradation of short-range order. Annealing of the bombardment-induced effects occurs over a broad temperature range, and the prebombardment absorption edge is essentially recovered by annealing at the deposition temperature

  7. Bio-functionalization of silicon nitride-based piezo-resistive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The polysilicon piezo-resistor was encapsulated using a top silicon nitride layer; further a chrome-gold layer was deposited to make electrical contact with the polysilicon layer. Process sequence was designed to ensure that the metal layers in the pad region made an electrical contact with the piezo-resistive layer. The top.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of nano silicon and titanium nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... nano titanium nitride was synthesized by using liquid titanium tetrachloride as the precursor. The synthesized nano silicon and titanium nitride powders were characterized by XRD, XPS, TEM, SEM and BET. The characterization techniques indicated that the synthesized powders were indeed crystalline nanomaterials.

  9. Deposition of silicon films in presence of nitrogen plasma— A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    physical and process related parameters are changed. The grown films are characterized using X-ray ... Silicon nitride is one of the promising materials for numerous applications in the semiconductor industry ... Compared to reactive sputtering, this method offers advantages of low power levels, higher deposition rates and ...

  10. Infrared Dielectric Properties of Low-stress Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Beall, James A.; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; McAndrew, Brendan; Niemack, Michael D.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nitride thin films play an important role in the realization of sensors, filters, and high-performance circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-IR regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectra for a commonly employed low-stress silicon nitride formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric parameters with an accuracy of approximately 4% are presented.

  11. Stacking faults and phase transformations in silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhet, X.; Demenet, J.-L.; Rabier, J.

    1998-11-01

    From observations of extended dislocation nodes in β silicon nitride, possible stacking fault structures in the basal plane of this compound have been investigated. It has been found that stacking fault structure is locally analogous to α silicon nitride. A phase transformation α to β or β to α can also be achieved by cooperative shear of partial dislocations with 1/3<~ngle1bar{1}00rangle Burgers vectors.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of aluminum nitride nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusova, N. R.; Kargin, N. I.; Ryndya, S. M.; Gusev, A. S.; Antonenko, S. V.; Timofeev, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    The possibility of AlN nanowires deposition on single-crystal silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum is shown in this work. Experimental samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and infrared Fourier spectroscopy. It is shown that the possible mechanism for the AlN nanowires formation is the "vapor-liquid-crystal" mechanism.

  13. Plasma-enhanced growth, composition, and refractive index of silicon oxy-nitride films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Kent Erik

    1995-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry and refractive index measurements have been carried out on silicon oxy-nitride produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Nitrous oxide and ammonia were added to a constant flow of 2% silane in nitrogen, to produce oxy-nitride films with atomic...... nitrogen concentrations between 2 and 10 at. %. A simple atomic valence model is found to describe both the measured atomic concentrations and published material compositions for silicon oxy-nitride produced by PECVD. A relation between the Si–N bond concentration and the refractive index is found......-product. A model, that combine the chemical net reaction and the stoichiometric rules, is found to agree with measured deposition rates for given material compositions. Effects of annealing in a nitrogen atmosphere has been investigated for the 400 °C– 1100 °C temperature range. It is observed that PECVD oxy...

  14. Manipulation of K center charge states in silicon nitride films to achieve excellent surface passivation for silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vivek; Tracy, Clarence; Schroder, Dieter; Herasimenka, Stanislau; Dauksher, William; Bowden, Stuart

    2014-02-01

    High quality surface passivation (Seff textured p- and n-type solar grade Czochralski silicon substrates by externally injecting and storing positive or negative charges (>±8 × 1012 cm-2) into a dual layer stack of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) Silicon Nitride (SiNx)/PECVD Silicon Oxide (SiO2) films using a corona charging tool. We demonstrate long term stability and uniform charge distribution in the SiNx film by manipulating the charge on K center defects while negating the requirement of a high temperature thermal oxide step.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of nano silicon and titanium nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Silicon nanoparticles attract a great deal of attention as they are used in logic gates, memory devices, light- emitting devices, sensors, bio-imaging, energy storage and photonic applications.1 Titanium nitride (TiN) is extensively used as an anti-wear coating,2 bio replace- ments,3 contact/barrier layer to silicon and as a gate.

  16. Effect of thermal treatment on the growth, structure and luminescence of nitride-passivated silicon nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normand Elise

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silicon nanoclusters (Si-ncs embedded in silicon nitride films have been studied to determine the effects that deposition and processing parameters have on their growth, luminescent properties, and electronic structure. Luminescence was observed from Si-ncs formed in silicon-rich silicon nitride films with a broad range of compositions and grown using three different types of chemical vapour deposition systems. Photoluminescence (PL experiments revealed broad, tunable emissions with peaks ranging from the near-infrared across the full visible spectrum. The emission energy was highly dependent on the film composition and changed only slightly with annealing temperature and time, which primarily affected the emission intensity. The PL spectra from films annealed for duration of times ranging from 2 s to 2 h at 600 and 800°C indicated a fast initial formation and growth of nanoclusters in the first few seconds of annealing followed by a slow, but steady growth as annealing time was further increased. X-ray absorption near edge structure at the Si K- and L3,2-edges exhibited composition-dependent phase separation and structural re-ordering of the Si-ncs and silicon nitride host matrix under different post-deposition annealing conditions and generally supported the trends observed in the PL spectra.

  17. Memory characteristics of silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals as a charge trapping layer of nonvolatile memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sangmoo; Yang, Hyundeok; Chang, Man; Baek, Sungkweon; Hwang, Hyunsang; Jeon, Sanghun; Kim, Juhyung; Kim, Chungwoo

    2005-01-01

    Silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals formed by low-energy silicon plasma immersion ion implantation has been investigated as a charge trapping layer of a polycrystalline silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon-type nonvolatile memory device. Compared with the control sample without silicon nanocrystals, silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals provides excellent memory characteristics, such as larger width of capacitance-voltage hysteresis, higher program/erase speed, and lower charge loss rate at elevated temperature. These improved memory characteristics are derived by incorporation of silicon nanocrystals into the charge trapping layer as additional accessible charge traps with a deeper effective trap energy level

  18. Optimization of time–temperature schedule for nitridation of silicon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A time–temperature schedule for formation of silicon–nitride by direct nitridation of silicon com- pact was optimized by kinetic study of the reaction, 3Si + 2N2 = Si3N4 at four different temperatures (1250°C,. 1300°C, 1350°C and 1400°C). From kinetic study, three different temperature schedules were selected each ...

  19. Origin of interfacial charging in irradiated silicon nitride capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Many experiments show that when metal-silicon nitride-silicon dioxide-silicon (MNOS) devices are irradiated in short circuit, a large interfacial charge builds up near the nitride-SiO 2 -Si interface. This effect cannot be explained by simple models of radiation-induced conductivity of the nitride, but it is reported here that inclusion of carrier diffusion and recombination in the photoconductivity equations can predict the observed behavior. Numerical solutions on a computer are required, however, when these complications are added. The simulations account for the magnitude and radiation dose dependence of the results, as well as the occurrence of a steady state during the irradiation. The location of the excess trapped charge near the interface is also predicted, along with the large number of new traps which must be introduced to influence the steady-state charge distribution

  20. Reactive radio frequency sputtering deposition and characterization of zinc nitride and oxynitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Nanke; Georgiev, Daniel G.; Wen, Ting; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc nitride films were deposited on glass or silicon substrates by reactive magnetron radio frequency sputtering of zinc in either N 2 –Ar or N 2 –Ar–O 2 ambient. The effects of varying the nitrogen contents and the substrate temperature were investigated. X-ray diffraction data showed that the as-deposited films contain the zinc nitride cubic crystalline phase with a preferred orientation, and Raman scattering measurements revealed Zn-N related modes. According to energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, the as-deposited films were nitrogen-rich and contained only a small fraction of oxygen. Hall-effect measurements showed that p-type zinc nitride with carrier concentration of ∼ 10 19 cm −3 , mobility of ∼ 10 1 cm 2 /Vs, resistivity of ∼ 10 −2 Ω ∗ cm, was obtained. The photon energy dependence of optical transmittance suggested that the material has an indirect bandgap.

  1. Ultra-thin alumina and silicon nitride MEMS fabricated membranes for the electron multiplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodanović, V.; Chan, H. W.; Graaf, H. V. D.; Sarro, P. M.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication of large arrays of ultrathin freestanding membranes (tynodes) for application in a timed photon counter (TiPC), a novel photomultiplier for single electron detection. Low pressure chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride (Si x N y ) and atomic layer deposited alumina (Al2O3) with thicknesses down to only 5 nm are employed for the membrane fabrication. Detailed characterization of structural, mechanical and chemical properties of the utilized films is carried out for different process conditions and thicknesses. Furthermore, the performance of the tynodes is investigated in terms of secondary electron emission, a fundamental attribute that determines their applicability in TiPC. Studied features and presented fabrication methods may be of interest for other MEMS application of alumina and silicon nitride as well, in particular where strong ultra-thin membranes are required.

  2. Microencapsulation of silicon nitride particles with yttria and yttria-alumina precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, A.K.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1990-01-01

    Procedures are described to deposit uniform layers of yttria and yttria-alumina precursors on fine powders and whiskers of silicon nitride. The coatings were produced by aging at elevated temperatures aqueous systems containing the silicon nitride core particles, yttrium and aluminum nitrates, and urea. Optimum concentrations of the core particles, in relation to the reactants, were established to promote surface deposition of the oxide precursors. Polymeric dispersants were used effectively to prevent agglomeration of the solids during the microencapsulation process. The morphology of the powders was characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanisms for the formation of the coated layers are discussed. A description is provided that allows qualitative assessment of the experimental factors that determine microencapsulation by a slurry method

  3. Remote PECVD silicon nitride films with improved electrical properties for GaAs P-HEMT passivation

    CERN Document Server

    Sohn, M K; Kim, K H; Yang, S G; Seo, K S

    1998-01-01

    In order to obtain thin silicon nitride films with excellent electrical and mechanical properties, we employed RPECVD (Remote Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition) process which produces less plasma-induced damage than the conventional PECVD. Through the optical and electrical measurements of the deposited films, we optimized the various RPECVD process parameters. The optimized silicon nitride films showed excellent characteristics such as small etch rate (approx 33 A/min by 7:1 BHF), high breakdown field (>9 MV/cm), and low compressive stress (approx 3.3x10 sup 9 dyne/cm sup 2). We successfully applied thin RPECVD silicon nitride films to the surface passivation of GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistors (P-HEMTs) with negligible degradations in DC and RF characteristics.

  4. Dry Lubrication of High Temperature Silicon Nitride Rolling Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    Ray Radiography A 150 mm x 15 mm x 3 mm slab was sliced from each HPSN billet received from Norton for this program. These sections were x-ray...that the micro- fissures did penetrate the silicon nitride, i.e., the microfis- sures were not confined to the thickness of the solid lubricant

  5. Damage initiation and evolution in silicon nitride under\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raga, R.; Khader, I.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Kailer, A.

    360-361, AUG (2016), s. 147-159 ISSN 0043-1648 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 263476 - ROLICER Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Silicon nitride * Rollingcontactfatigue * Subsurface damage Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.531, year: 2016

  6. TXRF analysis of trace metals in thin silicon nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vereecke, G.; Arnauts, S.; Verstraeten, K.; Schaekers, M.; Heyrts, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    As critical dimensions of integrated circuits continue to decrease, high dielectric constant materials such as silicon nitride are being considered to replace silicon dioxide in capacitors and transistors. The achievement of low levels of metal contamination in these layers is critical for high performance and reliability. Existing methods of quantitative analysis of trace metals in silicon nitride require high amounts of sample (from about 0.1 to 1 g, compared to a mass of 0.2 mg for a 2 nm thick film on a 8'' silicon wafer), and involve digestion steps not applicable to films on wafers or non-standard techniques such as neutron activation analysis. A novel approach has recently been developed to analyze trace metals in thin films with analytical techniques currently used in the semiconductor industry. Sample preparation consists of three steps: (1) decomposition of the silicon nitride matrix by moist HF condensed at the wafer surface to form ammonium fluosilicate. (2) vaporization of the fluosilicate by a short heat treatment at 300 o C. (3) collection of contaminants by scanning the wafer surface with a solution droplet (VPD-DSC procedure). The determination of trace metals is performed by drying the droplet on the wafer and by analyzing the residue by TXRF, as it offers the advantages of multi-elemental analysis with no dilution of the sample. The lower limits of detection for metals in 2 nm thick films on 8'' silicon wafers range from about 10 to 200 ng/g. The present study will focus on the matrix effects and the possible loss of analyte associated with the evaporation of the fluosilicate salt, in relation with the accuracy and the reproducibility of the method. The benefits of using an internal standard will be assessed. Results will be presented from both model samples (ammonium fluoride contaminated with metallic salts) and real samples (silicon nitride films from a production tool). (author)

  7. Modification of silicon nitride and silicon carbide surfaces for food and biosensor applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosso, M.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon-rich silicon nitride (SixN4, x > 3) is a robust insulating material widely used for the coating of microdevices: its high chemical and mechanical inertness make it a material of choice for the reinforcement of fragile microstructures (e.g. suspended microcantilevers, micro-fabricated

  8. Thin film silicon on silicon nitride for radiation hardened dielectrically isolated MISFET's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neamen, D.; Shedd, W.; Buchanan, B.

    1975-01-01

    The permanent ionizing radiation effects resulting from charge trapping in a silicon nitride isolation dielectric have been determined for a total ionizing dose up to 10 7 rads (Si). Junction FET's, whose active channel region is directly adjacent to the silicon-silicon nitride interface, were used to measure the effects of the radiation induced charge trapping in the Si 3 N 4 isolation dielectric. The JFET saturation current and channel conductance versus junction gate voltage and substrate voltage were characterized as a function of the total ionizing radiation dose. The experimental results on the Si 3 N 4 are compared to results on similar devices with SiO 2 dielectric isolation. The ramifications of using the silicon nitride for fabricating radiation hardened dielectrically isolated MIS devices are discussed

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous tungsten nitride for applications in ultra-large scale interconnect technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Jean E.

    Increasing demands on computer chip technology require exploration of novel materials and deposition techniques. The driving need to reduce device dimensions without increasing device delay time has forced a move towards copper interconnects. Copper interconnects require an encapsulating barrier layer to prevent diffusion into the dielectric layer, as well as a passivation layer to protect against oxidation. One potential material for the barrier layer is tungsten nitride (WNx). Tungsten nitride is expected to perform well as a barrier because of its refractory nature and excellent thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties. In addition, it can be deposited in amorphous form. Amorphous materials have no grain boundaries, thereby making grain boundary diffusion, a fast path diffusion mechanism, impossible. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process was developed for the deposition of tungsten nitride. CVD was selected because it has the potential to deposit highly conformal film. High conformality is critical in a barrier layer in order to ensure viable coverage at the bottom and sides of device structures without sacrificing critical space that would be better used by the copper metal. In this manner, the total resistivity of the interconnect is minimized. The CVD WNx process was systematically optimized for film conformality, resistivity and growth rate. This was achieved by thoroughly examining film nucleation and growth characteristics, and analyzing resulting film properties. Adhesion of copper to the CVD films was qualified using stud pull tests, while X-ray diffraction was implemented to determine crystallization temperature of the amorphous phase. Additionally, diffusion barrier properties of the CVD tungsten nitride were assessed using sputter deposited copper, and compared to those of sputter deposited tungsten nitride. Thermally activated barrier failure was studied as a function of barrier thickness using Rutherford backscattering

  10. Development of high-thermal-conductivity silicon nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride (Si3N4 with high thermal conductivity has emerged as one of the most promising substrate materials for the next-generation power devices. This paper gives an overview on recent developments in preparing high-thermal-conductivity Si3N4 by a sintering of reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN method. Due to the reduction of lattice oxygen content, the SRBSN ceramics could attain substantially higher thermal conductivities than the Si3N4 ceramics prepared by the conventional gas-pressure sintering of silicon nitride (SSN method. Thermal conductivity could further be improved through increasing the β/α phase ratio during nitridation and enhancing grain growth during post-sintering. Studies on fracture resistance behaviors of the SRBSN ceramics revealed that they possessed high fracture toughness and exhibited obvious R-curve behaviors. Using the SRBSN method, a Si3N4 with a record-high thermal conductivity of 177 Wm−1K−1 and a fracture toughness of 11.2 MPa m1/2 was developed. Studies on the influences of two typical metallic impurity elements, Fe and Al, on thermal conductivities of the SRBSN ceramics revealed that the tolerable content limits for the two impurities were different. While 1 wt% of impurity Fe hardly degraded thermal conductivity, only 0.01 wt% of Al caused large decrease in thermal conductivity.

  11. Tantalum Nitride Electron-Selective Contact for Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xinbo

    2018-04-19

    Minimizing carrier recombination at contact regions by using carrier‐selective contact materials, instead of heavily doping the silicon, has attracted considerable attention for high‐efficiency, low‐cost crystalline silicon (c‐Si) solar cells. A novel electron‐selective, passivating contact for c‐Si solar cells is presented. Tantalum nitride (TaN x ) thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition are demonstrated to provide excellent electron‐transporting and hole‐blocking properties to the silicon surface, due to their small conduction band offset and large valence band offset. Thin TaNx interlayers provide moderate passivation of the silicon surfaces while simultaneously allowing a low contact resistivity to n‐type silicon. A power conversion efficiency (PCE) of over 20% is demonstrated with c‐Si solar cells featuring a simple full‐area electron‐selective TaNx contact, which significantly improves the fill factor and the open circuit voltage (Voc) and hence provides the higher PCE. The work opens up the possibility of using metal nitrides, instead of metal oxides, as carrier‐selective contacts or electron transport layers for photovoltaic devices.

  12. Microstructure and properties of ultrathin amorphous silicon nitride protective coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, Bing K.; White, Richard L.; Waltman, Robert J.; Dai Qing; Miller, Dolores C.; Kellock, Andrew J.; Marchon, Bruno; Kasai, Paul H.; Toney, Michael F.; York, Brian R.; Deng Hong; Xiao Qifan; Raman, Vedantham

    2003-01-01

    The effect of N content on the structure and properties of rf reactively sputtered amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN x ) has been studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, x-ray reflectivity, ellipsometry, and nano-indentation. The N content in the film increased with the N 2 concentration in the sputtering gas until the Si 3 N 4 stoichiometry was reached. The hardness of a-SiN x increased with density, which in turn increased with the N content. The maximum hardness of 25 GPa and density of 3.2 g/cm 3 were attained at the stoichiometric Si 3 N 4 composition. With the application of a protective overcoat for magnetic disks in mind, thin a-SiN x films were deposited on CoPtCr media to examine their coverage, pinhole density, and wear resistance. According to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the minimum thickness of a-SiN x required to protect the CoPtCr alloy from oxidation was 10 A, which was 10 A thinner than that of the reference amorphous nitrogenated carbon (a-CN x ). A statistic model showed this lower thickness required for a-SiN x can be attributed to its high density, which corresponds to 93% bulk density of Si 3 N 4 . Compared with 45 A a-CN x coated disks, 15 A a-SiN x coated disks had lower pinhole defect density and superior wear resistance

  13. Hardness and thermal stability of cubic silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Kragh, Flemming; Frost, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    The hardness and thermal stability of cubic spinel silicon nitride (c-Si3N4), synthesized under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions, have been studied by microindentation measurements, and x-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively The phase at ambient...... temperature has an average hardness of 35.31 GPa, slightly larger than SiO2 stishovite, which is often referred to as the third hardest material after diamond and cubic boron nitride. The cubic phase is stable up to 1673 K in air. At 1873 K, alpha -and beta -Si3N4 phases are observed, indicating a phase...

  14. Metal-ceramic interfaces: joining silicon nitride-stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, R.; De Pablos, A.; Miranzo, P.; Osendi, M. I.

    2004-11-01

    Joining of hot pressed silicon nitride using three types of stainless steel (AISI 304, 316 and 321) as interlayer was done by diffusion bonding at 1100 °C for 120 min. An extensive reaction zone of about 7 μm was formed in the contact region, where Cr2N, FexSiy and α-Fe were observed, outside that region the austenitic phase with precipitates of chromium nitride was observed. In the Mo-containing stainless steel (AISI 316) formation of Mo3Si was also detected. Moderate strengths were measured by shear testing for these joints.

  15. Silicon Nitride Deposition for Flexible Organic Electronic Devices by VHF (162 MHz)-PECVD Using a Multi-Tile Push-Pull Plasma Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Seok; Kim, Ki Hyun; Ji, You Jin; Park, Jin Woo; Shin, Jae Hee; Ellingboe, Albert Rogers; Yeom, Geun Young

    2017-10-19

    Depositing a barrier film for moisture protection without damage at a low temperature is one of the most important steps for organic-based electronic devices. In this study, the authors investigated depositing thin, high-quality SiN x film on organic-based electronic devices, specifically, very high-frequency (162 MHz) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF-PECVD) using a multi-tile push-pull plasma source with a gas mixture of NH 3 /SiH 4 at a low temperature of 80 °C. The thin deposited SiN x film exhibited excellent properties in the stoichiometry, chemical bonding, stress, and step coverage. Thin film quality and plasma damage were investigated by the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) and by electrical characteristics of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices deposited with SiN x , respectively. The thin deposited SiN x film exhibited a low WVTR of 4.39 × 10 -4  g (m 2 · day) -1 for a single thin (430 nm thick) film SiN x and the electrical characteristics of OLED devices before and after the thin SiN x film deposition on the devices did not change, which indicated no electrical damage during the deposition of SiN x on the OLED device.

  16. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications Phase 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, G.J.; Vartabedian, A.M.; Wade, J.A.; White, C.S. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with 4wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  17. Modification of silicon nitride and silicon carbide surfaces for food and biosensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rosso, M.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon-rich silicon nitride (SixN4, x > 3) is a robust insulating material widely used for the coating of microdevices: its high chemical and mechanical inertness make it a material of choice for the reinforcement of fragile microstructures (e.g. suspended microcantilevers, micro-fabricated membranes-“microsieves”) or for the coating of the exposed surfaces of sensors (field-effect transistors, waveguide optical detectors). To a more limited extent, silicon carbide (SiC) can find similar ...

  18. Antifuse with a single silicon-rich silicon nitride insulating layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermehl, Scott D.; Apodaca, Roger T.

    2013-01-22

    An antifuse is disclosed which has an electrically-insulating region sandwiched between two electrodes. The electrically-insulating region has a single layer of a non-hydrogenated silicon-rich (i.e. non-stoichiometric) silicon nitride SiN.sub.X with a nitrogen content X which is generally in the range of 0silicon. Arrays of antifuses can also be formed.

  19. Stress in and texture of PVD deposited metal nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machunze, R.

    2010-01-01

    Thin metal nitride films deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) are used amongst many other applications as wear protective coatings in tool industry or as diffusion barriers in integrated circuit technology. Typically these films exhibit a residual in-plane stress when deposited onto rigid

  20. Thermodynamics of silicon nitridation - Effect of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, N. J.; Zeleznik, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Equilibrium compositions for the nitridization of Si were calculated to detect the effectiveness of H2 in removal of the oxide film and in increasing the concentration of SiO and reducing the proportions of O2. Gibbs free energy for the formation of SiN2O was computed above 1685 K, and at lower temperatures. The thermodynamic properties of SiN2O2 were then considered from 1000-3000 K, taking into account the known thermodynamic data for 39 molecular combinations of the Si, Ni, and O. The gases formed were assumed ideal mixtures with pure phase condensed species. The mole fractions were obtained for a system of SiO2 with each Si particle covered with a thin layer of SiO2 before nitridation, and a system in which the nitriding atmosphere had access to the Si. The presence of H2 was determined to enhance the removal of NiO2 in the first system, decrease the partial pressure of O2, increase the partial pressures of SiO, Si, H2O, NH3, and SiH4, while its effects were negligible in the Si system.

  1. Suppression of interfacial voids formation during silane (SiH4)-based silicon oxide bonding with a thin silicon nitride capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Hong; Bao, Shuyu; Wang, Yue; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Seng Tan, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    The material properties and bonding behavior of silane-based silicon oxide layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to determine the chemical composition of the silicon oxide films. The incorporation of hydroxyl (-OH) groups and moisture absorption demonstrates a strong correlation with the storage duration for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. It is observed that moisture absorption is prevalent in the silane-based silicon oxide film due to its porous nature. The incorporation of -OH groups and moisture absorption in the silicon oxide films increase with the storage time (even in clean-room environments) for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. Due to silanol condensation and silicon oxidation reactions that take place at the bonding interface and in the bulk silicon, hydrogen (a byproduct of these reactions) is released and diffused towards the bonding interface. The trapped hydrogen forms voids over time. Additionally, the absorbed moisture could evaporate during the post-bond annealing of the bonded wafer pair. As a consequence, defects, such as voids, form at the bonding interface. To address the problem, a thin silicon nitride capping film was deposited on the silicon oxide layer before bonding to serve as a diffusion barrier to prevent moisture absorption and incorporation of -OH groups from the ambient. This process results in defect-free bonded wafers.

  2. High Temperature Oxidation and Mechanical properties of Silicon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-30

    Continuo on r.vers side it nec..eary and iden0 y by block nmber)I : silicon nitride ~ceramics :! corrosion strength oxidation 20. 4 ACT (Continue on...concentration that optimizes densifi- cation during hot pressing can be altered to improve mechanical properties and oxidation resistance by removing Mg...the intergranular phase to improve the high-temperature- strength, creep resistance, and oxidation resistance. Preoxidation followed by surface

  3. Fabrication of silicon nitride nanoceramics—Powder preparation and sintering: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Nishimura et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fine-grained silicon nitride ceramics were investigated mainly for their high-strain-rate plasticity. The preparation and densification of fine silicon nitride powder were reviewed. Commercial sub-micrometer powder was used as raw powder in the "as-received" state and then used after being ground and undergoing classification operation. Chemical vapor deposition and plasma processes were used for fabricating nanopowder because a further reduction in grain size caused by grinding had limitations. More recently, nanopowder has also been obtained by high-energy milling. This process in principle is the same as conventional planetary milling. For densification, primarily hot pressing was performed, although a similar process known as spark plasma sintering (SPS has also recently been used. One of the advantages of SPS is its high heating rate. The high heating rate is advantageous because it reduces sintering time, achieving densification without grain growth. We prepared silicon nitride nanopowder by high-energy milling and then obtained nanoceramics by densifying the nanopowder by SPS.

  4. Fluidized bed silicon deposition from silane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, George (Inventor); Levin, Harry (Inventor); Hogle, Richard A. (Inventor); Praturi, Ananda (Inventor); Lutwack, Ralph (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A process and apparatus for thermally decomposing silicon containing gas for deposition on fluidized nucleating silicon seed particles is disclosed. Silicon seed particles are produced in a secondary fluidized reactor by thermal decomposition of a silicon containing gas. The thermally produced silicon seed particles are then introduced into a primary fluidized bed reactor to form a fludized bed. Silicon containing gas is introduced into the primary reactor where it is thermally decomposed and deposited on the fluidized silicon seed particles. Silicon seed particles having the desired amount of thermally decomposed silicon product thereon are removed from the primary fluidized reactor as ultra pure silicon product. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  5. Sintering of silicon nitride ceramics with magnesium silicon nitride and yttrium oxide as sintering aids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J; Xu, J Y [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Peng, G H [Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004, Guangxi (China); Zhuang, H R; Li, W L; Xu, S Y [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Mao, Y J, E-mail: guojianjiang@sit.edu.cn [Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2011-10-29

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics had been produced through pressureless sintering and hot-pressing sintering with MgSiN{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} or only MgSiN{sub 2} as sintering aids. The influences of the amount of MgSiN{sub 2} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and sintering methods on the properties of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics were investigated. The results show that the bend strength of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic fabricated through pressureless sintering at 1820 deg. C for 4 h with 5.6 wt.% MgSiN{sub 2}-15.8 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as sintering additive could achieve 839 MPa. However, the bend strength of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic produced by hot-pressing sintering at 1750 deg. C for 1 h under uniaxial pressure of 20 MPa with 4.76 wt.% MgSiN{sub 2} was 1149 MPa. The thermal conductivity of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic 2 3 4 could reach to 129 W{center_dot}m{sup -1{center_dot}}K{sup 1}. The present work demonstrated that MgSiN{sub 2} aids and hot-pressing sintering were effective to improve the thermal conductivity of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic.

  6. High-Index Contrast Silicon Rich Silicon Nitride Optical Waveguides and Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipp, Hugh Taylor

    2004-01-01

    This research focused on the realization of high-density integrated optical devices made with high-index contrast waveguides. The material platform used for to develop these devices was modeled after standard silicon on silicon technology. The high-index waveguide core material was silicon rich...... silicon nitride. This provided a sharp contrast with silica and made low-loss waveguide bending radii less than 25mm possible. An immediate consequence of such small bending radii is the ability to make practical ring resonator based devices with a large free spectral range. Several ring resonator based...

  7. Diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and silicon nitride to austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krugers, J.P.; Ouden, G. den

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the results are reported of a study dealing with diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and silicon nitride (both reaction-bonded and hot-pressed) to austenitic stainless steel (type AISI 316). Experiments were carried out in high vacuum (in the range of 10 -3 -10 -4 Pa) and in an inert gas atmosphere (95 vol% Ar, 5 vol% H 2 ), at temperatures between 1000 and 1300deg C and at various pressures. It was found that under specific conditions the steel could be bonded to both grades of silicon nitride. It was not possible, however, to produce an acceptable bond between steel and silicon carbide. The bonded combinations were tested mechanically by means of shear strength testing. It was found that the higher the process temperature or the longer the process time the stronger the bond. (orig.)

  8. Fabrication of thick silicon nitride blocks embedded in low-resistivity silicon substrates for radio frequency applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, L.J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Flokstra, Jakob; Flokstra, Jan; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2006-01-01

    Thick silicon nitride blocks embedded in silicon wafers were recently proposed as a substrate for RF devices. In this paper we show that deep trenches filled with silicon nitride—having thin slices of monocrystalline silicon in between—already result in a significantly improved RF behavior.

  9. Highly selective etching of silicon nitride to physical-vapor-deposited a-C mask in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CH2F2/H2 plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Kwon, B. S.; Heo, W.; Jung, C. R.; Park, J. S.; Shon, J. W.; Lee, N.-E.

    2010-01-01

    A multilevel resist (MLR) structure can be fabricated based on a very thin amorphous carbon (a-C) layer ( congruent with 80 nm) and Si 3 N 4 hard-mask layer ( congruent with 300 nm). The authors investigated the selective etching of the Si 3 N 4 layer using a physical-vapor-deposited (PVD) a-C mask in a dual-frequency superimposed capacitively coupled plasma etcher by varying the process parameters in the CH 2 F 2 /H 2 /Ar plasmas, viz., the etch gas flow ratio, high-frequency source power (P HF ), and low-frequency source power (P LF ). They found that under certain etch conditions they obtain infinitely high etch selectivities of the Si 3 N 4 layers to the PVD a-C on both the blanket and patterned wafers. The etch gas flow ratio played a critical role in determining the process window for infinitely high Si 3 N 4 /PVD a-C etch selectivity because of the change in the degree of polymerization. The etch results of a patterned ArF photoresisit/bottom antireflective coating/SiO x /PVD a-C/Si 3 N 4 MLR structure supported the idea of using a very thin PVD a-C layer as an etch-mask layer for the Si 3 N 4 hard-mask pattern with a pattern width of congruent with 80 nm and high aspect ratio of congruent with 5.

  10. Virtual Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Based Multifunctional MEMS Pressure Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Kumar PATANKAR

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how to combine absolute and differential pressure sensor on single silicon substrate for measuring the pressure in 0 – 1 MPa range. In this work, the sensor makes use a of silicon nitride square diaphragm supported by a thick silicon rim. Piezoresistors below the diaphragms are defined by the p+ etch stop technique and structured by the anisotropic etching in Wheatstone bridge configuration. In event of pressure, mechanical deformation occurs in the diaphragm and induces the stress in it which can be translated into electrical signal accordingly. This sensor shows the sensitivity of 142 mV/V.KPa. The pressure sensor has been designed, simulated and virtually fabricated using Intellisuite MEMS software tool. Simulation results shows that the good agreement with the analytical solutions.

  11. Back scattering involving embedded silicon nitride (SiN) nanoparticles for c-Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Hemanta; Mitra, Suchismita; Siddiqui, M. S.; Saxena, A. K.; Chaudhuri, Partha; Saha, Hiranmay; Banerjee, Chandan

    2018-04-01

    A novel material, structure and method of synthesis for dielectric light trapping have been presented in this paper. First, the light scattering behaviour of silicon nitride nanoparticles have been theoretically studied in order to find the optimized size for dielectric back scattering by FDTD simulations from Lumerical Inc. The optical results have been used in electrical analysis and thereby, estimate the effect of nanoparticles on efficiency of the solar cells depending on substrate thickness. Experimentally, silicon nitride (SiN) nanoparticles have been formed using hydrogen plasma treatment on SiN layer deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD). The size and area coverage of the nanoparticles were controlled by varying the working pressure, power density and treatment duration. The nanoparticles were integrated with partial rear contact c-Si solar cells as dielectric back reflector structures for the light trapping in thin silicon solar cells. Experimental results revealed the increases of current density by 2.7% in presence of SiN nanoparticles.

  12. Diamond deposition on siliconized stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, F.; Reinoso, M.; Huck, H.; Rosenbusch, M.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon diffusion layers in AISI 304 and AISI 316 type stainless steels were investigated as an alternative to surface barrier coatings for diamond film growth. Uniform 2 μm thick silicon rich interlayers were obtained by coating the surface of the steels with silicon and performing diffusion treatments at 800 deg. C. Adherent diamond films with low sp 2 carbon content were deposited on the diffused silicon layers by a modified hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method. Characterization of as-siliconized layers and diamond coatings was performed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

  13. On the temperature dependence of the photoconductivity of amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si Nx: H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessler, L.R.; Alvarez, F.; Chambouleyron, I.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results on the photoconducticity of amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride a-SiNx: H prepared from plasma decomposition of a gaseus mixture of silane and nitrogen ([Si H 4 ]/[N 2 ] ∼ 0.33) are presented. The material is deposited in a capacitively coupled glow discharge system and nitrogen content was continuously increased by increasing the RF power dissipated in the plasma. Studies of the photocurrent as a function of temperature as a function of temperature and lig ht intensities are reported. (Author) [pt

  14. Bio-functionalization of silicon nitride-based piezo-resistive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Methods of bio-functionalize silicon nitride involve process steps to convert it into an oxynitride via plasma implantation techniques. Such methods can potentially damage microstructures such as cantilevers. In this paper, we report suc- cessful bio-functionalization of Hotwire CVD silicon nitride-based piezo- ...

  15. Comparison of properties in silicon nitrides sintered with oxide and organometallic additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxem, W.; Saruhan, B.

    1994-01-01

    An homogeneous introduction of sintering additives to silicon nitride powder compacts is of great importance in the fabrication of high strength silicon nitride ceramics. Inhomogenities and impurities brought into the compacts with addition of sintering additives may influence the microstructure and phase development and subsequently degrade the mechanical properties and reliability of silicon nitride ceramics. Sintering additives in the system of Sm 2 O 3 + Al 2 O 3 as metaloxides and nitrates are introduced to two different kinds of α-silicon nitride powder. Thereby, a more homogeneous distribution of additives through an intimate mixing is aimed. Advantages of this type of processing of silicon nitride powders against conventional method are discussed. The contribution of powder characteristics in determination of these factors are displayed. (orig.)

  16. Optimization of time–temperature schedule for nitridation of silicon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    weight gain. Green compact of density 66%, the nitridation schedule was maneuvered for complete nitridation. Iron promotes nitridation reaction. Higher weight loss during nitridation of iron doped compact is the main cause of lower ...

  17. Surface Area, and Oxidation Effects on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon Powder Compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Commercially available silicon powders were wet-attrition-milled from 2 to 48 hr to achieve surface areas (SA's) ranging from 1.3 to 70 sq m/g. The surface area effects on the nitridation kinetics of silicon powder compacts were determined at 1250 or 1350 C for 4 hr. In addition, the influence of nitridation environment, and preoxidation on nitridation kinetics of a silicon powder of high surface area (approximately equals 63 sq m/g) was investigated. As the surface area increased, so did the percentage nitridation after 4 hr in N2 at 1250 or 1350 C. Silicon powders of high surface area (greater than 40 sq m/g) can be nitrided to greater than 70% at 1250 C in 4 hr. The nitridation kinetics of the high-surface-area powder compacts were significantly delayed by preoxidation treatment. Conversely, the nitridation environment had no significant influence on the nitridation kinetics of the same powder. Impurities present in the starting powder, and those accumulated during attrition milling, appeared to react with the silica layer on the surface of silicon particles to form a molten silicate layer, which provided a path for rapid diffusion of nitrogen and enhanced the nitridation kinetics of high surface area silicon powder.

  18. Nanostructured silicon nitride from wheat and rice husks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, S. B.; Rath, B. B.; Gorzkowski, E. P.; Wollmershauser, J. A.; Feng, C. R.

    2016-04-01

    Nanoparticles, submicron-diameter tubes, and rods of Si3N4 were synthesized from the thermal treatment of wheat and rice husks at temperatures at and above 1300 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere. The whole pattern Rietveld analysis of the observed diffraction data from treatments at 1300 °C showed the formation of only hexagonal α-phase of Si3N4 with an R-factor of 1%, whereas samples treated at 1400 °C and above showed both α- and β-phases with an R-factor of 2%. Transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of tubes, rods, and nanoparticles of Si3N4. In a two-step process, where pure SiC was produced first from rice or wheat husk in an argon atmosphere and subsequently treated in a nitrogen atmosphere at 1450 °C, a nanostructured composite material having α- and β-phases of Si3N4 combined with cubic phase of SiC was formed. The thermodynamics of the formation of silicon nitride is discussed in terms of the solid state reaction between organic matter (silica content), which is inherently present in the wheat and rice husks, with the nitrogen from the furnace atmosphere. Nanostructures of silicon nitride formed by a single direct reaction or their composites with SiC formed in a two-step process of agricultural byproducts provide an uncomplicated sustainable synthesis route for silicon nitride used in mechanical, biotechnology, and electro-optic nanotechnology applications.

  19. Quality factor improvement of silicon nitride micro string resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Malm, Bjarke; Boisen, Anja

    2011-01-01

    Resonant micro and nano strings are of interest for sensor applications due to their extraordinary high quality factors, low mass and tunable resonant frequency. It has been found that the quality factor of strings is usually limited by clamping loss. In this work, clamping loss has been addressed...... by varying the clamping design and string geometry. We present silicon nitride micro strings with quality factors (Q) of up to 4 million in high vacuum achieved by minimizing clamping loss. For applications such as for chemical sensing, strings need to vibrate at atmospheric pressure. Maximal quality factor...

  20. Defects Detection on Silicon Nitride Balls by Laser Ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, M.; Ouaftouh, M.; Duquennoy, M.; Jenot, F.; Ourak, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we study the generation and the detection of surface waves on silicon nitride balls a few millimetres in diameter. The excitation of these waves is carried out thanks to a pulsed laser YAG and their detection is achieved with a laser interferometric probe. The whole of the device requires neither coupling nor direct contact with the balls. These waves are then used for the analysis of defects close to the surface of the balls. Several measurements are carried out on samples presenting various defects. Correlation attempts are also carried out between some ultrasonic parameters and some characteristics of defects

  1. Elastic properties of silicon nitride ceramics reinforced with graphene nanofillers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seiner, Hanuš; Ramírez, C.; Koller, M.; Sedlák, Petr; Landa, Michal; Miranzo, P.; Belmonte, M.; Osendí, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, December (2015), s. 675-680 ISSN 0264-1275 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : multilayer graphene * graphene oxide (GO) * silicon nitride * elastic constants * elastic modulus * shear modulus Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 3.997, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264127515302938/pdfft?md5=571e00fd7f976e9b66ed789ae2a868b2&pid=1-s2.0-S0264127515302938-main.pdf

  2. The preparation and characterization of nearly hysteresis-free metal-nitride-silicon capacitors on both p- and n-type silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    The hysteresis in metal-nitride-silicon (MNS) capacitors can be reduced to nearly zero by using nitrogen-rich silicon nitride as the gate dielectric and treating the silicon substrate by an ammonia plasma before dielectric deposition. However, the ammonia plasma treatment step also causes an increase in interface state density, especially in the middle of the silicon band gap. Without the ammonia plasma treatment, the virgin flat-band voltage V*FB is always negative. With the ammonia plasma treatment, V*FB can be shifted from a negative value to zero for MNS capacitors on n-type silicon, whereas V*FB will be shifted from a negative value to a more negative value for MNS capacitors on p-type silicon. These effects can be explained by postulating that the interface states generated by the ammonia plasma treatment step are amphoteric defects similar to Pb centers at the oxide/silicon interface in metal-oxide-silicon capacitors.

  3. MgB2 thin films on silicon nitride substrates prepared by an in situ method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monticone, Eugenio; Gandini, Claudio; Portesi, Chiara; Rajteri, Mauro; Bodoardo, Silvia; Penazzi, Nerino; Dellarocca, Valeria; Gonnelli, Renato S

    2004-01-01

    Large-area MgB 2 thin films were deposited on silicon nitride and sapphire substrates by co-deposition of Mg and B. After a post-annealing in Ar atmosphere at temperatures between 773 and 1173 K depending on the substrate, the films showed a critical temperature higher than 35 K with a transition width less than 0.5 K. The x-ray diffraction pattern suggested a c-axis preferential orientation in films deposited on amorphous substrate. The smooth surface and the good structural properties of these MgB 2 films allowed their reproducible patterning by a standard photolithographic process down to dimensions of the order of 10 μm and without a considerable degradation of the superconducting properties

  4. The atomic and electronic structure of amorphous silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, F

    2002-01-01

    Using a novel approach to the ab initio generation of random networks we constructed two nearly stoichiometric samples of amorphous silicon nitride with the same content x= 1.29. The two 64-atom periodically-continued cubic diamond-like cells contain 28 silicons and 36 nitrogens randomly substituted, and were amorphized with a 6 f s time step by heating them to just below their melting temperature with a Harris-functional based, molecular dynamics code in the LDA approximation. The averaged total radial distribution function (RDF) obtained is compared with some existing Tersoff-like potential simulations and with experiment; ours agree with experiment. All the partial radial features are calculated and the composition of the second peak also agrees with experiment. The electronic structure is calculated and the optical gaps obtained using both a HOMO-LUMO approach and the Tauc-like procedure developed recently that gives reasonable gaps. (Author)

  5. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chemical Species in Silicon and Silicon-Rich Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill O. Bugaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational properties of hydrogenated silicon-rich nitride (SiN:H of various stoichiometry (0.6≤≤1.3 and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H films were studied using Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furnace annealing during 5 hours in Ar ambient at 1130∘C and pulse laser annealing were applied to modify the structure of films. Surprisingly, after annealing with such high-thermal budget, according to the FTIR data, the nearly stoichiometric silicon nitride film contains hydrogen in the form of Si–H bonds. From analysis of the FTIR data of the Si–N bond vibrations, one can conclude that silicon nitride is partly crystallized. According to the Raman data a-Si:H films with hydrogen concentration 15% and lower contain mainly Si–H chemical species, and films with hydrogen concentration 30–35% contain mainly Si–H2 chemical species. Nanosecond pulse laser treatments lead to crystallization of the films and its dehydrogenization.

  6. Electron and ion beam degradation effects in AES analysis of silicon nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fransen, F.; Vanden Berghe, R.; Vlaeminck, R.; Hinoul, M.; Remmerie, J.; Maes, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Silicon nitride films are currently investigated by AES combined with ion profiling techniques for their stoichiometry and oxygen content. During this analysis, ion beam and primary electron effects were observed. The effect of argon ion bombardment is the preferential sputtering of nitrogen, forming 'covalent' silicon at the surface layer (AES peak at 91 eV). The electron beam irradiation results in a decrease of the covalent silicon peak, either by an electron beam annealing effect in the bulk of the silicon nitride film, or by an ionization enhanced surface diffusion process of the silicon (electromigration). By the electron beam annealing, nitrogen species are liberated in the bulk of the silicon nitride film and migrate towards the surface where they react with the covalent silicon. The ionization enhanced diffusion originates from local charging of the surface, induced by the electron beam. (author)

  7. Observation of ultraslow stress release in silicon nitride films on CaF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Tianyi; Deen, M. Jamal; Xu, Changqing; Fang, Qiyin; Selvaganapathy, P. Ravi; Zhang, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Silicon nitride thin films are deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on (100) and (111) CaF 2 crystalline substrates. Delaminated wavy buckles formed during the release of internal compressive stress in the films and the stress releasing processes are observed macroscopically and microscopically. The stress release patterns start from the substrate edges and propagate to the center along defined directions aligned with the crystallographic orientations of the substrate. The stress releasing velocity of SiN x film on (111) CaF 2 is larger than that of SiN x film with the same thickness on (100) CaF 2 . The velocities of SiN x film on both (100) and (111) CaF 2 increase with the film thickness. The stress releasing process is initiated when the films are exposed to atmosphere, but it is not a chemical change from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

  8. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that the binary components, BN and Si3N4, melt incongruently under standard conditions. Neither has it been possible to employ sintering of μm-size powders consisting of binary nitrides BN and Si3N4. Instead, one employs the so-called sol-gel route starting from single component precursors such as TADB ((SiCl3NH(BCl2. In order to determine the atomic structure of this material, it has proven necessary to simulate the actual synthesis route.Many of the exciting properties of these ceramics are closely connected to the details of their amorphous structure. To clarify this structure, it is necessary to employ not only experimental probes on many length scales (X-ray, neutron- and electron scattering; complex NMR experiments; IR- and Raman scattering, but also theoretical approaches. These address the actual synthesis route to a-Si3B3N7, the structural properties, the elastic and vibrational properties, aging and coarsening behaviour, thermal conductivity and the metastable phase diagram both for a-Si3B3N7 and possible silicon boron nitride phases with compositions different from Si3N4: BN = 1 : 3. Here, we present a short comprehensive overview over the insights gained using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to explore the energy landscape of a-Si3B3N7, model the actual synthesis route and compute static and transport properties of a-Si3BN7.

  9. Distribution patterns of different carbon nanostructures in silicon nitride composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapasztó, Orsolya; Markó, Márton; Balázsi, Csaba

    2012-11-01

    The dispersion properties of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes as well as mechanically exfoliated few layer graphene flakes within the silicon nitride ceramic matrix have been investigated. Small angle neutron scattering experiments have been employed to gain information on the dispersion of the nano-scale carbon fillers throughout the entire volume of the samples. The neutron scattering data combined with scanning electron microscopy revealed strikingly different distribution patterns for different types of carbon nanostructures. The scattering intensities for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) reveal a decay exponent characteristic to surface fractals, which indicate that the predominant part of nanotubes can be found in loose networks wrapping the grains of the polycrystalline matrix. By contrast, multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were found to be present mainly in the form of bulk aggregate structures, while few-layer graphene (FLG) flakes have been individually dispersed within the host matrix, under the very same preparation and processing conditions.

  10. Soliton repetition rate in a silicon-nitride microresonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chengying; Xuan, Yi; Wang, Cong; Jaramillo-Villegas, Jose A; Leaird, Daniel E; Qi, Minghao; Weiner, Andrew M

    2017-02-15

    The repetition rate of a Kerr comb composed of a single soliton in an anomalous group velocity dispersion silicon-nitride microcavity is measured as a function of pump frequency. By comparing operation in the soliton and non-soliton states, the contributions from the Raman soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) and the thermal effects are evaluated; the SSFS is found to dominate the changes in the repetition rate, similar to silica cavities. The relationship between the changes in the repetition rate and the pump frequency detuning is found to be independent of the nonlinearity coefficient and dispersion of the cavity. Modeling of the repetition rate change by using the generalized Lugiato-Lefever equation is discussed; the Kerr shock is found to have only a minor effect on repetition rate for cavity solitons with duration down to ∼50  fs.

  11. Silicon nitride waveguide platform for fluorescence microscopy of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinguely, Jean-Claude; Helle, Øystein Ivar; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh

    2017-10-30

    Waveguide chip-based microscopy reduces the complexity of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, and adds features like large field of view illumination, decoupling of illumination and collection path and easy multimodal imaging. However, for the technique to become widespread there is a need of low-loss and affordable waveguides made of high-refractive index material. Here, we develop and report a low-loss silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) waveguide platform for multi-color TIRF microscopy. Single mode conditions at visible wavelengths (488-660 nm) were achieved using shallow rib geometry. To generate uniform excitation over appropriate dimensions waveguide bends were used to filter-out higher modes followed by adiabatic tapering. Si 3 N 4 material is finally shown to be biocompatible for growing and imaging living cells.

