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Sample records for deposited cvd diamond

  1. High-rate diamond deposition by microwave plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglin

    In this dissertation, the growth of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The goal of this research is to deposit high quality HOD (Highly Oriented Diamond) films with a growth rate greater than 1 mum/hr. For the (100)-oriented HOD films, the growth rate achieved by the traditional process is only 0.3 mum/hr while the theoretical limit is ˜0.45 mum/hr. This research increases the growth rate up to 5.3 mum/hr (with a theoretical limit of ˜7 mum/hr) while preserving the crystal quality. This work builds a connection between the theoretical study of the CVD process and the experimental research. The study is extended from the growth of regular polycrystalline diamond to highly oriented diamond (HOD) films. For the increase of the growth rate of regular polycrystalline diamond thin films, a scaling growth model developed by Goodwin is introduced in details to assist in the understanding of the MPCVD (Microwave Plasma CVD) process. Within the Goodwin's scaling model, there are only four important sub-processes for the growth of diamond: surface modification, adsorption, desorption, and incorporation. The factors determining the diamond growth rate and film quality are discussed following the description of the experimental setup and process parameters. Growth rate and crystal quality models are reviewed to predict and understand the experimental results. It is shown that the growth rate of diamond can be increased with methane input concentration and the amount of atomic hydrogen (by changing the total pressure). It is crucial to provide enough atomic hydrogen to conserve crystal quality of the deposited diamond film. The experimental results demonstrate that for a fixed methane concentration, there is a minimum pressure for growth of good diamond. Similarly, for a fixed total pressure, there is a maximum methane concentration for growth of good diamond, and this maximum methane concentration increases

  2. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kundrát

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42 substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo – tungsten (W interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  3. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundrát, Vojtěch; Sullivan, John; Ye, Haitao, E-mail: h.ye@aston.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham, B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Zhang, Xiaoling; Cooke, Kevin; Sun, Hailin [Miba Coating Group: Teer Coatings Ltd, West-Stone-House, West-Stone, Berry-Hill-Industrial-Estate, WR9 9AS, Droitwich (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42) substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo) – tungsten (W) interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  4. Deposition of ZnO Films on Freestanding CVD Thick Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jian; BAI Yi-Zhen; YANG Tian-Peng; XU Yi-Bin; WANG Xin-Sheng; DU Guo-Tong; WU Han-Hua

    2006-01-01

    @@ For ZnO/diamond structured surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters, performance is sensitively dependent on the quality of the ZnO films. In this paper, we prepare highly-oriented and fine grained polycrystalline ZnO thin films with excellent surface smoothness on the smooth nucleation surfaces of freestanding CVD diamond films by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The properties of the ZnO films are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The influences of the deposition conditions on the quality of ZnO films are discussed briefly. ZnO/freestanding thick-diamond-film layered SAW devices with high response frequencies are expected to be developed.

  5. Optical and mechanical properties of diamond like carbon films deposited by microwave ECR plasma CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S B Singh; M Pandey; N Chand; A Biswas; D Bhattacharya; S Dash; A K Tyagi; R M Dey; S K Kulkarni; D S Patil

    2008-10-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on Si (111) substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process using plasma of argon and methane gases. During deposition, a d.c. self-bias was applied to the substrates by application of 13.56 MHz rf power. DLC films deposited at three different bias voltages (–60 V, –100 V and –150 V) were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry to study the variation in the bonding and optical properties of the deposited coatings with process parameters. The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus were measured by load depth sensing indentation technique. The DLC film deposited at –100 V bias exhibit high hardness (∼ 19 GPa), high elastic modulus (∼ 160 GPa) and high refractive index (∼ 2.16–2.26) as compared to films deposited at –60 V and –150 V substrate bias. This study clearly shows the significance of substrate bias in controlling the optical and mechanical properties of DLC films.

  6. CVD diamond - fundamental phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbrough, W.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams addresses the basic physical processes involved in the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Different methods of deposition are illustrated. For each method, observations are made of the prominent advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Chemical mechanisms of nucleation are introduced.

  7. Structural and optical characterization of thick and thin polycrystalline diamond films deposited by microwave plasma activated CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Pradhan; B Satpati; B P Bag; T Sharda

    2012-02-01

    Preliminary results of growth of thin diamond film in a recently installed 3 kW capacity microwave plasma activated CVD (MW-PACVD) system are being reported. The films were deposited on Si (100) substrate at 850°C using methane and hydrogen mixture at 1.5 kW MW power. The grown polycrystalline films were characterized by micro-Raman, transmission electron microscope (TEM), spectrophotometer and atomic force microscope (AFM). The results were compared with that of a thicker diamond film grown elsewhere in a same make MWPACVD system at relatively higher power densities. The presence of a sharp Raman peak at 1332 cm-1 confirmed the growth of diamond, and transmission spectra showed typical diamond film characteristics in both the samples. Typical twin bands and also a quintuplet twinned crystal were observed in TEM, further it was found that the twinned region in thin sample composed of very fine platelet like structure.

  8. The Formation of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coating on WC Deposited by Microwave Assisted Plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toff, M. R. M.; Hamzah, E.; Purniawan, A.

    2010-03-01

    Diamond is one form of carbon structure. The extreme hardness and high chemical resistant of diamond coatings determined that many works on this area relate to coated materials for tribological applications in biomedicine, as mechanical seals or cutting tools for hard machining operations. In the work, nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coated tungsten carbide (WC) have been deposited by microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition (MAPCVD) from CH4/H2 mixtures. Morphology of NCD was investigated by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The quality of NCD is defined as ratio between diamond and non diamond and also full width at half maximum (FWHM) was determined using Raman spectra. The result found that the NCD structure can be deposited on WC surface using CH4/H2 gas mixture with grain size ˜20 nm to 100 nm. Increase %CH4 concentration due to increase the nucleation of NCD whereas decrease the quality of diamond. Based on Raman spectra, the quality of NCD is in the range ˜98.82-99.01% and 99.56-99.75% for NCD and microcrystalline (MCD), respectively. In addition, FWHM of NCD is high than MCD in the range of 8.664-62.24 cm-1 and 4.24-5.05 cm-1 for NCD and MCD respectively that indicate the crystallineity of NCD is smaller than MCD.

  9. The effectiveness of Ti implants as barriers to carbon diffusion in Ti implanted steel under CVD diamond deposition conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Hoffman, A. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Chemistry; Evan, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Paterson, P.J.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    The growth of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond onto iron based substrates complicated by preferential soot formation and carbon diffusion into the substrate [1], leading to poor quality films and poor adhesion. In the initial stages of exposure to a microwave plasma, a layer of graphite is rapidly formed on an untreated Fe based substrate. Once this graphite layer reaches a certain thickness, reasonable quality diamond nucleates and grows upon it. However, the diamond film easily delaminates from the substrate, the weak link being the graphitic layer. Following an initial success in using a TiN barrier layer to inhibit the formation of such a graphitic layer the authors report on attempts to use an implanted Ti layer for the same purpose. This work was prompted by observation that, although the TiN proved to be an extremely effective diffusion barrier, adhesion may be further enhanced by the formation of a TiC interface layer between the diamond film and the Fe substrate. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Comparative evaluation of CVD diamond technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, T.R. [General Electric Corporate Research & Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds occurs from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures in the presence of atomic hydrogen at subatmospheric pressures. Most CVD methods are based on different means of generating and transporting atomic hydrogen in a particular system. Evaluation of these different techniques involves their capital costs, material costs, energy costs, labor costs and the type and quality of diamond that they produce. Currently, there is no universal agreement on which is the best technique and technique selection has been largely driven by the professional background of the user as well as the particular application of interest. This article discusses the criteria for evaluating a process for low-pressure deposition of diamond. Next, a brief history of low-pressure diamond synthesis is reviewed. Several specific processes are addressed, including the hot filament process, hot filament electron-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and plasma generation of atomic hydrogen by glow discharge, microwave discharge, low pressure radio frequency discharge, high pressure DC discharge, high pressure microwave discharge jets, high pressure RF discharge, and high and low pressure flames. Other types of diamond deposition methods are also evaluated. 101 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Diamond like carbon coatings deposited by microwave plasma CVD: XPS and ellipsometric studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R M Dey; M Pandey; D Bhattacharyya; D S Patil; S K Kulkarni

    2007-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by microwave assisted chemical vapour deposition system using d.c. bias voltage ranging from –100 V to –300 V. These films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry techniques for estimating 3/2 ratio. The 3/2 ratio obtained by XPS is found to have an opposite trend to that obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry. These results are explained using sub-plantation picture of DLC growth. Our results clearly indicate that the film is composed of two different layers, having entirely different properties in terms of void percentage and 3/2 ratio. The upper layer is relatively thinner as compared to the bottom layer.

  12. An assessment of radiotherapy dosimeters based on CVD grown diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Ramkumar, S; Conway, J; Whitehead, A J; Sussman, R S; Hill, G; Walker, S

    2001-01-01

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as a dosimeter for radiotherapy. Its radiation hardness, the near tissue equivalence and chemical inertness are some of the characteristics of diamond, which make it well suited for its application as a dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technology have resulted in the improvement in the quality of material and increased its suitability for radiotherapy applications. We report in this paper, the response of prototype dosimeters based on two different types (CVD1 and CVD2) of CVD diamond to X-rays. The diamond devices were assessed for sensitivity, dependence of response on dose and dose rate, and compared with a Scanditronix silicon photon diode and a PTW natural diamond dosimeter. The diamond devices of CVD1 type showed an initial increase in response with dose, which saturates after approx 6 Gy. The diamond devices of CVD2 type had a response at low fields (1162.8 V/cm), the CVD2-type devices show...

  13. High collection efficiency CVD diamond alpha detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergonzo, P.; Foulon, F.; Marshall, R.D.; Jany, C.; Brambilla, A. [CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); McKeag, R.D.; Jackman, R.B. [University College London (United Kingdom). Electronic and Electrical Engineering Dept.

    1998-06-01

    Advances in Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond have enabled the routine use of this material for sensor device fabrication, allowing exploitation of its unique combination of physical properties (low temperature susceptibility (> 500 C), high resistance to radiation damage (> 100 Mrad) and to corrosive media). A consequence of CVD diamond growth on silicon is the formation of polycrystalline films which has a profound influence on the physical and electronic properties with respect to those measured on monocrystalline diamond. The authors report the optimization of physical and geometrical device parameters for radiation detection in the counting mode. Sandwich and co-planar electrode geometries are tested and their performances evaluated with regard to the nature of the field profile and drift distances inherent in such devices. The carrier drift length before trapping was measured under alpha particles and values as high as 40% of the overall film thickness are reported. Further, by optimizing the device geometry, they show that a gain in collection efficiency, defined as the induced charge divided by the deposited charge within the material, can be achieved even though lower bias values are used.

  14. Leakage current measurements of a pixelated polycrystalline CVD diamond detector

    OpenAIRE

    Zain, R.M.; Maneuski, D.; O'Shea, V.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Cunnigham, L.; Stehl, C.; Berderman, E.; Rahim, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Diamond has several desirable features when used as a material for radiation detection. With the invention of synthetic growth techniques, it has become feasible to look at developing diamond radiation detectors with reasonable surface areas. Polycrystalline diamond has been grown using a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique by the University of Augsburg and detector structures fabricated at the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (JWNC) in the University of Glasgow in order to produce pi...

  15. Radiation Hardness and Linearity Studies of CVD Diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Ghodbane, N; Imhof, A

    2003-01-01

    We report on the behavior of CVD diamonds under intense electromagnetic radiation and on the response of the detector to high density of deposited energy. Diamonds have been found to remain unaffected after doses of 10 MGy of MeV-range photons and the diamond response to energy depositions of up to 250 GeV/cm^3 has been found to be linear to better than 2 %. These observations make diamond an attractive detector material for a calorimeter in the very forward region of the detector proposed for TESLA.

  16. Engineered CVD Diamond Coatings for Machining and Tribological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumpala, Ravikumar; Chandran, Maneesh; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2015-07-01

    Diamond is an allotropes of carbon and is unique because of its extreme hardness (~100 GPa), low friction coefficient (fracture toughness can be tuned by controlling the grain size of the coatings from a few microns to a few nanometers. In this review, characteristics and performance of the CVD diamond coatings deposited on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates were discussed with an emphasis on WC-Co grade selection, substrate pretreatment, nanocrystallinity and microcrystallinity of the coating, mechanical and tribological characteristics, coating architecture, and interfacial adhesion integrity. Engineered coating substrate architecture is essential for CVD diamond coatings to perform well under harsh and highly abrasive machining and tribological conditions.

  17. The Charge Collection Properties of CVD Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Oh, A; Steuerer, J; Wagner, A; Zeuner, W; Behnke, Ties; Hüntemeyer, Petra; Oh, Alexander; Steuerer, Johannes; Wagner, Albrecht; Zeuner, Wolfram

    1998-01-01

    The charge collection properties of CVD diamond have been investigated with ionising radiation. In this study two CVD diamond samples, prepared with electrical contacts have been used as solid state ionisation chambers. The diamonds have been studied with beta particles and 10 keV photons, providing a homogeneous ionisation density and with protons and alpha particles which are absorbed in a thin surface layer. For the latter case a strong decrease of the signal as function of time is observed, which is attributed to polarisation effects inside the diamond. Spatially resolved measurements with protons show a large variation of the charge collection efficiency, whereas for photons and minimum ionising particles the response is much more uniform and in the order of 18%. These results indicate that the applicability of CVD diamond as a position sensitive particle detector depends on the ionisation type and appears to be promising for homogeneous ionisation densities as provided by relativistic charged particles.

  18. CVD diamond pixel detectors for LHC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedenig, R.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; Blanquart, L.; Breugnion, P.; Charles, E.; Ciocio, A.; Clemens, J.C.; Dao, K.; Einsweiler, K.; Fasching, D.; Fischer, P.; Joshi, A.; Keil, M.; Klasen, V.; Kleinfelder, S.; Laugier, D.; Meuser, S.; Milgrome, O.; Mouthuy, T.; Richardson, J.; Sinervo, P.; Treis, J.; Wermes, N

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the development of CVD diamond pixel detectors. The preparation of the diamond pixel sensors for bump-bonding to the pixel readout electronics for the LHC and the results from beam tests carried out at CERN are described.

  19. CVD Diamond Sensors In Detectors For High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00334150; Trischuk, William

    At the end of the next decade an upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is planned which requires the development of new radiation tolerant sensor technology. Diamond is an interesting material for use as a particle detector in high radiation environments. The large band gap ($5.47\\,\\text{eV}$) and the large displacement energy suggest that diamond is a radiation tolerant detector material. In this Thesis the capability of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond as such a sensor technology is investigated. The radiation damage constant for $800\\,\\text{MeV}$ protons is measured using single crystalline CVD (scCVD) and polycrystalline CVD (pCVD) diamonds irradiated to particle fluences up to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$. In addition the signal response of a pCVD diamond detector after an irradiation to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$ is investigated to determine if such a detector can be operated efficiently in the expected HL-LHC environment. By using electrodes em...

  20. Ultratough CVD single crystal diamond and three dimensional growth thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, Russell J [Washington, DC; Mao, Ho-kwang [Washington, DC; Yan, Chih-shiue [Washington, DC

    2009-09-29

    The invention relates to a single-crystal diamond grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition that has a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention also relates to a method of producing a single-crystal diamond with a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a process for producing a single crystal CVD diamond in three dimensions on a single crystal diamond substrate.

  1. CVD diamond resistor as heater and temperature sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.S.; Aslam, M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Heat generation and temperature control, essential for most heater applications, require different components in a conventional system. We achieve the heat generation and temperature measurement simultaneously by using a single diamond resistor. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) p-type diamond resistors with different dimensions were fabricated on polycrystalline diamond or oxidized Si substrates using diamond film technology compatible with integrated circuit (IC) processing. The temperature response of the resistors was characterized in the temperature range of 25 - 500{degrees}C. Power densities in access of 600 watt/in{sup 2} were achieved.

  2. Superconductivity in CVD diamond films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yoshihiko

    2009-06-24

    A beautiful jewel of diamond is insulator. However, boron doping can induce semiconductive, metallic and superconducting properties in diamond. When the boron concentration is tuned over 3 × 10(20) cm(-3), diamonds enter the metallic region and show superconductivity at low temperatures. The metal-insulator transition and superconductivity are analyzed using ARPES, XAS, NMR, IXS, transport and magnetic measurements and so on. This review elucidates the physical properties and mechanism of diamond superconductor as a special superconductivity that occurs in semiconductors.

  3. Present limitations of CVD diamond detectors for IMRT applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, C. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Viale regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: cinzia.deangelis@iss.it; Casati, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Onori, S. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Viale regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    The aim of the work was to test the suitability of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond detectors for dosimetry in IMRT fields. We used in-house CVD detectors prepared with state-of-the-art polycrystalline diamond films (Element Six Ltd., UK). The parameters considered were time stability, dynamic response, dose-rate dependence and energy dependence. Output factors and TPR were measured in conventional photon fields and dose measurements were performed in IMRT fields using the step-and-shoot technique. Results prove that CVD diamond detectors are suitable for dosimetry in conventional treatments, but they still do not fit the IMRT dosimetry requirements, mainly because of their slow dynamic response. In particular, the slow dynamics affects linearity at low Monitor Units and renders it impossible to follow the sharp transients of IMRT fields. Time stability and dose-rate dependence as well must be improved to reduce their influence on dose assessment.

  4. Surface analysis of CVD diamond exposed to fusion plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porro, S.; De Temmerman, G.; MacLaren, D. A.; Lisgo, S.; Rudakov, D. L.; Westerhout, J.; Wiora, M.; John, P.; Villalpando, I.; Wilson, J. I. B.

    2010-01-01

    Microcrystalline undoped and heavily boron-doped polycrystalline diamond layers have been deposited on various substrates by hot filament CVD and exposed to hydrogen plasma in a linear plasma reactor (Pilot-PSI, The Netherlands) that simulates the high flux and high density plasma conditions of toka

  5. Diagnosis of gas phase near the substrate surface in diamond film deposition by high-power DC arc plasma jet CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuyuan Zhou; Guangchao Chen; Bin Li; Weizhong Tang; Fanxiu Lv

    2007-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to study the gas phase composition near the substrate surface during diamond deposition by high-power DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (CVD). C2 radical was determined as the main carbon radical in this plasma atmosphere. The deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature, anode-substrate distance, methane concentration, and gas flow rate, were inspected to find out the influence on the gas phase. A strong dependence of the concentrations and distribution of radicals on substrate temperature was confirmed by the design of experiments (DOE). An explanation for this dependence could be that radicals near the substrate surface may have additional ionization or dissociation and also have recombination,or are consumed on the substrate surface where chemical reactions occur.

  6. Development of CVD diamond detectors for clinical dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliero, M. A.; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Ryde, S. J. S.; Oliver, K.

    2014-11-01

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) methods for the manufacture of diamonds could lead to detectors for high-resolution radiotherapy dosimetry that are cheaper and more reproducible than detectors based on natural diamonds. In this work two prototype designs (Diamond Detectors Ltd, Poole) of CVD diamond detectors were considered. The detectors were encapsulated in a water-proof housing in a form-factor that would be suitable for dosimetry measurements in water, as well as solid material phantoms. Stability of the dosimeter over time, the dose-response, dose-rate response and angular-response were examined. The study demonstrated that the detector behaviour conformed with theory in terms of the dose-rate response and had acceptable properties for use in the clinic.

  7. X-ray sensitivity measurements on CVD diamond film detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulon, F.; Pochet, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Electronique et d`Instrumentation Nucleaire; Gheeraert, E. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1993-12-31

    Microwave chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films have been used to fabricate radiation detectors. The polycrystalline diamond films have a resistivity of 10{sup 12} ohm.cm and carrier mobility and lifetime of about 280 cm{sup 2}/V.s and 530 ps. The detector response to laser pulses (355, 532 and 1064 nm), X-ray flux (15-50 keV) and alpha particles ({sup 241}Am, 5.49 MeV) has been investigated. The response speed of the detector is in the 100 ps range. A sensitivity of about 3 x 10{sup -10} A/V.Gy.s was measured under 50 keV X-ray flux. The detector current response to X-ray flux is almost linear. It is also shown that CVD diamond detectors can be used for alpha particle counting. (authors). 9 figs., 25 refs.

  8. TSC response of irradiated CVD diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Borchi, E; Bucciolini, M; Guasti, A; Mazzocchi, S; Pirollo, S; Sciortino, S

    1999-01-01

    CVD diamond films have been irradiated with electrons, sup 6 sup 0 Co photons and protons in order to study the dose response to exposure to different particles and energies and to investigate linearity with dose. The Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) has been studied as a function of the dose delivered to polymethilmetacrilate (PMMA) in the range from 1 to 12 Gy with 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. The TSC spectrum has revealed the presence of two components with peak temperatures of about 470 and 520 K, corresponding to levels lying in the diamond band gap with activation energies of the order of 0.7 - 1 eV. After the subtraction of the exponential background the charge emitted during the heating scan has been evaluated and has been found to depend linearly on the dose. The thermally emitted charge of the CVD diamond films has also been studied using different particles. The samples have been irradiated with the same PMMA dose of about 2 Gy with 6 and 20 MeV electrons from a Linac, sup 6 sup 0 ...

  9. Study of CVD diamond layers with amorphous carbon admixture by Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is a most often used standard technique for characterization of different carbon materials. In this work we present the Raman spectra of polycrystalline diamond layers of different quality, synthesized by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition method (HF CVD. We show how to use Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of the Raman bands to determine the structure of diamond films as well as the structure of amorphous carbon admixture. Raman spectroscopy has become an important technique for the analysis of CVD diamond films. The first-order diamond Raman peak at ca. 1332 cm−1 is an unambiguous evidence for the presence of diamond phase in the deposited layer. However, the existence of non-diamond carbon components in a CVD diamond layer produces several overlapping peaks in the same wavenumber region as the first order diamond peak. The intensities, wavenumber, full width at half maximum (FWHM of these bands are dependent on quality of diamond layer which is dependent on the deposition conditions. The aim of the present work is to relate the features of diamond Raman spectra to the features of Raman spectra of non-diamond phase admixture and occurrence of other carbon structures in the obtained diamond thin films.

  10. Dosimetric characterization of CVD diamonds irradiated with 62 MeV proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G.A.P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy)]. E-mail: cirrone@lns.infn.it; Cuttone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Lo Nigro, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); CSFNSM Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della MAteria, Catania (Italy); Mongelli, V. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Scuola di Specializzazione in Fisica Sanitaria, Universita di Catania (Italy); CSFNSM Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della MAteria, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Sabini, M.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera Cannizzaro, Catania (Italy); Valastro, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Scuola di Specializzazione in Fisica Sanitaria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita di Florence (Italy); Onori, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    2005-10-21

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as on-line radiation dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of polycrystalline diamond by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have produced material with electronic properties suitable for dosimetry applications. In this work the possibility to use a segmented commercial CVD detector in the dosimetry of proton beams has been investigated. The response as function of dose, dose rate, the priming and the rise time have been investigated thoroughly. This study shows the suitability of CVD diamond for dosimetry of clinical 62 MeV proton beams.

  11. Hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films by high-temperature annealing at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, V.; Ullien, D.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Sachdeva, S.; Murthy, D.H.K.; Savenije, T.J.; Ahmad, H.A.; Nunney, T.S.; Janssens, S.D.; Haenen, K.; Nesládek, M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; De Smet, L.C.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    A high-temperature procedure to hydrogenate diamond films using molecular hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was explored. Undoped and doped chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films were treated according to our annealing method using a H2 gas flow down to ∼50 ml/min (STP) at ∼850

  12. CVD diamond sensor for UV-photon detection

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Gervino, G; Lamarina, A M; Palmisano, C; Periale, R; Picchi, P

    2012-01-01

    A new generation of UV photosensors, based on single crystal Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamonds to work optically coupled with large volume two-phase liquid-Ar (LAr) or liquid-Xe (LXe) detectors nowadays under design for the next generation of WIMPs experiments, is under development. Preliminary tests and first calibrations show these devices can have better performance than the existing UV sensitive detectors (higher photosensitivity and better signal-to-noise ratio). I-V characteristics, dark current measurements, linearity response to X-ray irradiation, and alpha-particle energy resolution are reported and discussed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. CVD diamond sensors for charged particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Krammer, Manfred; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Dencuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetstein, M; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zöller, M

    2001-01-01

    CVD diamond material was used to build position-sensitive detectors for single-charged particles to be employed in high-intensity physics experiments. To obtain position information, metal contacts shaped as strips or pixels are applied to the detector surface for one- or two- dimensional coordinate measurement. Strip detectors 2*4 cm/sup 2/ in size with a strip distance of 50 mu m were tested. Pixel detectors of various pixel sizes were bump bonded to electronics chips and investigated. A key issue for the use of these sensors in high intensity experiments is the radiation hardness. Several irradiation experiments were carried out with pions, protons and neutrons exceeding a fluence of 10/sup 15/ particles/cm/sup 2/. The paper presents an overview of the results obtained with strip and pixel detectors in high-energy test beams and summarises the irradiation studies. (8 refs).

  14. Friction Properties of Polished Cvd Diamond Films Sliding against Different Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zichao; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties, like the well-known extreme hardness, low coefficient of friction and high chemical inertness, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have found applications as a hard coating for drawing dies. The surface roughness of the diamond films is one of the most important attributes to the drawing dies. In this paper, the effects of different surface roughnesses on the friction properties of diamond films have been experimentally studied. Diamond films were fabricated using hot filament CVD. The WC-Co (Co 6wt.%) drawing dies were used as substrates. A gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen gas was used as the feedstock gas. The CVD diamond films were polished using mechanical polishing. Polished diamond films with three different surface roughnesses, as well as the unpolished diamond film, were fabricated in order to study the tribological performance between the CVD diamond films and different metals with oil lubrication. The unpolished and polished CVD diamond films are characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), surface profilometer, Raman spectrum and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The friction examinations were carried out by using a ball-on-plate type reciprocating friction tester. Low carbide steel, stainless steel, copper and aluminum materials were used as counterpart balls. Based on this study, the results presented the friction coefficients between the polished CVD films and different metals. The friction tests demonstrate that the smooth surface finish of CVD diamond films is beneficial for reducing their friction coefficients. The diamond films exhibit low friction coefficients when slid against the stainless steel balls and low carbide steel ball, lower than that slid against copper ball and aluminum ball, attributed to the higher ductility of copper and aluminum causing larger amount of wear debris adhering to the sliding interface and higher adhesive

  15. Relationship between texture and residual macro-strain in CVD diamond films based on phenomenological analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin Mao; Hongxi Zhu; Leng Chen; Huiping Feng

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between texture and elastic properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films was analyzed based on the phenomenological theory, which reveals the influence of crystalline orientation and texture on the residual macro-strain and macro-stress. The phenomenological calculations indicated that the difference in Young's modulus could be 15% in single dia- mond crystals and 5% in diamond films with homogeneously distributed strong fiber texture. The experimentally measured residual strains of free-standing CVD diamond films were in good agreement with the correspondingly calculated Young's modulus in con- nection with the multi-fiber textures in the fills, though the difference in Young's modulus induced by texture was only around 1%. It is believed that texture should be one of the important factors influencing the residual stress and strain of CVD diamond films.

  16. Recent Results from Beam Tests of 3D and Pad pCVD Diamond Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wallny, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Results from prototypes of a detector using chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond with embedded resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond device are presented. A detector system consisting of 3D devices based on poly-crystalline CVD (pCVD) diamond was connected to a multi-channel readout and successfully tested in a 120 GeV/c proton beam at CERN proving for the first time the feasibility of the 3D detector concept in pCVD for particle tracking applications. We also present beam test results on the dependence of signal size on incident particle rate in charged particle detectors based on poly-crystalline CVD diamond. The detectors were tested in a 260 MeV/c pion beam over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2 . The pulse height of the sensors was measured with pad readout electronics at a peaking time of 7 ns. Our data from the 2015 beam tests at PSI indicate that the pulse height of poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensor irradiated to 5×1014 neq/cm2 is independent of particle flux...

  17. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers' traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers' capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  18. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grilj, V., E-mail: vgrilj@irb.hr [Division for Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M. [Division for Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pomorski, M. [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Kada, W. [Division of Electronics and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers’ traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers’ capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  19. CVD diamond for electronic devices and sensors

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic diamond is diamond produced by using chemical or physical processes. Like naturally occurring diamond it is composed of a three-dimensional carbon crystal. Due to its extreme physical properties, synthetic diamond is used in many industrial applications, such as drill bits and scratch-proof coatings, and has the potential to be used in many new application areas A brand new title from the respected Wiley Materials for Electronic and Optoelectronic Applications series, this title is the most up-to-date resource for diamond specialists. Beginning with an introduction to the pr

  20. Electrochemically assisted deposition of hydroxyapatite on Ti6Al4V substrates covered by CVD diamond films — Coating characterization and first cell biological results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strąkowska, Paulina [Gdańsk University of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Faculty (Poland); Gdańsk University of Technology, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications, and Informatics (Poland); Beutner, René [Max Bergmann Center, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany); Gnyba, Marcin [Gdańsk University of Technology, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications, and Informatics (Poland); Zielinski, Andrzej [Gdańsk University of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Faculty (Poland); Scharnweber, Dieter, E-mail: Dieter.Scharnweber@tu-dresden.de [Max Bergmann Center, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Although titanium and its alloys are widely used as implant material for orthopedic and dental applications they show only limited corrosion stability and osseointegration in different cases. The aim of the presented research was to develop and characterize a novel surface modification system from a thin diamond base layer and a hydroxyapatite (HAp) top coating deposited on the alloy Ti6Al4V widely used for implants in contact with bone. This coating system is expected to improve both the long-term corrosion behavior and the biocompatibility and bioactivity of respective surfaces. The diamond base films were obtained by Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PACVD); the HAp coatings were formed in aqueous solutions by electrochemically assisted deposition (ECAD) at varying polarization parameters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman microscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements were applied to characterize the generated surface states; the calcium phosphate coatings were additionally chemically analyzed for their composition. The biological properties of the coating system were assessed using hMSC cells analyzing for cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. Varying MW-PACVD process conditions resulted in composite coatings containing microcrystalline diamond (MCD/Ti-C), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) with the NCD coatings being dense and homogeneous and the B-NCD coatings showing increased electrical conductivity. The ECAD process resulted in calcium phosphate coatings from stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric HAp. The deposition of HAp on the B-NCD films run at lower cathodic potentials and resulted both in the highest coating mass and the most homogenous appearance. Initial cell biological investigations showed an improved cell adhesion in the order B-NCD > HAp/B-NCD > uncoated substrate. Cell proliferation was improved for both investigated coatings whereas ALP

  1. Crystal growth of CVD diamond and some of its peculiarities

    CERN Document Server

    Piekarczyk, W

    1999-01-01

    Experiments demonstrate that CVD diamond can form in gas environments that are carbon undersaturated with respect to diamond. This fact is, among others, the most serious violation of principles of chemical thermodynamics. In this $9 paper it is shown that none of the principles is broken when CVD diamond formation is considered not a physical process consisting in growth of crystals but a chemical process consisting in accretion of macro-molecules of polycyclic $9 saturated hydrocarbons belonging to the family of organic compounds the smallest representatives of which are adamantane, diamantane, triamantane and so forth. Since the polymantane macro-molecules are in every respect identical with $9 diamond single crystals with hydrogen-terminated surfaces, the accretion of polymantane macro- molecules is a process completely equivalent to the growth of diamond crystals. However, the accretion of macro-molecules must be $9 described in a way different from that used to describe the growth of crystals because so...

  2. Field electron emission of diamond films on nanocrystalline diamond coating by CVD method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Rangqi; CHEN Guanghua; SONG Xuemei; XING Guangjian; FENG Zhenjian; HE Deyan

    2003-01-01

    The preparation process, structure feature and field electron emission characteristic of diamond films on nanocyrstalline diamond coating by the CVD method were studied. The field electron emission measurements on the samples showed that the diamond films have lower turn-on voltage and higher field emission current density. A further detailed theory explanation to the results was given.

  3. A 3D tomographic EBSD analysis of a CVD diamond thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu, Dierk Raabe and Stefan Zaefferer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the nucleation and growth processes in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond film using a tomographic electron backscattering diffraction method (3D EBSD. The approach is based on the combination of a focused ion beam (FIB unit for serial sectioning in conjunction with high-resolution EBSD. Individual diamond grains were investigated in 3-dimensions particularly with regard to the role of twinning.

  4. CVD Diamond Sink Application in High Power 3D MCMs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Kuo-jun; JIANG Chang-shun; LI Cheng-yue

    2005-01-01

    As electronic packages become more compact, run at faster speeds and dissipate more heat, package designers need more effective thermal management materials. CVD diamond, because of its high thermal conductivity, low dielectric loss and its great mechanical strength, is an excellent material for three dimensional (3D) multichip modules (MCMs) in the next generation compact high speed computers and high power microwave components. In this paper, we have synthesized a large area freestanding diamond films and substrates, and polished diamond substrates, which make MCMs diamond film sink becomes a reality.

  5. CVD Diamond Detector Stability Issues for Operation at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, G J; Koch, J A; Moran, M J; Lerche, R A; Izumi, N; Phillips, T W; Glebov, V Y; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2003-08-22

    Synthetic diamond crystals produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique can serve as fast, radiation hard, neutron sensors for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Here we explore the stability issues, such as charge trapping and high-flux saturation, that will be relevant to operation at the NIF.

  6. Investigation on the priming effect of a CVD diamond microdosimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond microdosimeter is an ideal substitute of common Si.GaAs detector for extremely strong radiation experimental environment due to its high band gap energy, fast charge collection, low dielectric constant and hardness. In order to improve its character, a CVD diamond microdosimeter was irradiated by a proton dose of 46 Gy, and a lateral micro-ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique was utilized to characterize it in low beam current (~fA). It was clearly shown that charge collection efficiency and energy resolution were greatly improved after proton irradiation of that dose. Moreover, the homogeneities of both its counting performance and collection efficiency were enhanced. Proton irradiation of 46 Gy has been proved to be an effective way to prime a CVD diamond.

  7. Investigation on the priming effect of a CVD diamond microdosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Rong Rong; Jiang Da; Li Xiao Lin; Zhu Jie Qing

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond microdosimeter is an ideal substitute of common Si, GaAs detector for extremely strong radiation experimental environmental due to its high band gap energy, fast charge collection, low dielectric constant and hardness. In order to improve its character, a CVD diamond microdosimeter was irradiated by a proton dose of 46 Gy, and a lateral micro-ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique was utilized to characterize it in low beam current (approx fA). It was clearly shown that charge collection efficiency and energy resolution were greatly improved after proton irradiation of that dose. Moreover, the homogeneities of both its counting performance and collection efficiency were enhanced. Proton irradiation of 46 Gy has been proved to be an effective way to prime a CVD diamond

  8. A Fast CVD Diamond Beam Loss Monitor for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Griesmayer, E; Dobos, D; Effinger, E; Pernegger, H

    2011-01-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond detectors were installed in the collimation area of the CERN LHC to study their feasibility as Fast Beam Loss Monitors in a high-radiation environment. The detectors were configured with a fast, radiation-hard pre-amplifier with a bandwidth of 2 GHz. The readout was via an oscilloscope with a bandwidth of 1 GHz and a sampling rate of 5 GSPS. Despite the 250 m cable run from the detectors to the oscilloscope, single MIPs were resolved with a 2 ns rise time, a pulse width of 10 ns and a time resolution of less than 1 ns. Two modes of operation were applied. For the analysis of unexpected beam aborts, the loss profile was recorded in a 1 ms buffer and, for nominal operation, the histogram of the time structure of the losses was recorded in synchronism with the LHC period of 89.2 μs. Measurements during the LHC start-up (February to December 2010) are presented. The Diamond Monitors gave an unprecedented insight into the time structure of the beam losses resolving the 400...

  9. Physics and applications of CVD diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Koizumi, Satoshi; Nesladek, Milos

    2008-01-01

    Here, leading scientists report on why and how diamond can be optimized for applications in bioelectronic and electronics. They cover such topics as growth techniques, new and conventional doping mechanisms, superconductivity in diamond, and excitonic properties, while application aspects include quantum electronics at room temperature, biosensors as well as diamond nanocantilevers and SAWs.Written in a review style to make the topic accessible for a wider community of scientists working in interdisciplinary fields with backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering, this is e

  10. The conductivity of high-fluence noble gas ion irradiated CVD polycrystalline diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, A. M.; Kazakov, V. A.; Mashkova, E. S.; Ovchinnikov, M. A.; Shemukhin, A. A.; Sigalaev, S. K.

    2017-09-01

    The conductivity of surface layer of polycrystalline CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond has been studied experimentally after high-fluence 30 keV Ne+, 20 and 30 keV Ar+ ion irradiation at target temperature range from 30 to 400 °C. The hot ion irradiation of CVD diamond may be described as ion-stimulated heat graphitization in which an exponential resistance decrease with increasing of the irradiation temperature is much faster than at the heat treatment. Under ion irradiation of CVD diamond the graphite-like materials resistivity is achieved at temperatures not exceeding 200 °C. The graphite phase in a heterogeneous structure of diamond irradiated layer is in dynamic equilibrium. In the temperature range from RT to 400 °C, the proportion of graphite phase increases so that at temperatures 200 < Tir < 400 °C it is dominant. The Raman spectra of ion-induced conductive layer created on CVD diamond reflect the processes of nanostructural ordering - disordering of sp2-bonded carbon.

  11. CVD Diamonds in the BaBar Radiation Monitoring System

    CERN Document Server

    Bruinsma, M; Edwards, A J; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Kirkby, D; Petersen, B A

    2006-01-01

    To prevent excessive radiation damage to its Silicon Vertex Tracker, the BaBar experiment at SLAC uses a radiation monitoring and protection system that triggers a beam abort whenever radiation levels are anomalously high. The existing system, which employs large area Si PIN diodes as radiation sensors, has become increasingly difficult to operate due to radiation damage. We have studied CVD diamond sensors as a potential alternative for these silicon sensors. Two diamond sensors have been routinely used since their installation in the Vertex Tracker in August 2002. The experience with these sensors and a variety of tests in the laboratory have shown CVD diamonds to be a viable solution for dosimetry in high radiation environments. However, our studies have also revealed surprising side-effects.

  12. Biocompatibility and Surface Studies of Microwave CVD Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian; Garguilo, J. M.; Koeck, F. A. M.; Nemanich, R. J.; Price, K. J.

    2002-03-01

    The structure and surface properties of a variety of diamond and diamond like carbon films were studied at the nano-scale, in an attempt to assess the biocompatibility of these surfaces. The process of microwave chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit undoped diamond, nitrogen doped diamond, diamond with a titanium monolayer, and diamond-like carbon samples. The contact angles of de-ionized water droplets on the surface of the samples were measured to analyze the surface energy of each film. The rms roughness values of the diamond films measured by atomic force microscopy were also used in determining surface characteristics. Surface treatments of hydrogen passivation, and oxidization were applied to the surface of each film. Hydrogen passivation of the undoped diamond, and nitrogen doped diamond surfaces increases the contact angle on average 30 degrees. Oxidation of the surface decreases the contact angle on average 20 degrees. The surface treatments did not significantly change the contact angle of the diamond like carbon films. Protein adsorption is the first event to take place at a tissue/material interface of an implant into the body, and fibrinogen is the major surface protein, which initiates coagulation and inflammation in the body. The adsorption of fibrinogen was used as an indicator of the biocompatibility of these diamond materials. Fibrinogen was applied to the diamond, and diamond like carbon films. A correlation between contact angle/surface energy, roughness, and the fibrinogen adsorption of these diamond surfaces is reported. There was no significant change in the contact angles following the application of fibrinogen to the surface of the films. This could indicate the biocompatibility of the diamond films. This work supported by the NSF REU program at NCSU and a Physical Sciences Student Research grant from MSU.

  13. Response of CVD Diamond Detectors to 14 MeV Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, C; Gagnon-Moisan, F; Kasper, A; Lucke, A; Schuhmacher, H; Weierganz, M; Zimba, A

    2012-01-01

    A series of measurements was taken at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) Braunschweig [1] using the 14 MeV neutron beam at the Van der Graaf accelerator with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond detectors, in preparation of an upcoming (n, ) cross-section measurement [2] at the CERN-n TOF experiment [3, 4]. A single-crystal (sCVD) as well as a poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond detector were used for the measurements. The response of both materials to the mono-energetic neutron beam was studied, also with the prospect for future applications in plasma diagnostics for fusion research. The results of the measurements are presented in this report.

  14. Polycrystalline CVD diamond device level modeling for particle detection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozzi, A.; Passeri, D.; Kanxheri, K.; Servoli, L.; Lagomarsino, S.; Sciortino, S.

    2016-12-01

    Diamond is a promising material whose excellent physical properties foster its use for radiation detection applications, in particular in those hostile operating environments where the silicon-based detectors behavior is limited due to the high radiation fluence. Within this framework, the application of Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulation tools is highly envisaged for the study, the optimization and the predictive analysis of sensing devices. Since the novelty of using diamond in electronics, this material is not included in the library of commercial, state-of-the-art TCAD software tools. In this work, we propose the development, the application and the validation of numerical models to simulate the electrical behavior of polycrystalline (pc)CVD diamond conceived for diamond sensors for particle detection. The model focuses on the characterization of a physically-based pcCVD diamond bandgap taking into account deep-level defects acting as recombination centers and/or trap states. While a definite picture of the polycrystalline diamond band-gap is still debated, the effect of the main parameters (e.g. trap densities, capture cross-sections, etc.) can be deeply investigated thanks to the simulated approach. The charge collection efficiency due to β -particle irradiation of diamond materials provided by different vendors and with different electrode configurations has been selected as figure of merit for the model validation. The good agreement between measurements and simulation findings, keeping the traps density as the only one fitting parameter, assesses the suitability of the TCAD modeling approach as a predictive tool for the design and the optimization of diamond-based radiation detectors.

  15. Pulse-height defect in single-crystal CVD diamond detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliuskina, O.; Imai, N. [The University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Strekalovsky, A.O.; Aleksandrov, A.A.; Aleksandrova, I.A.; Ilich, S.; Kamanin, D.V.; Knyazheva, G.N.; Kuznetsova, E.A.; Mishinsky, G.V.; Pyatkov, Yu.V.; Strekalovsky, O.V.; Zhuchko, V.E. [JINR, Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Devaraja, H.M. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Heinz, C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); Heinz, S. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Hofmann, S.; Kis, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Maurer, J.; Traeger, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Pomorski, M. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensor Laboratory, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-02-15

    The pulse-height versus deposited energy response of a single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector was measured for ions of Ti, Cu, Nb, Ag, Xe, Au, and of fission fragments of {sup 252} Cf at different energies. For the fission fragments, data were also measured at different electric field strengths of the detector. Heavy ions have a significant pulse-height defect in CVD diamond material, which increases with increasing energy of the ions. It also depends on the electrical field strength applied at the detector. The measured pulse-height defects were explained in the framework of recombination models. Calibration methods known from silicon detectors were modified and applied. A comparison with data for the pulse-height defect in silicon detectors was performed. (orig.)

  16. Thermoluminescent properties of CVD diamond: applications to ionising radiation dosimetry; Proprietes thermoluminescentes du diamant CVD: applications a la dosimetrie des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitfils, A

    2007-09-15

    Remarkable properties of synthetic diamond (human soft tissue equivalence, chemical stability, non-toxicity) make this material suitable for medical application as thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). This work highlights the interest of this material as radiotherapy TLD. In the first stage of this work, we looked after thermoluminescent (TL) and dosimetric properties of polycrystalline diamond made by Chemically Vapor Deposited (CVD) synthesis. Dosimetric characteristics are satisfactory as TLD for medical application. Luminescence thermal quenching on diamond has been investigated. This phenomenon leads to a decrease of dosimetric TL peak sensitivity when the heating rate increases. The second part of this work analyses the use of synthetic diamond as TLD in radiotherapy. Dose profiles, depth dose distributions and the cartography of an electron beam obtained with our samples are in very good agreement with results from an ionisation chamber. It is clearly shown that CVD) diamond is of interest to check beams of treatment accelerators. The use of these samples in a control of treatment with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy underlines good response of synthetic diamond in high dose gradient areas. These results indicate that CVD diamond is a promising material for radiotherapy dosimetry. (author)

  17. Diagnostic Techniques Used to Study Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    The advantages and utility of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond as an industrial ceramic can only be realized if the price and quality are right. Until recently, this technology was of interest only to the academic and basic research community. However, interest has grown because of advances made by leading CVD diamond suppliers: 1) Reduction of the cost of CVD polycrystalline diamond deposition below $5/carat ($8/sq cm); 2) Installation of production capacity; 3) Epitaxial growth of CVD single-crystal diamond. Thus, CVD diamond applications and business are an industrial reality. At present, CVD diamond is produced in the form of coatings or wafers. CVD diamond film technology offers a broader technological potential than do natural and high-pressure synthetic diamonds because size, geometry, and eventually cost will not be as limiting. Now that they are cost effective, diamond coatings - with their extreme properties - can be used in a variety of applications. Diamond coatings can improve many of the surface properties of engineering substrate materials, including erosion, corrosion, and wear resistance. Examples of actual and potential applications, from microelectromechanical systems to the wear parts of diamond coatings and related superhard coatings are described. For example, diamond coatings can be used as a chemical and mechanical barrier for the space shuttles check valves, particularly on the guide pins and seat assemblies.

  18. Origin, state of the art and some prospects of the diamond CVD

    CERN Document Server

    Spitsyn, B V; Alexenko, A E

    2000-01-01

    A short review on the diamond CVD origin, together with its state of the art and some prospects was given. New hybrid methods of the diamond CVD permit to gain 1.2 to 6 times of growth rate in comparison with ordinary diamond CVD's. Recent results on n-type diamond film synthesis through phosphorus doping in the course of the CVD process are briefly discussed. In comparison with high-pressure diamond synthesis, the CVD processes open new facets of the diamond as ultimate crystal for science and technology evolution. It was stressed that, mainly on the basis of new CVDs of diamond, the properties of natural diamond are not only reproduced, but can be surpassed. As examples, mechanical (fracture resistance), physical (thermal conductivity), and chemical (oxidation stability) properties are mentioned. Some present issues in the field are considered.

  19. Correlation between optical emission spectra and the process parameters of a 915 MHz microwave plasma CVD reactor used for depositing polycrystalline diamond coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Awadesh Kumar Mallik; Sandip Bysakh; Someswar Dutta; Debabrata Basu

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen and hydrogen-methane mixed plasma have been generated inside a 33 cm diameter quartz bell jar with a low power (9 KW) and lower frequency 915 MHz microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. The reactor is being used for growing polycrystalline diamond (PCD) over large area (100 mm). The generated plasma is diagnosed by in situ optical emission spectroscopy method with wave length ranging from 200 to 900 nm. The effects of microwave power, chamber pressure and gas concentration on plasma characteristics have been studied in this work. Within the optical range, Balmer H, H, C2swan band and CH lines have been detected at the wavelengths of 655.95, 485.7, 515.82 and 430.17 nm, respectively. It has been observed that for hydrogen plasma, the amount of transition from hydrogen atom inner shell 3 to 2 (H) is almost constant with increasing microwave (MW) power (from 2000 to 2800 W) and pressure (from 15 to 30 Torr) initially, after that it increases with further increase of MW power and pressure, whereas, the transition from 4 to 2 (H) is slowly increased with increasing MW power and pressure. For hydrogen-methane plasma, intensities of C2 swan band, i.e., the transitions from D$^3\\Pi_\\text{g}$ to A$^3\\Pi_{\\mu}$ energy levels, are also increased with the increasing microwave power and reactor pressure. It has been observed that the radicals present in the plasma are affected by variation of different reactor parameters like pressure, MW power, CH4 concentration, etc.

  20. Low temperature growth of diamond films on optical fibers using Linear Antenna CVD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, M.; Drijkoningen, S.; Karczewski, J.; Bogdanowicz, R.; Haenen, K.

    2016-01-01

    It is not trivial to achieve a good quality diamond-coated fibre interface due to a large difference in the properties and composition of the diamond films (or use coating even) and the optical fibre material, i.e. fused silica. One of the biggest problems is the high temperature during the deposition which influences the optical fibre or optical fibre sensor structure (e.g. long-period gratings (LPG)). The greatest advantage of a linear antenna microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (LA MW CVD) is the fact that it allows to grow the diamond layers at low temperature (below 300°C) [1]. High quality nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films with thicknesses ranging from 70 nm to 150 nm, were deposited on silicon, glass and optical fibre substrates [2]. Substrates pretreatment by dip-coating and spin coating process with a dispersion consisting of detonation nanodiamond (DND) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) has been applied. During the deposition process the continuous mode of operation of the LA MW CVD system was used, which produces a continuous wave at a maximum power of 1.9 kW (in each antenna). Diamond films on optical fibres were obtained at temperatures below 350°C, providing a clear improvement of results compared to our earlier work [3]. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging to investigate the morphology of the nanocrystalline diamond films. The film growth rate, film thickness, and optical properties in the VIS-NIR range, i.e. refractive index and extinction coefficient will be discussed based on measurements on reference quartz plates by using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE).

  1. Electrical conduction in polycrystalline CVD diamond: Temperature dependent impedance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, H.; Williams, O.A.; Jackman, R.B. [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Rudkin, R.; Atkinson, A. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-16

    In this paper, we report the first measurement of impedance on freestanding diamond films from 0.1 Hz to 10 MHz up to 300 C. A wide range of CVD materials have been investigated, but here we concentrate on 'black' diamond grown by MWPECVD. The Cole-Cole (Z' via Z{sup ''}) plots are well fitted to a RC parallel circuit model and the equivalent resistance and capacitance for the diamond films have been estimated using the Zview curve fitting. The results show only one single semicircle response at each temperature measured. It was found that the resistance decreases from 62 M{omega} at room temperature to 4 k{omega} at 300 C, with an activation energy around 0.51 eV. The equivalent capacitance is maintained at the level of 10{sup 2} pF up to 300 C, suggesting that the diamond grain boundaries are dominating the conduction. At 400 C, the impedance at low frequencies shows a linear tail, which can be explained that the ac polarization of diamond/Au interface occurs. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Adhesive strength of CVD diamond thin films quantitatively measured by means of the bulge and blister test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daohui Xiang; Ming Chen; Yuping Ma; Fanghong Sun

    2008-01-01

    Large advancement has been made in understanding the nucleation and growth of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, but the adhesion of CVD diamond to substrates is poor and there is no good method for quantitative evaluation of the adhesive strength. The blister test is a potentially powerful tool for characterizing the mechanical properties of diamond films. In this test, pressure was applied on a thin membrane and the out-of-plane deflection of the membrane center was measured. The Young's modulus, residual stress, and adhesive strength were simultaneously determined using the load-deflection behavior of a membrane. The free-standing window sample of diamond thin films was fabricated by means of photolithography and anisotropic wet etching. The research indicates that the adhesive strength of diamond thin films is 4.28±0.37J/m2. This method uses a simple apparatus, and the fabrication of samples is very easy.

  3. Experimental studies of N~+ implantation into CVD diamond thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛火平; 林成鲁; 王建新; 邹世昌; 石晓红; 林梓鑫; 周祖尧; 刘祖刚

    1997-01-01

    The effects of N+ implantation under various conditions on CVD diamond films were analyzed with Raman spectroscopy, four-point probe method, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rutherford backseattering spectroscopy (RBS), ultraviolet photoluminescence spectroscopy (UV-PL), Fourier transformation infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the N+ implantation doping without any graphitization has been successfully realized when 100 keV N+ ions at a dosage of 2 × 1016 cm-2 were implanted into diamond films at 550℃ . UV-PL spectra indicate that the implanted N+ ions formed an electrically inactive deep-level impurity in diamond films. So the sheet resistance of the sample after N+ implantation changed little. Carbon nitride containing C≡N covalent bond has been successfully synthesized by 100 keV, 1.2×1018 N/cm2 N+ implantation into diamond films. Most of the implanted N+ ions formed C≡N covalent bonds with C atoms. The others were free state nitroge

  4. A CVD Diamond Detector for (n,a) Cross-Section Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Christina; Griesmayer, Erich; Guerrero, Carlos

    A novel detector based on the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond technology has been developed in the framework of this PhD, for the experimental determination of (n,a) cross-sections at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN. The 59Ni(n,a)56Fe cross-section, which is relevant for astrophysical questions as well as for risk-assessment studies in nuclear technology, has been measured in order to validate the applicability of the detector for such experiments. The thesis is divided in four parts. In the introductory part the motivation for measuring (n,a) cross-sections, the experimental challenges for such measurements and the reasons for choosing the CVD diamond technology for the detector are given. This is followed by the presentation of the n_TOF facility, an introduction to neutron-induced nuclear reactions and a brief summary of the interaction of particles with matter. The CVD diamond technology and the relevant matters related to electronics are given as well in this first part of the t...

  5. Deposition and Coating Properties on CVD Tungsten

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ji-hong; LI Zheng-xiang; LIU Gao-jian; ZHOU Hui-Huang; CHUN liang

    2004-01-01

    Surface characterization and microstructure studies are performed on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten coating. There is about 2 μm thickness diffusion layer of tungsten in the molybdenum substrate. The thermal shock test shows tungsten coating has good adhesion with molybdenum substrate, but the elements of oxygen and carbon in the tungsten coating have the bad affection to the adhesion. The result of high-temperature diffusion experiment is the diffusion rate from molybdenum substrate to tungsten coating is faster.

  6. Excimer Laser Beam Analyzer Based on CVD Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Marco; Salvatori, Stefano; Conte, Gennaro

    2010-11-01

    1-D and 2-D detector arrays have been realized on CVD-diamond. The relatively high resistivity of diamond in the dark allowed the fabrication of photoconductive "sandwich" strip (1D) or pixel (2D) detectors: a semitransparent light-receiving back-side contact was used for detector biasing. Cross-talk between pixels was limited by using intermediate guard contacts connected at the same ground potential of the pixels. Each pixel photocurrent was conditioned by a read-out electronics composed by a high sensitive integrator and a Σ-Δ ADC converter. The overall 500 μs conversion time allowed a data acquisition rate up to 2 kSPS. The measured fast photoresponse of the samples in the ns time regime suggests to use the proposed devices for fine tuning feedback of high-power pulsed-laser cavities, whereas solar-blindness guarantees high performance in UV beam diagnostics also under high intensity background illumination. Offering unique properties in terms of thermal conductivity and visible-light transparency, diamond represents one of the most suitable candidate for the detection of high-power UV laser emission. The technology of laser beam profiling is evolving with the increase of excimer lasers applications that span from laser-cutting to VLSI and MEMS technologies. Indeed, to improve emission performances, fine tuning of the laser cavity is required. In such a view, the development of a beam-profiler, able to work in real-time between each laser pulse, is mandatory.

  7. Effect of substrate roughness on growth of diamond by hot filament CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Awadesh K Mallik; S R Binu; L N Satapathy; Chandrabhas Narayana; Md Motin Seikh; S A Shivashankar; S K Biswas

    2010-06-01

    Polycrystalline diamond coatings are grown on Si (100) substrate by hot filament CVD technique. We investigate here the effect of substrate roughening on the substrate temperature and methane concentration required to maintain high quality, high growth rate and faceted morphology of the diamond coatings. It has been shown that as we increase the substrate roughness from 0.05 m to 0.91 m (centre line average or CLA) there is enhancement in deposited film quality (Raman peak intensity ratio of 3 to non-3 content increases from 1.65 to 7.13) and the substrate temperature can be brought down to 640°C without any additional substrate heating. The coatings grown at adverse conditions for 3 deposition has cauliflower morphology with nanocrystalline grains and coatings grown under favourable 3 condition gives clear faceted grains.