  12. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Silvan; Guillermo Villanueva, Luis; Amato, Bartolo; Boisen, Anja [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil; Sørensen, Anders S.; Usami, Koji; Polzik, Eugene S. [QUANTOP, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Taylor, Jacob M. [Joint Quantum Institute/NIST, College Park, Maryland 20899 (United States); Herring, Patrick K.; Cassidy, Maja C. [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Marcus, Charles M. [Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Cheol Shin, Yong; Kong, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene.

  13. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of thin molybdenum- and tungsten-nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereznai, M. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary)]. E-mail: bereznai@physx.u-szeged.hu; Toth, Z. [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Caricato, A.P. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Fernandez, M. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Luches, A. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Majni, G. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica ed Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Mengucci, P. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica ed Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Nagy, P.M. [Department of General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes University, H-1518 Budapest, POB 32 (Hungary); Juhasz, A. [Department of General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes University, H-1518 Budapest, POB 32 (Hungary); Nanai, L. [Department of Physics, University of Szeged JGYTF, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2005-02-01

    In this work reactive pulsed laser deposition of molybdenum- and tungsten-nitride thin films is investigated. Metallic targets were ablated in low-pressure (1, 10 and 100 Pa) nitrogen atmosphere by KrF excimer laser pulses (fluence {approx}6.5 J/cm{sup 2}). Films were deposited on silicon wafers heated to {approx}25, 250 and 500 deg. C. The characteristics of the films strongly depend on the N{sub 2} pressure. By increasing N{sub 2} pressure, the nitrogen content increases in the films, which leads to a monotonous increase of the electrical resistivity. Deposition rate decreases at 100 Pa as indicated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. At this pressure, hardness of the films significantly decreases also, as shown by microhardness measurements. X-ray diffractometry shows that films crystallinity is improved by increasing the substrate temperature. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied for visualising the film surface.

  14. Oxidation and crystallization behavior of calcium europium silicon nitride thin films during rapid thermal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, M. de, E-mail: m.dejong-1@tudelft.nl [Faculty of Applied Science, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Enter, V.E. van, E-mail: vvanenter@gmail.com [Faculty of Applied Science, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Schuring, E.W., E-mail: schuring@ecn.nl [Energy Center of the Netherlands, Westerduinweg 3, 1755LE Petten (Netherlands); Kolk, E. van der, E-mail: e.vanderkolk@tudelft.nl [Faculty of Applied Science, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-03-31

    Luminescent thin films were fabricated on silicon wafers using reactive magnetron sputtering of Ca, Si and Eu in Ar/N{sub 2} atmosphere. In order to activate the luminescence, the as-deposited nitride films were heated to 1100 °C by a rapid thermal processing treatment. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal the crystal phases that form during thermal treatment. By recording scanning electron microscopy images of the surface and the cross-section of the film at different radial locations, the formation of different layers with a thickness depending on the radial position is revealed. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis of these cross-sections reveals the formation of an oxide top layer and a nitride bottom layer. The thickness of the top layer increases as a function of radial position on the substrate and the thickness of the bottom layer decreases accordingly. The observation of different 4f{sup 6}5d{sup 1} → 4f{sup 7} Eu{sup 2+} luminescence emission bands at different radial positions correspond to divalent Eu doped Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 4}N{sub 2}, Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and CaSiO{sub 3}, which is in agreement with the phases identified by X-ray diffraction analysis. A mechanism for the observed oxidation process of the nitride films is proposed that consists of a stepwise oxidation from the as-deposited amorphous nitride state to crystalline Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 4}N{sub 2}, to Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and finally CaSiO{sub 3}. The oxidation rate and final state of oxidation show a strong temperature–time dependency during anneal treatment. - Highlights: • A thin film of nitridated Ca, Si and Eu was deposited using magnetron sputtering. • Rapid thermal processing (RTP) results in Eu{sup 2+} doped Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 4}N{sub 2}, Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, and CaSiO{sub 3}. • Oxidation rate differs with radial position due to a temperature gradient during RTP. • Cross-section SEM–EDX shows how the oxidation progresses in lateral direction.

  15. Structurally controlled deposition of silicon onto nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weijie; Liu, Zuqin; Han, Song; Bornstein, Jonathan; Stefan, Constantin Ionel

    2018-03-20

    Provided herein are nanostructures for lithium ion battery electrodes and methods of fabrication. In some embodiments, a nanostructure template coated with a silicon coating is provided. The silicon coating may include a non-conformal, more porous layer and a conformal, denser layer on the non-conformal, more porous layer. In some embodiments, two different deposition processes, e.g., a PECVD layer to deposit the non-conformal layer and a thermal CVD process to deposit the conformal layer, are used. Anodes including the nanostructures have longer cycle lifetimes than anodes made using either a PECVD or thermal CVD method alone.

  16. Resistance of Silicon Nitride Turbine Components to Erosion and Hot Corrosion/oxidation Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangmen, Thomas E.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride turbine components are under intensive development by AlliedSignal to enable a new generation of higher power density auxiliary power systems. In order to be viable in the intended applications, silicon nitride turbine airfoils must be designed for survival in aggressive oxidizing combustion gas environments. Erosive and corrosive damage to ceramic airfoils from ingested sand and sea salt must be avoided. Recent engine test experience demonstrated that NT154 silicon nitride turbine vanes have exceptional resistance to sand erosion, relative to superalloys used in production engines. Similarly, NT154 silicon nitride has excellent resistance to oxidation in the temperature range of interest - up to 1400 C. Hot corrosion attack of superalloy gas turbine components is well documented. While hot corrosion from ingested sea salt will attack silicon nitride substantially less than the superalloys being replaced in initial engine applications, this degradation has the potential to limit component lives in advanced engine applications. Hot corrosion adversely affects the strength of silicon nitride in the 850 to 1300 C range. Since unacceptable reductions in strength must be rapidly identified and avoided, AlliedSignal and the NASA Lewis Research Center have pioneered the development of an environmental life prediction model for silicon nitride turbine components. Strength retention in flexure specimens following 1 to 3300 hour exposures to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion has been measured and used to calibrate the life prediction model. Predicted component life is dependent upon engine design (stress, temperature, pressure, fuel/air ratio, gas velocity, and inlet air filtration), mission usage (fuel sulfur content, location (salt in air), and times at duty cycle power points), and material parameters. Preliminary analyses indicate that the hot corrosion resistance of NT154 silicon nitride is adequate for AlliedSignal's initial engine

  17. Conductivity of materials made of aluminum nitride and silicon nitride mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatov, A. G.; Kamyshov, V. M.

    1978-01-01

    To establish the possible mechanism for conductivity in aluminum nitride a study was made of the electric conductivity of pure AlN and its mixtures with silicon nitride at different temperatures and partial pressures of nitrogen in the gas phase. The thermoelectromotive force was also measured. The experiments used polycrystalline samples of cylindrical shape 18 mm in diameter made of powders by hot pressing in graphite press molds at a temperature of 1973-2273 K and pressure 1,470,000 n/sqm. The items obtained by this method had porosity not over 5%. After pressing, the samples were machined to remove carbon from the surface, and were annealed in a stream of dry ammonia for 10 h at a temperature of 1273-1373 K. Electric conductivity was measured according to the bridge scheme on an alternating current of frequency 10 kHz. In order to guarantee close contact of the platinum electrodes with the surface of the samples, a thin layer of platinum was sprayed on them. Experiments were conducted in the temperature interval 1273-1573 K with a half hour delay at each assigned temperature with heating and cooling.

  18. Use of additives to improve microstructures and fracture resistance of silicon nitride ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Paul F [Oak Ridge, TN; Lin, Hua-Tay [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-06-28

    A high-strength, fracture-resistant silicon nitride ceramic material that includes about 5 to about 75 wt-% of elongated reinforcing grains of beta-silicon nitride, about 20 to about 95 wt-% of fine grains of beta-silicon nitride, wherein the fine grains have a major axis of less than about 1 micron; and about 1 to about 15 wt-% of an amorphous intergranular phase comprising Si, N, O, a rare earth element and a secondary densification element. The elongated reinforcing grains have an aspect ratio of 2:1 or greater and a major axis measuring about 1 micron or greater. The elongated reinforcing grains are essentially isotropically oriented within the ceramic microstructure. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a room temperature flexure strength of 1,000 MPa or greater and a fracture toughness of 9 MPa-m.sup.(1/2) or greater. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a peak strength of 800 MPa or greater at 1200 degrees C. Also included are methods of making silicon nitride ceramic materials which exhibit the described high flexure strength and fracture-resistant values.

  19. High temperature mechanical performance of a hot isostatically pressed silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.; Lin, C.K.J. [and others

    1996-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics are an attractive material of choice for designers and manufacturers of advanced gas turbine engine components for many reasons. These materials typically have potentially high temperatures of usefulness (up to 1400{degrees}C), are chemically inert, have a relatively low specific gravity (important for inertial effects), and are good thermal conductors (i.e., resistant to thermal shock). In order for manufacturers to take advantage of these inherent properties of silicon nitride, the high-temperature mechanical performance of the material must first be characterized. The mechanical response of silicon nitride to static, dynamic, and cyclic conditions at elevated temperatures, along with reliable and representative data, is critical information that gas turbine engine designers and manufacturers require for the confident insertion of silicon nitride components into gas turbine engines. This final report describes the high-temperature mechanical characterization and analyses that were conducted on a candidate structural silicon nitride ceramic. The high-temperature strength, static fatigue (creep rupture), and dynamic and cyclic fatigue performance were characterized. The efforts put forth were part of Work Breakdown Structure Subelement 3.2.1, {open_quotes}Rotor Data Base Generation.{close_quotes} PY6 is comparable to other hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitrides currently being considered for advanced gas turbine engine applications.

  20. Surface nitridation of silicon nano-particles using double multi-hollow discharge plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Giichiro; Yamamoto, Kosuke; Kawashima, Yuki; Sato, Muneharu; Nakahara, Kenta; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kamataki, Kunihiro [Center for Reserch and Advancement in Higher Education, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kondo, Michio [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    We present production of silicon nano-particles and their surface nitridation for efficient multiple-exciton generation. Nitridated silicon nano-particles were produced using double multi-hollow discharge plasma CVD, where generation of silicon particles and their nitridation were independently performed using SiH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} multi-hollow discharge plasmas. We succeeded in controlling nitrogen content in a silicon nano-particle by varying a number density of N radicals irradiated to the Si particle. We also observed strong photoluminescence (PL) emission around 300-500 nm from silicon nano-particles, where the PL peak energy is about 2.5 and 3.1 eV for pure Si nano-particles, and 2.5, 3.1, and 4.1 eV for nitridated Si nano-particles. The additional UV-peak of 4.1 eV from nitridated Si particles is closely related to the nitridation surface layer on Si nano-particles (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D.; Hennessy, John J.; Carver, Alexander G.; Jones, Todd J.; Goodsall, Timothy M.; Hamden, Erika T.; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J.; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100–300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness. PMID:27338399

  2. Chemical-vapor-infiltrated silicon nitride, boron nitride, and silicon carbide matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventri, R.D.; Galasso, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports composites of carbon/chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) Si 3 N 4 , carbon/CVD BN, mullite/CVD SiC, and SiC yarn/CVD SiC prepared to determine if there were inherent toughness in these systems. The matrices were deposited at high enough temperatures to ensure that they were crystalline, which should make them more stable at high temperatures. The fiber-matrix bonding in the C/Si 3 N 4 composite appeared to be too strong; the layers of BN in the matrix of the C/BN were too weakly bonded; and the mullite/SiC composite was not as tough as the SiC/SiC composites. Only the SiC yarn/CVD SiC composite exhibited both strength and toughness

  3. Advances in pulsed laser deposition growth of nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Felix E.; Pumarol, Manuel; Martinez, Antonio; Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Yanyung; Rodriguez, Edgardo; Mourad, Houssam A.

    1999-07-01

    Pulsed laser deposition of nitride semiconductor films offers an alternative to more usual techniques, such as MOCVD and MBE. PLD can produce good quality films at reduced growth temperatures. Rapid progress has been achieved in the laser few years, including demonstrations of epitaxial growth of GaN directly on sapphire. Work on PLD of direct- transition III- nitrides is briefly reviewed and our recent results for these materials are presented. Growth of these nitrides requires provision of nitrogen in a reactive form, which is usually supplied by NH3 gas flow. With the approach described here, reactive nitrogen is provided in an atomic beam, which has the advantage of reducing dependence on substrate temperature to surmount the kinetic energy barrier for formation, while eliminating a source of hydrogen during growth. Films grown from ceramic GaN targets are compared with those grown from liquid Ga. The latter method can offer better control of unintentional doping. InN films were also grown directly from In metal targets, with very good results in term so stoichiometry and crystalline quality. AlN films were grown from ceramic AlN targets, with excellent texture at reduced temperatures. Results are presented for crystal structure, composition and surface morphology. Optical properties were studied by transmission and luminescence spectroscopy.

  4. Use of anionic surfactants for selective polishing of silicon dioxide over silicon nitride films using colloidal silica-based slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penta, Naresh K.; Amanapu, H. P.; Peethala, B. C.; Babu, S. V.

    2013-10-01

    Four different anionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate, dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA), dodecyl phosphate and Sodium lauroyl sarcosine, selected from the sulfate, phosphate, and carboxylic family, were investigated as additives in silica dispersions for selective polishing of silicon dioxide over silicon nitride films. We found that all these anionic surfactants suppress the nitride removal rates (RR) for pH ≤4 while more or less maintaining the oxide RRs, resulting in high oxide-to-nitride RR selectivity. The RR data obtained as a function of pH were explained based on pH dependent distributions of surfactant species, change in the zeta potentials of oxide and nitride surfaces, and thermogravimetric data. It appears that the negatively charged surfactant species preferentially adsorb on the positively charged nitride surface below IEP through its electrostatic interactions and form a bilayer adsorption, resulting in the suppression of nitride RRs. In contrast to the surfactants, K2SO4 interacts only weakly with the nitride surface and hence cannot suppress its RR.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of metal nitrides, phosphides and arsenides. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.M. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-03-01

    The author recently reported that dialkylamido complexes are promising precursors to nitride thin films. On this basis it was reasoned that transition metal and main group disilazide complexes in which the silicon has dialkylamido substituents are potential precursors to ternary silicon nitride films. Bulky disilazide ligands are known to stabilize main group and transition metal complexes with low coordination numbers. Reaction of dimethylamine with Cl{sub 3}SiN(H)SiMe{sub 3} in hexane solution at 25{degrees}C gave the bulky disilazane [(Me{sub 2}N){sub 3}Si]N(h)SiMe{sub 3} (1) in 73% yield. Reaction of (1) with n-butyl lithium in benzene at 0{degrees}C produced [(Me{sub 2}N){sub 3}Si]N(Li)SiMe{sub 3} in 82% yield. LiN[Si(NMe{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 2} was chemically prepared in 92% yield and was converted to the amine with 83% yield. The author examined the use of amido precursors for main group oxide thin films. Sn(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} and Si(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} react with oxygen in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor to give SnO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} films, respectively. The films were deposited on quartz, silicon, and glass at substrate temperatures of 250--400 {degrees}C. The results of the characterizations of the films and compounds are presented in this report.

  6. Low temperature CVD deposition of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dariel, M.; Yeheskel, J.; Agam, S.; Edelstein, D.; Lebovits, O.; Ron, Y.

    1991-04-01

    The coating of graphite on silicon carbide from the gaseous phase in a hot-well, open flow reactor at 1150degC is described. This study constitutes the first part of an investigation of the process for the coating of nuclear fuel by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

  7. Silicon Nitride Background in Nanophotonic Waveguide Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashim Dhakal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that evanescent Raman spectroscopy using a silicon nitride (SiN nanophotonic waveguide platform has higher signal enhancement when compared to free-space systems. However, signal-to-noise ratio from the waveguide at a low analyte concentration is constrained by the shot-noise from the background light originating from the waveguide itself. Hence, understanding the origin and properties of this waveguide background luminescence (WGBL is essential to developing mitigation strategies. Here, we identify the dominating component of the WGBL spectrum composed of a broad Raman scattering due to momentum selection-rule breaking in amorphous materials, and several peaks specific to molecules embedded in the core. We determine the maximum of the Raman scattering efficiency of the WGBL at room temperature for 785 nm excitation to be 4.5 ± 1 × 10−9 cm−1·sr−1, at a Stokes shift of 200 cm−1. This efficiency decreases monotonically for higher Stokes shifts. Additionally, we also demonstrate the use of slotted waveguides and quasi-transverse magnetic polarization as some mitigation strategies.

  8. Elasticity and inelasticity of silicon nitride/boron nitride fibrous monoliths.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, B. I.; Burenkov, Yu. A.; Kardashev, B. K.; Singh, D.; Goretta, K. C.; de Arellano-Lopez, A. R.; Energy Technology; Russian Academy of Sciences; Univer. de Sevilla

    2001-01-01

    A study is reported on the effect of temperature and elastic vibration amplitude on Young's modulus E and internal friction in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and BN ceramic samples and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN monoliths obtained by hot pressing of BN-coated Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers. The fibers were arranged along, across, or both along and across the specimen axis. The E measurements were carried out under thermal cycling within the 20-600 C range. It was found that high-modulus silicon-nitride specimens possess a high thermal stability; the E(T) dependences obtained under heating and cooling coincide well with one another. The low-modulus BN ceramic exhibits a considerable hysteresis, thus indicating evolution of the defect structure under the action of thermoelastic (internal) stresses. Monoliths demonstrate a qualitatively similar behavior (with hysteresis). This behavior of the elastic modulus is possible under microplastic deformation initiated by internal stresses. The presence of microplastic shear in all the materials studied is supported by the character of the amplitude dependences of internal friction and the Young's modulus. The experimental data obtained are discussed in terms of a model in which the temperature dependences of the elastic modulus and their features are accounted for by both microplastic deformation and nonlinear lattice-atom vibrations, which depend on internal stresses.

  9. Elastocapillary folding of three dimensional micro-structures using water pumped through the wafer via a silicon nitride tube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legrain, A.B.H.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Ma, Kechun; Tas, Niels Roelof; Abelmann, Leon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the first investigation of a batch method for folding of threedimensional micrometer-sized silicon nitride structures by capillary forces. Silicon nitride tubes have been designed and fabricated using DRIE at the center of the planar origami patterns of the structures. Water

  10. Hafnium nitride buffer layers for growth of GaN on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Robert D.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-08-16

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 {character pullout}m. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  11. Investigation of mechanical properties of CVD grown titanium silicon nitride thin films under reduced atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Spandan; Das, Soham; Bandyopadhyay, Asish; Das, Santanu; Swain, Bibhu P.

    2018-01-01

    Titanium silicon nitride (TiSiN) thin films were deposited by thermal chemical vapour deposition using TiO2 + Si3N4 powder with different H2 flow rates. Morphological, structural, and mechanical properties of deposited TiSiN films were characterized using different techniques by SEM, XRD, Raman, and nano-indentation. SEM images reveal that surface roughness of TiSiN thin films decreased with increasing of H2 flow rate. The Raman spectroscopy indicated that the intensity of acoustic phonon mode decreases, whereas intensity of optical phonon mode increases with increasing of H2 flow rate. The maximum hardness, Young's modulus, and yield strength of the TiSiN films are 18.23, 185.26, and 83.2 GPa, respectively. The crystallite size and lattice strain of TiSiN thin films vary 2.08-4.43 nm and 0.02-0.055, respectively, for different H2 flow rates. The quantitative and qualitative analyses of TiSiN thin were carried out using the Origin 9.0 software.

  12. Multilayer graphene electro-absorption optical modulator based on double-stripe silicon nitride waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Meiyong; Yang, Huimin; Zheng, Pengfei; Hu, Guohua; Yun, Binfeng; Cui, Yiping

    2017-09-04

    A graphene electro-absorption optical modulator based on double-stripe silicon nitride waveguide is proposed and analyzed. By embedding four graphene layers in the double-stripe silicon nitride waveguide and the graphene layers co-electrode design, the total metal-graphene contact resistance can be reduced 50% and as high as 30.6GHz modulation bandwidth can be achieved theoretically. The calculated extinction ratio and figure of merit are 0.1658dB/um and 9.7, respectively. And the required switching voltage from its minimum to maximum absorption state is 3.8180V and 780.50fJ/bit power consuming can be achieved. The proposed modulator can remedy the lack of high speed modulator on the passive silicon nitride waveguide.

  13. Ab initio design of nanostructures for solar energy conversion: a case study on silicon nitride nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Design of novel materials for efficient solar energy conversion is critical to the development of green energy technology. In this work, we present a first-principles study on the design of nanostructures for solar energy harvesting on the basis of the density functional theory. We show that the indirect band structure of bulk silicon nitride is transferred to direct bandgap in nanowire. We find that intermediate bands can be created by doping, leading to enhancement of sunlight absorption. We further show that codoping not only reduces the bandgap and introduces intermediate bands but also enhances the solubility of dopants in silicon nitride nanowires due to reduced formation energy of substitution. Importantly, the codoped nanowire is ferromagnetic, leading to the improvement of carrier mobility. The silicon nitride nanowires with direct bandgap, intermediate bands, and ferromagnetism may be applicable to solar energy harvesting.

  14. Preparation and mechanical properties of carbon nanotube-silicon nitride nano-ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, C. Y.; Jiang, H.

    2018-01-01

    Carbon nanotube–silicon nitride nano-ceramic matrix composites were fabricated by hot-pressing nano-sized Si3N4 powders and carbon nanotubes. The effect of CNTs on the mechanical properties of silicon nitride was researched. The phase compositions and the microstructure characteristics of the samples as well as the distribution of carbon nanotube in the silicon nitride ceramic were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The results show that the microstructure of composites consists mainly of α-Si3N4, β-Si3N4, Si2N2O and carbon natubes. The addition of proper amount of carbon nanotubes can improve the fracture toughness and the flexural strength, and the optimal amount of carbon nanotube are both 3wt.%. However the Vickers hardness values decrease with the increase of carbon nanotubes content.

  15. Electrical and thermal conductivities of the graphene, boron nitride and silicon boron honeycomb monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodadadi, Jabbar [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi Kurdestany, Jamshid [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Yarmohammadi, Zahra [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-25

    Density of states, electrical and thermal conductivities of electrons in graphene, boron nitride and silicon boron single sheets are studied within the tight-binding Hamiltonian model and Green's function formalism, based on the linear response theory. The results show that while boron nitride keeps significantly the lowest amounts overall with an interval of zero value in low temperatures, due to its insulating nature, graphene exhibits the most electrical and thermal conductivities, slightly higher than silicon boron except for low temperature region where the latter surpasses, owing to its metallic character. This work might make ideas for creating new electronic devices based on honeycomb nanostructures. - Highlights: • Electronic properties of graphene, silicon boron, and boron nitride planes are compared. • Tight-binding Hamiltonian model and Green's function formalism are implemented. • This work might make ideas for creating new electronic devices based on honeycomb nanostructures.

  16. Transient and steady-state erosion of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasek, K.R. [Allied Signal Research and Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Whalen, P.J. [Allied Signal, Inc., Morristown, NJ (United States); Rateick, R.G. Jr. [Allied Signal Aerospace, South Bend, IN (United States); Hamilton, A.C. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Routbort, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Relative to most other materials silicon nitride is very erosion resistant. However, the resulting surface flaws degrade strength - a serious concern for component designers. AlliedSignal Ceramic Components GS-44 in-situ reinforced silicon nitride was eroded in a slinger apparatus. Both transient (extremely low level) and steady-state erosion regimes were investigated. Alumina particles with effective average diameters of 140 Jim and 63 {mu}m were used at velocities of 50 m/s, 100 m/s, and 138 m/s. Biaxial tensile strength was measured. Strength decreased by about 15% after a very small erodent dosage and then remained virtually constant with further erosion. In-situ reinforcement produces R-curve behavior in which the fracture toughness increases with crack size. The effect of this is quite dramatic with strength loss being significantly less than expected for a normal silicon nitride with constant fracture toughness.

  17. Critical flaw size in silicon nitride ball bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, George Arthur

    Aircraft engine and bearing manufacturers have been aggressively pursuing advanced materials technology systems solutions to meet main shaft-bearing needs of advanced military aircraft engines. Ceramic silicon nitride hybrid bearings are being developed for such high performance applications. Though silicon nitride exhibits many favorable properties such as high compressive strength, high hardness, a third of the density of steel, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and high corrosion and temperature resistance, they also have low fracture toughness and are susceptible to failure from fatigue spalls emanating from pre-existing surface flaws that can grow under rolling contact fatigue (RCF). Rolling elements and raceways are among the most demanding components in aircraft engines due to a combination of high cyclic contact stresses, long expected component lifetimes, corrosive environment, and the high consequence of fatigue failure. The cost of these rolling elements increases exponentially with the decrease in allowable flaw size for service applications. Hence the range of 3D non-planar surface flaw geometries subject to RCF is simulated to determine the critical flaw size (CFS) or the largest allowable flaw that does not grow under service conditions. This dissertation is a numerical and experimental investigation of surface flaws in ceramic balls subjected to RCF and has resulted in the following analyses: Crack Shape Determination: the nucleation of surface flaws from ball impact that occurs during the manufacturing process is simulated. By examining the subsurface Hertzian stresses between contacting spheres, their applicability to predicting and characterizing crack size and shape is established. It is demonstrated that a wide range of cone and partial cone cracks, observed in practice, can be generated using the proposed approaches. RCF Simulation: the procedure and concerns in modeling nonplanar 3D cracks subject to RCF using FEA for stress intensity

  18. Hot isostatic pressing of silicon nitride Sisub3n4 containing zircon, or zirconia and silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somiya, S.; Yoshimura, M.; Suzuki, T.; Nishimura, H.

    1980-01-01

    A hydrothermal synthesis apparatus with a 10 KB cylinder was used to obtain a sintered body of silicon nitride. The sintering auxiliary agents used were zircon (ZrSiO4) and a mixture of zirconia (ZrO2) and silica (SiO2). Experiments were conducted with the amounts of ZrSi04 or ArO2 and SiO2 varying over a wide range and the results compared to discover the quantity of additive which produced sintering in silicon nitride by the hot pressing method.

  19. Alternative Liquid Fuel Effects on Cooled Silicon Nitride Marine Gas Turbine Airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holowczak, J.

    2002-03-01

    With prior support from the Office of Naval Research, DARPA, and U.S. Department of Energy, United Technologies is developing and engine environment testing what we believe to be the first internally cooled silicon nitride ceramic turbine vane in the United States. The vanes are being developed for the FT8, an aeroderivative stationary/marine gas turbine. The current effort resulted in further manufacturing and development and prototyping by two U.S. based gas turbine grade silicon nitride component manufacturers, preliminary development of both alumina, and YTRIA based environmental barrier coatings (EBC's) and testing or ceramic vanes with an EBC coating.

  20. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Fernandez, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Leggieri, G. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy)]. E-mail: leggieri@le.infn.it; Luches, A. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Romano, F. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Valerini, D. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Verdyan, A. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Soifer, Y.M. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Azoulay, J. [Science Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, Holon 58102 (Israel); Meda, L. [IGD Polimeri Europa S.p.A, Novara (Italy)

    2007-07-31

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si <1 0 0> substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 deg. C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) x 10{sup -8} {omega} m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 x 10{sup -8} {omega} m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N{sub 2} phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  1. Low-temperature formation of silicon nitride films using pulsed-plasma CVD under near atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, M.; Inayoshi, Y.; Suemitsu, M.; Miyamoto, E.; Yara, T.; Nakajima, S.; Uehara, T.; Toyoshima, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nitride (SiN X ) film fabrication on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates has been achieved at a low temperature (∼100 deg. C) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition operated at near atmospheric pressures. A short-pulse based power system was employed to maintain a stable discharge of SiH 4 , H 2 and N 2 in near atmospheric pressures without the use of any inert gases such as He. The deposited films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cross sections of the films were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Despite the use of N 2 in place of NH 3 , a high deposition rate (290 nm/min) was obtained by this near-atmospheric-pressure plasma

  2. Superconducting niobium nitride films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaya, J.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Ciudad Universitaria, Carrera 30 Numero 45-03, Bogota (Colombia); Huerta, L. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: ser42@iim.unam.mx; Escamilla, R. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, CU Coyoacan, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2008-10-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) thin films were deposited under different configurations of the magnetic field using a magnetron sputtering system. The magnetic field configuration varied from balanced to unbalanced leading to different growth conditions and film properties. The aim of the paper was to identify correlations between deposition conditions, film properties and the electrical properties, specially the superconductive critical temperature (T{sub C}). The results suggested that there is a critical deposition condition, having an optimum ion-atom arrival ratio that promotes a well ordered and textured nanocrystalline structure (cubic phase) with the minimum residual stress and only under this condition a high critical temperature (16K) was obtained. Lower T{sub C} values around 12K were obtained for the NbN samples having a lower degree of structural perfection and texture, and a larger fraction of intergranular voids. On the other hand, analysis of valence-band spectra showed that the contribution of the Nb 4d states remained essentially constant while the higher T{sub C} was correlated to a higher contribution of the N 2p states.

  3. Superconducting niobium nitride films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olaya, J.J.; Huerta, L.; Rodil, S.E.; Escamilla, R.

    2008-01-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) thin films were deposited under different configurations of the magnetic field using a magnetron sputtering system. The magnetic field configuration varied from balanced to unbalanced leading to different growth conditions and film properties. The aim of the paper was to identify correlations between deposition conditions, film properties and the electrical properties, specially the superconductive critical temperature (T C ). The results suggested that there is a critical deposition condition, having an optimum ion-atom arrival ratio that promotes a well ordered and textured nanocrystalline structure (cubic phase) with the minimum residual stress and only under this condition a high critical temperature (16K) was obtained. Lower T C values around 12K were obtained for the NbN samples having a lower degree of structural perfection and texture, and a larger fraction of intergranular voids. On the other hand, analysis of valence-band spectra showed that the contribution of the Nb 4d states remained essentially constant while the higher T C was correlated to a higher contribution of the N 2p states

  4. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  5. Review: Silicon-based oxynitride and nitride phosphors for white LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Jun Xie and Naoto Hirosaki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available As a novel class of inorganic phosphors, oxynitride and nitride luminescent materials have received considerable attention because of their potential applications in solid-state lightings and displays. In this review we focus on recent developments in the preparation, crystal structure, luminescence and applications of silicon-based oxynitride and nitride phosphors for white light-emitting diodes (LEDs. The structures of silicon-based oxynitrides and nitrides (i.e., nitridosilicates, nitridoaluminosilicates, oxonitridosilicates, oxonitridoaluminosilicates, and sialons are generally built up of networks of crosslinking SiN4 tetrahedra. This is anticipated to significantly lower the excited state of the 5d electrons of doped rare-earth elements due to large crystal-field splitting and a strong nephelauxetic effect. This enables the silicon-based oxynitride and nitride phosphors to have a broad excitation band extending from the ultraviolet to visible-light range, and thus strongly absorb blue-to-green light. The structural versatility of oxynitride and nitride phosphors makes it possible to attain all the emission colors of blue, green, yellow, and red; thus, they are suitable for use in white LEDs. This novel class of phosphors has demonstrated its superior suitability for use in white LEDs and can be used in bichromatic or multichromatic LEDs with excellent properties of high luminous efficacy, high chromatic stability, a wide range of white light with adjustable correlated color temperatures (CCTs, and brilliant color-rendering properties.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW Textured silicon nitride: processing and anisotropic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwen Zhu and Yoshio Sakka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Textured silicon nitride (Si3N4 has been intensively studied over the past 15 years because of its use for achieving its superthermal and mechanical properties. In this review we present the fundamental aspects of the processing and anisotropic properties of textured Si3N4, with emphasis on the anisotropic and abnormal grain growth of β-Si3N4, texture structure and texture analysis, processing methods and anisotropic properties. On the basis of the texturing mechanisms, the processing methods described in this article have been classified into two types: hot-working (HW and templated grain growth (TGG. The HW method includes the hot-pressing, hot-forging and sinter-forging techniques, and the TGG method includes the cold-pressing, extrusion, tape-casting and strong magnetic field alignment techniques for β-Si3N4 seed crystals. Each processing technique is thoroughly discussed in terms of theoretical models and experimental data, including the texturing mechanisms and the factors affecting texture development. Also, methods of synthesizing the rodlike β-Si3N4 single crystals are presented. Various anisotropic properties of textured Si3 N4 and their origins are thoroughly described and discussed, such as hardness, elastic modulus, bending strength, fracture toughness, fracture energy, creep behavior, tribological and wear behavior, erosion behavior, contact damage behavior and thermal conductivity. Models are analyzed to determine the thermal anisotropy by considering the intrinsic thermal anisotropy, degree of orientation and various microstructure factors. Textured porous Si3N4 with a unique microstructure composed of oriented elongated β-Si3N4 and anisotropic pores is also described for the first time, with emphasis on its unique mechanical and thermal-mechanical properties. Moreover, as an important related material, textured α-Sialon is also reviewed, because the presence of elongated α-Sialon grains allows the production of textured

  7. Processing development for ceramic structural components: the influence of a presintering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    The influence of a presintering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride has been studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, 4 pt. bend test, and mecury intrusion porosimetry. It has been shown that presintering at 1050/sup 0/C will not affect the final nitrided properties. At 1200/sup 0/C, the oxide layer is removed, promoting the formation of B-phase silicon nitride. Presintering at 1200/sup 0/C also results in compact weight loss due to the volatilization of silicon, and the formation of large pores which severely reduce nitrided strength. The development of the structure of sintered silicon compacts appears to involve a temperature gradient, with greater sintering observed near the surface.

  8. Damage progression in silicon nitride undergoing non-conforming hybrid cyclic contact

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raga, R.; Khader, I.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Kailer, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 105, DEC (2017), s. 97-110 ISSN 0142-1123 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 263476 - ROLICER Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Silicon nitride * Cyclic contact fatigue * Surface and subsurface damage Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2016

  9. Near-field optical microscope using a silicon-nitride probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Tack, R.G.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1993-01-01

    Operation of an alternative near-field optical microscope is presented. The microscope uses a microfabricated silicon- nitride probe with integrated cantilever, as originally developed for force microscopy. The cantilever allows routine close contact near-field imaging o­n arbitrary surfaces without

  10. Size-dependent effective Young’s modulus of silicon nitride cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babaei Gavan, K.; Westra, H.J.R.; Van der Drift, E.W.J.M.; Venstra, W.J.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2009-01-01

    The effective Young’s modulus of silicon nitride cantilevers is determined for thicknesses in the range of 20–684 nm by measuring resonance frequencies from thermal noise spectra. A significant deviation from the bulk value is observed for cantilevers thinner than 150 nm. To explain the observations

  11. The stopping power and energy straggling of heavy ions in silicon nitride and polypropylene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikšová, Romana; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Slepička, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 354, JUL (2015), s. 205-209 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : stopping power * heavy ions * polypropylene * silicon nitride Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.389, year: 2015

  12. Silicon nitride membrane resonators at millikelvin temperatures with quality factors exceeding 10^8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, M.; Cohen, M.A.; Steele, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the mechanical dissipation of the fundamental mode of millimeter-sized, high quality-factor (Q) metalized silicon nitride membranes at temperatures down to 14?mK using a three-dimensional optomechanical cavity. Below 200?mK, high-Q modes of the membranes show a diverging increase of Q with

  13. Radiative ballistic phonon transport in silicon-nitride membranes at low temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevers, H.F.C.; Ridder, M.L.; Germeau, A.; Bruijn, M.P.; de Korte, P.A.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the phonon transport in free-standing 1 µm thick silicon-nitride membranes at temperatures around 100 mK. By varying the geometry of the membranes and the dimensions of the heater element, we are able to distinguish between radiative and diffuse phonon transport. The data indicate that

  14. Microstructure, fracture and damage mechanisms in rare-earth doped silicon nitride ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tatarko, P.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Dusza, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 465, - (2011), s. 93-96 ISSN 1013-9826. [MSMF-6: Materials Structure and Micromechanics of Fracture VI. Brno, 28.06.2010-30.06.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : rare-earth element * silicon nitride * composite * fracture * mechanical properties Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  15. Flux stabilization of silicon nitride microsieves by backpulsing and surface modification with PEG moieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girones nogue, Miriam; Bolhuis-Versteeg, Lydia A.M.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the surface properties of chemically modified silicon nitride microsieves on the filtration of protein solutions and defatted milk is described in this research. Prior to membrane filtrations, an antifouling polymer based on poly(ethylene glycol), poly(TMSMA-r-PEGMA) was synthesized

  16. Evaluation and silicon nitride internal combustion engine components. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voldrich, W. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Torrance, CA (United States). Garrett Ceramic Components Div.

    1992-04-01

    The feasibility of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) use in internal combustion engines was studied by testing three different components for wear resistance and lower reciprocating mass. The information obtained from these preliminary spin rig and engine tests indicates several design changes are necessary to survive high-stress engine applications. The three silicon nitride components tested were valve spring retainers, tappet rollers, and fuel pump push rod ends. Garrett Ceramic Components` gas-pressure sinterable Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GS-44) was used to fabricate the above components. Components were final machined from densified blanks that had been green formed by isostatic pressing of GS-44 granules. Spin rig testing of the valve spring retainers indicated that these Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components could survive at high RPM levels (9,500) when teamed with silicon nitride valves and lower spring tension than standard titanium components. Silicon nitride tappet rollers showed no wear on roller O.D. or I.D. surfaces, steel axles and lifters; however, due to the uncrowned design of these particular rollers the cam lobes indicated wear after spin rig testing. Fuel pump push rod ends were successful at reducing wear on the cam lobe and rod end when tested on spin rigs and in real-world race applications.

  17. Nonvolatile Polycrystalline-Silicon Thin-Film-Transistor Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon Memory with Periodical Finlike Channels Fabricated Using Nanoimprint Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Henry J. H.; Huang, Chien-Jen

    2013-02-01

    This work addresses the characteristics of a nonvolatile polycrystalline-silicon thin-film-transistor silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) memory with periodical finlike channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography. The polycrystalline silicon periodical finlike channels were fabricated using ultraviolet (UV) nano-imprint lithography and studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The memories with periodical finlike channels have lower operation voltage, higher programming speed, larger memory window, and better endurance and data retention than those with a single channel. The proposed approach can be utilized to fabricate a high-performance thin-film-transistor memory at a low cost.

  18. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...

  19. Silicon deposition in diatoms : Control by the pH inside the silicon deposition vesicle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, EG; Gieskes, WWC; Beelen, TPM

    To test the hypothesis that silicification occurs under acid conditions in the silicon deposition vesicle (SDV), the acidity of the SDV of the pennate diatoms Navicula pelliculosa (Brebisson et Kutzing) Hilse, N. salinarum (Grunow) Hustedt, and Nitzschia sigma (Kutzing) Smith was determined during

  20. Effects of heat treatments on surface roughness of silicon nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, T.; Kinemuchi, Y.; Ishizaki, K.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics were sintered by Pulsed Electric Current Sintering (PECS) method. Sintered Si 3 N 4 bodies were coated by copper, and heat treated at 1200 deg C for 1 hour in air. After the Cu coating and heat treatment, the ground Si 3 N 4 surface was oxidized, its duration was calculated from intensities obtained by an Electron Probe Micro Analyzer. The oxidized surfaces became smoother by heat treatment as the Cu coating period increases. The oxidation for smoothening treatments of silicon nitride ceramics requires the eutectic mixture of copper oxide and silicon oxide formed by the heat treatment on the ground surface covered by Cu before the treatment. Less nitrogen atoms on the Si 3 N 4 surface is necessary in order to smoothen the Si 3 N 4 surface. Copyright (1999) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  1. Geometrical Deviation and Residual Strain in Novel Silicon-on-Aluminium-Nitride Bonded Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Chuan-Ling; Xu, Zheng; Wu, Yan-Jun; An, Zheng-Hua; Xie, Xin-Yun; Lin, Cheng-Lu

    2002-11-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN), with much higher thermal conductivity, is considered to be an excellent alternative to the SiO2 layer in traditional silicon-on-insulator (SOI) materials. The silicon-on-aluminium-nitride (SOAN) structure was fabricated by the smart-cut process to alleviate the self-heating effects for traditional SOI. The convergent beam Kikuchi line diffraction pattern results show that some rotational misalignment exists when two wafers are bonded, which is about 3°. The high-resolution x-ray diffraction result indicates that, before annealing at high temperature, the residual lattice strain in the top silicon layer is tensile. After annealing at 1100°C for an hour, the strain in the top Si decreases greatly and reverses from tensile to slightly compressive as a result of viscous flow of AlN.

  2. Joining silicon nitride to FA-129 iron aluminide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu, Mathieu

    Joints between dissimilar materials are characterized particularly by compositional gradients and microstructural changes, which yield large variations in chemical, physical and mechanical properties across the joint. The joining of dissimilar materials is therefore more complex than the joining of similar materials. In this project, the joining procedure, from the interaction between the different components in a joint to the determination of the mechanical properties was applied to the Si3N4/FA-129 system. This iron aluminide intermetallic alloy (FA-129), was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) to have high temperature properties with good room temperature ductility. This intermetallic is replacing high strength ferritic stainless steel (SS) in moderate strength applications due to cost and property reasons. Joints between SS and Si3N4 are already used industrially and this project was to evaluate the potential to replace these Si3N 4/SS joints by those of Si3N4/FA-129. Broadly stated, the results obtained during this project are as follows: (I) The E2 energy for Si3N4 ceramic was calculated to be 3.01 keV. (II) The wetting of iron aluminide alloy by copper has been achieved and the spreading and reaction kinetics are influenced by the presence of Cr as alloying element. (III) The penetration and decohesion of the FA-129 microstructure is significantly reduced by the utilization of a Cu alloy containing a high titanium concentration. (IV) An active brazing alloy containing a high active element content can be fabricated by an electroless deposition technique. (V) The melting behavior of the powder was characterized and complete melting occurs in a multi-step process at different temperatures, which are a function of the heating rate. (VI) The strength of joint produced by brazing Si3N4 to itself using the composite powder reached 400 MPa. (VII) Direct brazing of Si 3N4 to FA-129 was shown to be unsuccessful and therefore a soft Cu interlayer was

  3. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouleh Nikzad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE measurements show QE > 50% in the 100–300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness.

  4. A deep-level transient spectroscopy study of gamma-ray irradiation on the passivation properties of silicon nitride layer on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Dong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride (SiNx films are extensively used as passivation material in the solar cell industry. Such SiNx passivation layers are the most sensitive part to gamma-ray irradiation in solar cells. In this work, deep-level transient spectroscopy has been applied to analyse the influence of gamma-ray irradiation on the passivation properties of SiNx layer on silicon. It is shown that the effective carrier lifetime decreases with the irradiation dose. At the same time, the interface state density is significantly increased after irradiation, and its energy distribution is broadened and shifts deeper with respect to the conduction band edge, which makes the interface states becoming more efficient recombination centers for carriers. Besides, C–V characteristics show a progressive negative shift with increasing dose, indicating the generation of effective positive charges in SiNx films. Such positive charges are beneficial for shielding holes from the n-type silicon substrates, i. e. the field-effect passivation. However, based on the reduced carrier lifetime after irradiation, it can be inferred that the irradiation induced interface defects play a dominant role over the trapped positive charges, and therefore lead to the degradation of passivation properties of SiNx on silicon.

  5. A deep-level transient spectroscopy study of gamma-ray irradiation on the passivation properties of silicon nitride layer on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Peng; Yu, Xuegong; Ma, Yao; Xie, Meng; Li, Yun; Huang, Chunlai; Li, Mo; Dai, Gang; Zhang, Jian

    2017-08-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride (SiNx) films are extensively used as passivation material in the solar cell industry. Such SiNx passivation layers are the most sensitive part to gamma-ray irradiation in solar cells. In this work, deep-level transient spectroscopy has been applied to analyse the influence of gamma-ray irradiation on the passivation properties of SiNx layer on silicon. It is shown that the effective carrier lifetime decreases with the irradiation dose. At the same time, the interface state density is significantly increased after irradiation, and its energy distribution is broadened and shifts deeper with respect to the conduction band edge, which makes the interface states becoming more efficient recombination centers for carriers. Besides, C-V characteristics show a progressive negative shift with increasing dose, indicating the generation of effective positive charges in SiNx films. Such positive charges are beneficial for shielding holes from the n-type silicon substrates, i. e. the field-effect passivation. However, based on the reduced carrier lifetime after irradiation, it can be inferred that the irradiation induced interface defects play a dominant role over the trapped positive charges, and therefore lead to the degradation of passivation properties of SiNx on silicon.

  6. Study of the main parameters involved in carbothermal reduction reaction of silica aiming to obtain silicon nitride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, J.C. da; Greca, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of main parameters involved in the method of silicon nitride attainment by carbothermal reduction of silica followed by nitridation were studied in isothermal experiments of fine powder mixtures of silica and graphite in a nitrogen gas flow. The time, temperature, rate C/SiO 2 and flow of nitrogen were varied since they are the main parameters involved in this kind of reaction. The products of reaction were analysed by X-ray diffraction to identify the crystalline phases and as a result was obtained the nucleation of silicon nitride phase. Meanwhile, corroborating prior results, we verified to be difficult the progress of the reaction and the inhibition of formation of silicon carbide phase, the last one being associated to the formation of silicon nitride phase due to thermodynamic matters [pt

  7. Development of an aluminum nitride-silicon carbide material set for high-temperature sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Benjamin A.; Habermehl, Scott D.; Clews, Peggy J.

    2014-06-01

    A number of important energy and defense-related applications would benefit from sensors capable of withstanding extreme temperatures (>300°C). Examples include sensors for automobile engines, gas turbines, nuclear and coal power plants, and petroleum and geothermal well drilling. Military applications, such as hypersonic flight research, would also benefit from sensors capable of 1000°C. Silicon carbide (SiC) has long been recognized as a promising material for harsh environment sensors and electronics because it has the highest mechanical strength of semiconductors with the exception of diamond and its upper temperature limit exceeds 2500°C, where it sublimates rather than melts. Yet today, many advanced SiC MEMS are limited to lower temperatures because they are made from SiC films deposited on silicon wafers. Other limitations arise from sensor transduction by measuring changes in capacitance or resistance, which require biasing or modulation schemes that can with- stand elevated temperatures. We are circumventing these issues by developing sensing structures directly on SiC wafers using SiC and piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films. SiC and AlN are a promising material combination due to their high thermal, electrical, and mechanical strength and closely matched coefficients of thermal expansion. AlN is also a non-ferroelectric piezoelectric material, enabling piezoelectric transduction at temperatures exceeding 1000°C. In this paper, the challenges of incorporating these two materials into a compatible MEMS fabrication process are presented. The current progress and initial measurements of the fabrication process are shown. The future direction and the need for further investigation of the material set are addressed.

  8. Silver Nanoparticle-Deposited Boron Nitride Nanosheets as Fillers for Polymeric Composites with High Thermal Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-19

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have recently attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of the electronic devices toward higher speed and performance. However, a common method to enhance polymer thermal conductivity through an addition of high thermally conductive fillers usually cannot provide an expected value, especially for composites requiring electrical insulation. Here, we show that polymeric composites with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets as fillers could effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of polymer, thanks to the bridging connections of silver nanoparticles among boron nitride nanosheets. The thermal conductivity of the composite is significantly increased from 1.63 W/m-K for the composite filled with the silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets to 3.06 W/m-K at the boron nitride nanosheets loading of 25.1 vol %. In addition, the electrically insulating properties of the composite are well preserved. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity of epoxy composite with one physical model indicates that the composite with silver nanoparticle-deposited boron nitride nanosheets outperforms the one with boron nitride nanosheets, owning to the lower thermal contact resistance among boron nitride nanosheets' interfaces. The finding sheds new light on enhancement of thermal conductivity of the polymeric composites which concurrently require the electrical insulation.

  9. Surface Preparation and Deposited Gate Oxides for Gallium Nitride Based Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rathnait D.; McIntyre, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    The literature on polar Gallium Nitride (GaN) surfaces, surface treatments and gate dielectrics relevant to metal oxide semiconductor devices is reviewed. The significance of the GaN growth technique and growth parameters on the properties of GaN epilayers, the ability to modify GaN surface properties using in situ and ex situ processes and progress on the understanding and performance of GaN metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices are presented and discussed. Although a reasonably consistent picture is emerging from focused studies on issues covered in each of these topics, future research can achieve a better understanding of the critical oxide-semiconductor interface by probing the connections between these topics. The challenges in analyzing defect concentrations and energies in GaN MOS gate stacks are discussed. Promising gate dielectric deposition techniques such as atomic layer deposition, which is already accepted by the semiconductor industry for silicon CMOS device fabrication, coupled with more advanced physical and electrical characterization methods will likely accelerate the pace of learning required to develop future GaN-based MOS technology.