  8. Effect of CVD-diamond coatings on the tribological performance of cemented tungsten carbide substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleem Ahmad Najar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison has been documented between nanocrystalline diamond (NCD and microcrystalline diamond (MCD coatings deposited on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co substrates with architectures of WC-Co/NCD & WC-Co/MCD, using hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique. In the present work, the frictional characteristics were studied using ball-on-disc type linear reciprocating micro-tribometer, under the application of 1–10N normal loads, when sliding against smooth alumina (Al2O3 ceramic ball for the total duration of 15min, under dry sliding conditions. Nanoindentation tests were also conducted using Berkovich nanoindenter for the purpose of measurement of hardness and elastic modulus values. The average coefficients of friction of MCD and NCD coatings decrease from 0.37 – 0.32 and 0.3 – 0.27 respectively, when the load is increased from 1–10N. However, for conventional WC-Co substrate the average coefficient of friction increases from 0.60–0.75, under the same input operating conditions. The wear tracks formed on the surfaces of CVD-diamond coatings and WC-Co substrate, after friction measurement were characterised using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. However, the compositional analysis for the formation of tribo-layer observed on the wear tracks of CVD-diamond coatings was confirmed using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS technique. Therefore, maintaining an appropriate level of normal load and using appropriate type of diamond coating, friction may be kept to some lower value to improve mechanical processes.

  9. Utilization of Neutron Bang-time CVD diamond detectors at the Z Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Gordon; Hahn, Kelly; Ruiz, Carlos; Jones, Brent; Gomez, Matthew; Hess, Mark; Harding, Eric; Knapp, Patrick; Bur, James; Torres, Jose; Norris, Edward; Cooper, Gary; Styron, Jedediah; Moy, Ken; McKenna, Ian; Glebov, Vladimir; Fittinghoff, David; May, Mark; Snyder, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    We are utilizing Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) Diamond detectors at 2.3 meters on the Z accelerator to infer neutron bang-times from Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) sources yielding up to 3e12 DD neutrons and to bound the neutron time history of Deuterium Gas Puff loads producing 5e13 DD neutrons. The current implementation of the diagnostic and initial results will be shown as well as our future plans for the diagnostic. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part Ⅰ Simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition)diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge (J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC (Kinetic Monte Carlo) method. The results show that: (1) under Joe's model, the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature; (2) the deposition rate and surface roughness () under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature ()and not evident bymass fraction of atom chlorine; (3)the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate, i.e. the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature, in agreement with Grujicic's prediction; (4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.

  11. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part I simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe—Badgwell—Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xizhong; YuZhang; 等

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD( Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge(J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC(Kinetic Monte Carlo)method.The results show that:(1) under Joe's model,the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature;(2) the deposition rate and surface roughness(Rq) under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature(Ts) and not evident bymass fraction Wc1 of atom chlorine;(3) the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate.i.e.the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature,in agreement with Grujicic's prediction;(4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.

  12. CO{sub 2} laser-induced plasma CVD synthesis of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konov, V.I.; Prokhorov, A.M.; Uglov, S.A.; Bolshakov, A.P.; Leontiev, I.A. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Obshchej Fiziki; Dausinger, F.; Huegel, H.; Angstenberger, B. [Institute of High Power Beam Technology (IFSW), Stuttgart University, Pfaffenwaldring 43, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Sepold, G.; Metev, S. [Bremen Institute of Applied Beam Technology, D-28800 Bremen 33, Klagenfurter Str. 2 (Germany)

    1998-05-01

    A novel technique for CVD synthesis of materials that does not demand a vacuum chamber and provides high deposition rates has been developed. It is based on CO{sub 2} laser maintenance of a stationary optical discharge in a gas stream, exhausting over a substrate into the air (laser plasmatron). Nano- and polycrystalline-diamond films were deposited on tungsten substrates from atmospheric-pressure Xe(Ar):H{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} gas mixtures at flow rates of 2 l/min. A 2.5-kW CO{sub 2} laser focused beam produced plasma. The deposition area was about 1 cm{sup 2} and growth rates were up to 30-50 {mu}m/h. Peculiarities and advantages of laser plasmatrons are discussed. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 refs.

  13. Simulation of a perfect CVD diamond Schottky diode steep forward current–voltage characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukushkin, V.A., E-mail: vakuk@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science, 46 Ulyanov St., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Nizhny Novgorod State University named after N.I. Lobachevsky, 23 Gagarin pr., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    The kinetic equation approach to the simulation of the perfect CVD diamond Schottky diode current–voltage characteristic is considered. In result it is shown that the latter has a significantly steeper forward branch than that of perfect devices of such a type on usual semiconductors. It means that CVD diamond-based Schottky diodes have an important potential advantage over analogous devices on conventional materials.

  14. Simulation of a perfect CVD diamond Schottky diode steep forward current-voltage characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukushkin, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    The kinetic equation approach to the simulation of the perfect CVD diamond Schottky diode current-voltage characteristic is considered. In result it is shown that the latter has a significantly steeper forward branch than that of perfect devices of such a type on usual semiconductors. It means that CVD diamond-based Schottky diodes have an important potential advantage over analogous devices on conventional materials.

  15. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  16. FABRICATION OF DIAMOND TUBES IN BIAS-ENHANCED HOT-FILAMENT CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming; MA Yuping; XIANG Daohui; SUN Fanghong

    2007-01-01

    Deposition of diamond thin films on tungsten wire Substrate with the gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen by using bias-enhanced hol filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with the tantalum wires being optimized arranged is investigated. The self-supported diamond tubes are obtained by etching away the tungsten Substrates. The quality of the diamond film before and after the removal of Substrates is observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectrum. The results show that the cylindrical diamond tubes with good quality and uniform thickness are obtained on tungsten wires by using bias enhanced hot filament CVD. The compressive stress in diamond film formed during the deposition is released after the Substrate etches away by mixture of H202 and NH4OH. There is no residual stress in diamond tube after Substrate removal.

  17. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature-Part II Simulation of CVD diamond film growth in C-H system and in Cl-containing systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100}-oriented CVD diamond film under two modifications of J-B-H model at low substrate temperatures was simulated by using a revised KMC method at atomic scale. The results were compared both in Cl-containing systems and in C-H system as follows: (1) Substrate temperature can produce an important effect both on film deposition rate and on surface roughness; (2) Aomic Cl takes an active role for the growth of diamond film at low temperatures; (3) {100}-oriented diamond film cannot deposit under single carbon insertion mechanism, which disagrees with the predictions before; (4) The explanation of the exact role of atomic Cl is not provided in the simulation results.

  18. Surface morphology, growth rate and quality of diamond films synthesized in hot filament CVD system under various methane concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2011-08-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has been used to deposit diamond films on silicon substrate. In the present study, diamond films were grown at various vol.% CH 4 in H 2 from 0.5% to 3.5%, at substrate temperature and pressure of 850 °C and 80 torr, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the properties of deposited films. The formation of methyl radicals as a function of vol.% CH 4 not only changes film morphology but also increase film growth rate. At low, intermediate and high vol.% CH 4, cluster, faceted cubes and pyramidal features growth, were dominant. By increasing vol.% CH 4 from 0.5% to 3.5%, as the growth rate improved from ˜0.25 μm/h to ˜2.0 μm/h. Raman studies features revealed high purity diamond films at intermediate range of vol.% CH 4 and grain density increased by increasing CH 4 concentration. The present study represents experimentally surface morphology, growth rate and quality of diamond films grown in hot filament CVD system at various CH 4 concentrations.

  19. Low resistance polycrystalline diamond thin films deposited by hot filament chemical vapour deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahtab Ullah; Ejaz Ahmed; Abdelbary Elhissi; Waqar Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Polycrystalline diamond thin films with outgrowing diamond (OGD) grains were deposited onto silicon wafers using a hydrocarbon gas (CH4) highly diluted with H2 at low pressure in a hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) reactor with a range of gas flow rates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM showed polycrystalline diamond structure with a random orientation. Polycrystalline diamond films with various textures were grown and (111) facets were dominant with sharp grain boundaries. Outgrowth was observed in flowerish character at high gas flow rates. Isolated single crystals with little openings appeared at various stages at low gas flow rates. Thus, changing gas flow rates had a beneficial influence on the grain size, growth rate and electrical resistivity. CVD diamond films gave an excellent performance for medium film thickness with relatively low electrical resistivity and making them potentially useful in many industrial applications.

  20. Chemical vapour deposited diamonds for dosimetry of radiotherapeutical beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucciolini, M.; Mazzocchi, S. [Firenze Univ., Firenze (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica; INFN, Firenze (Italy); Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pini, S.; Sciortino, S. [Firenze Univ., Firenze (Italy). Dipartimento di Energetica; INFN, Firenze (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Guttone, G.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M.G. [INFN, Catania (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali del Sud

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the application of synthetic diamond detectors to the clinical dosimetry of photon and electron beams. It has been developed in the frame of INFN CANDIDO project and MURST Cofin. Diamonds grown with CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition) technique have been studied; some of them are commercial samples while others have been locally synthesised. Experiments have been formed using both on-line and off-line approaches. For the off-line measurements, TL (thermoluminescent) and TSC (thermally stimulated current) techniques have been used.

  1. A Bayesian method to estimate the neutron response matrix of a single crystal CVD diamond detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginatto, Marcel; Araque, Jorge Guerrero; Nolte, Ralf; Zbořil, Miroslav; Zimbal, Andreas [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Gagnon-Moisan, Francis [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-01-13

    Detectors made from artificial chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single crystal diamond are very promising candidates for applications where high resolution neutron spectrometry in very high neutron fluxes is required, for example in fusion research. We propose a Bayesian method to estimate the neutron response function of the detector for a continuous range of neutron energies (in our case, 10 MeV ≤ E{sub n} ≤ 16 MeV) based on a few measurements with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. This method is needed because a complete set of measurements is not available and the alternative approach of using responses based on Monte Carlo calculations is not feasible. Our approach uses Bayesian signal-background separation techniques and radial basis function interpolation methods. We present the analysis of data measured at the PTB accelerator facility PIAF. The method is quite general and it can be applied to other particle detectors with similar characteristics.

  2. Advanced laser diagnostics for diamond deposition research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, C.H.; Owano, T.G.; Wahl, E.H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using thermal plasmas is attractive for diamond synthesis applications due to the inherently high reactant densities and throughput, but the associated high gas-phase collision rates in the boundary layer above the substrate produce steep thermal and species gradients which can drive the complex plasma chemistry away from optimal conditions. To understand and control these environments, accurate measurements of temperature and species concentrations within the reacting boundary layer are needed. This is challenging in atmospheric pressure reactors due to the highly luminous environment, steep thermal and species gradients, and small spatial scales. The applicability of degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) as a spectroscopic probe of atmospheric pressure reacting plasmas has been investigated. This powerful, nonlinear technique has been applied to the measurement of temperature and radical species concentrations in the boundary layer of a diamond growth substrate immersed in a flowing atmospheric pressure plasma. In-situ measurements of CH and C{sub 2} radicals have been performed to determine spatially resolved profiles of vibrational temperature, rotational temperature, and species concentration. Results of these measurements are compared with the predictions of a detailed numerical simulation.

  3. Systematic study of pre-irradiation effects in high efficiency CVD diamond nuclear particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Marinelli, M; Milani, E; Paoletti, A; Pillon, M; Tucciarone, A; Verona-Rinati, G

    2002-01-01

    Many outstanding properties of diamond can, in principle, lead to the development of radiation detectors with interesting capabilities. In particular, diamond-based nuclear particle detectors are good candidates to replace silicon-based detectors in several fields, e.g. in high-flux applications such as next generation particle-accelerator experiments or beam monitoring. However, the high concentration of defects (grain boundaries, impurities) in synthetic diamond films can strongly limit the detector's performance. A significant increase in the efficiency of CVD diamond detectors is achieved by means of pre-irradiation (pumping) with beta particles. We report here on a systematic study of the effects of pumping in high-quality microwave CVD diamond films. The efficiency (eta) and charge collection distance (CCD) of nuclear particle detectors based on these films depend on the methane content in the growth gas mixture and on the film thickness. Both efficiency and CCD behave in a markedly different way in the...

  4. OSL and TL dosimeter characterization of boron doped CVD diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, J. A. N.; Sandonato, G. M.; Meléndrez, R.; Chernov, V.; Pedroza-Montero, M.; De la Rosa, E.; Rodríguez, R. A.; Salas, P.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2005-04-01

    Natural diamond is an exceptional prospect for clinical radiation dosimetry due to its tissue-equivalence properties and being chemically inert. The use of diamond in radiation dosimetry has been halted by the high market price; although recently the capability of growing high quality CVD diamond has renewed the interest in using diamond films as radiation dosimeters. In the present work we have characterized the dosimetric properties of diamond films synthesized by the HFCVD method. The thermoluminescence and the optically stimulated luminescence of beta exposed diamond sample containing a B/C 4000 ppm doping presents excellent properties suitable for dosimetric applications with β-ray doses up to 3.0 kGy. The observed OSL and TL performance is reasonable appropriate to justify further investigation of diamond films as dosimeters for ionizing radiation, specially in the radiotherapy field where very well localized and in vivo and real time radiation dose applications are essential.

  5. Diamond Deposition on WC/Co Alloy with a Molybdenum Intermediate Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Yu, Zhi-Ming; Yi, Dan-Qing

    It is known that in the condition of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond process, molybdenum is capable of forming carbide known as the "glue" which promotes growth of the CVD diamond, and aids its adhesion by (partial) relief of stresses at the interface. Furthermore, the WC grains are reaction bonded to the Mo2C phase. Therefore, molybdenum is a good candidate material for the intermediate layer between WC-Co substrates and diamond coatings. A molybdenum intermediate layer of 1-3 μm thickness was magnetron sputter-deposited on WC/Co alloy prior to the deposition of diamond coatings. Diamond films were deposited by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). The chemical quality, morphology, and crystal structure of the molybdenum intermediate layer and the diamond coatings were characterized by means of SEM, EDX, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the continuous Mo intermediate layer emerged in spherical shapes and had grain sizes of 0.5-1.5 μm after 30 min sputter deposition. The diamond grain growth rate was slightly slower as compared with that of uncoated Mo layer on the WC-Co substrate. The morphologies of the diamond films on the WC-Co substrate varied with the amount of Mo and Co on the substrate. The Mo intermediate layer was effective to act as a buffer layer for both Co diffusion and diamond growth.

  6. A new CVD Diamond Mosaic-Detector for (n,$\\alpha$) Cross-Section Measurements at the n_TOF Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, C; Guerrero, C; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Barbagallo, M; Becares, V; Becvar, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calvino, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapico, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Cortes-Giraldo, M.A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; Garcia, A.R; Giubrone, G; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B; Goncalves, I.F; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Hernandez-Prieto, A; Jenkins, D.G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; KäPpeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krticka, M; Kroll, J; Lampoudis, C; Langer, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L.S; Losito, R; Mallick, A; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martinez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P.F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P.M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J.M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Robles, M.S; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sabate-Gilarte, M; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J.L; Tarrio, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M.J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Wright, T; Zugec, P

    2013-01-01

    At the n_TOF experiment at CERN a dedicated single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) Diamond Mosaic-Detector has been developed for (n,$\\alpha$) cross-section measurements. The detector, characterized by an excellent time and energy resolution, consists of an array of 9 sCVD diamond diodes. The detector has been characterized and a cross-section measurement has been performed for the $^{59}$Ni(n,$\\alpha$)$^{56}$Fe reaction in 2012. The characteristics of the detector, its performance and the promising preliminary results of the experiment are presented.

  7. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power electronic devices. The CNTs and diamond substrates have a significantly higher specific thermal conductivity than traditional heat sink/spreader materials making them good replacement candidates. Only limited research has been performed on these CNT/diamond structures and their suitability of different growth methods. This study investigates three potential chemical vapor deposition (CVD techniques for growing CNTs on diamond: thermal CVD (T-CVD, microwave plasma-enhanced CVD (MPE-CVD, and floating catalyst thermal CVD (FCT-CVD. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to analyze the morphology and topology of the CNTs. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the quality of the CNTs by determining the ID/IG peak intensity ratios. Additionally, the CNT/diamond samples were sonicated for qualitative comparisons of the durability of the CNT forests. T-CVD provided the largest diameter tubes, with catalysts residing mainly at the CNT/diamond interface. The MPE-CVD process yielded non uniform defective CNTs, and FCT-CVD resulted in the smallest diameter CNTs with catalyst particles imbedded throughout the length of the nanotubes.

  8. Review: Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Okada

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline diamond films have attracted considerable attention because they have a low coefficient of friction and a low electron emission threshold voltage. In this paper, the author reviews the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD of nanocrystalline diamond and mainly focuses on the growth of nanocrystalline diamond by low-pressure PE-CVD. Nanocrystalline diamond particles of 200–700 nm diameter have been prepared in a 13.56 MHz low-pressure inductively coupled CH4/CO/H2 plasma. The bonding state of carbon atoms was investigated by ultraviolet-excited Raman spectroscopy. Electron energy loss spectroscopy identified sp2-bonded carbons around the 20–50 nm subgrains of nanocrystalline diamond particles. Plasma diagnostics using a Langmuir probe and the comparison with plasma simulation are also reviewed. The electron energy distribution functions are discussed by considering different inelastic interaction channels between electrons and heavy particles in a molecular CH4/H2 plasma.

  9. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  10. Cutting characteristics of dental diamond burs made with CVD technology Características de corte de pontas odontológicas diamantadas obtidas pela tecnologia CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Monti Lima

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the cutting ability of chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond burs coupled to an ultrasonic dental unit handpiece for minimally invasive cavity preparation. One standard cavity was prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 40 extracted human third molars either with cylindrical or with spherical CVD burs. The cutting ability was compared regarding type of substrate (enamel and dentin and direction of handpiece motion. The morphological characteristics, width and depth of the cavities were analyzed and measured using scanning electron micrographs. Statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test (p O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a habilidade de corte das pontas de diamante obtidas pelo processo de deposição química a vapor (CVD associadas ao aparelho de ultra-som no preparo cavitário minimamente invasivo. Uma cavidade padronizada foi preparada nas faces mesial e distal de 40 terceiros molares, utilizando-se pontas de diamante CVD cilíndrica e esférica. A habilidade de corte foi comparada quanto ao tipo de substrato (esmalte e dentina e quanto à direção do movimento realizado com a ponta. As características morfológicas, a largura e profundidade das cavidades foram analisadas e medidas em microscopia eletrônica de varredura. A análise estatística pelo teste de Kruskal-Wallis (p < 0,05 revelou que a largura e profundidade das cavidades foram significativamente maiores em dentina. Cavidades mais largas foram obtidas quando se utilizou a ponta de diamante CVD cilíndrica, e mais profundas quando a ponta esférica foi empregada. A direção do movimento da ponta não influenciou o tamanho das cavidades, sendo os cortes produzidos pelas pontas de diamante CVD precisos e conservadores.

  11. Multilayer CVD Diamond Coatings in the Machining of an Al6061-15 Vol % Al2O3 Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadmehdi Shabani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic cutting inserts coated with ten-fold alternating micro- and nanocrystalline diamond (MCD/NCD layers grown by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD were tested in the machining of an Al based metallic matrix composite (MMC containing 15 vol % Al2O3 particles. Inserts with total coating thicknesses of approximately 12 µm and 24 µm were produced and used in turning: cutting speed (v of 250 to 1000 m·min−1; depth of cut (DOC from 0.5 to 3 mm and feed (f between 0.1 and 0.4 mm·rev−1. The main cutting force increases linearly with DOC (ca. 294 N per mm and with feed (ca. 640 N per mm·rev−1. The thicker coatings work within the following limits: DOC up to 1.5 mm and maximum speeds of 750 m·min−1 for feeds up to 0.4 mm·rev−1. Flank wear is predominant but crater wear is also observed due to the negative tool normal rake. Layer-by-layer wear of the tool rake, and not total delamination from the substrate, evidenced one of the advantages of using a multilayer design. The MCD/NCD multilayer diamond coated indexable inserts have longer tool life than most CVD diamond systems and behave as well as most polycrystalline diamond (PCD tools.

  12. Commissioning and first operation of the pCVD diamond ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Dobos, D

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of the ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor is to protect the ATLAS Inner Detector silicon trackers from high radiation doses caused by LHC beam incidents, e.g. magnet failures. The BCM uses in total 16 1x1 cm2 500 μm thick polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (pCVD) diamond sensors. They are arranged in 8 positions around the ATLAS LHC interaction point. Time difference measurements with sub nanosecond resolution are performed to distinguish between particles from a collision and spray particles from a beam incident. An abundance of the latter leads the BCM to provoke an abort of the LHC beam. A FPGA based readout system with a sampling rate of 2.56 GHz performs the online data analysis and interfaces the results to ATLAS and the beam abort system. The BCM diamond sensors, the detector modules and their readout system are described. Results of the operation with the first LHC beams are reported and results of commissioning and timing measurements (e.g. with cosmic muons) in preparation for first ...

  13. CVD diamond coatings on titanium : Characterisation by XRD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappuccio, G. [CNR, Frascati, Rome (Italy). Istituto di Strutturistica Chimica]|[INFN-LNF, Frascati, Rome (Italy). Laboratorio Dafne Luce

    1996-09-01

    Here, the authors report an analysis carried out on diamond coatings on titanium substrates to show the potentially of x-ray diffraction techniques in the structural characterisation both of diamond thin films and of the other phases (TiC and TiH{sub 2}) present in the interfacial layer. It should be noted that the composition and microstructure of the interface layers strongly affect the characteristics of the diamond films, particularly adhesion, which is one of the most important elements determining the final quality of the coating.

  14. Proton Irradiation of CVD Diamond Detectors for High Luminosity Experiments at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, D; Bauer, C; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E A; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Jany, C; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Manfredi, P F; Marshall, R D; Mishina, M; Le Normand, F; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Thomson, G B; Trawick, M L; Trischuk, W; Turchetta, R; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    CVD diamond shows promising properties for use as a position sensitive detector for experiments in the highest radiation areas at the Large Hadron Collider. In order to study the radiation hardn ess of diamond we exposed CVD diamond detector samples to 24~GeV/$c$ and 500~MeV protons up to a fluence of $5\\times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$. We measured the charge collection distance, the ave rage distance electron hole pairs move apart in an external electric field, and leakage currents before, during, and after irradiation. The charge collection distance remains unchanged up to $1\\ times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$ and decreases by $\\approx$40~\\% at $5\\times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$. Leakage currents of diamond samples were below 1~pA before and after irradiation. The particle indu ced currents during irradiation correlate well with the proton flux. In contrast to diamond, a silicon diode, which was irradiated for comparison, shows the known large increase in leakage curren t. We conclude that CVD diamond detectors are radia...

  15. The first bump-bonded pixel detectors on CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pan, L.S.; Peitz, A.; Pernicka, M.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Steuerer, J.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W. E-mail: william@physics.utoronto.ca; Turchetta, R.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; Charles, E.; Ciocio, A.; Dao, K.; Einsweiler, K.; Fasching, D.; Gilchriese, M.; Joshi, A.; Kleinfelder, S.; Milgrome, O.; Palaio, N.; Richardson, J.; Sinervo, P.; Zizka, G

    1999-11-01

    Diamond is a nearly ideal material for detecting ionising radiation. Its outstanding radiation hardness, fast charge collection and low leakage current allow it to be used in high radiation environments. These characteristics make diamond sensors particularly appealing for use in the next generation of pixel detectors. Over the last year, the RD42 collaboration has worked with several groups that have developed pixel readout electronics in order to optimise diamond sensors for bump-bonding. This effort resulted in an operational diamond pixel sensor that was tested in a pion beam. We demonstrate that greater than 98% of the channels were successfully bump-bonded and functioning. The device shows good overall hit efficiency as well as clear spatial hit correlation to tracks measured in a silicon reference telescope. A position resolution of 14.8 {mu}m was observed, consistent with expectations given the detector pitch.

  16. Surface properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by CVD and PVD methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dong-Ping; Liu Yan-Hong; Chen Bao-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited using three different techniques: (a) electron cyclotron resonance-plasma source ion implantation, (b) low-pressure dielectric barrier discharge, (c) filtered-pulsed cathodic arc discharge. The surface and mechanical properties of these films are compared using atomic force microscopebased tests. The experimental results show that hydrogenated DLC films are covered with soft surface layers enriched with hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon while the soft surface layers of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films have graphite-like structure. The formation of soft surface layers can be associated with the surface diffusion and growth induced by the low-energy deposition process. For typical CVD methods, the atomic hydrogen in the plasmas can contribute to the formation of hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon enriched surface layers. The high-energy ion implantation causes the rearrangement of atoms beneath the surface layer and leads to an increase in film density. The ta-C films can be deposited using the medium energy carbon ions in the highly-ionized plasma.

  17. Selective growth of diamond by hot filament CVD using patterned carbon film as mask

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zhoutong; YANG Shumin; LI Qintao; ZHU Dezhang; GONG Jinlong

    2008-01-01

    Selected-area deposition (SAD) of diamond films was achieved on silicon substrates with carbon film mask by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Needle tip scraped lines were used to grow diamond films. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigation demonstrates that highly selective and sharp edged diamond films were produced. The results also demonstrate that the proper substrate temperature is very important for diamond selective growth in this deposition process. Since the enhancement of diamond growth was not observed on the needle tip scraped area of Si wafer with diamond powder scratching, the selective growth was considered to be closely correlated to silicon carbide formed during carbon film deposition and the residual carbon in the scraped area.

  18. Morphology of Diamond Layers Grown on Different Facets of Single Crystal Diamond Substrates by a Microwave Plasma CVD in CH4-H2-N2 Gas Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny E. Ashkinazi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial growth of diamond films on different facets of synthetic IIa-type single crystal (SC high-pressure high temperature (HPHT diamond substrate by a microwave plasma CVD in CH4-H2-N2 gas mixture with the high concentration (4% of nitrogen is studied. A beveled SC diamond embraced with low-index {100}, {110}, {111}, {211}, and {311} faces was used as the substrate. Only the {100} face is found to sustain homoepitaxial growth at the present experimental parameters, while nanocrystalline diamond (NCD films are produced on other planes. This observation is important for the choice of appropriate growth parameters, in particular, for the production of bi-layer or multilayer NCD-on-microcrystalline diamond (MCD superhard coatings on tools when the deposition of continuous conformal NCD film on all facet is required. The development of the film morphology with growth time is examined with SEM. The structure of hillocks, with or without polycrystalline aggregates, that appear on {100} face is analyzed, and the stress field (up to 0.4 GPa within the hillocks is evaluated based on high-resolution mapping of photoluminescence spectra of nitrogen-vacancy NV optical centers in the film.

  19. CVD grown diamond: A new material for high power CO{sub 2}-lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massart, M.; Union, P.; Muys, P. [Radius Engineering N.V., Gent (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    In CO{sub 2} laser engineering, combining high output power with low distortion of the laser beam is an ongoing challenge, leading to a search for optics with low absorption and high thermal conductivity. As CVD diamond has recently become available in larger sizes and with better surface quality, this material can now be assessed for use in high power CO{sub 2} laser optics. This paper presents the systematic study of diamond as a substrate material for optics at 10.6 microns. CO{sub 2}-laser calorimetry has been used for the measurement of absorption of laser power in uncoated and antireflection coated diamond optics. The bulk absorption coefficient of natural and CVD diamond is more than a magnitude higher than that of ZnSe, however, a laser window needs to be antireflection coated, and this (together with the ability to use thinner windows of diamond because of its greater strength) reduces the increase in overall absorption for the window to about a factor of three (or {approximately} 0.7%). In high power applications this is more than compensated for by the substantially higher thermal conductivity of diamond. Laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) measurements have been made on antireflection coated diamond optics. These measurements have been performed using a TEA CO{sub 2}-laser with a peak pulse width of 150 ns at 10.6 microns, and the results are reported here.

  20. Deep levels in CVD diamond and their influence on the electronic properties of diamond-based radiation sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, M.; Lagomarsino, S.; Menichelli, D.; Miglio, S.; Pini, S.; Sciortino, S. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Via S. Marta 3, 50139 Firenze (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); INFM, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Firenze (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Scaringella, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Via S. Marta 3, 50139 Firenze (Italy)

    2002-10-16

    Deep levels in undoped chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films have been characterized by thermally stimulated current spectroscopy (TSC) in the range of 300-650 K. The TSC results have been tentatively correlated to the performance of the samples as on-line dosimeters and particle detectors. The TSC signal is dominated by a set of deep levels with an activation energy in the range of 1.0-1.4 eV. The trapping activity of these levels, which can be related to grain boundaries, strongly influences the detector performance at room temperature. After neutron irradiation up to the fluence of 2 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} the amplitude of the TSC signal decreases of about one order of magnitude, the pumping effect becomes significantly less pronounced and the charge collection efficiency decreases of about 30%. Thus, the radiation-induced removal of these deep levels must be accompanied by the creation of other traps, probably vacancy-related and not visible by TSC in this temperature range, which have little effect on the dynamic response of the device but can affect the charge collection efficiency. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Plasma Processes : Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Patil; K Ramachandran; N Venkatramani; M Pandey; R D'Cunha

    2000-11-01

    The promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, etching of polymers to improve bonding of the other materials etc. With a 2.45 GHz, 700 W, microwave induced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system set up in our laboratory we have deposited diamond like carbon coatings. The microwave plasma generation was effected using a wave guide single mode applicator. We have deposited DLC coatings on the substrates like stainless steel, Cu–Be, Cu and Si. The deposited coatings have been characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometric techniques. The results show that we have achieved depositing ∼ 95% sp3 bonded carbon in the films. The films are uniform with golden yellow color. The films are found to be excellent insulators. The ellipsometric measurements of optical constant on silicon substrates indicate that the films are transparent above 900 nm.

  2. Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, D. S.; Ramachandran, K.; Venkataramani, N.; Pandey, M.; D'Cunha, R.

    2000-11-01

    he promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, etching of polymers to improve bonding of the other materials etc. With a 2.45 GHz, 700 W, microwave induced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system set up in our laboratory we have deposited diamond like carbon coatings. The microwave plasma generation was effected using a wave guide single mode applicator. We have deposited DLC coatings on the substrates like stainless steel, Cu--Be, Cu and Si. The deposited coatings have been characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometric techniques. The results show that we have achieved depositing ~ 95% sp3 bonded carbon in the films. The films are uniform with golden yellow color. The films are found to be excellent insulators. The ellipsometric measurements of optical constant on silicon substrates indicate that the films are transparent above 900 nm.

  3. Pulse-shape analysis for gamma background rejection in thermal neutron radiation using CVD diamond detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavrigin, P., E-mail: pavel.kavrigin@cividec.at [Vienna University of Technology (Austria); Finocchiaro, P., E-mail: finocchiaro@lns.infn.it [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Griesmayer, E., E-mail: erich.griesmayer@cividec.at [Vienna University of Technology (Austria); Jericha, E., E-mail: jericha@ati.ac.at [Vienna University of Technology (Austria); Pappalardo, A., E-mail: apappalardo@lns.infn.it [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Weiss, C., E-mail: Christina.Weiss@cern.ch [Vienna University of Technology (Austria); European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-09-21

    A novel technique for the rejection of gamma background from charged-particle spectra was demonstrated using a CVD diamond detector with a {sup 6}Li neutron converter installed at a thermal neutron beamline of the TRIGA research reactor at the Atominstitut (Vienna University of Technology). Spectra of the alpha particles and tritons of {sup 6}Li(n,T){sup 4}He thermal neutron capture reaction were separated from the gamma background by a new algorithm based on pulse-shape analysis. The thermal neutron capture in {sup 6}Li is already used for neutron flux monitoring, but the ability to remove gamma background allows using a CVD diamond detector for thermal neutron counting. The pulse-shape analysis can equally be applied to all cases where the charged products of an interaction are absorbed in the diamond and to other background particles that fully traverse the detector.

  4. Thin film deposition of diamond using normal paraffins as source of diamond nucleation centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershova, A., E-mail: ershovaangelina@mail.ru [Nano-Technology Laboratory, Triangle Inc., 01079 (Ukraine); Eizenbraun, A. [Nano-Technology Laboratory, Triangle Inc., 01079 (Ukraine)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Paraffin compounds are diamond nucleation sources. ► Thermoconductivity of Cu–DTF device is higher than such conductivity of Cu. ► DTF growth in HFCVD reactor is not linear function of time. -- Abstract: We propose a process for diamond thin film (DTF) deposition using normal paraffins (nP) as source of diamond nucleation centers. We deposited micro-crystalline diamond thin films (MCDTF) on a Cu substrate using Hot Filament CVD (HFCVD) and Passive Pt/Pd Surface Catalysis (PPt/PdSC) methods. Beeswax and a 1:1 mixture of normal paraffins of the general formula CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub n}CH{sub 3} with n = 22 and 26 were tested as nP starting material. The films obtained were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), Raman scattering temperature dependent spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, all of which confirmed that the deposited material is MCDTF.

  5. Simultaneous synthesis of nanodiamonds and graphene via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW PE-CVD) on copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Steven; Wöhrl, Nicolas; Schulz, Stephan; Buck, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous growth of both nanodiamonds and graphene on copper samples is described for the first time. A PE-CVD process is used to synthesize graphene layers and nanodiamond clusters from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture as it is typically done successfully in thermal CVD processes for graphene synthesis. However, the standard thermal CVD process is not without problems since the deposition of graphene is affected by the evaporation of a notable amount of copper caused by the slow temperature increase typical for thermal CVD resulting in a long process time. In sharp contrast, the synthesis of graphene by PE-CVD can circumvent this problem by substantially shortening the process time at holding out the prospect of a lower substrate temperature. The reduced thermal load and the possibility to industrially scale-up the PE-CVD process makes it a very attractive alternative to the thermal CVD process with respect to the graphene production in the future. Nanodiamonds are synthesized in PE-CVD reactors for a long time because these processes offer a high degree of control over the film's nanostructure and simultaneously providing a significant high deposition rate. To model the co-deposition process, the three relevant macroscopic parameters (pressure, gas mixture and microwave power) are correlated with three relevant process properties (plasma ball size, substrate temperature and C2/Hα-ratio) and the influence on the quality of the deposited carbon allotropes is investigated. For the evaluation of the graphene as well as the nanodiamond quality, Raman spectroscopy used whereas the plasma properties are measured by optical methods. It is found that the diamond nucleation can be influenced by the C2/Hα-ratio in the plasma, while the graphene quality remains mostly unchanged by this parameter. Moreover it is derived from the experimental data that the direct plasma contact with the copper surface is beneficial for the nucleation of the diamond while the growth and

  6. Preparation of diamond/Cu microchannel heat sink by chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘学璋; 罗浩; 苏栩; 余志明

    2015-01-01

    A Ti interlayer with thickness about 300 nm was sputtered on Cu microchannels, followed by an ultrasonic seeding with nanodiamond powders. Adherent diamond film with crystalline grains close to thermal equilibrium shape was tightly deposited by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD). The nucleation and growth of diamond were investigated with micro-Raman spectroscope and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). Results show that the nucleation density is found to be up to 1010 cm−2. The enhancement of the nucleation kinetics can be attributed to the nanometer rough Ti interlayer surface. An improved absorption of nanodiamond particles is found, which act as starting points for the diamond nucleation during HF-CVD process. Furthermore, finite element simulation was conducted to understand the thermal management properties of prepared diamond/Cu microchannel heat sink.

  7. Single crystal CVD diamond membranes for betavoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfaure, C.; Pomorski, M.; de Sanoit, J.; Bergonzo, P.; Saada, S.

    2016-06-01

    A single crystal diamond large area thin membrane was assembled as a p-doped/Intrinsic/Metal (PIM) structure and used in a betavoltaic configuration. When tested with a 20 keV electron beam from a high resolution scanning electron microscope, we measured an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 1.85 V, a charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 98%, a fill-factor of 80%, and a total conversion efficiency of 9.4%. These parameters are inherently linked to the diamond membrane PIM structure that allows full device depletion even at 0 V and are among the highest reported up to now for any other material tested for betavoltaic devices. It enables to drive a high short-circuit current Isc up to 7.12 μA, to reach a maximum power Pmax of 10.48 μW, a remarkable value demonstrating the high-benefit of diamond for the realization of long-life radioisotope based micro-batteries.

  8. Filmes de diamante CVD dopado com boro. Parte I . Histórico, produção e caracterização Boron-doped CVD diamond films. Part I. History, production and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Mendes de Barros

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a brief account concerning the production, characterization and evolution of the knowledge in the area of diamond and boron-doped diamond films. The most important methods used for the growth of these films, such as chemical vapor deposition and high pressure/high temperature systems, as well as the several kinds of reactors which can be employed are reviewed. However, larger emphasis is given to the CVD method. Morphological, structural and electric properties of these films, as well as their role in the performance of voltammetric electrodes for electrochemistry and electroanalytical chemistry are also discussed.

  9. Diamond films grown without seeding treatment and bias by hot-filament CVD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2012-04-01

    Diamond film growth without seeding treatment has been the subject of numerous studies. In the present study, diamond films with/without seeding treatment were grown on silicon using hot-filament chemical vapour deposition. An inexpensive and simple approach, namely, "dry ultrasonic treatment", was introduced in which full coverage of diamond film was achieved on unseeded substrate. For comparison, one substrate was seeded with 5 μm diamond particles, prior to deposition. The resulting diamond films were examined through standard characterization tools and distinct features were observed in each film. Here we present the results of uniform and high purity diamond film, free from nano-sized grains, which is grown without seeding treatment and is expected to be potential candidate for electro-optical applications, particularly as heat sinks.

  10. Electrical transport measurements and emission properties of freestanding single crystalline CVD diamond samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deferme, W.; Bogdan, A.; Bogdan, G. [Hasselt University, Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Diepenbeek (Belgium); Haenen, K.; Ceuninck, W. de [Hasselt University, Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw, Division IMOMEC, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Nesladek, M. [Hasselt University, Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMEC vzw, Division IMOMEC, Diepenbeek (Belgium); CEA/Saclay, LIST (CEA-Recherche Technologique)/DETECS/SSTM/LTD, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-09-15

    In this work time-of-flight (TOF) measurements are performed on freestanding single crystalline (100) CVD diamond layers with different surface terminations. The transit properties and electron and hole mobility are measured for completely oxidised and completely hydrogenated diamonds. The results clearly show that the different terminations of the diamond surface have an influence on the electrical transport properties. Furthermore, evidence is given that oxygen-induced surface states influence the TOF spectra. Light emission at 235 nm and around 430 nm is observed when applying a pulsed electric field on the diamond. The small peak at 235 nm is attributed to free exciton recombination while the broad band at 430 nm is contributed to A-band luminescence. Emission spectra at voltages as high as 1.4 V/{mu}m are given and compared. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. The High performance of nanocrystalline CVD diamond coated hip joints in wear simulator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, M M; Amaral, M; Rodrigues, S P; Santos, R; Gouvea, C P; Archanjo, B S; Trommer, R M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F; Achete, C A

    2015-09-01

    The superior biotribological performance of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was already shown to demonstrate high wear resistance in ball on plate experiments under physiological liquid lubrication. However, tests with a close-to-real approach were missing and this constitutes the aim of the present work. Hip joint wear simulator tests were performed with cups and heads made of silicon nitride coated with NCD of ~10 μm in thickness. Five million testing cycles (Mc) were run, which represent nearly five years of hip joint implant activity in a patient. For the wear analysis, gravimetry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used. After 0.5 Mc of wear test, truncation of the protruded regions of the NCD film happened as a result of a fine-scale abrasive wear mechanism, evolving to extensive plateau regions and highly polished surface condition (Ra<10nm). Such surface modification took place without any catastrophic features as cracking, grain pullouts or delamination of the coatings. A steady state volumetric wear rate of 0.02 mm(3)/Mc, equivalent to a linear wear of 0.27 μm/Mc favorably compares with the best performance reported in the literature for the fourth generation alumina ceramic (0.05 mm(3)/Mc). Also, squeaking, quite common phenomenon in hard-on-hard systems, was absent in the present all-NCD system.

  12. Optical and structural properties of polycrystalline CVD diamond films grown on fused silica optical fibres pre-treated by high-power sonication seeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, R.; Śmietana, M.; Gnyba, M.; Gołunski, Ł.; Ryl, J.; Gardas, M.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the growth of polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond thin films on fused silica optical fibres has been investigated. The research results show that the effective substrate seeding process can lower defect nucleation, and it simultaneously increases surface encapsulation. However, the growth process on glass requires high seeding density. The effects of suspension type and ultrasonic power were the specific objects of investigation. In order to increase the diamond density, glass substrates were seeded using a high-power sonication process. The highest applied power of sonotrode reached 72 W during the performed experiments. The two, most common diamond seeding suspensions were used, i.e. detonation nanodiamond dispersed in (a) dimethyl sulfoxide and (b) deionised water. The CVD diamond nucleation and growth processes were performed using microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition system. Next, the seeding efficiency was determined and compared using the numerical analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. The molecular composition of nucleated diamond was examined with micro-Raman spectroscopy. The sp3/sp2 band ratio was calculated using Raman spectra deconvolution method. Thickness, roughness, and optical properties of the nanodiamond films in UV-vis wavelength range were investigated by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry. It has been demonstrated that the high-power sonication process can improve the seeding efficiency on glass substrates. However, it can also cause significant erosion defects at the fibre surface. We believe that the proposed growth method can be effectively applied to manufacture the novel optical fibre sensors. Due to high chemical and mechanical resistance of CVD diamond films, deposition of such films on the sensors is highly desirable. This method enables omitting the deposition of an additional adhesion interlayer at the glass-nanocrystalline interface, and thus potentially increases

  13. Recent Advances in the Deposition of Diamond Coatings on Co-Cemented Tungsten Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Polini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-cemented tungsten carbides, namely, hard metals are largely used to manufacture high wear resistant components in several manufacturing segments. Coating hard metals with superhard materials like diamond is of utmost interest as it can further extend their useful lifespan. The deposition of diamond coatings onto WC-Co can be extremely complicated as a result of poor adhesion. This can be essentially ascribed to (i the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients between diamond and WC-Co, at the typical high temperatures inside the chemical vapour deposition (CVD chamber, generates large residual stresses at the interface; (ii the role of surface Co inside the WC-Co matrix during diamond CVD, which promotes carbon dissolution and diffusion. The present investigation reviews the techniques by which Co-cemented tungsten carbides can be treated to make them prone to receive diamond coatings by CVD. Further, it proposes interesting ecofriendly and sustainable alternatives to further improve the diamond deposition process as well as the overall performance of the coated hard metals.

  14. Influence of intermittently etching on quality of CVD diamond thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Kan-cheng; XIA Yi-ben; WANG Lin-jun; LIU Jian-min; SU Qing-feng; XU Run; PENG Hong-yan; SHI Wei-min

    2006-01-01

    A new method,called growing-etching repetitional process based on hot filament chemical vapor deposition,was proposed to improve the quality of diamond film. During the deposition carbon source was intermittently closed letting hydrogen etch the surface of the diamond film from time to time. In order to find whether it is helpful to the films' quality,a series of experiments were done. The results show that the new method can enhance the orientation of the chemical vapor deposition diamond films,reduce the graphite phase and increase the film's surface resistivity.

  15. Structure and wettability property of the growth and nucleation surfaces of thermally treated freestanding CVD diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaoqiang; Cheng, Shaoheng; Ma, Yibo; Wu, Danfeng; Liu, Junsong; Wang, Qiliang; Yang, Yizhou; Li, Hongdong

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the surface features and wettability properties of the (1 0 0)-textured freestanding chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films after thermal exposure in air at high temperature. Thermal oxidation at proper conditions eliminates selectively nanodiamonds and non-diamond carbons in the films. The growth side of the films contains (1 0 0)-oriented micrometer-sized columns, while its nucleation side is formed of nano-sized tips. The examined wettability properties of the as-treated diamond films reveal a hydrophilicity and superhydrophilicity on the growth surface and nucleation surface, respectively, which is determined by oxygen termination and geometry structure of the surface. When the surface termination is hydrogenated, the wettability of nucleation side converted from superhydrophilicity to high hydrophobicity, while the hydrophilicity of the growth side does not change significantly. The findings open a possibility for realizing freestanding diamond films having not only novel surface structures but also multifunction applications, especially proposed on the selected growth side or nucleation side in one product.

  16. Excitonic emission and N- and B-incorporation in homoepitaxial CVD-grown diamond investigated by cathodoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, D.; Kadri, M.; Wade, M.; Bustarret, E.; Deneuville, A.

    2005-03-01

    Diamond is a very large bandgap material arising high expectations either for optoelectronic applications or for active semiconducting layers in specific electronic devices to be used under extreme conditions of pressure, temperature, wear or radiation, as well as in chemically aggressive environments. Unintentionally boron-doped diamond layers were grown by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on {001}-oriented undoped Ib substrates with the addition of oxygen gas during growth. The relative quantities of nitrogen and boron incorporated in the diamond lattice are evaluated by cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra recorded at 5 K. Two different effects are shown to limit nitrogen incorporation: the substrate crystalline quality and the addition of oxygen into the precursor during the growth. First, the CL spectra are shown to change strongly near the edges of the substrate in the regions corresponding to different bulk crystal growth modes. Some regions show a luminescence governed by UV emission while in other regions, where the H3 defect-related luminescence of the substrate is much stronger, the film UV emission is reduced. Second, the relative importance of the free exciton emission with respect to those from the nitrogen-related H3 centre and from the boron-bound exciton is shown to increase with the addition of oxygen during growth. Such observations are of first importance to improve the spectral emission and absorption threshold of the diamond material in the deep UV range.

  17. Study of the triton-burnup process in different JET scenarios using neutron monitor based on CVD diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsev, G.; Amosov, V.; Meshchaninov, S.; Popovichev, S.; Rodionov, R.

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of analysis of triton burn-up process using the data from diamond detector. Neutron monitor based on CVD diamond was installed in JET torus hall close to the plasma center. We measure the part of 14 MeV neutrons in scenarios where plasma current varies in a range of 1-3 MA. In this experiment diamond neutron monitor was also able to detect strong gamma bursts produced by runaway electrons arising during the disruptions. We can conclude that CVD diamond detector will contribute to the study of fast particles confinement and help predict the disruption events in future tokamaks.

  18. Direct optical interfacing of CVD diamond for deported NV-based sensing experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond is a very promising tool for numerous sensing applications like magnetometry or thermometry. In this paper, we demonstrate a compact and convenient device for magnetic field imaging where a commercial single mode photonic crystal fibre is directly coupled to a commercial CVD ppm diamond. We managed to excite and detect efficiently the luminescence from an ensemble of NV centres and also to perform Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) experiments where the NV hyperfine structure is perfectly resolved under continuous excitation and measurement.

  19. Time Dependent DD Neutrons Measurement Using a Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Detector on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tengfei; Peng, Xingyu; Chen, Zhongjing; Hu, Zhimeng; Ge, Lijian; Hu, Liqun; Zhong, Guoqiang; Pu, Neng; Chen, Jinxiang; Fan, Tieshuan

    2016-09-01

    A single crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector has been successfully employed for neutron measurements in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) plasmas. The scCVD diamond detector coated with a 5 μm 6LiF (95% 6Li enriched) layer was placed inside a polyethylene moderator to enhance the detection efficiency. The time-dependent neutron emission from deuteron plasmas during neutral beam injection (NBI) heating was obtained. The measured results are compared with that of fission chamber detectors, which always act as standard neutron flux monitors. The scCVD diamond detector exhibits good reliability, stability and the capability to withstand harsh radiation environments despite its low detection efficiency due to the small active volume. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB106004 and 2012GB101003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 91226102)

  20. Gas electron multiplier based on laser-perforated CVD diamond film: First tests

    CERN Document Server

    Franchino, S; Bolshakov, A; Ashkinazi, E; Kalkan, Y; Popovich, A; Komlenok, M; Sosnovtsev, V; Ralchenko, V

    2016-01-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) is widely used in modern gas detectors of ionizing radiation in experiments on high-energy physics at accelerators and in other fields of science. Typically the GEM devices are based on a dielectric foil with holes and electrodes on both sides. GEMs made by radiation-hard dielectrics or wide band-gap semiconductors are desirable for some applications. The results of the first tests of the gas electron multiplier made of radiation-hard materials, such as polycrystalline CVD diamond with a thickness of 100 microns is described. Here we report on fabrication of GEM based on free-standing polycrystalline CVD diamond film and its first test.

  1. CVD diamond wafers as large-area thermoluminescence detectors for measuring the spatial distribution of dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczewska, B.; Bilski, P.; Olko, P.; Olko, P.; Nesládek, M.; Bergonzo, P.; Rbisz, M.; Waligórski, M. P. R.

    2003-09-01

    The applicability of large-area CVD diamond wafers (diameter about 5 cm, thickness about 0.1 mm), read out as thermoluminescence (TL) detectors, for assessing two-dimensional (2-D) dose distribution over their area, was investigated. To obtain 2-D TL images, a special TL reader equipped with large-area planchet and a CCD camera instead of the usual PM tube was developed. Several 2-D TL images: of an alpha source (Am-241), a Ra-226 needle source and a Ru-106 ophthalmic applicator, were measured and high-resolution digital images obtained. Our preliminary results demonstrate the potential capability of large-area CVD diamond wafers, read out as TL detectors, in 2-D dosimetry for medical applications. (

  2. Radiation hardness of a single crystal CVD diamond detector for MeV energy protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yuki, E-mail: y.sato@riken.jp [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Murakami, Hiroyuki [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi-cho Toki-city, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Tsubota, Masakatsu [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ochiai, Kentaro [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shinichi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    We have fabricated a particle detector using single crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition. The irradiation dose dependence of the output pulse height from the diamond detector was measured using 3 MeV protons. The pulse height of the output signals from the diamond detector decreases as the amount of irradiation increases at count rates of 1.6–8.9 kcps because of polarization effects inside the diamond crystal. The polarization effect can be cancelled by applying a reverse bias voltage, which restores the pulse heights. Additionally, the radiation hardness performance for MeV energy protons was compared with that of a silicon surface barrier detector.

  3. a Design of Experiment Study of the Nucleation of Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi

    1995-01-01

    Because of its property, diamond has a unique role in the semiconductor and tool industry. As diamond synthesis technology advances, more and more applications are emerging. However, in order to take advantage of its exceptional property, reliable control of nucleation and growth must be accomplished. In this study, the author systematically studies the nucleation process in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds. Among many important intricacies concerning diamond nucleation on foreign surfaces, this study addresses the following issues: the role of ultrasonic pre-treatment in CVD; the correlation between hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) and microwave assisted chemical vapor deposition (MACVD) control parameters and the nucleation processes; the role of biasing substrates on the nucleation density in MACVD; the correlation between parameters of biasing substrates and the nucleation density; the reliable control of nucleation in CVD diamond synthesis. To achieve the goal of this research, a multi -purpose deposition system was built enabling the author to eliminate unnecessary variables in the deposition process. To ensure the accuracy of the nucleation effects of parameters investigated, great effort was made to calibrate measurement instruments so that noise or fluctuations in the experiments were minimized. The implementation of design of experiments (DOE), a systematic investigating technique, vastly improved the efficiency of this study over the less sophisticated empirical approach. In addition, DOE allowed the author to quantitatively estimate the effects of control parameters. Finally, diamond deposition was confirmed by Scanning Electron microscope, Micro Raman Scattering and Rutherford Backscattering. This research has successfully implemented DOE in estimating the effects of diamond nucleation quantitatively. The mechanism of ultrasonic pre-treatment is explained, and its effects are ascribed to seeding. The effects of primary CVD

  4. Novel Diamond Films Synthesis Strategy: Methanol and Argon Atmosphere by Microwave Plasma CVD Method Without Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Jiang, Caiyi; Guo, Shenghui; Zhang, Libo; Gao, Jiyun; Peng, Jinhui; Hu, Tu; Wang, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Diamond thin films are grown on silicon substrates by only using methanol and argon mixtures in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. It is worth mentioning that the novel strategy makes the synthesis reaction works smoothly without hydrogen atmosphere, and the substrates temperature is only 500 °C. The evidence of surface morphology and thickness under different time is obtained by characterizing the samples using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectrum reveals that the preferential orientation of (111) plane sample is obtained. The Raman spectra indicate that the dominant component of all the samples is a diamond. Moreover, the diamond phase content of the targeted films was quantitatively analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method, and the surface roughness of diamond films was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Meanwhile, the possible synthesis mechanism of the diamond films in methanol- and argon-mixed atmosphere was discussed.

  5. Oxidative Degradation of High Quality CVD Diamond%高质量CVD金刚石膜的氧化损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敬明; 唐伟忠; 吕反修

    2001-01-01

    Studies of the oxidative degradation of high quality diamond have been conducted to better define the limits of application at high temperature.The infrared(IR)and visible optical performance of polished chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films were degraded seriously after heating at 780℃ for 15min,while heating at 780℃ for 3 min produced a little change .Microscopic etched features were revealed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM),atomic force microscopy (AFM),and Talystep surface profiles.Many of the etched features are concentrated at a variety of defects including grain boundaries,surface porosity etc. The results of heating are increasing the surface roughness of CVD diamond films and degradation of the infrared transmittance.%高质量CVD金刚石膜的高温损伤的研究是其高温应用的基础。抛光的金刚石膜经780℃保温3min后,红外透过和可见光的透过率开始下降;780℃保温15min后,其红外透过和可见光的透过率严重受损。扫描电镜、原子力学显微镜及台阶仪的结果表明:CVD金刚石膜氧化的开始阶段主要集中在晶界、表面孔洞等缺陷处,随后导致金刚石膜的晶面也开始刻蚀,表面粗糙度增大,最终使得金刚石膜丧失红外和可见光的透过。

  6. High-temperature characteristics of charge collection efficiency using single CVD diamond detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubota, Masakatsu, E-mail: tsubota@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kaneko, Junichi H.; Miyazaki, Daijirou; Shimaoka, Takehiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ueno, Katsunori; Tadokoro, Takahiro [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 2-1, Omika, 7-chome, Hitachi 319-1221, Ibaraki (Japan); Chayahara, Akiyoshi [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31, Midorigaoka, Ikeda 563-8577, Osaka (Japan); Watanabe, Hideyuki; Kato, Yukako; Shikata, Shin-ichi [Research Institute for Electronics and Photonics, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8562, Ibaraki (Japan); Kuwabara, Hitoshi [Infrastructure Systems Co., Hitachi, Ltd., 2-1, Omika-cho, 5-chome, Hitachi 319-1293, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2015-07-21

    We synthesized single-crystal diamonds using microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition and evaluated the temperature dependence of the diamond radiation detectors. We achieved charge collection efficiency of the hole of 96.9% with 3.0% energy resolution at 473 K. In the case of electrons, they became undetectable at temperatures higher than 373 K. It is possible that carrier trapping generated with frequency or the leakage current increased. The detector produced by the diamond in Diamond Detector Ltd. detector, operates normally at 523 K. Electrons can be measured at 573 K. We discussed the characteristics of charge carrier transport in the diamond detector to prepare for future use at higher temperatures. - Highlights: • We synthesized single-crystal diamonds and made the sandwich type detector. • Charge collection efficiency of the hole of 97% was achieved at high-temperature. • The radiation detector of the purchased diamond was stable operation at 573 K. • Increase of carrier trapping and the leakage current were the essential problems. • This study ascertains the current state of the art of diamond detectors.