  10. Linear and nonlinear characterization of low-stress high-confinement silicon-rich nitride waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krückel, Clemens J; Fülöp, Attila; Klintberg, Thomas; Bengtsson, Jörgen; Andrekson, Peter A; Torres-Company, Víctor

    2015-10-05

    In this paper we introduce a low-stress silicon enriched nitride platform that has potential for nonlinear and highly integrated optics. The manufacturing process of this platform is CMOS compatible and the increased silicon content allows tensile stress reduction and crack free layer growth of 700 nm. Additional benefits of the silicon enriched nitride is a measured nonlinear Kerr coefficient n(2) of 1.4·10(-18) m(2)/W (5 times higher than stoichiometric silicon nitride) and a refractive index of 2.1 at 1550 nm that enables high optical field confinement allowing high intensity nonlinear optics and light guidance even with small bending radii. We analyze the waveguide loss (∼1 dB/cm) in a spectrally resolved fashion and include scattering loss simulations based on waveguide surface roughness measurements. Detailed simulations show the possibility for fine dispersion and nonlinear engineering. In nonlinear experiments we present continuous-wave wavelength conversion and demonstrate that the material does not show nonlinear absorption effects. Finally, we demonstrate microfabrication of resonators with high Q-factors (∼10(5)).

  11. Biochemical analyses of lipids deposited on silicone hydrogel lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hatou

    2010-07-01

    Conclusions: The quantity of total lipid and cholesterol deposited on the 3 silicone hydrogel lenses tested did not differ. However, there were significant differences in the amounts of phospholipid deposited among the 3 silicone hydrogel lenses, of which clinical significance should be explored in the future study.

  12. Deposition of silicon films in presence of nitrogen plasma— A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. A design, development and validation work of plasma based 'activated reactive evaporation (ARE) system' is implemented for the deposition of the silicon films in presence of nitrogen plasma on substrate maintained at room temperature. This plasma based deposition system involves evaporation of pure silicon by.

  13. Electron-trapping-triggered anneal of defect states in silicon-rich hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oversluizen, G.; Lodders, W.H.; Johnson, M.T.; van der Put, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    The dc-current stress behavior of Mo/a-SiN x H y /Mo thin-film diodes is discussed for several a-SiN x H y -plasma-deposition conditions. Current transport is governed by thermionic field emission of electrons over a reverse biased Schottky barrier. The barrier height is determined by the a-SiN x H y -plasma-deposition conditions. Therefore these back-to-back Schottky devices provide an elegant way to perform dc-current stressing at several well defined carrier densities for similar stress fields. It is shown that such experiments allow assessment of defect-state creation/anneal mechanisms in a-SiN x H y . An electron-trapping-triggered anneal mechanism accounts for the observed dependence of the defect density at the electrode injecting contact (cathode) on the hole-barrier height at the anode. Also a new microscopically detailed anneal reaction scheme is proposed. The defect-state creation/anneal mechanism is expected to be generally applicable for all silicon-rich hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  14. Towards a high performing UV-A sensor based on Silicon Carbide and hydrogenated Silicon Nitride absorbing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzillo, M.; Renna, L.; Costa, N.; Badalà, P.; Sciuto, A.; Mannino, G.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major risk factor for most skin cancers. The sun is our primary natural source of UV radiation. The strength of the sun's ultraviolet radiation is expressed as Solar UV Index (UVI). UV-A (320–400 nm) and UV-B (290–320 nm) rays mostly contribute to UVI. UV-B is typically the most destructive form of UV radiation because it has enough energy to cause photochemical damage to cellular DNA. Also overexposure to UV-A rays, although these are less energetic than UV-B photons, has been associated with toughening of the skin, suppression of the immune system, and cataract formation. The use of preventive measures to decrease sunlight UV radiation absorption is fundamental to reduce acute and irreversible health diseases to skin, eyes and immune system. In this perspective UV sensors able to monitor in a monolithic and compact chip the UV Index and relative UV-A and UV-B components of solar spectrum can play a relevant role for prevention, especially in view of the integration of these detectors in close at hand portable devices. Here we present the preliminary results obtained on our UV-A sensor technology based on the use of hydrogenated Silicon Nitride (SiN:H) thin passivating layers deposited on the surface of thin continuous metal film Ni_2Si/4H-SiC Schottky detectors, already used for UV-Index monitoring. The first UV-A detector prototypes exhibit a very low leakage current density of about 0.2 pA/mm"2 and a peak responsivity value of 0.027 A/W at 330 nm, both measured at 0V bias.

  15. Laser-assisted turning of components made of silicon-nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klocke, F.; Bausch, S.

    2001-01-01

    The manufacture of high-precision parts made of silicon-nitride ceramic, such as roller bearing rings or valves, currently involves finishing in the form of time and cost intensive grinding operations. This has resulted in demands for the development of more efficient machining techniques and for the subsequent provision of these within a manufacturing environment. A prototype of a precision lathe with an integrated high power diode laser for laser-assisted turning has been developed at the Fraunhofer IPT in close co-operation with industrial partners. When the workpiece is heated continuously by the laser, the resultant localized material softening enables the ceramic to be machined using a defined cutting edge. The application of this technique allows complex silicon nitride ceramic parts with surface qualities of up to R a = 0.3 μm to be produced considerably more flexibly than before, with no requirement for cooling lubricant. (author)

  16. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride photonic crystals for improved-performance surface electromagnetic wave biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinibaldi, Alberto; Descrovi, Emiliano; Giorgis, Fabrizio; Dominici, Lorenzo; Ballarini, Mirko; Mandracci, Pietro; Danz, Norbert; Michelotti, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    We exploit the properties of surface electromagnetic waves propagating at the surface of finite one dimensional photonic crystals to improve the performance of optical biosensors with respect to the standard surface plasmon resonance approach. We demonstrate that the hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride technology is a versatile platform for fabricating one dimensional photonic crystals with any desirable design and operating in a wide wavelength range, from the visible to the near infrared. We prepared sensors based on photonic crystals sustaining either guided modes or surface electromagnetic waves, also known as Bloch surface waves. We carried out for the first time a direct experimental comparison of their sensitivity and figure of merit with surface plasmon polaritons on metal layers, by making use of a commercial surface plasmon resonance instrument that was slightly adapted for the experiments. Our measurements demonstrate that the Bloch surface waves on silicon nitride photonic crystals outperform surface plasmon polaritons by a factor 1.3 in terms of figure of merit.

  17. Application of Silicon Nitride (Si3N4 Ceramics in Ball Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijianto Wijianto

    2016-08-01

    operation up to 1000°C, greater thermal shock resistance, lower density and low thermal expansion. This properties gives some benefit for ball bearing material such as higher running speed, reduce vibration of the shaft, will improve the life time and maintenance cost, lower heat generated, less energy consumption, lower wear rate, reducing noise level and reduce of using lubricant. The sintering methods are used to produce ball bearing from silicon nitride. Some techniques can be applied to increase ceramics strength which are reduce porosity, reduce grain size, reduce surface flaw and proof stressing. The surface finishing of the ceramic bearing is very important because silicon nitride as a brittle material, its strength is limited to the flaw sizes especially the flaw at the surface.

  18. Electrical behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube network embedded in amorphous silicon nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buiculescu Raluca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The electrical behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube network embedded in amorphous silicon nitride is studied by measuring the voltage and temperature dependences of the current. The microstructure of the network is investigated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The multi-walled carbon nanotube network has an uniform spatial extension in the silicon nitride matrix. The current-voltage and resistance-temperature characteristics are both linear, proving the metallic behavior of the network. The I-V curves present oscillations that are further analyzed by computing the conductance-voltage characteristics. The conductance presents minima and maxima that appear at the same voltage for both bias polarities, at both 20 and 298 K, and that are not periodic. These oscillations are interpreted as due to percolation processes. The voltage percolation thresholds are identified with the conductance minima.

  19. Surface toughness of silicon nitride bioceramics: I, Raman spectroscopy-assisted micromechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Enomoto, Yuto; Zhu, Wenliang; Boffelli, Marco; Marin, Elia; McEntire, Bryan J

    2016-02-01

    Indentation micro-fracture is revisited as a tool for evaluating the surface toughness of silicon nitride (Si3N4) bioceramics for artificial joint applications. Despite being unique and practical from an experimental perspective, a quantitative assessment of surface fracture toughness using this method is challenging. An improved method has been developed, consisting of coupling indentation with confocal (spatially resolved) Raman piezo-spectroscopy. Empowered by the Raman microprobe, the indentation micro-fracture method was found to be capable of providing reliable surface toughness measurements in silicon nitride biomaterials. In designing the microstructures of bioceramic bearing couples for improved tribological performance, surface toughness must be considered as a fundamentally different and distinct parameter from bulk toughness. The coupling of indention crack opening displacements (COD) with local stress field assessments by spectroscopy paves the way to reliably compare the structural properties of bioceramics and to quantitatively monitor their evolution during environmental exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Silicon nitride: A ceramic material with outstanding resistance to thermal shock and corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, K. H.; Saure, F.

    1983-01-01

    The known physical, mechanical and chemical properties of reaction-sintered silicon nitride are summarized. This material deserves interest especially because of its unusually good resistance to thermal shock and corrosion at high temperatures. Two types are distinguished: reaction-sintered (porous) and hot-pressed (dense) Si3N4. Only the reaction-sintered material which is being produced today in large scale as crucibles, pipes, nozzles and tiles is considered.

  1. The Effects of Thermal Cycling on Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Devices for Aerospace Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These Include radiation, extreme temperatures, thermal cycling, to name a few. Preliminary data obtained on new Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide power devices under exposure to radiation followed by long term thermal cycling are presented. This work was done in collaboration with GSFC and JPL in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program

  2. Effect of hot isostatic pressing on reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, G. K.; Moore, T. J.; Millard, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Specimens of nearly theoretical density have been obtained through the isostatic hot pressing of reaction-bonded silicon nitride under 138 MPa of pressure for two hours at 1850, 1950, and 2050 C. An amorphous phase that is introduced by the hot isostatic pressing partly accounts for the fact that while room temperature flexural strength more than doubles, the 1200 C flexural strength increases significantly only after pressing at 2050 C.

  3. Mechanical behaviour and failure phenomenon of an in situ toughened silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, J. A.; Choi, S. R.; Freedman, M. R.; Jenkins, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    The Weibull modulus, fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of an in-situ toughened, silicon nitride material used to manufacture a turbine combustor were determined from room temperature to 1371 C. The material exhibited an elongated grain structure that resulted in improved fracture toughness, nonlinear crack growth resistance, and good elevated temperature strength. However, low temperature strength was limited by grains of excessive length (30 to 100 microns). These excessively long grains were surrounded by regions rich in sintering additives.

  4. Strength evaluation test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusue, K.; Takahara, K.; Hashimoto, R.

    1984-01-01

    In order to study strength characteristics at room temperature and the strength evaluating method of ceramic materials, the following tests were conducted on pressureless sintered silicon nitride specimens: bending tests, the three tensile tests of rectangular plates, holed plates, and notched plates, and spin tests of centrally holed disks. The relationship between the mean strength of specimens and the effective volume of specimens are examined using Weibull's theory. The effect of surface grinding on the strength of specimens is discussed.

  5. Analysis of the effective thermoelastic properties and stress fields in silicon nitride based on EBSD data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Othmani, Y.; Böhlke, T.; Lube, T.; Fellmeth, A.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Colonna, F.; Hashibon, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 5 (2016), s. 1109-1125 ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 263476 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Silicon nitride * EBSD data * Hashin-Shtrikman bounds * Finite element analysis Subject RIV: JH - Ceramic s, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  6. Robust Environmental Barrier Coatings for Silicon Nitride, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicon based ceramics are the leading candidates for the high temperature structural components of the advanced propulsion engines. For such applications, one key...

  7. Mechanics of silicon nitride thin-film stressors on a transistor-like geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reboh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To understand the behavior of silicon nitride capping etch stopping layer stressors in nanoscale microelectronics devices, a simplified structure mimicking typical transistor geometries was studied. Elastic strains in the silicon substrate were mapped using dark-field electron holography. The results were interpreted with the aid of finite element method modeling. We show, in a counterintuitive sense, that the stresses developed by the film in the vertical sections around the transistor gate can reach much higher values than the full sheet reference. This is an important insight for advanced technology nodes where the vertical contribution of such liners is predominant over the horizontal part.

  8. Impedimetric immunosensor for human serum albumin detection on a direct aldehyde-functionalized silicon nitride surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero, David, E-mail: caballero@unistra.fr [Nanobioengineering group-IBEC, Barcelona Science Park, C/ Baldiri Reixach 10-12, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); University of Barcelona, Department of Electronics, C/ Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Martinez, Elena [Nanobioengineering group-IBEC, Barcelona Science Park, C/ Baldiri Reixach 10-12, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Bausells, Joan [Centre Nacional de Microelectronica (CNM-IMB), CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Errachid, Abdelhamid, E-mail: abdelhamid.errachid-el-salhi@univ-lyon1.fr [Nanobioengineering group-IBEC, Barcelona Science Park, C/ Baldiri Reixach 10-12, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Universite Claude Bernard - Lyon 1, LSA - UMR 5180, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Samitier, Josep [Nanobioengineering group-IBEC, Barcelona Science Park, C/ Baldiri Reixach 10-12, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); University of Barcelona, Department of Electronics, C/ Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An impedimetric label-free immunosensor was developed for the specific detection of human serum albumin proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-HSA antibodies were covalently immobilized on silicon nitride surfaces using a direct functionalization methodology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silicon nitride offers multiple advantages compared to other common materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed sensor has high sensitivity and good selectivity for the detection of HSA proteins. - Abstract: In this work we report the fabrication and characterization of a label-free impedimetric immunosensor based on a silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) surface for the specific detection of human serum albumin (HSA) proteins. Silicon nitride provides several advantages compared with other materials commonly used, such as gold, and in particular in solid-state physics for electronic-based biosensors. However, few Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-based biosensors have been developed; the lack of an efficient and direct protocol for the integration of biological elements with silicon-based substrates is still one of its the main drawbacks. Here, we use a direct functionalization method for the direct covalent binding of monoclonal anti-HSA antibodies on an aldehyde-functionalized Si-p/SiO{sub 2}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} structure. This methodology, in contrast with most of the protocols reported in literature, requires less chemical reagents, it is less time-consuming and it does not need any chemical activation. The detection capability of the immunosensor was tested by performing non-faradaic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements for the specific detection of HSA proteins. Protein concentrations within the linear range of 10{sup -13}-10{sup -7} M were detected, showing a sensitivity of 0.128 {Omega} {mu}M{sup -1} and a limit of detection of 10{sup -14} M. The specificity of the sensor was also addressed by studying the

  9. Impedimetric immunosensor for human serum albumin detection on a direct aldehyde-functionalized silicon nitride surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, David; Martinez, Elena; Bausells, Joan; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Samitier, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An impedimetric label-free immunosensor was developed for the specific detection of human serum albumin proteins. ► Anti-HSA antibodies were covalently immobilized on silicon nitride surfaces using a direct functionalization methodology. ► Silicon nitride offers multiple advantages compared to other common materials. ► The proposed sensor has high sensitivity and good selectivity for the detection of HSA proteins. - Abstract: In this work we report the fabrication and characterization of a label-free impedimetric immunosensor based on a silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) surface for the specific detection of human serum albumin (HSA) proteins. Silicon nitride provides several advantages compared with other materials commonly used, such as gold, and in particular in solid-state physics for electronic-based biosensors. However, few Si 3 N 4 -based biosensors have been developed; the lack of an efficient and direct protocol for the integration of biological elements with silicon-based substrates is still one of its the main drawbacks. Here, we use a direct functionalization method for the direct covalent binding of monoclonal anti-HSA antibodies on an aldehyde-functionalized Si-p/SiO 2 /Si 3 N 4 structure. This methodology, in contrast with most of the protocols reported in literature, requires less chemical reagents, it is less time-consuming and it does not need any chemical activation. The detection capability of the immunosensor was tested by performing non-faradaic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements for the specific detection of HSA proteins. Protein concentrations within the linear range of 10 −13 –10 −7 M were detected, showing a sensitivity of 0.128 Ω μM −1 and a limit of detection of 10 −14 M. The specificity of the sensor was also addressed by studying the interferences with a similar protein, bovine serum albumin. The results obtained show that the antibodies were efficiently immobilized and the proteins

  10. Formation of Mach angle profiles during wet etching of silica and silicon nitride materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghulinyan, M., E-mail: ghulinyan@fbk.eu [Centre for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo (Italy); Bernard, M.; Bartali, R. [Centre for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo (Italy); Deptartment of Physics, University of Trento, I-38123 Povo (Italy); Pucker, G. [Centre for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Photoresist adhesion induces the formation of complex etch profiles in dielectrics. • Hydrofluoric acid etching of silica glass and silicon nitride materials was studied. • The phenomenon has been modeled in analogy with sonic boom propagation. • The material etch rate and resist adhesion/erosion define the final profile. - Abstract: In integrated circuit technology peeling of masking photoresist films is a major drawback during the long-timed wet etching of materials. It causes an undesired film underetching, which is often accompanied by a formation of complex etch profiles. Here we report on a detailed study of wedge-shaped profile formation in a series of silicon oxide, silicon oxynitride and silicon nitride materials during wet etching in a buffered hydrofluoric acid (BHF) solution. The shape of etched profiles reflects the time-dependent adhesion properties of the photoresist to a particular material and can be perfectly circular, purely linear or a combination of both, separated by a knee feature. Starting from a formal analogy between the sonic boom propagation and the wet underetching process, we model the wedge formation mechanism analytically. This model predicts the final form of the profile as a function of time and fits the experimental data perfectly. We discuss how this knowledge can be extended to the design and the realization of optical components such as highly efficient etch-less vertical tapers for passive silicon photonics.

  11. Comprehensive perspective on the mechanism of preferred orientation in reactive-sputter-deposited nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajikawa, Yuya; Noda, Suguru; Komiyama, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Texture control of sputter-deposited nitride films has provoked a great deal of interest due to its technological importance. Despite extensive research, however, the reported results are scattered and discussions about the origin of preferred orientation (PO) are sometimes conflicting, and therefore controversial. The aim of this study is to acquire a clear perspective in order to discuss the origin of PO of sputter-deposited nitrides. Among nitrides, we focus on titanium nitride (TiN), aluminum nitride (AlN), and tantalum nitride (TaN), which are three commonly used nitrides. First, we collected reported experimental results about the relation between operating conditions and PO, because PO is considered to be determined by film formation processes, such as surface diffusion or grain growth, which is affected by operating conditions. We also collected reported results about such PO-determining processes. Then, we categorized the PO-determining processes into an initial stage and a growth stage of film deposition, and further categorized each stage into a vapor-solid interface and a solid-solid interface. Then, we related each stage and interface to film morphology and to PO-determining processes. Finally, based on existing results, previous models, and proposed schema, we discuss the origin of PO. Based on previous experimental results on film morphology, PO of nitride films occurred in the growth stage at the vapor-solid interface, where the sticking process of the precursor and the surface diffusion process determine PO, rather than in the initial stage and in the growth stage at the solid-solid interface. TiN (002) PO, however, seems to be caused in the initial stage at the solid-solid interface

  12. Atomic oxygen effects on boron nitride and silicon nitride: A comparison of ground based and space flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, J. B.; Lan, E. H.; Smith, C. A.; Whatley, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen on boron nitride (BN) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) were evaluated in a low Earth orbit (LEO) flight experiment and in a ground based simulation facility. In both the inflight and ground based experiments, these materials were coated on thin (approx. 250A) silver films, and the electrical resistance of the silver was measured in situ to detect any penetration of atomic oxygen through the BN and Si3N4 materials. In the presence of atomic oxygen, silver oxidizes to form silver oxide, which has a much higher electrical resistance than pure silver. Permeation of atomic oxygen through BN, as indicated by an increase in the electrical resistance of the silver underneath, was observed in both the inflight and ground based experiments. In contrast, no permeation of atomic oxygen through Si3N4 was observed in either the inflight or ground based experiments. The ground based results show good qualitative correlation with the LEO flight results, indicating that ground based facilities such as the one at Los Alamos National Lab can reproduce space flight data from LEO.

  13. Nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehlls, A.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and certain properties of the ionic and covalent nitrides of alkali earth, rare earth, transition elements, cadmium, boron, indium and thorium are considered briefly. Peculiarities of the crystal structure, the structure of coordinated polyhedrons, the character and parameters of chemical bond depending on nitride composition are discussed

  14. Numerical modeling and experimental investigation of laser-assisted machining of silicon nitride ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinwei

    Laser-assisted machining (LAM) is a promising non-conventional machining technique for advanced ceramics. However, the fundamental machining mechanism which governs the LAM process is not well understood so far. Hence, the main objective of this study is to explore the machining mechanism and provide guidance for future LAM operations. In this study, laser-assisted milling (LAMill) of silicon nitride ceramics is focused. Experimental experience reveals that workpiece temperature in LAM of silicon nitride ceramics determines the surface quality of the machined workpiece. Thus, in order to know the thermal features of the workpiece in LAM, the laser-silicon nitride interaction mechanism is investigated via heating experiments. The trends of temperature affected by the key parameters (laser power, laser beam diameter, feed rate, and preheat time) are obtained through a parametric study. Experimental results show that high operating temperature leads to low cutting force, good surface finish, small edge chipping, and low residual stress. The temperature range for brittle-to-ductile transition should be avoided due to the rapid increase of fracture toughness. In order to know the temperature distribution at the cutting zone in the workpiece, a transient three-dimensional thermal model is developed using finite element analysis (FEA) and validated through experiments. Heat generation associated with machining is considered and demonstrated to have little impact on LAM. The model indicates that laser power is one critical parameter for successful operation of LAM. Feed and cutting speed can indirectly affect the operating temperatures. Furthermore, a machining model is established with the distinct element method (or discrete element method, DEM) to simulate the dynamic process of LAM. In the microstructural modeling of a beta-type silicon nitride ceramic, clusters are used to simulate the rod-like grains of the silicon nitride ceramic and parallel bonds act as the

  15. Electrochemical Deposition of High Purity Silicon from Molten Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarberg, Geir Martin

    Several approaches were tried in order to develop an electrochemical route for producing high purity silicon from molten salts. SiO2, K2SiF6 and metallurgical silicon were used as the source of silicon. Molten electrolytes based on chloride (CaCl2-NaCl) and fluoride (LiF-KF) at temperatures from 550 - 900 oC were used. Transient electrochemical techniques were used to study the electrochemical behaviour of dissolved silicon species. Electrolysis experiments were carried out to deposit silicon.

  16. Electrochemical Deposition of High Purity Silicon in Molten Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarberg, Geir Martin

    Several approaches were tried in order to develop an electrochemical route for producing high purity silicon from molten salts. SiO2, K2SiF6 and metallurgical silicon were used as the source of silicon. Molten electrolytes based on chloride (CaCl2-NaCl) and fluoride (LiF-KF) at temperatures from 550 - 900 °C were used. Transient electrochemical techniques were used to study the electrochemical behaviour of dissolved silicon species. Electrolysis experiments were carried out to deposit silicon.

  17. Cathodic cage plasma deposition of TiN and TiO{sub 2} thin films on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Romulo R. M. de [Department of Mechanics, Federal Institute of Education, Science, and Technology of Piaui, Praça da Liberdade, 1597, CEP 64000-040 Teresina, Piaui, Brazil and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Federal University of Piaui, Campus Min. Petronio Portela, Ininga, CEP 64049-550 Teresina, Piaui (Brazil); Sato, Patricia S.; Nascente, Pedro A. P., E-mail: nascente@ufscar.br [Department of Materials Engineering, Federal University of Sao Carlos, Via Washington Luis km 235, CEP 13565-905 Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Viana, Bartolomeu C. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Piaui, Campus Min. Petronio Portela, Ininga, CEP 64049-550 Teresina, Piaui (Brazil); Alves, Clodomiro [Department of Exact and Natural Sciences, Federal Rural University of Semi Arido, Avenida Francisco Mota, 572, CEP 59625-900 Mossoro, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Nishimoto, Akio [Department of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Chemistry, Materials and Bioengineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Cathodic cage plasma deposition (CCPD) was used for growing titanium nitride (TiN) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin films on silicon substrates. The main advantages of the CCPD technique are the uniformity, tridimensionality, and high rate of the film deposition that occurs at higher pressures, lower temperatures, and lower treatment times than those used in conventional nitriding treatments. In this work, the influence of the temperature and gas atmosphere upon the characteristics of the deposited films was investigated. The TiN and TiO{sub 2} thin films were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy to analyze their chemical, structural, and morphological characteristics, and the combination of these results indicates that the low-cost CCPD technique can be used to produce even and highly crystalline TiN and TiO{sub 2} films.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of nano silicon and titanium nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have demonstrated a simple, scalable and inexpensive method based on microwave plasma for synthesizing 5 to 10 g/h of nanomaterials. Luminescent nano silicon ..... abad for permitting to conduct experimental work in his organization and Prof. Krupashankara, Department of. Mechanical Engineering, RV College of ...

  19. Investigation of vanadium and nitride alloys thin layers deposited by PVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouveau C.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the technique of magnetron vapor deposition and the effect of several deposition parameters on the structural and morphological properties of prepared thin films. It was noted that the deposition time has an effect on the crystallinity, mechanical properties such as residual stress, roughness surface and the layer composition from target products. Studies were carried out on layers of vanadium (V and the nitride vanadium (VN.

  20. In situ synthesis of a large area boron nitride/graphene monolayer/boron nitride film by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinke; Jang, Sung Kyu; Park, Sangwoo; Jung, Seong Jun; Suh, Hwansoo; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Sungjoo; Song, Young Jae

    2015-04-01

    We describe the successful in situ chemical vapor deposition synthesis of a graphene-based heterostructure in which a graphene monolayer is protected by top and bottom boron nitride films. The boron nitride film/graphene monolayer/boron nitride film (BGB) was found to be a mechanically robust and chemically inert heterostructure, from which the deleterious effects of mechanical transfer processes and unwanted chemical doping under air exposure were eliminated. The chemical compositions of each film layer were monitored ex situ using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the crystalline structures were confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction measurements. The performance of the devices fabricated using the BGB film was monitored over six months and did not display large changes in the mobility or the Dirac point, unlike the conventional graphene devices prepared on a SiO2 substrate. The in situ-grown BGB film properties suggest a novel approach to the fabrication of commercial-grade graphene-based electronic devices.We describe the successful in situ chemical vapor deposition synthesis of a graphene-based heterostructure in which a graphene monolayer is protected by top and bottom boron nitride films. The boron nitride film/graphene monolayer/boron nitride film (BGB) was found to be a mechanically robust and chemically inert heterostructure, from which the deleterious effects of mechanical transfer processes and unwanted chemical doping under air exposure were eliminated. The chemical compositions of each film layer were monitored ex situ using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the crystalline structures were confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction measurements. The performance of the devices fabricated using the BGB film was monitored over six months and did not display large changes in the

  1. Effect of additive gases and injection methods on chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F2 remote plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y. B.; Park, S. M.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, N.-E.; Kim, K. S.; Bae, G. H.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of various additive gases and different injection methods on the chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F 2 remote plasmas. N 2 and N 2 +O 2 gases in the F 2 /Ar/N 2 and F 2 /Ar/N 2 /O 2 remote plasmas effectively increased the etch rate of the layers. The addition of direct-injected NO gas increased the etch rates most significantly. NO radicals generated by the addition of N 2 and N 2 +O 2 or direct-injected NO molecules contributed to the effective removal of nitrogen and oxygen in the silicon nitride and oxide layers, by forming N 2 O and NO 2 by-products, respectively, and thereby enhancing SiF 4 formation. As a result of the effective removal of the oxygen, nitrogen, and silicon atoms in the layers, the chemical dry etch rates were enhanced significantly. The process regime for the etch rate enhancement of the layers was extended at elevated temperature

  2. Ionizing Energy Depositions After Fast Neutron Interactions in Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Bergmann, Benedikt; Caicedo, Ivan; Kierstead, James; Takai, Helio; Frojdh, Erik

    2016-01-01

    In this study we present the ionizing energy depositions in a 300 μm thick silicon layer after fast neutron impact. With the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique, the ionizing energy deposition spectra of recoil silicons and secondary charged particles were assigned to (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron energies in the range from 180 keV to hundreds of MeV. We show and interpret representative measured energy spectra. By separating the ionizing energy losses of the recoil silicon from energy depositions by products of nuclear reactions, the competition of ionizing (IEL) and non-ionizing energy losses (NIEL) of a recoil silicon within the silicon lattice was investigated. The data give supplementary information to the results of a previous measurement and are compared with different theoretical predictions.

  3. High-pressure deuterium annealing for improving the reliability characteristics of silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon nonvolatile memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sangmoo; Jang, Man; Park, Hokyung; Hwang, Hyunsang; Jeon, Sanghun; Kim, Juhyung; Kim, Chungwoo

    2004-12-01

    We report the effects of high-pressure deuterium postmetallization annealing on the reliability characteristics of silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon nonvolatile memory devices. Compared with the control samples annealed in a conventional forming gas ambient (H2/N2=4%/96%), the samples annealed in a high-pressure (10 atm) pure deuterium ambient show improved endurance and retention characteristics without the degradation of program/erase (P/E) speed. In addition, the high-pressure deuterium-annealed samples show a significantly reduced charge loss rate for the electron-stored state and the hole-stored state, before and after the P/E cycles. The improved reliability of the high-pressure deuterium-annealed samples can be explained by the significantly decreased interface trap density and the large kinetic isotope effect of deuterium, which reduces the generation of the interface trap density under the stress of the P/E cycles.

  4. Pulsed laser heating of silicon-nitride capped GaAs: Optical properties at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, A.; Yao, H. D.; Compaan, A.; Horak, A.; Rys, A.

    1988-09-01

    The optical properties of silicon nitride and gallium arsenide were studied at temperatures up to and beyond the melting point of GaAs by means of laser heating. XeCl excimer and pulsed dye laser pulses, ˜10 ns in duration, were used to heat the semiconductor under nitride capping layers of varying thickness. The transient reflectivity response at 514.5 nm was used together with a multilayer interference analysis to obtain the optical constants of solid and molten GaAs and of solid Si3N4 near the 1513-K melting point of GaAs. In addition, we report the melt duration as a function of laser pulse energy for GaAs with and without capping layers.

  5. Effects of hot isostatic pressure on titanium nitride films deposited by physical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbonari M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Films of titanium nitride deposited by physical vapor deposition on 304 L stainless steel substrates were hot isostatic pressed (HIP under 150 MPa at 550 °C. To study the effects of this treatment on the microstructure of those films, X-ray diffraction analyses, Rutherford Backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy were performed. Surface hardness, and roughness were also evaluated to characterize the TiN properties. The hot isostatic pressure leads to an increase of hardness for depths up to 0.1 mum and a crystallographic texture change from (111 to (200. The original TiN golden color turned to red after the treatment. An increase of the grain size has been observed for hot isostatic pressed samples, but the stoichiometry of the TiN film was determined to be 1:1 by RBS. The microstructure observed by atomic force microscopy indicated that the TiN film surface is smoother after the HIP treatment.

  6. Cubic and hexagonal boron-nitride (c-BN/h-BN) thin films deposited in situ by r.f. magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, J. M.; Bejarano, G.; Zambrano, G.; Baca, E.; Morán, O.; Prieto, P.

    2005-07-01

    Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN)/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) thin films were grown in situ on (100) oriented silicon substrates by r.f. (13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering technique. In order to obtain the highest fraction of the c-BN phase, a negative d.c bias voltage, varying from 0 to -200 V was applied to the substrate during deposition. Another set of boron nitride thin films was deposited in situ on (100) oriented silicon substrates under r.f. bias voltage. The substrate holder was biased from 0 to -350 V by connecting such to an auxiliary r.f. generator (operated at 13.56 MHz). Films were characterized by Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Well-defined peaks at 787 cm-1, 1100 cm-1 and 1387 cm-1, corresponding to the 2Au (out-plane bending of B-N-B bond) h-BN vibration mode, the F2 (stretching) c-BN Transversal Optical (TO) mode and the E1u (in-plane stretching of B-N bond) vibration mode of the h-BN, respectively, were observed in the FTIR spectra. A maximal fraction of the c-BN phase close to 85% was obtained under a bias voltage of -150 V at substrate temperature of 300 °C and a total pressure of 4 × 10-2 mbar.

  7. Dual mechanical behaviour of hydrogen in stressed silicon nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpi, F.; Braccini, M.; Pasturel, A.; Devos, A.; Raymond, G.; Morin, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the present article, we report a study on the mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms and pores in silicon nitride (SiN) films. A simple three-phase model is proposed to relate the physical properties (stiffness, film stress, mass density, etc.) of hydrogenated nanoporous SiN thin films to the volume fractions of hydrogen and pores. This model is then applied to experimental data extracted from films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, where hydrogen content, stress, and mass densities range widely from 11% to 30%, −2.8 to 1.5 GPa, and 2.0 to 2.8 g/cm 3 , respectively. Starting from the conventional plotting of film's Young's modulus against film porosity, we first propose to correct the conventional calculation of porosity volume fraction with the hydrogen content, thus taking into account both hydrogen mass and concentration. The weight of this hydrogen-correction is found to evolve linearly with hydrogen concentration in tensile films (in accordance with a simple “mass correction” of the film density calculation), but a clear discontinuity is observed toward compressive stresses. Then, the effective volume occupied by hydrogen atoms is calculated taking account of the bond type (N-H or Si-H bonds), thus allowing a precise extraction of the hydrogen volume fraction. These calculations applied to tensile films show that both volume fractions of hydrogen and porosity are similar in magnitude and randomly distributed against Young's modulus. However, the expected linear dependence of the Young's modulus is clearly observed when both volume fractions are added. Finally, we show that the stiffer behaviour of compressive films cannot be only explained on the basis of this (hydrogen + porosity) volume fraction. Indeed this stiffness difference relies on a dual mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms against the film stress state: while they participate to the stiffness in compressive films, hydrogen atoms mainly

  8. Aluminum nitride-silicon carbide whisker composites: Processing, properties, and microstructural stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Aluminum nitride -- silicon carbide whisker composites with up to 20 vol % whiskers were fabricated by pressureless sintering (1750{degree}--1800{degree}C) and by hot-pressing (1700{degree}--1800{degree}C). Silicon carbide whiskers were found to degrade depending on the type of protective powder bed used during sintering. Whiskers were found to degraded in high oxygen containing samples by reaction with sintering additives. Whisker degradation was also due to the formation of silicon carbide -- aluminum nitride solid solution. No whisker degradation was observed in hot-pressed samples. For these samples Young's modulus and fracture toughness were measured. A 33% increase in the fracture toughness was measured by the indentation technique for a 20 vol % whisker composite. Operative toughening mechanisms were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Crack deflection and whisker bridging were the dominant mechanisms. It was also shown that load transfer from matrix to whiskers can be a contributing factor to toughening. 88 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Effects of oxidation and hot corrosion on the erosion of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Jip

    2005-01-01

    The effect of oxidation and hot corrosion on the solid particle erosion was investigated for hot-pressed silicon nitride using as- polished, pre-oxidized and pre-corroded specimens by molten sodium sulfates. Erosion tests were performed at 22, 500 and 900 .deg. C using angular silicon carbide particles of mean diameter 100 μm. Experimental results show that solid particle erosion rate of silicon nitride increases with increasing temperature for as-polished or pre-oxidized specimens in consistent with the prediction of a theoretical model. Erosion rate of pre-oxidized specimens is lower than that of as-polished specimens at 22 .deg. C, but it is higher at 900 .deg. C. Lower erosion rate at 22 .deg. C in the pre-oxidized specimens is attributed due to the blunting of surface flaws, and the higher erosion rate at 900 .deg. C is due to brittle lateral cracking. Erosion rate of pre-corroded specimens decreases with increasing temperature. Less erosion at 900 .deg. C than at 22 .deg. C is associated with the liquid corrosion products sealing off pores at 900 .deg. C and the absence of inter-granular crack propagation observed at 22 .deg. C

  10. Hydrothermal deposition and characterization of silicon oxide nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, L.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon oxide nanospheres with the average diameter of about 100 nm have been synthesized by hydrothermal deposition process using silicon and silica as the starting materials. The silicon oxide nanospheres were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, respectively. The results show that large scale silicon oxide nanospheres with the uniform size are composed of Si and O showing the amorphous structure. Strong PL peak at 435 nm is observed demonstrating the good blue light emission property

  11. Nitrogen rich carbon nitride thin films deposited by hybrid PLD technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Kulish, W.; Lančok, Ján; Popov, C.; Bulíř, Jiří; Delplancke-Ogletree, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 374, - (2002), s. 207-210 ISSN 1058-725X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : laser deposition * carbon nitride * radiofrequency discharge * hollow cathode discharge Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.457, year: 2002

  12. In situ observations during chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride on polycrystalline copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidambi, Piran R.; Blume, Raoul; Kling, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of complementary in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we study the fundamental mechanisms underlying the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on polycrystalline Cu. The nucleation and growth of h-BN layers is found to occ...

  13. Protective silicon coating for nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.; Wang, Y.H.; Zang, J.B.; Li, Y.N.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrathin silicon coating was deposited on nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition (ALD) from gaseous monosilane (SiH 4 ). The coating was performed by sequential reaction of SiH 4 saturated adsorption and in situ decomposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to investigate the structural and morphological properties of the coating. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to compare the thermal stability of nanodiamonds before and after silicon coating. The results confirmed that the deposited cubic phase silicon coating was even and continuous. The protective silicon coating could effectively improve the oxidation resistance of nanodiamonds in air flow, which facilitates the applications of nanodiamonds that are commonly hampered by their poor thermal stability

  14. Silicon nitride membrane resonators at millikelvin temperatures with quality factors exceeding 108

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mingyun; Cohen, Martijn A.; Steele, Gary A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the mechanical dissipation of the fundamental mode of millimeter-sized, high quality-factor (Q) metalized silicon nitride membranes at temperatures down to 14 mK using a three-dimensional optomechanical cavity. Below 200 mK, high-Q modes of the membranes show a diverging increase of Q with decreasing temperature, reaching Q =1.27 ×108 at 14 mK, an order of magnitude higher than that reported before. The ultra-low dissipation makes the membranes highly attractive for the study of optomechanics in the quantum regime, as well as for other applications of optomechanics such as microwave to optical photon conversion.

  15. Strength and fatigue of NT551 silicon nitride and NT551 diesel exhaust valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, M.J.; Werezczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P.; Breder, K.

    2000-02-01

    The content of this report is excerpted from Mark Andrew's Ph.D. Thesis (Andrews, 1999), which was funded by a DOE/OTT High Temperature Materials Laboratory Graduate Fellowship. It involves the characterization of NT551 and valves fabricated with it. The motivations behind using silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) as an exhaust valve for a diesel engine are presented in this section. There are several economic factors that have encouraged the design and implementation of ceramic components for internal combustion (IC) engines. The reasons for selecting the diesel engine valve for this are also presented.

  16. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon oxynitride for micromachined millimeter-wave devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadaoui, M.; Peyrou, D.; Achkar, H.; Pennec, F.; Bouscayrol, L.; Rousset, B.; Boyer, P. T.; Scheid, E.; Pons, P.; Plana, R.

    2008-03-01

    Silicon oxynitride films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at low temperature and frequency using SiH4 + NH3 + N2O gas mixtures. The process is optimized in order to deposit film with low tensile stress and high resistance during KOH etching. By increasing the gas flow of nitrous oxide (N2O), the film tends to be oxygen rich and the usual as-deposited high compressive stress is reduced to its lowest state at O/Si = 0.74. Annealing films above 480 °C generates low tensile stress suitable for membrane fabrication, and further infrared spectroscopy analysis shows that the shrinking of Si-O and Si-N bonds seems to be the cause of reversing the stress's nature. Young's modulus of the optimized layer is characterized by indentation. In application, 75 Ω coplanar waveguides (CPW) were fabricated on the top of an oxynitride membrane and characterized in term of insertion loss and effective permittivity. The results were compared to those obtained with the well-controlled bilayer silicon oxide-nitride membrane technology. The obtained losses are lower than 0.2 dB at 30 GHz with a free-space propagation signal.

  17. Design of polarization-insensitive 2 × 2 multimode interference coupler based on double strip silicon nitride waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huimin; Zheng, Pengfei; Liu, Panpan; Hu, Guohua; Yun, Binfeng; Cui, Yiping

    2018-03-01

    A polarization-insensitive 2 × 2 multimode interference coupler based on double strip silicon nitride waveguides is proposed and optimized by using the three-dimensional finite difference time domain method. By optimizing the device's structure parameters in detail, polarization independent excess loss of -0.32dB is obtained, and negligible output uniformities of -0.02dB and -0.03dB could be achieved for the TE and TM mode, respectively. The optimized polarization-insensitive 2 × 2 multimode interference coupler could be served as a building block on the double strip silicon nitride waveguides platform.

  18. Fabrication of Antireflective Sub-Wavelength Structures on Silicon Nitride Using Nano Cluster Mask for Solar Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Men-Ku

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have developed a simple and scalable approach for fabricating sub-wavelength structures (SWS on silicon nitride by means of self-assembled nickel nanoparticle masks and inductively coupled plasma (ICP ion etching. Silicon nitride SWS surfaces with diameter of 160–200 nm and a height of 140–150 nm were obtained. A low reflectivity below 1% was observed over wavelength from 590 to 680 nm. Using the measured reflectivity data in PC1D, the solar cell characteristics has been compared for single layer anti-reflection (SLAR coatings and SWS and a 0.8% improvement in efficiency has been seen.

  19. Electrical and optical properties of silicon-doped gallium nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    The main technological interest in the polycrystalline based devices lies in its very low production cost and ... ing (13⋅56 MHz) technique using a GaN target containing. 1 at % Si. The Si-doped GaN target was made by ... power ~ 200 W. Before starting the deposition, the target was pre-sputtered for ~ 10 min with a shutter ...

  20. Study of the structure and electrical properties of the copper nitride thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo-Vega, C. [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, A. Postal 2732, 22860, Ensenada B.C. (Mexico)]. E-mail: gallardo@ccmc.unam.mx; Cruz, W. de la [Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada, UNAM, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, A. Postal 2681, 22860, Ensenada B.C. (Mexico)

    2006-09-15

    Copper nitride thin films were prepared on glass and silicon substrates by ablating a copper target at different pressure of nitrogen. The films were characterized in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and ex situ by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The nitrogen content in the samples, x = [N]/[Cu], changed between 0 and 0.33 for a corresponding variation in nitrogen pressure of 9 x 10{sup -2} to 1.3 x 10{sup -1} Torr. Using this methodology, it is possible to achieve sub-, over- and stoichiometric films by controlling the nitrogen pressure. The XPS results show that is possible to obtain copper nitride with x = 0.33 (Cu{sub 3}N) and x = 0.25 (Cu{sub 4}N) when the nitrogen pressure is 1.3 x 10{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup -2} Torr, respectively. The lattice constants obtained from XRD results for copper nitride with x = 0.25 is of 3.850 A and with x = 0.33 have values between 3.810 and 3.830 A. The electrical properties of the films were studied as a function of the lattice constant. These results show that the electrical resistivity increases when the lattice parameter is decreasing. The electrical resistivity of copper nitride with x = 0.25 was smaller than samples with x = 0.33.

  1. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C.; Gallego, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  2. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarin, V.K.

    1991-01-01

    A process is disclosed for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900--1500 C and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer

  3. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Vinod K.

    1991-01-01

    A process for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900.degree.-1500.degree. C. and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  4. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, V.K.

    1991-07-30

    A process is disclosed for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900--1500 C and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  5. Sub-micron silicon nitride waveguide fabrication using conventional optical lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuewang; Zhao, Qiancheng; Kamyab, Lobna; Rostami, Ali; Capolino, Filippo; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2015-03-09

    We demonstrate a novel technique to fabricate sub-micron silicon nitride waveguides using conventional contact lithography with MEMS-grade photomasks. Potassium hydroxide anisotropic etching of silicon facilitates line reduction and roughness smoothing and is key to the technique. The fabricated waveguides is measured to have a propagation loss of 0.8dB/cm and nonlinear coefficient of γ = 0.3/W/m. A low anomalous dispersion of <100ps/nm/km is also predicted. This type of waveguide is highly suitable for nonlinear optics. The channels naturally formed on top of the waveguide also make it promising for plasmonics and quantum efficiency enhancement in sensing applications.

  6. Processing and performance of reactively sputtered titanium silicon nitride liners in copper metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Jawid Majid

    Titanium silicon nitride (TiSiN) is a potential candidate for diffusion barrier applications in the advanced copper metallization schemes. This thesis focuses on the process development and optimization of reactively sputtered TiSiN films using statistically valid "design of experiment" (DOE) approach and testing the copper diffusion performance of TiSiN films. The design of experiment (DOE) approach showed that the nitrogen and DC target power had the most influence over the composition and resistivity of reactively sputtered TiSiN films. Thermal diffusion barrier performance of reactively sputtered TiSiN films against copper diffusion was tested as a function of the composition of reactively sputtered TiSiN films. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) analysis of Cu (100 nm)/TiSiN (10 nm)/Si stacks annealed at 400°C temperatures indicated that TiSiN films deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique withstood this thermal treatment for 30 minutes. The situation was drastically changed when the Cu (100 nm)/TiSiN (10 nm)/Si film stacks were annealed at 500°C or higher temperatures for 30 minutes. All of the PVD TiSiN films tested (independent of their composition) showed copper diffusion through the barrier as detected by RBS. Secco etch method was used to confirm the findings of RBS studies. It was found that the PVD TiSiN films with at least 5--10 atomic percent of nitrogen acted as a good diffusion barrier against thermal diffusion of copper 400°C for 30 minutes anneal. However, 10 nm thick PVD TiSi film failed, even at a temperature 400°C for 30 minutes anneal. All of the PVD TiSiN films (independent of composition) annealed at 500°C or higher temperatures for 30 minutes, showed Secco etch pits in the silicon substrate. These etch pits indicate copper diffusion through the liner material. Thus nitrogen concentration of at least 5--10 atomic percent improved the barrier stability of reactively sputtered TiSiN films, as determined by Secco

  7. Characterization of polycrystalline silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon devices on a SiO2 or Si3N4 buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Youl; Oh, Jae-Sub; Yang, Seung-Dong; Yun, Ho-Jin; Jeong, Kwang-Seok; Kim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Hi-Deok; Lee, Ga-Won

    2013-10-01

    Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) memory devices were fabricated from polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) using the solid phase crystallization (SPC) method for use in a low-power system-on-panel (SOP) display. In these poly-Si SONOS memories, oxide or nitride was used as a buffer layer. The electrical characteristics, such as the threshold voltage ( V T ), subthreshold slope ( SS) and transconductance ( g m ), were determined for each SONOS device. To interpret the characteristics of both poly-Si devices, x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements and flicker noise analysis were conducted. The results show that the poly-Si SONOS on the oxide layer has better electrical, memory characteristics, such as turn-on speed and g m , program/erase, endurance and data retention than that on the nitride layer. From the XRD measurements, it is shown that the grain size of the poly-Si on the oxide layer is larger than that on the nitride layer. From the flicker noise analysis, the poly-Si device on oxide was shown to have less traps or defects in the channel layer than that on nitride.

  8. Phosphorus-doped Amorphous Silicon Nitride Films Applied to Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feinäugle, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The Photovoltaics Group at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya is investigating silicon carbide (SiC) for the electronic passivation of the surface of crystalline silicon solar cells. The doping of SiC passivation layers with phosphorus resulted in a clear improvement of the minority carrier

  9. Effect of Silicon Nitride Balls and Rollers on Rolling Bearing Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Three decades have passed since the introduction of silicon nitride rollers and balls into conventional rolling-element bearings. For a given applied load, the contact (Hertz) stress in a hybrid bearing will be higher than an all-steel rolling-element bearing. The silicon nitride rolling-element life as well as the lives of the steel races were used to determine the resultant bearing life of both hybrid and all-steel bearings. Life factors were determined and reported for hybrid bearings. Under nominal operating speeds, the resultant calculated lives of the deep-groove, angular-contact, and cylindrical roller hybrid bearings with races made of post-1960 bearing steel increased by factors of 3.7, 3.2, and 5.5, respectively, from those calculated using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. An all-steel bearing under the same load will have a longer life than the equivalent hybrid bearing under the same conditions. Under these conditions, hybrid bearings are predicted to have a lower fatigue life than all-steel bearings by 58 percent for deep-groove bearings, 41 percent for angular-contact bearings, and 28 percent for cylindrical roller bearings.