  7. Field emission from carbon films deposited by VHF CVD on difference substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, A A; Andronov, A N; Felter, T E; Ioffe, A F; Kosarev, A I; Shotov, M V; Vinogradov, A J

    1999-04-01

    As previously demonstrated, non-diamond carbon (NDC) films deposited at low temperatures 200-300 C on silicon tips reduced the threshold of field emission. In this paper we will present the results of the study of field emission from flat NDC films prepared by VHF CVD. Emission measurements were performed in a diode configuration at approximately 10{sup {minus}10} Torr. NDC films were deposited on ceramic and on c-Si substrates sputter coated with layers of Ti, Cu, Ni and Pt. The back contact material influences the emission characteristics but not as a direct correlation to work function. A model of field emission from metal-NDC film structures will be discussed.

  8. Magnetic and cytotoxic properties of hot-filament chemical vapour deposited diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanin, Hudson, E-mail: hudsonzanin@gmail.com [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Peterlevitz, Alfredo Carlos; Ceragioli, Helder Jose [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rodrigues, Ana Amelia; Belangero, William Dias [Laboratorio de Biomateriais em Ortopedia, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Cinco de Junho 350 CEP 13083970, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Baranauskas, Vitor [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotonica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N.400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-12-01

    Microcrystalline (MCD) and nanocrystalline (NCD) magnetic diamond samples were produced by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) on AISI 316 substrates. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) measurements indicated the presence of Fe, Cr and Ni in the MCD and NCD samples, and all samples showed similar magnetisation properties. Cell viability tests were realised using Vero cells, a type of fibroblastic cell line. Polystyrene was used as a negative control for toxicity (NCT). The cells were cultured under standard cell culture conditions. The proliferation indicated that these magnetic diamond samples were not cytotoxic. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polycrystalline diamonds doped with Fe, Cr and Ni acquire ferromagnetic properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CVD diamonds have been prepared with magnetic and semiconductor properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro/nanocrystalline diamonds show good cell viability with fibroblast proliferation.

  9. High-Resolution Energy and Intensity Measurements with CVD Diamond at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Griesmayer, E; Dobos, D; Wenander, F; Bergoz, J; Bayle, H; Frais-Kölbl, H; Leinweber, J; Aumeyr, T; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2009-01-01

    A novel beam instrumentation device for the HIE-REX (High In-tensity and Energy REX) upgrade has been developed and tested at the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator ISOLDE, located at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). This device is based on CVD diamond detector technology and is used for measuring the beam intensity, particle counting and measuring the energy spectrum of the beam. An energy resolution of 0.6% was measured at a carbon ion energy of 22.8 MeV. This corresponds to an energy spread of ± 140 keV.

  10. A study of the charge collection properties of polycrystalline CVD diamond with synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, A; Watts, S; Ahmed, M; Da Via, C

    2011-01-01

    Polycrystalline CVD diamond samples have been prepared with different electrode configurations, allowing to produce an electric field parallel and perpendicular to the direction of the grain boundaries. A photon beam with an energy of 15 key was used to study the response with a spatial resolution of about 7 mu m. Results on the influence of the field direction on the signal, the pumping effect, and the signal response as a function of the film thickness were obtained. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Growth mechanisms and defects in boronated CVD diamond as identified by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, T. J.; Clausing, R. E.; Heatherly, L., Jr.; Warmack, R. J.; Thundat, T.; Feigerle, C. S.; Wandelt, K.

    1995-05-01

    Boron-doped CVD-diamond films were grown in a simple hot filament reactor. A set of samples grown using various methane-in-hydrogen concentrations has been examined by scanning tunneling microscopy in air. On the diamond (111) crystal faces monoatomic steps could be observed giving evidence for layer growth. At low CH4 concentrations the layers form triangular growth spirals. Screw dislocations in the middle of the spirals serve as continuous sources of steps for the layer growth producing (111) faces of high crystal perfection. At higher methane concentrations the crystal perfection declines and the (111) crystal faces exhibit a mosaic structure. The size of the subgrains in the mosaic pattern decreases with increasing CH4 concentration. Nucleation of new layers takes place at the subgrain boundaries. The topography of (001) crystal faces did not significantly change with the methane-in-hydrogen concentration and did not allow the determination of the underlying growth mechanism.

  12. Absolute x-ray and neutron calibration of CVD-diamond-based time-of-flight detectors for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, A.; Kabadi, N. V.; Sio, H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J.

    2016-10-01

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) detector at the National Ignition Facility routinely measures proton and neutron nuclear bang-times in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The active detector medium in pTOF is a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond biased to 250 - 1500 V. This work discusses an absolute measurement of CVD diamond sensitivity to continuous neutrons and x-rays. Although the impulse response of the detector is regularly measured on a diagnostic timing shot, absolute sensitivity of the detector's response to neutrons and x-rays has not been fully established. X-ray, DD-n, and DT-n sources at the MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility provide continuous sources for testing. CVD diamond detectors are also fielded on OMEGA experiments to measure sensitivity to impulse DT-n. Implications for absolute neutron yield measurements at the NIF using pTOF detectors will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DoE and LLNL.

  13. Influence of boron doping on mechanical and tribological properties in multilayer CVD-diamond coating systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAJAD HUSSAIN DIN; M A SHAH; N A SHEIKH; K A NAJAR; K RAMASUBRAMANIAN; S BALAJI; M S RAMACHANDRA RAO

    2016-12-01

    Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) substrates were deposited with smooth multilayer coatings, by hot filament chemical vapour deposition technique. The effect of boron doping on lattice parameter, residual stresses, hardness and coefficient of friction in multilayer-diamond coating system was studied. The frictional behaviour of the coatings was studied using a ball-on-disc micro-tribometer by sliding the coated samples of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) substrates against alumina (Al$_2$O$_3$) balls, and increasing normal load from 1 to 10N. The average friction coefficient decreased from 0.36 to 0.29 for undoped multilayer-diamond coating system and from 0.33 to 0.18 for borondoped (BD) multilayer-diamond coating system. The average indentation depths for undoped and BD multilayerdiamond coating systems were found to be equal to $\\sim$58 and $\\sim$65 nm, respectively, and their hardness values were 60 and 55~GPa, respectively.

  14. Development of a CVD diamond Beam Condition Monitor for CMS at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Hernando, L; Gray, R; Ilgner, C; MacPherson, A; Oh, A; Pritchard, T; Stone, R; Worm, S

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will store 2808 bunches per colliding beam, with each bunch consisting of 1011 protons at an energy of 7 TeV. If there is a failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damage not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor fast increments of particle fluxes near the interaction point and, if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control to dump the beams. The system is being developed initially for the CMS experiment but it is sufficiently general to find potential applications elsewhere. Due to its high radiation hardness, CVD diamond was chosen for investigation as the BCM sensor. Various samples of CVD diamond have been characterized extensively with both a 90Sr source and in high-intensity test beams in order to assess the capabilities of such sensors and to study whether this detector technology is suitable for a BCM system. A selection of results fro...

  15. X-ray beam monitor made by thin-film CVD single-crystal diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E; Prestopino, G; Verona, C; Verona-Rinati, G; Angelone, M; Pillon, M; Kachkanov, V; Tartoni, N; Benetti, M; Cannatà, D; Di Pietrantonio, F

    2012-11-01

    A novel beam position monitor, operated at zero bias voltage, based on high-quality chemical-vapor-deposition single-crystal Schottky diamond for use under intense synchrotron X-ray beams was fabricated and tested. The total thickness of the diamond thin-film beam monitor is about 60 µm. The diamond beam monitor was inserted in the B16 beamline of the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Harwell (UK). The device was characterized under monochromatic high-flux X-ray beams from 6 to 20 keV and a micro-focused 10 keV beam with a spot size of approximately 2 µm × 3 µm square. Time response, linearity and position sensitivity were investigated. Device response uniformity was measured by a raster scan of the diamond surface with the micro-focused beam. Transmissivity and spectral responsivity versus beam energy were also measured, showing excellent performance of the new thin-film single-crystal diamond beam monitor.

  16. The adhesion of hot-filament CVD diamond films on AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, J.G.; Shankar, P.; Enckevort, W.J.P. van; Schermer, J.J.; Meulen, J.J. ter

    2004-01-01

    Steel ball indentation and scratch adhesion testing of hot filament chemical vapour deposited diamond films onto AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel substrates using two different interlayer systems, namely chromium nitride and borided steel, have been investigated. In order to compare the adhe

  17. Can surface preparation with CVD diamond tip influence on bonding to dental tissues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecido Kawaguchi, Fernando; Brossi Botta, Sergio; Nilo Vieira, Samuel; Steagall Júnior, Washington; Bona Matos, Adriana

    2008-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) tips surface treatments of enamel and dentin on bonding resistance of two adhesive systems. Thirty embedded samples were divided in 12 groups ( n = 10), according to factors: substrate (enamel and dentin), adhesive system [etch-and-rinse (SB) and self-etch]; and the surface treatments (paper discs, impact CVD tips and tangential CVD tip). When CVD tip was used in the impact mode the tip was applied perpendicular to dental surface, while at tangential mode, the tip worked parallel to dental surface. Specimens were tested in tension after 24 h at 0.5 mm/min of cross-head speed. ANOVA results, in MPa showed that in enamel, only adhesive system factor was statistically significant ( p = 0.015) under tested conditions, with higher bond strength observed for SB groups. However, in dentin the best bonding performance was obtained in SE groups ( p = 0.00). In both tested substrates, results did not show statistically significant difference for factors treatment and its interactions. ConclusionsIt may be concluded that CVD-tip surface treatment, in both tested modes, did not influence on adhesion to enamel and dentin. But, it is important to choose adhesive system according to the tissue available to bonding.

  18. Cutting force and wear evaluation in peripheral milling by CVD diamond dental tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polini, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: polini@uniroma2.it; Allegri, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); Guarino, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Quadrini, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Sein, H. [Department of Chemistry and Materials, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom); Ahmed, W. [Department of Chemistry and Materials, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-22

    Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) tools are currently employed in dental application for prosthesis fabrication. The deposition of a diamond coating onto WC-Co tools could allow both to increase the tool life and tool performance at higher speeds. However, at present it is very difficult to quantify the effective advantage of the application of a diamond coating onto dental tools compared to traditional uncoated tools. Therefore, in this work, we have deposited diamond coatings onto WC-Co dental tools having different geometries by Hot Filament Chemical Vapour Deposition (HFCVD). Prior to deposition, the WC-Co tools were pre-treated in order to roughen the surface and to modify the chemical surface composition. The use of the HFCVD process enabled the deposition of a uniform coating despite the complex geometries of the dental mills. For the first time, in accordance to the knowledge of the authors, we have studied and compared the cutting behaviour of both virgin and diamond-coated dental tools by measuring both wear and cutting force time evolution under milling a very hard Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy. To ensure constant cutting rate (20,000-r.p.m. cutting rate, 0.01-m/min feed rate and 0.5-mm depth of cut), a proper experimental apparatus was used. Three different mill geometries were considered in both coated and uncoated conditions. The results showed that, under the high-speed conditions employed, uncoated tools underwent to catastrophic failure within a few seconds of machining. Diamond-coated tools exhibited much longer tool lives. Lower forces were measured when the coated tool was employed due to the much lower material-mill friction. The best behaviour was observed for coated mills with the presence of a chip-breaker.

  19. Industrial diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Estimated 2012 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2012, natural industrial diamonds were produced in at least 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 12 countries. About 99 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Belarus, China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. During 2012, China was the world’s leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by the United States and Russia. In 2012, the two U.S. synthetic producers, one in Pennsylvania and the other in Ohio, had an estimated output of 103 million carats, valued at about $70.6 million. This was an estimated 43.7 million carats of synthetic diamond bort, grit, and dust and powder with a value of $14.5 million combined with an estimated 59.7 million carats of synthetic diamond stone with a value of $56.1 million. Also in 2012, nine U.S. firms manufactured polycrystalline diamond (PCD) from synthetic diamond grit and powder. The United States government does not collect or maintain data for either domestic PCD producers or domestic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond producers for quantity or value of annual production. Current trade and consumption quantity data are not available for PCD or for CVD diamond. For these reasons, PCD and CVD diamond are not included in the industrial diamond quantitative data reported here.

  20. Hydrogen distribution in CVD diamond films prepared by DC arcjet operating at gas recycling mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen distribution and content in diamond films deposited by DC arcjet under gas recycling mode was evaluated by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometry. The NRA results show that the hydrogen content in diamond films was approximately 0.6% (substrate temperature 770℃), and strongly depended on the substrate temperature. It was that the hydrogen content increased with the increase of the substrate temperature. The possibility of hydrogen trapping in the films was also discussed.

  1. Nano- and microcrystalline diamond deposition on pretreated WC-Co substrates: structural properties and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, M. A.; Contin, A.; Rodríguez, L. A. A.; Vieira, J.; Campos, R. A.; Corat, E. J.; Trava Airoldi, V. J.

    2016-02-01

    Many developments have been made to improve the quality and adherence of CVD diamond films onto WC-Co hard metal tools by the removing the cobalt from the substrate surface through substrate pretreatments. Here we compare the efficiency of three chemical pretreatments of WC-Co substrates for this purpose. First, the work was focused on a detailed study of the composition and structure of as-polished and pretreated substrate surfaces to characterize the effects of the substrate preparation. Considering this objective, a set of WC-9% Co substrates, before and after pretreatment, was analyzed by FEG-SEM, EDS and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The second stage of the work was devoted to the evaluation of the influence of seeding process, using 4 nm diamond nanoparticles, on the morphology and roughness of the pretreated substrates. The last and most important stage was to deposit diamond coatings with different crystallite sizes (nano and micro) by hot-filament CVD to understand fully the mechanism of growth and adhesion of CVD diamond films on pretreated WC-Co substrates. The transition from nano to microcrystalline diamond was achieved by controlling the CH4/H2 gas ratio. The nano and microcrystalline samples were grown under same time at different substrate temperatures 600 °C and 800 °C, respectively. The different substrate temperatures allowed the analysis of the cobalt diffusion from the bulk to the substrate surface during CVD film growth. Furthermore, it was possible to evaluate how the coating adhesion is affected by the diffusion. The diamond coatings were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, XRD, EDS, FEG-SEM, atomic force microscope and 1500 N Rockwell indentation to evaluate the adhesion.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of metallic films on the surface of diamond particles for diamond saw blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Chao [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, Hubei 430074 (China); Luo Fei [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, HuBei 430074 (China); Long Hua [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Hu Shaoliu [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Li Bo [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Wang Youqing [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)]. E-mail: lchwan@hust.edu.cn

    2005-06-15

    Ti or Ni films have been deposited on the diamond particle surfaces by pulsed laser deposition. Compressive resistance of the uncoated and coated diamond particles was measured, respectively, in the experiments. The compressive resistance of the Ti-coated diamonds particles was found much higher than that of the uncoated ones. It increased by 39%. The surface morphology is observed by the metallography microscope. The surface of the uncoated diamonds particles had many hollows and flaws, while the surface of Ni-coated diamond particles was flat and smooth, and the surface of Ti-coated diamond particles had some metal masses that stood out of the surface of the Ti-coated film. The components of the metallic films of diamond particles were examined by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). TiC was found formed on the Ti-coated diamond surface, which resulted in increased surface bonding strength between the diamond particles and the Ti films. Meanwhile, TiC also favored improving the bonding strength between the coated diamond particles and the binding materials. Moreover, the bending resistance of the diamond saw blade made of Ti-coated diamond was drastically higher than that of other diamond saw blades, which also played an important role in improving the blade's cutting ability and lifetime. Therefore, it was most appropriate that the diamond saw blade was made of Ti-coated diamond particles rather than other materials.

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of FeNiCr Matrix-TiC Composite for Polishing CVD Diamond Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuji Jin; Zewei Yuan; Renke Kang; Boxian Dong

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic friction polishing (DFP) is one of the most promising methods appropriate for polishing CVD diamond film with high efficiency and low cost.By this method CVD diamond film is polished through being simply pressed against a metal disc rotating at a high speed utilizing the thermochemical reaction occurring as a result of dynamic friction between them in the atmosphere.However, the relatively soft materials such as stainless steel, cast iron and nickel alloy widely used for polishing CVD diamond film are easy to wear and adhere to diamond film surface, which may further lead to low efficiency and poor polishing quality.In this paper, FeNiCr matrix-TiC composite used as grinding wheel for polishing CVD diamond film was obtained by combination of mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS).The process of ball milling,composition, density, hardness, high-temperature oxidation resistance and wear resistance of the sintered piece were analyzed.The results show that TiC was introduced in MA-SPS process and had good combination with FeNiCr matrix and even distribution in the matrix.The density of composite can be improved by mechanical alloying.The FeNiCr matrix-TiC composite obtained at 1273 K was found to be superior to at 1173 K sintering in hardness, high-temperature oxidation resistance and wearability.These properties are more favorable than SUS304 for the preparation of high-performance grinding wheel for polishing CVD diamond film.

  4. Effect of argon during diamond deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, D.C.; Mengui, U.A.; Contin, A.; Trava-Airoldi, V.J.; Baldan, M.R.; Corat, E.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais

    2014-07-01

    The effect of argon content upon the growth rate and the properties of diamond thin films grown with different grains sizes is explored. An argon-free and argon-rich gas mixture of methane and hydrogen is used in a hot filament chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of the films is accomplished by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution x-ray diffraction. An extensive comparison of the growth rate values obtained in this study with those found in the literature suggests that there are distinct common trends for microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond growth, despite a large variation in the gas mixture composition. Included is a discussion of the possible reasons for these observations. (author)

  5. Superconductivity and low temperature electrical transport in B-doped CVD nanocrystalline diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Nesladek, Jiri J. Mares, Dominique Tromson, Christine Mer, Philippe Bergonzo, Pavel Hubik and Jozef Kristofik

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report on superconductivity (SC found in thin B-doped nanocrystalline diamond films, prepared by the PE-CVD technique. The thickness of the films varies from about 100 to 400 nm, the films are grown on low-alkaline glass at substrate temperatures of about 500–700 °C. The SIMS measurements show that films can be heavily doped with boron in concentrations in the range of 3×1021 cm−3. The Raman spectra show Fano resonances, confirming the substitutional B-incorporation. The low temperature magnetotransport measurements reveal a positive magnetoresistance. The SC transition is observed at about Tc=1.66 K. A simple theory exploiting the concept of weak localization accounting for this transition is proposed.

  6. Channeling Effect in Polycrystalline Deuterium-Saturated CVD Diamond Target Bombarded by Deuterium Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bagulya, A V; Negodaev, M A; Rusetskii, A S; Chubenko, A P; Ralchenko, V G; Bolshakov, A P

    2014-01-01

    At the ion accelerator HELIS at the LPI, the neutron yield is investigated in DD reactions within a polycrystalline deuterium-saturated CVD diamond, during an irradiation of its surface by a deuterium ion beam with the energy less than 30 keV. The measurements of the neutron flux in the beam direction are performed in dependence on the target angle, \\b{eta}, with respect to the beam axis. These measurements are performed using a multichannel detector based on He3 counters. A significant anisotropy in neutron yield is observed, it was higher by a factor of 3 at \\b{eta}=0 compared to that at \\b{eta} = +-45{\\deg}. The possible reasons for the anisotropy, including ion channeling, are discussed.

  7. Ultrasonic cavity preparation using CVD coated diamond bur: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcellos, Beatriz Tholt; Thompson, Jeffrey Y; de Paula Macedo, Manoel Roberto; de Oliveira Maia, Janaína Monalisa; Oda, Margareth; Garone-Netto, Narciso

    2013-01-01

    Before any restorative procedure can be undertaken a proper cavity preparation is required. This clinical step is the mechanical alteration of the tooth to receive a restorative material with which a satisfactory form, function and the esthetics of the tooth will be established. In recent years improvements in materials and techniques have been devised and new technologies are now available for this purpose. The aim of the present study is to report two clinical cases in which a CVD coated diamond bur coupled to an ultrasonic handpiece is used in dental preparation. This technique provides an accurate and conservative tooth preparation with ideal access and visibility and because of enhanced efficiency can also play a role in eliminating some of the patient discomfort of the dental treatment.

  8. Cryotribology of diamond and graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Ashaboglu, A.F.; Rabinowicz, E.R. [Francis Bitter Magnet Lab., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out on the tribological behavior of materials of interest in cryogenic applications, focusing on diamond and graphite. Both natural diamond (referred in the text as diamond) and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond (CVD-diamond) were used. The experiment was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures, from 4.2 to 293 K. Two basic scenarios of testing were used: (1) frictional coefficient ({mu}) vs velocity (v) characteristics at constant temperatures; (2) {mu} vs temperature (T) behavior at fixed sliding speeds. For diamond/CVD-diamond, graphite/CVD-diamond, stainless steel/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are virtually velocity independent. For each of diamond/graphite, alumina/graphite, and graphite/graphite pairs, the {partial_derivative}{mu}/{partial_derivative}v characteristic is favorable, i.e., positive. For diamond/CVD-diamond and graphite/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are nearly temperature independent between in the range 77 - 293 K. Each {mu} vs T plot for pin materials sliding on graphite disks has a peak at a temperature in the range 100 - 200 K.

  9. Effect of CVD-Diamond on the Tribological and Mechanical Performance of Titanium Alloy (Ti6Al4V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Din

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nano-crystalline diamond and microcrystalline diamond films have been separately deposited on chemically treated titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V substrates from methane/hydrogen (CH4/H2 gas mixture, using hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. The coatings have architecture of Ti6Al4V/NCD and Ti6Al4V/MCD. The as grown nano-crystalline diamond and microcrystalline diamond films were characterized using high resolution scanning electron microscope and Raman’s spectroscopy. The residual stresses along the surface of nano-crystalline diamond coatings and micro-crystalline diamond coatings are compressive in nature as shown by the Raman spectroscopy. Nanoindentation tests were also conducted using Berkovich nanoindenter for the purpose of measurement of hardness and elastic modulus values. The indentation depth for microcrystalline diamond coating was 65 nm, whereas for nanocrystalline diamond coating, it was 72 nm. Microcrystalline diamond and nanocrystalline diamond coatings have yielded the super-hardness of ~55 G Pa and ~38 G Pa respectively. The average coefficient of friction of microcrystalline diamond and nanocrystalline diamond coatings decrease from 0.305-0.27 to 0.068-0.053, respectively, when the load is increased from 1 N to 10 N. However, for conventional Ti6Al4V substrate the average coefficient of friction changes from 0.625 to 0.38 under the same input conditions.

  10. Method of porous diamond deposition on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskas, Vitor; Peterlevitz, Alfredo C.; Chang, Dahge C.; Durrant, Steven F.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the experimental results of the fabrication of porous diamond/porous silicon and porous diamond structures by chemical vapor deposition of diamond over a skeleton of porous silicon, replicating the porous surface geometry around the Si pores and also creating new porous diamond structures. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the diamond nuclei are deposited on the top of the porous silicon skeleton, forming isolated grains in the first nucleation stages, and then growing like the usual structure of most ceramic materials, making a self-sustained porous diamond structure. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the diamond films are of good quality, close to that of diamond films grown on crystalline silicon.

  11. Coaxial CVD diamond detector for neutron diagnostics at ShenGuang III laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Liu, Shenye; Chen, Zhongjing; Huang, Tianxuan; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Bolun; Pu, Yudong; Yan, Ji; Zhang, Xing; Song, Zifeng; Tang, Qi; Hou, Lifei; Ding, Yongkun; Zheng, Jian

    2017-06-01

    A coaxial, high performance diamond detector has been developed for neutron diagnostics of inertial confinement fusion at ShenGuangIII laser facility. A Φ10 mm × 1 mm "optical grade" chemical-vapor deposition diamond wafer is assembled in coaxial-designing housing, and the signal is linked to a SubMiniature A connector by the cathode cone. The coaxial diamond detector performs excellently for neutron measurement with the full width at half maximum of response time to be 444 ps for a 50 Ω measurement system. The average sensitivity is 0.677 μV ns/n for 14 MeV (DT fusion) neutrons at an electric field of 1000 V/mm, and the linear dynamic range is beyond three orders of magnitude. The ion temperature results fluctuate widely from the neutron time-of-flight scintillator detector results because of the short flight length. These characteristics of small size, large linear dynamic range, and insensitive to x-ray make the diamond detector suitable to measure the neutron yield, ion temperature, and neutron emission time.

  12. Plasma enhanced diamond deposition on steel and Si substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.S. Li; Y. Tang; W. Chen; Q. Yang; C. Xiao; A. Hirose

    2009-01-01

    Diamond growth on Fe-Cr-Al-Si steel and Si substrates was comparatively investigated in microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor with different deposition parameters. Adherent nanocrystalline diamond films were directly deposited on this steel substrate under a typical deposition condition, whereas microcrystalline diamond films were produced on Si wafer. With increasing CH4 concentration, reaction pressure, or the total gas flow rate, the quality of nanocrystalline diamond films formed on Fe-Cr-Al-Si substrates is gradually deteriorated in terms of density and adhesion. This impaired diamond quality on steels is primarily associated with a combined effect by the substrate composition and the specific process conditions that favor excessive nucleation of diamond.

  13. Novel diamond cells for neutron diffraction using multi-carat CVD anvils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehler, R; Molaison, J J; Haberl, B

    2017-08-01

    Traditionally, neutron diffraction at high pressure has been severely limited in pressure because low neutron flux required large sample volumes and therefore large volume presses. At the high-flux Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have developed new, large-volume diamond anvil cells for neutron diffraction. The main features of these cells are multi-carat, single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds, very large diffraction apertures, and gas membranes to accommodate pressure stability, especially upon cooling. A new cell has been tested for diffraction up to 40 GPa with an unprecedented sample volume of ∼0.15 mm(3). High quality spectra were obtained in 1 h for crystalline Ni and in ∼8 h for disordered glassy carbon. These new techniques will open the way for routine megabar neutron diffraction experiments.

  14. Low-temperature deposition of transparent diamond films with a microwave cavity plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulczynski, Michael J.

    1998-10-01

    Low-temperature diamond deposition with Microwave Cavity Plasma Reactor (MCPR) technology was investigated for application to temperature sensitive substrates. The substrate temperature during most CVD diamond deposition processes is typically greater then 600 C; however, there are some applications where temperature sensitive materials are used and the deposition temperature must be maintained below 550 C. These applications include materials like boro-silicate glass, which has a relatively low strain-point temperature, and integrated circuits that contain low melting point components. Experiments were conducted in three areas. The first area was MCPR development, the second was benchmark deposition and characterization of diamond films on silicon substrates and the third was deposition and characterization of diamond films on boro-silicate glass substrates. MCPR development included an investigation of various MCPR configurations that were designed and adapted for uniform, low-temperature diamond deposition over areas as large as 80-cm2. Reactors were investigated with end-feed microwave excitation and side-feed microwave excitation for maximum deposition area and uniformity. Various substrate receptor configurations were also investigated including a substrate heater and cooler. From these investigations, deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, deposition rate, deposition area and deposition uniformity were characterized. The benchmark silicon diamond deposition experiments were conducted for comparison to previous high temperature, >550 C, MCPR research and growth models. Here deposition results such as deposition rate and film quality were compared with applications of diamond growth models by Harris-Goodwin and Bachmann. Additionally, characterization experiments were conducted to investigate film attributes that are critical to optical applications, such as film surface roughness and deposition uniformity. Included as variables in these

  15. EFFECTS OF OPERATING CONDITIONS ON THE DEPOSITION OF GaAs IN A VERTICAL CVD REACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    JAE-SANG BAEK; JIN-HYO BOO; YOUN-JEA KIM

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study is needed to gain insight into the growth mechanism and improve the reactor design or optimize the deposition condition in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In this study, we have performed a numerical analysis of the deposition of gallium arsenide (GaAs) from trimethyl gallium (TMG) and arsine in a vertical CVD reactor. The effects of operating parameters, such as the rotation velocity of susceptor, inlet velocity, and inlet TMG fraction, are investigated and presented. The ...

  16. Control of crystallite size in diamond film chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Mark B.; Johnson, Linda F.; Klemm, Karl A.

    1992-12-01

    In depositing an adhering, continuous, polycrystalline diamond film of optical or semiconductor quality on a substrate, as by forming on the substrate a layer of a refractory nitride interlayer and depositing diamond on the interlayer without mechanical treatment or seeding of the substrate or the interlayer, the substrate is heated in a vacuum chamber containing a microwave activated mixture of hydrogen and a gas including carbon, and the size of deposited diamond crystallites and their rate of deposition selectively varied by a bias voltage applied to the substrate.

  17. Atomic-Scale Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of {100}-Oriented Diamond Film Growth in C-H and C-H-Cl Systems by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安希忠; 张禹; 刘国权; 秦湘阁; 王辅忠; 刘胜新

    2002-01-01

    We simulate the { 100}-oriented diamond film growth of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) under different modelsin C-H and C-H-CI systems in an atomic scale by using the revised kinetic Monte Carlo method. The sirnulationresults show that: (1) the CVD diamond flm growth in the C-H system is suitable for high substrate temperature,and the flm surface roughness is very coarse; (2) the CVD diamond film can grow in the C-H-C1 system eitherat high temperature or at low temperature, and the film quality is outstanding; (3) atomic CI takes ala activerole for the growth of diamond film, especially at low temperatures. The concentration of atomic C1 should becontrolled in a proper range.

  18. Interlayer utilization (including metal borides) for subsequent deposition of NSD films via microwave plasma CVD on 316 and 440C stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Jared

    . Surface boriding was implemented using the novel method of microwave plasma CVD with a mixture of hydrogen and diborane gases. On 440C bearings, dual phase boride layers of Fe2B and FeB were formed which supported adhered nanostructured diamond films. Continuity of the films was not seamless with limited regions remaining uncoated potentially corresponding to delamination of the film as evidenced by the presence of tubular structures presumably composed of sp2 bonded carbon. Surface boriding of 316 stainless steel discs was conducted at various powers and pressures to achieve temperatures ranging from 550-800 °C. The substrate boriding temperature was found to substantially influence the resultant interlayer by altering the metal boride(s) present. The lowest temperatures produced an interlayer where CrB was the single detected phase, higher temperatures yielded the presence of only Fe2B, and a combination of the two phases resulted from an intermediate boriding temperature. Compared with the more common, commercialized boriding methods, this a profound result given the problems posed by the FeB phase in addition to other advantages offered by CVD processes and microwave generated plasmas in general. Indentation testing of the boride layers revealed excellent adhesion strength for all borided interlayers, and above all, no evidence of cracking was observed for a sole Fe2B phase. As with boriding of 440C bearings, subsequent diamond deposition was achieved on these interlayers with substantially improved adhesion strength relative to diamond coated TiN interlayers. Both XRD and Raman spectroscopy confirmed a nanostructured diamond film with interfacial chromium carbides responsible for enhanced adhesion strength. Interlayers consisting solely of Fe2B have displayed an ability to support fully continuous nanostructured diamond films, yet additional study is required for consistent reproduction. This is in good agreement with initial work on pack borided high alloy steels

  19. Rare earth-doped alumina thin films deposited by liquid source CVD processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschanvres, J.L.; Meffre, W.; Joubert, J.C.; Senateur, J.P. [Ecole Nat. Superieure de Phys. de Grenoble, St. Martin d`Heres (France). Lab. des Materiaux et du Genie Phys.; Robaut, F. [Consortium des Moyens Technologiques Communs, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, BP 75, 38402 St Martin d`Heres (France); Broquin, J.E.; Rimet, R. [Laboratoire d`Electromagnetisme, Microondes et Optoelectronique, CNRS-Ecole Nationale Superieure d`Electronique et Radioelectricite de Grenoble, BP 257, 38016 Grenoble, Cedex (France)

    1998-07-24

    Two types of liquid-source CVD processes are proposed for the growth of rare earth-doped alumina thin films suitable as amplifying media for integrated optic applications. Amorphous, transparent, pure and erbium- or neodymium-doped alumina films were deposited between 573 and 833 K by atmospheric pressure aerosol CVD. The rare earth doping concentration increases by decreasing the deposition temperature. The refractive index of the alumina films increases as a function of the deposition temperature from 1.53 at 573 K to 1.61 at 813 K. Neodymium-doped films were also obtained at low pressure by liquid source injection CVD. (orig.) 7 refs.

  20. CVD金刚石涂层拉丝模温度场数值分析%Numerical Analysis of CVD Diamond Wire Drawing Temperature Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄美健; 左敦稳; 卢文壮; 徐锋; 张旭辉

    2012-01-01

    Substrate temperature is one of the key parameters in diamond hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). Uniform substrate temperature field is even more important in diamond deposition on the interior surface of wire drawing. This paper carries out numerical analysis of the temperature field of wire drawing in HFCVD system and obtains the temperature distribution and the influence characteristics of the hot filament parameters on the magnitude and uniformity of substrate temperature field, which provide a guide for the fabrication of the CVD diamond wire drawing.%衬底温度是热丝化学气相沉积(HFCVD)制备金刚石薄膜的重要参数之一,在拉丝模表面沉积CVD金刚石涂层时,均匀的衬底温度场显得尤为重要.对HFCVD系统中制备CVD金刚石涂层时拉丝模衬底温度场进行数值分析,得到了拉丝模温度场的分布和热丝参数对衬底温度场的影响规律,为CVD金刚石涂层拉丝模的制备提供重要指导.

  1. Luminescence and conductivity studies on CVD diamond exposed to UV light

    CERN Document Server

    Bizzarri, A; Bruzzi, M; Sciortino, S

    1999-01-01

    The photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL) and thermally stimulated currents (TSC) of four high-quality CVD diamond films have been investigated in the range of temperatures between 300 and 700 K. The sample excitation has been carried out by means of an UV xenon lamp and UV laser lines. The features of the signals have been found equal to those obtained from particle excitation. The TL analysis shows the existence of several deep traps with activation energies between 0.6 and 1.0 eV. The contribution to the TL signal from different traps has been singled out by means of successive annealing processes. The TL results are in good agreement with those obtained from TSC measurements. The combined use of the two techniques allows a precise determination of the trap parameters. The spectral content of the TL response has also been compared with the PL signal in order to investigate the recombination process. This analysis shows that, in this temperature range, the TL signal is likely due to recombination ...

  2. Luminescence and conductivity studies on CVD diamond exposed to UV light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, A.; Bogani, F.; Bruzzi, M.; Sciortino, S.

    1999-04-01

    The photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL) and thermally stimulated currents (TSC) of four high-quality CVD diamond films have been investigated in the range of temperatures between 300 and 700 K. The sample excitation has been carried out by means of an UV xenon lamp and UV laser lines. The features of the signals have been found equal to those obtained from particle excitation. The TL analysis shows the existence of several deep traps with activation energies between 0.6 and 1.0 eV. The contribution to the TL signal from different traps has been singled out by means of successive annealing processes. The TL results are in good agreement with those obtained from TSC measurements. The combined use of the two techniques allows a precise determination of the trap parameters. The spectral content of the TL response has also been compared with the PL signal in order to investigate the recombination process. This analysis shows that, in this temperature range, the TL signal is likely due to recombination from bound states rather than due to radiative free to bound transitions, as generally assumed in TL theory. The TSC signal is likely to arise from impurity band rather than from free carriers conduction.

  3. Characterizations of microwave plasma CVD grown polycrystalline diamond coatings for advanced technological applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awadesh Kumar Mallik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycrystalline diamond (PCD coatings ranging from few microns to several hundred microns thickness have been grown by 915 MHz microwave plasma reactor with 9000 W power. The coatings were deposited on 100 mm diameter silicon (Si substrate from few hours to several days of continuous runs. PCD coatings were made freestanding by wet chemical etching technique. The deposited PCDs were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS for physical characterization and compared with authors’ earlier work. Refractive index of 2.41 was obtained at 633 nm wavelength and a maximum of 6.6 W·cm-1K-1 value for thermal conductivity could be achieved with the grown coatings. The values are well above the existing non-diamond heat spreading substrates, which makes the grown PCDs as candidates for heat spreaders in different technological applications. High refractive index along with translucent nature of the white freestanding PCDs, make them potential candidate for optical windows.

  4. Laser diagnostics of chemical vapour deposition of diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Wills, J B

    2002-01-01

    Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) has been used to make diagnostic measurements of chemically activated CH sub 4 / H sub 2 gas mixtures during the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of thin diamond films. Absolute absorbances, concentrations and temperatures are presented for CH sub 3 , NH and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a hot filament (HF) activated gas mixture and CH, C sub 2 and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a DC arc plasma jet activated mixture. Measurements of the radical species were made using a pulsed dye laser system to generate tuneable visible and UV wavelengths. These species have greatest concentration in the hottest, activated regions of the reactors. Spatial profiling of the number densities of CH sub 3 and NH radicals have been used as stringent tests of predictions of radical absorbance and number densities made by 3-D numerical simulations, with near quantitative agreement. O sub 2 has been shown to reside in the activated region of the Bristol DC arc jet at concentrations (approx 10 sup 1 sup 3 molecules / cm...

  5. High-Rate Growth and Nitrogen Distribution in Homoepitaxial Chemical Vapour Deposited Single-crystal Diamond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-Dong; ZOU Guang-Tian; WANG Qi-Liang; CHENG Shao-Heng; LI Bo; L(U) Jian-Nan; L(U) Xian-Yi; JIN Zeng-Sun

    2008-01-01

    High rate (> 50 μm/h) growth of homoepitaxial single-crystal diamond (SCD) is carried out by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) with added nitrogen in the reactant gases of methane and hydrogen,using a polycrystalline-CVD-diamond-film-made seed holder. Photoluminescence results indicate that the nitrogen concentration is spatially inhomogeneous in a large scale,either on the top surface or in the bulk of those as-grown SCDs.The presence of N-distribution is attributed to the facts: (I) a difference in N-incorporation efficiency and (ii) N-diffusion,resulting from the local growth temperatures changed during the high-rate deposition process.In addition,the formed nitrogen-vacancy centres play a crucial role in N-diffusion through the growing crystal.Based on the N-distribution observed in the as-grown crystals,we propose a simple method to distinguish natural diamonds and man-made CVD SCDs.Finally,the disappearance of void defect on the top surface of SCDs is discussed to be related to a filling-in mechanism.

  6. Hot-filament chemical vapour deposition of diamond onto steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, Ivan

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of this project was to establish the feasibility of depositing well adhering polycrystalline diamond coatings on steel substrates. It is well known that the growth and adhesion of diamond layers directly onto steels is complicated by the high carbon solubility and the high thermal expa

  7. Influence of growth conditions on microstructure and defects in diamond coatings grown by microwave plasma enhanced CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kalyan Sundar Pal; Sandip Bysakh; Awadesh Kumar Mallik; Nandadulal Dandapat; Someswar Datta; Bichitra K Guha

    2015-06-01

    Diamond coatings were grown on SiO2/Si substrate under various process conditions by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) using CH4/H2 gas mixture. In this paper, we present a microstructural study to elucidate on the growth mechanism and evolution of defects, viz., strain, dislocations, stacking faults, twins and non-diamond impurities in diamond coatings grown under different process conditions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the diamond coatings. It has been shown that our new approach of prolonged substrate pre-treatment under hydrogen plasma yielded a new growth sequence that the SiO2 layer on the Si substrate was first reduced to yield Si layer of ∼150 nm thickness before diamond was allowed to grow under CH4–H2 plasma, created subsequently. It has also been shown that Si and O as impurity from the substrate hinders the initial diamond growth to yield non-diamond phases. It is being suggested that the crystal defects like twins, stacking faults, dislocations in the diamond grains and dislocations in the intermediate Si layer are generated due to the development of non-uniform stresses during diamond growth at high temperature.

  8. Fission reactor flux monitors based on single-crystal CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, M.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' (Italy); Milani, E. [INFN - Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' (Italy); Angelone, M.; Lattanzi, D.; Pillon, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via E. Fermi 45, 00144 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Rosa, R. [Dipartimento Fusione e Presidio Nucleare ENEA C.R. Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Roma (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    Diamond based thermal neutron flux monitors have been fabricated using single crystal diamond films, grown by chemical vapour deposition. A 3 {mu}m thick {sup 6}LiF layer was thermally evaporated on the detector surface as a converting material for thermal neutron monitoring via the {sup 6}Li(n, {alpha}) T nuclear reaction. The detectors were tested in a fission nuclear reactor. One of them was positioned 80 cm above the core mid-plane, where the neutron flux is 2.2 x 10{sup 9} neutrons/cm{sup 2}s at 1 MW resulting in a device count rate of about 150000 cps. Good stability and reproducibility of the device output were proved over the whole reactor power range (up to 1 MW). During the irradiation, several pulse height spectra were recorded, in which both products of the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha})T reaction, e.g. 2.73 MeV tritium and the 2.06 MeV {alpha}, were clearly identified, thus excluding a degradation of the detector response. A comparison with a reference fission chamber monitor pointed out a limitation of the adopted readout electronics at high count rates, due to multiple pile-up processes. However, once this effect is properly accounted for, a good linearity of the diamond flux monitor response is observed as a function of the fission chamber one, as well as an excellent agreement between the temporal behaviour of the two detector response. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Morphology Analysis of Nickel-boron/ diamond Electroless Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin; ZHU Xuanmin; ZHOU Jian; OUYANG Shixi

    2008-01-01

    The influences of mass concentration of nickel chloride hexahydrate, sodium borohydride,ethylenediamine, pH value, bath temperature on deposition rate were studied with orthogonal experiments by a series of pre-treatments on micro-diamond particle, and the optimized parameters were obtained. Both the morphology and the composition of original diamond and the diamond with Ni-B coating were analyzed by SEM and XRD respectively. The SEM image shows that the spherical Ni-B particle is coated upon diamond.XRD pattern shows that the coating compositions are Ni and Ni2B.

  10. Tantalum Coating of Steel, Copper, Aluminum, and Titanium by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Bjerrum, Niels

    1998-01-01

    Tantalum coatings ranging from 0.5 to 120 mm has been deposited by CVD at 625-1000 C using tantalum pentachloride as precursor. Deposition rates range from 1 to 80mm/h and an activation energy of 103 kJ/mole is calculated. Well adhering deposits has been obtained on stainless steel, carbon steels...

  11. Room temperature CVD diamond X-ray and charged particle microdetectors

    CERN Document Server

    Vittone, E; Lo Giudice, A; Polesello, P; Manfredotti, C

    1999-01-01

    Hot filament chemical vapour deposition technique is particularly suitable for the realisation of diamond tip and wire detectors working in a coaxial geometry with a built-in internal metal electrode. By using tungsten wires of different diameters and by controlling the shape of the tip by an electrochemical etch, it is possible to obtain various kinds of microdetectors, with diameters ranging from 50 to 300 mu m. The response of these diamond tip and wire detectors has been tested at low X-ray energies (50-250 keV) and at relatively high energies (6-15 MeV) both in terms of sensitivity (collected charge with respect to the absorbed dose) and of linearity as a function of X-ray fluence. Sensitivities larger than 2 nC/Gy are achieved, with a good linearity in the dose rate range used in applications. Such microprobes have been proved to be suitable as narrow X-ray beam profilers and as surface or in vivo microdosimeters for on-line monitoring of radiotherapy plans. Such detectors have also been used as nuclear...

  12. Dual Ion Beam Deposition Of Diamond Films On Optical Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutchman, Arnold H.; Partyka, Robert J.; Lewis, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    Diamond film deposition processes are of great interest because of their potential use for the formation of both protective as well as anti-reflective coatings on the surfaces of optical elements. Conventional plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition diamond coating processes are not ideal for use on optical components because of the high processing temperatures required, and difficulties faced in nucleating films on most optical substrate materials. A unique dual ion beam deposition technique has been developed which now makes possible deposition of diamond films on a wide variety of optical elements. The new DIOND process operates at temperatures below 150 aegrees Farenheit, and has been used to nucleate and grow both diamondlike carbon and diamond films on a wide variety of optical :taterials including borosilicate glass, quartz glass, plastic, ZnS, ZnSe, Si, and Ge.

  13. N-Type Conductive Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Films Grown by Hot Filament CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mertens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the synthesis of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD films by application of hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD. We furthermore studied the different morphological, structural, and electrical properties. The grown films are fine grained with grain sizes between 4 and 7 nm. The UNCD films exhibit different electrical conductivities, dependent on grain boundary structure. We present different contact metallizations exhibiting ohmic contact behavior and good adhesion to the UNCD surface. The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is presented between −200 and 900°C. We furthermore present spectroscopic investigations of the films, supporting that the origin of the conductivity is the structure and volume of the grain boundary.

  14. Enhancement in Tribological and Mechanical Properties of Cemented Tungsten Carbide Substrates using CVD-diamond Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Najar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the influence on the performance characteristics of a cutting tool material notably known as cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co. A comparison has been documented between nanocrystalline diamond (NCD and microcrystalline diamond (MCD coatings deposited on two cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co substrates with the architectures of WC-Co/NCD and WC-Co/MCD, using hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique. In the present work, the friction characteristics were studied using ball-on-disc type linear reciprocating micro-tribometer, under the application of 1–10 N normal loads, when sliding against smooth alumina (Al2O3 ceramic ball for the total duration of 20 min, under dry sliding condition. Nanoindentation tests were also conducted using Berkovich nanoindenter for the purpose of measurement of hardness and elastic modulus values. However, the average value of friction coefficient (COF corresponding to MCD and NCD coatings decrease from ~0.37–0.32 and ~0.30–0.27, respectively when the load is increased from 1–10 N. However, for conventional WC-Co substrate the average COF increases from ~0.60–0.75, under the same input operating conditions. The wear tracks formed on the surfaces of NCD, MCD and WC-Co, after sliding were characterised using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. Therefore, the results will serve breakthrough information for the designer to design the cutting tool or mechanical component using this novel coating procedure.

  15. Continuous observation of polarization effects in thin SC-CVD diamond detector designed for heavy ion microbeam measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, Wataru, E-mail: kada.wataru@gunma-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-machi, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Iwamoto, Naoya [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Satoh, Takahiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Onoda, Shinobu [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Grilj, Veljko; Skukan, Natko [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 1016, 10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Koka, Masashi [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Ohshima, Takeshi [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Jakšić, Milko [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 1016, 10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Kamiya, Tomihiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Continuous irradiation effects on a thin-film diamond detector were investigated for the utilization of these films as a detector for heavy ion microbeams. Temporal signal degradation in the energy spectrum was frequently observed during the focused heavy ion microbeam irradiation. To measure the temporal response to the each ion incidents, focused heavy ion microbeam with different beam fluence rates were irradiated to a single crystal (SC)-CVD diamond film detector with thickness of 50 μm. The responses to each ion were continuously observed and characterized by ion beam-induced charge (IBIC) measurement system. Heavy ions with short penetration path in diamond generate the large difference in mean path of electrons and holes, which is inverted by changing bias polarity. Signal degradation condition was relied on the bias polarity under the irradiation of heavy ions with short penetration length in the diamond. The continuous observation of IBIC signals revealed that temporal degradation in pulse height of signals, so called polarization effects, seems to be mainly caused by the hole trapping in this diamond crystal.

  16. Tracing the depositional history of Kalimantan diamonds by zircon provenance and diamond morphology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueter, Nico; Soesilo, Joko; Fedortchouk, Yana; Nestola, Fabrizio; Belluco, Lorenzo; Troch, Juliana; Wälle, Markus; Guillong, Marcel; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Driesner, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Diamonds in alluvial deposits in Southeast Asia are not accompanied by indicator minerals suggesting primary kimberlite or lamproite sources. The Meratus Mountains in Southeast Borneo (Province Kalimantan Selatan, Indonesia) provide the largest known deposit of these so-called "headless" diamond deposits. Proposals for the origin of Kalimantan diamonds include the adjacent Meratus ophiolite complex, ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes, obducted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and undiscovered kimberlite-type sources. Here we report results from detailed sediment provenance analysis of diamond-bearing Quaternary river channel material and from representative outcrops of the oldest known formations within the Alino Group, including the diamond-bearing Campanian-Maastrichtian Manunggul Formation. Optical examination of surfaces of diamonds collected from artisanal miners in the Meratus area (247 stones) and in West Borneo (Sanggau Area, Province Kalimantan Barat; 85 stones) points toward a classical kimberlite-type source for the majority of these diamonds. Some of the diamonds host mineral inclusions suitable for deep single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigation. We determined the depth of formation of two olivines, one coesite and one peridotitic garnet inclusion. Pressure of formation estimates for the peridotitic garnet at independently derived temperatures of 930-1250 °C are between 4.8 and 6.0 GPa. Sediment provenance analysis includes petrography coupled to analyses of detrital garnet and glaucophane. The compositions of these key minerals do not indicate kimberlite-derived material. By analyzing almost 1400 zircons for trace element concentrations with laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) we tested the mineral's potential as an alternative kimberlite indicator. The screening ultimately resulted in a small subset of ten zircons with a kimberlitic affinity. Subsequent U-Pb dating resulting in Cretaceous ages plus a detailed chemical reflection make

  17. Electrochemical Properties of Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes Prepared by Hot Cathode Direct Current Plasma CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yan PENG

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of boron-doped diamond (BDD films were deposited by using a hot cathode direct current plasma chemical vapor deposition(HCDC-PCVD system with different ratios of CH4/H2/B(OCH33 (trimethylborate gas mixture. The morphology, structure and quality of BDD films were controled by SEM, XRD and Raman measurements. The electrochemical properties of the BDD films were investigated by electrochemical methods. Cyclic voltammetric performances of the BDD films indicated that the main determinant in the electrochemical characteristics of BDD films was the boron doping amount. The threshold potential for oxygen evolution increased from 1 V to 2.5 V. Meanwhile, the electrochemical potential window of BDD films was enlarged from 2.2 V to 4.5 V when the B content was increased from 1.75 × 1019cm-3 to 2.4 × 1021 cm−3. The cyclic voltammograms of BDD films in K4Fe(CN6 and K3Fe(CN6 mixed solution indicated that the behavior of Fe(CN6-3/-4 redox couple could be regarded as semi-reversible.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12926

  18. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of uranium for alpha spectrometry; Deposicion quimica de vapor (CVD) de uranio para espectrometria alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez V, M. L.; Rios M, C.; Ramirez O, J.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: luisalawliet@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The uranium determination through radiometric techniques as alpha spectrometry requires for its proper analysis, preparation methods of the source to analyze and procedures for the deposit of this on a surface or substrate. Given the characteristics of alpha particles (small penetration distance and great loss of energy during their journey or its interaction with the matter), is important to ensure that the prepared sources are thin, to avoid problems of self-absorption. The routine methods used for this are the cathodic electro deposition and the direct evaporation, among others. In this paper the use of technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the preparation of uranium sources is investigated; because by this, is possible to obtain thin films (much thinner than those resulting from electro deposition or evaporation) on a substrate and comprises reacting a precursor with a gas, which in turn serves as a carrier of the reaction products to achieve deposition. Preliminary results of the chemical vapor deposition of uranium are presented, synthesizing and using as precursor molecule the uranyl acetylacetonate, using oxygen as carrier gas for the deposition reaction on a glass substrate. The uranium films obtained were found suitable for alpha spectrometry. The variables taken into account were the precursor sublimation temperatures and deposition temperature, the reaction time and the type and flow of carrier gas. Of the investigated conditions, two depositions with encouraging results that can serve as reference for further work to improve the technique presented here were selected. Alpha spectra obtained for these depositions and the characterization of the representative samples by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are also presented. (Author)

  19. Purification of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by a Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) grown by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon monooxide has been developed. Based on the result from TGA/DTA of as-prepared sample, the oxidation temperature was determined. The process included sonication, oxidation and acid washing steps. The purity and yield after purification were determined and estimated by TEM. Moreover, for the first time, a loop structure for CVD SWNTs has been observed.

  20. Electronic properties of single crystal CVD diamond and its suitability for particle detection in hadron physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomorski, Michal

    2008-08-07

    This work presents the study on the suitability of single-crystal CVD diamond for particle-detection systems in present and future hadron physics experiments. Different characterization methods of the electrical and the structural properties were applied to gain a deeper understanding of the crystal quality and the charge transport properties of this novel semiconductor material. First measurements regarding the radiation tolerance of diamond were performed with sensors heavily irradiated with protons and neutrons. Finally, detector prototypes were fabricated and successfully tested in various experiments as time detectors for minimum ionizing particles as well as for spectroscopy of heavy ions at the energy ranges available at the SIS and the UNILAC facilities of GSI. (orig.)

  1. Improved CVD Techniques for Depositing Passivation Layers of ICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    went into compressive stress of 1.3 x 10 dynes/cm2. Results NX • thus show that room-temperature stress in CVD films can be reduced to nearly 35 -4 0...fluorescence working curves. X-ray fluorescence radiation measurements were carried out using a Siemens Crystalloflex 4 x-ray generator with a chromium target x...ray tube (2000 W) and a Siemens Vacuum X-Ray Spectrometer Model VRS. Sample area of measurement was usually 0.50 cm2 . 2= Experimental results will be

  2. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ceramic coatings. The influence of several process steps on the deposition rate and surface morphology is discussed. The deposition of SiO2 at atmospheric pressure is kinetically limited below 833 K ...

  3. Monte Carlo Simulation of Diamond Deposition at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董丽芳; 张玉红

    2001-01-01

    Diamond deposition at low temperatures is investigated and the relationship between substrate temperature for diamond growth and the energy of the carbonaceous species is given. The electron energy distribution and velocity distribution during the electron assisted chemical vapour deposition have been obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation. The main results obtained are as follows. (1) The substrate temperature for diamond growth will be lower than 800 C when the carbonaceous species on the substrate have mobility energy. For example, if the energy of the carbonaceous species is 0. 75 eV, the substrate temperature will be 380℃-600℃. (2) The greatnumber of atomic H on the substrate is of importance to the growth of diamond films.

  4. Superconductivity in CVD Diamond Thin Film Well-Above Liquid Helium Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Takano, Y.; Nagao, M.; Kobayashi, K; Umezawa, H.; Sakaguchi, I.; Tachiki, M.; Hatano, T.; Kawarada, H.

    2004-01-01

    Diamond has always been adored as a jewel. Even more fascinating is its outstanding physical properties; it is the hardest material known in the world with the highest thermal conductivity. Meanwhile, when we turn to its electrical properties, diamond is a rather featureless electrical insulator. However, with boron doping, it becomes a p-type semiconductor, with boron acting as a charge acceptor. Therefore the recent news of superconductivity in heavily boron-doped diamond synthesized by hig...

  5. A Study on Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) Technology and Super Coating Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian; LI Jian-ping; ZENG Xiang-cai; MA Wen-cun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the dense and columnar crystalline TiCN coating layers with very good bonding strength between a layer and another layer was deposited using Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) where CH3CN organic composite with C/N atomic clusters etc. was utilized at 700 ~ 900 ℃. Effect of coating processing parameters, such as coating temperature, pressure and different gas flow quantity on structures and properties of TiCN coating layers were investigated. The super coating mechanis mand structures were analyzed. The new coating processing parameters and properties of carbide inserts with super coating layers were gained by using the improved high temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD) equipment and HT-CVD, in combination with MT-CVD technology.

  6. High-order Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman generation in monoisotopic CVD {sup 12}C-diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminskii, Alexander A. [Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lux, Oliver; Rhee, Hanjo; Eichler, Hans J. [Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Ralchenko, Victor G.; Bolshakov, Andrey P. [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shirakawa, Akira; Yoneda, Hitoki [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We determined, for the first time, the room temperature phonon energy related to the F{sub 2g} vibration mode (ω{sub SRS(12C)} ∝ 1333.2 cm{sup -1}) in a mono-crystalline single-isotope CVD {sup 12}C-diamond crystal by means of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopy. Picosecond one-micron excitation using a Nd{sup 3+}:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}-laser generates a nearly two-octave spanning SRS frequency comb (∝12000 cm{sup -1}) consisting of higher-order Stokes and anti-Stokes components. The spacing of the spectral lines was found to differ by Δω{sub SRS} ∝ 0.9 cm{sup -1} from the comb spacing (ω{sub SRS(natC)} ∝ 1332.3 cm{sup -1}) when pumping a conventional CVD diamond crystal with a natural composition of the two stable carbon isotopes {sup 12}C (98.93%) and {sup 13}C (1.07%). (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Development of a Beam Condition Monitor System for the Experimental Areas of the LHC Using CVD Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Hernando, L

    2004-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will store 2808 bunches per colliding beam, each bunch consisting of 10^11 protons at an energy of 7 TeV. If there is a failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damages not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor fast increments of particle fluxes near the interaction point and, if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control to dump the beams. The system is being developed initially for the CMS experiment but is sufficiently general to find potential applications elsewhere. Due to its high radiation hardness, CVD diamond has been studied for use as the BCM sensor. Various samples of CVD diamond have been characterized extensively with a Sr-90 source and high intensity test beams in order to assess the capabilities of such sensors and to study whether this detector technology is suitable for a BCM system. The results from these investigations are p...

  8. Optical characterization and thermal properties of CVD diamond films for integration with power electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Mohammad; Hancock, B. Logan; Anderson, Jonathan; Hobart, Karl D.; Feygelson, Tatyana I.; Tadjer, Marko J.; Pate, Bradford B.; Anderson, Travis J.; Piner, Edwin L.; Holtz, Mark W.

    2017-10-01

    Studies of diamond material for thermal management are reported for a nominally 1-μm thick layer grown on silicon. Thickness of the diamond is measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Spectra are consistently modeled using a diamond layer taking into account surface roughness and requiring an interlayer of nominally silicon carbide. The presence of the interlayer is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Thermal conductivity is determined based on a heater which is microfabricated followed by back etching to produce a supported diamond membrane. Micro-Raman mapping of the diamond phonon is used to estimate temperature rise under known drive conditions of the resistive heater. Consistent values are obtained for thermal conductivity based on straightforward analytical calculation using phonon shift to estimate temperature and finite element simulations which take both temperature rise and thermal stress into account.

  9. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ce

  10. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Properties of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coatings Grown Using CVD with E/H Field Glow Discharge Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iu. Nasieka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanocrystalline diamond films (coatings were prepared using the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD technique. In this method, direct current (DC glow discharge in the crossed E/H fields was used to activate the gas phase. The diamond coatings were deposited from the working gas mixture CH4/H2 with addition of nitrogen in various concentrations. It was ascertained that addition of N2 to the working gas mixture leads to reduction in the sizes of diamond grains as well as to the substantial decrease in the resistivity of the studied films. The electrophysical data are in good agreement with the changes induced by varying the N2 content in the Raman scattering spectra. The increase in the N2 concentration causes significant lowering of the crystalline diamond related peak and increase in the intensity of the peaks related to the sp2-bonded carbon. These changes in the spectra indicate significant disordering of the structure of prepared films and its uniformity in the nanodiamond film volume. With the great possibility, it is associated with a decrease in the sizes of diamond crystalline grains and tendency of NCD film to amorphization.

  11. Oxidation Resistance of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    carbonaceous residuoe were overcome, and dense, iadherent, coat-ings which :ýtop oxidat-ion Of the substrate art! reliably produced. The iridium deposition...flow, pressure and geometry within the reaction chamber, and substrate material. For the coating to have high integrity and adhesion to the substrate...entirely produced by Ultramet using chemical vapor deposition and a novel integrated fabrication technique. Coating the inside of a long chamber presents

  12. Thin film zinc oxide deposited by CVD and PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelmann, Frank U.

    2016-10-01

    Zinc oxide is known as a mineral since 1810, but it came to scientific interest after its optoelectronic properties found to be tuneable by p-type doping. Since the late 1980’s the number of publications increased exponentially. All thin film deposition technologies, including sol-gel and spray pyrolysis, are able to produce ZnO films. However, for outstanding properties and specific doping, only chemical vapor deposition and physical vapor deposition have shown so far satisfying results in terms of high conductivity and high transparency. In this paper the different possibilities for doping will be discussed, some important applications of doped ZnO thin films will be presented. The deposition technologies used for industrial applications are shown in this paper. Especially sputtering of aluminium doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO:Al or AZO) and LPCVD of boron doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO:B or BZO) are used for the commercial production of transparent conductive oxide films on glass used for thin film photovoltaic cells. For this special application the typical process development for large area deposition is presented, with the important trade-off between optical properties (transparency and ability for light scattering) and electrical properties (conductivity). Also, the long term stability of doped ZnO films is important for applications, humidity in the ambient is often the reason for degradation of the films. The differences between the mentioned materials are presented.

  13. High Energy Radial Deposition of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Suschke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC coatings were deposited with a new direct ion deposition system using a novel 360 degree ion source operating at acceleration voltage between 4 and 8 kV. Cross-sectional TEM images show that the coatings have a three layered structure which originates from changes in the deposition parameters taking into account ion source condition, ion current density, deposition angles, ion sputtering and ion source movement. Varying structural growth conditions can be achieved by tailoring the deposition parameters. The coatings show good promise for industrial use due to their high hardness, low friction and excellent adhesion to the surface of the samples.

  14. Nanostructured TaxC interlayer synthesized via double glow plasma surface alloying process for diamond deposition on cemented carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Wolong; Hei, Hongjun; Zhong, Qiang; Shen, Yanyan; Liu, Xiaoping; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Bing; He, Zhiyong; Yu, Shengwang

    2015-12-01

    The aim in this work was to improve the adhesion of diamond coating with pre-deposition of a TaxC interlayer on cemented carbide (WC-Co) substrate by double glow plasma surface alloying technique. The following deposition of diamond coating on the interlayer was performed in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. TaxC interlayer with an inner diffusion layer and an outer deposition layer was composed of Ta2C and TaC nanocrystalline, and it exhibited a special compact surface morphology formed of flower-shaped pits. As the gradual element distributions existed in the diffusion layer, the interlayer displayed a superior adherence to the substrate with significantly enhanced surface microhardness to the original substrate. After CVD process, the preferred orientation of TaC changed from (2 2 2) to (2 0 0) plane, and a uniform and tense diamond coating with adhesion referred to class HF 2 at least (Verein Deutscher Ingenieure 3198 norm) was obtained on the interlayered substrate. It indicated that the diffusion of Co was effectively inhibited by the formation of TaxC diffusion-deposition interlayer. The TaxC interlayer is most likely to improve the performance of diamond coatings used in cutting tools.

  15. Synthesis of crystalline Ge nanoclusters in PE-CVD-deposited SiO2 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leervad Pedersen, T.P.; Skov Jensen, J.; Chevallier, J.

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of evenly distributed Ge nanoclusters in plasma-enhanced chemical-vapour-deposited (PE-CVD) SiO2 thin films containing 8 at. % Ge is reported. This is of importance for the application of nanoclusters in semiconductor technology. The average diameter of the Ge nanoclusters can...

  16. Advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Tantalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Christensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of tantalum in hot acidic media has made it a key material in the protection of industrial equipment from corrosion under such conditions. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of tantalum to achieve such thin corrosion resistant coatings is one of the most widely mentioned examples...

  17. High-Productivity Ultraprecise Polishing Technique of CVD Diamond Film%CVD金刚石膜高效超精密抛光技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苑泽伟; 金洙吉; 王坤; 温泉

    2011-01-01

    CVD diamond film, as the material for optical transmission windows and new-generation computer chips, is required to be fine polished. However, there is so far no individual method which can polish CVD diamond film with both high efficiency and fine polishing quality. This paper attempted to polish CVD diamond film by combining chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) method and mechanical polishing method. CVD diamond film was first polished by fixed abrasive and free diamond abrasive to remove course asperities, and subsequently polished by CMP to achieve fine surface. According to the experimental results, the material removal rate achieved by free diamond abrasive is much higher than that by fixed abrasive. The surface roughness of CVD diamond film polished by free diamond abrasive is about 42. 2 nm. Fine surface quality of CVD diamond film was achieved by CMP and the surface roughness is about 4. 551 nm.%CVD金刚石膜作为光学透射窗口和新一代计算机芯片的材料,其表面必须得到高质量抛光,但是现存方法难以满足既高效又超精密的加工要求.本文提出机械抛光与化学机械抛光相结合的方法.首先,采用固结金刚石磨料抛光盘和游离金刚石磨料两种机械抛光方法对CVD金刚石膜进行粗加工,然后采用化学机械抛光的方法对CVD金刚石膜进行精加工.结果表明,采用游离磨料抛光时材料去除率远比固结磨料高,表面粗糙度最低达到42.2 nm.化学机械抛光方法在CVD金刚石膜的超精密抛光中表现出较大的优势,CVD金刚石膜的表面粗糙度为4.551 nm.

  18. Diamond Pixel Detectors and 3D Diamond Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, N.

    2016-12-01

    Results from detectors of poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposited (pCVD) diamond are presented. These include the first analysis of data of the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). The DBM module consists of pCVD diamond sensors instrumented with pixellated FE-I4 front-end electronics. Six diamond telescopes, each with three modules, are placed symmetrically around the ATLAS interaction point. The DBM tracking capabilities allow it to discriminate between particles coming from the interaction point and background particles passing through the ATLAS detector. Also, analysis of test beam data of pCVD DBM modules are presented. A new low threshold tuning algorithm based on noise occupancy was developed which increases the DBM module signal to noise ratio significantly. Finally first results from prototypes of a novel detector using pCVD diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk, forming a 3D diamond device, are discussed. 3D devices based on pCVD diamond were successfully tested with test beams at CERN. The measured charge is compared to that of a strip detector mounted on the same pCVD diamond showing that the 3D device collects significantly more charge than the planar device.

  19. Behaviour of Self-Standing CVD Diamond Film with Different Dominant Crystalline Surfaces in Thermal-Iron Plate Polishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guang-Chao; ZHOU Zu-Yuan; LI Bin; ZHOU You-Liang; J. Askri; LI Cheng-Ming; TANG Wei-Zhong; TONG Yu-Mei; LU Fan-Xiu

    2006-01-01

    @@ Self-standing CVD diamond films with different dominant crystalline surfaces are polished by the thermal-iron plate polishing method. The influence of the dominant crystalline surfaces on polishing efficiency is investigated by measuring the removal rate and final roughness. The smallest rms roughness of 0.14μm is measured with smallest removal rate in the films with the initial (220) dominant crystalline surface. Activation energy for the polishing is analysed by the Arrhenius relation. It is found that the values are 170kJ/mol, 222kJ/mol and 214kJ/mol for the film with t hree different dominant crystalline surfaces. Based on these values, the polishing cause is regarded as the graphitization-controlling process. In the experiment, we find that transformation of the dominant crystalline surfaces from (111) to (220) always appears in the polishing process when we polish the (111) dominant surface.

  20. 电蚀抛光CVD金刚石膜的实验研究%A Study on the Polishing of CVD Diamond Film by Electromachining Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭钟宁; 王成勇; 匡同春; 王晓初; 黄志刚

    2000-01-01

    本文提出了一种新的CVD金刚石膜抛光技术。采用该项技术,可以高效率的完成CVD金刚石膜的粗抛光。CVD金刚石膜表面被预先涂覆一层导电金属,然后采用电蚀方法对该表面进行加工,使金刚石膜突起的尖峰被迅速去除。加工中金刚石表面的石墨化使电蚀加工得以不断延续。通过单脉冲放电试验已经发现涂覆层的材料对金刚石膜的加工效果有很大影响。与普通金属加工相比,金刚石膜的电蚀过程有其完全不同的特征。通过试验和分析,本文还对金刚石膜的电蚀去除机理进行了初步探讨。%A new technique for polishing CVD diamond film has been investigated, by which rough polishing of CVD diamond film can be efficiently carried out. Diamond film is coated with a thin layer of conductive material in advance, and then EDM method is used to machine the coated surface. As a result, peaks on the surface of diamond film axe removed rapidly. During the machining, graphitization of the surface of CVD diamonds film enables EDM process to continue. The discharge experiment of single pulse shows that the material of the coated layer will evidently affect the removal volume of CVD diamond film. Compared with the machining of ordinary metal, the process of ED machining of CVD diamond film has quite different characteristics. By means of the experimental observation and the analysis of the experimental results, the removal mechanism of CVD diamond film has been discussed.

  1. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yung-Hsiu

    This dissertation describes improvements in the growth of single crystal diamond by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Heteroepitaxial (001) diamond was grown on 1 cm. 2 a-plane sapphiresubstrates using an epitaxial (001) Ir thin-film as a buffer layer. Low-energy ion bombardment of the Ir layer, a process known as bias-enhanced nucleation, is a key step in achieving a high density of diamond nuclei. Bias conditions were optimized to form uniformly-high nucleation densities across the substrates, which led to well-coalesced diamond thin films after short growth times. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) was used as a means of decreasing diamond internal stress by impeding the propagation of threading dislocations into the growing material. Its use in diamond growth requires adaptation to the aggressive chemical and thermal environment of the hydrogen plasma in a CVD reactor. Three ELO variants were developed. The most successful utilized a gold (Au) mask prepared by vacuum evaporation onto the surface of a thin heteroepitaxial diamond layer. The Au mask pattern, a series of parallel stripes on the micrometer scale, was produced by standard lift-off photolithography. When diamond overgrows the mask, dislocations are largely confined to the substrate. Differing degrees of confinement were studied by varying the stripe geometry and orientation. Significant improvement in diamond quality was found in the overgrown regions, as evidenced by reduction of the Raman scattering linewidth. The Au layer was found to remain intact during diamond overgrowth and did not chemically bond with the diamond surface. Besides impeding the propagation of threading dislocations, it was discovered that the thermally-induced stress in the CVD diamond was significantly reduced as a result of the ductile Au layer. Cracking and delamination of the diamond from the substrate was mostly eliminated. When diamond was grown to thicknesses above 0.1 mm it was found that

  2. Numerical modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in a horizontal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Jasinski, T.; Fretz, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    In the present numerical prediction of the deposition rate of silicon from silane in a CVD process, the conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species are solved on a staggered grid using the SIMPLE algorithm, while the rate of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the susceptor surface is obtained from an Arrhenius rate equation. Predicted deposition rates as a function of position along the susceptor with and without the gas phase chemical reaction are compared with the available experimental and numerical data; agreement is excellent except at the leading edge of the susceptor, where the deposition rate is overpredicted.

  3. Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Deposited by Electron Assisted Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited on polished Si wafer surface with electron assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition at 1 kPa gas pressure, the deposited films were characterized and observed by Raman spectrum, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and semiconductor characterization system. The results show that when 8 A bias current is applied for 5 h, the surface roughness decreases to 28.5 nm. After 6 and 8 A bias current are applied for 1 h, and the nanocrystalline films deposition continue for 4 h with 0 A bias current at 1 kPa gas pressure. The nanocrystalline diamond films with 0.5×109 and 1×1010 Ω·cm resistivity respectively are obtained. It is demonstrated that electron bombardment plays an important role of nucleation to deposit diamond films with smooth surface and high resistivity.

  4. Photoionization of monocrystalline CVD diamond irradiated with ultrashort intense laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Stefano; Sciortino, Silvio; Obreshkov, Boyan; Apostolova, Tzveta; Corsi, Chiara; Bellini, Marco; Berdermann, Eleni; Schmidt, Christian J.

    2016-02-01

    Direct laser writing of conductive paths in synthetic diamond is of interest for implementation in radiation detection and clinical dosimetry. Unraveling the microscopic processes involved in laser irradiation of diamond below and close to the graphitization threshold under the same conditions as the experimental procedure used to produce three-dimensional devices is necessary to tune the laser parameters to optimal results. To this purpose a transient currents technique has been used to measure laser-induced current signals in monocrystalline diamond detectors in a wide range of laser intensities and at different bias voltages. The current transients vs time and the overall charge collected have been compared with theoretical simulations of the carrier dynamics along the duration and after the conclusion of the 30 fs laser pulse. The generated charge has been derived from the collected charge by evaluation of the lifetime of the carriers. The plasma volume has also been evaluated by measuring the modified region. The theoretical simulation has been implemented in the framework of the empirical pseudopotential method extended to include time-dependent couplings of valence electrons to the radiation field. The simulation, in the low-intensity regime, I ˜1 TW /cm2 , predicts substantial deviation from the traditional multiphoton ionization, due to nonperturbative effects involving electrons from degenerate valence bands. For strong field with intensity of about 50 TW /cm2, nonadiabatic effects of electron-hole pair excitation become prominent with high carrier densities eventually causing the optical breakdown of diamond. The comparison of theoretical prediction with experimental data of laser-generated charge vs laser energy density yields a good quantitative agreement over six orders of magnitude. At the highest intensities the change of slope in the trend is explained taking into account the dependence of the optical parameters and the carrier mobility on plasma

  5. Optimization of Cvd Diamond Coating Type on Micro Drills in Pcb Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, X. L.; He, Y.; Sun, F. H.

    2016-12-01

    The demand for better tools for machining printed circuit boards (PCBs) is increasing due to the extensive usage of these boards in digital electronic products. This paper is aimed at optimizing coating type on micro drills in order to extend their lifetime in PCB machining. First, the tribotests involving micro crystalline diamond (MCD), nano crystalline diamond (NCD) and bare tungsten carbide (WC-Co) against PCBs show that NCD-PCB tribopair exhibits the lowest friction coefficient (0.35) due to the unique nano structure and low surface roughness of NCD films. Thereafter, the dry machining performance of the MCD- and NCD-coated micro drills on PCBs is systematically studied, using diamond-like coating (DLC) and TiAlN-coated micro drills as comparison. The experiments show that the working lives of these micro drills can be ranked as: NCD>TiAlN>DLC>MCD>bare WC-Co. The superior cutting performance of NCD-coated micro drills in terms of the lowest flank wear growth rate, no tool degradation (e.g. chipping, tool tipping) appearance, the best hole quality as well as the lowest feed force may come from the excellent wear resistance, lower friction coefficient against PCB as well as the high adhesive strength on the underneath substrate of NCD films.

  6. Abnormal Crystallization of Silicon Thin Films Deposited by ICP-CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun-Shuai; YIN Min; WANG Jin-Xiao; HE De-Yan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Silicon thin films are deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) at a low temperature of 350℃ using a mixture of SiH4 and H2. The structures of the films are characterized by x-ray diffraction and Raman spectra. Under the optimum experimental conditions, we observe that the crystallinity of Si films becomes more excellent and the preferred orientation changes from (111) to (220) with the decreasing dilution of SiH4 in H2. Such an abnormal crystallization is tentatively interpreted in term of the high density,low electron temperature and spatial confinement of the plasma in the process of ICP-CVD.

  7. Selective deposition of polycrystalline diamond films using photolithography with addition of nanodiamonds as nucleation centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhotnikov, V. V.; Linnik, S. A.; Gaidaichuk, A. V.; Shashev, D. V.; Nazarova, G. Yu; Yurchenko, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    A new method of selective deposition of polycrystalline diamond has been developed and studied. The diamond coatings with a complex, predetermined geometry and resolution up to 5 μm were obtained. A high density of polycrystallites in the coating area was reached (up to 32·107 pcs/cm2). The uniformity of the film reached 100%, and the degree of the surface contamination by parasitic crystals did not exceed 2%. The technology was based on the application of the standard photolithography with an addition of nanodiamond suspension into the photoresist that provided the creation of the centers of further nucleation in the areas which require further overgrowth. The films were deposited onto monocrystalline silicon substrates using the method of “hot filaments” in the CVD reactor. The properties of the coating and the impact of the nanodiamond suspension concentration in the photoresist were also studied. The potential use of the given method includes a high resolution, technological efficiency, and low labor costs compared to the standard methods (laser treatment, chemical etching in aggressive environments,).

  8. EXELFS analysis of natural diamond and diamond films on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moller, A.D. [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (Mexico); Araiza, L.C.; Borja, M.A. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    In this work, we report the EXELFS results obtained from a polycrystalline diamond film grown on smooth silicon substrates using the Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HF-CVD) technique in a two-step deposition process published elsewhere. In order to evaluate the quality of the thin film obtained, these results were compared with results obtained from natural diamond.

  9. Plasma deposited diamond-like carbon films for large neutralarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I.G.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Galvin, J.E.; Monteiro, O.R.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.

    2004-07-15

    To understand how large systems of neurons communicate, we need to develop methods for growing patterned networks of large numbers of neurons. We have found that diamond-like carbon thin films formed by energetic deposition from a filtered vacuum arc carbon plasma can serve as ''neuron friendly'' substrates for the growth of large neural arrays. Lithographic masks can be used to form patterns of diamond-like carbon, and regions of selective neuronal attachment can form patterned neural arrays. In the work described here, we used glass microscope slides as substrates on which diamond-like carbon was deposited. PC-12 rat neurons were then cultured on the treated substrates and cell growth monitored. Neuron growth showed excellent contrast, with prolific growth on the treated surfaces and very low growth on the untreated surfaces. Here we describe the vacuum arc plasma deposition technique employed, and summarize results demonstrating that the approach can be used to form large patterns of neurons.

  10. Deposition of device quality silicon nitride with ultra high deposition rate (> 7 nm/s) using hot-wire CVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.; Houweling, Z.S.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Romijn, I.G.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Goldbach, H.D.

    2008-01-01

    The application of hot-wire (HW) CVD deposited silicon nitride (SiNx) as passivating anti-reflection coating on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells is investigated. The highest efficiency reached is 15.7% for SiNx layers with an N/Si ratio of 1.20 and a high mass density of 2.9 g/cm3. These

  11. Diamond detector technology: status and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Harris; Artuso, M; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bartosik, M; Beacham, J; Beck, H P; Bellini,, V; Belyaev, V; Bentele, B; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bes, A; Brom, J-M; Bruzzi, M; Cerv, M; Chiodini, G; Chren, D; Cindro, V; Claus, G; Collot, J; Cumalat, J; Dabrowski, A; D'Alessandro, R; De Boer, W; Dehning, B; Dorfer, C; Dunser, M; Eremin, V; Eusebi, R; Forcolin, G; Forneris, J; Frais-Kölbl, H; Gan, K K; Gastal, M; Giroletti, C; Goffe, M; Goldstein, J; Golubev, A; Gorišek, A; Grigoriev, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grummer, A; Gui, B; Guthoff, M; Haughton, I; Hiti, B; Hits, D; Hoeferkamp, M; Hofmann, T; Hosslet, J; Hostachy, J-Y; Hügging, F; Hutton, C; Jansen, H; Janssen, J; Kanxheri, K; Kasieczka, G; Kass, R; Kassel, F; Kis, M; Kramberger, G; Kuleshov, S; Lacoste, A; Lagomarsino, S; Lo Giudice, A; Lukosi, E; Maazouzi, C; Mandic, I; Mathieu, C; Mcfadden, N; Menichelli, M; Mikuž, M; Morozzi, A; Moss, J; Mountain, R; Murphy, S; Muškinja, M; Oh, A; Oliviero, P; Passeri, D; Pernegger, H; Perrino, R; Picollo, F; Pomorski, M; Potenza, R; Quadt, A; Re, A; Reichmann, M; Riley, G; Roe, S; Sanz, D; Scaringella, M; Schaefer, D; Schmidt, C J; Schnetzer, S; Schreiner, T; Sciortino, S; Scorzoni, A; Seidel, S; Servoli, L; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Spagnolo, S; Spanier, S; Stenson, K; Stone, R; Sutera, C; Taylor, Aaron; Traeger, M; Tromson, D; Trischuk, W; Tuve, C; Uplegger, L; Velthuis, J; Venturi, N; Vittone, E; Wagner, Stephen; Wallny, R; Wang, J C; Weingarten, J; Weiss, C; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Yamouni, M; Zavrtanik, M

    2017-01-01

    The status of material development of poly-crystalline chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond is presented. We also present beam test results on the independence of signal size on incident par-ticle rate in charged particle detectors based on un-irradiated and irradiated poly-crystalline CVD diamond over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2. The pulse height of the sensors was measured with readout electronics with a peaking time of 6 ns. In addition the first beam test results from 3D detectors made with poly-crystalline CVD diamond are presented. Finally the first analysis of LHC data from the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM) which is based on pixelated poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors bump-bonded to pixel readout elec-tronics is shown.

  12. Stable dropwise condensation for enhancing heat transfer via the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) of grafted polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Adam T; Yagüe, Jose L; Gleason, Karen K; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2014-01-22

    Ultra-thin copolymer films are deposited by initiated chemical deposition (iCVD) to investigate their performance under the condensation of water vapor. By forming a grafted interface between the coating and the substrate, the films exhibit stable dropwise condensation even when subjected to 100 °C steam. The applicability of the iCVD to complex substrate geometries is demonstrated on a copper condenser coil.

  13. Belle-II VXD radiation monitoring and beam abort with sCVD diamond sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, Lorenzo; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-07-01

    The Belle-II VerteX Detector (VXD) has been designed to improve the performances with respect to Belle and to cope with an unprecedented luminosity of 8 ×1035cm-2s-1 achievable by the SuperKEKB. Special care is needed to monitor both the radiation dose accumulated throughout the life of the experiment and the instantaneous radiation rate, in order to be able to promptly react to sudden spikes for the purpose of protecting the detectors. A radiation monitoring and beam abort system based on single-crystal diamond sensors is now under an active development for the VXD. The sensors will be placed in several key positions in the vicinity of the interaction region. The severe space limitations require a challenging remote readout of the sensors.

  14. Investigation of charge multiplication in single crystalline CVD diamond particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muškinja, M.; Cindro, V.; Gorišek, A.; Kagan, H.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Phan, S.; Smith, D. S.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2017-01-01

    A special metallization pattern was created on a single crystalline diamond detector aimed at creating high enough electric field for impact ionization in the detector material. Electric field line focusing through electrode design and very high bias voltages were used to obtain high electric fields. Previous measurements and theoretical calculations indicated that drifting charge multiplication by impact ionization could take place. A large increase of induced charge was observed for the smallest dot electrode which points to charge multiplication while for the large dot and pad detector structure no such effect was observed. The evolution of induced currents was also monitored with the transient current technique. Induced current pulses with duration of order 1 μs were measured. The multiplication gain was found to depend on the particle rate.

  15. Optically stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence in CVD diamond and dosimetric evaluation in fields of ionizing radiation; Luminiscencia opticamente estimulada y termoluminiscencia en diamante DQV y evaluacion dosimetrica en campos de radiacion ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza F, M.; Chernov, V.; Pedroza M, M. [Centro de Investigaciones en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Schreck, M. [Universitat Augsburg, Institut fur Physik D-86135, Augsburg (Germany); Preciado F, S.; Melendrez, R. [Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) results a highly appropriate dosimetric technique for readings of absorbed radiation 'in alive' and 'in situ', as well as in real time. The CVD diamond on the other hand presents excellent qualities like radiation reader thanks to its reproducibility, radiation resistance, biocompatibility and non toxicity. The present work studies the answer of two diamond films pure and polluted with nitrogen (750 ppm) grown by the Chemical Vapor Deposition method (CVD) on silicon substrate (001) irradiated with beta (Sr-90) in the 0.833-100 Gy interval. The optical stimulation was carried out by 40 seconds with infrared laser (830 nm, 0.36 W/cm{sup 2}) and the filter BG-39 (300-600 nm) coupled the PM. The intensity and the decay of the hyperbolic type of the LOE curves were similar in both samples, for the non doped diamond were observed trapping states in 200-380 C being compared with those that it presents the polluted diamond with nitrogen in 80-277 C. The dosimetric behavior in the pure sample is observed lineal in two regions 0-16 Gy and in 30-100 Gy, only the doped sample didn't present linearity in the all range of the studied dose. The advantage is stood out of LOE on TL because the first one not requires of thermal stimulation in such a way that is more appropriate to detect and to measure radiation doses in biomedicine. (Author)

  16. Thermoluminescence characterisation of chemical vapour deposited diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzocchi, S; Bucciolini, M; Cuttone, G; Pini, S; Sabini, M G; Sciortino, S

    2002-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of a set of six chemical vapour deposited diamond films have been studied with regard to their use as off-line dosimeters in radiotherapy. The structural characterisation has been performed by means of Raman spectroscopy. Their TL responses have been tested with radiotherapy beams ( sup 6 sup 0 Co photons, photons and electrons from a linear accelerator (Linac), 26 MeV protons from a TANDEM accelerator) in the dose range 0.1-7 Gy. The dosimetric characterisation has yielded a very good reproducibility, a very low dependence of the TL response on the type of particle and independence of the radiation energy. The TL signal is not influenced by the dose rate and exhibits a very low thermal fading. Moreover, the sensitivity of the diamond samples compares favourably with that of standard TLD100 dosimeters.

  17. Study of Nanocrystalline Diamond Film Deposited Rapidly by 500 W Excimer Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Hongyan; SHEN Jiajing; YANG Guilong

    2000-01-01

    High quality nanocrystalline diamond film deposited rapidly by an XeCl excimer laser operated at high laser power (500 W) and repetition rate (300~500 Hz) is presented. A high deposition rate, 250 nm/thousand pulses, was obtained. The effects of laser energy fluence and repetition rate on the deposition of diamond film were investigated.

  18. Effect of substrate bias on deposition behaviour of charged silicon nanoparticles in ICP-CVD process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung-Wan; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Seong, Dae-Jin; Seo, Byong-Hoon; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a substrate bias on the deposition behaviour of crystalline silicon films during inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) was analysed by consideration of non-classical crystallization, in which the building block is a nanoparticle rather than an individual atom or molecule. The coexistence of positively and negatively charged nanoparticles in the plasma and their role in Si film deposition are confirmed by applying bias voltages to the substrate, which is sufficiently small as not to affect the plasma potential. The sizes of positively and negatively charged nanoparticles captured on a carbon membrane and imaged using TEM are, respectively, 2.7-5.5 nm and 6-13 nm. The film deposited by positively charged nanoparticles has a typical columnar structure. In contrast, the film deposited by negatively charged nanoparticles has a structure like a powdery compact with the deposition rate about three times higher than that for positively charged nanoparticles. All the films exhibit crystallinity even though the substrate is at room temperature, which is attributed to the deposition of crystalline nanoparticles formed in the plasma. The film deposited by negatively charged nanoparticles has the highest crystalline fraction of 0.84.

  19. Zirconium influence on microstructure of aluminide coatings deposited on nickel substrate by CVD method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jolanta Romanowska; Maryana Zagula-Yavorska; Jan Sieniawski

    2013-11-01

    Influence of Zr on the microstructure and phase characteristics of aluminide diffusion coatings deposited on the nickel substrate has been investigated in this study. The coatings with and without zirconium were deposited by CVD method. The cross-section chemical composition investigations revealed that during the coatings formation, there is an inward aluminum diffusion and outward nickel diffusion in both types of coatings (with and without zirconium), whereas zirconium is located far below the coating surface, at a depth of ∼17 m, between -NiAl phase and '-Ni3Al phase. XRD examinations showed that -NiAl, -NiAl and '-Ni3Al were the main components of the deposited coatings. -NiAl phase is on the surface of the coatings, whereas -NiAl and '-Ni3Al form deeper parts of the coatings. Zirconium is dissolved in NiAl on the border between -NiAl and '-Ni3Al.

  20. Simulation optimization of filament parameters for uniform depositions of diamond films on surfaces of ultra-large circular holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinchang; Shen, Xiaotian; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have been widely applied as protective coatings on varieties of anti-frictional and wear-resistant components, owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties close to the natural diamond. In applications of some components, the inner hole surface will serve as the working surface that suffers severe frictional or erosive wear. It is difficult to realize uniform depositions of diamond films on surfaces of inner holes, especially ultra-large inner holes. Adopting a SiC compact die with an aperture of V80 mm as an example, a novel filament arrangement with a certain number of filaments evenly distributed on a circle is designed, and specific effects of filament parameters, including the filament number, arrangement direction, filament temperature, filament diameter, circumradius and the downward translation, on the substrate temperature distribution are studied by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations based on the finite volume method (FVM), adopting a modified computational model well consistent with the actual deposition environment. Corresponding temperature measurement experiments are also conducted to verify the rationality of the computational model. From the aspect of depositing uniform boron-doped micro-crystalline, undoped micro-crystalline and undoped fine-grained composite diamond (BDM-UMC-UFGCD) film on such the inner hole surface, filament parameters as mentioned above are accurately optimized and compensated by orthogonal simulations. Moreover, deposition experiments adopting compensated optimized parameters and some typical contrastive parameters are also accomplished for further verifying the rationality of the computational model and the correctness of the compensation coefficient 0.7 defined for the downward translation determined by simulations. More importantly, on the basis of more simulations and verification tests, a general filament arrangement model suitable for V50-120 mm

  1. An economic CVD technique for pure SnO2 thin films deposition: Temperature effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Maleki; S M Rozati

    2013-04-01

    A modified new method of CVD for formation of pure layers of tin oxide films was developed. This method is very simple and inexpensive and produces films with good electrical properties. The effect of substrate temperature on the sheet resistance, resistivity, mobility, carrier concentration and transparency of the films has been studied. The best sheet resistance obtained at substrate temperature of 500 ◦C was about 27 /cm2. X-ray diffraction showed that the structure of deposited films was polycrystalline with a grain size between 150–300 Å. The preferred orientation was (211) for films deposited at substrate temperature of about 500 °C. FESEM micrographs revealed that substrate temperature is an important factor for increasing grain size and modifies electrical parameters. UV-visible measurement showed reduction of transparency and bandgap of the layers with increasing substrate temperature.

  2. Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladwig, Angela

    2008-01-23

    There is great demand for thin functional coatings in the semiconductor, optics, electronics, medical, automotive and aerospace industries [1-13]. As fabricated components become smaller and more complex, the properties of the materials’ surface take on greater importance. Thin coatings play a key role in tailoring surfaces to give them the desired hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and electrical characteristics. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings possess an array of desirable properties, including outstanding abrasion and wear resistance, chemical inertness, hardness, a low coefficient of friction and exceptionally high dielectric strength [14-22]. Diamond-like carbon is considered to be an amorphous material, containing a mixture of sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon. Based on the percentage of sp3 carbon and the hydrogen content, four different types of DLC coatings have been identified: tetrahedral carbon (ta-C), hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) hard, a-C:H soft, and hydrogenated tetrahedral carbon (ta-C:H) [20,24,25]. Possessing the highest hardness of 80 GPa, ta-C possesses an sp3 carbon content of 80 to 88u%, and no appreciable hydrogen content whereas a-C:H soft possesses a hardness of less than 10 GPa, contains an sp3 carbon content of 60% and a hydrogen content between 30 to 50%. Methods used to deposit DLC coatings include ion beam deposition, cathodic arc spray, pulsed laser ablation, argon ion sputtering, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition [73-83]. Researchers contend that several advantages exist when depositing DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of

  3. Diamond sensors for future high energy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmair, Felix, E-mail: bachmair@phys.ethz.ch

    2016-09-21

    With the planned upgrade of the LHC to High-Luminosity-LHC [1], the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation tolerant technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond sensors are an established technology as beam condition monitors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. The RD42-collaboration at CERN is leading the effort to use CVD diamond as a material for tracking detectors operating in extreme radiation environments. An overview of the latest developments from RD42 is presented including the present status of diamond sensor production, a study of pulse height dependencies on incident particle flux and the development of 3D diamond sensors.

  4. Diamond sensors for future high energy experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmair, Felix

    2016-09-01

    With the planned upgrade of the LHC to High-Luminosity-LHC [1], the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation tolerant technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition CVD diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond sensors are an established technology as beam condition monitors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. The RD42-collaboration at CERN is leading the effort to use CVD diamond as a material for tracking detectors operating in extreme radiation environments. An overview of the latest developments from RD42 is presented including the present status of diamond sensor production, a study of pulse height dependencies on incident particle flux and the development of 3D diamond sensors.

  5. Regular growth combined with lateral etching in diamond deposited over silicon substrate by using hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2013-05-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition has proved to be an attractive method for growing diamond films with good quality and higher growth rate. Diamond films were produced at deposition parameters under which, it is possible to have regular growth combined with lateral etching (RGCLE). Fracture cross-section SEM images showed that RGCLE initiated over polycrystalline diamond film and proceeded by the growth of consecutive steps in each crystallite, which terminated with square/rectangle shaped facets. All the diamond films exhibit RGCLE but with different type of growth behavior. Present work discusses the cyclic formation of the steps in diamond crystallites and RGCLE modes. RGCLE in diamond film may find important applications where heat absorption and dissipation are key issues.

  6. Nanostructured Ta{sub x}C interlayer synthesized via double glow plasma surface alloying process for diamond deposition on cemented carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Wolong; Hei, Hongjun; Zhong, Qiang; Shen, Yanyan; Liu, Xiaoping; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Bing; He, Zhiyong, E-mail: hezhiyong@tyut.edu.cn; Yu, Shengwang, E-mail: yushengwang@tyut.edu.cn

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ta{sub x}C interlayer was creatively obtained on WC–Co by DG-PSA for diamond deposition. • The interlayer with a flower-shaped surface consisted of Ta{sub 2}C and TaC nanocrystal. • Ta{sub x}C interlayer had a superior adherence because of gradual element distributions. • The samples’ surface microhardness is increased caused by nanostructured interlayer. • Ta{sub x}C interlayer improved diamond adhesion on WC–Co by suppressing Co diffusion. - Abstract: The aim in this work was to improve the adhesion of diamond coating with pre-deposition of a Ta{sub x}C interlayer on cemented carbide (WC–Co) substrate by double glow plasma surface alloying technique. The following deposition of diamond coating on the interlayer was performed in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. Ta{sub x}C interlayer with an inner diffusion layer and an outer deposition layer was composed of Ta{sub 2}C and TaC nanocrystalline, and it exhibited a special compact surface morphology formed of flower-shaped pits. As the gradual element distributions existed in the diffusion layer, the interlayer displayed a superior adherence to the substrate with significantly enhanced surface microhardness to the original substrate. After CVD process, the preferred orientation of TaC changed from (2 2 2) to (2 0 0) plane, and a uniform and tense diamond coating with adhesion referred to class HF 2 at least (Verein Deutscher Ingenieure 3198 norm) was obtained on the interlayered substrate. It indicated that the diffusion of Co was effectively inhibited by the formation of Ta{sub x}C diffusion–deposition interlayer. The Ta{sub x}C interlayer is most likely to improve the performance of diamond coatings used in cutting tools.

  7. Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) Polymer Thin Films: Structure-Property Effects on Thermal Degradation and Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharamaiah Jeevendrakumar, Vijay Jain

    Opportunities and challenges for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polymer thin films stems from their applications in electronics, sensors, and adhesives with demands for control over film composition, conformity and stability. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a subset of the CVD technique that conjoins bulk free-radical polymerization chemistry with gas-phase processing. The novelty of iCVD technique stems from the use of an initiator that can be activated at low energies (150 -- 300 °C) to react with surface adsorbed monomer to form a polymer film. This reduces risk for potential unwarranted side-reactions. Until recently, majority of iCVD research was limited to understanding the deposition kinetics with monomer properties being the principal parameters. However, there is a lack of study on the properties of deposited films which is critical for utilizing the technique in any real-world applications. The work presented here aims to advance investigation in this direction by characterizing the thermal properties of iCVD polymer films with primary focus on the initiators. A detailed characterization of custom-built iCVD system served as ground work for following investigations. Poly(neopentyl methacrylate) (PnPMA) thin films were deposited with tert-butyl peroxide (TBPO) initiators and their Tg, CTE and thermal degradation properties were investigated. iCVD PnPMA films presented low-temperature degradation peaks attributed to weak linkages from H-abstraction and beta-scission reactions of TBPO. To test this hypothesis, PnPMA films were deposited with tert-butyl peroxybenzoate (TBPOB) which is selective towards vinyl addition. Contrary to expected results, TBPOB initiated films showed degradation at lower temperatures compared to TBPO initiated films. It is postulated that with TBPOB, the surface initiator concentration is higher and consequently small oligomeric molecules were formed that degraded easily. Following these investigations, poly

  8. Effect of Mo ion-implantation on the adhesion of diamond coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Shie; Wang Xiao Ping; Li Hui; Ma Bing Xian; Qin Guang Yong; Zhang Bing Lin

    2002-01-01

    Diamond coatings were deposited on the cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (YG6) substrates, which have been implanted with Mo ions, by microwave plasma CVD (MPCVD) method. The effect of ion-implantation on the adhesion of diamond coatings was studied. The results showed that the chemical compositions of cemented carbide substrate surfaces change obviously after Mo ion-implantation; and the adhesion strength between the CVD diamond coatings and the substrates implanted with Mo ions in proper concentration is improved remarkably

  9. Freestanding single crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond films produced using a lift-off method: Response to {alpha}-particles from {sup 241}Am and crystallinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubouchi, Nobuteru, E-mail: nobu-tsubouchi@aist.go.jp [Diamond Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Mokuno, Y. [Diamond Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Kakimoto, A.; Fujita, F.; Kaneko, J.H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Yamada, H.; Chayahara, A.; Shikata, S. [Diamond Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Thick ({approx}100 {mu}m) undoped diamond films were grown homoepitaxially on single crystal (SC) diamond substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD). To form a freestanding SC diamond film (plate), the substrate was pre-ion-implanted with high-energy ion beams before the film growth, and after the thick-film deposition, the substrate was eliminated using a lift-off method, resulting in fabrication of a SC CVD diamond plate. Two samples were prepared; sample 1 was grown on a (0 0 1) oriented, nitrogen doped CVD SC diamond at {approx}900 Degree-Sign C with the input microwave power of 1.7 kW, while sample 2 was grown on a (0 0 1) oriented, high-pressure high-temperature synthesized type-Ib SC diamond at {approx}900 Degree-Sign C with the input microwave power of 1.25 kW. The formed SC plates have high optical transparencies, indicating no remarkable optical absorptions seen in the wavelength from ultraviolet to near infrared. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of both samples show strong free exciton FE peaks, while in sample 2 relatively strong optical emissions corresponding to nitrogen related centers were observed in the visible region. After the metal electrodes were formed on both faces of the SC diamond plate to fabricate a sandwich-type diamond particle detector, the energy spectra of 5.486 MeV {alpha}-particles from {sup 241}Am were measured. The charge collection efficiencies (CCEs) of sample 1 were CCE = 98% for a hole transport and CCE = 89% for an electron transport, respectively, while CCEs of sample 2 were CCE = 80% for a hole transport and CCE = 78% for an electron transport, respectively. These results indicate that both holes and electrons in sample 2 were trapped much more than those in sample 1. Possible candidates of carrier capture centers are nitrogen and/or nitrogen-vacancy centers observed in PL, nonradiative defect (complex) centers, extended defects such as threading dislocations observed in micrographs taken with

  10. High-speed deposition of titanium carbide coatings by laser-assisted metal–organic CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yansheng [Faculty of Materials Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tu, Rong, E-mail: turong@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Goto, Takashi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A semiconductor laser was first used to prepare wide-area LCVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. • The effect of laser power for the deposition of TiC{sub x} coatings was discussed. • TiC{sub x} coatings showed a columnar cross section and a dense surface texture. • TiC{sub x} coatings had a 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous reports. • This study gives the possibility of LCVD applying on the preparation of TiC{sub x} coating. - Abstract: A semiconductor laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of titanium carbide (TiC{sub x}) coatings on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate using tetrakis (diethylamido) titanium (TDEAT) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as source materials were investigated. The influences of laser power (P{sub L}) and pre-heating temperature (T{sub pre}) on the microstructure and deposition rate of TiC{sub x} coatings were examined. Single phase of TiC{sub x} coatings were obtained at P{sub L} = 100–200 W. TiC{sub x} coatings had a cauliflower-like surface and columnar cross section. TiC{sub x} coatings in the present study had the highest R{sub dep} (54 μm/h) at a relative low T{sub dep} than those of conventional CVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. The highest volume deposition rate (V{sub dep}) of TiC{sub x} coatings was about 4.7 × 10{sup −12} m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, which had 3–10{sup 5} times larger deposition area and 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous LCVD using CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG and argon ion laser.

  11. Simultaneous growth of diamond and nanostructured graphite thin films by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond and graphite films on silicon wafer were simultaneously synthesized at 850 °C without any additional catalyst. The synthesis was achieved in hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactor by changing distance among filaments in traditional gas mixture. The inter-wire distance for diamond and graphite deposition was kept 5 and 15 mm, whereas kept constant from the substrate. The Raman spectroscopic analyses show that film deposited at 5 mm is good quality diamond and at 15 mm is nanostructured graphite and respective growths confirm by scanning auger electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscope results exhibit that black soot graphite is composed of needle-like nanostructures, whereas diamond with pyramidal featured structure. Transformation of diamond into graphite mainly attributes lacking in atomic hydrogen. The present study develops new trend in the field of carbon based coatings, where single substrate incorporate dual application can be utilized.

  12. Resonant excitation of ethylene molecules in the combustion flame CVD of diamond using a wavelength tunable CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z. Q.; Park, J. B.; He, X. N.; Gao, Y.; Zhou, Y. S.; Lu, Y. F.

    2010-02-01

    CO2 laser resonant excitations of precursor molecules were applied in combustion flame synthesis of diamond films. The combustion flame was produced from a mixture of ethylene (C2H4), acetylene (C2H2) and oxygen (O2). A wavelength-tunable CO2 laser with wavelength range from 9.2 to 10.9 μm was used for wavelength-matched excitation of the ethylene molecules. By irradiating the flame using CO2 laser at 10.532 μm, the ethylene molecules were resonantly excited through the CH2 wagging vibrational mode (ν7, 949.3 cm-1). Irradiation of the flame using the common CO2 laser wavelength at 10.591 μm was also carried out for comparison. It was found that diamond synthesis was more obviously enhanced by the CO2 laser resonant excitation at 10.532 μm as compared to that at 10.591 μm. Firstly, the flame was shortened by 50%, indicating a promoted reaction in the process. Secondly, the diamond grain sizes as well as the diamond film thicknesses were increased by 200~300% and 160% respectively, indicating a higher growth rate of diamond films. Finally, Raman spectra of the diamond sample showed a sharp diamond peak at 1334 cm-1 and a suppressed G-band, indicating higher diamond quality.

  13. The optoelectronic properties of silicon films deposited by inductively coupled plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin Yanli; Yan Hengqing; Li Fei; Qiao Li; Liu Qiming [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); He Deyan, E-mail: hedy@lzu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films were deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) at low substrate temperatures using H{sub 2}-diluted SiH{sub 4} as a source gas. High-density plasma generated by inductively coupled excitation facilitates the crystallization of silicon films at low temperatures, and microcrystalline silicon films were obtained at the substrate temperature as low as 180 deg. C. The columnar structure of the films becomes more and more compact with an increase of their crystallinity. The reduction of hydrogen content in the films causes a narrowing of the optical bandgap and an enhancement of the absorption with increasing the substrate temperature. The microcrystalline silicon films show two electronic transport mechanisms: one is related to the density of state distribution in the temperature region near room temperature and the other is the variable range hopping between localized electronic states close to the Fermi level below 170 K. A reasonable explanation is presented for the dependence of the optoelectronic properties on the microstructure of the silicon films. The films prepared at a substrate temperature of 300 deg. C have highly crystalline and compact columnar structure, high optical absorption coefficient and electrical conductivity, and a low hydrogen content of 3.8%.

  14. New insights into selected-area deposition of diamond films by means of selective seeding

    CERN Document Server

    LiuHongWu; Gao Chun Xi; Han Yong; Luo Ji Feng; Zou Guang Tian; Wen Chao

    2002-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond films have been patterned on a polished Si substrate by means of selective seeding via hot-filament chemical vapour deposition. In addition to the process of selective seeding, the CH sub 4 /H sub 2 concentration and the sizes of the patterns have effects on the selectivity. The mechanism of selective growth of diamond is also discussed in this paper.

  15. Flame deposition of diamond : gas phase diagnostics and the effects of nitrogen addition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Robert Leendert

    2002-01-01

    This thesis presents research on oxyacetylene flame deposition of diamond. Two main topics are addressed, namely the development and application of laser spectroscopic techniques for flame diagnostics, and the influence of nitrogen addition on the flame and diamond layer properties. Flame diagnostic

  16. Microwave Plasma-Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nitrogen-Doped Diamond. II: CH4/N2/H2 Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, Benjamin S; Kelly, Mark W; Potter, Katie J; Ashfold, Michael N R; Mankelevich, Yuri A

    2016-11-03

    We report a combined experimental and modeling study of microwave-activated dilute CH4/N2/H2 plasmas, as used for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond, under very similar conditions to previous studies of CH4/H2, CH4/H2/Ar, and N2/H2 gas mixtures. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, absolute column densities of CH(X, v = 0), CN(X, v = 0), and NH(X, v = 0) radicals in the hot plasma have been determined as functions of height, z, source gas mixing ratio, total gas pressure, p, and input power, P. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to investigate, with respect to the same variables, the relative number densities of electronically excited species, namely, H atoms, CH, C2, CN, and NH radicals and triplet N2 molecules. The measurements have been reproduced and rationalized from first-principles by 2-D (r, z) coupled kinetic and transport modeling, and comparison between experiment and simulation has afforded a detailed understanding of C/N/H plasma-chemical reactivity and variations with process conditions and with location within the reactor. The experimentally validated simulations have been extended to much lower N2 input fractions and higher microwave powers than were probed experimentally, providing predictions for the gas-phase chemistry adjacent to the diamond surface and its variation across a wide range of conditions employed in practical diamond-growing CVD processes. The strongly bound N2 molecule is very resistant to dissociation at the input MW powers and pressures prevailing in typical diamond CVD reactors, but its chemical reactivity is boosted through energy pooling in its lowest-lying (metastable) triplet state and subsequent reactions with H atoms. For a CH4 input mole fraction of 4%, with N2 present at 1-6000 ppm, at pressure p = 150 Torr, and with applied microwave power P = 1.5 kW, the near-substrate gas-phase N atom concentration, [N]ns, scales linearly with the N2 input mole fraction and exceeds the concentrations [NH]ns, [NH2]ns

  17. Mechanism and prediction of failure of diamond films deposited on various substrates by HFCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ling-ping; SUN Xin-yuan; LI Shao-lu; LI De-yi; CHEN Xiao-hua

    2004-01-01

    Diamond films were deposited on the WC-Co cemented carbide and Si3N4 ceramic cutting tool substrates by hot-filament-assisted chemical vapour deposition. The adherence property of diamond films was estimated using the critical load (Pcr) in the indentation test. The adhesive strength of diamond films is related to the intermediate layer between the film and the substrate. Poor adhesion of diamond films to polished cemented carbide substrate is owing to the formation of graphite phase in the interface. The adhesion of diamond films deposited on acid etched cemented carbide substrate is improved, and the peeling-off of the films often happens in the loosen layer of WC particles where the cobalt element is nearly removed. The diamond films' adhesion to cemented carbide substrate whose surface layer is decarbonizated is strengthened dramatically because WC phase forms by reaction between the deposited carbon and tungsten in the surface layer of substrates during the deposition of diamond, which results in chemical combination in the film-substrate interface. The adhesion of diamond films to silicon nitride substrate is the firmest due to the formation of chemical combination of the SiC intermediate layer in the interfaces. In the piston-turning application, the diamond-coated Si3N4 ceramic and the cemented carbide cutting tools usually fail in the form of collapsing of edge and cracking or flaking respectively. They have no built-up edge(BUE) as long as coating is intact.As it wears through, BUE develops and the cutting force on it increases 1 - 3 times than that prior to failure. This can predict the failure of diamond-coated cutting tools.

  18. CVD金刚石薄膜在钨丝和碳纤维上的制备%Preparation of CVD diamond coatings on W wire and C fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何贤昶; 沈荷生; 张志明; 胡晓君; 杨小倩; 万永中

    2001-01-01

    用CVD方法在钨丝和碳纤维上沉积金刚石薄膜。约含有10000根纤维的纤维束经特殊 处理后分离为单根。生长条件使碳纤维中心在CVD生长结束后仍保持固态。CVD金刚石在纤 维上生长的平均激活能为93.15kJ/mol。SEM照片给出了纤维涂层在不同生长条件下的表面和 中心的形貌。纤维内部的石墨碳和外部的金刚石层有很大的不同。钨丝的断裂强度和杨氏模量 的测量表明,具有金刚石涂层的钨丝的断裂强度为0.567GPa,非常接近不具有金刚石涂层的钨 丝的断裂强度。但具有金刚石涂层的钨丝的断裂应变为4.8%,比没有金刚石涂层的钨丝的断 裂应变7%要小得多。这表明了金刚石涂层可以减少钨丝的断裂应力,提高其机械性能。%Diamond growth on W-wire and C-fiber substrates was studied. A treatment was used to separate fibers one by one from a bunch of more than 10000 fibers. The selected growth condition was to keep the carbon fiber core solid after CVD growth. Activation energy of CVD coated fibers is 93.15 kJ/mol in average. SEM pictures show surface and core morphology of the coatings under different treatment conditions. There are two different contrasts related to interior graphite carbon and exterior diamond layer. Wire fracture strength and Young's modulus measurement indicates that the fracture strength of W wire with diamond coating is 0.567 GPa, very close to its value without coating. However, the fracture strain of the wire with diamond coating is 4.8% , which is much less than that of W wire fracture strain of 7% . It means that diamond coated wire may reduce wire fracture strain and improve its mechanical property.

  19. Atomic-Level Investigation of CHx and C2Hx Adsorption on β-SiC (111 Surface for CVD Diamond Growth from DFT Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naichao Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is on the adsorption of unsaturated hydrocarbon molecules on β-SiC (111 surfaces during diamond film growth. The CHx and C2Hx molecules have been investigated to obtain a specific insight into absorbing diamond processes on the atomic scale. Structural and electronic properties of CHx and C2Hx adsorption on the Si- and C-terminated surfaces have been studied by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT. From the calculated energetics and geometries, we find that C2Hx adsorption on the Si-terminated surfaces has six possible surface reconstructions. For the C-terminated surface, there exist eight possible surface reconstructions. Five surface reconstructions, including CH2 adsorption on the Si- and C-terminated surface, CH–CH2 and CH=CH2 adsorption on the C-terminated surface, and C2H5 adsorption on the Si-terminated surface, have the largest hydrogen adsorption energies and more stability of surface reconstructions. Calculations demonstrate that the Si-terminated surface is energetically more favorable for fabricating CVD diamond coatings than the C-terminated surface.

  20. Lubrication by Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Regardless of environment (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, dry nitrogen, or water), ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) and nitrogen-ion-implanted, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films had low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6)cu mm/N(dot)m). These films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings regardless of environment. On the other hand, as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond films; polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond films; and polished and then fluorinated, coarse-grain CVD diamond films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in humid air, in dry nitrogen, and in water, but they had a high coefficient of friction and a high wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. The polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond film revealed an extremely low wear rate, far less than 10(exp 10) cu mm/N(dot)m, in water.