  10. Effect of Projectile Materials on Foreign Object Damage of a Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Racz, Zsolt; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Brewer, David N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of AS800 silicon nitride was determined using four different projectile materials at ambient temperature. The target test specimens rigidly supported were impacted at their centers by spherical projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm. Four different types of projectiles were used including hardened steel balls, annealed steel balls, silicon nitride balls, and brass balls. Post-impact strength of each target specimen impacted was determined as a function of impact velocity to better understand the severity of local impact damage. The critical impact velocity where target specimens fail upon impact was highest with brass balls, lowest with ceramic ball, and intermediate with annealed and hardened steel balls. Degree of strength degradation upon impact followed the same order as in the critical impact velocity with respect to projectile materials. For steel balls, hardened projectiles yielded more significant impact damage than annealed counterparts. The most important material parameter affecting FOD was identified as hardness of projectiles and was correlated in terms of critical impact velocity, impact deformation, and impact load.

  11. Formation of boron nitride coatings on silicon carbide fibers using trimethylborate vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Mengjiao; Zhou, Tong; He, Jing; Chen, Lifu, E-mail: lfchen@xmu.edu.cn

    2016-09-30

    High quality boron nitride (BN) coatings have been grown on silicon carbide (SiC) fibers by carbothermal nitridation and at atmospheric pressure. SiC fibers were first treated in chlorine gas to form CDC (carbide-derived carbon) film on the fiber surface. The CDC-coated SiC fibers were then reacted with trimethylborate vapor and ammonia vapor at high temperature, forming BN coatings by carbothermal reduction. The FT-IR, XPS, XRD, SEM, TEM and AES were used to investigate the formation of the obtained coatings. It has been found that the obtained coatings are composed of phase mixture of h-BN and amorphous carbon, very uniform in thickness, have smooth surface and adhere well with the SiC fiber substrates. The BN-coated SiC fibers retain ∼80% strength of the as-received SiC fibers and show an obvious interfacial debonding and fiber pullout in the SiC{sub f}/SiOC composites. This method may be useful for the large scale production of high quality BN coating on silicon carbide fiber.

  12. Simultaneous direct determination of aluminum, calcium and iron in silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders by slurry-sampling graphite furnace AAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hirotsugu; Yada, Masako; Yoshida, Tomomi; Zhang, Qiangbin; Inoue, Sadanobu; Atsuya, Ikuo

    2004-03-01

    A fast and accurate analytical method was established for the simultaneous direct determination of aluminum, calcium and iron in silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a slurry sampling technique and a Hitachi Model Z-9000 atomic absorption spectrometer. The slurry samples were prepared by the ultrasonication of silicon carbide or silicon nitride powders with 0.1 M nitric acid. Calibration curves were prepared by using a mixed standard solution containing aluminum, calcium, iron and 0.1 M nitric acid. The analytical results of the proposed method for aluminum, calcium and iron in silicon carbide and silicon nitride reference materials were in good agreement with the reference values. The detection limits for aluminum, calcium and iron were 0.6 microg/g, 0.15 microg/g and 2.5 microg/g, respectively, in solid samples, when 200 mg of powdered samples were suspended in 20 ml of 0.1 M nitric acid and a 10 microl portion of the slurry sample was then measured. The relative standard deviation of the determination of aluminum, calcium and iron was 5 - 33%.

  13. Evaluation of silicon nitride as a substrate for culture of PC12 cells: an interfacial model for functional studies in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Jaime Medina Benavente

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride is a biocompatible material that is currently used as an interfacial surface between cells and large-scale integration devices incorporating ion-sensitive field-effect transistor technology. Here, we investigated whether a poly-L-lysine coated silicon nitride surface is suitable for the culture of PC12 cells, which are widely used as a model for neural differentiation, and we characterized their interaction based on cell behavior when seeded on the tested material. The coated surface was first examined in terms of wettability and topography using contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy and then, conditioned silicon nitride surface was used as the substrate for the study of PC12 cell culture properties. We found that coating silicon nitride with poly-L-lysine increased surface hydrophilicity and that exposing this coated surface to an extracellular aqueous environment gradually decreased its roughness. When PC12 cells were cultured on a coated silicon nitride surface, adhesion and spreading were facilitated, and the cells showed enhanced morphological differentiation compared to those cultured on a plastic culture dish. A bromodeoxyuridine assay demonstrated that, on the coated silicon nitride surface, higher proportions of cells left the cell cycle, remained in a quiescent state and had longer survival times. Therefore, our study of the interaction of the silicon nitride surface with PC12 cells provides important information for the production of devices that need to have optimal cell culture-supporting properties in order to be used in the study of neuronal functions.

  14. Evaluation of Silicon Nitride as a Substrate for Culture of PC12 Cells: An Interfacial Model for Functional Studies in Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Benavente, Johan Jaime; Mogami, Hideo; Sakurai, Takashi; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nitride is a biocompatible material that is currently used as an interfacial surface between cells and large-scale integration devices incorporating ion-sensitive field-effect transistor technology. Here, we investigated whether a poly-L-lysine coated silicon nitride surface is suitable for the culture of PC12 cells, which are widely used as a model for neural differentiation, and we characterized their interaction based on cell behavior when seeded on the tested material. The coated surface was first examined in terms of wettability and topography using contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy and then, conditioned silicon nitride surface was used as the substrate for the study of PC12 cell culture properties. We found that coating silicon nitride with poly-L-lysine increased surface hydrophilicity and that exposing this coated surface to an extracellular aqueous environment gradually decreased its roughness. When PC12 cells were cultured on a coated silicon nitride surface, adhesion and spreading were facilitated, and the cells showed enhanced morphological differentiation compared to those cultured on a plastic culture dish. A bromodeoxyuridine assay demonstrated that, on the coated silicon nitride surface, higher proportions of cells left the cell cycle, remained in a quiescent state and had longer survival times. Therefore, our study of the interaction of the silicon nitride surface with PC12 cells provides important information for the production of devices that need to have optimal cell culture-supporting properties in order to be used in the study of neuronal functions. PMID:24587271

  15. High aspect ratio titanium nitride trench structures as plasmonic biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shkondin, Evgeniy; Repän, Taavi; Takayama, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    High aspect ratio titanium nitride (TiN) grating structures are fabricated by the combination of deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques. TiN is deposited at 500 ◦C on a silicon trench template. Silicon between vertical TiN layers is selectively etched...

  16. Effects of deposition temperature and ammonia flow on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Anthony; Allerman, Andrew; Crawford, Mary; Beechem, Thomas; Ohta, Taisuke; Spataru, Catalin; Figiel, Jeffrey; Smith, Michael

    2018-03-01

    The use of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition at high temperature is investigated as a means to produce epitaxial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) at the wafer scale. Several categories of hBN films were found to exist based upon precursor flows and deposition temperature. Low, intermediate, and high NH3 flow regimes were found to lead to fundamentally different deposition behaviors. The low NH3 flow regimes yielded discolored films of boron sub-nitride. The intermediate NH3 flow regime yielded stoichiometric films that could be deposited as thick films. The high NH3 flow regime yielded self-limited deposition with thicknesses limited to a few mono-layers. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism is proposed to explain the onset of self-limited behavior for the high NH3 flow regime. Photoluminescence characterization determined that the intermediate and high NH3 flow regimes could be further divided into low and high temperature behaviors with a boundary at 1500 °C. Films deposited with both high NH3 flow and high temperature exhibited room temperature free exciton emission at 210 nm and 215.9 nm.

  17. Copper-Free Click Biofunctionalization of Silicon Nitride Surfaces via Strain-Promoted Alkyne-Azide Cycloaddition Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manova, R.K.; Pujari, S.P.; Weijers, C.A.G.M.; Zuilhof, H.; Beek, van T.A.

    2012-01-01

    Cu-free "click" chemistry is explored on silicon nitride (Si3N4) surfaces as an effective way for oriented immobilization of biomolecules. An omega-unsaturated ester was grafted onto Si3N4 using UV irradiation. Hydrolysis followed by carbodiimide-mediated activation yielded surface-bound active

  18. Corrosion-resistant titanium nitride coatings formed on stainless steel by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium films 70nm thick were deposited on austenitic type 316L stainless steel substrates, and these specimens were irradiated with titanium ions of energy 70kV at a fluence of 1x10 17 ioncm -2 , using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) IV metallic ion source at room temperature. After irradiation, titanium nitride (TiN) films were deposited by titanium evaporation and simultaneous irradiation by a nitrogen ion beam, with transport ratios of Ti to N atoms from 0.5 to 10.0 and an ion acceleration voltage of 2kV. The preferred orientation of the TiN films varied from left angle 200 right angle to left angle 111 right angle normal to the surface when the transport ratio was increased. With the help of Auger electron spectroscopy, interfacial mixing was verified. Nitrogen atoms were present in the state of titanium nitride for all transport ratios from 0.5 up to 10.0. However, the chemical bonding state of titanium changed from titanium nitride to the metallic state with increasing transport ratio Ti/N. The corrosion behavior was evaluated in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid saturated with oxygen, using multisweep cyclic voltammetry measurements. Thin film deposition of pure titanium and titanium implantation prior to TiN deposition have beneficial effects on the suppression of transpassive chromium dissolution. ((orig.))

  19. Synthesis of Few-Layer, Large Area Hexagonal-Boron Nitride by Pulsed Laser Deposition (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    electrons, and minimal sites for adsorbed surface impurities [7]. The use of exfoliated h BN as a substrate dielectric material in graphene devices has...by annealing at 1000 °C [16]. This also includes recent reports on the direct CVD growth of h BN on the surface of epitaxial graphene with an ammonia...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2015-0050 SYNTHESIS OF FEW-LAYER, LARGE AREA HEXAGONAL-BORON NITRIDE BY PULSED LASER DEPOSITION (POSTPRINT) Nicholas R Glavin

  20. Direct deposition of gold on silicon with focused ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebiker, P.W.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Muehle, R. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Irradiation with ions at very low energies (below 500 eV) no longer induces a removal of substrate material, but the ions are directly deposited on the surface. In this way, gold has been deposited on silicon with focused ion beam exposure and the properties of the film have been investigated with atomic force microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  1. High performance SONOS flash memory with in-situ silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon nitride charge trapping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae-Gab; Yang, Seung-Dong; Yun, Ho-Jin; Jung, Jun-Kyo; Park, Jung-Hyun; Lim, Chan; Cho, Gyu-seok; Park, Seong-gye; Huh, Chul; Lee, Hi-Deok; Lee, Ga-Won

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, SONOS-type flash memory device with highly improved charge-trapping efficiency is suggested by using silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) embedded in silicon nitride (SiNX) charge trapping layer. The Si-NCs were in-situ grown by PECVD without additional post annealing process. The fabricated device shows high program/erase speed and retention property which is suitable for multi-level cell (MLC) application. Excellent performance and reliability for MLC are demonstrated with large memory window of ∼8.5 V and superior retention characteristics of 7% charge loss for 10 years. High resolution transmission electron microscopy image confirms the Si-NC formation and the size is around 1-2 nm which can be verified again in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) where pure Si bonds increase. Besides, XPS analysis implies that more nitrogen atoms make stable bonds at the regular lattice point. Photoluminescence spectra results also illustrate that Si-NCs formation in SiNx is an effective method to form deep trap states.

  2. Low temperature deposition of crystalline silicon on glass by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yung-Bin; Park, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Jo, Wook; Song, Jean-Ho; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2011-07-01

    Although the deposition of crystalline silicon on a glass substrate has been pursued using hot wire chemical vapor deposition or plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for applications in flat panel displays and solar cells, the process has been only partly successful because of the inevitable formation of an amorphous incubation layer on a glass substrate. Currently, the crystalline silicon films are prepared by depositing an amorphous silicon film on a glass substrate and then crystallizing it by excimer laser annealing (ELA), metal induced crystallization or rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Here we report a new process, which can remove the amorphous incubation layer and thereby deposit crystalline silicon directly on glass using HCl. The intrinsic crystalline silicon film has a conductivity of 3.7×10 -5 Scm -1 and the n-type doped crystalline silicon film has the Hall mobility of 15.8 cm 2V -1 s -1, whose values are comparable to those prepared by ELA and RTA, respectively.

  3. Effect of Stress and Temperature on the Optical Properties of Silicon Nitride Membranes at 1,550 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Fletcher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Future gravitational-wave detectors operated at cryogenic temperatures are expected to be limited by thermal noise of the highly reflective mirror coatings. Silicon nitride is an interesting material for such coatings as it shows very low mechanical loss, a property related to low thermal noise, which is known to further decrease under stress. Low optical absorption is also required to maintain the low mirror temperature. Here, we investigate the effect of stress on the optical properties at 1,550 nm of silicon nitride membranes attached to a silicon frame. Our approach includes the measurement of the thermal expansion coefficient and the thermal conductivity of the membranes. The membrane and frame temperatures are varied, and translated into a change in stress using finite element modeling. The resulting product of the optical absorption and thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT is measured using photothermal common-path interferometry.

  4. Plasma deposition of amorphous silicon-based materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Giovanni; Madan, Arun

    1995-01-01

    Semiconductors made from amorphous silicon have recently become important for their commercial applications in optical and electronic devices including FAX machines, solar cells, and liquid crystal displays. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon-Based Materials is a timely, comprehensive reference book written by leading authorities in the field. This volume links the fundamental growth kinetics involving complex plasma chemistry with the resulting semiconductor film properties and the subsequent effect on the performance of the electronic devices produced. Key Features * Focuses on the plasma chemistry of amorphous silicon-based materials * Links fundamental growth kinetics with the resulting semiconductor film properties and performance of electronic devices produced * Features an international group of contributors * Provides the first comprehensive coverage of the subject, from deposition technology to materials characterization to applications and implementation in state-of-the-art devices.

  5. RF Reactive Magnetron Sputter Deposition of Silicon Sub-Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hattum, E.D. van

    2007-01-01

    RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition of silicon sub oxide E.D. van Hattum Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Utrecht University The work described in the thesis has been inspired and stimulated by the use of SiOx layers in the direct inductive printing technology,

  6. Light emission in forward and reverse bias operation in OLED with amorphous silicon carbon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, R [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica y Textil, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru SN, Lima (Peru); Cremona, M [Departamento de Fisica, PontifIcia Universidade Catolica de Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, Cx. Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Achete, C A, E-mail: rreyes@uni.edu.pe [Departamento de Engenheria Metalurgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68505, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiC:N) thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were used in the structure of an organic light emitting diode (OLED), obtaining an OLED operating in forward and reverse bias mode. The device consist of the heterojunction structure ITO/a-SiC:N/Hole Transport Layer (HTL)/ Electron Transport Layer (ETL)/a-SiC:N/Al. As hole transporting layer was used a thin film of 1-(3-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,4 tetrahydroquinoline - 6 - carboxyaldehyde - 1,1'- diphenylhydrazone (MTCD), while the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq{sub 3}) is used as electron transport and emitting layer. A significant increase in the voltage operation compared to the conventional ITO/MTCD/Alq{sub 3}/Al structure was observed, so the onset of electroluminescence occurs at about 22 V in the forward and reverse bias mode of operation. The electroluminescence spectra is similar in both cases, only slightly shifted 0.14 eV to lower energies in relation to the conventional device.

  7. Optical absorption of silicon nitride membranes at 1064 nm and at 1550 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Krüger, Christoph; Martin, Iain W.; Bell, Angus; Hough, Jim; Kaufer, Henning; Rowan, Sheila; Schnabel, Roman; Steinlechner, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    Because of a low mechanical loss, thin films made of silicon nitride (Si3N4 ) are interesting for fundamental research and development in the field of gravitational-wave detection. Si3N4 membranes allow for the characterization of quantum radiation pressure noise (RPN), which will be a limiting noise source in gravitational-wave detectors of the second and third generations. Furthermore, Si3N4 is an interesting material for possible thermal noise reduction in highly reflective mirror coatings. For both applications, the optical absorption of Si3N4 needs to be low. This paper presents absorption measurements on low-stress Si3N4 membranes showing an absorption a factor of 7 lower at 1550 nm than at 1064 nm resulting in an estimated 2 times higher sensitivity in RPN experiments at the higher wavelength and making Si3N4 an interesting material for highly reflective multimaterial mirror coatings at 1550 nm.

  8. Pressure bonding molybdenum alloy (TZM) to reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffsmith, S.A.; Landingham, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Topping cycles could boost the energy efficiencies of a variety of systems by using what is now waste heat. One such topping cycle uses a ceramic helical expander and would require that a reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) rotor be bonded to a shaft of TZM (Mo-0.5 wt % Ti-0.08 wt % Zr). Coupon studies show that TZM can be bonded to RBSN at 1300 0 C and 69 MPa if there is an interlayer of MoSi 2 . A layer of finely ground (10 μm) MoSi 2 facilitates bond formation and provides a thicker bond interface. The hardness and grain structure of the TZM and RBSN were not affected by the temperature and pressure required to bond the coupons

  9. Effect of loading rate on dynamic fracture of reaction bonded silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, B. M.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    Wedge-loaded, modified tapered double cantilever beam (WL-MTDCB) specimens under impact loading were used to determine the room temperature dynamic fracture response of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN). The crack extension history, with the exception of the terminal phase, was similar to that obtained under static loading. Like its static counterpart, a distinct crack acceleration phase, which was not observed in dynamic fracture of steel and brittle polymers, was noted. Unlike its static counterpart, the crack continued to propagate at nearly its terminal velocity under a low dynamic stress intensity factor during the terminal phase of crack propagation. These and previously obtained results for glass and RBSN show that dynamic crack arrest under a positive dynamic stress intensity factor is unlikely in static and impact loaded structural ceramics.

  10. Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, R.L.; Shell, T.E.

    1985-05-20

    A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500/sup 0/C in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850/sup 0/ to 950/sup 0/C in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

  11. Slot silicon-gallium nitride waveguide in MMI structures based 1x8 wavelength demultiplexer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Zaken, Bar Baruch; Zanzury, Tal; Malka, Dror

    2017-06-01

    We propose a novel 8-channel wavelength multimode interference (MMI) demultiplexer in slot waveguide structures that operated at 1530 nm, 1535 nm, 1540 nm, 1545 nm, 1550 nm, 1555 nm, 1560 nm and 1565 nm wavelengths. Gallium nitride (GaN) surrounded by silicon (Si) was founded as suitable materials for the slot-waveguide structures. The proposed device was designed by seven 1x2 MMI couplers, fourteen S-band and one input taper. Numerical investigations were carried out on the geometrical parameters by using a full vectorial-beam propagation method (FVBPM). Simulation results show that the proposed device can transmit 8-channel that works in the whole C-band (1530- 1565 nm) with low crosstalk ((-19.97)-(-13.77) dB) and bandwidth (1.8-3.6 nm). Thus, the device can be very useful in optical networking systems that work on dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) technology.

  12. Pressure dependence of the refractive index of diamond, cubic silicon carbide and cubic boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzaretti, N. M.; da Jornada, J. A. H.

    1996-09-01

    The pressure dependence of the refractive index of diamond, cubic boron nitride and cubic silicon carbide, was measured up to 9 GPa by an interferometric method using the diamond anvil cell. A least-square fit yields the following values for ( {1}/{n}) ( {dn }/{dP }): - 3.6 × 10 -4GPa -1 for diamond, -3.2 × 10 -4GPa -1 for c-BN and, for 3CSiC, -8.3 × 10 -4GPa -1. These results were used to investigate, for the first time under pressure, general empirical relationships between refractive index and energy gap found in the literature. The volume dependence of the electronic polarizability, α, of these compounds was determined through the Lorentz-Lorenz approach. The obtained linear behavior of α for the three cases was correlated to previous results for the pressure dependence of the transverse effective charge, e T∗.

  13. Low noise high-Tc superconducting bolometers on silicon nitride membranes for far-infrared detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Nivelle, M.J.; Bruijn, M.P.; de Vries, R.; Wijnbergen, J.J.; de Korte, P.A.; Sanchez, S.; Elwenspoek, M.; Heidenblut, T.; Schwierzi, B.; Michalke, W.; Steinbeiss, E.

    1997-01-01

    High-T c GdBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ superconductor bolometers with operation temperatures near 89 K, large receiving areas of 0.95mm 2 and very high detectivity have been made. The bolometers are supported by 0.62 μm thick silicon nitride membranes. A specially developed silicon-on-nitride layer was used to enable the epitaxial growth of the high-T c superconductor. Using a gold black absorption layer an absorption efficiency for wavelengths between 70 and 200 μm of about 83% has been established. The noise of the best devices is fully dominated by the intrinsic phonon noise of the thermal conductance G, and not by the 1/f noise of the superconducting film. The temperature dependence of the noise and the resulting optimum bias temperature have been investigated. In the analysis the often neglected effect of electrothermal feedback has been taken into account. The minimum electrical noise equivalent power (NEP) of a bolometer with a time constant τ of 95 ms is 2.9pW/Hz 1/2 which corresponds with an electrical detectivity D * of 3.4x10 10 cmHz 1/2 /W. Similar bolometers with τ=27ms and NEP=3.8pW/Hz 1/2 were also made. No degradation of the bolometers could be observed after vibration tests, thermal cycling and half a year storage. Measurements of the noise of a Pr doped YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ film with T c =40K show that with such films the performance of air bridge type high-T c bolometers could be improved. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  14. Electron irradiation effects on the nucleation and growth of Au nanoparticles in silicon nitride membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, M. M.; Fabrim, Z. E.; Marin, C.; Baptista, D. L.; Fichtner, P. F. P.

    2017-10-01

    The formation of Au nanoparticles (NPs) in Au+ ion-implanted silicon nitride thin films and membranes was investigated as a function of post-implantation thermal treatments or room temperature electron irradiation at energies of 80, 120, 160, and 200 keV. The samples were characterized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Transmission Electron Microscopy. High-temperature thermal annealing (1100 °C, 1 h) resulted in the formation of Au particles with a mean diameter of ≈1.3 nm. In comparison, room-temperature electron irradiation at energies from 80 to 200 keV caused the formation of larger Au particles according to two growth regimes. The first regime is characterized by a slow growth rate and occurs inside the silicon nitride membrane. The second regime presents a fast growth rate and starts when Au atoms become exposed to the back free surface of the membrane. Realistic binary electron-atom elastic collision cross-sections were used to analyze the observed nanoparticle growth and membrane sputtering phenomena. The results obtained demonstrate that binary electron-atom elastic collisions can account for the microstructure modifications if the critical displacement energies for the sputtering of N and Si atoms are around 14 ± 3 eV, and the displacement energy for surface located Au atoms is approximately 1.25 ± 0.2 eV. Irradiation experiments using focused electron probes demonstrate that the process provides fine control of nanoparticle formation, resulting in well-defined sizes and locations.

  15. Tribological behavior of DLC films deposited on nitrided and post-oxidized stainless steel by PACVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalibon, E. L.; Brühl, S. P.; Heim, D.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, the tribological behavior and adhesion of DLC films deposited by PACVD on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel was evaluated. Prior to DLC deposition, the samples were nitrided and some of them also post-oxidized. The films were characterized by Raman and EDS, microhardness was assessed with Vickers indenter and the microstructure was analyzed by OM, SEM, FIB. Fretting and linear reciprocating sliding tests were performed using a WC ball as counterpart, and the adhesion of the DLC films was characterized using the Scratch Test and Rockwell C indentation. Corrosion behavior was evaluated by the Salt Spray Fog Test. The film showed a hardness of only about 1500 HV but it was about 15-20 microns thick. The results of the mechanical tests showed that pre-treatments (nitriding and oxidizing) of the substrate did not have a big influence in the tribological behavior of the coating. However, the nitriding treatment before the DLC coating process reduced the interface stress and enhanced the adhesion. Additionally, all the films evidenced good corrosion resistance in a saline environment, better than the AISI 420 itself.

  16. Numerical study of self-heating effects of small-size MOSFETs fabricated on silicon-on-aluminum nitride substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yanfang; Zhu Ziqiang; Zhu Ming; Lin Chenglu

    2006-01-01

    Compared with bulk-silicon technology, silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology possesses many advantages but it is inevitable that the buried silicon dioxide layer also thermally insulates the metal-oxide-silicon field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) from the bulk due to the low thermal conductivity. One of the alternative insulator to replace the buried oxide layer is aluminum nitride (MN), which has a thermal conductivity that is about 200 times higher than that of SiO 2 (320 W·m -1 ·K -1 versus 1.4 W·m -1 ·K -l ). To investigate the self-heating effects of small-size MOSFETs fabricated on silicon-on-aluminum nitride (SOAN) substrate, a two-dimensional numerical analysis is performed by using a device simulator called MEDICI run on a Solaris workstation to simulate the electrical characteristics and temperature distribution by comparing with those of bulk and standard SOI MOSFETs. Our study suggests that AIN is a suitable alternative to silicon dioxide as a buried dielectric in SOI and expands the applications of SOI to high temperature conditions. (authors)

  17. Cubic and hexagonal boron-nitride (c-BN/h-BN) thin films deposited in situ by r.f. magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo, J.M.; Zambrano, G.; Baca, E.; Moran, O.; Prieto, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Bejarano, G. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros, CDT-ASTIN SENA, Cali (Colombia)

    2005-07-01

    Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN)/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) thin films were grown in situ on (100) oriented silicon substrates by r.f. (13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering technique. In order to obtain the highest fraction of the c-BN phase, a negative d.c bias voltage, varying from 0 to -200 V was applied to the substrate during deposition. Another set of boron nitride thin films was deposited in situ on (100) oriented silicon substrates under r.f. bias voltage. The substrate holder was biased from 0 to -350 V by connecting such to an auxiliary r.f. generator (operated at 13.56 MHz). Films were characterized by Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Well-defined peaks at 787 cm{sup -1}, 1100 cm{sup -1} and 1387 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the 2{sub Au} (out-plane bending of B-N-B bond) h-BN vibration mode, the F2 (stretching) c-BN Transversal Optical (TO) mode and the E{sub 1u} (in-plane stretching of B-N bond) vibration mode of the h-BN, respectively, were observed in the FTIR spectra. A maximal fraction of the c-BN phase close to 85% was obtained under a bias voltage of -150 V at substrate temperature of 300 C and a total pressure of 4 x 10{sup -2} mbar. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Enhancement of porous silicon photoluminescence by electroless deposition of nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amdouni, S. [Unité de nanomatériaux et photonique, Université El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, 2092 El Manar, Tunis Tunisia (Tunisia); Rahmani, M., E-mail: rahmanimehdi79@yahoo.com [Unité de nanomatériaux et photonique, Université El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, 2092 El Manar, Tunis Tunisia (Tunisia); Zaïbi, M.-A [Unité de nanomatériaux et photonique, Université El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, 2092 El Manar, Tunis Tunisia (Tunisia); Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Ingénieurs de Tunis, Université de Tunis, 5 Avenue Taha Hussein, 1008 Tunis (Tunisia); Oueslati, M. [Unité de nanomatériaux et photonique, Université El Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Département de Physique, 2092 El Manar, Tunis Tunisia (Tunisia)

    2015-01-15

    Nickel-porous silicon nanocomposites (PS/Ni) are elaborated by an electroless deposition method using NiCl{sub 2} aqueous solution. The presence of nickel ions in the porous layer is confirmed by Fourier Transformed InfraRed spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of PS/Ni, prepared at different electroless durations (t{sub edp}), are analyzed. A remarkable enhancement in the integrated PL intensity of PS containing nickel was observed. The lower t{sub edp} favor the deposition of nickel in PS, hence the silicon dangling bonds at the porous surface are quenched and this was increased the PL intensity. However, for the longer t{sub edp}, the PL intensity has been considerably decreased due to the destruction of some Si nanocrystallites. The PL spectra of PS/Ni, for t{sub edp} less than 8 min, show a multiband profile indicating the creation of new luminescent centers by Ni elements which induces a strong modification in the emission mechanisms. - Highlights: • Deposition of Ni ions into porous silicon (PS) layer using the electroless method. • Formation of Ni–O bonds on the porous layer. • The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of PS is enhanced after Ni deposition. • The increase of the PL is due to the contribution of radiative centers related to Ni.

  19. Excellent Silicon Surface Passivation Achieved by Industrial Inductively Coupled Plasma Deposited Hydrogenated Intrinsic Amorphous Silicon Suboxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an alternative method of depositing a high-quality passivation film for heterojunction silicon wafer solar cells, in this paper. The deposition of hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon suboxide is accomplished by decomposing hydrogen, silane, and carbon dioxide in an industrial remote inductively coupled plasma platform. Through the investigation on CO2 partial pressure and process temperature, excellent surface passivation quality and optical properties are achieved. It is found that the hydrogen content in the film is much higher than what is commonly reported in intrinsic amorphous silicon due to oxygen incorporation. The observed slow depletion of hydrogen with increasing temperature greatly enhances its process window as well. The effective lifetime of symmetrically passivated samples under the optimal condition exceeds 4.7 ms on planar n-type Czochralski silicon wafers with a resistivity of 1 Ωcm, which is equivalent to an effective surface recombination velocity of less than 1.7 cms−1 and an implied open-circuit voltage (Voc of 741 mV. A comparison with several high quality passivation schemes for solar cells reveals that the developed inductively coupled plasma deposited films show excellent passivation quality. The excellent optical property and resistance to degradation make it an excellent substitute for industrial heterojunction silicon solar cell production.

  20. Silicon rich nitride ring resonators for rare - earth doped telecommunications-band amplifiers pumped at the O-band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, P; Chen, G F R; Zhao, X; Ng, D K T; Tan, M C; Tan, D T H

    2017-08-22

    Ring resonators on silicon rich nitride for potential use as rare-earth doped amplifiers pumped at 1310 nm with amplification at telecommunications-band are designed and characterized. The ring resonators are fabricated on 300 nm and 400 nm silicon rich nitride films and characterized at both 1310 nm and 1550 nm. We demonstrate ring resonators exhibiting similar quality factors exceeding 10,000 simultaneously at 1310 nm and 1550 nm. A Dysprosium-Erbium material system exhibiting photoluminescence at 1510 nm when pumped at 1310 nm is experimentally demonstrated. When used together with Dy-Er co-doped particles, these resonators with similar quality factors at 1310 nm and 1550 nm may be used for O-band pumped amplifiers for the telecommunications-band.

  1. Effect of Stress and Temperature on the Optical Properties of Silicon Nitride Membranes at 1,550 nm

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Fletcher; Simon Tait; Jessica Steinlechner; Jessica Steinlechner; Iain W. Martin; Angus S. Bell; James Hough; Sheila Rowan; Roman Schnabel

    2018-01-01

    Future gravitational-wave detectors operated at cryogenic temperatures are expected to be limited by thermal noise of the highly reflective mirror coatings. Silicon nitride is an interesting material for such coatings as it shows very low mechanical loss, a property related to low thermal noise, which is known to further decrease under stress. Low optical absorption is also required to maintain the low mirror temperature. Here, we investigate the effect of stress on the optical properties at ...

  2. Structural characterization of thin films of titanium nitride deposited by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro C, M.A.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E.; Mejia H, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Thin films of titanium nitride were deposited using the technique of laser ablation. It was studied the effect of the density of laser energy used for ablation the target as well as of the pressure of the work gas about the structure and the hardness of the deposited thin films. Depending on the pressure of the work gas films was obtained with preferential orientation in the directions (200) and (111). At a pressure of 1 x 10 -2 Torr only the direction (200) was observed. On the other hand to the pressure of 5 x 10 -3 Torr the deposited material this formed by a mixture of the orientation (200) and (111), being the direction (111) the predominant one. Thin films of Ti N were obtained with hardness of up to 24.0 GPa that makes to these attractive materials for mechanical applications. The hardness showed an approximately linear dependence with the energy density. (Author)

  3. Synthesis of multifilament silicon carbide fibers by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Vithal; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    A process for development of clean silicon carbide fiber with a small diameter and high reliability is presented. An experimental evaluation of operating conditions for SiC fibers of good mechanical properties and devising an efficient technique which will prevent welding together of individual filaments are discussed. The thermodynamic analysis of a different precursor system was analyzed vigorously. Thermodynamically optimum conditions for stoichiometric SiC deposit were obtained.

  4. Deposition of magnetoelectric hexaferrite thin films on substrates of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Saba; Izadkhah, Hessam; Vittoria, Carmine

    2016-12-15

    Magnetoelectric M-type hexaferrite thin films (SrCo{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}Fe{sub 8}O{sub 19}) were deposited using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique on Silicon substrate. A conductive oxide layer of Indium-Tin Oxide (ITO) was deposited as a buffer layer with the dual purposes of 1) to reduce lattice mismatch between the film and silicon and 2) to lower applied voltages to observe magnetoelectric effects at room temperature on Silicon based devices. The film exhibited magnetoelectric effects as confirmed by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) techniques in voltages as low as 0.5 V. Without the oxide conductive layer the required voltages to observe magnetoelectric effects was typically about 1000 times larger. The magnetoelectric thin films were characterized by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and ferromagnetic resonance techniques. We measured saturation magnetization of 650 G, and coercive field of about 150 Oe for these thin films. The change in remanence magnetization was measured in the presence of DC voltages and the changes in remanence were in the order of 15% with the application of only 0.5 V (DC voltage). We deduced a magnetoelectric coupling, α, of 1.36×10{sup −9} s m{sup −1} in SrCo{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}Fe{sub 8}O{sub 19} thin films.

  5. WEAR PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION OF SILICON NITRIDE USING GENETIC AND SIMULATED ANNEALING ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SACHIN GHALME

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Replacing damaged joint with the suitable alternative material is a prime requirement in a patient who has arthritis. Generation of wear particles in the artificial joint during action or movement is a serious issue and leads to aseptic loosening of joint. Research in the field of bio-tribology is trying to evaluate materials with minimum wear volume loss so as to extend joint life. Silicon nitride (Si3N4 is non-oxide ceramic suggested as a new alternative for hip/knee joint replacement. Hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN is recommended as a solid additive lubricant to improve the wear performance of Si3N4 . In this paper, an attempt has been made to evaluate the optimum combination of load and % volume of hBN in Si3N4 to minimize wear volume loss (WVL. The experiments were conducted according to Design of Experiments (DoE – Taguchi method and a mathematical model is developed. Further, this model is processed with Genetic Algorithm (GA and Simulated Annealing (SA to find out the optimum percentage of hBN in Si3N4 to minimize wear volume loss against Alumina (Al2O3 counterface. Taguchi method presents 15 N load and 8% volume of hBN to minimize WVL of Si3N4 . While GA and SA optimization offer 11.08 N load, 12.115% volume of hBN and 11.0789 N load, 12.128% volume of hBN respectively to minimize WVL in Si3N4. .

  6. Improvement of efficiency in graphene/gallium nitride nanowire on Silicon photoelectrode for overall water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyojung; Rho, Hokyun; Min, Jung-Wook; Lee, Yong-Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Fujii, Katsushi; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Ha, Jun-Seok

    2017-11-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires are one of the most promising photoelectrode materials due to their high stability in acidic and basic electrolytes, and tunable band edge potentials. In this study, GaN nanowire arrays (GaN NWs) were prepared by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE); their large surface area enhanced the solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency. More significantly, graphene was grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), which enhanced the electron transfer between NWs for water splitting and protected the GaN NW surface. Structural characterizations of the prepared composite were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The photocurrent density of Gr/GaN NWs exhibited a two-fold increase over pristine GaN NWs and sustained water splitting up to 70 min. These improvements may accelerate possible applications for hydrogen generation with high solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency.

  7. On-chip photonic microsystem for optical signal processing based on silicon and silicon nitride platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Li, Jiachen; Yu, Hongchen; Yu, Hai; Chen, Hongwei; Yang, Sigang; Chen, Minghua

    2018-04-01

    The explosive growth of data centers, cloud computing and various smart devices is limited by the current state of microelectronics, both in terms of speed and heat generation. Benefiting from the large bandwidth, promising low power consumption and passive calculation capability, experts believe that the integrated photonics-based signal processing and transmission technologies can break the bottleneck of microelectronics technology. In recent years, integrated photonics has become increasingly reliable and access to the advanced fabrication process has been offered by various foundries. In this paper, we review our recent works on the integrated optical signal processing system. We study three different kinds of on-chip signal processors and use these devices to build microsystems for the fields of microwave photonics, optical communications and spectrum sensing. The microwave photonics front receiver was demonstrated with a signal processing range of a full-band (L-band to W-band). A fully integrated microwave photonics transceiver without the on-chip laser was realized on silicon photonics covering the signal frequency of up 10 GHz. An all-optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) de-multiplier was also demonstrated and used for an OFDM communication system with the rate of 64 Gbps. Finally, we show our work on the monolithic integrated spectrometer with a high resolution of about 20 pm at the central wavelength of 1550 nm. These proposed on-chip signal processing systems potential applications in the fields of radar, 5G wireless communication, wearable devices and optical access networks.

  8. Synthesis of few-layer, large area hexagonal-boron nitride by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glavin, Nicholas R.; Jespersen, Michael L.; Check, Michael H.; Hu, Jianjun; Hilton, Al M.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Voevodin, Andrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been investigated as a technique for synthesis of ultra-thin, few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) thin films on crystalline highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and sapphire (0001) substrates. The plasma-based processing technique allows for increased excitations of deposited atoms due to background nitrogen gas collisional ionizations and extended resonance time of the energetic species presence at the condensation surface. These processes permit growth of thin, polycrystalline h-BN at 700 °C, a much lower temperature than that required by traditional growth methods. Analysis of the as-deposited films reveals epitaxial-like growth on the nearly lattice matched HOPG substrate, resulting in a polycrystalline h-BN film, and amorphous BN (a-BN) on the sapphire substrates, both with thicknesses of 1.5–2 nm. Stoichiometric films with boron-to-nitrogen ratios of unity were achieved by adjusting the background pressure within the deposition chamber and distance between the target and substrate. The reduction in deposition temperature and formation of stoichiometric, large-area h-BN films by PLD provide a process that is easily scaled-up for two-dimensional dielectric material synthesis and also present a possibility to produce very thin and uniform a-BN. - Highlights: • PLD was used to synthesize boron nitride thin films on HOPG and sapphire substrates. • Lattice matched substrate allowed for formation of polycrystalline h-BN. • Nitrogen gas pressure directly controlled film chemistry and structure. • Technique allows for ultrathin, uniform films at reduced processing temperatures

  9. The preparation and properties of aluminum nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Kelm, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Aluminum nitride films have been deposited on silicon substrates at 800-1200 C by the pyrolysis of an aluminum trichloride-ammonia complex, AlCl3.3NH3, in a gas flow system. The deposit was transparent, tightly adherent to the substrate, and was confirmed to be aluminum nitride by X-ray and electron diffraction techniques. The deposited aluminum nitride films were found to be polycrystalline with the crystallite size increasing with increasing temperature of deposition. Other properties of aluminum nitride films relevant to device applications, including density, refractive index, dissolution rate, dielectric constant, and masking ability, have been determined. These properties indicate that aluminum nitride films have potential as a dielectric in electronic devices.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon deposited by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebollo P, B.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work is the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon (a-C-N) using the laser ablation technique for their deposit. For this purpose, the physical properties of the obtained films were studied as function of diverse parameters of deposit such as: nitrogen pressure, power density, substrate temperature and substrate-target distance. For the characterization of the properties of the deposited thin films the following techniques were used: a) Raman spectroscopy which has demonstrated being a sensitive technique to the sp 2 and sp 3 bonds content, b) Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy which allows to know semi-quantitatively way the presence of the elements which make up the deposited films, c) Spectrophotometry, for obtaining the absorption spectra and subsequently the optical energy gap of the deposited material, d) Ellipsometry for determining the refraction index, e) Scanning Electron Microscopy for studying the surface morphology of thin films and, f) Profilemetry, which allows the determination the thickness of the deposited thin films. (Author)

  11. Modeling of flame assisted chemical vapor deposition of silicon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masi, M.; Cavallotti, C.; Raffa, E. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, 20131 Milano (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    The simulation of a flame assisted chemical vapor deposition (FACVD) process is here proposed with reference to the growth of silicon thin films through the silane/chlorosilanes/hydrogen/chlorine route. The goal is to design a reactor able to deposit micromorphous or multicrystalline films at the high growth rates necessary for photovoltaic applications. In fact, since FACVD processes can operate in atmospheric conditions and in auto-thermal mode, they present significant energetic advantages with respect to the plasma assisted technology used today. This work is in particular devoted to illustrate the multi-hierarchical modeling procedure adopted to determine the process optimal operating conditions and to design the deposition chamber. Different burner geometries (single, porous or multiple nozzles burner) were investigated in order to exploit the advantages of the two classical stagnation flow and Bunsen stretched flames. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Optical properties of plasma deposited amorphous carbon nitride films on polymer substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, S.H., E-mail: abo_95@yahoo.co [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); El-Hossary, F.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); Gamal, G.A.; Kahlid, M.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University, 83523 Qena (Egypt)

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride thin films were deposited on polymer substrates using radio frequency (rf) plasma in a mixture of nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) gasses. The samples were prepared at different rf plasma power (350, 400, 450, 500, and 550 W), at constant plasma exposure time of 10 min, and constant N{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratio of 50%. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the prepared samples were examined using X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analysis, respectively. The absence of the carbon nitride diffraction peaks confirms the amorphous nature of these films. The root mean square roughness of the films increased from 3.77 to 25.22 nm as the power increased from 350 to 550 W. The thickness and the deposition rate were found to increase with increasing plasma power. Over the whole studied wavelength range, from 200 to 2500 nm, the transmittance decreased with increasing plasma power. A shift in the onset of absorption towards higher wavelengths with increasing plasma power, indicating a decrease in the optical band gap, has been observed. The refractive index values were found to decrease while the extinction coefficient increased with increasing plasma power.

  13. Optical properties of plasma deposited amorphous carbon nitride films on polymer substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, S. H.; El-Hossary, F. M.; Gamal, G. A.; Kahlid, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride thin films were deposited on polymer substrates using radio frequency (rf) plasma in a mixture of nitrogen (N 2) and acetylene (C 2H 2) gasses. The samples were prepared at different rf plasma power (350, 400, 450, 500, and 550 W), at constant plasma exposure time of 10 min, and constant N 2/C 2H 2 ratio of 50%. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the prepared samples were examined using X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analysis, respectively. The absence of the carbon nitride diffraction peaks confirms the amorphous nature of these films. The root mean square roughness of the films increased from 3.77 to 25.22 nm as the power increased from 350 to 550 W. The thickness and the deposition rate were found to increase with increasing plasma power. Over the whole studied wavelength range, from 200 to 2500 nm, the transmittance decreased with increasing plasma power. A shift in the onset of absorption towards higher wavelengths with increasing plasma power, indicating a decrease in the optical band gap, has been observed. The refractive index values were found to decrease while the extinction coefficient increased with increasing plasma power.

  14. Thickness Influence on In Vitro Biocompatibility of Titanium Nitride Thin Films Synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Duta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a study on the biocompatibility vs. thickness in the case of titanium nitride (TiN films synthesized on 410 medical grade stainless steel substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The films were grown in a nitrogen atmosphere, and their in vitro cytotoxicity was assessed according to ISO 10993-5 [1]. Extensive physical-chemical analyses have been carried out on the deposited structures with various thicknesses in order to explain the differences in biological behavior: profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, X-ray diffraction and surface energy measurements. XPS revealed the presence of titanium oxynitride beside TiN in amounts that vary with the film thickness. The cytocompatibility of films seems to be influenced by their TiN surface content. The thinner films seem to be more suitable for medical applications, due to the combined high values of bonding strength and superior cytocompatibility.

  15. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wananuruksawong, R; Jinawath, S; Wasanapiarnpong, T; Padipatvuthikul, P

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si 3 N 4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si 3 N 4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si 3 N 4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si 3 N 4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder ( 2 O 3 - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si 3 N 4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200 deg. C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100 deg. C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98x10 -6 deg. C -1 , rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  16. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wananuruksawong, R.; Jinawath, S.; Padipatvuthikul, P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si3N4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si3N4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si3N4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si3N4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (<150 micrometer, Pyrex) with 5 wt% of zirconia powder (3 wt% Y2O3 - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si3N4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200°C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100°C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98×10-6 °C-1, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  17. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope observes cells and tissues in open medium through silicon nitride film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Ogura, Toshihiko; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Mio, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Shinichi; Sato, Chikara

    2010-03-01

    Direct observation of subcellular structures and their characterization is essential for understanding their physiological functions. To observe them in open environment, we have developed an inverted scanning electron microscope with a detachable, open-culture dish, capable of 8 nm resolution, and combined with a fluorescence microscope quasi-simultaneously observing the same area from the top. For scanning electron microscopy from the bottom, a silicon nitride film window in the base of the dish maintains a vacuum between electron gun and open sample dish while allowing electrons to pass through. Electrons are backscattered from the sample and captured by a detector under the dish. Cells cultured on the open dish can be externally manipulated under optical microscopy, fixed, and observed using scanning electron microscopy. Once fine structures have been revealed by scanning electron microscopy, their component proteins may be identified by comparison with separately prepared fluorescence-labeled optical microscopic images of the candidate proteins, with their heavy-metal-labeled or stained ASEM images. Furthermore, cell nuclei in a tissue block stained with platinum-blue were successfully observed without thin-sectioning, which suggests the applicability of this inverted scanning electron microscope to cancer diagnosis. This microscope visualizes mesoscopic-scale structures, and is also applicable to non-bioscience fields including polymer chemistry. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Processing of Silicon Nitride Ceramics from Concentrated Aqueous Suspensions by Robocasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HE,GUOPING; HIRSCHFELD,DEIDRE A.; CESARANO III,JOSEPH; STUECKER,JOHN N.

    2000-08-14

    The optimization of concentrated AlliedSignal GS-44 silicon nitride aqueous slurries for robocasting was investigated. The dispersion mechanisms of GS-44 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} aqueous suspensions with and without polyacrylate were analyzed. The zero point of charge (ZPC) was at about pH 6. Well-dispersed GS-44 suspensions were obtained in the pH range from 7 to 11 by the addition of Darvan 821A. The influence of pH, amount of Darvan 821A and solids loading on the theological behavior of GS-44 aqueous suspensions was determined. A coagulant, aluminum nitrate, was used to control the yield stress and shear thinning behavior of highly loaded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} slurries. Homogeneous and stable suspensions of 52 vol% GS-44 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were robocast successfully at pH 7.8 to pH 8.5. The sintering process, mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of robocast GS-44 bars were determined.

  19. High-Responsivity Graphene–Boron Nitride Photodetector and Autocorrelator in a Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiue, Ren-Jye; Gao, Yuanda; Wang, Yifei; Peng, Cheng; Robertson, Alexander D.; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Assefa, Solomon; Koppens, Frank H. L.; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2015-11-11

    Graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising materials for broadband and ultrafast photodetection and optical modulation. These optoelectronic capabilities can augment complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) devices for high-speed and low-power optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip ultrafast photodetector based on a two-dimensional heterostructure consisting of high-quality graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. Coupled to the optical mode of a silicon waveguide, this 2D heterostructure-based photodetector exhibits a maximum responsivity of 0.36 A/W and high-speed operation with a 3 dB cutoff at 42 GHz. From photocurrent measurements as a function of the top-gate and source-drain voltages, we conclude that the photoresponse is consistent with hot electron mediated effects. At moderate peak powers above 50 mW, we observe a saturating photocurrent consistent with the mechanisms of electron–phonon supercollision cooling. This nonlinear photoresponse enables optical on-chip autocorrelation measurements with picosecond-scale timing resolution and exceptionally low peak powers.

  20. Nano-mechanical measurements of protein-DNA interactions with a silicon nitride pulley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Min Ju; Cohen, Adam E

    2016-01-08

    Proteins adhere to DNA at locations and with strengths that depend on the protein conformation, the underlying DNA sequence and the ionic content of the solution. A facile technique to probe the positions and strengths of protein-DNA binding would aid in understanding these important interactions. Here, we describe a 'DNA pulley' for position-resolved nano-mechanical measurements of protein-DNA interactions. A molecule of λ DNA is tethered by one end to a glass surface, and by the other end to a magnetic bead. The DNA is stretched horizontally by a magnet, and a nanoscale knife made of silicon nitride is manipulated to contact, bend and scan along the DNA. The mechanical profile of the DNA at the contact with the knife is probed via nanometer-precision optical tracking of the magnetic bead. This system enables detection of protein bumps on the DNA and localization of their binding sites. We study theoretically the technical requirements to detect mechanical heterogeneities in the DNA itself. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Two color DNA barcode detection in photoluminescence suppressed silicon nitride nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assad, Ossama N; Di Fiori, Nicolas; Squires, Allison H; Meller, Amit

    2015-01-14

    Optical sensing of solid-state nanopores is a relatively new approach that can enable high-throughput, multicolor readout from a collection of nanopores. It is therefore highly attractive for applications such as nanopore-based DNA sequencing and genotyping using DNA barcodes. However, to date optical readout has been plagued by the need to achieve sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for single fluorophore sensing, while still maintaining millisecond resolution. One of the main factors degrading the optical SNR in solid-state nanopores is the high photoluminescence (PL) background emanating from the silicon nitride (SiNx) membrane in which pores are commonly fabricated. Focusing on the optical properties of SiNx nanopores we show that the local membrane PL intensity is substantially reduced, and its spectrum is shifted toward shorter wavelengths with increasing e-beam dose. This phenomenon, which is correlated with a marked photocurrent enhancement in these nanopores, is utilized to perform for the first time single molecule fluorescence detection using both green and red laser excitations. Specifically, the reduction in PL and the concurrent measurement of the nanopore photocurrent enhancement allow us to maximize the background suppression and to detect a dual color, five-unit DNA barcode with high SNR levels.

  2. Characteristics of laser assisted machining for silicon nitride ceramic according to machining parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Do; Lee, Su Jin; Suh, Jeong

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Laser Assisted Machining (LAM) that cuts and removes softened parts by locally heating the ceramic with laser. Silicon nitride ceramics can be machined with general machining tools as well, because YSiAlON, which was made up ceramics, is soften at about 1,000 .deg. C. In particular, the laser, which concentrates on highly dense energy, can locally heat materials and very effectively control the temperature of the heated part of specimen. Therefore, this paper intends to propose an efficient machining method of ceramic by deducing the machining governing factors of laser assisted machining and understanding its mechanism. While laser power is the machining factor that controls the temperature, the CBN cutting tool could cut the material more easily as the material gets deteriorated from the temperature increase by increasing the laser power, but excessive oxidation can negatively affect the quality of the material surface after machining. As the feed rate and cutting depth increase, the cutting force increases and tool lifespan decreases, but surface oxidation also decreases. In this experiment, the material can be cut to 3 mm of cutting depth. And based on the results of the experiment, the laser assisted machining mechanism is clarified

  3. Joining and Integration of Silicon Nitride Ceramics for Aerospace and Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2009-01-01

    Light-weight, creep-resistant silicon nitride ceramics possess excellent high-temperature strength and are projected to significantly raise engine efficiency and performance when used as turbine components in the next-generation turbo-shaft engines without the extensive cooling that is needed for metallic parts. One key aspect of Si3N4 utilization in such applications is its joining response to diverse materials. In an ongoing research program, the joining and integration of Si3N4 ceramics with metallic, ceramic, and composite materials using braze interlayers with the liquidus temperature in the range 750-1240C is being explored. In this paper, the self-joining behavior of Kyocera Si3N4 and St. Gobain Si3N4 using a ductile Cu-based active braze (Cu-ABA) containing Ti will be presented. Joint microstructure, composition, hardness, and strength as revealed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Knoop microhardness test, and offset compression shear test will be presented. Additionally, microstructure, composition, and joint strength of Si3N4/Inconel 625 joints made using Cu-ABA, will be presented. The results will be discussed with reference to the role of chemical reactions, wetting behavior, and residual stresses in joints.

  4. Comparative study of niobium nitride coatings deposited by unbalanced and balanced magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaya, J.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota Colombia (Colombia); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D. F. 04510 (Mexico); Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D. F. 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: muhl@servidor.unam.mx

    2008-10-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) coatings have many interesting properties such as chemical inertness, excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity, high melting point, and a superconducting transition temperature between 16 and 17 K. For this reason, these compounds have many potential thin film applications. In this work we compare the properties of NbN{sub x} films deposited using well-characterized balanced and unbalanced magnetron sputtering systems. Samples of NbN were deposited in the two systems under almost identical deposition conditions, that is, the same substrate temperature, plasma power, gas pressure, substrate to target distance and Ar/N{sub 2} ratio. Prior to the film preparation both the magnetic field geometry and the characteristics of the plasma were determined. The microstructure and composition of the deposits were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance and the micro-abrasion wear resistance were measured by anodic polarization potentiodynamic studies and by ball cratering, respectively. The NbN films grown using the highly unbalanced magnetron configuration had a preferential (111) crystal orientation and a composite hardness of up to 2400 HV{sub 0.025}. While the films deposited using the balanced magnetron had a mixed crystalline orientation and a hardness of 2000 HV{sub 0.025}. The results demonstrate the strong effect of magnetic field configuration on the ion bombardment, and the resultant coating characteristics.

  5. Comparative study of niobium nitride coatings deposited by unbalanced and balanced magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olaya, J.J.; Rodil, S.E.; Muhl, S.

    2008-01-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) coatings have many interesting properties such as chemical inertness, excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity, high melting point, and a superconducting transition temperature between 16 and 17 K. For this reason, these compounds have many potential thin film applications. In this work we compare the properties of NbN x films deposited using well-characterized balanced and unbalanced magnetron sputtering systems. Samples of NbN were deposited in the two systems under almost identical deposition conditions, that is, the same substrate temperature, plasma power, gas pressure, substrate to target distance and Ar/N 2 ratio. Prior to the film preparation both the magnetic field geometry and the characteristics of the plasma were determined. The microstructure and composition of the deposits were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance and the micro-abrasion wear resistance were measured by anodic polarization potentiodynamic studies and by ball cratering, respectively. The NbN films grown using the highly unbalanced magnetron configuration had a preferential (111) crystal orientation and a composite hardness of up to 2400 HV 0.025 . While the films deposited using the balanced magnetron had a mixed crystalline orientation and a hardness of 2000 HV 0.025 . The results demonstrate the strong effect of magnetic field configuration on the ion bombardment, and the resultant coating characteristics

  6. Titanium nitride deposition in titanium implant alloys produced by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, V.A.R.; Cairo, C.A.A.; Faria, J.; Lemos, T.G.; Galvani, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is an extremely hard material, often used as a coating on titanium alloy, steel, carbide, and aluminum components to improve wear resistance. Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) is a form of deposition in which a target anode is bombarded with an electron beam given off by a charged tungsten filament under high vacuum, producing a thin film in a substrate. In this work are presented results of TiN deposition in targets and substrates of Ti (C.P.) and Ti- 13 Nb- 13 Zr obtained by powder metallurgy. Samples were produced by mixing of hydride metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering between 900°C up to 1400 °C, in vacuum. The deposition was carried out under nitrogen atmosphere. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively. It was shown that the samples were sintered to high densities and presented homogeneous microstructure, with ideal characteristics for an adequate deposition and adherence. The film layer presented a continuous structure with 15μm. (author)

  7. Stress measurement and stress relaxation during magnetron sputter deposition of cubic boron nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abendroth, B.; Gago, R.; Kolitsch, A.; Moeller, W.

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic in situ analysis of stress and film thickness provide fast and more physical information on growth and stress evolution in cBN layers than integrating (ex situ) methods. Especially, features of the layered structure of boron nitride films, like the evolution of instantaneous stress and growth rates during deposition can be resolved by in situ methods. This work is concerned with dynamic in-situ stress measurement by means of cantilever bending during magnetron sputter deposition of cBN thin films. Laser deflection in combination with in situ ellipsometry is used to determine the instantaneous stress of the films. The results show in agreement with results that were obtained previously from ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD), that the hBN and cBN layers exhibit different levels of stress under constant deposition conditions. The stress increases from less than -4 GPa to very high values (-10 GPa) after the coalescence of the cBN nuclei. Therefore, it is possible to establish the point of cBN nucleation instantly. A simultaneous medium energy ion bombardment is used for stress relaxation during film deposition. A modified substrate bias voltage, combining negative high and low voltage pulses, is used to enable an ion bombardment of the growing film with energies up to 8 keV. In this way, cBN films with a stress as low as -1.7 GPa could be produced without destroying the sp 3 -bonds significantly

  8. Thermal stability of hot-wire deposited amorphous silicon

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Arendse, CJ

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available the solar cells may also be exposed to temperature cycling over a wide range of 2. Experimental details The a-Si:H sample was deposited simultaneously on single-side polished <100> crystalline silicon (c-Si) and Corning 7059 substrates by the hot... change in the defect structure is observed, caused by y clustering at 400 -C, caused by the alignment of unterminated , concentration or both. Raman scattering shows evidence that no s upon annealing. ) 92 – 94 www.elsevier.com/locate/tsf nitrogen...

  9. Silicon protected with atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Tilley, David S.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The semiconducting materials used for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting must withstand the corrosive nature of the aqueous electrolyte over long time scales in order to be a viable option for large scale solar energy conversion. Here we demonstrate that atomic layer deposited titanium...... dioxide (TiO2) overlayers on silicon-based photocathodes generate extremely stable electrodes. These electrodes can produce an onset potential of +0.510 V vs. RHE and a hydrogen evolution saturation current of 22 mA cm−2 using the red part of the AM1.5 solar spectrum (λ > 635 nm, 38.6 mW cm−2). A PEC...

  10. Thermodynamic calculations for chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kousaku; Ikawa, Katsuichi

    1985-03-01

    The composition of vapor and condensed phases at equilibrium and CVD phase diagrams were calculated for the CH 3 SiCl 3 -H 2 -Ar system using a computer code SOLGASMIX-PV, which is based on the free energy minimization method. These calculations showed that β-SiC, β-SiC+C(s), β-SiC+Si(s), β-SiC+Si(l), Si(s), Si(l), or C(s) would be deposited depending on deposition parameters. In the CH 3 SiCl 3 -Ar system, condensed phase was found to be β-SiC+C(s) or C(s). Comparing the calculated CVD phase diagrams with the experimental results from the literature, β-SiC+C(s) and β-SiC+Si(s) were deposited in the experiments at the high temperature (more than 2000K) and low temperature (less than 1700K) parts of a resion, respectively, where only β-SiC would be deposited in the calculations. These are remakable results to consider the deposition mechanism of silicon carbide. (author)

  11. Silicon nitride and silicon etching by CH{sub 3}F/O{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}F/CO{sub 2} plasma beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaler, Sanbir S.; Lou, Qiaowei; Donnelly, Vincent M., E-mail: vmdonnelly@uh.edu; Economou, Demetre J., E-mail: economou@uh.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Plasma Processing Laboratory, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Silicon nitride (SiN, where Si:N ≠ 1:1) films low pressure-chemical vapor deposited on Si substrates, Si films on Ge on Si substrates, and p-Si samples were exposed to plasma beams emanating from CH{sub 3}F/O{sub 2} or CH{sub 3}F/CO{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas. Conditions within the plasma beam source were maintained at power of 300 W (1.9 W/cm{sup 3}), pressure of 10 mTorr, and total gas flow rate of 10 sccm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the thicknesses of Si/Ge in addition to hydrofluorocarbon polymer films formed at low %O{sub 2} or %CO{sub 2} addition on p-Si and SiN. Polymer film thickness decreased sharply as a function of increasing %O{sub 2} or %CO{sub 2} addition and dropped to monolayer thickness above the transition point (∼48% O{sub 2} or ∼75% CO{sub 2}) at which the polymer etchants (O and F) number densities in the plasma increased abruptly. The C(1s) spectra for the polymer films deposited on p-Si substrates appeared similar to those on SiN. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to measure the thickness of SiN films etched using the CH{sub 3}F/O{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}F/CO{sub 2} plasma beams. SiN etching rates peaked near 50% O{sub 2} addition and 73% CO{sub 2} addition. Faster etching rates were measured in CH{sub 3}F/CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 3}F/O{sub 2} plasmas above 70% O{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} addition. The etching of Si stopped after a loss of ∼3 nm, regardless of beam exposure time and %O{sub 2} or %CO{sub 2} addition, apparently due to plasma assisted oxidation of Si. An additional GeO{sub x}F{sub y} peak was observed at 32.5 eV in the Ge(3d) region, suggesting deep penetration of F into Si, under the conditions investigated.

  12. Increased charge storage capacity of titanium nitride electrodes by deposition of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijs, Suzan; McDonald, Matthew; Sørensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of depositing a thin layer of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) on titanium nitride (TiN) coated electrodes and the effect this has on charge injection properties. The charge storage capacity increased by applying the B-NCD film...

  13. Phase formation and microstructure of boron nitride thin layers deposited using Nd:YAG and KrF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mroz, W.; Kosydar, R.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Major, B.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 200, - (2006), s. 6438-6443 ISSN 0257-8972 Grant - others:Polish Ministry of Science and Informatization(PL) PBZ-KBN-100/T08/2003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : boron nitride * pulsed laser deposition * coating Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.559, year: 2006

  14. Study of the deposition process of vinpocetine on the surface of porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenshin, A. S.; Polkovnikova, Yu. A.; Seredin, P. V.

    Currently the most prospective way in pharmacotherapy is the obtaining of nanoparticles involving pharmaceutical substances. Application of porous inorganic materials on the basis of silicon is among the main features in solving of this problem. The present work is concerned with the problem of the deposition of pharmaceutical drug with nootropic activity - vinpocetine - into porous silicon. Silicon nanoparticles were obtained by electrochemical anodic etching of Si plates. The process of vinpocetine deposition was studied in dependence of the deposition time. As a result of the investigations it was found that infrared transmission spectra of porous silicon with the deposited vinpocetine revealed the absorption bands characteristic of vinpocetine substance.

  15. Corrosion, optical and magnetic properties of flexible iron nitride nano thin films deposited on polymer substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, W. Q.; Wang, Qun; Jin, Xin; Yasin, G.

    2017-11-01

    Iron nitride thin films of different compositions and thicknesses were deposited on flexible polymer substrate in Ar/N2 atmosphere by reactive magnetron sputtering under varying nitrogen flow rates. The nano structured films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometer, electrochemical impedance (EIS), atomic force (AFM) and transmission electron microscopies. The dependence of their functional properties on coating and growth conditions was studied in detail. It was found that the thin films show a uniform permeability in the frequency range of 200 MHz to 1 Ghz and can be used in this range without appreciable changes. Decrease of nitrogen flow rate resulted in the smoother surfaces which in turn increase transmittance quality and corrosion resistance. Functional properties are dependent of nature, relative concentration of the iron nitride phases and film thickness. Surface integrity is excellent for180 nm thick sample because the films appear to be very dense and free from open pores. By keeping sputtering power stable at 110 W, nitrogen flow rate of 10 sccm was ideal to develop the ferromagnetic γʹFe4N phase at room temperature.

  16. Direct growth of graphene on gallium nitride by using chemical vapor deposition without extra catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yun; An Tie-Lei; Yang Jian-Kun; Wei Tong-Bo; Duan Rui-Fei; Wang Gang; Yang Huai-Chao; Chen Min-Jiang; Yu Fang; Tao Li; Sun Lian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Graphene on gallium nitride (GaN) will be quite useful when the graphene is used as transparent electrodes to improve the performance of gallium nitride devices. In this work, we report the direct synthesis of graphene on GaN without an extra catalyst by chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectra indicate that the graphene films are uniform and about 5–6 layers in thickness. Meanwhile, the effects of growth temperatures on the growth of graphene films are systematically studied, of which 950 °C is found to be the optimum growth temperature. The sheet resistance of the grown graphene is 41.1 Ω/square, which is close to the lowest sheet resistance of transferred graphene reported. The mechanism of graphene growth on GaN is proposed and discussed in detail. XRD spectra and photoluminescence spectra indicate that the quality of GaN epi-layers will not be affected after the growth of graphene. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  17. Effects of Interface Coating and Nitride Enhancing Additive on Properties of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishana T.; Hull, David R.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Babuder, Raymond

    2000-01-01

    Strong and tough Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites (SiC/ RBSN) have been fabricated by the fiber lay-up approach. Commercially available uncoated and PBN, PBN/Si-rich PBN, and BN/SiC coated SiC Hi-Nicalon fiber tows were used as reinforcement. The composites contained approximately 24 vol % of aligned 14 micron diameter SiC fibers in a porous RBSN matrix. Both one- and two-dimensional composites were characterized. The effects of interface coating composition, and the nitridation enhancing additive, NiO, on the room temperature physical, tensile, and interfacial shear strength properties of SiC/RBSN matrix composites were evaluated. Results indicate that for all three coated fibers, the thickness of the coatings decreased from the outer periphery to the interior of the tows, and that from 10 to 30 percent of the fibers were not covered with the interface coating. In the uncoated regions, chemical reaction between the NiO additive and the SiC fiber occurs causing degradation of tensile properties of the composites. Among the three interface coating combinations investigated, the BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced RBSN matrix composite showed the least amount of uncoated regions and reasonably uniform interface coating thickness. The matrix cracking stress in SiC/RBSN composites was predicted using a fracture mechanics based crack bridging model.

  18. Analysis of Carrier Traps in Si3N4 in Oxide/Nitride/Oxide for Metal/Oxide/Nitride/Oxide/Silicon Nonvolatile Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aozasa, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Ichiro; AkihiroNakamura, AkihiroNakamura; Komatsu, Yasutoshi

    1999-03-01

    The energy level, density and attempt to escape frequency ofcarrier traps in an Si3N4 film in tunnel oxide/nitride/oxide(ONO) multilayer for metal/oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon (MONOS)nonvolatile memory are investigated by discharging current transientspectroscopy (DCTS). To analyze the electrical properties of carriertraps observed through DCTS, a new model including the tunnelingprobability of the tunnel oxide film between the Si3N4 filmand an Si substrate was proposed. As a result, the electron traps inthe Si3N4 film, which are assumed to be related to thethreshold voltage decay, i.e. data retention, were found for the firsttime. The energy level of the electron traps in the Si3N4film in the ONO multilayer was 0.8 0.9 eV from the conduction bandand the density was 1 5×1018 cm-3. Theattempt to escape frequency of 2×1014 s-1 was alsoobtained. The energy level of the hole traps and its density were0.8 0.9 eV from the top of the valence band and 1 4×1018 cm-3, respectively. The magnitude of the trap density obtained from DCTS shows good agreement with that obtained from memory hysteresis characteristics. These results indicate that their carrier traps are amphoteric traps.

  19. Selective deposition contact patterning using atomic layer deposition for the fabrication of crystalline silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Joon; Shin, Woong-Chul; Chang, Hyo Sik

    2014-01-01

    Selective deposition contact (SDC) patterning was applied to fabricate the rear side passivation of crystalline silicon (Si) solar cells. By this method, using screen printing for contact patterning and atomic layer deposition for the passivation of Si solar cells with Al 2 O 3 , we produced local contacts without photolithography or any laser-based processes. Passivated emitter and rear-contact solar cells passivated with ozone-based Al 2 O 3 showed, for the SDC process, an up-to-0.7% absolute conversion-efficiency improvement. The results of this experiment indicate that the proposed method is feasible for conversion-efficiency improvement of industrial crystalline Si solar cells. - Highlights: • We propose a local contact formation process. • Local contact forms a screen print and an atomic layer deposited-Al 2 O 3 film. • Ozone-based Al 2 O 3 thin film was selectively deposited onto patterned silicon. • Selective deposition contact patterning method can increase cell-efficiency by 0.7%

  20. Development of a Computational Chemical Vapor Deposition Model: Applications to Indium Nitride and Dicyanovinylaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    A computational chemical vapor deposition (CVD) model is presented, that couples chemical reaction mechanisms with fluid dynamic simulations for vapor deposition experiments. The chemical properties of the systems under investigation are evaluated using quantum, molecular and statistical mechanics models. The fluid dynamic computations are performed using the CFD-ACE program, which can simulate multispecies transport, heat and mass transfer, gas phase chemistry, chemistry of adsorbed species, pulsed reactant flow and variable gravity conditions. Two experimental setups are being studied, in order to fabricate films of: (a) indium nitride (InN) from the gas or surface phase reaction of trimethylindium and ammonia; and (b) 4-(1,1)dicyanovinyl-dimethylaminoaniline (DCVA) by vapor deposition. Modeling of these setups requires knowledge of three groups of properties: thermodynamic properties (heat capacity), transport properties (diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity), and kinetic properties (rate constants for all possible elementary chemical reactions). These properties are evaluated using computational methods whenever experimental data is not available for the species or for the elementary reactions. The chemical vapor deposition model is applied to InN and DCVA. Several possible InN mechanisms are proposed and analyzed. The CVD model simulations of InN show that the deposition rate of InN is more efficient when pulsing chemistry is used under conditions of high pressure and microgravity. An analysis of the chemical properties of DCVA show that DCVA dimers may form under certain conditions of physical vapor transport. CVD simulations of the DCVA system suggest that deposition of the DCVA dimer may play a small role in the film and crystal growth processes.

  1. Deposit of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon using the laser ablation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebollo, P.B.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E.; Haro P, E.; Camacho L, M.A.; Muhl S, S.

    2000-01-01

    It is reported the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) nitrided, deposited by laser ablation in a nitrogen atmosphere at pressures which are from 4.5 x 10 -4 Torr until 7.5 x 10 -2 Torr. The structural properties of the films are studied by Raman spectroscopy obtaining similar spectra at the reported for carbon films type diamond. The study of behavior of the energy gap and the ratio nitrogen/carbon (N/C) in the films, shows that the energy gap is reduced when the nitrogen incorporation is increased. It is showed that the refraction index of the thin films diminish as nitrogen pressure is increased, indicating the formation of graphitic material. (Author)

  2. Rapid determination of trace amounts of fluorine in silicon nitride by instrumental neutron-activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Chushiro; Matsue, Hideaki; Kurosawa, Tatsuya

    1998-01-01

    The rapid determination of ppm levels of F in silicon nitride powder and some reference materials by instrumental neutron-activation analysis (INAA), measuring the short-lived nuclide 20 F (half life: 11.00 s), has been studied. The determination was carried out by single and cyclic activation methods using an activation analysis facility (PN-3) of the 20 MW reactor JRR-3M. Using this method, the sample was irradiated with a thermal neutron flux of 1.9 x 10 13 n cm -2 s -1 for 5 s, and the γ-ray spectrum was measured for 10 s after letting the sample stand for 7 s. In the cyclic-activation method, the single-activation method was repeated 5 times, including more than a 10 min cooling interval between each measurement. The effects of evaporating F during neutron irradiation and a side reaction due to 23 Na (n, α) 20 F were examined; it was confirmed that these effects can be neglected under the present experimental conditions. Due to the high Cd ratio of the irradiation field at PN-3, the effect of the side reaction from Na is 25- to 155-times lower than the values obtained by other reactors. The cyclic-activation method presents not only a lower detection limit, but also better analytical precision than the single-activation method. The analytical results of F in reference materials of Opal Glass (NIST SRM91) and Oyster Tissue (NIST SRM1566a) almost agreed within 5.1 to 5.9 % with the certified and reference values. The relationship between the detection limit of the F and Al contents was also clarified. (author)

  3. Thermal Response of Cooled Silicon Nitride Plate Due to Thermal Conductivity Effects Analyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Bhatt, Ramakrishna

    2003-01-01

    Lightweight, strong, tough high-temperature materials are required to complement efficiency improvements for next-generation gas turbine engines that can operate with minimum cooling. Because of their low density, high-temperature strength, and high thermal conductivity, ceramics are being investigated as materials to replace the nickelbase superalloys that are currently used for engine hot-section components. Ceramic structures can withstand higher operating temperatures and a harsh combustion environment. In addition, their low densities relative to metals help reduce component mass (ref. 1). To complement the effectiveness of the ceramics and their applicability for turbine engine applications, a parametric study using the finite element method is being carried out. The NASA Glenn Research Center remains very active in conducting and supporting a variety of research activities related to ceramic matrix composites through both experimental and analytical efforts (ref. 1). The objectives of this work are to develop manufacturing technology, develop a thermal and environmental barrier coating (TBC/EBC), develop an analytical modeling capability to predict thermomechanical stresses, and perform a minimal burner rig test on silicon nitride (Si3N4) and SiC/SiC turbine nozzle vanes under simulated engine conditions. Moreover, we intend to generate a detailed database of the material s property characteristics and their effects on structural response. We expect to offer a wide range of data since the modeling will account for other variables, such as cooling channel geometry and spacing. Comprehensive analyses have begun on a plate specimen with Si3N4 cooling holes.

  4. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wananuruksawong, R; Jinawath, S; Wasanapiarnpong, T [Research Unit of Advanced Ceramic, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Padipatvuthikul, P, E-mail: raayaa_chula@hotmail.com [Faculty of Dentistry, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2011-10-29

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (<150 micrometer, Pyrex) with 5 wt% of zirconia powder (3 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200 deg. C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100 deg. C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98x10{sup -6} deg. C{sup -1}, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  5. Prototype of a silicon nitride ceramic-based miniplate osteofixation system for the midface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Andreas; Unkel, Claus; Werry, Christoph; Herborn, Christoh U; Maier, Horst R; Ragoss, Christian; Jahnke, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    The favorable properties of silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics, such as high mean strength level and fracture toughness, suggest biomedical use as an implant material. Minor reservations about the biocompatibility of Si3N4 ceramics were cleared up by previous in vitro and in vivo investigations. A Si3N4 prototype minifixation system was manufactured and implanted for osteosynthesis of artificial frontal bone defects in 3 minipigs. After 3 months, histological sections, computed tomography (CT) scans, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained. Finite element modeling (FEM) was used to simulate stresses and strains on Si3N4 miniplates and screws to calculate survival probabilities. Si3N4 miniplates and screws showed satisfying intraoperative workability. There was no implant loss, displacement, or fracture. Bone healing was complete in all animals. The formation of new bone was observed in direct contact to the implants. The implants showed no artifacts on CT and MRI scanning. FEM simulation confirmed the mechanical reliability of the screws, whereas simulated plate geometries regarding pullout forces at maximum load showed limited safety in a bending situation. Si3N4 ceramics show a good biocompatibility outcome both in vitro and in vivo. In ENT surgery, this ceramic may serve as a biomaterial for osteosynthesis (eg, of the midface including reconstruction the floor of the orbit and the skull base). To our knowledge, this is the first introduction of a ceramic-based miniplate-osteofixation system. Advantages compared with titanium are no risk of implantation to bone with mucosal attachment, no need for explantation, and no interference with radiologic imaging. Disadvantages include the impossibility of individual bending of the miniplates.

  6. Nitride-based Quantum-Confined Structures for Ultraviolet-Visible Optical Devices on Silicon Substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2017-04-01

    III–V nitride quantum-confined structures embedded in nanowires (NWs), also known as quantum-disks-in-nanowires (Qdisks-in-NWs), have recently emerged as a new class of nanoscale materials exhibiting outstanding properties for optoelectronic devices and systems. It is promising for circumventing the technology limitation of existing planar epitaxy devices, which are bounded by the lattice-, crystal-structure-, and thermal- matching conditions. This work presents significant advances in the growth of good quality GaN, InGaN and AlGaN Qdisks-in-NWs based on careful optimization of the growth parameters, coupled with a meticulous layer structure and active region design. The NWs were grown, catalyst-free, using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) on silicon (Si) substrates. A 2-step growth scheme was developed to achieve high areal density, dislocation free and vertically aligned NWs on Ti/Si substrates. Numerical modeling of the NWs structures, using the nextnano3 software, showed reduced polarization fields, and, in the presence of Qdisks, exhibited improved quantum-confinement; thus contributing to high carrier radiative-recombination rates. As a result, based on the growth and device structure optimization, the technologically challenging orange and yellow NWs light emitting devices (LEDs) targeting the ‘green-yellow’ gap were demonstrated on scalable, foundry compatible, and low-cost Ti coated Si substrates. The NWs work was also extended to LEDs emitting in the ultraviolet (UV) range with niche applications in environmental cleaning, UV-curing, medicine, and lighting. In this work, we used a Ti (100 nm) interlayer and Qdisks to achieve good quality AlGaN based UV-A (320 - 400 nm) device. To address the issue of UV-absorbing polymer, used in the planarization process, we developed a pendeo-epitaxy technique, for achieving an ultra-thin coalescence of the top p-GaN contact layer, for a self-planarized Qdisks-in-NWs UV-B (280 – 320 nm) LED grown

  7. Silicon-Nitride-based Integrated Optofluidic Biochemical Sensors using a Coupled-Resonator Optical Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawei eWANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride (SiN is a promising material platform for integrating photonic components and microfluidic channels on a chip for label-free, optical biochemical sensing applications in the visible to near-infrared wavelengths. The chip-scale SiN-based optofluidic sensors can be compact due to a relatively high refractive index contrast between SiN and the fluidic medium, and low-cost due to the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS-compatible fabrication process. Here, we demonstrate SiN-based integrated optofluidic biochemical sensors using a coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW in the visible wavelengths. The working principle is based on imaging in the far field the out-of-plane elastic-light-scattering patterns of the CROW sensor at a fixed probe wavelength. We correlate the imaged pattern with reference patterns at the CROW eigenstates. Our sensing algorithm maps the correlation coefficients of the imaged pattern with a library of calibrated correlation coefficients to extract a minute change in the cladding refractive index. Given a calibrated CROW, our sensing mechanism in the spatial domain only requires a fixed-wavelength laser in the visible wavelengths as a light source, with the probe wavelength located within the CROW transmission band, and a silicon digital charge-coupled device (CCD / CMOS camera for recording the light scattering patterns. This is in sharp contrast with the conventional optical microcavity-based sensing methods that impose a strict requirement of spectral alignment with a high-quality cavity resonance using a wavelength-tunable laser. Our experimental results using a SiN CROW sensor with eight coupled microrings in the 680nm wavelength reveal a cladding refractive index change of ~1.3 × 10^-4 refractive index unit (RIU, with an average sensitivity of ~281 ± 271 RIU-1 and a noise-equivalent detection limit (NEDL of 1.8 ×10^-8 RIU ~ 1.0 ×10^-4 RIU across the CROW bandwidth of ~1 nm.

  8. N-rich silicon nitride angled MMI for coarse wavelength division (de)multiplexing in the O-band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucio, Thalía Domínguez; Khokhar, Ali Z; Mashanovich, Goran Z; Gardes, Frederic Y

    2018-03-15

    We report the design and fabrication of a compact angled multimode interferometer (AMMI) on a 600 nm thick N-rich silicon nitride platform (n=1.92) optimized to match the International Telecommunication Union coarse wavelength division (de)multiplexing standard in the O telecommunication band. The demonstrated device exhibited a good spectral response with Δλ=20  nm, BW 3 dB ∼11  nm, ILprocess that enables multilayer integration schemes due to its processing temperature <400°C.

  9. Laser Induced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zahavi, Joseph

    1995-01-01

    .... It completes the information which was given in the previous two progress reports. Basically, the aim of the first year was to study the possibility of deposition of silicon nitride thin films from silane and ammonia at low temperatures...

  10. A Thermodynamic Model to Estimate the Formation of Complex Nitrides of Al x Mg(1-x)N in Silicon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan; Zhang, Lifeng; Li, Ming; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2018-03-01

    A complex nitride of Al x Mg(1-x)N was observed in silicon steels. A thermodynamic model was developed to predict the ferrite/nitride equilibrium in the Fe-Al-Mg-N alloy system, using published binary solubility products for stoichiometric phases. The model was used to estimate the solubility product of nitride compound, equilibrium ferrite, and nitride compositions, and the amounts of each phase, as a function of steel composition and temperature. In the current model, the molar ratio Al/(Al + Mg) in the complex nitride was great due to the low dissolved magnesium in steel. For a steel containing 0.52 wt pct Als, 10 ppm T.Mg., and 20 ppm T.N. at 1100 K (827 °C), the complex nitride was expressed by Al0.99496Mg0.00504N and the solubility product of this complex nitride was 2.95 × 10-7. In addition, the solution temperature of the complex nitride increased with increasing the nitrogen and aluminum in steel. The good agreement between the prediction and the detected precipitate compositions validated the current model.

  11. Direct deposition of cubic boron nitride films on tungsten carbide-cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teii, Kungen; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2012-10-24

    Thick cubic boron nitride (cBN) films in micrometer-scale are deposited on tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) substrates without adhesion interlayers by inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) using the chemistry of fluorine. The residual film stress is reduced because of very low ion-impact energies (a few eV to ∼25 eV) controlled by the plasma sheath potential. Two types of substrate pretreatment are used successively; the removal of surface Co binder using an acid solution suppresses the catalytic effect of Co and triggers cBN formation, and the surface roughening using mechanical scratching and hydrogen plasma etching increases both the in-depth cBN fraction and deposition rate. The substrate surface condition is evaluated by the wettability of the probe liquids with different polarities and quantified by the apparent surface free energy calculated from the contact angle. The surface roughening enhances the compatibility in energy between the cBN and substrate, which are bridged by the interfacial sp(2)-bonded hexagonal BN buffer layer, and then, the cBN overlayer is nucleated and evolved easier.

  12. A difference in using atomic layer deposition or physical vapour deposition TiN as electrode material in metal-insulator-metal and metal-insulator-silicon capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenland, A W; Wolters, R A M; Kovalgin, A Y; Schmitz, J

    2011-09-01

    In this work, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and metal-insulator-silicon (MIS) capacitors are studied using titanium nitride (TiN) as the electrode material. The effect of structural defects on the electrical properties on MIS and MIM capacitors is studied for various electrode configurations. In the MIM capacitors the bottom electrode is a patterned 100 nm TiN layer (called BE type 1), deposited via sputtering, while MIS capacitors have a flat bottom electrode (called BE type 2-silicon substrate). A high quality 50-100 nm thick SiO2 layer, made by inductively-coupled plasma CVD at 150 degrees C, is deposited as a dielectric on top of both types of bottom electrodes. BE type 1 (MIM) capacitors have a varying from low to high concentration of structural defects in the SiO2 layer. BE type 2 (MIS) capacitors have a low concentration of structural defects and are used as a reference. Two sets of each capacitor design are fabricated with the TiN top electrode deposited either via physical vapour deposition (PVD, i.e., sputtering) or atomic layer deposition (ALD). The MIM and MIS capacitors are electrically characterized in terms of the leakage current at an electric field of 0.1 MV/cm (I leak) and for different structural defect concentrations. It is shown that the structural defects only show up in the electrical characteristics of BE type 1 capacitors with an ALD TiN-based top electrode. This is due to the excellent step coverage of the ALD process. This work clearly demonstrates the sensitivity to process-induced structural defects, when ALD is used as a step in process integration of conductors on insulation materials.

  13. PECVD Silicon Nitride Passivation on Boron Emitter: The Analysis of Electrostatic Charge on the Interface Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalita M. Nursam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of surface recombination of boron diffused and undiffused silicon surfaces passivated with a-SiN:H on the net charge density is investigated in detail. The films are deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition using a 2.45 GHz microwave remote plasma system. The surface charge density on the samples is varied by depositing charge using a corona discharge chamber. Excess carrier lifetime, capacitance-voltage, and Kelvin probe measurements are combined to determine the surface recombination velocity and emitter saturation current density as a function of net charge density. Our results show that the application of negative charge causes a substantial reduction in the surface recombination of samples with boron diffused emitters, even for high boron surface concentrations of 5×1019 cm−3. The significant difference observed in surface recombination between boron diffused and undiffused sample under accumulation implies that the presence of boron diffusion has results in some degradation of the Si-SiN interface. Further, (111 oriented surfaces appear more sensitive to the boron surface concentration than (100 oriented surfaces.

  14. Coupled fiber taper extraction of 1.53 microm photoluminescence from erbium doped silicon nitride photonic crystal cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambat, Gary; Gong, Yiyang; Lu, Jesse; Yerci, Selçuk; Li, Rui; Dal Negro, Luca; Vucković, Jelena

    2010-03-15

    Optical fiber tapers are used to collect photoluminescence emission at approximately 1.5 microm from photonic crystal cavities fabricated in erbium doped silicon nitride on silicon. In the experiment, photoluminescence collection via one arm of the fiber taper is enhanced 2.5 times relative to free space collection, corresponding to a net collection efficiency of 4%. Theoretically, the collection efficiency into one arm of the fiber-taper with this material system and cavity design can be as high as 12.5%, but the degradation of the experimental coupling efficiency relative to this value mainly comes from scattering loss within the short taper transition regions. By varying the fiber taper offset from the cavity, a broad tuning range of coupling strength and collection efficiency is obtained. This material system combined with fiber taper collection is promising for building on-chip optical amplifiers.

  15. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-07-04

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

  16. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of the nitrides and oxynitrides of vanadium, titanium and chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elwin, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    A study has been made into the atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of nitrides and oxynitrides of vanadium, titanium and chromium. Vanadium tetrachloride, vanadium oxychloride, chromyl chloride and titanium tetrachloride have been used as precursors with ammonia, at different flow conditions and temperatures. Vanadium nitride, vanadium oxynitride, chromium oxynitride, titanium/vanadium nitride and titanium/chromium oxynitride have been deposited as thin films on glass. The APCVD reaction of VCl 4 and ammonia leads to films with general composition VN x O y . By raising the ammonia concentration so that it is in excess (0.42 dm 3 min -1 VCl 4 with 1.0 dm 3 min -1 NH 3 at 500 deg. C) a film has been deposited with the composition VN 0.8 O 0.2 . Further investigation discovered similar elemental compositions could be reached by deposition at 350 deg. C (0.42 dm 3 min -1 VCl 4 with 0.5 dm 3 min -1 NH 3 ), followed by annealing at 650 deg. C, and cooled under a flow of ammonia. Only films formed below 400 deg. C were found to contain carbon or chlorine ( 3 and ammonia also lead to films of composition VN x O y the oxygen to nitrogen ratios depending on the deposition conditions. The reaction Of VOCl 3 (0.42 dm 3 min -1 ) and ammonia (0.2 dm 3 min -1 ) at 500 deg. C lead to a film of composition VN 0. 47O 1.06 . The reaction of VOCl 3 (0.42 dm 3 min -1 ) and ammonia (0.5 dm 3 min -1 ) at 650 deg. C lead to a film of composition VN 0.63 O 0.41 . The reaction of chromyl chloride with excess ammonia led to the formation of chromium oxide (Cr 2 O 3 ) films. Mixed metal films were prepared from the reactions of vanadium tetrachloride, titanium tetrachloride and ammonia to prepare V x Ti y N z and chromyl chloride, titanium tetrachloride and ammonia to form TiCr x O y N z . Both reactions produced the intended mixed coating but it was found that the vanadium / titanium nitride contained around 10 % vanadium whatever the conditions used. Oxygen contamination

  17. Influence of the Surface Layer on the Electrochemical Deposition of Metals and Semiconductors into Mesoporous Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubenko, E. B., E-mail: eugene.chubenko@gmail.com; Redko, S. V.; Sherstnyov, A. I.; Petrovich, V. A.; Kotov, D. A.; Bondarenko, V. P. [Belarusian State University of Information and RadioElectronics (Belarus)

    2016-03-15

    The influence of the surface layer on the process of the electrochemical deposition of metals and semiconductors into porous silicon is studied. It is shown that the surface layer differs in structure and electrical characteristics from the host porous silicon bulk. It is established that a decrease in the conductivity of silicon crystallites that form the surface layer of porous silicon has a positive effect on the process of the filling of porous silicon with metals and semiconductors. This is demonstrated by the example of nickel and zinc oxide. The effect can be used for the formation of nanocomposite materials on the basis of porous silicon and nanostructures with a high aspect ratio.

  18. Embedded nonvolatile memory devices with various silicon nitride energy band gaps on glass used for flat panel display applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Dang Ngoc; Van Duy, Nguyen; Jung, Sungwook; Yi, Junsin

    2010-01-01

    Nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices with a nitride–nitride–oxynitride stack structure on a rough poly-silicon (poly-Si) surface were fabricated using a low-temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistor technology on glass substrates for application of flat panel display (FPD). The plasma-assisted oxidation/nitridation method is used to form a uniform oxynitride with an ultrathin tunneling layer on a rough LTPS surface. The NVMs, using a Si-rich silicon nitride film as a charge-trapping layer, were proposed as one of the solutions for the improvement of device performance such as the program/erase speed, the memory window and the charge retention characteristics. To further improve the vertical scaling and charge retention characteristics of NVM devices, the high-κ high-density N-rich SiN x films are used as a blocking layer. The fabricated NVM devices have outstanding electrical properties, such as a low threshold voltage, a high ON/OFF current ratio, a low subthreshold swing, a low operating voltage of less than ±9 V and a large memory window of 3.7 V, which remained about 1.9 V over a period of 10 years. These characteristics are suitable for electrical switching and data storage with in FPD application

  19. Effect of negative bias on TiAlSiN coating deposited on nitrided Zircaloy-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Zhou; Zhendong, Feng; Xiangfang, Fan; Yanhong, Liu; Huanlin, Li

    2018-01-01

    TiAlSiN coatings were deposited on the nitrided Zircaloy-4 by multi-arc ion plating at -100 V, -200 V and -300 V. In this study, the high temperature oxidation behavior of coatings was tested by a box-type resistance furnace in air for 3 h at 800 °C; the macro-morphology of coatings was observed and analyzed by a zoom-stereo microscope; the micro-morphology of coatings was analyzed by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the chemical elements of samples were analyzed by an energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS); the adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate was measured by an automatic scratch tester; and the phases of coatings were analyzed by an X-ray diffractometer(XRD). Results show that the coating deposited at -100 V shows better high temperature oxidation resistance behavior, at the same time, Al elements contained in the coating is of the highest amount, meanwhile, the adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate is the highest, which is 33N. As the bias increases, high temperature oxidation resistance behavior of the coating weakens first and then increases, the amount of large particles on the surface of the coating increases first and then decreases whereas the density of the coating decreases first and then increases, and adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate increases first and then weakens. The coating's quality is relatively poor when the bias is -200 V.

  20. Boron Nitride Nanoporous Membranes with High Surface Charge by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Matthieu; Koonkaew, Boonprakrong; Balme, Sebastien; Utke, Ivo; Picaud, Fabien; Iatsunskyi, Igor; Coy, Emerson; Miele, Philippe; Bechelany, Mikhael

    2017-05-17

    In this work, we report the design and the fine-tuning of boron nitride single nanopore and nanoporous membranes by atomic layer deposition (ALD). First, we developed an ALD process based on the use of BBr 3 and NH 3 as precursors in order to synthesize BN thin films. The deposited films were characterized in terms of thickness, composition, and microstructure. Next, we used the newly developed process to grow BN films on anodic aluminum oxide nanoporous templates, demonstrating the conformality benefit of BN prepared by ALD, and its scalability for the manufacturing of membranes. For the first time, the ALD process was then used to tune the diameter of fabricated single transmembrane nanopores by adjusting the BN thickness and to enable studies of the fundamental aspects of ionic transport on a single nanopore. At pH = 7, we estimated a surface charge density of 0.16 C·m -2 without slip and 0.07 C·m -2 considering a reasonable slip length of 3 nm. Molecular dynamics simulations performed with experimental conditions confirmed the conductivities and the sign of surface charges measured. The high ion transport results obtained and the ability to fine-tune nanoporous membranes by such a scalable method pave the way toward applications such as ionic separation, energy harvesting, and ultrafiltration devices.

  1. Pulsed Laser Deposition Processing of Improved Titanium Nitride Coatings for Implant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Talisha M.

    Recently surface coating technology has attracted considerable attention of researchers to develop novel coatings with enhanced functional properties such as hardness, biocompatibility, wear and corrosion resistance for medical devices and surgical tools. The materials currently being used for surgical implants include predominantly stainless steel (316L), cobalt chromium (Co-Cr), titanium and its alloys. Some of the limitations of these implants include improper mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, cytotoxicity and bonding with bone. One of the ways to improve the performance and biocompatibility of these implants is to coat their surfaces with biocompatible materials. Among the various coating materials, titanium nitride (TiN) shows excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and low cytotoxicity. In the present work, a systematic study of pulsed laser ablation processing of TiN coatings was conducted. TiN thin film coatings were grown on commercially pure titanium (Ti) and stainless steel (316L) substrates at different substrate temperatures and different nitrogen partial pressures using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Microstructural, surface, mechanical, chemical, corrosion and biological analysis techniques were applied to characterize the TiN thin film coatings. The PLD processed TiN thin film coatings showed improvements in mechanical strength, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility when compared to the bare substrates. The enhanced performance properties of the TiN thin film coatings were a result of the changing and varying of the deposition parameters.

  2. Structural and chemical analysis of annealed plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition aluminum nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broas, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.broas@aalto.fi; Vuorinen, Vesa [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sippola, Perttu; Pyymaki Perros, Alexander; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University. P.O. Box 13500, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-07-15

    Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition was utilized to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) films on Si from trimethylaluminum and N{sub 2}:H{sub 2} plasma at 200 °C. Thermal treatments were then applied on the films which caused changes in their chemical composition and nanostructure. These changes were observed to manifest in the refractive indices and densities of the films. The AlN films were identified to contain light element impurities, namely, H, C, and excess N due to nonideal precursor reactions. Oxygen contamination was also identified in the films. Many of the embedded impurities became volatile in the elevated annealing temperatures. Most notably, high amounts of H were observed to desorb from the AlN films. Furthermore, dinitrogen triple bonds were identified with infrared spectroscopy in the films. The triple bonds broke after annealing at 1000 °C for 1 h which likely caused enhanced hydrolysis of the films. The nanostructure of the films was identified to be amorphous in the as-deposited state and to become nanocrystalline after 1 h of annealing at 1000 °C.

  3. The combined effects of Fe and H2 on the nitridation of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the support offered by previous work for the suggestion that Fe may affect alpha-Si3N4 formation and microstructural development, a two-part study was conducted to differentiate the effects of H2 and Fe in, first, the nitridation of pure and of Fe-containing powder in N2 and N2-4% H2, and then the nitridation of (1 1 1) Si single crystal wafers with and without Fe powder on the surface. The degree of nitridation is most strongly affected by H2 at 1200 C, but by Fe at 1375 C, where Fe-containing samples in either atmosphere were almost completely nitrided. While neither H2 nor Fe alone changed the ratio of alpha-Si3N4 to beta-Si3N4, the combination of H2 and Fe increased it at both temperatures.

  4. Improving the Microstructure and Electrical Properties of Aluminum Induced Polysilicon Thin Films Using Silicon Nitride Capping Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hang Weng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the capping layer effect of SiNx (silicon nitride on the microstructure, electrical, and optical properties of poly-Si (polycrystalline silicon prepared by aluminum induced crystallization (AIC. The primary multilayer structure comprised Al (30 nm/SiNx (20 nm/a-Si (amorphous silicon layer (100 nm/ITO coated glass and was then annealed in a low annealing temperature of 350°C with different annealing times, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. The crystallization properties were analyzed and verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD and Raman spectra. The grain growth was analyzed via optical microscope (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The improved electrical properties such as Hall mobility, resistivity, and dark conductivity were investigated by using Hall and current-voltage (I-V measurements. The results show that the amorphous silicon film has been effectively induced even at a low temperature of 350°C and a short annealing time of 15 min and indicate that the SiNx capping layer can improve the grain growth and reduce the metal content in the induced poly-Si film. It is found that the large grain size is over 20 μm and the carrier mobility values are over 80 cm2/V-s.

  5. Optical and structural characterization of silicon-carbon-nitride thin films for optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swatowska, Barbara; Stapinski, Tomasz [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2010-04-15

    Amorphous a-SiCN:H films were deposited by radio frequency Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) at 13.56 MHz from silane-methane-ammonia (SiH{sub 4}+CH{sub 4}+NH{sub 3}) gaseous mixture. Morphological, structural and optical characterization of a-SiCN:H in correlation with process parameters was done. High growth rate of films was influenced mainly by presence of ammonia and silane in technological process. FTIR spectra analysis of films revealed the influence of gaseous mixture content in PECVD process on their structure. The refractive index and optical gap depended on elemental composition of films. The total reflectivity of a-SiCN:H on monocrystalline silicon revealed increase with the decrease in carbon and nitrogen content. The a-SiCN:H films are smooth, homogeneous, chemically inert and wear resistive and also hydrogen rich, which is important from the application point of view (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Study of the deposition process of vinpocetine on the surface of porous silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Lenshin

    Full Text Available Currently the most prospective way in pharmacotherapy is the obtaining of nanoparticles involving pharmaceutical substances. Application of porous inorganic materials on the basis of silicon is among the main features in solving of this problem. The present work is concerned with the problem of the deposition of pharmaceutical drug with nootropic activity – vinpocetine – into porous silicon. Silicon nanoparticles were obtained by electrochemical anodic etching of Si plates. The process of vinpocetine deposition was studied in dependence of the deposition time. As a result of the investigations it was found that infrared transmission spectra of porous silicon with the deposited vinpocetine revealed the absorption bands characteristic of vinpocetine substance. Keywords: Nanoparticles, Porous silicon, Vinpocetine

  7. Defects study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon samples and their relation with the substrate and deposition conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwich, R.