  1. Resonant vibrational excitation of ethylene molecules in laser-assisted diamond deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L. S.; Zhou, Y. S.; Wang, M. X.; Gao, Y.; Liu, L.; Silvain, J. F.; Lu, Y. F.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of resonant vibrational excitation of ethylene molecules in combustion chemical vapor deposition of diamond was investigated. Resonant vibrational excitation of the CH2-wagging mode (a type c fundamental band, υ7, at 949.3 cm-1) in ethylene molecules was achieved by using a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser with a matching wavelength at 10.532 µm. By comparing to laser irradiation at off-resonance wavelengths, an on-resonance vibrational excitation is more efficient in energy coupling, increasing flame temperatures, accelerating the combustion reactions, and promoting diamond deposition. An enhanced rate of 5.7 was achieved in terms of the diamond growth rate with an improved diamond quality index at a high flame temperature under a resonant excitation of the CH2-wagging mode. This study demonstrates that a resonant vibrational excitation is an effective route for coupling energy into the gas phase reactions and promoting the diamond synthesis process.

  2. Tl and OSL dosimetry of diamond films CVD pure and unpurified with boron-carbon; Dosimetria Tl y OSL de peliculas de diamante CVD puras e impurificadas con boro-carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendrez, R.; Pedroza M, M.; Chernov, V.; Ochoa N, J.D.; Bernal, R.; Barboza F, M. [CIF, UNISON, A.P. 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Castaneda, B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apdo. Postal 1626, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Goncalves, J.A.N.; Sandonato, G.M. [Laboratorio Associado de Plasma, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais C.P. 515- 12201 -970, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Cruz Z, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Preciado F, S.; Cruz V, C.; Brown, F. [Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales de la Universidad de Sonora, Apdo. Postal 130, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Schreck, M. [Universitaet Augsburg, Institut fuer Physik D-86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The diamond is a material that possesses extreme physical properties, such as its hardness to the radiation, its low chemical reactivity besides its equivalence to the human tissue, which qualify him as an ideal material for radiation dosimetry. In this work, it was studied the thermal and optically stimulated response (Tl and OSL) of polycrystalline diamond films grown by the technique of CVD pure and contaminated with Boron-carbon (B/C) with the intention of characterizing their efficiency like a dosemeter for radiation in a range of 0 - 3000 Gy. For the case of the films without impurities, the Tl curve presents four main peaks, two of them in an interval of temperatures of 150-200 C and other two additional around of 250-400 C. The dependence of the response of integrated Tl and that of OSL always maintained a lineal relationship with the exhibition dose up to 100 Gy. The behavior of the films contaminated with B/C (2000 - 20000 ppm) was established through experiments that involved the signal of OSL and their relationship with the Tl response. It was found that this processes are correlated, since the electrons caught in the traps of low temperature (50 - 250 C) of the Tl they are the electrons that recombining with more probability to provide the signal of OSL. According to these results it is possible to propose the diamond films as a good candidate for dosimetry to, using the traditional technique of Tl so much as well as the but recent of OSL. (Author)

  3. Hot wire CVD deposition of nanocrystalline silicon solar cells on rough substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongbo B.T., E-mail: h.li@uu.n [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Werf, Karine H.M. van der; Rath, Jatin K.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-04-30

    In silicon thin film solar cell technology, frequently rough or textured substrates are used to scatter the light and enhance its absorption. The important issue of the influence of substrate roughness on silicon nanocrystal growth has been investigated through a series of nc-Si:H single junction p-i-n solar cells containing i-layers deposited with Hot-wire CVD. It is shown that silicon grown on the surface of an unoptimized rough substrate contains structural defects, which deteriorate solar cell performance. By introducing parameter v, voids/substrate area ratio, we could define a criterion for the morphology of light trapping substrates for thin film silicon solar cells: a preferred substrate should have a v value of less than around 1 x 10{sup -6}, correlated to a substrate surface rms value of lower than around 50 nm. Our Ag/ZnO substrates with rms roughness less than this value typically do not contain microvalleys with opening angles smaller than {approx} 110{sup o}, resulting in solar cells with improved output performance. We suggest a void-formation model based on selective etching of strained Si-Si atoms due to the collision of growing silicon film surface near the valleys of the substrate.

  4. Properties of Boron-dopedμc-Ge:H Films Deposited by Hot-wire CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Haibin; SHEN Honglie; WU Tianru; LU Linfeng; TANG Zhengxia; SHEN Jiancang

    2015-01-01

    Boron-doped hydrogenated microcrystalline Germanium (μc-Ge:H)fi lms were deposited by hot-wire CVD. H2 diluted GeH4 and B2H6 were used as precursors and the substrate temperature was kept at 300ć. The properties of the samples were analyzed by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and Hall Effect measurement with Van der Pauw method. It is found that thefi lms are partially crystallized, with crystalline fractions larger than 45% and grain sizes smaller than 50 nm. The B-doping can enhance the crystallization but reduce the grain sizes, and also enhance the preferential growth of Ge (220). The conductivity of thefi lms increases and tends to be saturated with increasingdiborane-to-germane ratio . All the Hall mobilities of the samples are larger than 3.8 cm2·V-1·s-1. A high conductivity of 41.3Ω-1ίcm-1 is gained at=6.7%.

  5. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubkov, V. I., E-mail: VZubkovspb@mail.ru; Kucherova, O. V.; Zubkova, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas' ev, A. V. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University (LETI), Professor Popov Street 5, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bogdanov, S. A.; Vikharev, A. L. [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul' yanov Street 46, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Butler, J. E. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University (LETI), Professor Popov Street 5, 197376 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul' yanov Street 46, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), P.O. Box 37012 Smithsonian Inst., Washington, D.C. 20013-7012 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120–150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10{sup −13} down to 2 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (∼2 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}). At T > T{sub room} in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  6. Growth and characterization of large, high quality single crystal diamond substrates via microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nad, Shreya

    Single crystal diamond (SCD) substrates can be utilized in a wide range of applications. Important issues in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of such substrates include: shrinking of the SCD substrate area, stress and cracking, high defect density and hence low electronic quality and low optical quality due to high nitrogen impurities. The primary objective of this thesis is to begin to address these issues and to find possible solutions for enhancing the substrate dimensions and simultaneously improving the quality of the grown substrates. The deposition of SCD substrates is carried out in a microwave cavity plasma reactor via the microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. The operation of the reactor was first optimized to determine the safe and efficient operating regime. By adjusting the matching of the reactor cavity with the help of four internal tuning length variables, the system was further matched to operate at a maximum overall microwave coupling efficiency of ˜ 98%. Even with adjustments in the substrate holder position, the reactor remains well matched with a coupling efficiency of ˜ 95% indicating good experimental performance over a wide range of operating conditions. SCD substrates were synthesized at a high pressure of 240 Torr and with a high absorbed power density of 500 W/cm3. To counter the issue of shrinking substrate size during growth, the effect of different substrate holder designs was studied. An increase in the substrate dimensions (1.23 -- 2.5 times) after growth was achieved when the sides of the seeds were shielded from the intense microwave electromagnetic fields in a pocket holder design. Using such pocket holders, high growth rates of 16 -- 32 mum/hr were obtained for growth times of 8 -- 72 hours. The polycrystalline diamond rim deposition was minimized/eliminated from these growth runs, hence successfully enlarging the substrate size. Several synthesized CVD SCD substrates were laser cut and separated

  7. Deposition of polycrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond on graphite: effects of surface pre-treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando, I.; John, P.; Porro, S.; Wilson, J. I. B.

    2017-03-01

    The growth of hydrogenated sp3-phase of diamond on the sp2-phase of graphite by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPECVD) is a challenge, primarily because hydrogen etches graphite much faster than the growth rate of diamond. To enhance nucleation of diamond on graphite, we used a plethora of techniques such as plasma etching, ion bombardment, manual scratching, and scratching by ultrasonic agitation. Nanocrystalline and polycrystalline diamond thin-films were grown by MPECVD on the surface of pre-treated or pristine graphite using 1.5, 3.0, and 3.6 kW microwave power. Samples were characterised by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Species in the gas phase during film deposition were monitored by Optical Emission Spectroscopy. We have found that the surface area covered and the morphology of the diamond films are dependent on the surface pre-treatment. The crystallite size of the films depends on the microwave power used during MPECVD growth. The results of this study establish the protocols for diamond deposition by MPECVD on graphite substrates with a desired crystalline quality based on the pre-treatment of the substrate and the microwave power used during MPECVD. These results are important to modern applications, such as plasma facing materials, in which diamond has shown outstanding performance in contrast to that of graphite.

  8. Investigation of chemical vapour deposition diamond detectors by X- ray micro-beam induced current and X-ray micro-beam induced luminescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Olivero, P; Vittone, E; Fizzotti, F; Paolini, C; Lo Giudice, A; Barrett, R; Tucoulou, R

    2004-01-01

    Tracking detectors have become an important ingredient in high-energy physics experiments. In order to survive the harsh detection environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), trackers need to have special properties. They must be radiation hard, provide fast collection of charge, be as thin as possible and remove heat from readout electronics. The unique properties of diamond allow it to fulfill these requirements. In this work we present an investigation of the charge transport and luminescence properties of "detector grade" artificial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond devices developed within the CERN RD42 collaboration, performed by means of X-ray micro-beam induced current collection (XBICC) and X-ray micro- beam induced luminescence (XBIL) techniques. XBICC technique allows quantitative estimates of the transport parameters of the material to be evaluated and mapped with micrometric spatial resolution. In particular, the high resolution and sensitivity of the technique has allowed a quantitati...

  9. Study on the Microstructure and Electrical Properties of Boron and Sulfur Codoped Diamond Films Deposited Using Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic-scale microstructure and electron emission properties of boron and sulfur (denoted as B-S codoped diamond films grown on high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP diamond and Si substrates were investigated using atom force microscopy (AFM, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, and current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS measurement techniques. The films grown on Si consisted of large grains with secondary nucleation, whereas those on HTHP diamond are composed of well-developed polycrystalline facets with an average size of 10–50 nm. SIMS analyses confirmed that sulfur was successfully introduced into diamond films, and a small amount of boron facilitated sulfur incorporation into diamond. Large tunneling currents were observed at some grain boundaries, and the emission character was better at the grain boundaries than that at the center of the crystal. The films grown on HTHP diamond substrates were much more perfect with higher quality than the films deposited on Si substrates. The local I-V characteristics for films deposited on Si or HTHP diamond substrates indicate n-type conduction.

  10. Investigation of the Millimeter-Wave Plasma Assisted CVD Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikharev, A; Gorbachev, A; Kozlov, A; Litvak, A; Bykov, Y; Caplan, M

    2005-07-21

    A polycrystalline diamond grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique is recognized as a unique material for high power electronic devices owing to unrivaled combination of properties such as ultra-low microwave absorption, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength and chemical stability. Microwave vacuum windows for modern high power sources and transmission lines operating at the megawatt power level require high quality diamond disks with a diameter of several centimeters and a thickness of a few millimeters. The microwave plasma-assisted CVD technique exploited today to produce such disks has low deposition rate, which limits the availability of large size diamond disk windows. High-electron-density plasma generated by the millimeter-wave power was suggested for enhanced-growth-rate CVD. In this paper a general description of the 30 GHz gyrotron-based facility is presented. The output radiation of the gyrotron is converted into four wave-beams. Free localized plasma in the shape of a disk with diameter much larger than the wavelength of the radiation is formed in the intersection area of the wave-beams. The results of investigation of the plasma parameters, as well as the first results of diamond film deposition are presented. The prospects for commercially producing vacuum window diamond disks for high power microwave devices at much lower costs and processing times than currently available are outlined.

  11. Evaluating electrically insulating films deposited on V-4% Cr-4% Ti by reactive CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.H.; Cho, W.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Previous CaO coatings on V-4%Cr-4%Ti exhibited high-ohmic insulator behavior even though a small amount of vanadium from the alloy was incorporated in the coating. However, when the vanadium concentration in the coatings is > 15 wt%, the coating becomes conductive. When the vanadium concentration is high in localized areas, a calcium vanadate phase that exhibits semiconductor behavior can form. To explore this situation, CaO and Ca-V-O coatings were produced on vanadium alloys by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and by a metallic-vapor process to investigate the electrical resistance of the coatings. Initially, the vanadium alloy specimens were either charged with oxygen in argon that contained trace levels of oxygen, or oxidized for 1.5-3 h in a 1% CO-CO{sub 2} gas mixture or in air to form vanadium oxide at 625-650{degrees}C. Most of the specimens were exposed to calcium vapor at 800-850{degrees}C. Initial and final weights were obtained to monitor each step, and surveillance samples were removed for examination by optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron-energy-dispersive and X-ray diffraction analysis; the electrical resistivity was also measured. The authors found that Ca-V-O films exhibited insulator behavior when the ratio of calcium concentration to vanadium concentration R in the film was > 0.9, and semiconductor or conductor behavior for R < 0.8. However, in some cases, semiconductor behavior was observed when CaO-coated samples with R > 0.98 were exposed in liquid lithium. Based on these studies, the authors conclude that semiconductor behavior occurs if a conductive calcium vanadate phase is present in localized regions in the CaO coating.

  12. Deposition of TiC film on titanium for abrasion resistant implant material by ion-enhanced triode plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Yuhe, E-mail: zyh1120@hotmail.co.jp [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Wang Wei; Jia Xingya [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Akasaka, Tsukasa [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Liao, Susan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Watari, Fumio [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deposition of Titanium Carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. - Abstract: Deposition of titanium carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using a TiCl{sub 4} + CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2} gas mixture. Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the specimen was consisted of TiC and Ti. Carbide layer of about 6 {mu}m thickness was observed on the cross section of the specimen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance.

  13. Highly segmented CVD diamond detectors and high-resolution momentum measurements in knockout reactions; Hochsegmentierte CVD Diamant Detektoren und hochaufloesende Impulsmessungen in Knockout Reaktionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwertel, Sabine

    2009-11-26

    highly segmented detectors with an efficiency {epsilon}>98 % could be built from this material. The diamond detectors were segmented in our laboratory and achieved a time resolution of {sigma}{sub t}=75 ps. Medium-size (25.4 x 25.4 mm{sup 2}) micro-strip detectors were tested at the FRS and at the ALADIN/LAND setup at GSI. The obtained position resolution was in the range of the strip size of 200 {mu}m. First full-size detectors (50 x 50 mm{sup 2}) will be completed soon. (orig.)

  14. Surface chemical studies of chemical vapour deposited diamond thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Proffitt, S

    2001-01-01

    could not easily be correlated to the bulk film properties. It is suggested that electron emission arises from the graphite component of graphite- diamond grain boundaries that are present in the nanocrystalline films. species. The adsorbed O and Cl species are more strongly bound to the K layer than they are to the diamond substrate, so thermal desorption of K from the K/CI/diamond or K/O/diamond surface results also in the simultaneous loss ofO and Cl. The phosphorus precursor trisdimethylaminophosphine (TDMAP) has a negligible reactive sticking probability on the clean diamond surface. This can be increased by thermal cracking of the gas phase precursor by a heated filament, resulting in non-activated adsorption to produce an adlayer containing a mixture of surface-bound ligands and phosphorus containing species. The ligands were readily lost upon heating, leaving P, some of which was lost from the surface at higher temperatures. Pre-hydrogenation of the diamond surface inhibited the uptake of cracked TDMA...

  15. Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond Films on Silicon From Ethanol and Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马志斌; 汪建华; 王传新; 满卫东

    2003-01-01

    Diamond films with very smooth surface and good optical quality have been deposited onto silicon substrate using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) from a gas mixture of ethanol and hydrogen at a low substrate temperature of 450 ℃. The effects of the substrate temperature on the diamond nucleation and the morphology of the diamond film have been investigated and observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microstructure and the phase of the film have been characterized using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The diamond nucleation density significantly decreases with the increasing of the substrate temperature. There are only sparse nuclei when the substrate temperature is higher than 800 ℃ although the ethanol concentration in hydrogen is very high. That the characteristic diamond peak in the Raman spectrum of a diamond film prepared at a low substrate temperature of 450 ℃ extends into broadband indicates that the film is of nanophase. No graphite peak appeared in the XRD pattern confirms that the film is mainly composed of SP3 carbon. The diamond peak in the XRD pattern also broadens due to the nanocrystalline of the film.

  16. Effect of surface treatment on hot-filament chemical vapour deposition grown diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.; Atta, M. A.

    2012-02-01

    Diamond film growth without seeding treatment has been the subject of numerous studies. In this study, diamond films with/without seeding treatment were grown on silicon using hot-filament chemical vapour deposition. An inexpensive and simple approach, namely ‘dry ultrasonic treatment’, was introduced in which full coverage of the diamond film was achieved over the substrate having no prior seeding treatment. For comparison purposes, two substrates were seeded with different sizes of diamond particles, 5 µm by hand and 30-40 µm by ultrasonic agitation, prior to deposition. The produced diamond films were examined through standard characterization tools and distinct features were observed in each film. The diamond film grown without the seeding treatment shows slightly lower growth rate (1 µm h-1) but bigger grain size up to 8 µm compared with seeded films. Here we show the growth of uniform and high-purity diamond films free from nano-sized grains, which are grown without any seeding treatment.

  17. Deposition and characterization of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films on rubber seals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y.T.; Bui, X.L.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2010-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) for reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals. The wax removal and pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrates are proven to be cruci

  18. Synthesis of SiV-diamond particulates via the microwave plasma chemical deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond on soda-lime glass fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunuku, Srinivasu; Chen, Yen-Chun; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Chang, Wen-Hao; Manoharan, Divinah; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2016-10-01

    We report the synthesis of silicon-vacancy (SiV) incorporated spherical shaped ultrananocrystalline diamond (SiV-UNCD) particulates (size ∼1 μm) with bright luminescence at 738 nm. For this purpose, different granular structured polycrystalline diamond films and particulates were synthesized by using three different kinds of growth plasma conditions on the three types of substrate materials in the microwave plasma enhanced CVD process. The grain size dependent photoluminescence properties of nitrogen vacancy (NV) and SiV color centers have been investigated for different granular structured diamond samples. The luminescence of NV center and the associated phonon sidebands, which are usually observed in microcrystalline diamond and nanocrystalline diamond films, were effectively suppressed in UNCD films and UNCD particulates. Micron sized SiV-UNCD particulates with bright SiV emission has been attained by transfer of SiV-UNCD clusters on soda-lime glass fibers to inverted pyramidal cavities fabricated on Si substrates by the simple crushing of UNCD/soda-lime glass fibers in deionized water and ultrasonication. Such a plasma enhanced CVD process for synthesizing SiV-UNCD particulates with suppressed NV emission is simple and robust to attain the bright SiV-UNCD particulates to employ in practical applications.

  19. Influence of melt treatments and polished CVD diamond coated insert on cutting force and surface integrity in turning of Al–7Si and Al–7Si–2.5Cu cast alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K G Basavakumar; P G Mukunda; M Chakraborty

    2007-10-01

    The microstructures, machinability and surface characteristics of Al–7Si and Al–7Si–2.5Cu cast alloys were studied after various melt treatments like grain refinement and modification. The results indicate that combined grain refined and modified Al–7Si–2.5Cu cast alloys have microstructures consisting of uniformly distributed -Al grains, eutectic Al-silicon and fine CuAl2 particles in the interdendritic region. These alloys exhibited better machinability and surface characteristics in the cast condition compared with the same alloy subjected to only grain refinement or modification. Performances of the turning inserts (uncoated and polished CVD diamond coated) were evaluated in machining Al–7Si and Al–7Si–2.5Cu cast alloys under dry environment using a lathe. The polished CVD diamond coated insert outperformed the uncoated cutting insert which suffered from sizeable edge buildup leading to higher cutting force and poor surface finish. The polished CVD diamond coated insert shows a very small steady wear without flaking of the diamond film during cutting. This paper attempts to investigate the influence of grain refinement, modification and combined action of both on the microstructural changes in the Al–7Si and Al–7Si–2.5Cu cast alloys and their machinability and surface finish when different turning inserts are used.

  20. Single-crystal CVD diamond detector for low-energy charged particles with energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuki Sato; Hiroyuki Murakami [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, (Japan); Takehiro Shimaoka; Masakatsu Tsubota; Junichi, H. Kaneko [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Sapporo 060-8628, (Japan)

    2015-07-01

    The performance of a diamond detector made of a single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition was studied for charged particles, having energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV. Energy peaks of these low-energy ions were clearly observed. However, we observed that the pulse height for individual incident ion decreases with increasing atomic number of the ions. We estimated the charge collection efficiency of the generated charge carriers by charged particle incident. The charge collection above ∼95% is achieved for helium (He{sup +}) with the energy above 1.5 MeV. On the other hand, the charge collection efficiency for heavy-ions shows wrong values compared with that of He{sup +}, ∼70% for silicon (Si{sup +}) and 35 to 40% for gold (Au{sup 3+}), at the same incident energy range, respectively. (authors)

  1. Multi-Length Scale Tribology of Electrophoretically Deposited Nickel-Diamond Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Shikha; Goel, Sneha; Pandey, Chandra Prabha; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-02-01

    Electrophoretically deposited (EPD) nickel and its composite coatings are widely used to enhance the life span of continuous ingot casting molds in the steel, aerospace and automotive industries. This article reports the effect of different concentrations of diamond particles (2.5-10 g/L) on the wear mechanism of EPD Ni. The distribution of diamond particles in the Ni matrix was observed using Voronoi tessellation. Variation in COF was observed by a fretting wear test to be 0.51 ± 0.07 for Ni, which decreases to 0.35 ± 0.03 for the Ni-diamond coatings. The wear volume of the coatings with 7.5 g/L concentration of diamond was observed to be a minimum (0.051 ± 0.02 × 10-3 mm3) compared with other composite coatings. Further, the micro-scratch testing of the coatings also exhibited a reduced COF (0.03-0.12) for 7.5 g/L diamond concentration compared with Ni (0.08-0.13). Higher wear resistance of the diamond-added coatings (optimum 7.5 g/L concentration) is due to the balance between the dispersion strengthening mechanism and the enhancement of the load-bearing capacity due to the incorporation of diamond particles. Thus, these composites can be used for applications in automotive and aerospace industries.

  2. Recent results on the development of radiation-hard diamond detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Conway, J S; Bauer, C; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Dabrowski, W; Da Graca, J; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Jamieson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Plano, R; Polesello, P; Prawer, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Procario, M; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Somalwar, S V; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R; Thomson, G B; Trawick, M; Trischuk, W; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; White, C; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    Charged particle detectors made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond have radiation hardness greatly exceeding that of silicon- based detectors. The CERN-based RD42 Collaboration has developed and tested CVD diamond microstrip and pixel detectors with an eye to their application in the intense radiation environment near the interaction region of hadron colliders. This paper presents recent results from tests of these detectors. (4 refs).

  3. Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Marc D; Vohra, Yogesh K [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2002-10-21

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60{+-}5 GPa averaged over three samples. (rapid communication)

  4. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Marc D.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2002-10-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60+/-5 GPa averaged over three samples.

  5. Low temperature back-surface-field contacts deposited by hot-wire CVD for heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, D. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)], E-mail: delfina@eel.upc.edu; Voz, C.; Martin, I.; Orpella, A.; Alcubilla, R. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Villar, F.; Bertomeu, J.; Andreu, J. [CeRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Roca-i-Cabarrocas, P. [LPICM-Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2008-08-30

    The growing interest in using thinner wafers (< 200 {mu}m) requires the development of low temperature passivation strategies for the back contact of heterojunction solar cells. In this work, we investigate low temperature deposited back contacts based on boron-doped amorphous silicon films obtained by Hot-Wire CVD. The influence of the deposition parameters and the use of an intrinsic buffer layer have been considered. The microstructure of the deposited thin films has been comprehensively studied by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry in the UV-visible range. The effective recombination velocity at the back surface has been measured by the Quasi-Steady-State Photoconductance technique. Complete double-side heterojunction solar cells (1 cm{sup 2}) have been fabricated and characterized by External Quantum Efficiency and current-voltage measurements. Total-area conversion efficiencies up to 14.5% were achieved in a fully low temperature process (< 200 deg. C)

  6. Sputtered tungsten-based ternary and quaternary layers for nanocrystalline diamond deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walock, Michael J; Rahil, Issam; Zou, Yujiao; Imhoff, Luc; Catledge, Shane A; Nouveau, Corinne; Stanishevsky, Andrei V

    2012-06-01

    Many of today's demanding applications require thin-film coatings with high hardness, toughness, and thermal stability. In many cases, coating thickness in the range 2-20 microm and low surface roughness are required. Diamond films meet many of the stated requirements, but their crystalline nature leads to a high surface roughness. Nanocrystalline diamond offers a smoother surface, but significant surface modification of the substrate is necessary for successful nanocrystalline diamond deposition and adhesion. A hybrid hard and tough material may be required for either the desired applications, or as a basis for nanocrystalline diamond film growth. One possibility is a composite system based on carbides or nitrides. Many binary carbides and nitrides offer one or more mentioned properties. By combining these binary compounds in a ternary or quaternary nanocrystalline system, we can tailor the material for a desired combination of properties. Here, we describe the results on the structural and mechanical properties of the coating systems composed of tungsten-chromium-carbide and/or nitride. These WC-Cr-(N) coatings are deposited using magnetron sputtering. The growth of adherent nanocrystalline diamond films by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition has been demonstrated on these coatings. The WC-Cr-(N) and WC-Cr-(N)-NCD coatings are characterized with atomic force microscopy and SEM, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation.

  7. Deposition of boron doped diamond and carbon nanomaterials on graphite foam electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, Marian, E-mail: marian.marton@stuba.sk; Vojs, Marian; Kotlár, Mário; Michniak, Pavol; Vančo, Ľubomír; Veselý, Marian; Redhammer, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • The possibility of boron doped diamond deposition on porous carbon foam by HFCVD method was demonstrated. • Various carbon forms were synthesized including BDD, thin films of graphite nanosheets, carbon nanowalls, graphite nanotips and its composites. • Carbon nanowalls were overgrown by BDD nanocrystals, thus creating a new type of carbon nanomaterial not published yet, a CNW/BDD composite with a unique Raman spectrum. - Abstract: Boron doped diamond (BDD) has remarkable physical and chemical properties, that makes it an attractive material for electrochemical applications. In this study, deposition process of BDD on porous carbon foam electrodes was performed by HFCVD method. After depositions, the substrates were not homogenously covered by the BDD thin film only. Depending on the deposition temperature, foam porosity and distance from heated filaments, different carbon nanomaterials were synthesized. The boron doped diamond, graphite nanosheets, carbon nanowalls and its composites occurred on the foams outer and inner surfaces. Two new observed types of carbon structures, the carbon nanowalls – boron doped diamond composite and graphite nanotips are analyzed and described. Analyses were made by SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The influence of deposition conditions on the growth process is discussed.

  8. Nanodiamond films deposited at moderate temperature on pure titanium substrate pretreated by ultrasonic scratching in diamond powder suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed Jawid Askari; Fanxiu Lv; Akhtar Farid; Fengying Wang; Qi He; Zuyuan Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) film deposition on pure titanium and Ti alloys is extraordinarily difficult because of the high diffusion coefficient of carbon in Ti, the large mismatch in their thermal expansion coefficients, the complex nature of the interlayer formed during diamond deposition, and the difficulty to achieve very high nucleation density. In this investigation, NCD films were successfully deposited on pure Ti substrate by using a novel substrate pretreatment of ultrasonic scratching in a diamond powder-ethanol suspension and by a two-step process at moderate temperature. It was shown that by scratching with a 30-μm diamond suspension for 1 h, followed by a 10-h diamond deposition, a continuous NCD film was obtained with an average grain size of about 200 nm. Detailed experimental results on the preparation, characterization, and successful deposition of the NCD films on Ti were discussed.

  9. The effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on nucleation density of chemical vapor deposition diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi; Ingram, David C.

    1995-11-01

    Using statistical design of experiments, the effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on the nucleation density of diamond was studied. The parameters investigated included ultrasonic excitation power, concentration of diamond powder in water, duration of ultrasonic excitation, and duration of cleaning with water after ultrasonic excitation. Diamond films were deposited on silicon (100) substrates using microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nucleation density varied from 106 nuclei/cm2 to 109 nuclei/cm2. The results illustrated that the dominant effect in ultrasonic pre-treatment was seeding. Moreover, scratches caused by the seeds during the treatment enabled more seeds to be retained on the surface. Based on these results, an optimized ultrasonic pretreatment has been developed. The new procedure yields a uniform nucleation density of 109 nuclei/cm2 on silicon (100) substrates.

  10. Interaction of carbon nanotubes and diamonds under hot-filament chemical vapor deposition conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Nagraj

    A composite of CNTs and diamond can be expected to have unique mechanical, electrical and thermal properties due to the synergetic combination of the excellent properties of these two allotropes of carbon. The composite may find applications in various fields that require a combination of good mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties such as, wear-resistant coatings, thermal management of integrated chips (ICs), and field emission devices. This research is devoted to the experimental studies of phase stability of diamond and CNTs under chemical vapor deposition conditions to investigate the possibility of combining these materials to produce a hybrid composite. Growth of the hybrid material is investigated by starting with a pre-existing film of CNTs and subsequently growing diamond on it. The diamond growth phase space is systematically scanned to determine optimal conditions where diamond nucleates on the CNT without destroying it. Various techniques including SEM, TEM, and Micro Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the hybrid material. A selective window where the diamond directly nucleates on the CNT without destroying the underlying CNT network is identified. Based on the material characterization, a growth mechanism based on etching of CNT at the defective sites to produce sp3 dangling bonds onto which diamond nucleates is proposed. Though a hybrid material is synthesized, the nucleation density of diamond on the CNTs is low and highly non-homogenous. Improvements to the CNT dispersion in the hybrid material are investigated in order to produce a homogenous material with predictable CNT loading fractions and to probe the low nucleation density of diamond on the CNT. The effect of several dispersion techniques and solvents on CNT surface homogeneity is studied using SEM, and a novel, vacuum drying based approach using CNT/dichlorobenzene dispersions is suggested. SEM and Raman analysis of the early stage nucleation are used to develop a

  11. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, J.P. van der; Martinez Martinez, Diego; Pei, Y.T.; Rudolf, P.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes

  12. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  13. Optical and Electrical Properties Evolution of Diamond-Like Carbon Thin Films with Deposition Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Xu-Li; LI Qing-Shan; KONG Xiang-He

    2009-01-01

    Optical and electrical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited by pulsed laser ablation of graphite target at different substrate temperatures are reported. By varying the deposition temperature from 400 to 25℃, the film optical transparency and electrical resistivity increase severely. Most importantly, the transparency and resistivity properties of the DLC films can be tailored to approaching diamond by adjusting the deposition temperature, which is critical to many applications. DLC films deposited at low temperatures show excellent optical transmittance and high resistivity. Over the same temperature regime an increase of the spa bonded C content is observed using visible Raman spectroscopy, which is responsible for the enhanced transparency and resistivity properties.

  14. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  15. Ti-doped hydrogenated diamond like carbon coating deposited by hybrid physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Rae; Sle Jun, Yee; Moon, Kyoung Il; Sunyong Lee, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Diamond-like carbon films containing titanium and hydrogen (Ti-doped DLC:H) were synthesized using a hybrid technique based on physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The film was deposited under a mixture of argon (Ar) and acetylene gas (C2H2). The amount of Ti in the Ti-doped DLC:H film was controlled by varying the DC power of the Ti sputtering target ranging from 0 to 240 W. The composition, microstructure, mechanical and chemical properties of Ti-doped DLC:H films with varying Ti concentrations, were investigated using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano indentation, a ball-on-disk tribometer, a four-point probe system and dynamic anodic testing. As a result, the optimum composition of Ti in Ti-doped DLC:H film using our hybrid method was found to be a Ti content of 18 at. %, having superior electrical conductivity and high corrosion resistance, suitable for bipolar plates. Its hardness value was measured to be 25.6 GPa with a low friction factor.

  16. Chemical Vapour Deposition Diamond - Charge Carrier Movement at Low Temperatures and Use in Time-Critical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, Hendrik; Pernegger, Heinz

    Diamond, a wide band gap semiconductor with exceptional electrical properties, has found its way in diverse fields of application reaching from the usage as a sensor material for beam loss monitors at particle accelerator facilities, to laser windows, to UV light sensors in space applications, e.g. for space weather forecasting. Though often used at room temperature, little is known about the charge transport in diamond towards liquid helium temperatures. In this work the method of the transient current technique is employed at temperatures between room temperature and 2 K. The temperature and electric field strength dependence of the pulse shape, the charge carrier transit time, the drift velocity, the saturation velocity, and the low-field mobility is measured in detector-grade scCVD diamond. Furthermore, the usability of diamond in time-critical applications is tested, and the main results are presented.

  17. A methodological toolkit for field assessments of artisanally mined alluvial diamond deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.

    2014-01-01

    This toolkit provides a standardized checklist of critical issues relevant to artisanal mining-related field research. An integrated sociophysical geographic approach to collecting data at artisanal mine sites is outlined. The implementation and results of a multistakeholder approach to data collection, carried out in the assessment of Guinea’s artisanally mined diamond deposits, also are summarized. This toolkit, based on recent and successful field campaigns in West Africa, has been developed as a reference document to assist other government agencies or organizations in collecting the data necessary for artisanal diamond mining or similar natural resource assessments.

  18. Effects of Implant Copper Layer on Diamond Film Deposition on Cemented Carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The deposition of high-quality diamond films and their adhesion on cemented carbides are strongly influenced by the catalytic effect of cobalt under typical deposition conditions.Decreasing Co content on the surface of the cemented carbide is often used for the diamond filmdeposition. But the leaching of Co from the WC-Co substrate leading to a mechanical weak surface often causes a poor adhesion. In this paper we adopted an implant copper layer preparedby vaporization to improve the mechanical properties of the Co-leached substrate. The diamondfilms were grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from CH4 :H2 gas mixture. Thecross section and the morphology of the diamond film were characterized by scanning electronmicroscopy (SEM). The non-diamond content in the film was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy.The effects of pretreatment on the concentrations of Co and Cu near the interfacial region wereexamined by energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) equipped with SEM. The adhesion of the diamondon the substrate was evaluated with a Rockwell-type hardness tester. The results indicate that thediamond films prepared with implant copper layer have a good adhesion to the cemented carbidesubstrate due to the recovery of the mechanical properties of the Co-depleted substrate after thecopper implantation and the formation of less amorphous carbon between the substrate and thediamond film.

  19. Method to grow pure nanocrystalline diamond films at low temperatures and high deposition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, John A.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Auciello, Orlando; Xiao, Xingcheng

    2009-07-07

    A method of depositing nanocrystalline diamond film on a substrate at a rate of not less than about 0.2 microns/hour at a substrate temperature less than about 500.degree. C. The method includes seeding the substrate surface with nanocrystalline diamond powder to an areal density of not less than about 10.sup.10sites/cm.sup.2, and contacting the seeded substrate surface with a gas of about 99% by volume of an inert gas other than helium and about 1% by volume of methane or hydrogen and one or more of acetylene, fullerene and anthracene in the presence of a microwave induced plasma while maintaining the substrate temperature less than about 500.degree. C. to deposit nanocrystalline diamond on the seeded substrate surface at a rate not less than about 0.2 microns/hour. Coatings of nanocrystalline diamond with average particle diameters of less than about 20 nanometers can be deposited with thermal budgets of 500.degree. C.-4 hours or less onto a variety of substrates such as MEMS devices.

  20. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mengdi, E-mail: M.Yang@utwente.nl; Aarnink, Antonius A. I.; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J.; Wolters, Rob A. M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 °C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), which reacted with WF{sub 6} at the substrate to deposit W. The growth behavior was monitored in real time by an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer. In this work, the authors compare samples with tungsten grown by either HWALD or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in terms of growth kinetics and properties. For CVD, the samples were made in a mixture of WF{sub 6} and molecular or atomic hydrogen. Resistivity of the WF{sub 6}-H{sub 2} CVD layers was 20 μΩ·cm, whereas for the WF{sub 6}-at-H-CVD layers, it was 28 μΩ·cm. Interestingly, the resistivity was as high as 100 μΩ·cm for the HWALD films, although the tungsten films were 99% pure according to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction reveals that the HWALD W was crystallized as β-W, whereas both CVD films were in the α-W phase.

  1. Plasma environment during hot cathode direct current discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition of diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓东; 詹如娟; 周海洋; 胡敏; 温晓辉; 周贵恩; 李凡庆

    1999-01-01

    The plasma characteristics have been investigated in situ by using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and the Langmuir probe during hot cathode direct current discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The changes of atomic H and CH radical in the ground state have been calculated quantitatively according to the results of OES and the Langmuir probe measurement as discharge current density varied. It is shown that atomic H and CH radicals both in the ground state and in the excited state increase with the enhancement of the discharge current density in the plasma. The electron density and CH emission intensity increase linearly with the enhancement of discharge current densities. The generation of different carbon-containing radicals is related to the elevation of electron temperature. Combining the growth process of diamond films and the diagnostic results, it is shown that atomic H in the excited state may improve the diamond growth efficiently, and the increase of electron temperat

  2. Deposition rate and morphology of carbon nanotubes at different positions in a CVD reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized through the catalytic decomposition of a ferroeene-xylene mixture in a horizontal chemical vapor deposition reactor.The deposition rate of CNTs along the axial direction was measured.The morphology of CNTs was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The results showed that the deposition rate of CNTs along the axial direction first increased and later decreased,the position achieving the maximum deposition rate was influenced by the operating conditions.The morphologies of CNTs also changed along the axial direction.

  3. Adhesion analysis of polycrystalline diamond films on molybdenum by means of scratch, indentation and sand abrasion testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, J.G.; Shankar, P.; Enckevort, W.J.P. van; Schermer, J.J.; Meulen, J.J. ter

    2005-01-01

    Diamond films have been grown by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on molybdenum substrates under different growth conditions. The films grown with increasing substrate temperatures show a higher interconnection of diamond grains, whereas increasing methane concentrations in the 0.5-4.0%

  4. Adhesion analysis of polycrystalline diamond films on molybdenum by means of scratch, indentation and sand abrasion testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, J.G.; Shankar, P.; Enckevort, W.J.P. van; Schermer, J.J.; Meulen, J.J. ter

    2005-01-01

    Diamond films have been grown by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on molybdenum substrates under different growth conditions. The films grown with increasing substrate temperatures show a higher interconnection of diamond grains, whereas increasing methane concentrations in the 0.5-4.0%

  5. Filament poisoning at typical carbon nanotube deposition conditions by hot-filament CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the poisoning of tungsten filaments during the hot-filament chemical vapour deposition process at typical carbon nanotube (CNT) deposition conditions and filament temperatures ranging from 1400 to 2000 °C. The morphological...

  6. Field emissions of graphene films deposited on different substrates by CVD system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiao-Ping; Liu Xiao-Fei; Liu Xin-Xin; Wang Li-Jun; Yang Can; Jing Long-Wei; Li Song-Kun; Pan Xiu-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Graphene films are deposited on copper (Cu) and aluminum (A1) substrates,respectively,by using a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition technique.Furthermore,these graphene films are characterized by a field emission type scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM),Raman spectra,and field emission (FE) I-V measurements.It is found that the surface morphologies of the films deposited on Cu and Al substrates are different:the field emission property of graphene film deposited on the Cu substrate is better than that on the Al substrate,and the lowest turn-on field of 2.4 V/μm is obtained for graphene film deposited on the Cu substrate.The macroscopic areas of the graphene samples are all above 400 mm2.

  7. Characterisation of sputter deposited niobium and boron interlayer in the copper-diamond system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, J; Chirtoc, M; Eisenmenger-Sittner, C; Hutter, H; Kornfeind, N; Kijamnajsuk, P; Kitzmantel, M; Neubauer, E; Zellhofer, K

    2012-09-15

    In most metal matrix composites (MMCs) interfaces are decisive but hard to manipulate. Especially copper-carbon composites can exhibit excellent mechanical and thermal properties only if the Cu/C interface is modified by an optimised interlayer. Due to the excellent thermal conductivity and mechanical stability of diamond this form of carbon is preferred as reinforcement in heat sink materials (copper-diamond composite) which are often subjected to severe thermal and mechanical loads. In the present case niobium and boron interlayers of various thicknesses were deposited on diamond and vitreous carbon substrates by magnetron sputter deposition. After the coverage of all samples by a copper film, a part of the samples was subjected to heat treatment for 30 min at 800 °C under high vacuum (HV) to simulate the thermal conditions during the production of the composite material by uniaxial hot pressing. De-wetting during heat treatment leads to the formation of holes or humps in the Cu coating. This effect was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A comparison of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF SIMS) profiles of heat treated samples with those of as deposited ones showed the influence of interdiffusion during the heating process. Diffusion behaviour and chemical composition of the interface were also studied by cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (X-TEM) investigations using focused ion beam (FIB) cut samples. The thermal contact resistance (TCR) of the interface was calculated from results obtained from modulated infrared radiometry (IR). Thin interlayers suppressed de-wetting most effectively and consequently the TCR at the Cu-diamond interface was found to decrease. Therefore they are promising candidates for optimising the Cu-diamond interface.

  8. Development Status of a CVD System to Deposit Tungsten onto UO2 Powder via the WCI6 Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, O. R.; Kimberlin, A.; Broadway, J.; Hickman, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is under development for deep space exploration. NTP's high specific impulse (> 850 second) enables a large range of destinations, shorter trip durations, and improved reliability. W-60vol%UO2 CERMET fuel development efforts emphasize fabrication, performance testing and process optimization to meet service life requirements. Fuel elements must be able to survive operation in excess of 2850 K, exposure to flowing hydrogen (H2), vibration, acoustic, and radiation conditions. CTE mismatch between W and UO2 result in high thermal stresses and lead to mechanical failure as a result UO2 reduction by hot hydrogen (H2) [1]. Improved powder metallurgy fabrication process control and mitigated fuel loss can be attained by coating UO2 starting powders within a layer of high density tungsten [2]. This paper discusses the advances of a fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system that utilizes the H2-WCl6 reduction process.

  9. Growth and characterization of single-crystal CVD diamond for radiation detection applications; Synthese et caracterisation de diamants monocristallins pour applications de detecteur de rayonnements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranchant, N

    2008-01-15

    This work aimed at the study of the synthesis of single crystal diamond using the Microwave enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition technique (MPCVD). The work enabled the development and optimisation of the growth conditions, from the study of the crystalline quality, of the material purity, and of its electronic properties. The assessment of the transport properties was the most determinant: the use of the time of flight (TOF) technique has enabled the measurement of the carrier mobilities and of their kinetic properties as a function of the temperature. When coupled with collected charge efficiency measurements, the work led to remarkable carrier mobility values obtained in the synthesised crystals (3000 cm{sup 2}.V-1.s{sup -1}). Prepared samples were mounted as detection devices and used successfully in real conditions for the monitoring of ultra-fast pulses, as well as for neutron fluency monitoring, and for medical dosimeters for radiotherapy applications. (author)

  10. Role of Duty Ratio in Diamond Growth by Pulsed DC-Bias Enhanced Hot Filament Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Liang; ZHOU Haiyang; ZHU Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the role of the pulse duty ratio was investigated during the deposition of diamond films in a hot filament chemical vapour deposition reactor with a pulsed-dc biased substrate positively relative to the hot filaments. The voltage-current characteristics showed that the discharge current rose with the increase of biasing voltage, which was modified by the duty ratio. Before deposition, two approaches were adopted for the pre-treatment of the silicon substrates, respectively, and the substrates were scratched by diamond paste or seeded by diamond powders using the so-called 'soft dry polished' technique. Diamond films were deposited under a fixed discharge power by changing the duty ratios. In the first group with scratched substrates, it was found that under a high duty ratio the diamond grew slowly with quite poor nucleation, while in the second case a high duty ratio induced a high deposition rate and good diamond quality. Reactive hydrocarbon species with high energy are essential for the initial nucleation process, which is more effectively achieved at a high biasing voltage in the condition of a low duty ratio. In the film growth process, the large discharge current at a high duty ratio represents an increased concentration of electrons and reactive species as well, promoting the growth of diamond films.

  11. Effect of surface irradiation during the photo-CVD deposition of a-Si:H thin films. Hikari CVD ho ni yoru amorphous silicon sakuseiji no kiban hikari reiki koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasaka, K.; Doering, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Fujishima, A. (The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-06

    This paper shows the impact of the irradiation from an additional light source during the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by photo-CVD deposition. Using a mercury sensitized photo-CVD process from Disilan (Si {sub 2} H {sub 6}) and hydrogen, silicon was deposited. A 40W low pressure mercury lamp was applied as the light source. A portion of the substrate was in addition irradiated using an Xg-He lamp through a thermal filter. Irradiation of the substrate using only Xg-He lamp produced no deposition, since this light has a wavelength which is too long to produce the SiH {sub 3}-radicals needed for Si deposition. The additional Xg-He light source was discovered to cause an increased thickness of deposited a-Si:H film and a transmission of the band structure. The reasons of these are considered that the influence of irradiation is not limited to film thickness, but that irradiation also impacts the composition of the a-Si:H film so as to cause a reduction in the hydrogen content. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Diamonds from the Machado River alluvial deposit, Rondônia, Brazil, derived from both lithospheric and sublithospheric mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, A. D.; Bulanova, G. P.; Smith, C. B.; Whitehead, S. C.; Kohn, S. C.; Gobbo, L.; Walter, M. J.

    2016-11-01

    Diamonds from the Machado River alluvial deposit have been characterised on the basis of external morphology, internal textures, carbon isotopic composition, nitrogen concentration and aggregation state and mineral inclusion chemistry. Variations in morphology and features of abrasion suggest some diamonds have been derived directly from local kimberlites, whereas others have been through extensive sedimentary recycling. On the basis of mineral inclusion compositions, both lithospheric and sublithospheric diamonds are present at the deposit. The lithospheric diamonds have clear layer-by-layer octahedral and/or cuboid internal growth zonation, contain measurable nitrogen and indicate a heterogeneous lithospheric mantle beneath the region. The sublithospheric diamonds show a lack of regular sharp zonation, do not contain detectable nitrogen, are isotopically heavy (δ13CPDB predominantly - 0.7 to - 5.5) and contain inclusions of ferropericlase, former bridgmanite, majoritic garnet and former CaSiO3-perovskite. This suggests source lithologies that are Mg- and Ca-rich, probably including carbonates and serpentinites, subducted to lower mantle depths. The studied suite of sublithospheric diamonds has many similarities to the alluvial diamonds from Kankan, Guinea, but has more extreme variations in mineral inclusion chemistry. Of all superdeep diamond suites yet discovered, Machado River represents an end-member in terms of either the compositional range of materials being subducted to Transition Zone and lower mantle or the process by which materials are transferred from the subducted slab to the diamond-forming region.

  13. Effect of PbI2 deposition rate on two-step PVD/CVD all-vacuum prepared perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioakeimidis, Apostolos; Christodoulou, Christos; Lux-Steiner, Martha; Fostiropoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-12-01

    In this work we fabricate all-vacuum processed methyl ammonium lead halide perovskite by a sequence of physical vapour deposition of PbI2 and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of CH3NH3I under a static atmosphere. We demonstrate that for higher deposition rate the (001) planes of PbI2 film show a higher degree of alignment parallel to the sample's surface. From X-ray diffraction data of the resulted perovskite film we derive that the intercalation rate of CH3NH3I is fostered for PbI2 films with higher degree of (001) planes alignment. The stoichiometry of the produced perovskite film is also studied by Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Complete all-vacuum perovskite solar cells were fabricated on glass/ITO substrates coated by an ultra-thin (5 nm) Zn-phthalocyanine film as hole selective layer. A dependence of residual PbI2 on the solar cells performance is displayed, while photovoltaic devices with efficiency up to η=11.6% were achieved.

  14. Silicon-Germanium Films Deposited by Low Frequency PE CVD: Effect of H2 and Ar Dilution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosarev, A; Torres, A; Hernandez, Y; Ambrosio, R; Zuniga, C; Felter, T E; Asomoza, R R; Kudriavtsev, Y; Silva-Gonzalez, R; Gomez-Barojas, E; Ilinski, A; Abramov, A S

    2005-09-22

    We have studied structure and electrical properties of Si{sub 1-Y}Ge{sub Y}:H films deposited by low frequency PE CVD over the entire composition range from Y=0 to Y=1. The deposition rate of the films and their structural and electrical properties were measured for various ratios of the germane/silane feed gases and with and without dilution by Ar and by H{sub 2}. Structure and composition was studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Surface morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We found: (1) The deposition rate increased with Y maximizing at Y=1 without dilution. (2) The relative rate of Ge and Si incorporation is affected by dilution. (3) Hydrogen preferentially bonds to silicon. (4) Hydrogen content decreases for increasing Y. In addition, optical measurements showed that as Y goes for 0 to 1, the Fermi level moves from mid gap to the conduction band edge, i.e. the films become more n-type. No correlation was found between the pre-exponential and the activation energy of conductivity. The behavior of the conductivity {gamma}-factor suggests a local minimum in the density of states at E {approx} 0.33 eV for the films grown with or without H-dilution and E {approx} 0.25 eV for the films with Ar dilution.

  15. Influence of deposition rate on the structural properties of plasma-enhanced CVD epitaxial silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanghua; Cariou, Romain; Hamon, Gwenaëlle; Léal, Ronan; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i

    2017-01-01

    Solar cells based on epitaxial silicon layers as the absorber attract increasing attention because of the potential cost reduction. In this work, we studied the influence of the deposition rate on the structural properties of epitaxial silicon layers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (epi-PECVD) using silane as a precursor and hydrogen as a carrier gas. We found that the crystalline quality of epi-PECVD layers depends on their thickness and deposition rate. Moreover, increasing the deposition rate may lead to epitaxy breakdown. In that case, we observe the formation of embedded amorphous silicon cones in the epi-PECVD layer. To explain this phenomenon, we develop a model based on the coupling of hydrogen and built-in strain. By optimizing the deposition conditions to avoid epitaxy breakdown, including substrate temperatures and plasma potential, we have been able to synthesize epi-PECVD layers up to a deposition rate of 8.3 Å/s. In such case, we found that the incorporation of hydrogen in the hydrogenated crystalline silicon can reach 4 at. % at a substrate temperature of 350 °C. PMID:28262840

  16. Non-classical crystallization of thin films and nanostructures in CVD and PVD processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Nong Moon

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to a recently-developed approach to the growth mechanism of thin films and nanostructures via chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Starting from the underlying principles of the low pressure synthesis of diamond films, it is shown that diamond growth occurs not by individual atoms but by charged nanoparticles. This newly-discovered growth mechanism turns out to be general to many CVD and some physical vapor deposition (PVD) processes. This non-classical crystallization is a new paradigm of crystal growth, with active research taking place on growth in solution, especially in biomineralization processes. Established understanding of the growth of thin films and nanostructures is based around processes involving individual atoms or molecules. According to the author’s research over the last two decades, however, the generation of charged gas phase nuclei is shown to be the rule rather than the exception in the CVD process, and charged gas phase nuclei are actively ...

  17. The effects of flow multiplicity on GaN deposition in a rotating disk CVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkinis, P. A.; Aviziotis, I. G.; Koronaki, E. D.; Gakis, G. P.; Boudouvis, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of gas flow multiplicity, i.e. the possibility of two very different flow regimes prevailing at random in a rotating disk metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, on the deposited GaN film is investigated. A transport model coupled with a system of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the wafer where the film is formed, is implemented in the parameter regions where multiple flows are possible. In the region of multiplicity where either plug flow, imposed by forced convection, or buoyancy-dominated flow is possible, the results in the latter case indicate high deposition rate and decreased uniformity. In the former case, increasing the pressure and the rotation rate has a favorable effect on the deposition rate without sacrificing uniformity. In the parameter window of multiplicity where either rotation or combined rotation/buoyancy may prevail, the effects of buoyancy lead to higher deposition rate at the center of the wafer and reduced uniformity. The Arrhenius plots in the regions of multiplicity for exactly the same operating conditions reveal that the system operates in a diffusion-limited regime in the plug flow and in the rotation-dominated flow, in the first and second region of multiplicity respectively. In contrast, in the buoyancy-dominated flow and the combined rotation/buoyancy flow (first and second region of multiplicity respectively) the process shifts into the kinetics-limited regime.

  18. Early diamond making at General Electric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, H. M.

    1989-09-01

    This is an account of how GE's early interest in a new super-hard metal, cobalt cemented tungsten carbide, for drawing tungsten lamp filament wire, led to a broader interest in the realm of super pressure and to diamond synthesis. P. W. Bridgman at Harvard University had demonstrated the new metal's (``Carboloy'') ability to generate pressures of 100 000 atm (100 kbars). Armed with this new capability, GE initiated a diamond project in 1951. In December 1954 two synthesized diamonds emerged in a marginal experiment that for a while could not be reproduced. Nevertheless, that experiment gave the critical clue to the process that now provides 90% of the world's industrial diamond needs. The high-pressure high-temperature process (HPHT) together with the new carbon vapor deposition process (CVD) brings diamonds' unique and valuable properties to applications requiring crystals tailored to fit specific needs.

  19. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H{sub 2} into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH, H{sub β}, and H{sub α} were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T{sub 2g} phonon at 1333 cm{sup −1} peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  20. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, X.L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma trea

  1. MBMS studies of gas-phase kinetics in diamond chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, C.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); McMaster, M.C. [IBM San Jose, CA (United States); Tung, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system (MBMS) has been used to determine the near-surface gaseous composition involved in the low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond. With this system, radical and stable species can be detected with a sensitivity better than 10 ppm. Threshold ionization techniques have been employed to distinguish between radical species in the deposition environment from radical species generated by parent molecule cracking. An extensive calibration procedure was used to enable the quantitative determination of H-atom and CH{sub 3} radical mole fractions. Using the MBMS system, the gaseous composition involved in LPCVD of diamond has been measured for a wide variety of deposition conditions, including hot-filament gas activation, microwave-plasma gas activation, and a variety of precursor feed mixtures (ex: CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}). For microwave-plasma activation (MPCVD), the radical concentrations (H-atom and CH{sub 3} radicals) are independent of the identity of the precursor feed gas provided the input carbon mole fraction is constant. However, in hot-filament diamond deposition (HFCVD), the atomic hydrogen concentration decreased by an order of magnitude as the mole fraction of carbon in the precursor mixture is increased to .07; this sharp reduction has been attributed to filament poisoning of the catalytic tungsten surface via hydrocarbon deposition. Additionally, the authors find that the H-atom concentration is independent of the substrate temperature for both hot-filament and microwave plasma deposition; radial H-atom diffusion is invoked to explain this observation.