    2009-07-01

    The goal of this work is to study the properties of the defects aiming to explore the types of defects and the effect of various deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, the kind of the substrate, gas pressure and deposition rate. Two kinds of samples have been used; The first one was a series of Schottky diodes, and the second one a series of solar cells (p-i-n junction) deposited on crystalline silicon or on corning glass substrates with different deposition parameters. The deposition parameters were chosen to obtain materials whose their structures varying from amorphous to microcrystalline silicon including polymorphous silicon. Our results show that the polymorphous silicon samples deposited at high deposition rates present the best photovoltaic properties in comparison with those deposited at low rates. Also we found that the defects concentration in high deposition rate samples is less at least by two orders than that obtained in low deposition rate polymorphous, microcrystalline and amorphous samples. This study shows also that there is no effect of the substrate, or the thin films of highly doped amorphous silicon deposited on the substrate, on the creation and properties of these defects. Finally, different experimental methods have been used; a comparison between their results has been presented. (author)

  8. Effect of pyrolysis atmospheres on the morphology of polymer-derived silicon oxynitrocarbide ceramic films coated aluminum nitride surface and the thermal conductivity of silicone rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsien T.; Sukachonmakul, Tanapon; Wang, Chen H.; Wattanakul, Karnthidaporn; Kuo, Ming T.; Wang, Yu H.

    2014-02-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) and silicon oxynitrocarbide (SiONC) ceramic films coated aluminum nitride (AlN) were prepared by using preceramic-polysilazane (PSZ) with dip-coating method, followed by pyrolysis at 700 °C in different (air, Ar, N2 and NH3) atmospheres to converted PSZ into SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic. The existence of amorphous SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films on AlN surface was characterized by FTIR, XRD and XPS. The interfacial adhesion between silicone rubber and AlN was significantly improved after the introduction of amorphous SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films on AlN surface. It can be observed from AFM that the pyrolysis of PSZ at different atmosphere strongly affected to films morphology on AlN surface as SiOCair and SiONCNH3 ceramic films were more flat and smooth than SiONCN2 and SiONCAr ceramic films. Besides, the enhancement of the thermal conductivity of silicone rubber composites was found to be related to the decrease in the surface roughness of SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films on AlN surface. This present work provided an alternative surface modification of thermally conductive fillers to improve the thermal conductivity of silicon rubber composites by coating with amorphous SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films.

  9. Surface modification of aluminum nitride by polysilazane and its polymer-derived amorphous silicon oxycarbide ceramic for the enhancement of thermal conductivity in silicone rubber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsien Tang; Sukachonmakul, Tanapon; Kuo, Ming Tai; Wang, Yu Hsiang; Wattanakul, Karnthidaporn

    2014-02-01

    Polysilazane (PSZ) and its polymer-derived amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) ceramic were coated on aluminum nitride (AlN) by using a dip-coating method to allow moisture-crosslinking of PSZ on AlN, followed by heat treatment at 700 °C in air to convert PSZ into SiOC on AlN. The results from FTIR, XPS and SEM indicated that the surface of AlN was successfully coated by PSZ and SiOC film. It was found that the introduction of PSZ and SiOC film help improve in the interfacial adhesion between the modified AlN (PSZ/AlN and SiOC/AlN) and silicone rubber lead to the increase in the thermal conductivity of the composites since the thermal boundary resistance at the filler-matrix interface was decreased. However, the introduction of SiOC as an intermediate layer between AlN and silicone rubber could help increase the thermal energy transport at the filler-matrix interface rather than using PSZ. This result was due to the decrease in the surface roughness and thickness of SiOC film after heat treatment at 700 °C in air. Thus, in the present work, a SiOC ceramic coating could provide a new surface modification for the improvement of the interfacial adhesion between the thermally conductive filler and the matrix in which can enhance the thermal conductivity of the composites.

  10. Formation of silicon nanoislands on crystalline silicon substrates by thermal annealing of silicon rich oxide deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zhenrui; Aceves-Mijares, Mariano; Luna-Lopez, A; Du Jinhui; Bian Dongcai

    2006-01-01

    We report the preparation and characterization of Si nanoislands grown on a c-Si substrate by thermal annealing of silicon-rich oxide (SRO) films deposited using a conventional low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) technique. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that a high density of Si nanoislands was formed on the surface of the c-Si substrate during thermal annealing. The nanoislands are nanocrystallites with the same crystal orientation as the substrate. The strain at the c-Si/SRO interface is probably the main reason for the nucleation of the self-assembled Si nanoislands that epitaxially grow on the c-Si substrate. The proposed method is very simple and compatible with Si integrated circuit technology

  11. Optimation of Sputtering Process Parameters on the Deposition of Nitride Titanium Thin Layer on Aluminum Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjipto Sujitno; Agus Santoso; Wiryoadi; Sayono; Bambang Siswanto; Lely Susita RM

    2002-01-01

    Research on the optimization of sputtering process parameters on the deposition of nitride titanium thin layer on aluminum alloys has been carried out. The aim of this research is to get the optimum conditions of the process parameters. The parameters of the process are ratio of sputter gas (Ar) and dopant (Nitrogen) gas, time of the process (t), temperature (T), electrode distance, electrode voltage and vacuum conditions of the process. In this experiment the electrode distance and electrode voltage are constants i.e.: 4 cm, 1.5 kV and 2.0 x 10 -1 torr, respectively. To examine the results, it was characterized its hardness, wear and corrosion resistance. It's found that optimum conditions was achieved at the ratio of Ar:N 2 = 5:7, t = 3 hours, T= 100 o C and vacuum conditions 2 x 10 -2 torr. At the optimum conditions, the hardness increases from 120.33 KHN to 149.59 KHN or there is an increasing in hardness in order of 24.32 %, the wear resistance increases from 1 x 10 -4 g/minutes to 6 x 10 -5 g/minutes or there is an increasing in wear resistance in order of 40.00 %, and the corrosion resistance in diluted sea water 1000 times media increases from 6.22 mpy to 0.68 mpy or there is an increasing in corrosion resistance in order of 811.76 %. (author)

  12. Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coscia, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNISM Unita' di Napoli, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosone, G., E-mail: ambrosone@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Basa, D.K. [Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India); Rigato, V. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Ferrero, S.; Virga, A. [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films, composed of Si nanocrystallites embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon matrix, have been prepared by varying rf power in ultra high vacuum plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system using silane and methane gas mixtures diluted in hydrogen. In this paper we have studied the compositional, structural and electrical properties of these films as a function of rf power. It is shown that with increasing rf power the atomic densities of carbon and hydrogen increase while the atomic density of silicon decreases, resulting in a reduction in the mass density. Further, it is demonstrated that carbon is incorporated into amorphous matrix and it is mainly bonded to silicon. The study has also revealed that the crystalline volume fraction decreases with increase in rf power and that the films deposited with low rf power have a size distribution of large and small crystallites while the films deposited with relatively high power have only small crystallites. Finally, the enhanced transport properties of the nanostructured silicon carbon films, as compared to amorphous counterpart, have been attributed to the presence of Si nanocrystallites. - Highlights: • The mass density of silicon carbon films decreases from 2.3 to 2 g/cm{sup 3}. • Carbon is incorporated in the amorphous phase and it is mainly bonded to silicon. • Nanostructured silicon carbon films are deposited at rf power > 40 W. • Si nanocrystallites in amorphous silicon carbon enhance the electrical properties.

  13. Low-loss, silicon integrated, aluminum nitride photonic circuits and their use for electro-optic signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chi; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Tang, Hong X

    2012-07-11

    Photonic miniaturization requires seamless integration of linear and nonlinear optical components to achieve passive and active functions simultaneously. Among the available material systems, silicon photonics holds immense promise for optical signal processing and on-chip optical networks. However, silicon is limited to wavelengths above 1.1 μm and does not provide the desired lowest order optical nonlinearity for active signal processing. Here we report the integration of aluminum nitride (AlN) films on silicon substrates to bring active functionalities to chip-scale photonics. Using CMOS-compatible sputtered thin films we fabricate AlN-on-insulator waveguides that exhibit low propagation loss (0.6 dB/cm). Exploiting AlN's inherent Pockels effect we demonstrate electro-optic modulation up to 4.5 Gb/s with very low energy consumption (down to 10 fJ/bit). The ultrawide transparency window of AlN devices also enables high speed modulation at visible wavelengths. Our low cost, wideband, carrier-free photonic circuits hold promise for ultralow power and high-speed signal processing at the microprocessor chip level.

  14. Nanopore fabrication in silicon oxynitride membranes by heating Au-particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vreede, Lennart; Schmidt Muniz, M.; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2016-01-01

    We report the fabrication of nanopores in a silicon oxynitride (SiON) membrane by heating a silicon rich-silicon nitride (SiRN) membrane with a gold nanoparticle array deposited on its surface. The gold nanoparticle array was realized by photolithography and the membrane by wet-etching. The entire

  15. Effect of argon ion energy on the performance of silicon nitride multilayer permeation barriers grown by hot-wire CVD on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpuim, P.; Majee, S.; Cerqueira, M.F.; Tondelier, D.; Geffroy, B.; Bonnassieux, Y.; Bourée, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Permeation barriers for organic electronic devices on polymer flexible substrates were realized by combining stacked silicon nitride (SiN x ) single layers (50 nm thick) deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition process at low-temperature (~ 100°°C) with a specific argon plasma treatment between two successive layers. Several plasma parameters (RF power density, pressure, treatment duration) as well as the number of single layers have been explored in order to improve the quality of permeation barriers deposited on polyethylene terephthalate. In this work, maximum ion energy was highlighted as the crucial parameter making it possible to minimize water vapor transmission rate (WVTR), as determined by the electrical calcium test method, all the other parameters being kept fixed. Thus fixing the plasma treatment duration at 8 min for a stack of two SiN x single layers, a minimum WVTR of 5 × 10 −4 g/(m 2 day), measured at room temperature, was found for a maximum ion energy of ~ 30 eV. This minimum WVTR value was reduced to 7 × 10 −5 g/(m 2 day) for a stack of five SiN x single layers. The reduction in the permeability is interpreted as due to the rearrangement of atoms at the interfaces when average transferred ion energy to target atoms exceeds threshold displacement energy. - Highlights: • Αn original way to achieve permeation barriers on polymer substrates is developed. • It combines SiN x multilayers grown by HWCVD with an intermediate Ar plasma treatment. • A minimum of water vapor transmission rate is found related to maximum Ar ion energy. • This minimum is due to atomic rearrangement in SiN x interfaces under the impact of ions. • The average Ar ion energy must exceed atomic threshold displacement energy for Si.

  16. Nanoscale, conformal films of graphitic carbon nitride deposited at room temperature: a method for construction of heterojunction devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladva, Satyam A; Travis, William; Quesada-Cabrera, Raul; Rosillo-Lopez, Martin; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Li, Yaomin; Jackman, Richard B; Bear, Joseph C; Parkin, Ivan P; Blackman, Christopher; Salzmann, Christoph G; Palgrave, Robert G

    2017-11-09

    Graphitic carbon nitrides (GCNs) represent a family of 2D materials composed of carbon and nitrogen with variable amounts of hydrogen, used in a wide variety of applications. We report a method of room temperature thin film deposition which allows ordered GCN layers to be deposited on a very wide variety of substrates, including conductive glass, flexible plastics, nanoparticles and nano-structured surfaces, where they form a highly conformal coating on the nanoscale. Film thicknesses of below 20 nm are achievable. In this way we construct functional nanoscale heterojunctions between TiO 2 nanoparticles and GCN, capable of producing H 2 photocatalytically under visible light irradiation. The films are hydrogen rich, have a band gap around 1.7 eV, display transmission electron microscopy lattice fringes as well as X-ray diffraction peaks despite being deposited at room temperature, and show characteristic Raman and IR bands. We use cluster etching to reveal the chemical environments of C and N in GCN using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We elucidate the mechanism of this deposition, which operates via sequential surface adsorption and reaction analogous to atomic layer deposition. The mechanism may have implications for current models of carbon nitride formation.

  17. Performance of Chevron-notch short bar specimen in determining the fracture toughness of silicon nitride and aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munz, D.; Bubsey, R. T.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ease of preparation and testing are advantages unique to the chevron-notch specimen used for the determination of the plane strain fracture toughness of extremely brittle materials. During testing, a crack develops at the notch tip and extends stably as the load is increased. For a given specimen and notch configuration, maximum load always occurs at the same relative crack length independent of the material. Fracture toughness is determined from the maximum load with no need for crack length measurement. Chevron notch acuity is relatively unimportant since a crack is produced during specimen loading. In this paper, the authors use their previously determined stress intensity factor relationship for the chevron-notch short bar specimen to examine the performance of that specimen in determining the plane strain fracture toughness of silicon nitride and aluminum oxide.

  18. INFLUENCE OF PLASMA NITRIDING ON THE CORROSION BEHAVIOUR AND ADHESION OF DLC COATINGS DEPOSITED ON AISI 420 STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge N. Pecina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the corrosion behavior and adhesion of two DLC (“Diamond Like Carbon” films (“Soft” and “Hard” were studied. Both coatings were deposited by PACVD (“Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition” on plasma-nitrided and non-nitrided AISI 420 stainless steel. Raman spectroscopy was conducted and surface hardness was measured. The microstructure by OM and SEM, was observed. Adhesion tests were performed with C. Rockwell indentation test. Salt Spray and immersion were performed in HCl. The “Soft” coating was 20 μm thick, the “Hard” film was about 2.5 μm. The hardness was of 500 HV in the “Soft” DLC and 1400 HV in the “Hard” DLC. Both coatings presented low friction coefficient and good adhesion when they were deposited on nitrided steel. Also presented good resistance to atmospheric corrosion. HCl DLC degradation slowed rapidly introduced uncoated samples.

  19. Modeling chemical vapor deposition of silicon dioxide in microreactors at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiphysics mathematical model for simulation of silicon dioxide Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and oxygen mixture in a microreactor at atmospheric pressure. Microfluidics is a promising technology with numerous applications in chemical synthesis

  20. Charging effects during focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Sanne K.; van Dorp, Willem F.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concentrates on focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide. Silicon oxide pillars are written using 2, 4, 6, 8, 10-pentamethyl-cyclopenta-siloxane (PMCPS) as precursor. It is observed that branching of the pillar occurs above a minimum pillar height. The branching is

  1. Direct chemical vapour deposited grapheme synthesis on silicon oxide by controlled copper dewettting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beld, Wesley Theodorus Eduardus; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for direct uniform graphene synthesis onto silicon oxide in a controlled manner. On a grooved silicon oxide wafer is copper deposited under a slight angle and subsequently the substrate is treated by a typical graphene synthesis process. During this process

  2. MICROSTRUCTURE AND CORROSION RESISTANCE OF CHROMIUM NITRIDES OBTAINED BY VACUUM GAS NITRIDING OF ELECTROLYTIC CHROMIUM DEPOSITED ON AISI H13 STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Cifuentes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this scientific research paper, the microstructure and corrosion resistance of chromium nitrides obtained from a duplex treatment consisting of an electroplated hard chromium coating applied on a steel AISI H13 follow by a thermochemical treatment in vacuum using NH3 as precursor gas of nitrogen, is evaluated. This type of duplex treatments combine the benefits of each individual treatment in order to obtain, with this synergic effect, compounds type CrxN more economic than those obtained by other kind of treatments e.g. physical vapor deposition (PVD. The results obtained by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD indicate the surface and subsurface transformation of the electrolytic hard chromium coating by formation of CrN and Cr2N phases. Likewise, potentiodynamic polarization tests indicate an increase in corrosion resistance of such kind of compounds in comparison with the obtained results with electroplated hard chromium.

  3. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, E.E.; Cohen, M.L.; Hansen, W.L.

    1992-05-05

    Novel crystalline [alpha](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and [beta](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate. 1 figure.

  4. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon nitride to metal and silicon carbide to metal for advanced heat engine applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S.; Selverian, J.H.; O`Neil, D.; Kim, H. [GTE Labs., Inc., Waltham, MA (US); Kim, K. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (US). Div. of Engineering

    1993-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Nitride to Metal and Silicon Carbide to Metal for Advanced Heat Engine Applications. A general methodology was developed to optimize the joint geometry and material systems for 650{degrees}C applications. Failure criteria were derived to predict the fracture of the braze and ceramic. Extensive finite element analyses (FEA) were performed to examine various joint geometries and to evaluate the affect of different interlayers on the residual stress state. Also, material systems composed of coating materials, interlayers, and braze alloys were developed for the program based on the chemical stability and strength of the joints during processing, and service. The FEA results were compared with experiments using two methods: (1) an idealized strength relationship of the ceramic, and (2) a probabilistic analysis of the ceramic strength (NASA CARES). The results showed that the measured strength of the joint reached 30--80% of the strength predicted by FEA. Also, potential high-temperature braze alloys were developed and evaluated for the high-temperature application of ceramic-metal joints. 38 tabs, 29 figs, 20 refs.

  5. A Difference in Using Atomic Layer Deposition or Physical Vapour Deposition TiN as Electrode Material in Metal-Insulator-Metal and Metal-Insulator-Silicon Capacitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenland, A.W.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    In this work, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and metal-insulator-silicon (MIS) capacitors are studied using titanium nitride (TiN) as the electrode material. The effect of structural defects on the electrical properties on MIS and MIM capacitors is studied for various electrode configurations. In the

  6. Ultraclean and large-area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Cu foil using chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yao; Shang, Xunzhong; Dong, Ji; Xu, Kai; He, Jun; Jiang, Chao

    2015-07-10

    Atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been demonstrated to be an excellent dielectric layer as well as an ideal van der Waals epitaxial substrate for fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers and their vertical heterostructures. Although many groups have obtained large-scale monolayer h-BN through low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), it is still a challenge to grow clean monolayers without the reduction of domain size. Here we report the synthesis of large-area (4 × 2 cm(2)) high quality monolayer h-BN with an ultraclean and unbroken surface on copper foil by using LPCVD. A detailed investigation of the key factors affecting growth and transfer of the monolayer was carried out in order to eliminate the adverse effects of impurity particles. Furthermore, an optimized transfer approach allowed the nondestructive and clean transfer of the monolayer from copper foil onto an arbitrary substrate, including a flexible substrate, under mild conditions. Atomic force microscopy indicated that the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the monolayer h-BN on SiO2 was less than 0.269 nm for areas with fewer wrinkles. Selective area electron diffraction analysis of the h-BN revealed a pattern of hexagonal diffraction spots, which unambiguously demonstrated its highly crystalline character. Our work paves the way toward the use of ultraclean and large-area monolayer h-BN as the dielectric layer in the fabrication of high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices for novel 2D atomic layer materials.

  7. Ultraclean and large-area monolayer hexagonal boron nitride on Cu foil using chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yao; Shang, Xunzhong; Dong, Ji; Xu, Kai; He, Jun; Jiang, Chao

    2015-07-01

    Atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been demonstrated to be an excellent dielectric layer as well as an ideal van der Waals epitaxial substrate for fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers and their vertical heterostructures. Although many groups have obtained large-scale monolayer h-BN through low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), it is still a challenge to grow clean monolayers without the reduction of domain size. Here we report the synthesis of large-area (4 × 2 cm2) high quality monolayer h-BN with an ultraclean and unbroken surface on copper foil by using LPCVD. A detailed investigation of the key factors affecting growth and transfer of the monolayer was carried out in order to eliminate the adverse effects of impurity particles. Furthermore, an optimized transfer approach allowed the nondestructive and clean transfer of the monolayer from copper foil onto an arbitrary substrate, including a flexible substrate, under mild conditions. Atomic force microscopy indicated that the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the monolayer h-BN on SiO2 was less than 0.269 nm for areas with fewer wrinkles. Selective area electron diffraction analysis of the h-BN revealed a pattern of hexagonal diffraction spots, which unambiguously demonstrated its highly crystalline character. Our work paves the way toward the use of ultraclean and large-area monolayer h-BN as the dielectric layer in the fabrication of high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices for novel 2D atomic layer materials.

  8. Reactive magnetron sputtering of titanium nitride: analysis of the deposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danroc, J.; Aubert, A.; Gillet, R.

    1987-03-01

    Pumping rate and gas inlet position are important parameters for elaboration of thin films of zirconium and titanium nitrides. It is observed generally that when partial pressure of nitrogen increases progressively in the plasma, total pressure increases abruptly in the enclosure. This phenomenon reversible with hysteresis, due rapid nitride formation on the target should be weaken for a better operation. It can be obtained by positioning the nitrogen inlet near the pumping system and/or in increasing pumping rate

  9. Silicon nitride and intrinsic amorphous silicon double antireflection coatings for thin-film solar cells on foreign substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Da; Kunz, Thomas; Wolf, Nadine; Liebig, Jan Philipp; Wittmann, Stephan; Ahmad, Taimoor; Hessmann, Maik T.; Auer, Richard; Göken, Mathias; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) was investigated as a surface passivation method for crystalline silicon thin film solar cells on graphite substrates. The results of the experiments, including quantum efficiency and current density-voltage measurements, show improvements in cell performance. This improvement is due to surface passivation by an a-Si:H(i) layer, which increases the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. In comparison with our previous work, we have achieved an increase of 0.6% absolute cell efficiency for a 40 μm thick 4 cm 2 aperture area on the graphite substrate. The optical properties of the SiN x /a-Si:H(i) stack were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. Scanning transmission electron microscopy inside a scanning electron microscope was applied to characterize the cross section of the SiN x /a-Si:H(i) stack using focus ion beam preparation. - Highlights: • We report a 10.8% efficiency for thin-film silicon solar cell on graphite. • Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon was applied for surface passivation. • SiN x /a-Si:H(i) stacks were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. • Cross-section micrograph was obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Quantum efficiency and J-V measurements show improvements in the cell performance

  10. Epitaxial Oxides on Silicon by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbink, D.

    2017-01-01

    Within the perovskite oxides a wide range of physical properties can be found, making this class of materials interesting for use in new types of microelectronic devices. The microelectronic industry is silicon based, which requires integration of these oxides on silicon. This integration should be

  11. Characterization Of Annealed Pulsed Laser Deposited (PLD) Thin Films of Cesium Oxythiomolybdate (Cs2MoOS3)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Storng, Karla

    2002-01-01

    .... In the presence of silicon nitride, the oxidation reactions change. The purpose of the present research was to determine the chemistry of Cs2MoOS3 coatings grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD...

  12. Effect of active screen plasma nitriding pretreatment on wear behavior of TiN coating deposited by PACVD technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raoufi, M., E-mail: raoufi@iust.ac.ir [School of Metallurgical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirdamadi, Sh. [School of Metallurgical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboubi, F. [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahangarani, Sh. [Advanced Materials and Renewable Energies Dep., Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdipoor, M.S. [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Elmkhah, H. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-08-01

    Titanium based alloys are used extensively for improving wear properties of different parts due to their high hardness contents. Titanium nitride (TiN) is among these coatings which can be deposited on surface using various techniques such as CVD, PVD and PACVD. Their weak interface with substrate is one major drawback which can increase the total wear in spite of favorite wear behavior of TiN. Disc shaped samples from AISI H13 (DIN 1.2344) steel were prepared in this study. Single TiN coating was deposited on some of them while others have experienced a TiN deposition by active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN). Hardness at the surface and depth of samples was measured through Vickers micro hardness test which revealed 1810 Hv hardness as the maximum values for a dual-layered ASPN-TiN. Pin-on-disc wear test was done in order to study the wear mechanism. In this regard, the wear behavior of samples was investigated against pins from 100Cr6 (Din 1.3505) bearing steel and tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) steel. It was evidenced that the dual-layer ASPN-TiN coating has shown the least weight loss with the best wearing behavior because of its high hardness values, stable interface and acceptable resistance against peeling during wearing period.

  13. A chemical and fluid dynamic study of the chemical vapor deposition of aluminum nitride in a vertical reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bather, Wayne Anthony

    The metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of compound semiconductors has become important in producing many high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices from the wide bandgaps III-V nitrides, for example, aluminum nitride (AlN). A systematic theoretical and experimental investigation of the chemistry and mass transport process in a MOCVD system can yield predictive models of the deposition process. The chemistries and fluid dynamics of the MOCVD growth of AlN in a vertical reactor is analyzed and characterized in order to parameterize and model the deposition process. A Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic study of the predeposition reactions between trimethylaluminum (TMAl) and ammonia (NHsb3) is carried out in a static gas cell to examine the primary homogeneous gas phase reactions, pyrolysis of the reactants, and adduct formation, possibly accompanied by elimination reactions. A series of reactions, based on laboratory studies and literature review, is then proposed to model the deposition process. All pertinent kinetic, thermochemical, and transport properties were obtained. Utilizing a mass transport model, we performed computational fluid dynamics calculations using the FLUENT software package. We determined temperature, velocity, and concentration profiles, along with deposition rates inside the experimental vertical CVD reactor in the Howard University Material Science Research Center of Excellence. Experimental deposition rate data were found to be in good agreement with those predicted from the simulations, thus validating the proposed model. The control of the homogeneous gas phase reaction leading to the formation and subsequent decomposition of the adduct is critical to the formation of device-grade AlN films. Many basic processes occurring during MOCVD of AlN are still not completely understood, and none of the detailed surface reaction mechanisms are known.

  14. 229 nm UV LEDs on aluminum nitride single crystal substrates using p-type silicon for increased hole injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Cho, Sang June; Park, Jeongpil; Seo, Jung-Hun; Dalmau, Rafael; Zhao, Deyin; Kim, Kwangeun; Gong, Jiarui; Kim, Munho; Lee, In-Kyu; Albrecht, John D.; Zhou, Weidong; Moody, Baxter; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2018-02-01

    AlGaN based 229 nm light emitting diodes (LEDs), employing p-type Si to significantly increase hole injection, were fabricated on single crystal bulk aluminum nitride (AlN) substrates. Nitride heterostructures were epitaxially deposited by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy and inherit the low dislocation density of the native substrate. Following epitaxy, a p-Si layer is bonded to the heterostructure. LEDs were characterized both electrically and optically. Owing to the low defect density films, large concentration of holes from p-Si, and efficient hole injection, no efficiency droop was observed up to a current density of 76 A/cm2 under continuous wave operation and without external thermal management. An optical output power of 160 μW was obtained with the corresponding external quantum efficiency of 0.03%. This study demonstrates that by adopting p-type Si nanomembrane contacts as a hole injector, practical levels of hole injection can be realized in UV light-emitting diodes with very high Al composition AlGaN quantum wells, enabling emission wavelengths and power levels that were previously inaccessible using traditional p-i-n structures with poor hole injection efficiency.

  15. Optimization of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition silicon oxynitride layers for integrated optics applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussein, M.G.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Sengo, G.; Sengo, G.; Driessen, A.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon oxynitride $(SiO_{x}N_{y}:H)$ layers were grown from 2% $SiH_{4}/N_{2}$ and $N_{2}O$ gas mixtures by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Layer properties such as refractive index, deposition rate, thickness non-uniformity and hydrogen bond content were correlated to the

  16. Silicon nanomembranes as a means to evaluate stress evolution in deposited thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna M. Clausen; Deborah M. Paskiewicz; Alireza Sadeghirad; Joseph Jakes; Donald E. Savage; Donald S. Stone; Feng Liu; Max G. Lagally

    2014-01-01

    Thin-film deposition on ultra-thin substrates poses unique challenges because of the potential for a dynamic response to the film stress during deposition. While theoretical studies have investigated film stress related changes in bulk substrates, little has been done to learn how stress might evolve in a film growing on a compliant substrate. We use silicon...

  17. Characterization and modeling of atomic layer deposited high-density trench capacitors in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matters-Kammerer, M.K.; Jinesh, K.B.; Rijks, T.G.S.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Klootwijk, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed electrical analysis of multiple layer trench capacitors fabricated in silicon with atomic-layer-deposited Al 2O 3 and TiN is presented. It is shown that in situ ozone annealing of the Al 2O 3 layers prior to the TiN electrode deposition significantly improves the electric properties of

  18. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition silicon oxynitride optimized for application in integrated optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worhoff, Kerstin; Driessen, A.; Lambeck, Paul; Hilderink, L.T.H.; Linders, Petrus W.C.; Popma, T.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon Oxynitride layers are grown from SiH4/N2, NH3 and N2O by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. The process is optimized with respect to deposition of layers with excellent uniformity in the layer thickness, high homogeneity of the refractive index and good reproducibility of the layer

  19. Comparison between transient and frequency modulated excitation: application to silicon nitride and aluminum oxide coatings of silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, D; Ohm, W; Fengler, S; Kunst, M

    2014-06-01

    Contactless measurements of the lifetime of charge carriers are presented with varying ways of photo excitation: with and without bias light and pulsed and frequency modulated. These methods are applied to the study of the surface passivation of single crystalline silicon by a-SiN(x):H and Al2O3 coatings. The properties of these coatings are investigated under consideration of the merits of the different methods.

  20. Evidence of coexistence of micro and nanoporosity of organo-silica polymeric films deposited on silicon by plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, Viswas; Mielczarski, Ela; Mielczarski, Jerzy A.; Akesso, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    A range of hybrid, SiOCH films were deposited on silicon substrates within a radio frequency plasma reactor using hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) as a precursor. The plasma polymerized films were deposited at various HMDSO/argon/oxygen ratios. The composition and structure, at microscopic and nanoscopic levels, of the deposited films were determined by external reflection and transmission Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as well as by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The content of carbon and oxygen in films were found to be inversely proportional to each other. XPS results showed that the outermost surface of the deposited films are nanoporous and coexist with microporosity which was revealed by electron microscopy. The structure of deposited coatings is anisotropic as was documented by polarized external reflection FTIR spectroscopy. Several correlations between the film chemical composition, surface structure, and macroscopic properties of the films such as: hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity were established. - Highlights: • Hybrid organo-polymer silicon films deposited by RF plasma on silicon substrates. • FTIR and XPS reveal porosity by interpreting bonding between Si and –O. • Quantification of nano and microporosity are identified with bonding of Si with –O

  1. Tribological and structural properties of titanium nitride and titanium aluminum nitride coatings deposited with modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Logan

    The demand for economical high-performance materials has brought attention to the development of advanced coatings. Recent advances in high power magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) have shown to improve tribological properties of coatings. These coatings offer increased wear and oxidation resistance, which may facilitate the use of more economical materials in harsh applications. This study demonstrates the use of novel forms of HPPMS, namely modulated pulsed-power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) and deep oscillation magnetron sputtering (DOMS), for depositing TiN and Ti1-xAlxN tribological coatings on commonly used alloys, such as Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718. Both technologies have been shown to offer unique plasma characteristics in the physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. High power pulses lead to a high degree of ionization compared to traditional direct-current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) and pulsed magnetron sputtering (PMS). Such a high degree of ionization was previously only achievable by cathodic arc deposition (CAD); however, CAD can lead to increased macroparticles that are unfavorable in high friction and corrosive environments. MPPMS, DOMS, and other HPPMS techniques offer unique plasma characteristics and have been shown to produce coatings with refined grain structure, improved density, hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance. Using DOMS and MPPMS, TiN and Ti1-xAlxN coatings were deposited using PMS to compare microstructures and tribological performance. For Ti1-xAlxN, two sputtering target compositions, Ti 0.5Al0.5 and Ti0.3Al0.7, were used to evaluate the effects of MPPMS on the coating's composition and tribological properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize microstructure and crystallographic texture. Several tribological properties were evaluated including: wear rate, coefficient of friction, adhesion, and nanohardness. Results show that substrate

  2. Matrix density effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced silicon nitride matrix properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Kiser, Lames D.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties were measured for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composites (SiC/RBSN) of different densities. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix. The composite density was varied by changing the consolidation pressure during RBSN processing and by hot isostatically pressing the SiC/RBSN composites. Results indicate that as the consolidation pressure was increased from 27 to 138 MPa, the average pore size of the nitrided composites decreased from 0.04 to 0.02 microns and the composite density increased from 2.07 to 2.45 gm/cc. Nonetheless, these improvements resulted in only small increases in the first matrix cracking stress, primary elastic modulus, and ultimate tensile strength values of the composites. In contrast, HIP consolidation of SiC/RBSN resulted in a fully dense material whose first matrix cracking stress and elastic modulus were approx. 15 and 50 percent higher, respectively, and ultimate tensile strength values were approx. 40 percent lower than those for unHIPed SiC/RBSN composites. The modulus behavior for all specimens can be explained by simple rule-of-mixture theory. Also, the loss in ultimate strength for the HIPed composites appears to be related to a degradation in fiber strength at the HIP temperature. However, the density effect on matrix fracture strength was much less than would be expected based on typical monolithic Si3N4 behavior, suggesting that composite theory is indeed operating. Possible practical implications of these observations are discussed.

  3. Silicon Carbide/Boron Nitride Dual In-Line Coating of Silicon Carbide Fiber Tows, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project will demonstrate monolayer and dual layer coating of SiC fiber by leveraging Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition techniques developed by Free...

  4. Dielectric properties of silicon aluminium oxides and boron nitride during heating to 2300 deg K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litovchenko, A.V.; Brekhovskikh, S.M.; Dem'yanov, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    Temperature dependences of permittivity and tangent of the angle of dielectric losses of melted quartz, alumooxide and nitride-boron ceramics at the frequency of approximately 10 10 Hz in the range from 300 to 2300 K, are obtained. Lambda-shape anomaly E(T) and tg delta(T) of quartz glass at approximately 1950 k with characteristic decrease E and tg delta in the liquid phase is established. The applicability of the resonator method (using graphite resonator) of measuring dielectric properties when heating samples at the temperature up to 2300 K, is shown

  5. Deposition and characterization of amorphous silicon with embedded nanocrystals and microcrystalline silicon for thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, R., E-mail: rambrosi@uacj.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, UACJ, C.J., Chihuahua (Mexico); Moreno, M.; Torres, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Carrillo, A. [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, UACJ, C.J., Chihuahua (Mexico); Vivaldo, I.; Cosme, I. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Heredia, A. [Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nanostructured silicon thin films were deposited by PECVD. • Polymorphous and microcrystalline were obtained varying the pressure and power. • Structural and optoelectronics properties were studied. • The σ{sub dark} changed by 5 order of magnitude under illumination, V{sub d} was at 2.5 A/s. • The evidence of embedded nanocrystals into the amorphous matrix was investigated. - Abstract: Amorphous silicon thin films with embedded nanocrystals and microcrystalline silicon were deposited by the standard Radio Frequency (RF) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) technique, from SiH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, Ar gas mixture at substrate temperature of 200 °C. Two series of films were produced varying deposition parameters as chamber pressure and RF power density. The chemical bonding in the films was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, where it was observed a correlation between the hydrogen content and the morphological and electrical properties in the films. Electrical and optical parameters were extracted in both series of films, as room temperature conductivity (σ{sub RT}), activation energy (E{sub a}), and optical band gap (E{sub g}). As well, structural analysis in the films was performed by Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), which gives an indication of the films crystallinity. The photoconductivity changed in a range of 2 and 6 orders of magnitude from dark to AM 1.5 illumination conditions, which is of interest for thin film solar cells applications.

  6. Deposition and characterization of amorphous silicon with embedded nanocrystals and microcrystalline silicon for thin film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosio, R.; Moreno, M.; Torres, A.; Carrillo, A.; Vivaldo, I.; Cosme, I.; Heredia, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanostructured silicon thin films were deposited by PECVD. • Polymorphous and microcrystalline were obtained varying the pressure and power. • Structural and optoelectronics properties were studied. • The σ dark changed by 5 order of magnitude under illumination, V d was at 2.5 A/s. • The evidence of embedded nanocrystals into the amorphous matrix was investigated. - Abstract: Amorphous silicon thin films with embedded nanocrystals and microcrystalline silicon were deposited by the standard Radio Frequency (RF) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) technique, from SiH 4 , H 2 , Ar gas mixture at substrate temperature of 200 °C. Two series of films were produced varying deposition parameters as chamber pressure and RF power density. The chemical bonding in the films was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, where it was observed a correlation between the hydrogen content and the morphological and electrical properties in the films. Electrical and optical parameters were extracted in both series of films, as room temperature conductivity (σ RT ), activation energy (E a ), and optical band gap (E g ). As well, structural analysis in the films was performed by Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), which gives an indication of the films crystallinity. The photoconductivity changed in a range of 2 and 6 orders of magnitude from dark to AM 1.5 illumination conditions, which is of interest for thin film solar cells applications

  7. Analysis of heating effect on the process of high deposition rate microcrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Dan, Zhang; He, Zhang; Chang-Chun, Wei; Jian, Sun; Guo-Fu, Hou; Shao-Zhen, Xiong; Xin-Hua, Geng; Ying, Zhao

    2010-01-01

    A possible heating effect on the process of high deposition rate microcrystalline silicon has been studied. It includes the discharge time-accumulating heating effect, discharge power, inter-electrode distance, and total gas flow rate induced heating effect. It is found that the heating effects mentioned above are in some ways quite similar to and in other ways very different from each other. However, all of them will directly or indirectly cause the increase of the substrate surface temperature during the process of depositing microcrystalline silicon thin films, which will affect the properties of the materials with increasing time. This phenomenon is very serious for the high deposition rate of microcrystalline silicon thin films because of the high input power and the relatively small inter-electrode distance needed. Through analysis of the heating effects occurring in the process of depositing microcrystalline silicon, it is proposed that the discharge power and the heating temperature should be as low as possible, and the total gas flow rate and the inter-electrode distance should be suitable so that device-grade high quality deposition rate microcrystalline silicon thin films can be fabricated

  8. The Influence of Plasma Nitriding Pre-Treatment on Tribological Properties of TiN Coatings Deposited by PACVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdipoor, M. S.; Mahboubi, F.; Ahangarani, Sh.; Raoufi, M.; Elmkhah, H.

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of plasma nitriding pre-treatment (PN) on mechanical and tribological behavior of TiN coatings produced by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD). The heat treatment of quench and temper was carried out on hot work AISI H11 (DIN 1.2343) steel samples. A group of samples were plasma nitrided at 500 °C for 4 h in an atmosphere containing 25 vol.% nitrogen and 75 vol.% hydrogen. Then TiN layer was deposited on all of samples at 520 °C temperature, 8 kHz frequency, and 33% duty cycle. The microstructural, mechanical, and tribological properties of the coatings were investigated using SEM, WDS, AFM, microhardness tester, and pin-on-disc wear test. The load of wear test was 10 N and the samples were worn against different pins, ball-bearing steel (DIN 1.3505), and cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co). The results indicate that the difference of hardness between the samples with PN-TiNlayer and those samples with only TiN layer without PN was 450 HV and the former samples showed a significant amount of wear resistance in comparison to the latter ones.

  9. Development of Nitride Coating Using Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sumit

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power and can withstand high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. The design of the research reactor fuels is done for efficient heat emission, and consists of assemblies of thin-plates cladding made from aluminum alloy. The low-enriched fuels (LEU) were developed for replacing high-enriched fuels (HEU) for these reactors necessitates a significantly increased uranium density in the fuel to counterbalance the decrease in enrichment. One of the most promising new fuel candidate is U-Mo alloy, in a U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel form, due to its high uranium loading as well as excellent irradiation resistance performance, is being developed extensively to convert from HEU fuel to LEU fuel for high-performance research reactors. However, the formation of an interaction layer (IL) between U-Mo particles and the Al matrix, and the associated pore formation, under high heat flux and high burnup conditions, degrade the irradiation performance of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel. From the recent tests results accumulated from the surface engineering of low enriched uranium fuel (SELENIUM) and MIR reactor displayed that a surface barrier coating like physical vapor deposited (PVD) zirconium nitride (ZrN) can significantly reduce the interaction layer. The barrier coating performed well at low burn up but above a fluence rate of 5x 1021 ions/cm2 the swelling reappeared due to formation interaction layer. With this result in mind the objective of this research was to develop an ultrathin ZrN coating over particulate uranium-molybdenum nuclear fuel using a modified savannah 200 atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. This is done in support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) effort to slow down the interaction at fluence rate and reach higher burn up for high power research reactor. The low-pressure Savannah 200 ALD system is modified to be designed as a batch powder coating system using the

  10. Directed deposition of silicon nanowires using neopentasilane as precursor and gold as catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Kämpken

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work the applicability of neopentasilane (Si(SiH34 as a precursor for the formation of silicon nanowires by using gold nanoparticles as a catalyst has been explored. The growth proceeds via the formation of liquid gold/silicon alloy droplets, which excrete the silicon nanowires upon continued decomposition of the precursor. This mechanism determines the diameter of the Si nanowires. Different sources for the gold nanoparticles have been tested: the spontaneous dewetting of gold films, thermally annealed gold films, deposition of preformed gold nanoparticles, and the use of “liquid bright gold”, a material historically used for the gilding of porcelain and glass. The latter does not only form gold nanoparticles when deposited as a thin film and thermally annealed, but can also be patterned by using UV irradiation, providing access to laterally structured layers of silicon nanowires.

  11. Silicon transport in sputter-deposited tantalum layers grown under ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallais, P.; Hantzpergue, J.J.; Remy, J.C.; Roptin, D.

    1988-01-01

    Tantalum was sputter deposited on (111) Si substrate under low-energy ion bombardment in order to study the effects of the ion energy on the silicon transport into the Ta layer. The Si substrate was heated up to 500 0 C during growth. For ion energies up to 180 eV silicon is not transported into tantalum and the growth temperature has no effect. An ion bombardment energy of 280 eV enhances the transport of silicon throughout the tantalum layer. Growth temperatures up to 300 0 C have no effect on the silicon transport which is mainly enhanced by the ion bombardment. For growth temperatures between 300 and 500 0 C, the silicon transport is also enhanced by the thermal diffusion. The experimental depth distribution of silicon is similar to the theoretical depth distribution calculated for the case of an interdiffusion. The ion-enhanced process of silicon transport is characterized by an activation energy of 0.4 eV. Silicon into the layers as-grown at 500 0 C is in both states, amorphous silicide and microcrystalline cubic silicon

  12. Mechanical Properties of Microelectronics Thin Films: Silicon Nitride (Si3N4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    for manual construction of 3-D solid models, graphical display, and interfacing with FEM packages (we are usirng ABAQUS ). The 3-D solid atodel resides...29] T.F R.-tajczyck, Jr. arnd A K. Sinha, ś’lastic Stiffness and Thernial Expansion1 Coefficients of Various Refractory Silicuiies and Silicon

  13. Wavelength-agile near-IR optical parametric oscillator using a deposited silicon waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Yao; Foster, Mark A; Foster, Amy C

    2015-06-15

    Using a deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) waveguide, we demonstrate ultra-broad bandwidth (60 THz) parametric amplification via four-wave mixing (FWM), and subsequently achieve the first silicon optical parametric oscillator (OPO) at near-IR wavelengths. Utilization of the time-dispersion-tuned technique provides an optical source with active wavelength tuning over 42 THz with a fixed pump wave.

  14. Durable ultrathin silicon nitride/carbon bilayer overcoats for magnetic heads: The role of enhanced interfacial bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Reuben J.; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, S.; Lim, Christina Y. H.

    2015-01-01

    Pole tip recession (PTR) is one of the major issues faced in magnetic tape storage technology, which causes an increase in the magnetic spacing and hence signal loss during data readback. Despite efforts to reduce the magnetic spacing, PTR, and surface wear on the heads by using protective overcoats, most of them either employ complex fabrication processes and approaches do not provide adequate protection to the head or are too thick (∼10–20 nm), especially for future high density tape storage. In this work, we discuss an approach to reduce the PTR and surface wear at the head by developing an ultrathin ∼7 nm bilayer overcoat of silicon/silicon nitride (Si/SiN x ) and carbon (C), which is totally fabricated by a cost-effective and industrial-friendly magnetron sputtering process. When compared with a monolithic C overcoat of similar thickness, the electrically insulating Si/SiN x /C bilayer overcoat was found to provide better wear protection for commercial tape heads, as demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopic analyses after wear tests with commercial tape media. Although the microstructures of carbon in the monolithic and bilayer overcoats were similar, the improved wear durability of the bilayer overcoat was attributed to the creation of extensive interfacial bonding of Si and N with the C overcoat and the alumina-titanium carbide composite head substrate, as predicted by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and confirmed by in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. This study highlights the pivotal role of enhanced interfaces and interfacial bonding in developing ultrathin yet wear-durable overcoats for tape heads

  15. Ion assisted deposition of SiO2 film from silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tuan. H.; Dang, Cu. X.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon dioxide, SiO2, is one of the preferred low index materials for optical thin film technology. It is often deposited by electron beam evaporation source with less porosity and scattering, relatively durable and can have a good laser damage threshold. Beside these advantages the deposition of critical optical thin film stacks with silicon dioxide from an E-gun was severely limited by the stability of the evaporation pattern or angular distribution of the material. The even surface of SiO2 granules in crucible will tend to develop into groove and become deeper with the evaporation process. As the results, angular distribution of the evaporation vapor changes in non-predicted manner. This report presents our experiments to apply Ion Assisted Deposition process to evaporate silicon in a molten liquid form. By choosing appropriate process parameters we can get SiO2 film with good and stable property.

  16. Hot wire CVD deposition of nanocrystalline silicon solar cells on rough substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Li, H. B. T.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2009-01-01

    In silicon thin film solar cell technology, frequently rough or textured substrates are used to scatter the light and enhance its absorption. The important issue of the influence of substrate roughness on silicon nanocrystal growth has been investigated through a series of nc-Si:H single junction p-i-n solar cells containing i-layers deposited with Hot-wire CVD. It is shown that silicon grown on the surface of an unoptimized rough substrate contains structural defects, which deteriorate solar...

  17. Reprint of: Atmospheric scanning electron microscope observes cells and tissues in open medium through silicon nitride film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Ogura, Toshihiko; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Mio, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Shinichi; Sato, Chikara

    2010-11-01

    Direct observation of subcellular structures and their characterization is essential for understanding their physiological functions. To observe them in open environment, we have developed an inverted scanning electron microscope with a detachable, open-culture dish, capable of 8 nm resolution, and combined with a fluorescence microscope quasi-simultaneously observing the same area from the top. For scanning electron microscopy from the bottom, a silicon nitride film window in the base of the dish maintains a vacuum between electron gun and open sample dish while allowing electrons to pass through. Electrons are backscattered from the sample and captured by a detector under the dish. Cells cultured on the open dish can be externally manipulated under optical microscopy, fixed, and observed using scanning electron microscopy. Once fine structures have been revealed by scanning electron microscopy, their component proteins may be identified by comparison with separately prepared fluorescence-labeled optical microscopic images of the candidate proteins, with their heavy-metal-labeled or stained ASEM images. Furthermore, cell nuclei in a tissue block stained with platinum-blue were successfully observed without thin-sectioning, which suggests the applicability of this inverted scanning electron microscope to cancer diagnosis. This microscope visualizes mesoscopic-scale structures, and is also applicable to non-bioscience fields including polymer chemistry. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1989-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  19. DNA Physical Mapping via the Controlled Translocation of Single Molecules through a 5-10nm Silicon Nitride Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Derek; Reisner, Walter; Jiang, Zhijun; Hagerty, Nick; Wood, Charles; Chan, Jason

    2009-03-01

    The ability to map the binding position of sequence-specific markers, including transcription-factors, protein-nucleic acids (PNAs) or deactivated restriction enzymes, along a single DNA molecule in a nanofluidic device would be of key importance for the life-sciences. Such markers could give an indication of the active genes at particular stage in a cell's transcriptional cycle, pinpoint the location of mutations or even provide a DNA barcode that could aid in genomics applications. We have developed a setup consisting of a 5-10 nm nanopore in a 20nm thick silicon nitride film coupled to an optical tweezer setup. The translocation of DNA across the nanopore can be detected via blockades in the electrical current through the pore. By anchoring one end of the translocating DNA to an optically trapped microsphere, we hope to stretch out the molecule in the nanopore and control the translocation speed, enabling us to slowly scan across the genome and detect changes in the baseline current due to the presence of bound markers.

  20. Identification of crack path of inter- and transgranular fractures in sintered silicon nitride by in situ TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ii, Seiichiro; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2004-01-01

    Inter- and/or transgranular crack paths in sintered silicon nitride (Si3N4) during fracture were investigated by in situ straining experiments in a transmission electron microscope at room temperature, using a high-precision micro-indenter. By this technique, cracks introduced in an in situ manner were observed to propagate in the grain interior and along grain boundaries. High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) observation revealed that the crack propagation takes place at an interface between Si3N4 grains and an intergranular glassy film (IGF) in the case of intergranular fractures. According to the results by previous molecular dynamics simulations, a number of dangling bonds are present at the Si3N4/IGF interface, which should result in the observed fracture behavior at the interface. On the other hand, the crack path introduced during transgranular fracture of Si3N4 grains was found to be sharp and straight. The observed crack propagated towards [1120] inside the Si3N4 grain with the crack surface parallel to the (1100) plane. The HREM observations of crack walls revealed them to be atomically flat. The atomic termination of the crack walls was identified in combination with image simulations based on atomic models of the cleaved crack walls.