  2. Dual-ion-beam deposition of carbon films with diamond-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamond like films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  3. Synthesis of thick diamond films by direct current hot-cathode plasma chemical vapour deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Jin Zeng Sun; Bai Yi Zhen; Lu Xian Yi

    2002-01-01

    The method of direct current hot-cathode plasma chemical vapour deposition has been established. A long-time stable glow discharge at large discharge current and high gas pressure has been achieved by using a hot cathode in the temperature range from 1100 degree C to 1500 degree C and non-symmetrical configuration of the poles, in which the diameter of the cathode is larger than that of anode. High-quality thick diamond films, with a diameter of 40-50 mm and thickness of 0.5-4.2 mm, have been synthesized by this method. Transparent thick diamond films were grown over a range of growth rates between 5-10 mu m/h. Most of the thick diamond films have thermal conductivities of 10-12 W/K centre dot cm. The thick diamond films with high thermal conductivity can be used as a heat sink of semiconducting laser diode array and as a heat spreading and isolation substrate of multichip modules. The performance can be obviously improved

  4. Fabrication of thin diamond membranes by using hot implantation and ion-cut methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Jaekwon; Kim, Hyeongkwon; Lim, Weon Cheol; Yune, Jiwon; Moon, Sung; Eliades, John A.; Kim, Joonkon; Lee, Jaeyong; Song, Jonghan

    2017-03-01

    A thin (2 μm) and relatively large area (3 × 3 mm2) diamond membrane was fabricated by cleaving a surface from a single crystal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond wafer (3 × 3 mm2× 300 μm) using a hot implantation and ion-cut method. First, while maintaining the CVD diamond at 400 °C, a damage zone was created at a depth of 2.3 μm underneath the surface by implanting 4 MeV carbon ions into the diamond in order to promote membrane cleavage (hot implantation). According to TEM data, hot implantation reduces the thickness of the implantation damage zone by about a factor of 10 when compared to implanting carbon ions with the CVD diamond at room temperature (RT). In order to recover crystallinity, the implanted sample was then annealed at 850 °C. Next, 380 keV hydrogen ions were implanted into the sample to a depth of 2.3 μm below the surface with the CVD diamond at RT. After annealing at 850 °C, the CVD diamond surface layer was cleaved at the damage-zone due to internal pressure from H2 gas arising from the implanted hydrogen (ion-cut). A thin layer of graphite (˜300 nm) on the cleavage surface, arising from the implanted carbon, was removed by O2 annealing. This technique can potentially be used to produce much larger area membranes of variable thickness.

  5. 直流电弧等离子体喷射CVD硼掺杂金刚石薄膜的制备及电化学性能研究%Electrochemical Properties of Boron Doped Diamond Films Prepared by DC Arc Plasma Jet CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张聪聪; 戴玮; 朱宁; 尹振超; 吴小国; 曲长庆

    2012-01-01

    Boron doped diamond films on silicon ( BDD) substrates were deposited by DC ARC Plasma Jet CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) , SEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the morphology, crystal structure and film quality. The SEM and XRD show jointly that the samples are high-quality polycrystalline diamond films composed of micro meter-sized grains. The Raman spectrum show the 1126 cm-1,1336 cm -1and 1560 cm-1, respectively corresponds to peak due to boron incorporation, sp3 carbon peak ,and sp2 carbon peak. Study the effects of pressure and (100) BDD films were deposited at the pressure of 5500 Pa. The resistivity and carrier concentration of the (111) films measured by the Hall system, respectively corresponds to 0. 0095 Ω · cm and 1. 1 × 1020 cm-3. The electrochemical behaviors of the boron-doped diamond film electrode in sodium sulfate solution, potassium ferrocyanide/ potassium ferricyanide solution and dopamine solution are studied. The results show that the' diamond film electrode have a wide electrochemical window of about 4 V and a low background current close to zero in the aqua solution, meanwhile they have a high sensitivity, good stability and reversibility in the dopamine detection experiment which makes boron-doped diamond film obtained by DC ARC Plasma Jet CVD being an excellent material of electrochemical electrode.%采用直流电弧等离子体喷射CVD(Chemical Vapor Deposition)法在硅(100)衬底上制备了(111)占优的掺硼金刚石(BDD)薄膜,研究了压强对薄膜生长的影响,在压强为5500Pa时得到了(100)占优的金刚石薄膜,并用SEM、XRD及拉曼光谱分析了薄膜的表面形貌、晶体结构、薄膜品质.测试结果表明,掺硼金刚石膜具有较好的成膜质量.霍尔测试表明BDD的电阻率为0.0095Ω·cm,载流子浓度为1.1×1020 cm-3;研究了BDD薄膜电极在硫酸钠空白底液、铁氰化钾/亚铁氰化钾溶液和多巴胺溶液中的循环伏安曲线(CVs),发现该金刚

  6. TiAlN and TiAlCN deposition in an industrial PaCVD-plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heim, D.; Hochreiter, R. [Ruebig GmbH, Co., Wels (Austria)

    1998-01-01

    An industrial PaCVD-plant was equipped with an AlCl{sub 3}-generator. By using Ar, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, TiCl{sub 4} and AlCl{sub 3}, TiAlN- and TiAlCN-films could be deposited on hard metal and steel substrates. The plasma was generated by a DC-pulse power supply with frequencies up to 50 kHz. The reactor size was 350 mm in diameter and 900 mm in height. During one batch 1200 indexable inserts could be coated. The growth rates were about 1-3 {mu}m h{sup -1}. The deposited films show a fine structure and Cl-concentrations below 3%. The measured critical loads were between 30 and 40 N. Wear test results show an increase in tool life up to several 100% compared with uncoated or TiN-coated tools. (orig.) 7 refs.

  7. Charge multiplication effect in thin diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skukan, N., E-mail: nskukan@irb.hr; Grilj, V.; Sudić, I.; Jakšić, M. [Division of Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pomorski, M. [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Andoh, Y. [Division of Electronics and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Makino, T.; Onoda, S.; Sato, S.; Ohshima, T.; Kamiya, T. [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2016-07-25

    Herein, we report on the enhanced sensitivity for the detection of charged particles in single crystal chemical vapour deposition (scCVD) diamond radiation detectors. The experimental results demonstrate charge multiplication in thin planar diamond membrane detectors, upon impact of 18 MeV O ions, under high electric field conditions. Avalanche multiplication is widely exploited in devices such as avalanche photo diodes, but has never before been reproducibly observed in intrinsic CVD diamond. Because enhanced sensitivity for charged particle detection is obtained for short charge drift lengths without dark counts, this effect could be further exploited in the development of sensors based on avalanche multiplication and radiation detectors with extreme radiation hardness.

  8. Electroless Deposition of Composite Nickel-Phosphorous Coatings with Diamond Dispersoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrova M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The composite Ni-P coating with diamond particles (D deposited on the flexible substrates of pressed polyethylene terephthalate material (PET was obtained, to be used in the development of efficient, flexible grinding and polishing tools. The optimal conditions of the hydrodynamic regime, deposition time and temperature were found. The influence of the concentration and size of the D particles (3/7 ÷ 225/300 μm on the coating thickness and number of co-deposited particles were studied. By Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM images were defined the morphology of dispersion coatings and number of co-deposited particles in them, and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS/INCA was used to determine the elemental chemical composition of the composite coatings.

  9. Kinetics of diamond-like film growth using filament-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsuch, G.; Jin, Y.; Ingle, N.K.; Mountziaris, T.J.; Yu, W.Y.; Petrou, A. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A detailed kinetic model of diamond-like film growth from methane diluted in hydrogen using low-pressure, filament-assisted chemical vapor deposition (FACVD) has been developed. The model includes both gas-phase and surface reactions. The surface kinetics include adsorption of CH{sub 3}{center_dot} and H{center_dot}, abstraction reactions by gas phase radicals, desorption, and two pathways for diamond (sp{sup 3}) and graphitic carbon (sp{sup 2}) growth. It is postulated that adsorbed CH{sub 2}{center_dot} species are the major film precursors. The proposed kinetic model was incorporated into a transport model describing flow, heat and mass transfer in stagnation flow FACVD reactors. Diamond-like films were deposited on preceded Si substrates in such a reactor as a pressure of 26 Torr, inlet gas composition ranging from 0.5% to 1.5% methane in hydrogen and substrate temperatures ranging from 600 to 950 C. The best films were obtained at low methane concentrations and substrate temperature of 700 C. The films were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Observations from their experiments and growth rates, compositions and stable species distributions in the gas phase. It is the first complete model of FACVD that includes gas-phase and surface kinetics coupled with transport phenomena.

  10. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  11. Influences of H+ Implantation on the Boron-Doped Synthesized by Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuang-Bao

    2000-01-01

    Diamond films (DF) were preliminarily B doped in situ during chemical vapor deposition. Subsequently, the films were implanted with 120keV H+ to dose of 5 × 1014 ~ 5 × 1016cm-2. After the implantation, the B doped DF become insulating and Raman measurements indicate that the implantation has amorphous carbon and graphite etched. It is known that the formation of H-B pairs plays an important pole in property changes. However, for larger dose cases, the electrical resistance of DF is influenced by radiation damage and/or non-diamond phases. In addition to them, annealing makes the specimens conducting again. This phenomenon maybe has potential for application in designing DF device.

  12. Preliminary viability studies of fibroblastic cells cultured on microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamonds produced by chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Amélia Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant materials used in orthopedics surgery have demonstrated some disadvantages, such as metallic corrosion processes, generation of wear particles, inflammation reactions and bone reabsorption in the implant region. The diamond produced through hot-filament chemical vapour deposition method is a new potential biomedical material due to its chemical inertness, extreme hardness and low coefficient of friction. In the present study we analysis two samples: the microcrystalline diamond and the nanocrystalline diamond. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface properties of the diamond samples by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Cell viability and morphology were assessed using thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide, cytochemical assay and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results revealed that the two samples did not interfere in the cell viability, however the proliferation of fibroblasts cells observed was comparatively higher with the nanocrystalline diamond.

  13. Preliminary viability studies of fibroblastic cells cultured on microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamonds produced by chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Amélia Rodrigues

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Implant materials used in orthopedics surgery have demonstrated some disadvantages, such as metallic corrosion processes, generation of wear particles, inflammation reactions and bone reabsorption in the implant region. The diamond produced through hot-filament chemical vapour deposition method is a new potential biomedical material due to its chemical inertness, extreme hardness and low coefficient of friction. In the present study we analysis two samples: the microcrystalline diamond and the nanocrystalline diamond. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface properties of the diamond samples by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Cell viability and morphology were assessed using thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide, cytochemical assay and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results revealed that the two samples did not interfere in the cell viability, however the proliferation of fibroblasts cells observed was comparatively higher with the nanocrystalline diamond.

  14. Fabrication of a micro-spherical tool in EDM combined with Ni-diamond co-deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jung-Chou; Lien, Shao-Chun; Lin, Jui-Kuan; Huang, Fuang-Yuan; Yan, Biing-Hwa

    2008-04-01

    This paper demonstrates a novel fabrication process using electro-discharge-machining (EDM) combined with co-deposited Ni-diamond composites to build a unique micro-spherical diamond tool. A micro tool is made by a hybrid process including wire electro-discharge grinding, EDM spherical forming, electrochemical machining and co-deposition. Tungsten carbide material is used as the tool substrate. The influence of EDM spherical forming and co-deposition parameters on the tool geometry is presented. The experimental result shows a unique micro-spherical diamond tool can be successfully built with suitable spherical forming parameters that are a peak current of 3 A, pulse duration of 40 µs and spindle rotational speed of 0 rpm in the air, and in Ni-diamond co-deposition are a current density of 7 A dm-2, diamond particle size of 3 µm, diamond particle concentration of 10 g l-1 and rotational speed of 15 rpm. When using this method, the micro tool has a better geometric shape, uniform particle distribution and suitable particle adhesion quantity. The tool is tested to machine a mold provided with a micro-spherical cavity in a high nickel alloy.

  15. Structural and optical properties of tellurium films obtained by chemical vapor deposition(CVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yu-tian; GONG Zhu-Qing; XU Wei-Hong; HUANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    Tellurium thin films were prepared by the chemical vapor deposition method. The structure, surface morphology and optical properties of the Te thin films were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, FTIR transmission,UV/VIS/NIR transmission and reflectance. The results show that the films structural and optical properties are influenced by many factors such as film thickness, crystallite size and substrate temperature. The films as thick as 111-133 nm have high IR transmission across the full 8-13 μm band and highly blocking in the solar spectral region elsewhere, which indicates that Te films thickness in this region can be used as good solar radiation shields in radiative cooling devices.

  16. Diamond film deposition on WC-Co and steel substrates with a CrN interlayer for tribological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-06-01

    The most renowned property of diamond is its exceptional hardness. By depositing diamond films on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) and steel substrates, the hardness of diamond can be combined with the toughness of these materials, resulting in an excellent wear resistance material for tribological applications. However, poor adhesion of diamond coating on these substrates leads to a lesser lifetime for the diamond coated tools than expected. The prime reasons for the lack of proper adhesion are the preferential formation of graphitic layer at the interface due to the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and the interfacial residual stresses due to the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients of diamond (1.5  ×  10-6 K-1) and WC-Co (5.2  ×  10-6 K-1) or steel (12  ×  10-6 K-1). In this review, we discuss the possibility of using a Cr-N interlayer as a diffusion barrier to prevent the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and also to relax the interfacial residual stresses to some extent to enhance the adhesion of diamond coatings on these substrates. An overview of the most pertinent results of the last two decades, including the recent progress is introduced. We describe in detail how the Cr-N interlayer with the desired properties is fabricated. We give a concise overview of diamond deposition process, including the methods to vary the grain size from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline, which are suitable for some tribological applications. We describe in detail on surface and interface analysis, residual stress measurements, assessment adhesion strength and tribological performance of diamond coated WC-Co and steel substrates using various characterization techniques. We conclude by highlighting the current progress and future perspectives of diamond coatings on these substrates for tribological applications.

  17. Adhesion improvement of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon thin films by pre-deposition plasma treatment of rubber substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Bui, X. L.; Pei, Y.T.; Mulder, E.D.G.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    For reduction of friction and enhancement of wear resistance of dynamic rubber seals, thin films of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) have been deposited on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) via magnetron-enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (ME-PCVD). Pre-deposition plasma treatment of HNBR substrate is proved to be crucial for the improvement of film performance due to enhanced interfacial adhesion. The columnar structure and the crack network formed during deposition e...

  18. Friction Behaviors of the Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Film under Ambient Air and Water Lubricating Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Bin; SUN Fanghong

    2009-01-01

    The friction behavior of the hot filament chemical vapor deposition(HFCVD) diamond film plays a critical role on its applications in mechanical fields and largely depends on the environment. Studies on the tribological properties of HFCVD diamond films coated on Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates are rarely reported in available literatures, especially in the water lubricating conditions. In this paper, conventional microcrystalline diamond(MCD) and fine-grained diamond(FGD) films are deposited on WC-Co substrates and their friction properties are evaluated on a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer, where they are brought to slide against ball-bearing steel and copper balls in dry and water lubricating conditions. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM), atomic force microscopy(AFM), surface profilometer and Raman spectroscopy are adopted to characterize as-deposited diamond films;SEM and energy dispersive X-ray(EDX) are used to investigate the worn region on the surfaces of both counterface balls and diamond films. The research results show that the friction coefficient of HFCVD diamond films always starts with a high initial value, and then gradually transits to a relative stable state. For a given counterface and a sliding condition, the FGD film presents lower stable friction coefficients by 0.02-0.03 than MCD film. The transferred materials adhered on sliding interface are supposed to have predominate effect on the friction behaviors of HFCVD diamond films. Furthermore, the effect of water lubricating on reducing friction coefficient is significant. For a given counterpart, the stable friction coefficients of MCD or FGD films reduce by about 0.07-0.08 while sliding in the water lubricating condition, relative to in dry sliding condition. This study is beneficial for widespread applications of HFCVD diamond coated mechanical components and adopting water lubricating system, replacing of oil lubricating, in a variety of mechanical processing fields to

  19. Microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Shin

    Microwave plasma assisted ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition was investigated using hydrogen deficient, carbon containing argon plasma chemistries with MSU-developed microwave plasma reactors. Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition on mechanically scratched silicon wafers was experimentally explored over the following input variables: (1) pressure: 60--240Torr, (2) total gas flow rate: 101--642 sccm, (3) input microwave power 732--1518W, (4) substrate temperature: 500°C--770°C, (5) deposition time: 2--48 hours, and (6) N2 impurities 5--2500 ppm. H2 concentrations were less than 9%, while CH 4 concentration was 0.17--1.85%. It was desired to grow films uniformly over 3″ diameter substrates and to minimize the grain size. Large, uniform, intense, and greenish-white discharges were sustained in contact with three inch silicon substrates over a 60--240 Torr pressure regime. At a given operating pressure, film uniformity was controlled by adjusting substrate holder geometry, substrate position, input microwave power, gas chemistries, and total gas flow rates. Film ultra-nanocrystallinity and smoothness required high purity deposition conditions. Uniform ultra-nanocrystalline films were synthesized in low leak-rate system with crystal sizes ranging from 3--30 nm. Films with 11--50 nm RMS roughness and respective thickness values of 1--23 mum were synthesized over 3″ wafers under a wide range of different deposition conditions. Film RMS roughness 7 nm was synthesized with thickness of 430 nm. Film uniformities of almost 100% were achieved over three inch silicon wafers. UV Raman and XRD characterization results indicated the presence of diamond in the synthesized films. Optical Emission Spectroscopy measurements showed that the discharge gas temperature was in excess of 2000 K. The synthesized films are uniformly smooth and the as grown ultra-nanocrystalline diamond can be used for a high frequency SAW device substrate material. IR measurements

  20. The use of thin diamond films in fiber-optic low-coherence interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewska, D.; Karpienko, K.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the use of thin diamond films in fiber-optic low-coherence interferometers. Two kinds of diamond surfaces were used: undoped diamond film and boron- doped diamond film. They were deposited on glass plates as well as silicon layers. A conventionally used mirror was used as a reference layer. Diamond films were deposited using Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (μPE CVD) system. Measurements were performed using two superluminescent diodes (SLD) with wavelengths of 1300 mm and 1550 mm. The optimal conditions for each layers were examined: the required wavelength of the light source and the length of Fabry-Perot interferometer cavity. Metrological parameters of Fabry-Perot interferometer with different mirrors were compared. The presented thin diamond films may be an interesting alternative to the commonly used reflective surfaces.

  1. Investigation of phonon modes in gallium nitride nanowires deposited by thermal CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizal, Umesh, E-mail: umeshrizal680@gmail.com; Swain, Bibhu P., E-mail: bibhu.s@smit.smu.edu.in [Nano Processing Laboratory, Centre for Material Science and Nanotechnology, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East Sikkim, India-737136 (India); Swain, Bhabani S., E-mail: bsswain@kookmin.ac.kr [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Sungbuk-gu, Jeongnung-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-13

    Gallium nitride nanowires (GaN-NWs) of diameters ranging from 20 to 80 nm were grown on the p-type Si substrate by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using Iron (Fe) catalyst via VLS mechanism. Raman and FTIR spectra reveal the presence of broad transverse optic (TO) and longitudinal optic (LO) phonon peak spreads over 500-600 cm{sup −1} and 720 cm{sup −1} respectively. The detail deconvolution of integrated transverse and longitudinal phonon analysis reveals phonon confinement brought out by incorporation of hydrogen atom. The red shifts of TO and LO phonon peak position indicates nanosized effect. I{sub A1(LO)}/I{sub A1(TO)} increases from 0.073 to 1.0 and their respective fwhm{sub A1(LO)}/fwhm{sub A1(TO)} also increases from 0.71 to 1.31 with increasing H{sub 2} flow rate. E{sub 1}(LO) - E{sub 1}(TO) and A{sub 1}(LO) - A{sub 1}(TO) increases from 173.83 to 190.73 and 184.89 to 193.22 respectively. Apart from this usual TO and LO phonon, we have found Surface Optic (SO) phonon at 671 cm{sup −1} in FTIR spectra. The intensity of PL peak increases with increasing H{sub 2} dilution reveals efficient passivation of defect centre at surface of GaN-NWs.

  2. The deposition characteristics of copper(I) compounds for CVD by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, F.D.; Peden, C.H.F.; Omstead, T.R.; Blewer, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farkas, J.; Hampden-Smith, M.J.; Kodas, T.T. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to investigate the adsorption and thermally-induced decomposition of copper (I) {beta}-diketonate precursors of the type (hfac)CuL, where hfac is the hexafluoroacetylacetonate bidentate ligand and L is trimethylphosphine or 1,5-cyclooctadiene. The (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} precursor desorbs from the surface at very low temperatures whereas the (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD) dissociates on adsorption, liberating 1,5-COD and leaving a surface(hfac)Cu complex which can subsequently disproportionate. Evidence is provided for hydrogen-bonding between the hfac ligand and the surface silanols for (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3}, but not for (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD). These results are consistent with the selective behavior of these precursors for copper deposition and suggest that the selectivity of the (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} and (hfac)Cu(1, 5-COD) precursors may be due to the ability of the hfac ligand to hydrogen bond to the surface silanol groups.

  3. The deposition characteristics of copper(I) compounds for CVD by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, F.D.; Peden, C.H.F.; Omstead, T.R.; Blewer, R.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Farkas, J.; Hampden-Smith, M.J.; Kodas, T.T. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to investigate the adsorption and thermally-induced decomposition of copper (I) {beta}-diketonate precursors of the type (hfac)CuL, where hfac is the hexafluoroacetylacetonate bidentate ligand and L is trimethylphosphine or 1,5-cyclooctadiene. The (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} precursor desorbs from the surface at very low temperatures whereas the (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD) dissociates on adsorption, liberating 1,5-COD and leaving a surface(hfac)Cu complex which can subsequently disproportionate. Evidence is provided for hydrogen-bonding between the hfac ligand and the surface silanols for (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3}, but not for (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD). These results are consistent with the selective behavior of these precursors for copper deposition and suggest that the selectivity of the (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} and (hfac)Cu(1, 5-COD) precursors may be due to the ability of the hfac ligand to hydrogen bond to the surface silanol groups.

  4. Nitrogen-Doped Chemical Vapour Deposited Diamond: a New Material for Room-Temperature Solid State Maser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. A. Poklonski; N. M. Lapchuk; A. V. Khomich; LU Fan-Xiu; TANG Wei-Zhong; V. G. Ralchenko; I. I. Vlasov; M. V. Chukichev; Sambuu Munkhtsetseg

    2007-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) in polycrystalline diamond films grown by dc arc-jet and microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition is studied. The films with nitrogen impurity concentration up to 8 × 1018 cm-3 are also characterized by Raman, cathodoluminescence and optical absorption spectra. The ESR signal from P1 centre with g-factor of 2.0024 (nitrogen impurity atom occupying C site in diamond lattice) is found to exhibit an inversion with increasing the microwave power in an H102 resonator. The spin inversion effect could be of interest for further consideration of N-doped diamonds as a medium for masers operated at room temperature.

  5. Simulations of the Dependence of Gas Physical Parameters on Deposition Variables during HFCVD Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiying WANG; Kwangryeol Lee; Chao SUN; Lishi WEN

    2006-01-01

    During the growth of the hot filament chemical vapor deposition(HFCVD)diamond films, numerical simulations in a 2-D mathematical model were employed to investigate the influence of various deposition parameters on the gas physical parameters, including the temperature, velocity and volume density of gas. It was found that, even in the case of optimized deposition parameters, the space distributions of gas parameters were heterogeneous due primarily to the thermal blockage come from the hot filaments and cryogenic pump effect arisen from the cold reactor wall. The distribution of volume density agreed well with the thermal round-flow phenomenon, one of the key obstacles to obtaining high growth rate in HFCVD process. In virtue of isothermal boundary with high temperature or adiabatic boundary condition of reactor wall, however, the thermal roundflow was profoundly reduced and as a consequence, the uniformity of gas physical parameters was considerably improved, as identified by the experimental films growth.

  6. [The change of bacterial adhesion during deposition nitrogen-diamond like carbon coating on pure titanium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lu; Xiao, Yun

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the change of bacterial adhesion on pure titanium coated with nitrogen-diamond like carbon (N-DLC) films and to guide the clinical application. N-DLC was deposited on titanium using ion plating machine, TiN film, anodic oxide film and non-deposition were used as control, then made specimens adhering on the surface of resin denture base for 6 months. The adhesion of Saccharomyces albicans on the titanium surface was observed using scanning electron microscope, and the roughness was tested by roughness detector. The number of Saccharomyces albicans adhering on diamond-like carbon film was significantly less than on the other groups (P < 0.05), and the growth of bacterial cell was inhibited and in a poor state. The largest number of adhesion and cell strains grew well on anodic oxide film group and non-deposition control group. The change of surface roughness of N-DLC film was less than other group (P < 0.05). Pure titanium coated with N-DLC film reduced the adhesion of Saccharomyces albicans after clinical application, thereby reduced the risk of denture stomatitis.

  7. Cytotoxicity of Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Prepared by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Gou, Li; Ran, Junguo; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties and chemical stability, making it highly suitable for biomedical applications. For implant materials, the impact of boron-doped NCD films on the character of cell growth (i.e., adhesion, proliferation) is very important. Boron-doped NCD films with resistivity of 10-2 Ω·cm were grown on Si substrates by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) process with H2 bubbled B2O3. The crystal structure, diamond character, surface morphology, and surface roughness of the boron-doped NCD films were analyzed using different characterization methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The contact potential difference and possible boron distribution within the film were studied with a scanning kelvin force microscope (SKFM). The cytotoxicity of films was studied by in vitro tests, including fluorescence microscopy, SEM and MTT assay. Results indicated that the surface roughness value of NCD films was 56.6 nm and boron was probably accumulated at the boundaries between diamond agglomerates. MG-63 cells adhered well and exhibited a significant growth on the surface of films, suggesting that the boron-doped NCD films were non-toxic to cells. supported by the Open Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China) (No. KFJJ201313)

  8. Hollow cathode sustained plasma microjets: Characterization and application to diamond deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, R. Mohan; Giapis, Konstantinos P.

    2002-09-01

    Extending the principle of operation of hollow cathode microdischarges to a tube geometry has allowed the formation of stable, high-pressure plasma microjets in a variety of gases including Ar, He, and H2. Direct current discharges are ignited between stainless steel capillary tubes (d=178 mum) which are operated as the cathode and a metal grid or plate that serves as the anode. Argon plasma microjets can be sustained in ambient air with plasma voltages as low as 260 V for cathode-anode gaps of 0.5 mm. At larger operating voltage, this gap can be extended up to several millimeters. Using a heated molybdenum substrate as the anode, plasma microjets in CH4/H2 mixtures have been used to deposit diamond crystals and polycrystalline films. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of these films shows mainly sp3 carbon content with slight shifting of the diamond peak due to internal stresses. Optical emission spectroscopy of the discharges used in the diamond growth experiments confirms the presence of atomic hydrogen and CH radicals.

  9. Deposition of diamond like carbon films by using a single ion gun with varying beam source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jin-qiu; Chen Zhu-ping

    2001-01-01

    Diamond like carbon films have been successfully deposited on the steel substrate, by using a single ion gun with varying beam source. The films may appear blue, yellow and transparent in color, which was found related to contaminants from the sample holder and could be avoided. The thickness of the films ranges from tens up to 200 nanometers, and the hardness is in the range 20 to 30 GPa. Raman analytical results reveal the films are in amorphous structure. The effects of different beam source on the films structure are further discussed.

  10. Properties of Diamond Film/Alumina Composites for Integrated Circuits with Ultra-High Speed and High Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin-Jun; XIA Yi-Ben; FANG Zhi-Jun; ZHANG Ming-Long; SHEN Hu-Jiang

    2004-01-01

    @@ We report the properties of the diamond film/alumina composites which were thought of as promising substrate materials for integrated circuits with ultra-high speed and high power. The measurement results of dielectric properties of diamond film/alumina composites show that the coating of CVD diamond films could effectively reduce the dielectric constant of the composite. Carbon ion implantation into alumina substrates prior to the diamond deposition can reduce the dielectric loss of the composite from 5 × 10-3 to 2 × 10-3, and can give the composite better frequency stability. The thermal conductivity of composites could be obviously increased by coating CVD diamond film. The composite has a dielectric constant of 6.5 and a thermal conductivity of 3.98 W/(cmK) when the thickness of diamond film is up to 100 μm.

  11. On the Use of Mo/Mo2C Gradient Interlayers in Diamond Deposition onto Cemented Carbide Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Hei, Hongjun; Zheng, Ke; Gao, Xueyan; Liu, Xiaoping; Tang, Bin; He, Zhiyong; Yu, Shengwang

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum/molybdenum carbide (Mo/Mo2C) gradient interlayers were prepared via double glow plasma surface alloying (DGPSA) technique onto cemented carbide (WC-Co) substrates for diamond deposition. The morphologies, phase composition and adhesion of the interlayers were investigated, as well as their effect on the subsequent diamond deposition. The results indicated that the Mo/Mo2C gradient interlayer deposited on WC-Co substrate was composed of 4.0-μm-thick diffusion layer and 2.7-μm-thick deposition layer. The Mo concentration decreased gradually with the depth direction whereas the Co and W concentrations increased. As a result, the Co binder phase was completely restricted within the substrate by the diffusion layer. The presence of gradient diffusion layer ensured excellent adhesion of the interlayer. Subsequently, nanocrystalline diamond coatings with excellent adhesion were deposited on the interlayered substrates. Thus, the Mo/Mo2C gradient interlayers deposited via DGPSA technique were demonstrated as a novel option for depositing adherent diamond coatings on WC-Co substrates.

  12. Development of diamond coated tool and its performance in machining Al–11%Si alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Sahoo; A K Chattopadhyay; A B Chattopadhyay

    2002-11-01

    An attempt has been made to deposit CVD diamond coating on conventional carbide tool using hot filament CVD process. ISO grade K10 turning inserts with SPGN 120308 geometry were used to deposit diamond coating. This diamond coating well covering the rake surface, cutting edges and flank surfaces could be successfully deposited. The coatings were characterized by SEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy for coating quality, morphology etc. Performance of diamond coated tool relative to that of uncoated carbide tool was evaluated in turning Al–11%Si alloy under dry environment. The diamond coated tool outperformed the uncoated carbide tool which severely suffered from sizeable built-up edge formation leading not only to escalation of cutting forces but also poorer surface finish. In contrast, the diamond coated tool, owing to chemical inertness of diamond coating towards the work material, did not show any trace of edge built-up even in dry environment and could maintain low level of cutting forces and remarkably improved surface finish. It has been further revealed that success of the diamond coated tool depends primarily on adhesion of the diamond coating with the carbide substrate and this is strongly influenced by the pre-treatment of the carbide substrate surface before coating.

  13. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and mo...

  14. Effect of Plasma Boronitriding on Diamond Nucle-ation and Growth onto Cemented Carbide Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    满卫东; 汪建华; 马志斌; 王传新

    2002-01-01

    Plasma boronitriding has been successfully employed to overcome the difficulty in diamond growth on ferrous-based substrates. Commercial cobalt-sintered, tungsten-cemented carbides (WC(Co)) were pretreated by a plasma boronitriding method, diamond was then deposited by microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Continuous diamond films with a sharp characteristic Raman peak of 1334 cm-1 were grown and adhered well on the boronitrided region of the cemented carbide substrates. On the other hand, a mixture of diamond crystallites, amorphous carbon and graphitic carbon was loosely deposited on the unboronitrided region. A cobalt inert thin layer formed after plasma boronitriding pretreatment enabled the subsequent nucleation and growth of a high-quality CVD diamond.

  15. Mosaic diamond based detector for MIPs detection, T0 determination and triggering in HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietraszko, Jerzy; Koenig, Wolfgang [GSI Helmholtzzentum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The CVD based diamond detectors were successfully used for HI detection in HADES already in 2001. In the following experiments the polycrystalline diamond material showed very good performance (time resolution below 50 ps sigma) and stable long term operation. Detection of the minimum ionising particles (MIPs) by means of the diamond detectors is a challenging task mainly because of very small energy deposit in the diamond material. In this case the single crystalline CVD diamond material has to be used which is well known for its excellent charge collection efficiency (almost 100 %) and for its very good timing properties. For pion induced experiments at HADES a large area, segmented, position sensitive, operated in vacuum detector was developed. The construction of the detector is presented along with the requirements and the obtained performance.

  16. Study of filament performance in heat transfer and hydrogen dissociation in diamond chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) is a promising method for commercial production of diamond films.Filament performance in heat transfer and hydrogen decomposition in reactive environment was investigated. Power consumption by the filament in vacuum, helium and 2% CH4/H2 was experimentally determined in temperature range 1300℃-2200℃. Filament heat transfer mechanism in C-H reactive environment was calculated and analyzed. The result shows that due to surface carburization and slight carbon deposition, radiation in stead of hydrogen dissociation, becomes the largest contributor to power consumption. Filament-surface dissociation of H2 was observed at temperatures below 1873K, demonstrating the feasibility of diamond growth at low filament temperatures. The effective activation energies of hydrogen dissociation on several clean refractory filaments were derived from power consumption data in literatures. They are all lower than that of thermal dissociation of hydrogen, revealing the nature of catalytic dissociation of hydrogen on filament surface. Observation of substrate temperature suggested a weakerrole of atomic hydrogen recombination in heating substrates in C-H environment than in pure hydrogen.

  17. Silicon solar cell performance deposited by diamond like carbon thin film ;Atomic oxygen effects;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Abbas Ail; Eshaghi, Akbar; Karami, Esmaeil

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a diamond-like carbon thin film was deposited on p-type polycrystalline silicon solar cell via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method by using methane and hydrogen gases. The effect of atomic oxygen on the functioning of silicon coated DLC thin film and silicon was investigated. Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the DLC thin film. Photocurrent-voltage characteristics of the silicon solar cell were carried out using a solar simulator. The results showed that atomic oxygen exposure induced the including oxidation, structural changes, cross-linking reactions and bond breaking of the DLC film; thus reducing the optical properties. The photocurrent-voltage characteristics showed that although the properties of the fabricated thin film were decreased after being exposed to destructive rays, when compared with solar cell without any coating, it could protect it in atomic oxygen condition enhancing solar cell efficiency up to 12%. Thus, it can be said that diamond-like carbon thin layer protect the solar cell against atomic oxygen exposure.

  18. Diamond-Like Carbon Film Deposition Using DC Ion Source with Cold Hollow Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shevchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon diamond-like thin films on a silicon substrate were deposited by direct reactive ion beam method with an ion source based on Penning direct-current discharge system with cold hollow cathode. Deposition was performed under various conditions. The pressure (12–200 mPa and the plasma-forming gas composition consisting of different organic compounds and hydrogen (C3H8, CH4, Si(CH32Cl2, H2, the voltage of accelerating gap in the range 0.5–5 kV, and the substrate temperature in the range 20–850°C were varied. Synthesized films were researched using nanoindentation, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the experimental results was made in accordance with a developed model describing processes of growth of the amorphous and crystalline carbon materials.

  19. [Manufacture of diamond blades via microsystem technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spraul, Christoph W; Ertl, Stephan; Strobel, Stefan; Gretzschel, Ralph; Schirmer, Enrico; Rösch, Rudolf; Lingenfelder, Christian; Lang, Gerhard K

    2003-04-01

    The application of diamond knives has steadily increased in ophthalmic surgery. However, the geometry of the blade, its thickness and the sharpness of the cutting edge are limited by the abrasive diamond polishing process, e. g. the crystalline morphology of the bulk material and the grinding powder used. A new generation of diamond blades is presented herewith allowing free choice of blade shape and thickness and possessing excellent sharpness due to a new polishing process. The new production method is based on a high-quality CVD (chemical vapour deposition) diamond film of some tenths of microns thickness, deposited on a silicon wafer as microchip technology. The mechanical properties of this synthetic diamond film are almost equal to those of a natural diamond and the surface of this film is mirror-like after deposition without requiring post-polishing. The shape of the blade can be freely defined and is transferred into the diamond film by a plasma polishing process adopted from microsystem technology. The new production method results in highly reproducible diamond blades. Concave blades and round shapes can now be realised without the restrictions of the conventional production process. The force-free fabrication method even allows realisation of miniaturized blades (e. g. width production. Plasma polishing by means of gas atoms results in extreme sharpness with the cutting edge radius in the range of approx. 3 nm. Utilising microsystem technology we were able to manufacture reproducible artificial diamond blades. The new process offers for the first time surgeons a possibility of designing blades with a geometry close to their personal needs. Furthermore, the potential of facet-free ergonomically shaped diamond blades may stimulate further improvements towards novel surgical techniques.

  20. Graded composite diamond coatings with top-layer nanocrystallinity and interfacial integrity: Cross-sectional Raman mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumpala, Ravikumar [Manufacturing Engineering Section, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Ramamoorthy, B. [Manufacturing Engineering Section, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Rao, M.S. Ramachandra, E-mail: msrrao@iitm.ac.in [Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-01-15

    Cross-sectional structural characteristics of the CVD diamond coatings deposited on the tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates were analysed using Raman imaging technique. The grain size of the nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings was observed to deviate from the nanocrystallinity with increasing thickness and exhibited the surface characteristics of microcrystalline diamond (MCD). However, thick diamond coatings with surface nanocrystallinity is the key requirement for load-bearing tribological applications. Tribological tests have clearly indicated the significance and need for the top-layer nanocrystallinity. Graded composite diamond coatings with an architecture of NCD/transition-layer/MCD/WC-Co are potentail candiadates to realize thick diamond coatings with top-layer nanocrystallinity. Residual stresses along the cross-section of the graded composite diamond coatings were analysed using Raman imaging technique, which confirmed the improved interfacial integrity of the graded composite diamond coatings.

  1. Growth and Characterization of Silicon Carbide (SiC) Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) for Electronic Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karina

    In recent years nanowires have gained a generous amount of interest because of the possible application of nanowires within electronic devices. A nanowire is a one dimensional semiconductor nanostructure with a diameter less than 100 nm. Nanowires have the potential to be a replacement for the present day complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology; it is believed by 2020, a 5--6 nm gate length within field effect transistors (FET) would be realized and cease further miniaturization of electronic devices. SiC processes several unique chemical and physical properties that make it an attractive alternative to Si as a semiconductor material. Silicon carbide's properties make it a perfect candidate for applications such as high temperature sensors, x-ray emitters and high radiation sensors. The main objective of this thesis is to successfully grow silicon carbide nanowires on silicon substrates with the assistance of a metal catalyst, by the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The contributions made by the work carried out in this thesis are broad. This is the first study that has carried out a comprehensive investigation into a wide range of metal catalyst for the growth of SiC nanowires by the process of chemical vapor deposition. The study proved that the surface tension interactions between the silicon substrate and the metal catalyst are the controlling factor in the determination of the diameter of the nanowires grown. This study also proved that the silicon substrate orientation has no impact on the growth of the nanowires, similar growth patterns occurred on both Si and Si substrates. The nanowires grown were characterized by a variety of different methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and raman spectroscopy. The effect of temperature, growth temperature, growth time and the catalyst type used are investigated to determine the most suitable conditions necessary for SiC nanowire

  2. Growth of Free-standing Diamond Films on Graphite Substrates with Ti Interlayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-qing; LI Cheng-ming; CHEN Guang-chao; LU Fan-xiu; TANG Wei-zhong; TONG Yu-mei

    2004-01-01

    Free-standing diamond films, deposited using Dc Arc Plasma Jet CVD method onto graphite substrates with titanium interlayers, have been investigated. The Ti interlayers were deposited by arc ion plating equipments. The thickness,morphology and composite phase of Ti interlayers were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The titanium carbide (TiC) was detected in both sides of the interlayers, which played an important role with respect to reasonable adhesion with film and diamond nucleation. The semi-translucent diamond films were characterized by SEM and Raman spectrum. The sharp diamond peak with low intensity of amorphous carbon shows that diamond films have very high quality. The overall results suggest that plating Ti interlayer on graphite substrate is an effective way to obtain optical grade free-standing diamond films.

  3. Growth of Free-standing Diamond Films on Graphite Substrates with Ti Interlayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIHui-qing; LICheng-ming; CHENGuang-chao; LUFan-xiu; TANGWei-zhong; TONGYu-mei

    2004-01-01

    Free-standing diamond films, deposited using De Arc Plasma Jet CVD method onto graphite substrates with titanium interlayers, have been investigated. The Ti interlayers were deposited by arc ion plating equipments. The thickness, morphology and composite phase of Ti interlayers were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The titanium carbide (TIC) was detected in both sides of the interlayers, which played an important role with respect to reasonable adhesion with film and diamond nucleation. The semi-translucent diamond films were characterized by SEM and Raman spectrum. The sharp diamond peak with low intensity of amorphous carbon shows that diamond films have very high quality. The overall results suggest that plating Ti interlayer on graphite substrate is an effective way to obtain optical grade free-standing diamond films.

  4. Ultratough single crystal boron-doped diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, Russell J [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Mao, Ho-Kwang [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Yan, Chih-Shiue [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Liang, Qi [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC

    2015-05-05

    The invention relates to a single crystal boron doped CVD diamond that has a toughness of at least about 22 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a method of manufacturing single crystal boron doped CVD diamond. The growth rate of the diamond can be from about 20-100 .mu.m/h.

  5. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) yields better Hydrolytical Stability of Biocompatible SiOx Thin Films on Implant Alumina Ceramics compared to Rapid Thermal Evaporation Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böke, Frederik; Giner, Ignacio; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Fischer, Horst

    2016-07-20

    Densely sintered aluminum oxide (α-Al2O3) is chemically and biologically inert. To improve the interaction with biomolecules and cells, its surface has to be modified prior to use in biomedical applications. In this study, we compared two deposition techniques for adhesion promoting SiOx films to facilitate the coupling of stable organosilane monolayers on monolithic α-alumina; physical vapor deposition (PVD) by thermal evaporation and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD). We also investigated the influence of etching on the formation of silanol surface groups using hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid solutions. The film characteristics, that is, surface morphology and surface chemistry, as well as the film stability and its adhesion properties under accelerated aging conditions were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and tensile strength tests. Differences in surface functionalization were investigated via two model organosilanes as well as the cell-cytotoxicity and viability on murine fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC). We found that both SiOx interfaces did not affect the cell viability of both cell types. No significant differences between both films with regard to their interfacial tensile strength were detected, although failure mode analyses revealed a higher interfacial stability of the PE-CVD films compared to the PVD films. Twenty-eight day exposure to simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C revealed a partial delamination of the thermally deposited PVD films whereas the PE-CVD films stayed largely intact. SiOx layers deposited by both PVD and PE-CVD may thus serve as viable adhesion-promoters for subsequent organosilane coupling agent binding to α-alumina. However, PE-CVD appears to be favorable for long-term direct film exposure to aqueous

  6. Effects of deposition parameters on microstructure and thermal conductivity of diamond films deposited by DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Quan-yan; QIU Wan-qi; ZENG De-chang; LIU Zhong-wu; DAI Ming-jiang; ZHOU Ke-song

    2009-01-01

    The uniform diamond films with 60 mm in diameter were deposited by improved DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition technique. The structure of the film was characterized by scanning electronic microcopy(SEM) and laser Raman spectrometry. The thermal conductivity was measured by a photo thermal deflection technique. The effects of main deposition parameters on microstructure and thermal conductivity of the films were investigated. The results show that high thermal conductivity, 10.0 W/(K-cm), can be obtained at a CH4 concentration of 1.5% (volume fraction) and the substrate temperatures of 880-920 ℃ due to the high density and high purity of the film. A low pressure difference between nozzle and vacuum chamber is also beneficial to the high thermal conductivity.

  7. Deposition and characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite coatings grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition over different substrate materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Awadesh Kr Mallik; Nanadadulal Dandapat; Prajit Ghosh; Utpal Ganguly; Sukhendu Jana; Sayan Das; Kaustav Guha; Garfield Rebello; Samir Kumar Lahiri; Someswar Datta

    2013-04-01

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) coatings have been deposited over different substrates used for biomedical applications by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). DLN has an interconnecting network of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and quartz-like oxygenated silicon. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform–infra red (FT–IR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used for structural characterization. Typical DLN growth rate is about 1 m/h, measured by stylus profilometer. Due to the presence of quartz-like Si:O in the structure, it is found to have very good adhesive property with all the substrates. The adhesion strength found to be as high as 0.6 N on SS 316 L steel substrates by scratch testing method. The Young’s modulus and hardness have found to be 132 GPa and 14.4 GPa, respectively. DLN coatings have wear factor in the order of 1 × 10-7 mm3/N-m. This coating has found to be compatible with all important biomedical substrate materials and has successfully been deposited over Co–Cr alloy based knee implant of complex shape.

  8. Synthesis and Characteristics of Diamond-like Carbon Films Deposited on Quartz Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄卫东; 丁鼎; 詹如娟

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited on quartz substrate using pure CH4 in the surface wave plasma equipment. A direct current negative bias up to -90 V is applied to the substrate to investigate the bias effect on the film characteristics. Deposited films are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet-visible absorption techniques.There are two broad Raman peaks around 1340 cm-1 and 1600 cm-1 and the first one has a greater sp3 component with an increased bias. Infrared spectroscopy has three sp3 C-H modes at 2852 cm-1, 2926 cm- 1 and 2962 cm-1, respectively and also shows an intensity increase with the negative bias. Optical band gap is calculated from the ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy and the increased values with negative bias and deposition time are obtained. After a thermal anneal at about 500 ℃ for an hour to the film deposited under the bias of-90 V, we get an almost unchanged Raman spectrum and a peak intensity-reduced IR signal, which indicates a reduced H-content in the film. Meanwhile the optical band gap changed from 0.85 eV to 1.5 eV.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of the deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YuJun; DONG GuangNeng; MAO JunHong; XIE YouBai

    2008-01-01

    The deposition process of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) film greatly affects its frictional properties. In this study, CH3 radicals are selected as source species to deposit hydrogenated DLC films for molecular dynamics simulation. The growth and structural properties of hydrogenated DLC films are investigated and elucidated in detail. By comparison and statistical analysis, the authors find that the ratio of carbon to hydrogen in the films generally shows a monotonously increasing trend with the increase of impact energy. Carbon atoms are more reactive during deposition and more liable to bond with substrate atoms than hydrogen atoms. In addition, there exists a peak value of the number of hydrogen atoms deposited in hydrogenated DLC films. The trends of the variation are opposite on the two sides of this peak point, and itbecomes stable when impact energy is greater than 80 eV. The average relative density also indicates a rising trend along with the increment of impact energy, while it does not reach the saturation value until impact energy comes to 50 eV. The hydrogen content in source species is a key factor to determine the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films. When the hydrogen content in source species is high, the hydrogen content in hydrogenated DLC films is accordingly high.

  10. Optical Characterization of Diamond Synthesis Using CH3OH-H2 Gas Mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Man Weidong; Wang Jianhua; Li Lei; Zhang Baohua; Bai Yuming

    2005-01-01

    Diamond films with high infrared transmittance have been successfully deposited using CH3OH-H2 gas mixtures through microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD). The primary purpose of this study is to determine the effect of the deposition conditions on the optical properties of MWCVD diamond films using CH3OH-H2 gas mixtures. Room temperature optical properties of freestanding diamond films were studied by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. Experimental results indicated that under appropriate deposition temperature (620 ℃) and methanol concentration (5.7%), the refractive index of CVD diamond films (2.33)was comparable with that of natural diamond (2.417). The average infrared transmittance was above 65% in the middle infrared region (500 cm-1 ~ 4000 cm-1), approaching to the theoretical value of diamond (71.4%). The mechanism of growing high IR transmittance diamond films by utilizing CH3OH-H2 gas system is that the high methanol concentration used in this study makes the surface roughness of diamond films decreased by increasing the secondary nucleation density and the high O/C ratio in CH3OH-H2 gas system, improved the quality of diamond films and therefore decreased the absorption of non-diamond carbon in the films.

  11. Increased charge storage capacity of titanium nitride electrodes by deposition of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijs, Suzan; McDonald, Matthew; Sørensen, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of depositing a thin layer of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) on titanium nitride (TiN) coated electrodes and the effect this has on charge injection properties. The charge storage capacity increased by applying the B-NCD film...

  12. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  13. Nanocrystalline sp 2 and sp 3 carbons: CVD synthesis and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, M. L.; Rossi, M.; Tamburri, E.

    2016-11-01

    The design and production of innovative materials based on nanocrystalline sp 2- and sp 3-coordinated carbons is presently a focus of the scientific community. We present a review of the nanostructures obtained in our labs using a series of synthetic routes, which make use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the selective production of non-planar graphitic nanostructures, nanocrystalline diamonds, and hybrid two-phase nanostructures.

  14. Preparation of Diamond-like Carbon Films on the Surface of Ti Alloy by Electro-deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenglei SHEN; Hongwei WANG; Dijiang WEN

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, diamond-like carbon (DLC) fi[ms were deposited on Ti alloy by electro-deposition. DLC films were brown and composed of the compact grains whose diameter was about 400 nm. Examined by XPS, the main composition of the films was carbon. In the Raman spectrum, there were a broad peak at 1350 cm-1 and a broad peak at 1600 cm-1, which indicated that the films were DLC films.

  15. Investigation of Chemical-Vapour-Deposition Diamond Alpha-Particle Detectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Bei-Bei; WANG Lin-Jun; ZHANG Ming-Long; XIA Yi-Ben

    2004-01-01

    Diamond films with [100] texture were prepared by a hot-filament chemical vapour deposition technique to fabricate particle detectors. The response of detectors to 5.5 MeV 241 Am particles is studied. The photocurrent increases linearly and then levels off with voltage, and 7hA is obtained at bias voltage of 100 V. The timedependent photocurrent initially increases rapidly and then tends to reach saturation. Furthermore, a little increase of the dark-current after irradiation can be accounted for by the release of the charges captured by the trapping centres at low energy levels during irradiation. An obvious peak of the pulse height distribution can be observed, associated with the energy of 5.5 MeV.

  16. High Resistive ZnO/Diamond/Si Films Grown via Metal-organic Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-jun; ZHAO Bai-jun; FANG Xiu-jun; DU Guo-tong; LIU Da-li; GAO Chun-xiao; LIU Xi-zhe

    2005-01-01

    Piezoelectric ZnO layers with high resistivity for surface acoustic wave applications were prepared on polycrystalline diamond/Si substrates with (111) orientation via metal-organic chemical vapour deposition.The characteristics of the films were optimized through different growth methods. The comparative study of the X-ray diffraction spectra and scanning electron microscopic images showed that the final-prepared ZnO films were dominantly c-axis oriented. Zn and O elements in the final prepared ZnO films were investigated through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. According to the statistical results, the n(Zn)/n(O) ratio is near 1. The Raman scattering was also performed in back scattering configuration. E2 mode was observed for the final films, which indicated that the better quality ZnO films had been obtained. The resistivity of the films was also enhanced via the modification of the growth methods.

  17. The potential use of diamond coated tungsten tips as a field ionisation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, A.; Prawer, S.; Legge, G.J.F.; Kostidis, L.I. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Tungsten tips are convenient for use in a high brightness gaseous phase field ionisation source. However, the lifetime of these tips is not adequate for practical use. The authors are investigating whether coating tungsten tips with diamond using Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) will improve the practicality of using these tips by an improvement in longevity of the source and/or an improvement in brightness due to the effects of the property of negative electron affinity which has been observed on CVD diamond. 1 ref.

  18. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    a,b , Paul N. Barnes c , Chakrapani V. Varanasi e , Jack Burke d , Bang -Hung Tsao d , and Sharmila M. Mukhopadhyay b a. Air Force Research...catalysts play a big role in the structure and properties of the resulting CNTs. The three different techniques compared here have two different approaches...catalysts at the interface suggests the silica nanolayer keeps them anchored and prevents them from migrating during CNT growth. Figure 5: Cross

  19. High performance diamond-like carbon layers obtained by pulsed laser deposition for conductive electrode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, F.; Antoni, F.; Le Normand, F.; Muller, D.; Abdesselam, M.; Boubiche, N.; Komissarov, I.

    2017-09-01

    For the future, one of the biggest challenge faced to the technologies of flat panel display and various optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices is to find an alternative to the use of transparent conducting oxides like ITO. In this new approach, the objective is to grow high conductive thin-layer graphene (TLG) on the top of diamond-like carbon (DLC) layers presenting high performance. DLC prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) have attracted special interest due to a unique combination of their properties, close to those of monocrystalline diamond, like its transparency, hardness and chemical inertia, very low roughness, hydrogen-free and thus high thermal stability up to 1000 K. In our future work, we plane to explore the synthesis of conductive TLG on top of insulating DLC thin films. The feasibility and obtained performances of the multi-layered structure will be explored in great details in the short future to develop an alternative to ITO with comparable performance (conductivity of transparency). To select the best DLC candidate for this purpose, we focus this work on the physicochemical properties of the DLC thin films deposited by PLD from a pure graphite target at two wavelengths (193 and 248 nm) at various laser fluences. A surface graphenization process, as well as the required efficiency of the complete structure (TLG/DLC) will clearly be related to the DLC properties, especially to the initial sp3/sp2 hybridization ratio. Thus, an exhaustive description of the physicochemical properties of the DLC layers is a fundamental step in the research of comparable performance to ITO.

  20. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, Andreas, E-mail: A.Markwitz@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Gupta, Prasanth [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, Berit [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hübner, René [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, αγ){sup 12}C (E{sub res} = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0–10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp{sup 2} hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  1. Diamond-coated probe head for measurements in the deep SOL and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Xu, G. S.; Yan, Ning;

    We have tested two cylindrical graphite probe heads coated by a layer of electrically isolating UNCD (Ultra Nano-Crystalline Diamond) using a CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition) method. The probe heads were mounted on the reciprocating probe manipulator of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting T...

  2. Ultra-Smooth Nanostructured Diamond Films Deposited from He/H2/CH4/N2 Microwave Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Konovalov, Valery V.; Melo, Andrew; Catledge, Shane A.; Chowdhury, Shafiul; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2006-01-01

    Addition of He to a high CH4 content (10.7 vol%) H2/CH4/N2 feedgas mixture for microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition produced hard (56–72 GPa), ultra-smooth nanostructured diamond films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrates. Upon increase in He content up to 71 vol%, root mean squared (RMS) surface roughness of the film decreased to 9–10 nm and average diamond grain size to 5–6 nm. Our studies show that increased nanocrystallinity with He addition in plasma is related to plasma dilution, enhance...

  3. First use of single-crystal diamonds as fission-fragment detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frégeau, M.O.; Oberstedt, S.; Brys, T.; Gamboni, Th.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre (IRMM), B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Oberstedt, A. [OSSOLUTIONS Consulting, S-70353 Örebro (Sweden); Fundamental Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Vidali, M. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre (IRMM), B-2440 Geel (Belgium)

    2015-08-11

    Single-crystal chemical vapor-deposited diamond (sCVD) was investigated for its ability to act as fission-fragment detector. In particular we investigated timing and energy resolution for application in a simultaneous time-of-flight and energy measurement to determine the mass of the detected fission fragment. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapor deposited (pCVD) diamonds provide sufficient timing resolution, but their poor energy resolution did not allow complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, α-particles and noise. Our present investigations prove artificial sCVD diamonds to show similar timing resolution as pCVD diamonds close to 100 ps. Improved pulse-height resolution allows the unequivocal separation of fission fragments, and the detection efficiency reaches 100%, but remains with about a few percent behind requirements for fragment-mass identification. With high-speed digital electronics a timing resolution well below 100 ps is possible. However, the strongly varying quality of the presently available diamond material does not allow application on a sufficiently large scale within reasonable investments.

  4. Diamond films grown on seeded substrates by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition with H sub 2 as the only feeding gas

    CERN Document Server

    LiuHongWu; Gao Chun Xi; Han Yong; Luo Ji Feng; Zou Guang Tian; Wen Chao

    2002-01-01

    Diamond films have been grown on polished Si substrates seeded with nanocrystalline diamond powder colloid using hot-filament chemical vapour deposition. Instead of using the conventional gaseous carbon source, a carbonized W filament was used as the carbon source. The only feeding gas was hydrogen. Compared with those produced by traditional methods, the polycrystalline diamond grown by this new method has smaller grain size. The growth mechanism is also discussed.