  1. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Ion Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor for pH Measurement and DNA Immobilization/Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Hashim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of ion sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET using silicon nitride (Si3N4 as the sensing membrane for pH measurement and DNA is reported. For the pH measurement, the Ag/AgCl electrode was used as the reference electrode, and different pH values of buffer solution were used in the ISFET analysis. The ISFET device was tested with pH buffer solutions of pH2, pH3, pH7, pH8, and pH9. The results show that the IV characteristic of ISFET devices is directly proportional and the device’s sensitivity was 43.13 mV/pH. The ISFET is modified chemically to allow the integration with biological element to form a biologically active field-effect transistor (BIOFET. It was found that the DNA immobilization activities which occurred on the sensing membrane caused the drain current to drop due to the negatively charged backbones of the DNA probes repelled electrons from accumulating at the conducting channel. The drain current was further decreased when the DNA hybridization took place.

  2. Effect of Primary Recrystallized Microstructure and Nitriding on Secondary Recrystallization in Grain Oriented Silicon Steel by Low Temperature Slab Reheating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Gong-tao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Different primary recrystallized grain sizes were obtained by controlling decarburization process in grain oriented silicon steel produced by low temperature slab reheating technique. The effect of primary grain size on secondary recrystallization and magnetic properties was studied. The appropriate nitrogen content after nitriding was explored in case of very large primary grain size, and the effect of {411}〈148〉 primary recrystallized texture on the abnormal growth behavior was discussed. The results show that an increase in average primary grain size from 10μm to 15μm leads to an increase of secondary recrystallization temperature and a sharper Goss texture with higher magnetic permeability, in the condition of a very large average primary grain size of 28μm, the suitable amount of nitrogen increases to about 6×10-4. The {411}〈148〉 oriented grains in primary recrystallized microstructure can easily grow into larger sizes due to their size advantage, and thus hinder the abnormal growth of secondary grains, moreover, the hindering effect is more pronounced in the abnormal growth of Brass-oriented grains due to their misorientation with low migration rate other than Goss grains.

  3. Plasma deposition of microcrystalline silicon solar cells. Looking beyond the glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donker, M.N. van den

    2006-07-01

    Microcrystalline silicon emerged in the past decade as highly interesting material for application in efficient and stable thin film silicon solar cells. It consists of nanometer-sized crystallites embedded in a micrometer-sized columnar structure, which gradually evolves during the SiH{sub 4} based deposition process starting from an amorphous incubation layer. Understanding of and control over this transient and multi-scale growth process is essential in the route towards low-cost microcrystalline silicon solar cells. This thesis presents an experimental study on the technologically relevant high rate (5-10 Aa s{sup -1}) parallel plate plasma deposition process of state-of-the-art microcrystalline silicon solar cells. The objective of the work was to explore and understand the physical limits of the plasma deposition process as well as to develop diagnostics suitable for process control in eventual solar cell production. Among the developed non-invasive process diagnostics were a pyrometer, an optical spectrometer, a mass spectrometer and a voltage probe. Complete thin film silicon solar cells and modules were deposited and characterized. (orig.)

  4. Dependences of deposition rate and OH content on concentration of added trichloroethylene in low-temperature silicon oxide films deposited using silicone oil and ozone gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Susumu; Jain, Puneet

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the dependences of the deposition rate and residual OH content of SiO2 films on the concentration of trichloroethylene (TCE), which was added during deposition at low temperatures of 160–260 °C with the reactant gases of silicone oil (SO) and O3. The deposition rate depends on the TCE concentration and is minimum at a concentration of ∼0.4 mol/m3 at 200 °C. The result can be explained by surface and gas-phase reactions. Experimentally, we also revealed that the thickness profile is strongly affected by gas-phase reaction, in which the TCE vapor was blown directly onto the substrate surface, where it mixed with SO and O3. Furthermore, it was found that adding TCE vapor reduces residual OH content in the SiO2 film deposited at 200 °C because TCE enhances the dehydration reaction.

  5. Energy transfer phenomena and radiative processes in silicon nitride based materials for on-chip photonics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui

    Rare-earth (RE) doping of silicon-based structures provides a valuable approach for light-emitting devices which could be monolithically integrated atop the widespread silicon electronics platform and enables inexpensive integration of on-chip optical components. However, the small excitable fraction of RE ions and the substantial free carrier losses in Si nanostructures severely limit the possibility to achieve net optical gain using traditional Er doped materials, such as Er doped Si-rich oxides (Er:SRO). On the other hand, a novel material platform based on RE-doped silicon nitride (RE:Six) materials has recently revealed unique advantages for on-chip light source. Based on a variety of light emission spectroscopic techniques and rate equation modeling, light emission and energy transfer phenomena were studied to quantitatively assess the benefits of the novel Er and Nd doped SiNx (Er: SiN x and Nd:SiNx) material platform compared to the standard Er:SRO. Efficient energy transfer and nanosecond-time dynamics from SiN x matrices to RE ions with two orders of magnitude larger coupling coefficient than Er:SRO were demonstrated for the first time. The origin of this energy transfer was shown to consist of non-resonant phonon-mediated coupling by temperature-dependent experiments. In addition, a tradeoff between excitation efficiency by energy transfer and emission efficiency, determined by excess Si concentration, was discovered and studied. Although carrier absorption and non-radiative recombination jeopardize the observation of optical gain, differential loss measurements under femtosecond pulsed excitation resulted in the bleaching of the Er ground state absorption by energy transfer in Er:SiN x materials, which bears great hope for the engineering of Si-based lasers. On the other hand, with a superior 4-level system, Nd:SiNx is promising to lase with a lower threshold. To make use of the better field confinement in SiNx due to its higher refractive index, RE

  6. Spontaneously-acoustic hypersound long-range stimulation of silicon nitride synthesis in silicon at argon ion irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Demidov, E S; Markov, K A; Sdobnyakov, V V

    2001-01-01

    The work is dedicated to the nature of the average energy ions implantation process effect on the crystal defective system at the distances, exceeding by three-four orders the averagely projected ions run value. It is established that irradiation by the argon ions stimulated the Si sub 3 N sub 4 phase formation in the preliminarily nitrogen-saturated layers at the distances of approximately 600 mu m from the ions deceleration zone. It is supposed that there appear sufficiently effective pulse sources of the hypersonic shock waves in the area of the Ar sup + deceleration zone. These waves are the result of the jump-like origination and grid evolution of the loop-shaped dislocations and argon blisters as well as of the blisters explosion, The evaluations show that the peak pressure in wave due to the synchronized explosion of blisters in the nitrogen-saturated area on the reverse side of the silicon plate 600 mu m thick may exceed 10 sup 8 Pa and cause experimentally observed changes

  7. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  8. Correlations between optical properties, microstructure, and processing conditions of Aluminum nitride thin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jonghoon; Ma, James; Becker, Michael F.; Keto, John W.; Kovar, Desiderio

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) films were deposited using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) onto sapphire (0001) substrates with varying processing conditions (temperature, pressure, and laser fluence). We have studied the dependence of optical properties, structural properties and their correlations for these AlN films. The optical transmission spectra of the produced films were measured, and a numerical procedure was applied to accurately determine the optical constants for films of non-uniform thickness. The microstructure and texture of the films were studied using various X-ray diffraction techniques. The real part of the refractive index was found to not vary significantly with processing parameters, but absorption was found to be strongly dependent on the deposition temperature and the nitrogen pressure in the deposition chamber. We report that low optical absorption, textured polycrystalline AlN films can be produced by PLD on sapphire substrates at both low and high laser fluence using a background nitrogen pressure of 6.0 x 10 -2 Pa (4.5 x 10 -4 Torr) of 99.9% purity

  9. Epitaxial growth of group III-nitride films by pulsed laser deposition and their use in the development of LED devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Wang, Haiyan

    2015-11-01

    Recently, pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technology makes viable the epitaxial growth of group III-nitrides on thermally active substrates at low temperature. The precursors generated from the pulsed laser ablating the target has enough kinetic energy when arriving at substrates, thereby effectively suppressing the interfacial reactions between the epitaxial films and the substrates, and eventually makes the film growth at low temperature possible. So far, high-quality group III-nitride epitaxial films have been successfully grown on a variety of thermally active substrates by PLD. By combining PLD with other technologies such as laser rastering technique, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), III-nitride-based light-emitting diode (LED) structures have been realized on different thermally active substrates, with high-performance LED devices being demonstrated. This review focuses on the epitaxial growth of group III-nitrides on thermally active substrates by PLD and their use in the development of LED devices. The surface morphology, interfacial property between film and substrate, and crystalline quality of as-grown group III-nitride films by PLD, are systematically reviewed. The corresponding solutions for film homogeneity on large size substrates, defect control, and InGaN films growth by PLD are also discussed in depth, together with introductions to some newly developed technologies for PLD in order to realize LED structures, which provides great opportunities for commercialization of LEDs on thermally active substrates.

  10. Co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into silicon dioxide for synthesis of carbon nitride materials

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, M B; Nuesca, G; Moore, R

    2002-01-01

    Materials synthesis of carbon nitride has been attempted with co-implantation of carbon and nitrogen into thermally grown SiO sub 2. Following implantation of C and N ions to doses of 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 , thermal annealing of the implanted SiO sub 2 sample was conducted at 1000 degree sign C in an N sub 2 ambient. As evidenced in Fourier transform infrared measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, different bonding configurations between C and N, including C-N single bonds, C=N double bonds and C=N triple bonds, were found to develop in the SiO sub 2 film after annealing. Chemical composition profiles obtained with secondary ion mass spectroscopy were correlated with the depth information of the chemical shifts of N 1s core-level electrons, allowing us to examine the formation of C-N bonding for different atomic concentration ratios between N and C. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed no sign of the formation of crystalline C sub 3 N sub 4 precipitates in the SiO ...

  11. Layer-by-layer composition and structure of silicon subjected to combined gallium and nitrogen ion implantation for the ion synthesis of gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korolev, D. S.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Belov, A. I.; Vasiliev, V. K.; Guseinov, D. V.; Okulich, E. V. [Nizhny Novgorod State University (Russian Federation); Shemukhin, A. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Surodin, S. I.; Nikolitchev, D. E.; Nezhdanov, A. V.; Pirogov, A. V.; Pavlov, D. A.; Tetelbaum, D. I., E-mail: tetelbaum@phys.unn.ru [Nizhny Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The composition and structure of silicon surface layers subjected to combined gallium and nitrogen ion implantation with subsequent annealing have been studied by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, electron spin resonance, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. A slight redistribution of the implanted atoms before annealing and their substantial migration towards the surface during annealing depending on the sequence of implantations are observed. It is found that about 2% of atoms of the implanted layer are replaced with gallium bonded to nitrogen; however, it is impossible to detect the gallium-nitride phase. At the same time, gallium-enriched inclusions containing ∼25 at % of gallium are detected as candidates for the further synthesis of gallium-nitride inclusions.

  12. Selective layer disordering in intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattices with silicon nitride capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, Jonathan J., Jr.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Skogen, Erik J.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Vawter, Gregory A.; Montaño, Ines

    2015-06-01

    Selective layer disordering in an intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattice using a silicon nitride (SiNx) capping layer is demonstrated. The SiNx capped superlattice exhibits suppressed layer disordering under high-temperature annealing. Additionally, the rate of layer disordering is reduced with increased SiNx thickness. The layer disordering is caused by Si diffusion, and the SiNx layer inhibits vacancy formation at the crystal surface and ultimately, the movement of Al and Ga atoms across the heterointerfaces. Patterning of the SiNx layer results in selective layer disordering, an attractive method to integrate active and passive III-nitride-based intersubband devices.

  13. Pull-test adhesion measurements of diamondlike carbon films on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, and zirconium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erck, R.A.; Nichols, F.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dierks, J.F. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films or diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were formed by ion-beam deposition of 400 eV methane (CH{sub 4}) ions on several smooth and rough ceramics, as well as on ceramics coated with a layer of Si and Ti. Adhesion was measured by the pin-pull method. Excellent adhesion was measured for smooth SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, but adhesion of DLC to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} was negligible. The use of a Si bonding interlayer produced good adhesion to all the substrates, but a Ti layer was ineffective because bonding between the DLC film and Ti was poor. The presence of surface roughness appeared to greatly increase the measured adhesion in all cases. Bulk thermodynamic calculations are not directly applicable to bonding at the interface. If the standard enthalpy of formation for reaction between CH{sub 4} and substrate is calculated assumpting a carbide or carbon phase is produced, a relation is seen between reaction enthalpy and relative adhesion. Large positive enthalpies are associated with poor adhesion; negative or small positive enthalpies are associated with good adhesion. This relation between enthalpy and adhesion was also observed for DLC deposited on Si. Lack of adhesion to Ti was attributed to inadvertent formation of a surface oxide layer that rendered the enthalpy for reaction with CH{sub 4} strongly positive and similar in magnitude to that for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}.

  14. INFLUENCE OF THE SILICON INTERLAYER ON DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON FILMS DEPOSITED ON GLASS SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deiler Antonio Lima Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC films as a hard protective coating have achieved great success in a diversity of technological applications. However, adhesion of DLC films to substrates can restrict their applications. The influence of a silicon interlayer in order to improve DLC adhesion on glass substrates was investigated. Amorphous silicon interlayer and DLC films were deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from silane and methane, respectively. The bonding structure, transmittance, refraction index, and adherence of the films were also evaluated regarding the thickness of the silicon interlayer. Raman scattering spectroscopy did not show any substantial difference in DLC structure due to the interlayer thickness of the silicon. Optical measurements showed a sharp decrease of transmittance in the ultra-violet region caused by the fundamental absorption of the light. In addition, the absorption edge of transmittance shifted toward longer wavelength side in the ultra-violet region as the thickness of the silicon interlayer increased. The tribological results showed an increase of DLC adherence as the silicon interlayer increased, which was characterized by less cracks around the grooves.

  15. Coating and selective deposition of nanofilm on silicone rubber for cell adhesion and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Hua; Lvov, Yuri M; Mills, David K; Jennings, Merilyn; Alexander, Jonathan S; Jones, Steven A

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed method for surface modification, layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly, has been applied to silicone, and its ability to encourage endothelial cell growth and control cell growth patterns has been examined. The surfaces studied consisted of a precursor, with alternating cationic polyethyleneimine (PEI) and anionic sodium polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) layers followed by alternating gelatin and poly-D-lysine (PDL) layers. Film growth increased linearly with the number of layers. Each PSS/PEI bilayer was 3 nm thick, and each gelatin/PDL bilayer was 5 nm thick. All layers were more hydrophilic than the unmodified silicone rubber surface, as determined from contact angle measurements. The contact angle was primarily dictated by the outermost layer. Of the coatings studied, gelatin was the most hydrophilic. A film of (PSS/PEI)4/(gelatin/PDL)4/ gelatin was highly favorable for cell adhesion and growth, in contrast to films of (PSS/PEI)8 or (PSS/PEI)8/PSS. Cell growth patterns were successfully controlled by selective deposition of microspheres on silicone rubber, using microcontact printing with a silicone stamp. Cell adhesion was confined to the region of microsphere deposition. These results demonstrate that the LbL self-assembly technique provides a general approach to coat and selectively deposit films with nanometer thickness on silicone rubber. Furthermore, they show that this method is a viable technique for controlling cellular adhesion and growth.

  16. Uniform-sized silicone oil microemulsions: preparation, investigation of stability and deposition on hair surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Habiba; Lv, Piping; Wang, Lianyan; Lian, Guoping; Zhu, Shiping; Ma, Guanghui

    2011-12-01

    Emulsions are commonly used in foods, pharmaceuticals and home-personal-care products. For emulsion based products, it is highly desirable to control the droplet size distribution to improve storage stability, appearance and in-use property. We report preparation of uniform-sized silicone oil microemulsions with different droplets diameters (1.4-40.0 μm) using SPG membrane emulsification technique. These microemulsions were then added into model shampoos and conditioners to investigate the effects of size, uniformity, and storage stability on silicone oil deposition on hair surface. We observed much improved storage stability of uniform-sized microemulsions when the droplets diameter was ≤22.7 μm. The uniform-sized microemulsion of 40.0 μm was less stable but still more stable than non-uniform sized microemulsions prepared by conventional homogenizer. The results clearly indicated that uniform-sized droplets enhanced the deposition of silicone oil on hair and deposition increased with decreasing droplet size. Hair switches washed with small uniform-sized droplets had lower values of coefficient of friction compared with those washed with larger uniform and non-uniform droplets. Moreover the addition of alginate thickener in the shampoos and conditioners further enhanced the deposition of silicone oil on hair. The good correlation between silicone oil droplets stability, deposition on hair and resultant friction of hair support that droplet size and uniformity are important factors for controlling the stability and deposition property of emulsion based products such as shampoo and conditioner. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of microcrystalline silicon carbide growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on crystalline silicon surface passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomaska, M.; Beyer, W.; Neumann, E.; Finger, F.; Ding, K.

    2015-01-01

    Highly crystalline microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H) with excellent optoelectronic material properties is a promising candidate as highly transparent doped layer in silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. These high quality materials are usually produced using hot wire chemical vapor deposition under aggressive growth conditions giving rise to the removal of the underlying passivation layer and thus the deterioration of the crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation. In this work, we introduced the n-type μc-SiC:H/n-type μc-SiO x :H/intrinsic a-SiO x :H stack as a front layer configuration for p-type SHJ solar cells with the μc-SiO x :H layer acting as an etch-resistant layer against the reactive deposition conditions during the μc-SiC:H growth. We observed that the unfavorable expansion of micro-voids at the c-Si interface due to the in-diffusion of hydrogen atoms through the layer stack might be responsible for the deterioration of surface passivation. Excellent lifetime values were achieved under deposition conditions which are needed to grow high quality μc-SiC:H layers for SHJ solar cells. - Highlights: • High surface passivation quality was preserved after μc-SiC:H deposition. • μc-SiC:H/μc-SiO x :H/a-SiO x :H stack a promising front layer configuration • Void expansion at a-SiO x :H/c-Si interface for deteriorated surface passivation • μc-SiC:H provides a high transparency and electrical conductivity.

  18. Bulk-wave and guided-wave photoacoustic evaluation of the mechanical properties of aluminum/silicon nitride double-layer thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feifei; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar; Lilley, Carmen M

    2006-12-01

    The development of devices made of micro- and nano-structured thin film materials has resulted in the need for advanced measurement techniques to characterize their mechanical properties. Photoacoustic techniques, which use pulsed laser irradiation to nondestructively induce very high frequency ultrasound in a test object via rapid thermal expansion, are suitable for nondestructive and non-contact evaluation of thin films. In this paper, we compare two photoacoustic techniques to characterize the mechanical parameters of edge-supported aluminum and silicon nitride double-layer thin films. The elastic properties and residual stresses in such films affect their mechanical performance. In a first set of experiments, a femtosecond transient pump-probe technique is used to investigate the Young's moduli of the aluminum and silicon nitride layers by launching ultra-high frequency bulk acoustic waves in the films. The measured transient signals are compared with simulated transient thermoelastic signals in multi-layer structures, and the elastic moduli are determined. Independent pump-probe tests on silicon substrate-supported region and unsupported region are in good agreement. In a second set of experiments, dispersion curves of the A(0) mode of the Lamb waves that propagate along the unsupported films are measured using a broadband photoacoustic guided-wave method. The residual stresses and flexural rigidities for the same set of double-layer membranes are determined from these dispersion curves. Comparisons of the results obtained by the two photoacoustic techniques are made and discussed.

  19. Superhard PVD carbon films deposited with different gradients with and without additions of titanium and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, C.

    2003-10-01

    This work focusses on thin carbon-based films, deposited by magnetron sputtering with additional argon ion bombardment (0 eV to 800 eV) without extra adhesive layer on hard metal inserts. As one possibility of increasing the reduced adherence of hard carbon films the deposition of films with additions of titanium and silicon is studied. The aim of this work is to examine the influence of a modification of the transition between substrate and film by realizing three different types of deposition gradients. The pure carbon films are amorphous, the dominant network of atoms is formed by sp 2 bonded atoms. The amount of sp 3 bonded atoms is up to 30% and is influenced by the bombarding argon ion energy. Carbon films with additions of silicon are amorphous, only in films with a high amount of titanium (approx. 20 at%) nanocomposites of titanium carbide crystals with diameters of less than 5 nm in an amorphous carbon matrix were found. The mechanical properties and the behavior of single layer carbon films strongly depend on the argon ion energy. An increase of this energy leads to higher film hardness and higher residual stress and results in the delamination of superhard carbon films on hard metal substrates. The adhesion of single layer films for ion energies of more than 200 eV is significantly improved by additions of titanium and silicon, respectively. The addition of 23 at% silicon and titanium, respectively leads to a high reduction of the residual stress. In a non-reactive PVD process thin films were deposited with a continuously gradient in chemical composition. The results of the investigations of the films with two different concentrations of titanium and silicon, respectively show that carbon-based films with a good adhesion could be deposited. The combination of the two gradients in structure and properties and in chemical composition leads in the system with carbon and silicon carbide to hard and very adhesive films. Especially for carbon films with a high

  20. Surface Characteristics and Catalytic Activity of Copper Deposited Porous Silicon Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yusri Abdul Halim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Porous structured silicon or porous silicon (PS powder was prepared by chemical etching of silicon powder in an etchant solution of HF: HNO3: H2O (1:3:5 v/v. An immersion time of 4 min was sufficient for depositing Cu metal from an aqueous solution of CuSO4 in the presence of HF. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis revealed that the Cu particles aggregated upon an increase in metal content from 3.3 wt% to 9.8 wt%. H2-temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR profiles reveal that re-oxidation of the Cu particles occurs after deposition. Furthermore, the profiles denote the existence of various sizes of Cu metal on the PS. The Cu-PS powders show excellent catalytic reduction on the p-nitrophenol regardless of the Cu loadings.

  1. Preparation of lanthanum fluoride nanolayers by depositing ionic layers on silicon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuchkov, B.S.; Tolstoi, V.P.; Murin, I.V.; Kirillov, S.N. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-10

    The kinetics of growth of LaF{sub 3} nanolayers on silicon surface was studied. Influences due to preparation conditions (the concentration and the pH values of the solution, the time of surface treatment, the number of cycles of ionic layer deposition) were evaluated.

  2. Hydrogenated Silicon Layers and Solar Cells Deposited at Very Low Substrate Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronsveld, P.C.P.

    2013-01-01

    For direct production of solar cells on cheap plastics, the quality of VHF-PECVD deposited intrinsic and doped silicon layers made at substrate temperatures ≤ 100 °C was optimized. The investigation showed that at lower substrate temperatures, higher hydrogen dilution of the source gas silane was

  3. Metal Nanoparticles Deposited on Porous Silicon Templates as Novel Substrates for SERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Mikac

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, results on preparation of stable and uniform SERS solid substrates using macroporous silicon (pSi with deposited silver and gold are presented. Macroporous silicon is produced by anodisation of p-type silicon in hydrofluoric acid. The as prepared pSi is then used as a template for Ag and Au depositions. The noble metals were deposited in three different ways: by immersion in silver nitrate solution, by drop-casting silver colloidal solution and by pulsed laser ablation (PLA. Substrates obtained by different deposition processes were evaluated for SERS efficiency using methylene blue (MB and rhodamine 6G (R6G at 514.5, 633 and 785 nm. Using 514.5 nm excitation and R6G the limits of detection (LOD for macroporous Si samples with noble metal nanostructures obtained by immersion of pSi sample in silver nitrate solution and by applying silver colloidal solution to pSi template were 10–9 M and 10–8 M respectively. Using 633 nm laser and MB the most noticeable SERS activity gave pSi samples ablated with 30000 and 45000 laser pulses where the LODs of 10–10 M were obtained. The detection limit of 10–10 M was also reached for 4 mA cm–2-15 min pSi sample, silver ablated with 30000 pulses. Macroporous silicon proved to be a good base for the preparation of SERS substrates.

  4. Controlled deposition and combing of DNA across lithographically defined patterns on silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazari, Zeniab Esmail; Gurevich, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a new procedure for efficient combing of DNA on a silicon substrate, which allows reproducible deposition and alignment of DNA molecules across lithographically defined patterns. The technique involves surface modification of Si/SiO2 substrates with a hydrophobic silane by using...

  5. Controllable chemical vapor deposition of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene directly on silicon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Cole, Matthew T.

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene on oxidized silicon substrates is demonstrated. The material grows slowly, allowing for thickness control down to monolayer graphene. The as-grown thin films are continuous with no observable pinhol...

  6. Efficient and Stable CsPbBr3 Quantum-Dot Powders Passivated and Encapsulated with a Mixed Silicon Nitride and Silicon Oxide Inorganic Polymer Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hee Chang; Lee, Soyoung; Song, Jae Kyu; Yang, Heesun; Do, Young Rag

    2018-04-11

    Despite the excellent optical features of fully inorganic cesium lead halide (CsPbX 3 ) perovskite quantum dots (PeQDs), their unstable nature has limited their use in various optoelectronic devices. To mitigate the instability issues of PeQDs, we demonstrate the roles of dual-silicon nitride and silicon oxide ligands of the polysilazane (PSZ) inorganic polymer to passivate the surface defects and form a barrier layer coated onto green CsPbBr 3 QDs to maintain the high photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) and improve the environmental stability. The mixed SiN x /SiN x O y /SiO y passivated and encapsulated CsPbBr 3 /PSZ core/shell composite can be prepared by a simple hydrolysis reaction involving the addition of adding PSZ as a precursor and a slight amount of water into a colloidal CsPbBr 3 QD solution. The degree of the moisture-induced hydrolysis reaction of PSZ can affect the compositional ratio of SiN x , SiN x O y , and SiO y liganded to the surfaces of the CsPbBr 3 QDs to optimize the PLQY and the stability of CsPbBr 3 /PSZ core/shell composite, which shows a high PLQY (∼81.7%) with improved thermal, photo, air, and humidity stability as well under coarse conditions where the performance of CsPbBr 3 QDs typically deteriorate. To evaluate the suitability of the application of the CsPbBr 3 /PSZ powder to down-converted white-light-emitting diodes (DC-WLEDs) as the backlight of a liquid crystal display (LCD), we fabricated an on-package type of tricolor-WLED by mixing the as-synthesized green CsPbBr 3 /PSZ composite powder with red K 2 SiF 6 :Mn 4+ phosphor powder and a poly(methyl methacrylate)-encapsulating binder and coating this mixed paste onto a cup-type blue LED. The fabricated WLED show high luminous efficacy of 138.6 lm/W (EQE = 51.4%) and a wide color gamut of 128% and 111% without and with color filters, respectively, at a correlated color temperature of 6762 K.

  7. Silicon oxide sacrificial layers deposited by pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering for MEMS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castilla, Sheila; Olivares, Jimena; Clement, Marta; Vergara, Lucía; Pulido, Laura; Iborra, Enrique; Sangrador, Jesús

    2009-05-01

    Surface micromachining requires the use of easily-removable sacrificial layers fully compatible with all the materials and technological processes involved. Silicon dioxide films, thermally grown on silicon substrates or deposited by CVD, are commonly used as sacrificial layers in surface micromachining technologies, despite their low lateral etch rate in conventional fluorinate solutions. The development of silicon oxide layers with high etch rates poses a great technological challenge. In this work we have investigated the possibility of obtaining easily removable silicon oxide layers by pulsed-DC magnetron reactive sputtering. We have carried out a comprehensive study of the influence of the deposition parameters (total pressure and gas composition) on the composition, residual stress and lateral etch rate in fluorine wet solutions of the films. This study has allowed to determine the sputtering conditions to deposit, at very high rates (up to 0.1 μm/min), silicon oxide films with excellent characteristics for their use as sacrificial layers. Films with roughness around 5 nm rms, residual stress below 100 MPa and very high etch rate (up to 5 μm/min in the lateral directions), around 70 times greater than for thermal silicon oxide, have been achieved. The structural characteristics of these easily removable silicon oxide layers have been assessed by infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, which have revealed that the films exhibit some kind of porous structure, related to very specific sputter conditions. Finally, the viability of these films has been demonstrated by using them as sacrificial layer in the fabrication process of AlN-based microresonators.

  8. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades; Analise da austenita expandida em camadas nitretadas em acos inoxidaveis austeniticos e superaustenitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia de Materais, Aeronautica e Automobilistica; Oliveira, A.M. [Instituto de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranhao (IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Gallego, J., E-mail: gallego@dem.feis.unesp.b [UNESP, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Dept. Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  9. Porous silicon nitride spacers versus PEEK cages for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: clinical and radiological results of a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Mark P; Wolfs, Jasper F C; Corbin, Terry P

    2017-04-05

    Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion is a common procedure for treating radicular arm pain. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) plastic is a frequently used material in cages for interbody fusion. Silicon nitride is a new alternative with desirable bone compatibility and imaging characteristics. The aim of the present study is to compare silicon nitride implants with PEEK cages filled with autograft harvested from osteophytes. The study is a prospective, randomized, blinded study of 100 patients with 2 years follow-up. The primary outcome measure was improvement in the Neck Disability Index. Other outcome measures included SF-36, VAS arm pain, VAS neck pain, assessment of recovery, operative characteristics, complications, fusion and subsidence based on dynamic X-ray and CT scan. There was no significant difference in NDI scores between the groups at 24 months follow-up. At 3 and 12 months the NDI scores were in favor of PEEK although the differences were not clinically relevant. On most follow-up moments there was no difference in VAS neck and VAS arm between both groups, and there was no statistically significant difference in patients' perceived recovery during follow-up. Fusion rate and subsidence were similar for the two study arms and about 90% of the implants were fused at 24 months. Patients treated with silicon nitride and PEEK reported similar recovery rates during follow-up. There was no significant difference in clinical outcome at 24 months. Fusion rates improved over time and are comparable between both groups.

  10. Specific Neuron Placement on Gold and Silicon Nitride-Patterned Substrates through a Two-Step Functionalization Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescola, Andrea; Canale, Claudio; Prato, Mirko; Diaspro, Alberto; Berdondini, Luca; Maccione, Alessandro; Dante, Silvia

    2016-06-28

    The control of neuron-substrate adhesion has been always a challenge for fabricating neuron-based cell chips and in particular for multielectrode array (MEA) devices, which warrants the investigation of the electrophysiological activity of neuronal networks. The recent introduction of high-density chips based on the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, integrating thousands of electrodes, improved the possibility to sense large networks and raised the challenge to develop newly adapted functionalization techniques to further increase neuron electrode localization to avoid the positioning of cells out of the recording area. Here, we present a simple and straightforward chemical functionalization method that leads to the precise and exclusive positioning of the neural cell bodies onto modified electrodes and inhibits, at the same time, cellular adhesion in the surrounding insulator areas. Different from other approaches, this technique does not require any adhesion molecule as well as complex patterning technique such as μ-contact printing. The functionalization was first optimized on gold (Au) and silicon nitride (Si3N4)-patterned surfaces. The procedure consisted of the introduction of a passivating layer of hydrophobic silane molecules (propyltriethoxysilane [PTES]) followed by a treatment of the Au surface using 11-amino-1-undecanethiol hydrochloride (AT). On model substrates, well-ordered neural networks and an optimal coupling between a single neuron and single micrometric functionalized Au surface were achieved. In addition, we presented the preliminary results of this functionalization method directly applied on a CMOS-MEA: the electrical spontaneous spiking and bursting activities of the network recorded for up to 4 weeks demonstrate an excellent and stable neural adhesion and functional behavior comparable with what expected using a standard adhesion factor, such as polylysine or laminin, thus demonstrating that this procedure can be

  11. High resolution medium energy ion scattering study of silicon oxidation and oxy nitridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, E.P.; Lu, H.C.; Garfunkel, E.; Gustafsson, T.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Silicon oxide is likely to remain the material of choice for gate oxides in microelectronics for the foreseeable future. As device become ever smaller and faster, the thickness of these layers in commercial products is predicted to be less than 50 Angstroms in just a few years. An understanding of such devices will therefore likely to be based on microscopic concepts and should now be investigated by atomistic techniques. With medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) using an electrostatic energy analyzer, depth profiling of thin (<60 Angstroms) silicon oxide films on Si(100) with 3 - 5 Angstroms depth resolution in the near region has been done. The growth mechanism of thin oxide films on Si(100) has been studied, using sequential oxygen isotope exposures. It is found that the oxide films are stoichiometric to within approx. 10 Angstroms of the interface. It is also found that the oxidation reactions occur at the surface, in the transition region and at interface, with only the third region being included in the conventional (Deal-Grove) model for oxide formation. Nitrogen is sometimes added to gate oxides, as it has been found empirically that his improves some of the electrical properties. The role, location and even the amount of nitrogen that exists in such films are poorly understood, and represent interesting analytical challenges. MEIS data will be presented that address these questions, measured for a number of different processing conditions. We have recently demonstrated how to perform nitrogen nano-engineering in such ultrathin gate dielectrics, and these results will also be discussed

  12. Femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of silicon and germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reenaas, Turid Worren [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Lee, Yen Sian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chowdhury, Fatema Rezwana; Gupta, Manisha; Tsui, Ying Yin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Tou, Teck Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Ling [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kok, Soon Yie [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Shan, E-mail: seongshan@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Ge and Si were deposited by fs and ns laser at room temperature and at vacuum. • Ion of 10{sup 4} ms{sup −1} and 30–200 eV was obtained for ns ablation for Ge and Si. • Highly energetic ions of 10{sup 5} ms{sup −1} with 2–7 KeV were produced in fs laser ablation. • Nanocrystalline Si and Ge were deposited by using fs laser. • Nanoparticles < 10 nm haven been obtained by fs laser. - Abstract: 150 fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulsed laser deposition of Si and Ge were compared to a nanosecond KrF laser (25 ns). The ablation thresholds for ns lasers were about 2.5 J cm{sup −2} for Si and 2.1 J cm{sup −2} for Ge. The values were about 5–10 times lower when fs laser were used. The power densities were 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup −2} for ns but 10{sup 12} W cm{sup −2} for fs. By using an ion probe, the ions emission at different fluence were measured where the emitting ions achieving the velocity in the range of 7–40 km s{sup −1} and kinetic energy in the range of 30–200 eV for ns laser. The ion produced by fs laser was measured to be highly energetic, 90–200 km s{sup −1}, 2–10 KeV. Two ion peaks were detected above specific laser fluence for both ns and fs laser ablation. Under fs laser ablation, the films were dominated by nano-sized crystalline particles, drastically different from nanosecond pulsed laser deposition where amorphous films were obtained. The ions characteristics and effects of pulse length on the properties of the deposited films were discussed.

  13. Electrochemical lithiation of thin silicon based layers potentiostatically deposited from ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlaic, Codruta Aurelia; Ivanov, Svetlozar; Peipmann, Ralf; Eisenhardt, Anja; Himmerlich, Marcel; Krischok, Stefan; Bund, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Thin silicon layers containing about 20% carbon and 20% oxygen were deposited on copper substrates by potentiostatic electroreduction from a 1 M SiCl 4 1-butyl-1-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis (trifluoromethyl) sulfonylimide [BMP][TFSI] electrolyte. The electrodeposition process was investigated by means of voltammetric techniques, coupled with in-situ microgravimetry (quartz crystal microbalance, QCM). The electrochemical and QCM data suggest a possible contribution of a partial Si 4+ to Si 2+ reduction and/or a restructuring of the metallic substrate. Considerable impact of side reactions parallel to the deposition process was indicated by QCM measurements performed under potentiostatic and potentiodynamic conditions. The deposition of silicon-based films was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Analysis of the chemical composition of the deposit and its elemental distribution were achieved by depth profiling X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrodeposited silicon containing layers showed stable lithiation and delithiation with capacity values of about 1200 mAhg −1 and 80% capacity retention after 300 cycles in standard EC/DMC electrolytes. In ionic liquid (IL) the material displayed lower capacity of ca. 500 mAhg −1 , which can be attributed to the higher viscosity of this electrolyte and deposition of IL decomposition products during lithiation

  14. Surface passivation of efficient nanotextured black silicon solar cells using thermal atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Che-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Jui; Chang, Che-Wei; Huang, Jhih-Jie; Yang, Ming-Jui; Tjahjono, Budi; Huang, Jian-Jia; Hsu, Wen-Ching; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2013-10-09

    Efficient nanotextured black silicon solar cells passivated by an Al2O3 layer are demonstrated. The broadband antireflection of the nanotextured black silicon solar cells was provided by fabricating vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays on the n(+) emitter. A highly conformal Al2O3 layer was deposited upon the SiNW arrays by the thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) based on the multiple pulses scheme. The nanotextured black silicon wafer covered with the Al2O3 layer exhibited a low total reflectance of ∼1.5% in a broad spectrum from 400 to 800 nm. The Al2O3 passivation layer also contributes to the suppressed surface recombination, which was explored in terms of the chemical and field-effect passivation effects. An 8% increment of short-circuit current density and 10.3% enhancement of efficiency were achieved due to the ALD Al2O3 surface passivation and forming gas annealing. A high efficiency up to 18.2% was realized in the ALD Al2O3-passivated nanotextured black silicon solar cells.

  15. Influence of deposition temperature of thermal ALD deposited Al2O3 films on silicon surface passivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Batra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of deposition temperature (Tdep and subsequent annealing time (tanl of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide (Al2O3 films on silicon surface passivation (in terms of surface recombination velocity, SRV is investigated. The pristine samples (as-deposited show presence of positive fixed charges, QF. The interface defect density (Dit decreases with increase in Tdep which further decreases with tanl up to 100s. An effective surface passivation (SRV<8 cm/s is realized for Tdep ≥ 200 °C. The present investigation suggests that low thermal budget processing provides the same quality of passivation as realized by high thermal budget process (tanl between 10 to 30 min.

  16. Atomic layer deposition TiO2 coated porous silicon surface: Structural characterization and morphological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iatsunskyi, Igor; Jancelewicz, Mariusz; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Kempiński, Mateusz; Peplińska, Barbara; Jarek, Marcin; Załęski, Karol; Jurga, Stefan; Smyntyna, Valentyn

    2015-01-01

    TiO 2 thin films were grown on highly-doped p-Si (100) macro- and mesoporous structures by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using TiCl 4 and deionized water as precursors at 300 °C. The crystalline structure, chemical composition, and morphology of the deposited films and initial silicon nanostructures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mean size of TiO 2 crystallites was determined by TEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the mean crystallite size and the crystallinity of the TiO 2 are influenced dramatically by the morphology of the porous silicon, with the mesoporous silicon resulting in a much finer grain size and amorphous structure than the macroporous silicon having a partially crystal anatase phase. A simple model of the ALD layer growth inside the pores was presented. - Highlights: • The morphology and chemical composition of TiO 2 and porous Si were established. • The approximate size of TiO 2 nanocrystals was estimated. • The model of the atomic layer deposition coating in the porous Si was presented

  17. Hot-pressed silicon nitride with various lanthanide oxides as sintering additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, K.; Toibana, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of addition of various lanthanide oxides and their mixture with Y2O3 on the sintering of Si3N4 were investigated. The addition of simple and mixed lanthanide oxides promoted the densification of Si3N4 in hot-pressing at 1800 C under 300-400kg/ centimeters squared for 60 min. The crystallization of yttrium and lanthanide-silicon oxynitrides which was observed inn the sintered body containing yttrium-lanthanide mixed oxides as additives led to the formation of a highly refractory Si3N4 ceramic having a bending strength of 82 and 84 kg/millimeters squared at room temperature and 1300 C respectively. In a Y2O3+La2O3 system, a higher molar ratio of La2O3 to Y2O3 gave a higher hardness and strength at high temperatures. It was found that 90 min was an optimum sintering time for the highest strength.

  18. Depth profiling using C60+ SIMS-Deposition and topography development during bombardment of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, Greg; Batteas, James; Michaels, Chris A.; Chi, Peter; Small, John; Windsor, Eric; Fahey, Albert; Verkouteren, Jennifer; Kim, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    A C 60 + primary ion source has been coupled to an ion microscope secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instrument to examine sputtering of silicon with an emphasis on possible application of C 60 + depth profiling for high depth resolution SIMS analysis of silicon semiconductor materials. Unexpectedly, C 60 + SIMS depth profiling of silicon was found to be complicated by the deposition of an amorphous carbon layer which buries the silicon substrate. Sputtering of the silicon was observed only at the highest accessible beam energies (14.5 keV impact) or by using oxygen backfilling. C 60 + SIMS depth profiling of As delta-doped test samples at 14.5 keV demonstrated a substantial (factor of 5) degradation in depth resolution compared to Cs + SIMS depth profiling. This degradation is thought to result from the formation of an unusual platelet-like grain structure on the SIMS crater bottoms. Other unusual topographical features were also observed on silicon substrates after high primary ion dose C 60 + bombardment

  19. Aluminum-doped hydrogenated microcrystalline cubic silicon carbide films deposited by hot wire CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyajima, Shinsuke; Yamada, Akira; Konagai, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum-doped hydrogenated microcrystalline cubic silicon carbide (Al-doped μc-3C-SiC:H) films were successfully deposited by hot wire chemical vapor deposition using a gas mixture of monomethylsilane, hydrogen and trimethylaluminum (TMA). Deposition rate and infrared absorption measurements indicate that radicals generated from TMA extract hydrogen atoms from the growing surface of the films. Infrared absorption and secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements suggest the existence of Al-H complexes in the deposited film. The dark conductivity was found to be below 10 - 7 S/cm for as-deposited films and 10 - 6 -10 - 4 S/cm for annealed films. Our studies indicate the possibility of forming p-type μc-3C-SiC:H films on glass substrates at process temperature below 400 deg. C

  20. The growth and characterization of group III-nitride transistor devices grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael Ming

    The InAlGaN, or III-nitride, material system has received much interest from the research community. A direct wide bandgap semiconductor, GaN offers a high breakdown field (>3 x 106 V/cm) due to its large bandgap energy of 3.4 eV, high electron saturation velocity (1.5 x 10 7 cm/s, predicted peak up to 2.7 x 107 cm/s), good thermal conductivity (≥1.7 W/cm K), and reasonable mobility (800 cm 2/V s). In an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure, the formation of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) leads to a higher electron mobility (2000 cm2/V s) and a high sheet density (1--5 x 1013 cm -2). This makes transistors based on the III-nitride material system ideal for high-temperature, high-power, and high-frequency applications. Two such transistors include the heterojunction field-effect transistor (HFET) and bipolar junction transistor (BJT), which includes the heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). Both HFETs and HBTs were studied, and the epitaxial heterostructures were grown by the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. The MOCVD process and system are described, along with the growth details. As material characterization is important for the optimization of growth, several of the techniques used are discussed. An extensive study to improve the performance of AlGaN/GaN HFETs is detailed. Through the use of a delta-doped, binary barrier novel device structure, the highest reported maximum drain current and transconductance is reported: IDSmax = 1.82 A/mm and gm = 331 mS/mm. The device also exhibits excellent RF characteristics. HBTs based on the III-nitride material system face a more difficult challenge associated with p-type material. Development of HBTs is still in the early stages, although there are reports of working devices. The gain is still below its potential, but many of the issues have been identified. Two novel structures are reported for the first time, a GaN/InGaN/GaN pnp HBT and a AlGaN/GaN npn graded-base and collector-up HBT. The

  1. Modification of the surfaces of stainless steel during titanium nitride deposition by a dynamic mixing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Katsuhiro; Tamura, Susumu; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Horiguchi, Motohiro; Nakaiwa, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Takashi; Akamatsu, Katsuya; Nakao, Kazuyoshi

    2000-05-01

    Surfaces of stainless steel SUS304 were coated with titanium nitride (TiN) at temperatures ranging from 400°C to 770°C using a dynamic mixing technique. The N+ ions were accelerated at energies of 0.5-2.0 keV, and were implanted into the stainless steel. The composition of the prepared TiN films was measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with He ions at an energy of 2.0 MeV. Intermediate layers containing compounds such as FesNq, Cr2N, and CrFe were formed between the TiN films and substrates at substrate temperatures higher than 700°C. The thickness of the TiN films decreased significantly when the intermediate layers were formed.

  2. Improvement of carrier diffusion length in silicon nanowire arrays using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinya; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Yuya; Yamada, Akira; Ohta, Yoshimi; Niwa, Yusuke; Hirota, Masaki

    2013-08-01

    To achieve a high-efficiency silicon nanowire (SiNW) solar cell, surface passivation technique is very important because a SiNW array has a large surface area. We successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) high-quality aluminum oxide (Al2O3) film for passivation on the whole surface of the SiNW arrays. The minority carrier lifetime of the Al2O3-depositedSiNW arrays with bulk silicon substrate was improved to 27 μs at the optimum annealing condition. To remove the effect of bulk silicon, the effective diffusion length of minority carriers in the SiNW array was estimated by simple equations and a device simulator. As a result, it was revealed that the effective diffusion length in the SiNW arrays increased from 3.25 to 13.5 μm by depositing Al2O3 and post-annealing at 400°C. This improvement of the diffusion length is very important for application to solar cells, and Al2O3 deposited by ALD is a promising passivation material for a structure with high aspect ratio such as SiNW arrays.

  3. Development of amorphous silicon based EUV hardmasks through physical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Anuja; Mignot, Yann; Meli, Luciana; DeVries, Scott; Xu, Yongan; Seshadri, Indira; Felix, Nelson M.; Zeng, Wilson; Cao, Yong; Phan, Khoi; Dai, Huixiong; Ngai, Christopher S.; Stolfi, Michael; Diehl, Daniel L.

    2017-10-01

    Extending extreme ultraviolet (EUV) single exposure patterning to its limits requires more than photoresist development. The hardmask film is a key contributor in the patterning stack that offers opportunities to enhance lithographic process window, increase pattern transfer efficiency, and decrease defectivity when utilizing very thin film stacks. This paper introduces the development of amorphous silicon (a-Si) deposited through physical vapor deposited (PVD) as an alternative to a silicon ARC (SiARC) or silicon-oxide-type EUV hardmasks in a typical trilayer patterning scheme. PVD offers benefits such as lower deposition temperature, and higher purity, compared to conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. In this work, sub-36nm pitch line-space features were resolved with a positive-tone organic chemically-amplified resist directly patterned on PVD a-Si, without an adhesion promotion layer and without pattern collapse. Pattern transfer into the underlying hardmask stack was demonstrated, allowing an evaluation of patterning metrics related to resolution, pattern transfer fidelity, and film defectivity for PVD a-Si compared to a conventional tri-layer patterning scheme. Etch selectivity and the scalability of PVD a-Si to reduce the aspect ratio of the patterning stack will also be discussed.

  4. Silicon surface passivation using thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gope, Jhuma; Vandana; Batra, Neha; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Maurya, K.K.; Srivastava, Ritu; Singh, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HfO 2 films using thermal ALD are studied for silicon surface passivation. • As-deposited thin film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with surface recombination velocity (SRV) <100 cm/s. • Annealing improves passivation quality with SRV ∼20 cm/s for ∼8 nm film. - Abstract: Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) is a potential material for equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) scaling in microelectronics; however, its surface passivation properties particularly on silicon are not well explored. This paper reports investigation on passivation properties of thermally deposited thin HfO 2 films by atomic layer deposition system (ALD) on silicon surface. As-deposited pristine film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with <100 cm/s surface recombination velocity (SRV) vis-à-vis thicker films. Further improvement in passivation quality is achieved with annealing at 400 °C for 10 min where the SRV reduces to ∼20 cm/s. Conductance measurements show that the interface defect density (D it ) increases with film thickness whereas its value decreases after annealing. XRR data corroborate with the observations made by FTIR and SRV data.

  5. Aluminum nitride electro-optic phase shifter for backend integration on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shiyang; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2016-06-13

    An AlN electro-optic phase shifter with a parallel plate capacitor structure is fabricated on Si using the back-end complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, which is feasible for multilayer photonics integration. The modulation efficiency (Vπ⋅Lπ product) measured from the fabricated waveguide-ring resonators and Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) modulators near the 1550-nm wavelength is ∼240 V⋅cm for the transverse electric (TE) mode and ∼320 V⋅cm for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode, from which the Pockels coefficient of the deposited AlN is deduced to be ∼1.0 pm/V for both TE and TM modes. The methods for further modulation efficiency improvement are addressed.

  6. A superhydrophobic chip based on SU-8 photoresist pillars suspended on a silicon nitride membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2014-07-28

    We developed a new generation of superhydrophobic chips optimized for probing ultrasmall sample quantities by X-ray scattering and fluorescence techniques. The chips are based on thin Si3N4 membranes with a tailored pattern of SU-8 photoresist pillars. Indeed, aqueous solution droplets can be evaporated and concentrated at predefined positions using a non-periodic pillar pattern. We demonstrated quantitatively the deposition and aggregation of gold glyconanoparticles from the evaporation of a nanomolar droplet in a small spot by raster X-ray nanofluorescence. Further, raster nanocrystallography of biological objects such as rod-like tobacco mosaic virus nanoparticles reveals crystalline macro-domain formation composed of highly oriented nanorods. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  7. Electrophoretic Deposition of Aluminum Nitride from Its Suspension in Acetylacetone Using Iodine as an Additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizuneh Workie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied electrophoretic deposition of AlN from its suspension in acetylacetone with I2 as an additive. AlN powder with particle size <10 μm is dispersed to produce a positive charge and deposited on the cathode by applying fields greater than 10 V/cm between the electrodes. X-ray diffraction and FTIR studies indicate that the AlN before and after deposition has the same composition and structure. An increase in the amount of AlN in the suspension, the deposition potential, and the deposition time results in a linear increase in the weight of the AlN deposited. Electrophoretic deposition from 10 g/L AlN suspension shows an initial increase in the weight of AlN deposited with the concentration of I2, and the weight of AlN decreases after reaching a maximum at 0.20 g/L I2.

  8. Impact of ionic strength of growth on the physiochemical properties, structure, and adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes polyelectrolyte brushes to a silicon nitride surface in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordesli, Fatma Pinar; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2012-12-15

    The adhesion energies between pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes EGDe to a model surface of silicon nitride were quantified using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in water for cells grown in pure media (as the control) and in media of four different ionic strengths of added NaCl (IS of 0.05 M, 0.1 M, 0.3 M and 0.5 M NaCl). The physiochemical properties of L. monocytogenes EGDe surface brushes were shown to have a strong influence on the adhesion of the microbe to the silicon nitride surface. The transitions in the adhesion energies, physiochemical properties, and the structure of bacterial surface polyelectrolyte brushes were observed for the cells grown in the media of 0.1M added NaCl. Our results suggested that the highest long-range electrostatic repulsion which was partially balanced by the Liftshitz-van der Waals attraction for the cells grown at 0.1M was responsible for the highest energy barrier to adhesion for these cells as predicted by the soft-particle analysis of DLVO theory and the lower adhesion measured by AFM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A study on the edge chipping according to spindle speed and inclination angle of workpiece in laser-assisted milling of silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Wan-Sik; Lee, Choon-Man

    2018-02-01

    Ceramics are difficult to machine due to their high hardness and brittleness. As an effective method for machining ceramics, laser-assisted machining (LAM) has been studied by many researchers. In particular, many studies of methods to improve the machinability of silicon nitride using LAM have been performed. However, there is little research on the effect of the inclination angle of the workpiece, because varying the angle increases the difficulty of controlling the laser preheating and tool path. This paper investigates the effect of preheating temperature, spindle speed and inclination angle of the workpiece on edge chipping of silicon nitride in an effort to obtain an enhanced surface finish using laser-assisted milling (LAMill). The machining conditions were determined by considering the parameters that can reduce edge chipping using related theory. Experimental results showed a reduction in edge chipping based on increases in preheating temperature, spindle speed and inclination angle of the workpiece. Also, by increasing the spindle speed and the inclination angle of the workpiece, surface roughness was decreased due to reduction in the cutting force. The energy efficiency of LAMill by comparing the specific cutting energy according to the machining conditions is analyzed.

  10. Cubic silicon carbide and boron nitride as possible primary pressure calibrants for high pressure and temperature scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, K. K.; Goncharov, A. F.; Tkachev, S. N.; Prakapenka, V.

    2010-12-01

    K. K. Zhuravlev, A. F. Goncharov Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington DC, 20015 V. Prakapenka, S. N. Tkachev CARS, the University of Chicago, Bldg. 434A, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass. Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 Abstract Since its introduction, ruby-based pressure scale (Mao et al., 1986) has been the most commonly used by the high-pressure scientific community. However, it has limited use at elevated temperatures, due to the weakening and broadening of the ruby fluorescence line. The recent developments in the field of high temperature, high pressure physics and geophysics require some alternative pressure scale, which will be capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 3000 K. Cubic boron nitride (cBN) was recently (Goncharov et al., 2005) proposed as the possible pressure calibrant. It has been suggested that the simultaneous use of x-ray diffraction to measure density and Brillouin spectroscopy to obtain elastic properties of the crystal can be used to construct the pressure scale independent of any other pressure standards, i.e. cBN can be a primary pressure calibrant. However, the acoustic velocities of cBN are very close to those of diamond and, therefore, are hard to resolve in experiment at high pressures in diamond-anvil cell. Another possible primary pressure calibrant is cubic silicon carbide (SiC-3C). Its density and elastic parameters are quite different from the diamond ones and it is stable over the broad range of temperatures and pressures (up to 1 Mbar). SiC-3C is transparent and allows the use of Brillouin spectroscopy. Additionally, SiC-3C has two strong Raman lines, which can be used for the optical in situ pressure measurements. We report our experimental data on both cBN and SiC-3C and show that they, indeed, can be used in constructing reliable and accurate high-pressure, high-temperature scale. We performed single crystal x-ray diffraction and Brillouin

  11. Biomimetic surface-conducting silicone rubber obtained by physical deposition of MWCNT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylka, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a minimal approach to produce superhydrophobic, surface-conducting silicone rubber with a strongly developed surface modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes partially embedded in the silicone elastic matrix. The modification was achieved by physical deposition of carbon nanotube powder on a semi-liquid silicone rubber surface prior to its cross-linking. The resulting biomimetic material displayed superhydrophobic properties (static wetting angle >160°, sliding angle ∼10°), as well as elevated electric surface resistance (surface resistivity approx 18 kΩ). A piezoresistive hysteretic response with nonmonotonic change of the surface resistance accompanying substantial linear stretching was also demonstrated in the developed specimens displaying negative resistance change in a broad range of extension ratios, making them applicable as highly compliant, large-specific-area electrodes. (paper)

  12. Low threading dislocation density aluminum nitride on silicon carbide through the use of reduced temperature interlayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Wu, Feng; Zollner, Christian; Alif, Muhammad Esmed; Saifaddin, Burhan; Almogbel, Abdullah; Iza, Michael; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, reduced threading dislocation density AlN on (0 0 0 1) 6H-SiC was realized through the use of reduced temperature AlN interlayers in the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth. We explored the dependence of the interlayer growth temperature on the AlN crystal quality, defect density, and surface morphology. The crystal quality was characterized using omega rocking curve scans and the threading dislocation density was determined by plan view transmission electron microscopy. The growth resulted in a threading dislocation density of 7 × 108 cm-2 indicating a significant reduction in the defect density of AlN in comparison to direct growth of AlN on SiC (∼1010 cm-2). Atomic force microscopy images demonstrated a clear step-terrace morphology that is consistent with step flow growth at high temperature. Reducing the interlayer growth temperature increased the TD inclination and thus enhanced TD-TD interactions. The TDD was decreased via fusion and annihilation reactions.

  13. Low threading dislocation density aluminum nitride on silicon carbide through the use of reduced temperature interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Foronda, Humberto M.

    2017-11-23

    In this work, reduced threading dislocation density AlN on (0 0 0 1) 6H-SiC was realized through the use of reduced temperature AlN interlayers in the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth. We explored the dependence of the interlayer growth temperature on the AlN crystal quality, defect density, and surface morphology. The crystal quality was characterized using omega rocking curve scans and the threading dislocation density was determined by plan view transmission electron microscopy. The growth resulted in a threading dislocation density of 7 × 108 cm−2 indicating a significant reduction in the defect density of AlN in comparison to direct growth of AlN on SiC (∼1010 cm−2). Atomic force microscopy images demonstrated a clear step-terrace morphology that is consistent with step flow growth at high temperature. Reducing the interlayer growth temperature increased the TD inclination and thus enhanced TD-TD interactions. The TDD was decreased via fusion and annihilation reactions.

  14. Boron nitride - Composition, optical properties, and mechanical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Warner, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    A low energy ion beam deposition technique was used to grow boron nitride films on quartz, germanium, silicon, gallium arsenide, and indium phosphate. The film structure was amorphous with evidence of a hexagonal phase. The peak boron concentration was 82 at. percent. The carbon and oxygen impurities were in the 5 to 8 at. percent range. Boron-nitrogen and boron-boron bonds were revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The index of refraction varied from 1.65 to 1.67 for films deposited on III-V compound semiconductors. The coefficient of friction for boron nitride in sliding contact with diamond was less than 0.1. The substrate was silicon.

  15. Boron nitride: Composition, optical properties and mechanical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Warner, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    A low energy ion beam deposition technique was used to grow boron nitride films on quartz, germanium, silicon, gallium arsenide, and indium phosphate. The film structure was amorphous with evidence of a hexagonal phase. The peak boron concentration was 82 at %. The carbon and oxygen impurities were in the 5 to 8 at % range. Boron-nitrogen and boron-boron bonds were revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The index of refraction varied from 1.65 to 1.67 for films deposited on III-V compound semiconductors. The coefficient of friction for boron nitride in sliding contact with diamond was less than 0.1. The substrate was silicon.

  16. Thermal recrystallization of physical vapor deposition based germanium thin films on bulk silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2013-08-16

    We demonstrate a simple, low-cost, and scalable process for obtaining uniform, smooth surfaced, high quality mono-crystalline germanium (100) thin films on silicon (100). The germanium thin films were deposited on a silicon substrate using plasma-assisted sputtering based physical vapor deposition. They were crystallized by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 1100 °C. We report that the best quality germanium thin films are obtained above the melting point of germanium (937 °C), thus offering a method for in-situ Czochralski process. We show well-behaved high-κ /metal gate metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) using this film. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Low temperature magnetron sputter deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films using high flux ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbi, Jennifer E.; Abelson, John R.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate that the microstructure of polycrystalline silicon thin films depends strongly on the flux of low energy ions that bombard the growth surface during magnetron sputter deposition. The deposition system is equipped with external electromagnetic coils which, through the unbalanced magnetron effect, provide direct control of the ion flux independent of the ion energy. We report the influence of low energy ( + on the low temperature ( + ions to silicon neutrals (J + /J 0 ) during growth by an order of magnitude (from 3 to 30) enables the direct nucleation of polycrystalline Si on glass and SiO 2 coated Si at temperatures below 400 degree sign C. We discuss possible mechanisms for this enhancement of crystalline microstructure, including the roles of enhanced adatom mobility and the formation of shallow, mobile defects

  18. Silicon solar cell performance deposited by diamond like carbon thin film ;Atomic oxygen effects;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Abbas Ail; Eshaghi, Akbar; Karami, Esmaeil

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a diamond-like carbon thin film was deposited on p-type polycrystalline silicon solar cell via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method by using methane and hydrogen gases. The effect of atomic oxygen on the functioning of silicon coated DLC thin film and silicon was investigated. Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the DLC thin film. Photocurrent-voltage characteristics of the silicon solar cell were carried out using a solar simulator. The results showed that atomic oxygen exposure induced the including oxidation, structural changes, cross-linking reactions and bond breaking of the DLC film; thus reducing the optical properties. The photocurrent-voltage characteristics showed that although the properties of the fabricated thin film were decreased after being exposed to destructive rays, when compared with solar cell without any coating, it could protect it in atomic oxygen condition enhancing solar cell efficiency up to 12%. Thus, it can be said that diamond-like carbon thin layer protect the solar cell against atomic oxygen exposure.

  19. Mocvd Growth of Group-III Nitrides on Silicon Carbide: From Thin Films to Atomically Thin Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, Zakaria Y.

    Group-III nitride semiconductors (AlN, GaN, InN and their alloys) are considered one of the most important class of materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices. This is not limited to the blue light-emitting diode (LED) used for efficient solid-state lighting, but other applications as well, such as solar cells, radar and a variety of high frequency power electronics, which are all prime examples of the technological importance of nitride based wide bandgap semiconductors in our daily lives. The goal of this dissertation work was to explore and establish new growth schemes to improve the structural and optical properties of thick to atomically thin films of group-III nitrides grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on SiC substrates for future novel devices. The first research focus of this dissertation was on the growth of indium gallium nitride (InGaN). This wide bandgap semiconductor has attracted much research attention as an active layer in LEDs and recently as an absorber material for solar cells. InGaN has superior material properties for solar cells due to its wavelength absorption tunability that nearly covers the entire solar spectrum. This can be achieved by controlling the indium content in thick grown material. Thick InGaN films are also of interest as strain reducing based layers for deep-green and red light emitters. The growth of thick films of InGaN is, however, hindered by several combined problems. This includes poor incorporation of indium in alloys, high density of structural and morphological defects, as well as challenges associated with the segregation of indium in thick films. Overcoming some of these material challenges is essential in order integrate thick InGaN films into future optoelectronics. Therefore, this dissertation research investigated the growth mechanism of InGaN layers grown in the N-polar direction by MOCVD as a route to improve the structural and optical properties of thick InGaN films. The growth

  20. Influence of additive system (Al2O3-RE2O3 , RE = Y, La, Nd, Dy, Yb on microstructure and mechanical properties of silicon nitride-based ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marchi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride based ceramics have been widely used as structural ceramics, due mainly to their thermo-mechanical properties such as high density, high thermal shock resistance, corrosion resistance and chemical stability. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of rare earth and aluminum oxide additions as sintering aids on densification, microstructure and mechanical properties of silicon nitride. Silicon nitride mixtures with 91 wt. (% Si3N4 and 9% wt. (% additives were prepared and sintered. The density, microstructure and mechanical properties of the sintered specimens of these mixtures were determined. In most specimens, scanning electron microscopic examination and X ray diffraction analysis revealed elongated grains of β-Si3N4 with aspect ratio of about 2.0 and dispersed in a glassy phase. The density of the sintered specimens was higher than 94% of the theoretical density (td and specimens with La2O3 and Al2O3 additions exhibited the highest value. The results of this investigation indicate that the rare earth ion size influences densification of silicon nitride, but this correlation was not observed in specimens containing two different rare earth oxides. The hardness values varied in direct proportion to the density of the specimens and the fracture toughness values were influenced by the composition of the intergranular glassy phase.

  1. Optical, mechanical and tribological properties of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped polycrystalline silicon nitride ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Bhupendra [Department of Metallurgy and Material Engineering, Sunmoon University (Korea, Republic of); Fu Zhengyi [State Key Lab of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology (China); Niihara, Koichi [Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka (Japan); Lee, Soo W, E-mail: joshibhupen@gmail.com [Department of Environment Engineering, Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-29

    Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped polycrystalline silicon nitride ceramics were prepared by hot press sintering method at 1850deg. C and 30 MPa pressure. 1 wt.% of each rare earth oxides (REO) were sintered with 3 wt.% MgO, 9 wt.% AlN and 87 wt.% {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}.The optical, mechanical and tribological properties of REO doped polycrystalline silicon nitride ceramics were investigated. Optical transmittance was measured in visible and near infrared region and found to be 54% transmittance for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics. {beta}- phase transformation was suppressed with REO addition. High hardness and high fracture toughness were achieved by addition of REO. Adding REO shows good mechanical properties as high strength and toughness. Coefficient of friction of the REO doped silicon nitride ceramics was lower than that of without REO doped silicon nitride ceramics.

  2. Surface Recombination of Crystalline Silicon Substrates Passivated by Atomic-Layer-Deposited AlOx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafune, Koji; Miki, Shohei; Matsutani, Ryosuke; Hamano, Junpei; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Tomihisa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ogura, Atsuhi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Satoh, Shin-ichi

    2012-04-01

    AlOx films as passivation layers for p-type crystalline silicon were prepared by atomic layer deposition with ozone as an oxidant, and the effects of the AlOx film thickness and deposition temperature on the maximum recombination velocity (Smax) were evaluated. Smax is improved by increasing the layer thickness but saturates at a layer thickness of about 30 nm. In the case of samples deposited at room temperature, Smax is improved fivefold when the thickness is increased from 20 to 33 nm. Smax also improved as the deposition temperature was increased to 300 °C then deteriorated when it was further increased to 350 °C. After postdeposition annealing, we obtained an Smax of 8.5 cm/s.

  3. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  4. Substrate temperature dependence of microcrystallinity in plasma-deposited, boron-doped hydrogenated silicon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajeswaran, G.; Kampas, F.J.; Vanier, P.E.; Sabatini, R.L.; Tafto, J.

    1983-01-01

    The glow-discharge decomposition of silane diluted in hydrogen using diborane as a dopant results in the deposition of p-type microcrystalline silicon films at relatively low temperatures. The conductivity of these films is critically dependent on the substrate temperature when the ratio of silane flow rate to total gas flow rate is 1%. Electron micrographs show that highly conducting films contain numerous clusters of 2.5-nm crystallites that are embedded in an amorphous medium

  5. Development and characterization of Undoped Silicon Glass (USG) using chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Jagadeesha T; Louis Kim; Joseph Gonsalvis,; Thammaiah Gowda

    2011-01-01

    Sub atmospheric chemical vapour deposition (SACVD) is a widely used technique in semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing, especially to form inter-metal silicon (IMD) dioxide thin films. It was designed for commercially available tools in order to satisfy the gap filling requirements necessary for 0.18 and 0.15 lm technology ICs, but it has been successfully extended also for 0.13 lm technological node and over. SACVD technique has a potential impact on device electrical character...

  6. UV Laser Deposition of Nanostructured Si/C/O/N/H Precursor to Silicon Oxycarbonitride

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pola, Josef; Galíková, Anna; Bastl, Zdeněk; Šubrt, Jan; Vacek, Karel; Brus, Jiří; Ouchi, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 10 (2006), s. 648-655 ISSN 0268-2605 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME 684 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z40320502; CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : laser photolysis * silicon oxycarbonitride * chemical vapor deposition Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.233, year: 2006

  7. Effect of deposition and annealing conditions on the optical properties of amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashin, A.I.; Ershov, A.V.; Khokhlov, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of the refractive index and the extinction coefficient in the range 0.6-2.0 eV for amorphous silicon films prepared by electron-beam evaporation with variation of the substrate temperature, deposition rate, and annealing temperature in air are presented. The results obtained are discussed on the basis of the changes in the Penn gap energy as a function of the indicated preparation and treatment conditions

  8. Highly conductive boron-doped hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon films obtained by hot wire deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, W. [IEF5-Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Malibu GmbH and Co. KG, Bielefeld (Germany); Carius, R.; Einsele, F.; Lennartz, D.; Niessen, L.; Pennartz, F. [IEF5-Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The growth of highly conductive boron doped microcrystalline silicon by the hot wire method was studied. Various series of films were deposited to investigate the influence of the deposition parameters on conductivity, crystallinity and (void-related) microstructure. Maximum (room temperature) conductivities > 200 S/cm with carrier mobilities > 2.5 cm{sup 2}/Vs were achieved. While a high crystallinity is the major requirement for achieving high conductivities, the microstructure is also of influence. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Brun, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths

  10. Fluidized bed deposition and evaluation of silicon carbide coatings on microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federer, J.I.

    1977-01-01

    The fuel element for the HTGR is an array of closely packed fuel microspheres in a carbonaceous matrix. A coating of dense silicon carbide (SiC), along with pyrocarbon layers, is deposited on the fueled microspheres to serve as a barrier against diffusion of fission products. The microspheres are coated with silicon carbide in a fluidized bed by reaction of methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 or MTS) and hydrogen at elevated temperatures. The principal variables of coating temperature and reactant gas composition (H 2 /MTS ratio) have been correlated with coating rate, morphology, stoichiometry, microstructure, and density. The optimum temperature for depositing highly dense coatings is in the range 1475 to 1675 0 C. Lower temperatures result in silicon-rich deposits, while higher temperatures may cause unacceptable porosity. The optimum H 2 /MTS ratio for highly dense coatings is 20 or more (approximately 5% MTS or less). The amount of grown-in porosity increases as the H 2 /MTS ratio decreases below 20. The requirement that the H 2 /MTS ratio be about 20 or more imposes a practical restraint on coating rate, since increasing the total flow rate would eventually expel microspheres from the coating tube. Evaluation of stoichiometry, morphology, and microstructure support the above mentioned optimum conditions of temperature and reactant gas composition. 18 figures, 3 tables

  11. Enhanced Tunnel Spin Injection into Graphene using Chemical Vapor Deposited Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakar, M. Venkata; Dankert, André; Bergsten, Johan; Ive, Tommy; Dash, Saroj P.

    2014-01-01

    The van der Waals heterostructures of two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals constitute a new paradigm in nanoscience. Hybrid devices of graphene with insulating 2D hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have emerged as promising nanoelectronic architectures through demonstrations of ultrahigh electron mobilities and charge-based tunnel transistors. Here, we expand the functional horizon of such 2D materials demonstrating the quantum tunneling of spin polarized electrons through atomic planes of CVD grown h-BN. We report excellent tunneling behavior of h-BN layers together with tunnel spin injection and transport in graphene using ferromagnet/h-BN contacts. Employing h-BN tunnel contacts, we observe enhancements in both spin signal amplitude and lifetime by an order of magnitude. We demonstrate spin transport and precession over micrometer-scale distances with spin lifetime up to 0.46 nanosecond. Our results and complementary magnetoresistance calculations illustrate that CVD h-BN tunnel barrier provides a reliable, reproducible and alternative approach to address the conductivity mismatch problem for spin injection into graphene. PMID:25156685

  12. Electrochemical deposition of copper on single-crystal gallium nitride(0001) electrode: nucleation and growth mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yu; Deng, Feng-Xiang; Hu, Li-Feng; Liu, Yong-Qiang; Pan, Ge-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The nucleation and growth of Cu electrodeposition on n-GaN was explored. • The Cu deposition commenced at a large negative potential of −840 mV vs. Pt/Pt 2+ . • The deposition process was quasi-reversible and mass transfer limited. • The deposition occurred on the conduction band of n-GaN. - Abstract: The electrodeposition of Cu on n-type single-crystal GaN(0001) electrode from sulfate solution was investigated by electrochemical techniques and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that Cu deposition on GaN(0001) commenced at a large negative potential of −840 mV vs. Pt/Pt 2+ and was quasi-reversible and mass transfer limited. On the basis of Tafel plot, a low exchange current density of ∼ 2.3 × 10 −6 mA cm −2 was calculated. This was mainly due to the limited free electrons in the conduction band of GaN. In addition, the current transient measurements revealed that the deposition process followed the progressive nucleation in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 + 5 mM CuSO 4 . The instantaneous nucleation was observed only at the large applied potential of −1.1 V

  13. Structural characterization of the interface structure of amorphous silicon thin films after post-deposition argon or hydrogen plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumüller, Alex; Sergeev, Oleg; Vehse, Martin; Agert, Carsten

    2017-05-01

    The interfaces in silicon thin film solar cells and silicon heterojunction solar cells are considered to be very important for the solar cell conversion efficiency. This work studies the interface properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films deposited on crystalline silicon wafers after post-deposition hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) or argon plasma treatment (APT). The investigation extends our previous study by examining the structural changes resulting from the post-deposition plasma treatment on silicon thin film solar cells. We analyzed the ellipsometry and infrared spectra of our samples to gain a deeper understanding of the fundamental plasma treatment effects. By using post-deposition APT and HPT, we were able to reduce the material stress and improve the structure of these layers. Our results show that APT yields a more compact material with fewer voids and less distinct localized tail states. We discuss the effect of APT and HPT on the most crucial interface in silicon heterojunction solar cells, the i-a-Si:H/c-Si interface. We propose to introduce APT as a post-deposition process step in the fabrication of silicon heterojunction solar cells.

  14. A simple and controlled single electron transistor based on doping modulation in silicon nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Hofheinz, M.; Jehl, X.; Sanquer, M.; Molas, G.; Vinet, M.; Deleonibus, S.

    2006-01-01

    A simple and highly reproducible single electron transistor (SET) has been fabricated using gated silicon nanowires. The structure is a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor made on silicon-on-insulator thin films. The channel of the transistor is the Coulomb island at low temperature. Two silicon nitride spacers deposited on each side of the gate create a modulation of doping along the nanowire that creates tunnel barriers. Such barriers are fixed and controlled, like in metallic...

  15. Radiation damage in boron nitride x-ray lithography masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.L.; Pan, L.; Pianetta, P.; Shimkunas, A.; Mauger, P.; Seligson, D.

    1988-01-01

    The optical and mechanical properties of boron nitride vapor deposited at 400 0 C are shown to degrade when exposed to synchrotron radiation. The extent of the damage and the rate at which the damage occurs are similar to that first reported by Johnson et al. Transmission through membranes of boron nitride was measured in situ during exposure to x rays. Membranes darkened considerably with the transmission through a typical membrane falling from 50% to 20% after absorbing ∼250 kJ/cm 3 of x rays. Changes in local film stress were measured with a simple cantilever technique. Films originally in tension (∼5E8 dyne/cm 2 ) were found to become compressive after absorbing 300 kJ/cm 3 of x rays. Both forms of damage responded well to annealing. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and near-edge x-ray absorption measurements were made to discern the structural differences between degraded and unexposed films. No significant structural changes were observed. Boron nitride films deposited at higher temperatures (600 0 C) proved to be much less susceptible to radiation damage. In a related development, films produced through the pyrolysis of borazine appeared to be completely immune to radiation damage as were silicon and silicon nitride membranes. FTIR spectra indicate that less hydrogen is present in the 600 0 C chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) and the pyrolytic boron nitride films than in the 400 0 C CVD films. As proposed by Johnson et al., hydrogen is implicated as an intermediary in the boron nitride damage mechanism

  16. Fabrication of silicon condenser microphones using single wafer technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeper, P.R.; van der Donk, A.G.H.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    1992-01-01

    A condenser microphone design that can be fabricated using the sacrificial layer technique is proposed and tested. The microphone backplate is a 1-¿m plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride film with a high density of acoustic holes (120-525 holes/mm2), covered with a thin

  17. Deposition of titanium nitride on AISI-304 in a plasma focus environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, S.; Qayyum, A.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2008-05-01

    Polycrystalline, smooth, and hard thin films of TiN are successfully deposited on AISI-304 substrates using a 1.5kJ Mather-type dense plasma focus device charged at 18kV. The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural and mechanical properties of the TiN thin films in terms of ion dose and substrate position to establish the optimum deposition conditions. The films are analyzed using XRD, SEM, electron microprobe and micro-hardness testing. XRD confirms the deposition of a polycrystalline TiN thin film together with the emergence of an iron chromium nickel phase. The surface hardness-in comparison to the unexposed substrate-is found to increase up to 250% when a film is deposited using 30 focus shots at an axial distance of 6cm. SEM micrographs show that the quality of the film is improved with an increasing number of focus shots. The constituent elements of the film are also confirmed by electron microprobe.

  18. Effect of deposition temperature on the bonding configurations and properties of fluorine doped silicon oxide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Wei-Lun; Kuo, Ting-Wei; Huang, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Na-Fu; Tsai, Yu-Zen; Wang, Ming-Wei; Hung, Chen-I.; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2011-01-01

    In our study, fluorine-doped silicon oxide (SiOF) films were prepared using a mixture of SiH 4 , N 2 O, and CF 4 in a conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system at various deposition temperatures. Deposition behaviors are determined by the deposition temperature. Our results show that for temperatures below 300 deg. C the process is surface-reaction-limited controlled, but becomes diffusion-limited when the deposition temperature exceeds 300 deg. C. The surface topography images obtained using an atomic force microscope show that a large amount of free volume space was created in the film with a low temperature deposition. The optical microscope and secondary ion mass spectrometer analyses show that precipitates were produced at the near-surface at the deposition temperature of 150 deg. C with a higher fluorine concentration of 2.97 at.%. Our results show that the properties of the SiOF film are controlled not only by the free volume space but also by the fluorine concentration. An optimal SiOF film prepared at a temperature of 200 deg. C shows a low dielectric constant of 3.55, a leakage current of 1.21 x 10 -8 A/cm 2 at 1 MV/cm, and a fluorine concentration of 2.5 at.%.

  19. Study of silicon-silicon nitride interface properties on planar (1 0 0), planar (1 1 1) and textured surfaces using deep-level transient spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Chun; Simoen, Eddy; Posthuma, Niels E; Van Kerschaver, Emmanuel; Poortmans, Jef; Mertens, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been applied to metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitors fabricated on planar (1 0 0), planar (1 1 1) orientations and textured n-type silicon wafers. Low frequency direct plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition Si-SiN x interface properties with and without plasma NH 3 pre-treatment, with and without rapid thermal annealing (RTA) have been investigated. It is shown that three different kinds of defect states are identified at the Si-SiN x interface. For the planar (1 0 0) surface, samples with plasma NH 3 pre-treatment plus RTA show the lowest DLTS signals, which suggests the lowest overall interface states density. For planar (1 1 1) Si surfaces, plasma NH 3 pre-treatment and RTA yield a small improvement. With the textured surface, the RTA step improves the surface passivation quality further but no obvious impact is found with plasma NH 3 pre-treatment. Energy-dependent electron capture cross sections were also measured by small-pulse DLTS. The capture cross sections depend strongly on the energy level and decrease towards the conduction band edge.

  20. Surface evolution during crystalline silicon film growth by low-temperature hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Christine Esber; Park, Young-Bae; Atwater, Harry A.

    2006-06-01

    We investigate the low-temperature growth of crystalline thin silicon films: epitaxial, twinned, and polycrystalline, by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). Using Raman spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy, we find the relationship between surface roughness evolution and (i) the substrate temperature (230-350°C) and (ii) the hydrogen dilution ratio (H2/SiH4=0-480) . The absolute silicon film thickness for fully crystalline films is found to be the most important parameter in determining surface roughness, hydrogen being the second most important. Higher hydrogen dilution increases the surface roughness as expected. However, surface roughness increases with increasing substrate-temperature, in contrast to previous studies of crystalline Si growth. We suggest that the temperature-dependent roughness evolution is due to the role of hydrogen during the HWCVD process, which in this high hydrogen dilution regime allows for epitaxial growth on the rms roughest films through a kinetic growth regime of shadow-dominated etch and desorption and redeposition of growth species.

  1. MICROSTRUCTURE AND CORROSION RESISTANCE OF CHROMIUM NITRIDES OBTAINED BY VACUUM GAS NITRIDING OF ELECTROLYTIC CHROMIUM DEPOSITED ON AISI H13 STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    H. Cifuentes; J. J. Olaya

    2013-01-01

    In this scientific research paper, the microstructure and corrosion resistance of chromium nitrides obtained from a duplex treatment consisting of an electroplated hard chromium coating applied on a steel AISI H13 follow by a thermochemical treatment in vacuum using NH3 as precursor gas of nitrogen, is evaluated. This type of duplex treatments combine the benefits of each individual treatment in order to obtain, with this synergic effect, compounds type CrxN more economic than those obtained ...

  2. Cathode encapsulation of OLEDs by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films and Al2O3/a-SiNx:H stacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuning, W.; Van de Weijer, P.; Lifka, H.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Creatore, M.

    2011-01-01

    Al2O3 thin films synthesized by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition(ALD) at room temperature (25 ºC) have been tested as water vapor per-meation barriers for OLED devices. Silicon nitride films (a-SiNx:H)deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) servedas reference and were

  3. Preparation of gallium nitride surfaces for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A J; Chagarov, E; Gu, S; Kaufman-Osborn, T; Madisetti, S; Wu, J; Asbeck, P M; Oktyabrsky, S; Kummel, A C

    2014-09-14

    A combined wet and dry cleaning process for GaN(0001) has been investigated with XPS and DFT-MD modeling to determine the molecular-level mechanisms for cleaning and the subsequent nucleation of gate oxide atomic layer deposition (ALD). In situ XPS studies show that for the wet sulfur treatment on GaN(0001), sulfur desorbs at room temperature in vacuum prior to gate oxide deposition. Angle resolved depth profiling XPS post-ALD deposition shows that the a-Al2O3 gate oxide bonds directly to the GaN substrate leaving both the gallium surface atoms and the oxide interfacial atoms with XPS chemical shifts consistent with bulk-like charge. These results are in agreement with DFT calculations that predict the oxide/GaN(0001) interface will have bulk-like charges and a low density of band gap states. This passivation is consistent with the oxide restoring the surface gallium atoms to tetrahedral bonding by eliminating the gallium empty dangling bonds on bulk terminated GaN(0001).

  4. New deposition processes for the growth of oxide and nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apen, E.A.; Atagi, L.M.; Barbero, R.S.; Espinoza, B.F.; Hubbard, K.M.; Salazar, K.V.; Samuels, J.A.; Smith, D.C.; Hoffman, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this effort is to study the use of homoleptic metal amido compounds as precursors for chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The amides offer potential for the deposition of a variety of important materials at low temperatures. The establishment of these precursor compounds will enhance the ability to exploit the properties of advanced materials in numerous coatings applications. Experiments were performed to study the reactivity of Sn[NMe 2 ] 4 with oxygen. The data demonstrated that gas-phase insertion of oxygen into the Sn-N bond, leading to a reactive intermediate, plays an important role in tin oxide deposition. Several CVD processes for technologically important materials were developed using the amido precursor complexes. These included the plasma enhanced CVD of TiN and Zr 3 N 4 , and the thermal CVD of GaN and AlN. Quality films were obtained in each case, demonstrating the potential of the amido compounds as CVD precursors

  5. Facile fabrication of boron nitride nanosheets-amorphous carbon hybrid film for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)-amorphous carbon (a-C) hybrid film has been deposited successfully on silicon substrates by simultaneous electrochemical deposition, and showed a good integrity of this B-C-N composite film by the interfacial bonding. This synthesis can potentially provide the facile control of the B-C-N composite film for the potential optoelectronic devices. This journal is

  6. Trace detection of herbicides by SERS technique, using SERS-active substrates fabricated from different silver nanostructures deposited on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Tran Cao; Luong, Truc Quynh Ngan; Nguyen, Ngoc Hai; Kieu, Ngoc Minh; Luong, Thi Thuy; Cao, Tuan Anh; Le, Van Vu

    2015-01-01

    In this report we present the initial results of the use of different silver nanostructures deposited on silicon for trace detection of paraquat (a commonly used herbicide) using the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. More specifically, the SERS-active substrates were fabricated from silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) deposited onto the flat surface of a silicon wafer (AgNPs@Si substrate), as well as on the surface of an obliquely aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) array (AgNPs@SiNWs substrate), and from silver nanodendrites (AgNDs) deposited onto the flat surface of a silicon wafer (AgNDs@Si substrate). Results showed that with the change of the structure of the SERS-active substrate, higher levels of SERS enhancement have been achieved. Specifically, with the fabricated AgNDs@Si substrate, paraquat concentration as low as 1 ppm can be detected. (paper)

  7. Micro-light-emitting diodes with III–nitride tunnel junction contacts grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, David; Mughal, Asad J.; Wong, Matthew S.; Alhassan, Abdullah I.; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2018-01-01

    Micro-light-emitting diodes (µLEDs) with tunnel junction (TJ) contacts were grown entirely by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. A LED structure was grown, treated with UV ozone and hydrofluoric acid, and reloaded into the reactor for TJ regrowth. The silicon doping level of the n++-GaN TJ was varied to examine its effect on voltage. µLEDs from 2.5 × 10‑5 to 0.01 mm2 in area were processed, and the voltage penalty of the TJ for the smallest µLED at 20 A/cm2 was 0.60 V relative to that for a standard LED with indium tin oxide. The peak external quantum efficiency of the TJ LED was 34%.

  8. Micro-light-emitting diodes with III–nitride tunnel junction contacts grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Hwang, David

    2017-12-13

    Micro-light-emitting diodes (µLEDs) with tunnel junction (TJ) contacts were grown entirely by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. A LED structure was grown, treated with UV ozone and hydrofluoric acid, and reloaded into the reactor for TJ regrowth. The silicon doping level of the n++-GaN TJ was varied to examine its effect on voltage. µLEDs from 2.5 × 10−5 to 0.01 mm2 in area were processed, and the voltage penalty of the TJ for the smallest µLED at 20 A/cm2 was 0.60 V relative to that for a standard LED with indium tin oxide. The peak external quantum efficiency of the TJ LED was 34%.

  9. Microstructure-property relationships of chemically vapor deposited zirconia fiber coating for environmentally durable silicon carbide/silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao

    In SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites, toughness is obtained by adding a fiber coating, which provides a weak interface for crack deflection and debonding between the fiber and the matrix. However, the most commonly used fiber coatings, carbon and boron nitride, are unstable in oxidative environments. In the present study, the feasibility of using a chemically vapor deposited zirconia (CVD-ZrO2) fiber coating as an oxidation-resistant interphase for SiC/SiC composites was investigated. A study of morphological evolution in the CVD-ZrO2 coating suggested that a size-controlled displacive phase transformation from tetragonal ZrO2 ( t-ZrO2) to monoclinic ZrO2 (m-ZrO 2) was the key mechanism responsible for the weak interface behavior exhibited by the ZrO2 coating. It appeared that a low oxygen partial pressure in the CVD reactor chamber was essential for the nucleation of t-ZrO2 and therefore was responsible for the delamination behavior. With this understanding of the weak interface mechanism, minicomposite specimens containing various ZrO2 fiber coating morphologies were fabricated and tested. A fractographic analysis showed that in-situ fiber strength and minicomposite failure loads were strongly dependent on the phase contents and microstructure of the ZrO2 coating. We determined that an optimum microstructure of the ZrO2 coating should contain a predelaminated interface surrounded by a dense outer layer. The outer layer was needed to protect the fiber from degradation during the subsequent SiC matrix infiltration procedure. A preliminary tensile stress-rupture study indicated that the ZrO2 coating exhibited promising performance in terms of providing the weak interface behavior and maintaining the thermal and oxidative stability at elevated temperatures.

  10. Improved memory performance of metal—oxide—nitride—oxide—silicon by annealing the SiO2 tunnel layer in different nitridation atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilin, He; Jingping, Xu; Jianxiong, Chen; Lu, Liu

    2013-11-01

    Metal—oxide—nitride—oxide—silicon (MONOS) capacitors with thermally grown SiO2 as the tunnel layer are fabricated, and the effects of different ambient nitridation (NH3, NO and N2O) on the characteristics of the memory capacitors are investigated. The experimental results indicate that the device with tunnel oxide annealed in NO ambient exhibits excellent memory characteristics, i.e. a large memory window, high program/erase speed, and good endurance and retention performance (the charge loss rate is 14.5% after 10 years). The mechanism involved is that much more nitrogen is incorporated into the tunnel oxide during NO annealing, resulting in a lower tunneling barrier height and smaller interface state density. Thus, there is a higher tunneling rate under a high electric field and a lower probability of trap-assisted tunneling during retention, as compared to N2O annealing. Furthermore, compared with the NH3-annealed device, no weak Si—H bonds and electron traps related to the hydrogen are introduced for the NO-annealed devices, giving a high-quality and high-reliability SiON tunneling layer and SiON/Si interface due to the suitable nitridation and oxidation roles of NO.

  11. Relative SHG measurements of metal thin films: Gold, silver, aluminum, cobalt, chromium, germanium, nickel, antimony, titanium, titanium nitride, tungsten, zinc, silicon and indium tin oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Che

    Full Text Available We have experimentally measured the surface second-harmonic generation (SHG of sputtered gold, silver, aluminum, zinc, tungsten, copper, titanium, cobalt, nickel, chromium, germanium, antimony, titanium nitride, silicon and indium tin oxide thin films. The second-harmonic response was measured in reflection using a 150 fs p-polarized laser pulse at 1561 nm. We present a clear comparison of the SHG intensity of these films relative to each other. Our measured relative intensities compare favorably with the relative intensities of metals with published data. We also report for the first time to our knowledge the surface SHG intensity of tungsten and antimony relative to that of well known metallic thin films such as gold and silver. Keywords: Surface second-harmonic generation, Nonlinear optics, Metal thin films

  12. Performance Improvements of Metal-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon Nonvolatile Memory with ZrO2 Charge-Trapping Layer by Using Nitrogen Incorporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Xiong; Xu, Jing-Ping; Liu, Lu; Lai, Pui-To

    2013-08-01

    The properties of ZrO2 and ZrON as the charge-trapping layer (CTL) of metal-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon memory are investigated. The microstructure and chemical bonding are examined by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that nitrogen incorporation in ZrO2 can induce more charge-trapping sites, effectively suppress the formation of zirconium silicate (leading to better interface quality between the CTL and the SiO2 tunneling layer), and increase the dielectric constant of ZrO2, thus improving the memory performances (large memory window, high program/erase speed, good endurance characteristics, and small charge loss).

  13. Nonequilibrium Growth of GaN/Si(1-x-y)Ge(x)C(y)/Silicon-on-Insulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ho, Wilson

    2000-01-01

    ... of this growth technique. Research highlights include the successful growth of silicon carbide, gallium nitride, and aluminum nitride thin films on silicon and miscut silicon substrates, on four-inches silicon wafers...

  14. Characterisation of titanium nitride films obtained by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD); Caracterizacao de filmes de nitreto de titanio obtidos por MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillis, M.F., E-mail: mfpillis@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CCTM/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais; Franco, A.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Araujo, E.G. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sacilotti, M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (IF/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Fundacao de Amparo a Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (FACEPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Ceramic coatings have been widely used as protective coating to improve the life of cutting tools, for corrosion protection and in microelectronics, optical and medical areas. Transition metals nitrides are of special interest due to its high hardness and thermal stability. In this work thin films of titanium nitride were obtained by MOCVD (metalorganic chemical vapor deposition) process. The tests were carried out for 1h at 700 deg C under 80 and 100 mbar of pressure. The characterization was made by using scanning electron microscopy coupled with dispersive energy analysis, and X-ray diffraction. Preliminary results suggested that Ti{sub 2}N phase was formed and that the growth rate varied between 4 and 13 nm/min according to the process parameter considered. (author)

  15. Influence of silicon orientation and cantilever undercut on the determination of Young's modulus of pulsed laser deposited PZT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazeer, H.; Woldering, L.A.; Abelmann, Leon; Nguyen, Duc Minh; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    In this work we show for the first time that the effective in-plane Young’s modulus of PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT) thin films, deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on dedicated single crystal silicon cantilevers, is independent of the in-plane orientation of cantilevers.

  16. Interpretation of the hydrogen evolution during deposition of microcrystalline silicon by chemical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, N.; Hadjadj, A.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.; Jbara, O.; Kail, F.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion is a crucial step in film growth by chemical vapor deposition of both hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μ-Si:H) materials. To gain an insight into the correlation between hydrogen diffusion and the amorphous to microcrystalline transition, we have exposed freshly deposited intrinsic, boron- and phosphorus-doped a-Si:H thin films to hydrogen (or deuterium) plasma in conditions of μc-Si:H deposition by chemical transport. Using both in-situ and ex-situ characterizations techniques, we examined the kinetics of hydrogen excess evolution during the plasma exposure. Solution of the partial differential equation for the diffusion of mobile H atoms with a specific boundary condition that accounts for the reduction of atomic H flux with the growth of the μc-Si:H layer supports the theory that the out-diffusion is a consequence of the growth of the μc-Si:H layer.

  17. Aluminium-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kezzoula, F.; Hammouda, A.; Kechouane, M.; Simon, P.; Abaidia, S.E.H.; Keffous, A.; Cherfi, R.; Menari, H.; Manseri, A.

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering technique with argon and hydrogen plasma mixture on Al deposited by thermal evaporation on glass substrates. The a-Si/Al and a-Si:H/Al thin films were annealed at different temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 deg. C during 4 h in vacuum-sealed bulb. The effects of annealing temperature on optical, structural and morphological properties of as-grown as well as the vacuum-annealed a-Si/Al and a-Si:H/Al thin films are presented in this contribution. The averaged transmittance of a-Si:H/Al film increases upon increasing the annealing temperature. XRD measurements clearly evidence that crystallization is initiated at 450 deg. C. The number and intensity of diffraction peaks appearing in the diffraction patterns are more important in a-Si:H/Al than that in a-Si/Al layers. Results show that a-Si:H films deposited on Al/glass crystallize above 450 deg. C and present better crystallization than the a-Si layers. The presence of hydrogen induces an improvement of structural properties of poly-Si prepared by aluminium-induced crystallization (AIC).

  18. Application of silver nanodendrites deposited on silicon in SERS technique for the trace analysis of paraquat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao Dao, Tran; Quynh Ngan Luong, Truc; Cao, Tuan Anh; Kieu, Ngoc Minh; Le, Van Vu

    2016-03-01

    In order to detect trace concentrations of organic or biological molecules by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique, the SERS-active substrates with high enhancement factor are required. The silver nanodendrites (AgNDs) are a growing class of such SERS-active substrates. This report presents the preliminary results of the trace detection of paraquat (PQ), a commonly used herbicide, with the use of SERS-active substrates, which have been made from AgNDs deposited on silicon. The AgNDs were produced either by electroless deposition, or by electrodeposition onto a silicon wafer, using aqueous solution of HF and AgNO3. It was observed that the silver dendrites are formed only when AgNO3 concentration is high enough. Next, it was found that with the additional assistance of an electric potential in the electrodeposition, the dendrites have grown up with the more perfect ramification. The AgNDs with more perfect branching gave the Raman spectrum of PQ with higher enhancement factor. More specifically, while the SERS-active substrates prepared from electrodeposited AgNDs were able to detect PQ with concentration as low as 0.01 ppm, the ones made from electroless deposited AgNDs could only detect PQ at concentration of hundreds times higher.

  19. Transport in microcrystalline silicon thin films deposited at low temperature by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouree, Jean-Eric [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS UMR 7647, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)]. E-mail: jean-eric.bouree@polytechnique.edu; Jadkar, Sandesh R. [School of Energy Studies, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Kasouit, Samir [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS UMR 7647, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Vanderhaghen, Regis [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS UMR 7647, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2006-04-20

    This work is focused on the determination of the variation of local mobility of charge carriers with thickness (< 1 {mu}m) for undoped microcrystalline silicon layers deposited by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique. We observed that the temperature of the layers T {sub s} evolves with the deposition time, once the tungsten filament has been heated from room temperature to a fixed definite value. Thus, experiments have been realized by fixing the gas pressure (41 mTorr), the dilution of silane in hydrogen (50%), by setting the filament temperature (1600 deg. C) and letting the time run. An average substrate temperature T {sub s,av} has been defined, whose value depends on deposition time. As a result, the local mobility deduced from time-resolved microwave conductivity increases almost linearly with T {sub s,av} up to 193 deg. C, i.e. with thickness up to 400 nm corresponding approximately to the amorphous-microcrystalline transition and then increases sublinearly up to T {sub s,av} = 221 deg. C, i.e. a 900-nm-thick layer. These results, compatible with the highest AM1.5 efficiency (> 9%) reported so far for p-i-n {mu}c-Si:H solar cells realized at T {sub s} = 185 deg. C [S. Klein, F. Finger, R. Carius, T. Dylla, B. Rech, M. Grimm, L. Houben, M. Stutzmann, Thin Solid Films 430 (2003) 202], suggest that in the range of T {sub s,av} from 190 deg. C to 220 deg. C, hydrogen plays a dominant role in the HWCVD growth of {mu}c-Si:H films.

  20. Plasma-enhanced deposition of antifouling layers on silicone rubber surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongquan

    In food processing and medical environments, biofilms serve as potential sources of contamination, and lead to food spoilage, transmission of diseases or infections. Because of its ubiquitous and recalcitrant nature, Listeria monocytogenes biofilm is especially hard to control. Generating antimicrobial surfaces provide a method to control the bacterial attachment. The difficulty of silver deposition on polymeric surfaces has been overcome by using a unique two-step plasma-mediated method. First silicone rubber surfaces were plasma-functionalized to generate aldehyde groups. Then thin silver layers were deposited onto the functionalized surfaces according to Tollen's reaction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that silver particles were deposited. By exposing the silver coated surfaces to L. monocytogenes, it was demonstrated that they were bactericidal to L. monocytogenes. No viable bacteria were detected after 12 to 18 h on silver-coated silicone rubber surfaces. Another antifouling approach is to generate polyethylene glycol (PEG) thin layer instead of silver on polymer surfaces. Covalent bond of PEG structures of various molecular weights to cold-plasma-functionalized polymer surfaces, such as silicone rubber, opens up a novel way for the generation of PEG brush-like or PEG branch-like anti-fouling layers. In this study, plasma-generated surface free radicals can react efficiently with dichlorosilane right after plasma treatment. With the generation of halo-silane groups, this enables PEG molecules to be grafted onto the modified surfaces. XPS data clearly demonstrated the presence of PEG molecules on plasma-functionalized silicone rubber surfaces. AFM images showed the changed surface morphologies as a result of covalent attachment to the surface of PEG molecules. Biofilm experiment results suggest that the PEG brush-like films have the potential ability to be the next