  5. Synthesis of few-layer graphene on a Ni substrate by using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hyuk; Castro, Edward Joseph; Hwang, Yong Gyoo; Lee, Choong Hun [Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    In this work, few-layer graphene (FLG) was successfully grown on polycrystalline Ni a large scale by using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC PE-CVD), which may serve as an alternative route in large-scale graphene synthesis. The synthesis time had an effect on the quality of the graphene produced. The applied DC voltage, on the other hand, influenced the minimization of the defect densities in the graphene grown. We also present a method of producing a free-standing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)/graphene membrane on a FeCl{sub 3(aq)} solution, which could then be transferred to the desired substrate.

  6. Fabrication of ZnO nanoparticles-embedded hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films by electrochemical deposition technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Pei-Zeng; Li Rui-Shan; Pan Xiao-Jun; Xie Er-Qing

    2013-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles-embedded hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (ZnO-DLC) films have been prepared by electrochemical deposition in ambient conditions.The morphology,composition,and microstructure of the films have been investigated.The results show that the resultant films are hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films embedded with ZnO nanoparticles in wurtzite structure,and the content and size of the ZnO nanoparticles increase with increasing deposition voltage,which are confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),Raman,and transmission electron microscope (TEM).Furthermore,a possible mechanism used to describe the growth process of ZnO-DLC films by electrochemical deposition is also discussed.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of the behaviour of electrons during electron-assisted chemical vapour deposition of diamond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董丽芳; 陈俊英; 董国义; 尚勇

    2002-01-01

    The behaviour of electrons during electron-assisted chemical vapour deposition of diamond is investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. The electron energy distribution and velocity distribution are obtained over a wide range of reduced field E/N (the ratio of the electric field to gas molecule density) from 100 to 2000 in units of 1Td=10-17Vcm2.Their effects on the diamond growth are also discussed. Themain results obtained are as follows. (1) The velocity profile is asymmetric for the component parallel to the field.Ihe velocity distribution has a peak shift in the field direction. Most electrons possess non-zero velocity parallel to the substrate. (2) The number of atomic H is a function of E/N. (3) High-quality diamond can be obtained under the condition of E/N from 50 to 800Td due to sufficient atomic H and electron bombardment.

  8. A multilayer innovative solution to improve the adhesion of nanocrystalline diamond coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulon-Quintin, A., E-mail: poulon@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Faure, C.; Teulé-Gay, L.; Manaud, J.P. [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of the NCD adhesion on WC-12%Co substrates for tooling applications using a multi-interlayer additional system. • Reduction of the graphite layer thickness and continuity at the interface with the diamond. • Transmission electron microscopy study for a better understanding of the diffusion phenomena occurring at the interfaces. - Abstract: Nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) films grown under negative biased substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are widely used as surface overlay coating onto cermet WC-Co cutting tools to get better performances. To improve the diamond adhesion to the cermet substrate, suitable multi-layer systems have been added. They are composed of a cobalt diffusion barrier close to the substrate (single and sequenced nitrides layers) coated with a nucleation extra layer to improve the nucleus density of diamond during CVD processing. For all systems, before and after diamond deposition, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been performed for a better understanding of the diffusion phenomena occurring at the interfaces and to evaluate the presence of graphitic species at the interface with the diamond. Innovative multilayer system dedicated to the regulation of cobalt diffusion coated with a bilayer system optimized for the carbon diffusion control, is shown as an efficient solution to significantly reduce the graphite layer formation at the interface with the diamond down to 10 nm thick and to increase the adhesion of NCD diamond layer as scratch-tests confirm.

  9. Low-temperature synthesis of diamond films by photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawata, Mayuri, E-mail: kawata@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Ojiro, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Shuichi; Takakuwa, Yuji [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Okano, Ken [International Christian University, 3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka 181-8585 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Photoemission-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PA-PECVD), a process in which photoelectrons emitted from a substrate irradiated with ultraviolet light are utilized as a trigger for DC discharge, was investigated in this study; specifically, the DC discharge characteristics of PA-PECVD were examined for an Si substrate deposited in advance through hot-filament chemical vapor deposition with a nitrogen-doped diamond layer of thickness ∼1 μm. Using a commercially available Xe excimer lamp (hν = 7.2 eV) to illuminate the diamond surface with and without hydrogen termination, the photocurrents were found to be 3.17 × 10{sup 12} and 2.11 × 10{sup 11} electrons/cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The 15-fold increase in photocurrent was ascribed to negative electron affinity (NEA) caused by hydrogen termination on the diamond surfaces. The DC discharge characteristics revealed that a transition bias voltage from a Townsend-to-glow discharge was considerably decreased because of NEA (from 490 to 373 V for H{sub 2} gas and from 330 to 200 V for Ar gas), enabling a reduction in electric power consumption needed to synthesize diamond films through PA-PECVD. In fact, the authors have succeeded in growing high-quality diamond films of area 2.0 cm{sup 2} at 540 °C with a discharge power of only 1.8 W, plasma voltage of 156.4 V, and discharge current of 11.7 mA under the glow discharge of CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar mixed gases. In addition to having only negligible amounts of graphite and amorphous carbon, the diamond films exhibit a relatively high diamond growth rate of 0.5 μm/h at temperatures as low as 540 °C, which is attributed to Ar{sup +} ions impinging on the diamond surface, and causing the removal of hydrogen atoms from the surface through sputtering. This process leads to enhanced CH{sub x} radical adsorption, because the sample was applied with a negative potential to accelerate photoelectrons in PA-PECVD.

  10. Characterization of diamond-like nanocomposite thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, T. S.; Liu, C. H.; Bhattacharyya, T. K.; Patel, P.; Barik, T. K.

    2010-06-01

    Diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) thin films, comprising the networks of a-C:H and a-Si:O were deposited on pyrex glass or silicon substrate using gas precursors (e.g., hexamethyldisilane, hexamethyldisiloxane, hexamethyldisilazane, or their different combinations) mixed with argon gas, by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Surface morphology of DLN films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic result shows that the films contain nanoparticles within the amorphous structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the structural change within the DLN films. The hardness and friction coefficient of the films were measured by nanoindentation and scratch test techniques, respectively. FTIR and XPS studies show the presence of CC, CH, SiC, and SiH bonds in the a-C:H and a-Si:O networks. Using Raman spectroscopy, we also found that the hardness of the DLN films varies with the intensity ratio ID/IG. Finally, we observed that the DLN films has a better performance compared to DLC, when it comes to properties like high hardness, high modulus of elasticity, low surface roughness and low friction coefficient. These characteristics are the critical components in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and emerging nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  11. INFLUENCE OF THE SILICON INTERLAYER ON DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON FILMS DEPOSITED ON GLASS SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deiler Antonio Lima Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-like carbon (DLC films as a hard protective coating have achieved great success in a diversity of technological applications. However, adhesion of DLC films to substrates can restrict their applications. The influence of a silicon interlayer in order to improve DLC adhesion on glass substrates was investigated. Amorphous silicon interlayer and DLC films were deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from silane and methane, respectively. The bonding structure, transmittance, refraction index, and adherence of the films were also evaluated regarding the thickness of the silicon interlayer. Raman scattering spectroscopy did not show any substantial difference in DLC structure due to the interlayer thickness of the silicon. Optical measurements showed a sharp decrease of transmittance in the ultra-violet region caused by the fundamental absorption of the light. In addition, the absorption edge of transmittance shifted toward longer wavelength side in the ultra-violet region as the thickness of the silicon interlayer increased. The tribological results showed an increase of DLC adherence as the silicon interlayer increased, which was characterized by less cracks around the grooves.

  12. Target-plane deposition of diamond-like carbon in pulsed laser ablation of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, S.S. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Tou, T.Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.my

    2007-10-15

    In pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at 10{sup -6} Torr, diamond-like carbon (DLC) are deposited at laser wavelengths of 1064, 532, and 355 nm on substrates placed in the target-plane. These target-plane samples are found to contain varying sp{sup 3} content and composed of nanostructures of 40-200 nm in size depending on the laser wavelength and laser fluence. The material and origin of sp{sup 3} in the target-plane samples is closely correlated to that in the laser-modified HOPG surface layer, and hardly from the backward deposition of ablated carbon plume. The surface morphology of the target-plane samples shows the columnar growth and with a tendency for agglomeration between nanograins, in particular for long laser wavelength at 1064 nm. It is also proposed that DLC formation mechanism at the laser-ablated HOPG is possibly via the laser-induced subsurface melting and resolidification.

  13. Maskless Selective Growth Method for p-n Junction Applications on (001)-Oriented Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiromitsu; Makino, Toshiharu; Ogura, Masahiko; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2012-09-01

    A maskless selective growth method by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising technique for fabricating various types of p-n junction devices on diamond semiconductors, instead of the impurity doping by ion-implantation technique. We control diamond growth and impurity doping using patterned surface morphologies of (001)-oriented diamond, which results in a selective growth along the or direction. In the case of phosphorus doping, the diamond with selective growth shows the n-type conducting property, whereas that with selective growth shows the insulating property owing to the coincorporation of hydrogen. Such strong orientational properties are peculiar in CVD phosphorus doping. The detailed procedures of this selective growth method and the electrical properties of fabricated vertical and lateral p-n junction diodes are described in this article.

  14. Analyzing the performance of diamond-coated micro end mills.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, C. D.; Heaney, P. J.; Sumant, A. V.; Hamilton, M. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Pfefferkorn, F. E.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-06-01

    A method is presented to improve the tool life and cutting performance of 300 {micro}m diameter tungsten carbide (WC) micro end mills by applying thin (<300 nm) fine-grained diamond (FGD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings using the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) process. The performance of the diamond-coated tools has been evaluated by comparing their performance in dry slot milling of 6061-T6 aluminum against uncoated WC micro end mills. Tool wear, coating integrity, and chip morphology were characterized using SEM and white light interferometry. The initial test results show a dramatic improvement in the tool integrity (i.e., corners not breaking off), a lower wear rate, no observable adhesion of aluminum to the diamond-coated tool, and a significant reduction in the cutting forces (>50%). Reduction of the cutting forces is attributed to the low friction and adhesion of the diamond coating. However, approximately 80% of the tools coated with the larger FGD coatings failed during testing due to delamination. Additional machining benefits were attained for the NCD films, which was obtained by using a higher nucleation density seeding process for diamond growth. This process allowed for thinner, smaller grained diamond coatings to be deposited on the micro end mills, and enabled continued operation of the tool even after the integrity of the diamond coating had been compromised. As opposed to the FGD-coated end mills, only 40% of the NCD-tools experienced delamination issues.

  15. Nano-inclusions in diamond: Evidence of diamond genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, R.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Focused Ion Beam technology (FIB) for TEM sample preparation introduced approximately 15 years ago revolutionized the application of TEM in Geosciences. For the first time, FIB enabled cutting samples for TEM use from exactly the location we are interested in. Applied to diamond investigation, this technique revealed the presence of nanometre-sized inclusions in diamond that have been simply unknown before. Nanoinclusions in diamond from different location and origin such as diamonds from the Lower and Upper Mantle, metamorphic diamonds (Kazakhstan, Erzgebirge, Bohemia), diamonds from ophiolites (Tibet, Mongolia, Xinjiang, Ural Mountains), diamonds from igneous rocks (Hawaii, Kamchatka) and impact diamonds (Popigai Crater, Siberia) have been investigated during the last 15 years. The major conclusion of all these TEM studies is, that the nanoinclusions, their phases and phase composition together with the micro- and nanostructure evidence the origin of diamond and genesis of diamond. We can discriminate Five different mechanisms of diamond genesis in nature are observed: Diamond crystallized from a high-density fluid (Upper mantle and metamorphic diamond). Diamond crystallized from carbonatitic melt (Lower mantle diamond). Diamond precipitates from a metal alloy melt (Diamond from ophiolites). Diamond crystallized by gas phase condensation or chemical vapour condensation (CVD) (Lavas from Kamchatka, xenoliths in Hawaiian lavas). Direct transformation of graphite into diamond.

  16. Initial damage processes for diamond film exposure to hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslandes, A., E-mail: acd@ansto.gov.au [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Guenette, M.C. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Samuell, C.M. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Karatchevtseva, I. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Ionescu, M.; Cohen, D.D. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Blackwell, B. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Corr, C., E-mail: cormac.corr@anu.edu.au [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Riley, D.P., E-mail: dry@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: • Exposing chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond films in a recently constructed device, MAGPIE, specially commissioned to simulate fusion plasma conditions. • Non-diamond material is etched from the diamond. • There is no hydrogen retention observed, which suggests diamond is an excellent candidate for plasma facing materials. • Final structure of the surface is dependent on synergistic effects of etching and ion-induced structural change. -- Abstract: Diamond is considered to be a possible alternative to other carbon based materials as a plasma facing material in nuclear fusion devices due to its high thermal conductivity and resistance to chemical erosion. In this work CVD diamond films were exposed to hydrogen plasma in the MAGnetized Plasma Interaction Experiment (MAGPIE): a linear plasma device at the Australian National University which simulates plasma conditions relevant to nuclear fusion. Various negative sample stage biases of magnitude less than 500 V were applied to control the energies of impinging ions. Characterisation results from SEM, Raman spectroscopy and ERDA are presented. No measureable quantity of hydrogen retention was observed, this is either due to no incorporation of hydrogen into the diamond structure or due to initial incorporation as a hydrocarbon followed by subsequent etching back into the plasma. A model is presented for the initial stages of diamond erosion in fusion relevant hydrogen plasma that involves chemical erosion of non-diamond material from the surface by hydrogen radicals and damage to the subsurface region from energetic hydrogen ions. These results show that the initial damage processes in this plasma regime are comparable to previous studies of the fundamental processes as reported for less extreme plasma such as in the development of diamond films.

  17. Microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon films deposited on hydrogenated rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, J.P. van der [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Martinez-Martinez, D., E-mail: d.martinez.martinez@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Pei, Y.T., E-mail: y.pei@rug.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Rudolf, P. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); De Hosson, J.Th.M. [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the microstructure and tribological performance of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films prepared by plasma chemical vapor deposition on hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubbers (HNBR) are studied. Different negative variations of temperature during film growth were selected by proper changes of the bias voltage. Raman measurements show a similar bonding regardless of the voltages used. A columnar growth and a tile-like microstructure of the DLC films were identified by scanning electron microscopy. Patch sizes can be correlated with the deposition conditions. The coefficient of friction (CoF) of DLC film coated HNBR was found to be much lower than that of the unprotected rubber, and more reduced for the DLC films with smaller patch sizes, which is explained by a better flexibility and conformity of the film during testing. In one of the samples, unexpected low CoF was observed, which was attributed to a modification of the mechanical properties of the rubber during the plasma treatment at high voltage. This issue was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicated a modification of the cross linking in the rubber. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bias voltage does not vary the chemical bonding and surface morphology of films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Film structure is patched, whose size depends on the etching and deposition voltages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frictional behavior can be correlated with the patch size of the films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface analysis showed that rubber x-linking is modified by etching at high voltage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of rubber x-linking leads to a different frictional behavior.

  18. Intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like carbon films prepared by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨武保; 王久丽; 张谷令; 范松华; 刘赤子; 杨思泽

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the structures, optical and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films are studied, which are prepared by a self-fabricated electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method at room temperature in the ambient gases of mixed acetylene and nitrogen. The morphology and microstructure of the processed film are characterized by the atomic force microscope image, Raman spectra and middle Fourier transform infrared transmittance spectra, which reveal that there is an intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like structure in the film and the film is mainly composed of sp3 CH, sp3 C-C, sp2 C=C, C=N and C60. The film micro-hardness and bulk modulus are measured by a nano-indenter and the refractive constant and deposition rate are also calculated.

  19. Effect of working pressure and temperature on ZnO film deposited on free-standing diamond substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ping; XIA Yi-ben; WANG Lin-jun; LIU Jian-min; XU Run; PENG Hong-yan; SHI Wei-min

    2006-01-01

    The structure characteristic and electric performance of ZnO film deposited on nucleation side of free-standing diamond substrates under different heating temperatures (Th) of substrate and working pressures (p) were studied. The structure of the ZnO films tested by X-ray diffraction shows that ZnO film of high c-axis orientation is deposited on the nucleation side of free-standing diamond substrate which is extremely smooth when Th=250 ℃ and p=0.4 Pa. After annealing at 480 ℃ in N2 atmosphere,the SEM and the AFM analyses demonstrate that the c-axis orientation of ZnO film is obviously enhanced. The resistivity of ZnO films also increases up to 8×105 Ω·cm which is observed by I-V test.

  20. Characterization of diamond thin films deposited by a CO{sub 2} laser-assisted combustion-flame method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKindra, Travis, E-mail: mckindra@mst.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); O' Keefe, Matthew J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Xie Zhiqiang; Lu Yongfeng [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Diamond thin films were deposited by a CO{sub 2} laser-assisted O{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 4} combustion-flame process. The effect of the deposition parameters, in particular the laser wavelength and power, on the film surface morphology, microstructure and phases present was the primary focus of the work. The laser power was set at 100, 400 and 800 W while the wavelength was varied and set at 10.591 {mu}m in the untuned condition and set at 10.532 {mu}m to resonantly match the CH{sub 2}-wagging vibrational mode of the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} molecule when in the tuned condition. When the laser was coupled to the combustion flame during deposition the diamond film growth was enhanced as the lateral grain size increased from 1 {mu}m to greater than 5 {mu}m. The greatest increase in grain size occurred when the wavelength was in the tuned condition. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images from focused-ion beam cross-sectioned samples revealed a sub-layer of smaller grains less than 1 {mu}m in size near the substrate surface at the lower laser powers and untuned wavelength. X-ray diffraction results showed a more intense Diamond (111) peak as the laser power increased from 100 to 800 W for the films deposited with the tuned laser wavelength. Micro-Raman spectra showed a diamond peak nearly twice as intense from the films with the tuned laser wavelength.

  1. AFM Morphology Study of Si1-Y GeY:H Films Deposited by LF PE CVD from Silane-Germane with Different

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, L; Kosarev, A

    2005-03-28

    The morphology of Si{sub 1-Y} Ge{sub Y}:H films in the range of Y=0.23 to 0.9 has been studied by AFM. The films were deposited by Low Frequency (LF) PE CVD at substrate temperature T{sub s}=300 C and discharge frequency f=110 kHz from silane+germane mixture with and without, Ar and H{sub 2} dilution. The films were deposited on silicon and glass substrates. AFM images were taken and analyzed for 2 x 2 mm{sup 2} area. All the images demonstrated ''grain'' like structure, which was characterized by the height distribution function F(H) average roughness , standard height deviation Rq, lateral correlation length L{sub c} area distribution function F(s), mean grain area , diameter distribution function F(d), and mean grain diameter . The roughness of the films monotonically increases with Y for all dilutions, but more significantly in the films deposited without dilution. L{sub c} continuously grows with Y in the films deposited without dilution, while more complex behavior L{sub c}(Y) is observed in the films deposited with H- or Ar dilution. The sharpness of F(H) characterized by curtosis {gamma} depends on dilution and the sharpest F(H) are for the films deposited with Ar ({gamma}=5.30,Y=0.23) and without dilution ({gamma}=4.3, Y=0.45). Isothermal annealing caused increase of , L{sub c} in the films deposited with H- and Ar dilutions, while in the films prepared without dilution the behavior was more complex, depending on the substrates. Significant narrowing of the height distribution was observed in the films deposited with H dilution or without dilution.

  2. Deposition of hard and adherent diamond-like carbon films inside steel tubes using a pulsed-DC discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir Jesus; Capote, Gil; Bonetti, Luís Francisco; Fernandes, Jesum; Blando, Eduardo; Hübler, Roberto; Radi, Polyana Alves; Santos, Lúcia Vieira; Corat, Evaldo José

    2009-06-01

    A new, low cost, pulsed-DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system that uses a bipolar, pulsed power supply was designed and tested to evaluate its capacity to produce quality diamond-like carbon films on the inner surface of steel tubes. The main focus of the study was to attain films with low friction coefficients, low total stress, a high degree of hardness, and very good adherence to the inner surface of long metallic tubes at a reasonable growth rate. In order to enhance the diamond-like carbon coating adhesion to metallic surfaces, four steps were used: (1) argon ion sputtering; (2) plasma nitriding; (3) a thin amorphous silicon interlayer deposition, using silane as the precursor gas; and (4) diamond-like carbon film deposition using methane atmosphere. This paper presents various test results as functions of the methane gas pressure and of the coaxial metal anode diameter, where the pulsed-DC voltage constant is kept constant. The influence of the coaxial metal anode diameter and of the methane gas pressure is also demonstrated. The results obtained showed the possibilities of using these DLC coatings for reduced friction and to harden inner surface of the steel tubes.

  3. Progress on Diamond-Based Cylindrical Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.

    2006-11-01

    The development of a high gradient diamond-based cylindrical dielectric loaded accelerator (DLA) is presented. A diamond-loaded DLA can potentially sustain accelerating gradients far in excess of the limits experimentally observed for conventional metallic accelerating structures. The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerators: high rf breakdown level, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. We used the hot-filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process to produce high quality 5-10 cm long cylindrical diamond layers. Our collaboration has also been developing a new method of CVD diamond surface preparation that reduces the secondary electron emission coefficient below unity. Special attention was paid to the numerical optimization of the waveguide to structure rf coupling section, where the surface magnetic and electric fields were minimized relative to the accelerating gradient and within known metal surface breakdown limits. We conclude with a brief overview of the use of diamond microstructures for use in compact rf sources.

  4. Diamond dosimetry: Outcomes of the CANDIDO and CONRAD INFN projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: marta@dfc.unifi.it; Borchi, E. [Dipartimento di Energetica dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Casati, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Cirrone, P. [Laboratori Nazionali del SUD, INFN, Catania (Italy); Cuttone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del SUD, INFN, Catania (Italy); De Angelis, C. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Rome (Italy); Lovik, I. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Onori, S. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Rome (Italy); Raffaele, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del SUD, INFN, Catania (Italy); Sciortino, S. [Dipartimento di Energetica dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy)

    2005-10-21

    This paper reviews the main results of the study, carried out in the framework of the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) projects, namely CANDIDO and CONRAD, on natural and synthetic diamond-based dosimeters for clinical radiotherapy. Characteristics of diamond such as radiation hardness, high sensitivity, tissue equivalence, etc., make this material interesting for dosimetry applications. For some years, natural diamonds have been commercially available for on-line radiotherapy dosimetry. Nevertheless, recent developments in the 'Chemical Vapour Deposition' (CVD) technique have addressed the attention on synthetic samples that potentially could be grown at low cost and with features suitable for dosimetric use. Several samples, differently grown and with different electrical contacts, have been compared by measuring their current response during irradiation with high-energy photon, electron and proton beams. Properties of dosimetric interest such as linearity, pre-irradiation dose, dose rate dependence, stability and rise time have been investigated. The results obtained so far within the INFN collaboration demonstrate the suitability of natural diamond detectors for many radiotherapy applications and the great potential of CVD diamond-based devices even though, at present, the commercial natural diamond dosimeters have a better behaviour with respect to the synthetic samples. Further efforts have to be made mainly to improve the dynamic of response and performance stability.

  5. Diamond dosimetry: Outcomes of the CANDIDO and CONRAD INFN projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciolini, M.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Casati, M.; Cirrone, P.; Cuttone, G.; De Angelis, C.; Lovik, I.; Onori, S.; Raffaele, L.; Sciortino, S.

    2005-10-01

    This paper reviews the main results of the study, carried out in the framework of the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) projects, namely CANDIDO and CONRAD, on natural and synthetic diamond-based dosimeters for clinical radiotherapy. Characteristics of diamond such as radiation hardness, high sensitivity, tissue equivalence, etc., make this material interesting for dosimetry applications. For some years, natural diamonds have been commercially available for on-line radiotherapy dosimetry. Nevertheless, recent developments in the "Chemical Vapour Deposition" (CVD) technique have addressed the attention on synthetic samples that potentially could be grown at low cost and with features suitable for dosimetric use. Several samples, differently grown and with different electrical contacts, have been compared by measuring their current response during irradiation with high-energy photon, electron and proton beams. Properties of dosimetric interest such as linearity, pre-irradiation dose, dose rate dependence, stability and rise time have been investigated. The results obtained so far within the INFN collaboration demonstrate the suitability of natural diamond detectors for many radiotherapy applications and the great potential of CVD diamond-based devices even though, at present, the commercial natural diamond dosimeters have a better behaviour with respect to the synthetic samples. Further efforts have to be made mainly to improve the dynamic of response and performance stability.

  6. Deodorisation effect of diamond-like carbon/titanium dioxide multilayer thin films deposited onto polypropylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, K., E-mail: ozeki@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, 162-1 Shirakata, Toukai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Hirakuri, K.K. [Applied Systems Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Ishizaka, Hatoyama, Hiki, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan); Masuzawa, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Many types of plastic containers have been used for the storage of food. In the present study, diamond-like carbon (DLC)/titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) multilayer thin films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) to prevent flavour retention and to remove flavour in plastic containers. For the flavour removal test, two types of multilayer films were prepared, DLC/TiO{sub 2} films and DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC films. The residual gas concentration of acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric compounds in bottle including the DLC/TiO{sub 2}-coated and the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC-coated PP plates were measured after UV radiation, and the amount of adsorbed compounds to the plates was determined. The percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene, and turmeric with the DLC/TiO{sub 2} coated plates were 0.8%, 65.2% and 75.0% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. For the DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film, the percentages of residual gas for acetaldehyde, ethylene and turmeric decreased to 34.9%, 76.0% and 85.3% after 40 h of UV radiation, respectively. The DLC/TiO{sub 2}/DLC film had a photocatalytic effect even though the TiO{sub 2} film was covered with the DLC film.

  7. Structural and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Hellgren, N.; Czigány, Zs.; Twesten, R. D.; Luning, J.; Petrov, I.; Hultman, L.; Holloway, B. C.

    2003-07-01

    The microstructure, morphology, and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering were investigated for microelectromechanical systems applications. Film properties were found to vary markedly with the ion energy (Eion) and ion-to-carbon flux ratio (Jion/JC). Cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed an amorphous microstructure. However, the presence of nanometer-sized domains at Eion~85 eV was detected. Film stresses, σ, which were compressive in all cases, ranged from 0.5 to 3.5 GPa and depended on the flux ratio as well as ion energy. The hardness (H), Young's moduli (ɛ), and elastic recovery (R) increased with Eion to maximum values of H=27 GPa, ɛ=250 GPa, and R=68% at Eion=85 eV and Jion/JC=4.4. However, near edge x-ray absorption fine structure and electron energy-loss spectrum analysis showed that the sp2/sp3 content of the films does not change with Eion or Jion/JC. The measured change in mechanical properties without a corresponding change in sp2/sp3 ratio is not consistent with any previously published models. We suggest that, in the ranges 5 eV <=Eion<=85 eV and 1.1 <=Jion/JC<=6.8, the presence of defective graphite formed by subplanted C and Ar atoms has the dominant influence on the mechanical properties of DLC films.

  8. Continuous production of carbon nanotubes and diamond films by swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Iyuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are being developed to meet an increasing demand as a result of their versatile applications. Swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD is one of these techniques. This method was used to synthesise CNTs on a continuous basis using acetylene gas as a carbon source, ferrocene dissolved in xylene as a catalyst precursor, and both hydrogen and argon as carrier gases. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that a mixture of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanomaterials were produced within the pyrolytic temperature range of 900–1 100°C and acetylene flow rate range of 118–370 ml min–1. Image comparison of raw and purified products showed that low contents of iron particles and amorphous carbon were contained in the synthesised carbon nanotubes. Diamond films were produced at high ferrocene concentration, hydrogen flow rate and pyrolysis temperatures, while carbon nanoballs were formed and attached to the surface of theCNTs at low ferrocene content and low pyrolysis temperature.

  9. Negative Resistance Effect and Charge Transfer Mechanisms in the lon Beam Deposited Diamond Like Carbon Superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius VASILIAUSKAS

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/nSi and DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/pSi structures were fabricated by ion beam deposition using a closed drift ion source. Current-voltage (I-V characteristics of the multilayer samples were measured at room temperature. The main charge transfer mechanisms were considered. Unstable negative resistance effect was observed for some DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/nSi and DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/pSi structures. In the case of the diamond like carbon superlattices fabricated on nSi it was observed only during the first measurement. In the case of the some DLC:SiOx/DLC/DLC:SiOx/pSi negative resistance "withstood" several measurements. Changes of the charge carrier mechanisms were observed along with the dissapear of the negative resistance peaks. It seems, that in such a case influence of the bulk related charge transfer mechanisms such as Poole-Frenkel emission increased, while the influence of the contact limited charge transfer mechanisms such as Schottky emission decreased. Observed results were be explained by current flow through the local microconducting channels and subsequent destruction of the localized current pathways as a result of the heating by flowing electric current.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.240

  10. Diamond-like carbon films synthesized on bearing steel surface by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-xi; TANG Bao-yin; WANG Lang-ping; WANG Xiao-feng; YU Yong-hao; SUN Tao; HU Li-guo

    2004-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were synthesized by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) on 9Cr18 bearing steel surface. Influences of working gas pressure and pulse width of the bias voltage on properties of the thin film were investigated. The chemical compositions of the as-deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The micro-hardness, friction and wear behavior, corrosion resistance of the samples were evaluated, respectively. Compared with uncoated substrates, micro-hardness results reveal that the maximum is increased by 88.7%. In addition, the friction coefficient decreases to about 0.1, and the corrosion resistance of treated coupons surface are improved significantly.

  11. Diamond detector - material science, design and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaowei, Mengjia

    Modern synchrotrons, such as the NSLS-II, will enable unprecedented science by having extremely high brightness and flux with exceptional beam stability. These capabilities create a harsh and demanding environment for measuring the characteristics of the x-ray beam. In many cases, existing measurement techniques fail completely, requiring the development of new detectors which can meet the demands of the synchrotron. The combination of diamond properties ranked diamond an appealing candidate in the field of radiation detection in extreme conditions and it has been used as x-ray sensor material for decades. However, only until the development of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process in the synthesis of diamond that has it been considered for wider applications in the state-of-art synchrotron light sources as part of beamline diagnostics, including the detection of x-ray beam flux and position. While defects and dislocations in CVD grown single crystal diamonds are inevitable, there are solutions in other aspects of a device fabrication to compensate this technological downside, including improving device performance in engineering diamond surface electrode materials and patterns and slicing and polishing diamond plates into thinner pieces. The content of this dissertation summarizes our effort in addressing several problems we encounter in the process of design and fabrication of single crystal CVD diamond based electronic devices. In order to study the generation of post-anneal photoconductive gain in our devices we have discussed in section 3 and 4 the two criteria for the observation of photoconductive current. In section 3 we reveal the correlation between structural defects in diamond and the post-anneal photoconductive regions. Section 4 introduces the measurements of hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) we applied to investigate the diamond-metal Schottky barrier height for several metals and diamond surface terminations. The position of the

  12. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messier, R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  13. Deposition of low stress, high transmittance SiC as an x-ray mask membrane using ECR plasma CVD

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S Y; Lim, S T; Ahn, J H

    1998-01-01

    SiC for x-ray mask membrane is deposited by Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition from SiH sub 4 /CH sub 4 Ar mixtures. Stoichiometric SiC is deposited at SiH sub 4 /CH sub 4 ratio of 0.4, deposition temperature of 600.deg.C and microwave power of 500 W with +- 5% thickness uniformity, As-deposited film has compressive residual stress, very smooth surface (31 A rms) and high optical transmittance of 90% at 633 nm wavelength. The microstructure of this film consists of the nanocrystalline particle (100 A approx 200A) embedded in amorphous matrix. Residual stress can be turned to tensile stress via Rapid Thermal Annealing in N sub 2 atmosphere, while suppressing structural change during annealing, As a result, smooth (37 A rms) SiC film with moderate tensile stress and high optical transmittance (85% at 633 nm wavelength) is obtained.

  14. Thermal effects on structure and photoluminescence properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Da; LI Qing-shan; WANG Jing-jing; ZHENG Xue-gang

    2006-01-01

    Un-hydrogenated Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique at different substrate temperature.The Raman spectra,the absorption and the photoluminescence spectra were measured.The dependence of structure and photoluminescence properties on deposition temperature were studied in detail.The experimental results indicate that the sp2 sites form small clusters that consist of both olefinic chains and aromatic ring groups within the sp3 matrix.With raising deposition temperature,the optical band gaps increase from 1.87 to 2.85 eV.The main band of photoluminescence centered at around 700nm shifts to short wavelength,and the intensity of this band increases.The photoluminescence can be attributed to carrier localization within an increasing sp2 clusters.It was clarified that the DLC films are ordered with increasing deposition temperature.

  15. Morphology and Structure Properties of Boron-doped Diamond Films Prepared by Hot Cathode Direct Current Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmei PAN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Boron-doped diamond (BDD films were deposited by hot cathode direct current plasma chemical vapor deposition (HCDC-PCVD according to various mixture ratios of CH4/H2/B(OCH33 gas. The Raman performances and surface morphologies of the BDD films were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results indicated that the flow rate of B(OCH33 had marked effects on the growth characteristics of the produced boron-doped diamond films. The presence and concentration of the doped boron atoms significantly altered both the surface morphologies and structures of the diamond films. With increasing flow rate of B(OCH33, the crystal grain surfaces became smooth as visible under SEM. The B-doping levels in these films increased from 1.75×1019cm-3 to a maximum of 2.4×1021cm-3, estimated from the Raman spectra. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12923

  16. Hydrogeologic Framework and Ground Water in Basin-Fill Deposits of the Diamond Valley Flow System, Central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumbusch, Mary L.; Plume, Russell W.

    2006-01-01

    The Diamond Valley flow system, an area of about 3,120 square miles in central Nevada, consists of five hydrographic areas: Monitor, Antelope, Kobeh, and Diamond Valleys and Stevens Basin. Although these five areas are in a remote part of Nevada, local government officials and citizens are concerned that the water resources of the flow system eventually could be further developed for irrigation or mining purposes or potentially for municipal use outside the study area. In order to better understand the flow system, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with Eureka, Lander, and Nye Counties and the Nevada Division of Water Resources, is conducting a multi-phase study of the flow system. The principal aquifers of the Diamond Valley flow system are in basin-fill deposits that occupy structural basins comprised of carbonate rocks, siliciclastic sedimentary rocks, igneous intrusive rocks, and volcanic rocks. Carbonate rocks also function as aquifers, but their extent and interconnections with basin-fill aquifers are poorly understood. Ground-water flow in southern Monitor Valley is from the valley margins toward the valley axis and then northward to a large area of discharge by evapotranspiration (ET) that is formed south of a group of unnamed hills near the center of the valley. Ground-water flow from northern Monitor Valley, Antelope Valley, and northern and western parts of Kobeh Valley converges to an area of ground-water discharge by ET in central and eastern Kobeh Valley. Prior to irrigation development in the 1960s, ground-water flow in Diamond Valley was from valley margins toward the valley axis and then northward to a large discharge area at the north end of the valley. Stevens Basin is a small upland basin with internal drainage and is not connected with other parts of the flow system. After 40 years of irrigation pumping, a large area of ground-water decline has developed in southern Diamond Valley around the irrigated area. In this part of Diamond

  17. Formation of perfectly aligned nitrogen-vacancy-center ensembles in chemical-vapor-deposition-grown diamond (111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Hayato; Tahara, Kosuke; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Hatano, Mutsuko; Iwasaki, Takayuki

    2017-04-01

    Selectively aligning a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) ensemble in diamond is an important technique for obtaining a high-sensitivity magnetic sensor. Nitrogen-doped diamonds were grown on (111) substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition to perform the selective alignment of high-density NV ensembles, yielding perfectly aligned NV ensembles along the [111] direction with a density greater than 1016 cm‑3 and a spin relaxation time of 2 µs. Such alignment results in a high signal contrast with an optical magnetic resonance close to the typical value reported with an isolated NV center. These results indicate the possibility of achieving a high sensitivity through the selective alignment of NV ensembles.

  18. Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) of Highly Cross-Linked Polymer Films for Advanced Lithium-Ion Battery Separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Youngmin; Kim, Byung Gon; Pak, Kwanyong; Han, Sung Jae; Song, Heon-Sik; Choi, Jang Wook; Im, Sung Gap

    2015-08-26

    We report an initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) process to coat polyethylene (PE) separators in Li-ion batteries with a highly cross-linked, mechanically strong polymer, namely, polyhexavinyldisiloxane (pHVDS). The highly cross-linked but ultrathin pHVDS films can only be obtained by a vapor-phase process, because the pHVDS is insoluble in most solvents and thus infeasible with conventional solution-based methods. Moreover, even after the pHVDS coating, the initial porous structure of the separator is well preserved owing to the conformal vapor-phase deposition. The coating thickness is delicately controlled by deposition time to the level that the pore size decreases to below 7% compared to the original dimension. The pHVDS-coated PE shows substantially improved thermal stability and electrolyte wettability. After incubation at 140 °C for 30 min, the pHVDS-coated PE causes only a 12% areal shrinkage (versus 90% of the pristine separator). The superior wettability results in increased electrolyte uptake and ionic conductivity, leading to significantly improved rate performance. The current approach is applicable to a wide range of porous polymeric separators that suffer from thermal shrinkage and poor electrolyte wetting.

  19. New driving parameters for diamond deposition reactors: pulsed mode versus continuous mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gicquel Alix

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigation and modeling of pulsed H2/CH4 plasmas used for diamond deposition are presented. Two plasma configurations are studied : a 2.45 GHz microwave cavity configuration and a 915 MHz surface-wave configuration. Time-resolved measurements of the gas temperature determined from the Doppler broadening of the Balmer ­Ha line, of the H-atom relative density and of the discharge volume (Vpl are reported. The experimental time-variations of the gas temperature are characterized by a sharp increase at the beginning of the pulse (t 1 ms. The simulations enable us to estimate time-variations of the electron energy distribution function, gas temperature and chemical species densities. The in-pulse steady state temperature obtained from the model is in agreement with the measured one, although a discrepancy is obtained on the shape of the early time-variation. Calculations were carried out in order to study the effects of the in-pulse power, the duty cycle and the off-plasma time on the H-atom and CH3-radical densities. It is seen that, at a constant power density averaged over a period, low duty cycles favor high H-atom and CH3 - radical densities, while too long off-plasma times reduce the H-atom density during the pulse. In addition, the production of H atoms was seen to be governed by thermal dissociation in the 2.45 GHz microwave cavity system, and by electronic impact dissociation in the 915 MHz surface wave system, the latter operating under high gas velocities.

  20. Optical and electrical properties of boron doped diamond thin conductive films deposited on fused silica glass substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficek, M.; Sobaszek, M.; Gnyba, M. [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Ryl, J. [Department of Electrochemistry, Corrosion and Material Engineering, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Gołuński, Ł. [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Smietana, M.; Jasiński, J. [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, 75 Koszykowa St., 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Caban, P. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 133 Wolczynska St., 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Bogdanowicz, R., E-mail: rbogdan@eti.pg.gda.pl [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Growth of 60% of transmittance diamond films with resistivity as low as 48 Ω cm. • Two step seeding process of fused silica: plasma hydrogenation and wet seeding. • Nanodiamond seeding density of 2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} at fused silica substrates. • High refractive index (2.4 @550 nm) was achieved for BDD films deposited at 500 °C. - Abstract: This paper presents boron-doped diamond (BDD) film as a conductive coating for optical and electronic purposes. Seeding and growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica have been investigated. Growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica were investigated at various boron doping level and methane admixture. Two step pre-treatment procedure of fused silica substrate was applied to achieve high seeding density. First, the substrates undergo the hydrogen plasma treatment then spin-coating seeding using a dispersion consisting of detonation nanodiamond in dimethyl sulfoxide with polyvinyl alcohol was applied. Such an approach results in seeding density of 2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}. The scanning electron microscopy images showed homogenous, continuous and polycrystalline surface morphology with minimal grain size of 200 nm for highly boron doped films. The sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio was calculated using Raman spectra deconvolution method. A high refractive index (range of 2.0–2.4 @550 nm) was achieved for BDD films deposited at 500 °C. The values of extinction coefficient were below 0.1 at λ = 550 nm, indicating low absorption of the film. The fabricated BDD thin films displayed resistivity below 48 Ohm cm and transmittance over 60% in the visible wavelength range.

  1. Epitaxial Growth of beta-Silicon Carbide (SiC) on a Compliant Substrate via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharanda L.

    1996-01-01

    Many lattice defects have been attributed to the lattice mismatch and the difference in the thermal coefficient of expansion between SiC and silicon (Si). Stacking faults, twins and antiphase boundaries are some of the lattice defects found in these SiC films. These defects may be a partial cause of the disappointing performance reported for the prototype devices fabricated from beta-SiC films. The objective of this research is to relieve some of the thermal stress due to lattice mismatch when SiC is epitaxially grown on Si. The compliant substrate is a silicon membrane 2-4 microns thick. The CVD process includes the buffer layer which is grown at 1360 C followed by a very thin epitaxial growth of SiC. Then the temperature is raised to 1500 C for the subsequent growth of SiC. Since silicon melts at 1415 C, the SiC will be grown on molten Silicon which is absorbed by a porous graphite susceptor eliminating the SiC/Si interface. We suspect that this buffer layer will yield less stressed material to help in the epitaxial growth of SiC.

  2. Evaluation on residual stresses of silicon-doped CVD diamond films using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy%CVD掺硅金刚石残余应力的X射线衍射和拉曼光谱分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈苏琳; 沈彬; 张建国; 王亮; 孙方宏

    2012-01-01

    采用X射线衍射(XRD)和拉曼光谱2种方法测量了不同硅碳比的CVD掺硅金刚石薄膜的残余应力.采用偏压增强热丝化学气相沉积装置在硬质合金基底上制备了掺硅金刚石薄膜,将正硅酸乙酯以不同的体积比溶解在丙酮中以使得反应气体中的硅碳比从0.1%变化到1.4%,从而控制掺硅金刚石薄膜的掺杂浓度.SEM和XRD的表征结果显示,随着硅掺杂浓度的增加,金刚石薄膜的晶粒尺寸减小,而金刚石(110)的晶面则逐渐占优.XRD法是测量入射角从0°到45°变化时对应的金刚石(220)面XRD衍射峰,并采用sin2ψ方法计算掺硅金刚石薄膜的残余应力.拉曼谱法则是通过检测金刚石特征峰偏移1332 cm-1位置的偏移量来测量残余应力.2种方法测得的残余应力随着硅掺杂含量的升高显示出良好的一致性,所有的硅掺杂金刚石的残余应力均为压应力,Si/C摩尔比为0.1%的薄膜具有最高的残余应力,为~1.75 GPa(拉曼谱法)或~2.3 GPa(XRD法).随着硅掺杂浓度的进一步升高,薄膜的残余应力则稳定在~1.3 GPa左右.%The effect of silicon doping on the residual stress of CVD diamond films is examined using both X-ray diffraction(XRD)analysis and Raman spectroscopy measurements.The examined Si-doped diamond films are deposited on WC-Co substrates in a home-made bias-enhanced HFCVD apparatus.Ethyl silicate(Si(OC2H5)4)is dissolved in acetone to obtain various Si/C mole ratio ranging from 0.1% to 1.4% in the reaction gas.Characterizations with SEM and XRD indicate increasing silicon concentration may result in grain size decreasing and diamond [110] texture becoming dominant.The residual stress values of as-deposited Si-doped diamond films are evaluated by both sin2ψ method,which measures the(220)diamond Bragg diffraction peaks using XRD,with ψ-values ranging from 0°to 45°,and Raman spectroscopy,which detects the diamond Raman peak shift from the natural diamond line at

  3. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  4. On the development of single and multijunction solar cells with hot-wire CVD deposited active layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; Schuttauf, J.A.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of the scientific challenges and achievements during the development of thin film silicon based single and multijunction solar cells with hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of the active silicon layers. The highlights discussed include the development of Ag/ZnO coating

  5. Enhancement of the nucleation of smooth and dense nanocrystalline diamond films by using molybdenum seed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijnsters, J. G.; Vázquez, L.; van Dreumel, G. W. G.; ter Meulen, J. J.; van Enckevort, W. J. P.; Celis, J. P.

    2010-11-01

    A method for the nucleation enhancement of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films on silicon substrates at low temperature is discussed. A sputter deposition of a Mo seed layer with thickness 50 nm on Si substrates was applied followed by an ultrasonic seeding step with nanosized detonation diamond powders. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) was used to nucleate and grow NCD films on substrates heated up at 550 °C. The nucleation of diamond and the early stages of NCD film formation were investigated at different methane percentages in methane/hydrogen gas mixtures by atomic force microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and grazing incidence x-ray analyses in order to gain specific insight in the nucleation process of NCD films. The nucleation kinetics of diamond on the Mo-coated Si substrates was found to be up to ten times higher than on blank Si substrates. The enhancement of the nucleation of diamond on thin Mo interlayers results from two effects, namely, (a) the nanometer rough Mo surface shows an improved embedding of ultrasonically introduced nanosized diamond seeds that act as starting points for the diamond nucleation during HF-CVD and (b) the rapid carbonization of the Mo surface causes the formation of Mo2C onto which diamond easily nucleates. The diamond nucleation density progressively increases at increasing methane percentages and is about 5×1010 cm-2 at 4.0% methane. The improved nucleation kinetics of diamond on Mo interlayers facilitates the rapid formation of NCD films possessing a very low surface roughness down to ˜6 nm, and allows a submicron thickness control.

  6. PLD deposition of tungsten carbide contact for diamond photodiodes. Influence of process conditions on electronic and chemical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, E.; Bellucci, A.; Orlando, S.; Trucchi, D. M.; Mezzi, A.; Valentini, V.

    2013-08-01

    Tungsten carbide, WC, contacts behave as very reliable Schottky contacts for opto-electronic diamond devices. Diamond is characterized by superior properties in high-power, high frequency and high-temperature applications, provided that thermally stable electrode contacts will be realized. Ohmic contacts can be easily achieved by using carbide-forming metals, while is difficult to get stable Schottky contacts at elevated temperatures, due to the interface reaction and/or inter-diffusion between metals and diamond. Novel type of contacts, made of tungsten carbide, WC, seem to be the best solution, for their excellent thermal stability, high melting point, oxidation and radiation resistance and good electrical conductivity. Our research was aimed at using pulsed laser deposition for WC thin film deposition, optimizing experimental parameters, to obtain a final device characterized by excellent electronic properties, as a detector for radiation in deep UV or as X-ray dosimeter. We deposited our films by laser ablation from a target of pure WC, using different reaction conditions (i.e., substrate heating, vacuum or reactive atmosphere (CH4/Ar), RF plasma activated), to optimize both the stoichiometry of the film and its structure. Trying to obtain a material with the best electronic response, we used also two sources of laser radiation for target ablation, i.e., nano-second pulsed excimer laser ArF, and ultra-short fs Ti:Sapphire laser. The structure and chemical aspects have been evaluated by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), while the dosimeter photodiode response has been tested by the I-V measurements, under soft X-ray irradiation.

  7. PLD deposition of tungsten carbide contact for diamond photodiodes. Influence of process conditions on electronic and chemical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelli, E., E-mail: emilia.cappelli@imip.cnr.it [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, via Salaria Km 29.3, P.O.B. 10, 00016 Rome (Italy); Bellucci, A. [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, via Salaria Km 29.3, P.O.B. 10, 00016 Rome (Italy); Orlando, S. [CNR-IMIP sez. Potenza, 85050 Tito Scalo, Potenza (Italy); Trucchi, D.M. [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, via Salaria Km 29.3, P.O.B. 10, 00016 Rome (Italy); Mezzi, A. [CNR-ISMN, Montelibretti, via Salaria Km 29.3, P.O.B. 10, 00016 Rome (Italy); Valentini, V. [CNR-IMIP, Montelibretti, via Salaria Km 29.3, P.O.B. 10, 00016 Rome (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Tungsten carbide, WC, contacts behave as very reliable Schottky contacts for opto-electronic diamond devices. Diamond is characterized by superior properties in high-power, high frequency and high-temperature applications, provided that thermally stable electrode contacts will be realized. Ohmic contacts can be easily achieved by using carbide-forming metals, while is difficult to get stable Schottky contacts at elevated temperatures, due to the interface reaction and/or inter-diffusion between metals and diamond. Novel type of contacts, made of tungsten carbide, WC, seem to be the best solution, for their excellent thermal stability, high melting point, oxidation and radiation resistance and good electrical conductivity. Our research was aimed at using pulsed laser deposition for WC thin film deposition, optimizing experimental parameters, to obtain a final device characterized by excellent electronic properties, as a detector for radiation in deep UV or as X-ray dosimeter. We deposited our films by laser ablation from a target of pure WC, using different reaction conditions (i.e., substrate heating, vacuum or reactive atmosphere (CH{sub 4}/Ar), RF plasma activated), to optimize both the stoichiometry of the film and its structure. Trying to obtain a material with the best electronic response, we used also two sources of laser radiation for target ablation, i.e., nano-second pulsed excimer laser ArF, and ultra-short fs Ti:Sapphire laser. The structure and chemical aspects have been evaluated by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), while the dosimeter photodiode response has been tested by the I–V measurements, under soft X-ray irradiation.

  8. Deposition and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Diamond Films on Mirror-Polished Si Substrate by Biased Enhanced Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, T.; Sharda, T.; Jimbo, T.; Umeno, M.

    Hard and smooth nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films were deposited on polished silicon substrates by biased enhanced growth in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. The films deposited with varying the methane concentration and biasing voltage were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, nano-indenter, x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Stress in the films increases with decreasing methane concentration in the gas-phase and with increasing biasing. The adhesion between NCD film and Si substrate is very strong sustaining the compressive stress as high as high as 85 GPa. It was hypothesized that hydrogen content of the films and graphitic content of the films are responsible in generating stress. The hardness is well correlated with the Raman peak intensity ratio of NCD peak to G peak.

  9. Optical and electrical properties of boron doped diamond thin conductive films deposited on fused silica glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, M.; Sobaszek, M.; Gnyba, M.; Ryl, J.; Gołuński, Ł.; Smietana, M.; Jasiński, J.; Caban, P.; Bogdanowicz, R.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents boron-doped diamond (BDD) film as a conductive coating for optical and electronic purposes. Seeding and growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica have been investigated. Growth processes of thin diamond films on fused silica were investigated at various boron doping level and methane admixture. Two step pre-treatment procedure of fused silica substrate was applied to achieve high seeding density. First, the substrates undergo the hydrogen plasma treatment then spin-coating seeding using a dispersion consisting of detonation nanodiamond in dimethyl sulfoxide with polyvinyl alcohol was applied. Such an approach results in seeding density of 2 × 1010 cm-2. The scanning electron microscopy images showed homogenous, continuous and polycrystalline surface morphology with minimal grain size of 200 nm for highly boron doped films. The sp3/sp2 ratio was calculated using Raman spectra deconvolution method. A high refractive index (range of 2.0-2.4 @550 nm) was achieved for BDD films deposited at 500 °C. The values of extinction coefficient were below 0.1 at λ = 550 nm, indicating low absorption of the film. The fabricated BDD thin films displayed resistivity below 48 Ohm cm and transmittance over 60% in the visible wavelength range.

  10. Ionization signals from diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); CIVIDEC Instrumentation, Wien (Austria); Frais-Koelbl, H. [University of Applied Sciences, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Griesmayer, E.; Kavrigin, P. [CIVIDEC Instrumentation, Wien (Austria); Vienna University of Technology, Wien (Austria)

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we introduce a novel analysis technique for measurements with single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields. This method exploits the unique electronic property of sCVD diamond sensors that the signal shape of the detector current is directly proportional to the initial ionization profile. In fast-neutron fields the diamond sensor acts simultaneously as target and sensor. The interaction of neutrons with the stable isotopes {sup 12}C and {sup 13}C is of interest for fast-neutron diagnostics. The measured signal shapes of detector current pulses are used to identify individual types of interactions in the diamond with the goal to select neutron-induced reactions in the diamond and to suppress neutron-induced background reactions as well as γ-background. The method is verified with experimental data from a measurement in a 14.3 MeV neutron beam at JRC-IRMM, Geel/Belgium, where the {sup 13}C(n, α){sup 10}Be reaction was successfully extracted from the dominating background of recoil protons and γ-rays and the energy resolution of the {sup 12}C(n, α){sup 9}Be reaction was substantially improved. The presented analysis technique is especially relevant for diagnostics in harsh radiation environments, like fission and fusion reactors. It allows to extract the neutron spectrum from the background, and is particularly applicable to neutron flux monitoring and neutron spectroscopy. (orig.)

  11. High collection efficiency thin film diamond particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergonzo, P.; Foulon, F.; Marshall, R.D.; Jany, C.; Brambilla, A. [CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); McKeag, R.D.; Jackman, R.B. [University College, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    Diamond is a resilient material with rather extreme electronic properties. As such it is an interesting candidate for the fabrication of high performance solid state particle detectors. However, the commercially accessible form of diamond, grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods, is polycrystalline in nature and often displays rather poor electrical characteristics. This paper considers ways in which this material may be used to form alpha particle detectors with useful performance levels. One approach adopted has been to reduce the impurity levels within the feed-stock gases that are used to grow the diamond films. This has enabled significant improvements to be achieved in the mean carrier drift distance within the films leading to alpha detectors with up to 40% collection efficiencies. An alternative approach explored is the use of planar device geometries whereby charge collection is limited to the top surface of the diamond which comprises higher quality material than the bulk of the film. This has lead to collection efficiencies of 70%, the highest yet reported for polycrystalline CVD diamond based detectors. Techniques for improving the characteristics of these devices further are discussed.

  12. Ionization signals from diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, C.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Griesmayer, E.; Kavrigin, P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel analysis technique for measurements with single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields. This method exploits the unique electronic property of sCVD diamond sensors that the signal shape of the detector current is directly proportional to the initial ionization profile. In fast-neutron fields the diamond sensor acts simultaneously as target and sensor. The interaction of neutrons with the stable isotopes 12 C and 13 C is of interest for fast-neutron diagnostics. The measured signal shapes of detector current pulses are used to identify individual types of interactions in the diamond with the goal to select neutron-induced reactions in the diamond and to suppress neutron-induced background reactions as well as γ-background. The method is verified with experimental data from a measurement in a 14.3 MeV neutron beam at JRC-IRMM, Geel/Belgium, where the 13C(n, α)10Be reaction was successfully extracted from the dominating background of recoil protons and γ-rays and the energy resolution of the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction was substantially improved. The presented analysis technique is especially relevant for diagnostics in harsh radiation environments, like fission and fusion reactors. It allows to extract the neutron spectrum from the background, and is particularly applicable to neutron flux monitoring and neutron spectroscopy.

  13. The low coherence Fabry-Pérot interferometer with diamond and ZnO layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrowicz, D.; Den, W.; Hirsch, M.

    2016-09-01

    The authors present a fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot interferometer built with the application of diamond and zinc oxide (ZnO) thin layers. Thin ZnO films were deposited on the tip of a standard telecommunication single-mode optical fiber (SMF- 28) while the diamond layer was grown on the plate of silicon substrate. Investigated ZnO layers were fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and the diamond films were deposited using Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (μPE CVD) system. Different thickness of layers was examined. The measurements were performed for the fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot interferometer working in the reflective mode. Spectra were registered for various thicknesses of ZnO layer and various length of the air cavity. As a light source, two superluminescent diodes (SLD) with central wavelength of 1300 nm and 1550 nm were used in measurement set-up.

  14. Grating-assisted coupling to nanophotonic circuits in microcrystalline diamond thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Rath

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic diamond films can be prepared on a waferscale by using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on suitable substrates such as silicon or silicon dioxide. While such films find a wealth of applications in thermal management, in X-ray and terahertz window design, and in gyrotron tubes and microwave transmission lines, their use for nanoscale optical components remains largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that CVD diamond provides a high-quality template for realizing nanophotonic integrated optical circuits. Using efficient grating coupling devices prepared from partially etched diamond thin films, we investigate millimetre-sized optical circuits and achieve single-mode waveguiding at telecoms wavelengths. Our results pave the way towards broadband optical applications for sensing in harsh environments and visible photonic devices.

  15. Microcrystalline silicon from very high frequency plasma deposition and hot-wire CVD for ``micromorph`` tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brummack, H.; Brueggemann, R.; Wanka, H.N.; Hierzenberger, A.; Schubert, M.B. [Univ. Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Elektronik

    1997-12-31

    The authors have grown microcrystalline silicon from a glow discharge at very high frequencies of 55 MHz and 170 MHz with high hydrogen dilution, and also, at more than 10 times higher growth rates, similar films by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. Both kinds of materials have extensively been characterized and compared in terms of structural, optical and electronic properties, which greatly improve by deposition in a multi- instead of a single-chamber system. Incorporation of these different materials into pin solar cells results in open circuit voltages of about 400 mV as long as the doped layers are microcrystalline and rise to more than 870 mV if amorphous p- and n-layers are used. Quantum efficiencies and fill factors are still poor but leave room for further improvement, as clearly demonstrated by a remarkable reverse bias quantum efficiency gain.

  16. Deposition of TiO2/Al2O3 bilayer on hydrogenated diamond for electronic devices: Capacitors, field-effect transistors, and logic inverters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Imura, M.; Banal, R. G.; Koide, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The wide bandgap semiconductor diamond has been studied to develop high-power and high-frequency electronic devices. Here, high dielectric constant (high-k) TiO2/Al2O3 bilayers are deposited on hydrogenated diamond (H-diamond) channel layers using sputter deposition (SD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques. Thin ALD-Al2O3 films are employed as buffer layers for the SD-TiO2 and ALD-TiO2 on H-diamond to suppress plasma discharge effect and to decrease leakage current density (J), respectively. The electrical properties of the resulting TiO2/Al2O3/H-diamond metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors, MOS field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), and MOSFET logic inverters are investigated. With the same thickness (4.0 nm) for ALD-Al2O3 buffer layer, the ALD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond MOS capacitor shows a lower J and better capacitance-voltage characteristics than the SD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond capacitor. The maximum capacitance of the ALD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond capacitor and the k value of the ALD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3 bilayer are 0.83 μF cm-2 and 27.2, respectively. Valence band offset between ALD-TiO2 and H-diamond is calculated to be 2.3 ± 0.2 eV based on the element binding energies measured using an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique. Both the SD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond and ALD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond MOSFETs show p-type, pinch-off, and enhancement mode characteristics with on/off current ratios around 109. The subthreshold swings of them are 115 and as low as 79 mV dec-1, respectively. The ALD-TiO2/ALD-Al2O3/H-diamond MOSFET logic inverters, when coupled with load resistors, show distinct inversion characteristics with gains of 6.2-12.7.

  17. Fabrication of planarised conductively patterned diamond for bio-applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Wei [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Fox, Kate, E-mail: kfox@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Ganesan, Kumaravelu [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Turnley, Ann M. [Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Shimoni, Olga [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Tran, Phong A. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Lohrmann, Alexander; McFarlane, Thomas; Ahnood, Arman; Garrett, David J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Meffin, Hamish [National Information and Communication Technology Australia, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); O' Brien-Simpson, Neil M.; Reynolds, Eric C. [Oral Health Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne Dental School, The University of Melbourne, 720 Swanston Street, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Prawer, Steven [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-10-01

    The development of smooth, featureless surfaces for biomedical microelectronics is a challenging feat. Other than the traditional electronic materials like silicon, few microelectronic circuits can be produced with conductive features without compromising the surface topography and/or biocompatibility. Diamond is fast becoming a highly sought after biomaterial for electrical stimulation, however, its inherent surface roughness introduced by the growth process limits its applications in electronic circuitry. In this study, we introduce a fabrication method for developing conductive features in an insulating diamond substrate whilst maintaining a planar topography. Using a combination of microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching, secondary diamond growth and silicon wet-etching, we have produced a patterned substrate in which the surface roughness at the interface between the conducting and insulating diamond is approximately 3 nm. We also show that the patterned smooth topography is capable of neuronal cell adhesion and growth whilst restricting bacterial adhesion. - Highlights: • We have fabricated a planar diamond device with conducting and insulating features. • A precise method is provided using CVD and RIE techniques to develop the substrate. • The step between conducting and insulating features is less than 3 nm. • Planar topography promotes neuronal cell adhesion and restricts bacterial adhesion. • Neuronal cells prefer conductive diamond (N-UNCD) to non-conductive diamond (UNCD)

  18. Optical spectroscopic analyses of CVD plasmas used in the deposition of transparent and conductive ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Espinos, J.P.; Yubero, F.; Barranco, A.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R. [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Cotrino, J. [Universidad de Sevilla, Facultad de Fisica, Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Transparent conducting ZnO:A1 thin films have been prepared by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Emission line profiles were recorded as a function of different plasma gas composition (oxygen and hydrogen mixtures) and different rates of precursors (Zn(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2} and A1(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) in the downstream zone of the plasma reactor. Optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the oxygen/hydrogen plasma as a function of hydrogen flow rate. The variation of plasma hydrogen content has an important influence in the resistivity of the films. (authors)

  19. Diamond-like carbon films deposited on three-dimensional shape substrate model by liquid electrochemical technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Y.Y. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Zhang, G.F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian China (China); Zhao, Y.; Liu, D.D. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Cong, Y., E-mail: congyan@ciomp.ac.cn [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Buck, V. [Thin Film Technology Group, Faculty of Physics, University Duisburg-Essen and CeNIDE, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on three-dimensional (3D) shape substrate model by electrolysis of 2-propanol solution at low temperature (60 °C). This 3D shape model was composed of a horizontally aligned stainless steel wafer and vertically aligned stainless steel rods. Morphology and microstructure of the films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The results suggested there were only differences in film uniformity and thickness for two kinds of samples. The hydrogenated amorphous carbon films deposited on horizontally aligned substrate were smooth and homogeneous. And the film thickness of DLC films gained on the vertical substrates decreased along vertical direction. It is believed that bubble formation could enhance nucleation on the wetted capillary area. This experiment shows that deposition of DLC films by liquid phase deposition on 3D shape conductive substrates is possible. - Highlights: • DLC film is expected to be deposited on complex surface/shape substrate. • DLC film is deposited on 3D shape substrate by liquid electrochemical method. • Horizontal substrate is covered by smooth and homogeneous DLC films. • Film thickness decreases along vertical direction due to boiling effect.

  20. Comparison of diamond growth with different gas mixtures in microwave plasma asssited chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corat Evaldo J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study the influence of oxygen addition to several halocarbon-hydrogen gas systems. Diamond growth have been performed in a high power density MWCVD reactor built in our laboratory. The growth experiments are monitored by argon actinometry as a reference to plasma temperature and atomic hydrogen production, and by mass spectrometry to compare the exhaust gas composition. Atomic hydrogen actinometry revealed that the halogen presence in the gas phase is responsible for a considerable increase of atomic hydrogen concentration in the gas phase. Mass spectrometry shows similar results for all gas mixtures tested. Growth studies with oxygen addition to CF4/H2, CCl4/H2, CCl2F2/H2 and CH3Cl/H2 reveals that oxygen increases the carbon solubility in the gas phase but no better diamond growth conditions were found. Halogens are not, per se, eligible for diamond growth. All the possible advantages, as the higher production of atomic hydrogen, have been suppressed by the low carbon solubility in the gas phase, even when oxygen is added. The diamond growth with small amount of CF4 added to CH4/H2 mixture is not aggressive to the apparatus but brings several advantages to the process.

  1. Thermally Induced Nano-Structural and Optical Changes of nc-Si:H Deposited by Hot-Wire CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller TFG

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on the thermally induced changes of the nano-structural and optical properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon in the temperature range 200–700 °C. The as-deposited sample has a high crystalline volume fraction of 53% with an average crystallite size of ~3.9 nm, where 66% of the total hydrogen is bonded as ≡Si–H monohydrides on the nano-crystallite surface. A growth in the native crystallite size and crystalline volume fraction occurs at annealing temperatures ≥400 °C, where hydrogen is initially removed from the crystallite grain boundaries followed by its removal from the amorphous network. The nucleation of smaller nano-crystallites at higher temperatures accounts for the enhanced porous structure and the increase in the optical band gap and average gap.

  2. Thermally Induced Nano-Structural and Optical Changes of nc-Si:H Deposited by Hot-Wire CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendse, C J; Malgas, G F; Muller, T F G; Knoesen, D; Oliphant, C J; Motaung, D E; Halindintwali, S; Mwakikunga, B W

    2009-01-21

    We report on the thermally induced changes of the nano-structural and optical properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon in the temperature range 200-700 degrees C. The as-deposited sample has a high crystalline volume fraction of 53% with an average crystallite size of ~3.9 nm, where 66% of the total hydrogen is bonded as identical withSi-H monohydrides on the nano-crystallite surface. A growth in the native crystallite size and crystalline volume fraction occurs at annealing temperatures >/=400 degrees C, where hydrogen is initially removed from the crystallite grain boundaries followed by its removal from the amorphous network. The nucleation of smaller nano-crystallites at higher temperatures accounts for the enhanced porous structure and the increase in the optical band gap and average gap.

  3. Deposition of Diamond-Like carbon Films by High-Intensity Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation at Various Substrate Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅显秀; 刘振民; 马腾才; 董闯

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on to Si substrates at substrate temperatures from 25℃to 400 ℃ by a high-intensity pulsed-ion-beam (HIPIB) ablation deposition technique. The formation of DLC is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. According to an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the concentration of spa carbon in the films is about 40% when the substrate temperature is below 300 ℃. With increasing substrate temperature from 25 ℃ to 400 ℃, the concentration of sp3 carbon decreases from 43% to 8%. In other words,sp3 carbon is graphitized into sp2 carbon when the substrate temperature is above 300 ℃. The results of xray diffraction and atomic force microscopy show that, with increasing the substrate temperature, the surface roughness and the friction coefficient increase, and the microhardness and the residual stress of the films decrease.

  4. A synthetic diamond probe for low-energy X-ray dose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiamah, M; Nam, T L; Keddy, R J

    2007-05-01

    The desirable physical properties of diamond have made the mineral a choice material in radiation measurements. Diamond detectors are currently used extensively in high-energy physics. Their use for low-energy beams such as, for example, in mammography X-ray beams however, has not been fully investigated. This paper describes a diamond probe which has been constructed for the evaluation, as the radiation sensing material, of polycrystalline synthetic diamonds produced by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The specimens were fabricated in wafer form and so the exposure orientation geometry of the diamond wafers, to give optimum absorption of the incident X-ray beam, was also investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The samples were characterized to obtain information regarding the elemental impurity levels, especially nitrogen, and consequently to establish the material quality. Nitrogen impurities and concentration levels in the diamond lattice have been shown to have a profound effect on the radiation detection properties of diamond. The probe described has the diamond surfaces metallized with titanium, platinum and gold to provide ohmic contacts. The probe was connected independently to both Wellhöfer Dosimetrie (model CU 500) and PTW Unidos E commercial electrometers. In all of the measurements, the incident radiation beam was normal to the edge of the diamond wafer to optimize absorption of the X-ray beam after establishing that this orientation was the optimum geometry. The results of the study are presented in both tabular and graphical forms.

  5. [Influence of deposition time on chromatics during nitrogen-doped diamond like carbon coating on pure titanium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lu; Yao, Jiang-wu; Xu, De-wen

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to observed the influence of deposition time on chromatics during nitrogen-doped diamond like carbon coating (N-DLC) on pure titanium by multi impulse are plasma plating machine. Applying multi impulse are plasma plating machine to produce TiN coatings on pure titanium in nitrogen atmosphere, then filming with nitrogen-doped DLC on TiN in methane (10-80 min in every 5 min). The colors of N-DLC were evaluated in the CIE1976 L*a*b* uniform color scale and Mussell notation. The surface morphology of every specimen was analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). When changing the time of N-DLC coating deposition, N-DLC surface showed different color. Golden yellow was presented when deposition time was 30 min. SEM showed that crystallization was found in N-DLC coatings, the structure changed from stable to clutter by varying the deposition time. The chromatics of N-DLC coatings on pure titanium could get golden yellow when deposition time was 30 min, then the crystallized structure was stable.

  6. Molecular fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic initiated chemically vapor-deposited (iCVD) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R; Goktekin, E; Wang, MH; Gleason, KK

    2014-08-08

    Biofouling is a universal problem in various applications ranging from water purification to implantable biomedical devices. Recent advances in surface modification have created a rich library of antifouling surface chemistries, many of which can be categorized into one of the two groups: hydrophilic surfaces or amphiphilic surfaces. We report the straightforward preparation of antifouling thin film coatings in both categories via initiated chemical vapor deposition. A molecular force spectroscopy-based method is demonstrated as a rapid and quantitative assessment tool for comparing the differences in antifouling characteristics. The fouling propensity of single molecules, as opposed to bulk protein solution or bacterial culture, is assessed. This method allows for the interrogation of molecular interaction without the complication resulted from protein conformational change or micro-organism group interactions. The molecular interaction follows the same trend as bacterial adhesion results obtained previously, demonstrating that molecular force probe is a valid method for the quantification and mechanistic examination of fouling. In addition, the molecular force spectroscopy-based method is able to distinguish differences in antifouling capability that is not resolvable by traditional static protein adsorption tests. To lend further insight into the intrinsic fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic surface chemistries, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, advancing and receding water contact angles, and atomic force microscopy are used to elucidate the film properties that are relevant to their antifouling capabilities.

  7. Effect of Boron-Doped Diamond Interlayer on Cutting Performance of Diamond Coated Micro Drills for Graphite Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thin boron doped diamond (BDD film is deposited from trimethyl borate/acetone/hydrogen mixture on Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co micro drills by using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique. The boron peak on Raman spectrum confirms the boron incorporation in diamond film. This film is used as an interlayer for subsequent CVD of micro-crystalline diamond (MCD film. The Rockwell indentation test shows that boron doping could effectively improve the adhesive strength on substrate of as deposited thin diamond films. Dry drilling of graphite is chosen to check the multilayer (BDD + MCD film performance. For the sake of comparison, machining tests are also carried out under identical conditions using BDD and MCD coated micro drills with no interlayer. The wear mechanism of the tools has been identified and correlated with the criterion used to evaluate the tool life. The results show that the multilayer (BDD + MCD coated micro drill exhibits the longest tool life. Therefore, thin BDD interlayer is proved to be a new viable alternative and a suitable option for adherent diamond coatings on micro cutting tools.

  8. The effect of substrate holder size on the electric field and discharge plasma on diamond-film formation at high deposition rates during MPCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Kang; Chen, Liangxian; Liu, Jinlong; Zhao, Yun; Yan, Xiongbo; Hua, Chenyi; Guo, Jianchao; Wei, Junjun; Hei, Lifu; Li, Chengming; Lu, Fanxiu

    2017-09-01

    The effect of the substrate holder feature dimensions on plasma density (n e), power density (Q mw) and gas temperature (T) of a discharge marginal plasma (a plasma caused by marginal discharge) and homogeneous plasma were investigated for the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process. Our simulations show that decreasing the dimensions of the substrate holder in a radical direction and increasing its dimension in the direction of the axis helps to produce marginally inhomogeneous plasma. When the marginal discharge appears, the maximum plasma density and power density appear at the edge of the substrate. The gas temperature increases until a marginally inhomogeneous plasma develops. The marginally inhomogeneous plasma can be avoided using a movable substrate holder that can tune the plasma density, power density and gas temperature. It can also ensure that the power density and electron density are as high as possible with uniform distribution of plasma. Moreover, both inhomogeneous and homogeneous diamond films were prepared using a new substrate holder with a diameter of 30 mm. The observation of inhomogeneous diamond films indicates that the marginal discharge can limit the deposition rate in the central part of the diamond film. The successfully produced homogeneous diamond films show that by using a substrate holder it is possible to deposit diamond film at 7.2 μm h-1 at 2.5 kW microwave power.

  9. Untersuchungen zum Fräsen mit CVD-diamantbeschichteten Werkzeugen

    OpenAIRE

    Grams, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    CVD-diamond coatings on cemented carbide substrates have undergone significant developments in recent years. Former CVD-diamond coated tools failed in metal cutting applications due to severe flaking of the diamond layer. Thus, first industrial applications had been restricted to machining of graphite, fibre reinforced plastics and green compacts made of cemented carbide respectively of ceramics. The field of application is widened nowadays towards machining of non ferrous metallic materials ...

  10. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  11. Diamond-like carbon formation for various positions by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong-Shan [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)]. E-mail: ssyap@mmu.edu.my; Tou, Teck-Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2005-07-30

    Pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite target was carried out by an Nd-YAG laser with {lambda} = 1064 nm and fluence in the range of 1-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The plume was produced by focusing the laser beam and rastering over a 6.5 mm x 6.5 mm area on the graphite target. The substrates were placed at two positions: on-axis position facing the target and off-axis position in the target plane with 2 mm offset from the ablation site. Diamond-like carbon was formed on the substrates at both positions and on the ablated area as detected by Raman spectroscopy. Rough and granular surface was observed for the samples placed in the target plane and smooth diamond-like carbon films for the samples placed facing the target as observed by SEM and optical microscopy.

  12. Optical and morphological properties of porous diamond-like-carbon films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Baroni, M. P. M. A.; Conceição, M. Ventura; Rosa, R. R.; Persson, C.; Arwin, H.; Silva Jr., E.F. da; Roman, L.S.; Nakamura, O.; I. Pepe; Silva, A. Ferreira da

    2006-01-01

    RESTRITO Porous diamond-like-carbon (PDLC) thin films obtained on silicon substrate by DC low energy magnetron sputtering have been investigated by photoluminescence, transmission and reflection spectroscopy, photoacoustic and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The absorption features observed for these films show similarities with those of porous silicon (PS) as well as in the performed gradient structural pattern classification of the SFM porosity, by means of the computational GPA-flyby enviro...

  13. Effect of nitrogen on deposition and field emission properties of boron-doped micro-and nano-crystalline diamond films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.A. Li; S.H. Cheng; H.D. Li; Q. Yu; J.W. Liu; X.Y. Lv

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report the effect of nitrogen on the deposition and properties of boron doped diamond films synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The diamond films consisting of micro-grains (nano-grains) were realized with low (high) boron source flow rate during the growth processes. The transition of micro-grains to nano-grains is speculated to be strongly (weekly) related with the boron (nitrogen) flow rate. The grain size and Raman spectral feature vary insignificantly as a function of the nitrogen introduction at a certain boron flow rate. The variation of electron field emission characteristics dependent on nitrogen is different between microcrystalline and nanocrystalline boron doped diamond samples, which are related to the combined phase composition, boron doping level and texture structure. There is an optimum nitrogen proportion to improve the field emission properties of the boron-doped films.

  14. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nix, W.D.

    1995-05-01

    We submit here a final technical report for the research program entitled: Fundamental Studies of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond, DOE Grant No. DE-FG05-88ER45345-M006. This research program was initiated in 1988 under the direction of the late Professor David A. Stevenson and was renewed in 1992. Unfortunately, at the end of 1992, just as the last phase of this work was getting underway, Professor Stevenson learned that he had developed mesothelioma, a form of cancer based on asbestos. Professor Stevenson died from that disease in February of 1994. Professor William D. Nix, the Chairman of the Materials Science department at Stanford was named the Principal Investigator. Professor Nix has assembled this final technical report. Much of the work of this grant was conducted by Mr. Paul Dennig, a graduate student who will receive his Ph.D. degree from Stanford in a few months. His research findings are described in the chapters of this report and in the papers published over the past few years. The main discovery of this work was that surface topology plays a crucial role in the nucleation of diamond on silicon. Dennig and his collaborators demonstrated this by showing that diamond nucleates preferentially at the tips of asperities on a silicon surface rather than in the re-entrant comers at the base of such asperities. Some of the possible reasons for this effect are described in this report. The published papers listed on the next page of this report also describe this research. Interested persons can obtain copies of these papers from Professor Nix at Stanford. A full account of all of the research results obtained in this work is given in the regular chapters that follow this brief introduction. In addition, interested readers will want to consult Mr. Dennig`s Ph.D. dissertation when it is made available later this year.

  15. Fluorine and boron co-doped diamond-like carbon films deposited by pulsed glow discharge plasma immersion ion processing

    CERN Document Server

    He, X M; Peters, A M; Taylor, B; Nastasi, M

    2002-01-01

    Fluorine (F) and boron (B) co-doped diamond-like carbon (FB-DLC) films were prepared on different substrates by the plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP) technique. A pulse glow discharge plasma was used for the PIIP deposition and was produced at a pressure of 1.33 Pa from acetylene (C sub 2 H sub 2), diborane (B sub 2 H sub 6), and hexafluoroethane (C sub 2 F sub 6) gas. Films of FB-DLC were deposited with different chemical compositions by varying the flow ratios of the C sub 2 H sub 2 , B sub 2 H sub 6 , and C sub 2 F sub 6 source gases. The incorporation of B sub 2 H sub 6 and C sub 2 F sub 6 into PIIP deposited DLC resulted in the formation of F-C and B-C hybridized bonding structures. The levels of the F and B concentrations effected the chemical bonding and the physical properties as was evident from the changes observed in density, hardness, stress, friction coefficient, and contact angle of water on films. Compared to B-doped or F-doped DLC films, the F and B co-doping of DLC during PIIP deposition...

  16. Two- and three-dimensional ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) structures for a high resolution diamond-based MEMS technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auciello, O.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Busmann, H. G.; Meyer, E. M.; Tucek, J.; Sumant, A.; Jayatissa, A.; Moldovan, N.; Mancini, D. C.; Gardos, M. N.

    2000-01-17

    Silicon is currently the most commonly used material for the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). However, silicon-based MEMS will not be suitable for long-endurance devices involving components rotating at high speed, where friction and wear need to be minimized, components such as 2-D cantilevers that may be subjected to very large flexural displacements, where stiction is a problem, or components that will be exposed to corrosive environments. The mechanical, thermal, chemical, and tribological properties of diamond make it an ideal material for the fabrication of long-endurance MEMS components. Cost-effective fabrication of these components could in principle be achieved by coating Si with diamond films and using conventional lithographic patterning methods in conjunction with e. g. sacrificial Ti or SiO{sub 2} layers. However, diamond coatings grown by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods exhibit a coarse-grained structure that prevents high-resolution patterning, or a fine-grained microstructure with a significant amount of intergranular non-diamond carbon. The authors demonstrate here the fabrication of 2-D and 3-D phase-pure ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) MEMS components by coating Si with UNCD films, coupled with lithographic patterning methods involving sacrificial release layers. UNCD films are grown by microwave plasma CVD using C{sub 60}-Ar or CH{sub 4}-Ar gas mixtures, which result in films that have 3--5 nm grain size, are 10--20 times smoother than conventionally grown diamond films, are extremely resistant to corrosive environments, and are predicted to have a brittle fracture strength similar to that of single crystal diamond.

  17. Chemical pretreatments at surface of WC-6% Co for diamond coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘沙; 易丹青; 余志明; 卢斌; 王建华

    2002-01-01

    The WC-6%Co(mass fraction) substrate surfaces were chemically pretreated with the two-step etching method, using Murakami reagent for 3~7min, and then an φ(HNO3)∶φ(HCl)=4∶1 solution for 1~15min. Diamond films were deposited on the substrates by a hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactor. The results show that the Co content of the substrate surfaces can be reduced from 6% to 0.12% within the etching depth of 5~10μm, the surface roughness of the substrates is increased up to Ra=1.0μm, as well as the substrates hardness is decreased from HRA 89.5 to HRA 84.2 after the two-step etching. A slight preference towards {111} orientation can be observed from the XRD patterns and SEM micrograph of diamond film on WC-6%Co sample. The morphology of small rice-like ballas diamond was observed on the WC-6%Co substrates. A typical Raman spectrum with a sharp peak at 1332cm-1 for the diamond film indicates that the deposited films are good-quality polycrystalline diamond. The indentation testing shows that the adhesion between diamond film and the substrate after HF CVD deposition is good.

  18. An X-Ray Diffraction Study of an Inclusion in Diamond from the Luobusha Chromite Deposit in Tibet,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Nicheng; BAI Wenji; MA Zhesheng; FANG Qingsong; XIONG Ming; YAN Binggang; DAI Mingquan; YANG Jingsui

    2003-01-01

    Diamond was found in podiform chromitites of ophiolite and harzburgite from Luobusha, Tibet. There are silicate inclusions in some diamond grains from this area. In the present work, the CCD (charge coupled detector) technology of X-ray powder diffraction was applied to the study of the inclusion in diamond from the ophiolite of Tibet. Diffraction patterns are obtained even though the inclusion is only 20 μm in crystal size. The results show that the inclusion in diamond consists of talc and clinochrysotile. Therefore, it is clear that the diamond from the ophiolite of Luobusha, Tibet, is natural diamond rather than a synthetic one.

  19. Investigation of superfast deposition of metal oxide and Diamond-Like Carbon thin films by nanosecond Ytterbium (Yb+) fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbezov, V.; Sotirov, S.; Benkhouja, K.; Zawadzka, A.; Sahraoui, B.

    2013-11-01

    Metal oxide (MOx, M: titanium, magnesium) and Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) thin films were synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) at room temperature and low vacuum of 2 Pa for MOx and vacuum of 4 × 10-3 Pa for DLC films. A fiber based Ytterbium (Yb+) laser operating in the nanosecond regime at a repetition rate of 20 kHz was used as an ablation source. Dense and smooth thin films with a thickness from 120 to 360 nm and an area of up to 10 cm2 were deposited on glass and stainless steel substrates at high growth rates up to 2 nm/s for a laser intensity of 10-12 J/cm2. The thin films synthesis was compared for two fiber laser modes of operation, at a repetition rate of 20 kHz and with an additional modulation at 1 kHz. The morphology, chemical composition and structure of the obtained thin films were evaluated using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman spectroscopy. The morphology of the MOx thin films and the deposition rate strongly depend on the fiber laser mode of operation. Very smooth surfaces were obtained for the metal oxide thin films deposited at lower deposition rates in the modulation mode at 1 kHz. The effect of the substrate on the DLC film structure was studied. The films deposited on dielectric substrates were identified as typical tetrahedral (ta-C) DLC with high sp3 content. DLC films on metal substrates were found typical a-C amorphous carbon films with mixing sp2/sp3 bonds.

  20. Ionoluminescence of diamond, synthetic diamond and simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo del Castillo, H. [Departamento de Geologia y Geoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ctra de Colmenar km 15, Madrid 27049 (Spain); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Ciudad de Mexico 04519, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Ruvalcaba-Sil, J.L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Ciudad de Mexico 04519, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Barboza-Flores, M. [Centro de Investigacio en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado postal 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora 83190 (Mexico); Belmont, E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Ciudad de Mexico 04519, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Calderon, T. [Departamento de Geologia y Geoquimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ctra de Colmenar km 15, Madrid 27049 (Spain)], E-mail: tomas.calderon@uam.es

    2007-09-21

    Ionoluminescence (IL) spectra of diamond (natural samples and synthetic CVD) and its more common synthetic simulates such as sapphire, spinel, cubic zirconia, strontium titanate and yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG: Er) will be discussed here in order to support some criteria that will allow to distinguish between them. While diamond shows emission bands due to nitrogen defects, simulants feature d-transition metals and rare earths such as Cr{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Ti{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+} emissions.

  1. Diamond-like carbon and ceramic materials as protective coatings grown by pulsed laser deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Perera Mercado, Yibran Argenis

    2004-01-01

    A rather large number of nitride, carbide, and oxide thin films are used as hard and wear-resistant coatings, for optical, corrosive, and refractory applications that are of crucial importance. Additional requirements place even more stringent conditions on the deposition processes. The properties of coatings deposited by pulsed laser deposition are determined by the deposition parameters, the composition of the PLD plasma and its ionization states, the substrate conditions, etc.. In this way...

  2. Performance of detectors using a diamond sensors at the LHC and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Hempel, M; Dabrowski, A E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Novgorodova, O; Odell, N J; Stickland, D P; Griesmayer, E

    2013-01-01

    Diamond detectors are used as beam loss and luminos- ity monitors for CMS and LHC. A time resolution in the nanosecond range allows to detect beam losses and lumi- nosities of single bunches. The radiation hardness and neg- ligible temperature dependence allow the usage of diamond sensors in high radiation fields without cooling. Two differ- ent diamond detector types are installed at LHC and CMS. One is based on pcCVD (polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition) diamonds and installed at different locations in the LHC tunnel for beam loss monitoring. Measurements of these detectors are used to perform a bunch-by-bunch beam loss analysis. They allow to disentangle the origin of beam losses. The second type uses scCVD (single crystal chemical vapor deposition) diamonds and is located inside CMS for van-der-Meer scan, beam halo and online lumi- nosity monitoring and around the LHC tunnel for beam loss observation. Results on the performance of these detectors will be presented and examples of the use for analyzi...

  3. Growth of large size diamond single crystals by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition: Recent achievements and remaining challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallaire, Alexandre; Achard, Jocelyn; Silva, François; Brinza, Ovidiu; Gicquel, Alix

    2013-02-01

    Diamond is a material with outstanding properties making it particularly suited for high added-value applications such as optical windows, power electronics, radiation detection, quantum information, bio-sensing and many others. Tremendous progresses in its synthesis by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition have allowed obtaining single crystal optical-grade material with thicknesses of up to a few millimetres. However the requirements in terms of size, purity and crystalline quality are getting more and more difficult to achieve with respect to the forecasted applications, thus pushing the synthesis method to its scientific and technological limits. In this paper, after a short description of the operating principles of the growth technique, the challenges of increasing crystal dimensions both laterally and vertically, decreasing and controlling point and extended defects as well as modulating crystal conductivity by an efficient doping will be detailed before offering some insights into ways to overcome them.

  4. Sensitivity of chemical vapor deposition diamonds to DD and DT neutrons at OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, N. V.; Sio, H.; Glebov, V.; Gatu Johnson, M.; MacPhee, A.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.

    2016-11-01

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) detector at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is used routinely to measure nuclear bang-times in inertial confinement fusion implosions. The active detector medium in pTOF is a chemical vapor deposition diamond. Calibration of the detectors sensitivity to neutrons and protons would allow measurement of nuclear bang times and hot spot areal density (ρR) on a single diagnostic. This study utilizes data collected at both NIF and Omega in an attempt to determine pTOF's absolute sensitivity to neutrons. At Omega pTOF's sensitivity to DT-n is found to be stable to within 8% at different bias voltages. At the NIF pTOF's sensitivity to DD-n varies by up to 59%. This variability must be decreased substantially for pTOF to function as a neutron yield detector at the NIF. Some possible causes of this variability are ruled out.

  5. Mechanically induced degradation of diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwelen, F V

    1996-01-01

    bombardment a mechanically induced graphitisation, as opposed to a thermally activated transformation, may occur locally on collision with the CVD diamond. Two types of diamond-graphite interfaces were observed: (111) planes of diamond parallel to the a-b planes of graphite and (111) planes of diamond, smoothly within the plane, connected to a-b planes of graphite. The thesis concludes with a summary of the results, conclusions and recommendations for further work. This thesis deals with the wear of diamond occurring during frictional sliding contact between diamonds. In the introduction, a literature survey on friction, wear and polishing behaviour of diamond, with some emphasis on the anisotropy, is presented and earlier work is discussed. A review of the existing theories is given, a new hypothesis is proposed and key-experiments for verification are identified. Electron microscopical techniques such as High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HREM) imaging and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy are described a...

  6. Optimizing Chemical-Vapor-Deposition Diamond for Nitrogen-Vacancy Center Ensemble Magnetrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    of the diamond samples. The apparatus is shown in Figure A-1. 91 LASER 532 nm Verdi -G Periscope to 3 in height PBS AOM HWP #1 10 MM fiber To...excitation path and the NV fluores- cence collection path. The optical excitation path begins with a 5 W 532 nm laser (Coherent Verdi G5). To maximize the... Verdi G5 laser manual specifies a Gaussian beam diameter of 2.25 mm ± 10%, which is in agreement with the X-width of 2.33 mm and Y width of 2.24 mm

  7. Silicon Carbide in Heavy-Mineral Samples: Indicator of Diamond Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, I. S.; Wang, W.

    2013-12-01

    Since kimberlite Pipe 50 of Wafangdian, 120 km northeast of the port city Dalian in Liaoning Province, ceased production in 2002, exploration programs have been conducted along tributaries of the Fuzhou River south of Wafangdian. The heavy-mineral method is often based on finding deep red G10 pyrope garnets which can be identified accurately by means of microprobe analysis to confirm their particular range of composition: high chromium, low calcium. Garnets are prone to hydrothermal alteration during kimberlite eruption, oxidation on Earth's surface, or be broken during mass transport. Unlike garnet, silicon carbide (SiC) resists chemical and mechanical alterations, but it crystallized at similarly high temperatures as diamond in Earth's mantle, and has the same atomic structure as diamond. Thus, SiC seems to be an ideal diamond indicator, although it is one of the rarest minerals in nature. Because of its characteristic blue-green color and adamantine luster, it can be recognized easily, no matter how minute the grains may be. We decided to re-examine small samples of heavy minerals collected and previously studied by exploration geologists, respectively from 3 tributaries of the Fuzhou River (Laogugao, Saocentun, Pingiaying), and from 3 ravines in the vicinity of Wafangdian (Songiagao, Dlitun, Lidianzhun), among which Songiagao, flowing into Qingnian Reservoir, is apparently a pristine water system, unpolluted by human activities. We found one grain of SiC in all the samples. From Fuzhou River: (1) Blue-green, euhedral, hexagonal shape, water-clear, one edge slightly chipped. (2) Light green, slightly corroded edges. (3) Green, half of the crystal's surface is covered by a blister-like yellow overgrowth; this material protrudes out on one side like a thick tapering paint brush. From Wafandian Vicinity: (1) Blue-green, with patchy black edges. (2) Green, with deep green rims and one brown inclusion. (3) Pale green, subhedral with one beige inclusion. All the

  8. AC Impedance Behaviour of Black Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao YE; Olivier GAUDIN; Richard B.JACKMAN

    2005-01-01

    The first measurement of impedance on free-standing diamond films from 0.1 Hz to 10 MHz up to 300℃ were reported. A wide range of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) materials were investigated, but here we concentrate are well fitted to a RC parallel circuit model and the equivalent resistance and capacitance for the diamond films have been estimated using the Zview curve fitting. The results show only one single semicircle response at each temperature measured. It was found that the resistance decreases from 62 MΩ at room temperature to 4 kΩ at300℃, with an activation energy around 0.51 eV. The equivalent capacitance is maintained at the level of 100 pF up to 300℃ suggesting that the diamond grain boundaries are dominating the conduction. At 400℃, the impedance at low frequencies shows a linear tail, which can be explained that the AC polarization of diamond/Au interface occurs.

  9. Diamond-based protective layer for optical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrowicz, D.; Ficek, M.; Baran, T.; WÄ sowicz, M.; Struk, P.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2016-09-01

    Optical biosensors have become a powerful alternative to the conventional ways of measurement owing to their great properties, such as high sensitivity, high dynamic range, cost effectiveness and small size. Choice of an optical biosensor's materials is an important factor and impacts the quality of the obtained spectra. Examined biological objects are placed on a cover layer which may react with samples in a chemical, biological and mechanical way, therefore having a negative impact on the measurement reliability. Diamond, a metastable allotrope of carbon with sp3 hybridization, shows outstanding properties such as: great chemical stability, bio-compatibility, high thermal conductivity, wide bandgap and optical transparency. Additionally it possesses great mechanical durability, which makes it a long-lasting material. The protective diamond thin films were deposited on the substrate using Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW PA CVD) system. The surface morphology and roughness was assessed with atomic force microscopy and profilometry. We have performed a series of measurements to assess the biocompatibility of diamond thin films with whole blood. The results show that thin diamond protective layer does not affect the red blood cells, while retaining the sensors high resolution and dynamic range of measurement. Therefore, we conclude that diamond thin films are a viable protective coating for optical biosensors, which allows to examine many biological elements. We project that it can be particularly useful not only for biological objects but also under extreme conditions like radioactive or chemically aggressive environments and high temperatures.

  10. Diamond-like a-C:H coatings deposited in a non-self-sustained discharge with plasma cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, N. V.; Mamaev, A. S.; Kaĭigorodov, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) coatings have been obtained by means of acetylene decomposition in a non-self-sustained periodic pulse discharge (2A, 50 kHz, 10 μs) with hollow cathode. The discharge operation was maintained by plasma cathode emission with grid stabilization based on dc glow discharge. Using the proposed method, it is possible to control the deposition conditions (total pressure of the Ar + C2H2 mixture, partial pressure of C2H2, ion current density, carbon ion energy) within broad limits, to apply a-C:H coatings onto large-area articles, and to perform deposition in one technological cycle with ion etching and ion implantation treatments aimed at improving the adhesion of coatings to substrates (Ti, Al, stainless steel, VK8 hard alloy) at temperatures below 150°C. Results of determining the deposition rate (1-8 μm), the nanohardness of coatings (up to 70 GPa), and the fraction of sp 3 bonds (25-70%) in the diamond-like coating material are presented.

  11. Time-Resolved Observation of Deposition Process of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Hanada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study pulsed laser ablation of graphite in a hydrogen atmosphere wherein ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H composite films were grown on heated substrates. Time-resolved photographs of a plume that expanded from a laser-irradiation spot toward a substrate were taken using a high-speed ICCD camera equipped with narrow-bandpass filters. While the emissions from C atoms and C2 dimers lasted above the laser-irradiation spot on the target, the emission from C+ ions lasted above the substrate surface for approximately 7 microseconds, although the emission lifetime of species is generally approximately 10 nanoseconds. This implies that C+ ions actively collided with each other above the substrate surface for such a long time. We believe that the keys to UNCD growth in PLD are the supply of highly energetic carbon species at a high density to the substrate and existence of atomic hydrogen during the growth.

  12. Nucleation and Oriented Textured Growth of Diamond Films on Si(100) via Electron Emission in Ho.t Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Oriented textured diamond films were obtained on Si(100) substrate via electron emission in hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). A dc bias voltage relative to the filament was applied to the tungsten electrode between the substrate and the filament. The nucleation and subsequent growth of diamond films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the electron emission from the diamond coating on the electrode played a critical role during the nucleation.The maximum value of nucleation density was up to 1011 cm-2 on pristine Si surface at emission current of 250 mA. The effect of the electron emission on the reactive gas composition was analyzed by in situ infrared absorption, indicating that the concentration of CH3 and C2H2 near the substrate surface was extremely increased. This may be responsible for the enhanced nucleation by electron emission.

  13. Characteristics of diamond – like carbon(DLC film deposited by PACVD process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Lukaszkowicz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Diamond – like carbon (DLC film is promising materials for many technical and engineering applications. DLC films are used in many different industries for example: in medicine, in electronics, in optics and the automotive industry. They have excellent tribological properties (low friction coefficient, chemical inertness and high mechanical hardness. This paper provides an analysis of the microstructure, mechanical and tribological properties of DLC films. In the study of the coating used several surface sensitive techniques and methods, i.e. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Raman spectroscopy and tribological tests like ball-on-disc. HRTEM investigation shows an amorphous character of DLC layer. In sliding dry friction conditions the friction coefficient for the investigated elements is set in the range between 0.02-0.03. The investigated coating reveals high wear resistance. The coating demonstrated a good adhesion to the substrate.

  14. Solar blind chemically vapor deposited diamond detectors for vacuum ultraviolet pulsed light-source characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, F.; Bergonzo, P.; Borel, C.; Marshall, R. D.; Jany, C.; Besombes, L.; Brambilla, A.; Riedel, D.; Museur, L.; Castex, M. C.; Gicquel, A.

    1998-11-01

    A major difficulty in characterizing vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation produced by harmonic generation or four-wave sum frequency mixing arises in differentiating between the desired VUV signal and the remaining fundamental pump laser beam. To overcome this problem, visible and near UV blind VUV detectors, made from natural and synthetic diamond, have been developed. Such detectors have been used to characterize coherent VUV pulses (λ=125 nm, pulse duration at full width half maximum (FWHM) τFWHM~7 ns) generated by resonance-enhanced four-wave sum mixing in mercury vapor. They allow full characterization of the intensity profile of the VUV pulses, without any significant parasitic signal from simultaneous stray light irradiation at λ=313 nm. Detectors were fabricated exhibiting response times of less than 70 ps at FWHM, corresponding to the lowest response time obtainable with a 7 GHz bandwidth single-shot oscilloscope.

  15. Electroreduction of CO{sub 2} using copper-deposited on boron-doped diamond (BDD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panglipur, Hanum Sekar; Ivandini, Tribidasari A., E-mail: ivandini.tri@sci.ui.ac.id [Department of Chemistry, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok (Indonesia); Einaga, Yasuaki [Department of Chemistry, Keio University (Japan); Wibowo, Rahmat

    2016-04-19

    Electroreduction of CO{sub 2} was studied at copper-modified boron-doped diamond (Cu-BDD) electrodes as the working electrode. The Cu-BDD electrodes were prepared by electrochemical reduction with various concentrations of CuSO{sub 4} solutions. FE-SEM was utilized to characterize the electrodes. At Cu-BDD electrodes, a reduction peak at around -1.2 V (vs Ag/AgCl) attributtable to CO{sub 2} reductions could be observed by cyclic voltammetry technique of CO{sub 2} bubbled in water containing 0.1M NaCl. Accordingly, electroreduction of CO{sub 2} was conducted at -1.2 V (vs Ag/AgCl) using amperometry technique. The chemical products of the electroreduction analyzed by using HPLC showed the formation of formaldehyde, formic acid, and acetic acid at Cu-BDD electrodes.

  16. Studies of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on stainless steel substrate with Si/SiC intermediate layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Liu Gui-Chang; Wang Li-Da; Deng Xin-Lü; Xu Jun

    2008-01-01

    In this work, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on stainless steel substrates with Si/SiC intermediate layers by combining plasma enhanced sputtering physical vapour deposition (PEUMS-PVD) and microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MW-ECRPECVD) techniques. The influence of substrate negative self-bias voltage and Si target power on the structure and nano-mechanical behaviour of the DLC films were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, nano-indentation, and the film structural morphology by atomic force microscopy (AFM). With the increase of deposition bias voltage, the G band shifted to higher wave-number and the integrated intensity ratio ID/IG increased. We considered these as evidences for the development of graphitization in the films. As the substrate negative self-bias voltage increased, particle bombardment function was enhanced and thesp3-bond carbon density reducing, resulted in the peak values of hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E). Silicon addition promoted the formation of sp3 bonding and reduced the hardness. The incorporated Si atoms substituted sp2- bond carbon atoms in ring structures, which promoted the formation of sp3-bond. The structural transition from C-C to C-Si bonds resulted in relaxation of the residual stress which led to the decrease of internal stress and hardness. The results of AFM indicated that the films was dense and homogeneous, the roughness of the films was decreased due to the increase of substrate negative self-bias voltage and the Si target power.

  17. Diamond field-effect transistors for RF power electronics: Novel NO2 hole doping and low-temperature deposited Al2O3 passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasu, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Diamond possesses a combination of exceptional physical properties and is expected to be used as a semiconductor material in high-efficiency and high-power electronic devices. In this study, hole doping was observed when using NO2 molecules on a H-diamond surface. The activation energy of hole concentration in NO2/H-diamond was measured as 0.006 eV, and holes were fully activated at room temperature. A thermal stabilization of the hole channel was realized by passivation with an atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 layer. The passivation method enabled the realization of a thermally stable high-performance diamond field-effect transistor (FET), which exhibited high-performance DC and RF characteristics. NO2 hole-doping and Al2O3-passivation technologies enabled reproducible measurements of MOS structure electric properties. Such technologies also facilitated observations of two-dimensional holes at the MOS interface and type-II band alignment of Al2O3/NO2/H-diamond. Additionally, the band diagram under various gate bias conditions was proposed on the basis of capacitance-voltage measurements and analysis using Poisson’s equations.

  18. Spontaneous growth of whiskers from an interlayer of Mo sub 2 C beneath a diamond particle deposited in a combustion-flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Katsuyuki; Komatsu, Shojiro; Ishigaki, Takamasa; Matsumoto, Seiichiro; Moriyoshi, Yusuke (National Inst. for Research in Inorganic Materials, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1992-02-01

    When diamond particles deposited on a molybdenum substrate in a C{sub 2}H{sub -}O{sub 2} combustion-flame were kept for one year in the ambient atmosphere at room temperature, spontaneous whisker growth from an interlayer of Mo{sub 2}C beneath the diamond particles took place. The whiskers were clarified by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a polycrystal composed of MoO{sub 2}, MoOC, and Mo{sub 2}C. The growth mechanism of them is discussed from two different points of view as follows: One is that the oxidation of an interlayer of Mo{sub 2}C beneath a diamond particle effectively reduces the surface free energy between the interlayer and diamond particle; consequently, the whisker can grow by using a screw dislocation. The other is that the internal stress existing between a diamond particle and an Mo{sub 2}C interlayer provides a very reactive zone where the growth of whisker takes place through the oxidation of Mo{sub 2}C. (orig.).

  19. Debris reduction for copper and diamond-like carbon thin films produced by magnetically guided pulsed laser deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Tsui, Y Y; Vick, D; Fedosejevs, R

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of debris reduction using magnetically guided pulsed laser deposition (MGPLD) is reported here. KrF laser pulses (248 nm) of 100 mJ energy were focused to intensities of 6x10 sup 9 W/cm sup 2 onto the surface of a copper or a carbon source target and a magnetic field of 0.3 T as used to steer the plasma around a curved arc of 0.5 m length to the deposition substrate. Debris counts were compared for films produced by the MGPLD and conventional PLD (nonguided) techniques. A significant reduction in particulates of size greater than 0.1 mu m was achieved using MGPLD. For the copper films, particulate count was reduced from 150 000 particles/cm sup 2 /nm to 50 particulates/cm sup 2 /nm and for diamond-like carbon thin films particulate count was reduced from 25 000 particles/cm sup 2 /nm to 1200 particles/cm sup 2 /nm.

  20. Structural and optical properties of gold-incorporated diamond-like carbon thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Shahbaz; Siraj, K.; Naseem, S.; Khan, Muhammad F.; Irshad, M.; Faiz, H.; Mahmood, A.

    2017-07-01

    Pure and gold-doped diamond-like carbon (Au-DLC) thin films are deposited at room temperature by using RF magnetron sputtering in an argon gas-filled chamber with a constant flow rate of 100 sccm and sputtering time of 30 min for all DLC thin films. Single-crystal silicon (1 0 0) substrates are used for the deposition of pristine and Au-DLC thin films. Graphite (99.99%) and gold (99.99%) are used as co-sputtering targets in the sputtering chamber. The optical properties and structure of Au-DLC thin films are studied with the variation of gold concentration from 1%-5%. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), Vickers hardness measurement (VHM), and spectroscopic ellipsometry are used to analyze these thin films. Raman spectroscopy indicates increased graphitic behavior and reduction in the internal stresses of Au-DLC thin films as the function of increasing gold doping. AFM is used for surface topography, which shows that spherical-like particles are formed on the surface, which agglomerate and form larger clusters on the surface by increasing the gold content. Spectroscopy ellipsometry analysis elucidates that the refractive index and extinction coefficient are inversely related and the optical bandgap energy is decreased with increasing gold content. VHM shows that gold doping reduces the hardness of thin films, which is attributed to the increase in sp2-hybridization.

  1. Effect of characteristics of plasma plume on the diamond-like film deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚东升; 刘晶儒; 俞昌旋; 王丽戈; 詹如娟

    2000-01-01

    Pulsed KrF lasers of two different durations (30 ns, 500 fs) are used to deposit DLCfilms. By optical emission spectroscopy and ion probe, the composite species of laser generated plas-ma plume are identified, the average kinetic energy of ions, the plume flux and their variation with laserenergy density, and the distance from the target are investigated. The relation of the properties of de-posited films with the plasma characteristics is studied.

  2. FTIR monitoring of industrial scale CVD processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfe, V.; Mosebach, H.; Meyer, M.; Sheel, D.; Grählert, W.; Throl, O.; Dresler, B.

    1998-06-01

    The goal is to improve chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and infiltration (CVI) process control by a multipurpose, knowledge based feedback system. For monitoring the CVD/CVI process in-situ FTIR spectroscopic data has been identified as input information. In the presentation, three commonly used, and distinctly different, types of industrial CVD/CVI processes are taken as test cases: (i) a thermal high capacity CVI batch process for manufacturing carbon fibre reinforced SiC composites for high temperature applications, (ii) a continuously driven CVD thermal process for coating float glass for energy protection, and (iii) a laser stimulated CVD process for continuously coating bundles of thin ceramic fibers. The feasibility of the concept with FTIR in-situ monitoring as a core technology has been demonstrated. FTIR monitoring sensibly reflects process conditions.

  3. Advances in PSII Deposited Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings for Use as a Barrier to Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Baker, N.P.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-10-01

    Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is a non line of sight process for implanting complex shaped targets without the need for complex fixturing. The breakdown initiation of materials coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) produced by PSII occurs at defects in the DLC which expose the underlying material. To summarize these findings, a galvanic couple is established between the coating and exposed material at the base of the defect. Pitting and oxidation of the base and metal leads to the development of mechanical stress in the coating and eventually spallation of the coating. This paper presents our current progress in attempting to mitigate the breakdown of these coatings by implanting the parent material prior to coating with DLC. Ideally one would like to implant the parent material with chromium or molybdenum which are known to improve corrosion resistance, however, the necessary organometallics needed to implant these materials with PSII are not yet available. Here we report on the effects of carbon, nitrogen, and boron implantation on the susceptibility of PSII-DLC coated mild steel to breakdown.

  4. Plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon and fluorinated amorphous carbon and the resultant properties and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glew, Alexander David

    Researchers first created diamondlike carbon (DLC) 50 years ago, but it has only been the subject of intense research for the last decade. DLC is a highly stressed thin film that exists as a mixture of diamond like sp 3 and graphite like sp2 bonded carbon, with 0--50% H. Many believe that high intrinsic stress states are necessary to stabilize the carbon spa content responsible for the high hardness of DLC. This author's goals include fabricating high quality fluorinated amorphous carbon (FLAC) films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), exploring the relationships between the processing parameters and the dielectric value, as well as the related material properties which limit the useful application of FLAC. An improved understanding of the fundamentals behind FLAC processing may allow workers to improve upon the properties limiting its use, such as intrinsic stress, thermal stability, and thermal conductivity. DLC and FLAC film hardness ranged from 14--16 GP and 16--18 GPa respectively. Their film stress ranged from 800 MPa to a 10 GPa. A study of the thickness dependent properties showed that only films thicker than 200 nm were able to achieve stresses greater than approximately 1.6 GPa, the room temperature transition pressure of graphite to diamond. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements also yielded different C sp3 contents for films of varying thickness deposited under the same conditions, helping to confirm a thickness dependence of film properties greater than 200 nm. Observation of the stress in real time during annealing of the films on Si wafers yielded activation energy values for the stress relief of DLC and FLAC as 0.11 and 0.24 eV respectively, and the CTE of DLC as 10.6 x 10-6 C-1. The stress relief mechanism consists of kinetically limited network arrangements that occur in highly stressed zones due heating, which are also the cause of the reduction in dielectric constant that occurs during rapid thermal annealing. Thermal

  5. Clinical studies of optimised single crystal and polycrystalline diamonds for radiotherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descamps, C. [CEA-LIST (Recherche Technologique)/DETECS/SSTM/LCD, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)], E-mail: cdescamps23@yahoo.fr; Tromson, D.; Tranchant, N. [CEA-LIST (Recherche Technologique)/DETECS/SSTM/LCD, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Isambert, A.; Bridier, A. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); De Angelis, C.; Onori, S. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Roma (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita, Firenze (Italy); Bergonzo, P. [CEA-LIST (Recherche Technologique)/DETECS/SSTM/LCD, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-02-15

    Natural diamond based ionisation chambers commercialised by PTW are used in several hospitals, and their dosimetric properties have been reported in many papers. Nevertheless their high costs and long delivery times are strong drawbacks. Advancements in the growth of synthetic diamonds offer new possibilities. This paper presents the dosimetric analysis in terms of stability and repeatability of the signal, background signal, detector response dynamics, linearity of the signal with the absorbed dose and dose rate dependence of synthetic optimised polycrystalline and single crystal diamonds. Both were elaborated at the CEA-LIST using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth technique. The first dosimetric evaluation of single crystal diamond detector, reported here, shows a repeatability better than 0.1%, a good sensitivity around 70 nC/Gy compared to 3 nC/Gy for optimised polycrystalline diamond, very fast response with rise time around 1 s. Moreover, the signal linearity vs absorbed dose and energy dependence are very satisfactory. This preliminary dosimetric study with medical linear accelerators proves that diamond, and more precisely synthetic single crystal diamond, appears as a good alternative to air ionisation chambers for quality beam control and could be a good candidate for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams dosimetry.

  6. Response of diamond detector sandwich to 14 MeV neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Osipenko, M; Ricco, G; Caiffi, B; Pompili, F; Pillon, M; Verona-Rinati, G; Cardarelli, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the measurement of the response of 50 $\\mu$m thin diamond detectors to 14 MeV neutrons. Such neutrons are produced in fusion reactors and are of particular interest for ITER neutron diagnostics. Among semiconductor detectors diamond has properties most appropriate for harsh radiation and temperature conditions of a fusion reactor. However, 300-500 $\\mu$m thick diamond detectors suffer significant radiation damage already at neutron fluences of the order of $10^{14}$ n/cm$^2$. It is expected that a 50 $\\mu$m thick diamond will withstand a fluence of $>10^{16}$ n/cm$^2$. We tested two 50 $\\mu$m thick single crystal CVD diamonds, stacked to form a ``sandwich'' detector for coincidence measurements. The detector measured the conversion of 14 MeV neutrons, impinging on one diamond, into $\\alpha$ particles which were detected in the second diamond in coincidence with nuclear recoil. For $^{12}C(n,\\alpha)^{9}Be$ reaction the total energy deposited in the detector gives access to the initial ...

  7. Study of the effects of focused high-energy boron ion implantation in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ynsa, M. D.; Agulló-Rueda, F.; Gordillo, N.; Maira, A.; Moreno-Cerrada, D.; Ramos, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    Boron-doped diamond is a material with a great technological and industrial interest because of its exceptional chemical, physical and structural properties. At modest boron concentrations, insulating diamond becomes a p-type semiconductor and at higher concentrations a superconducting metal at low temperature. The most conventional preparation method used so far, has been the homogeneous incorporation of boron doping during the diamond synthesis carried out either with high-pressure sintering of crystals or by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of films. With these methods, high boron concentration can be included without distorting significantly the diamond crystalline lattice. However, it is complicated to manufacture boron-doped microstructures. A promising alternative to produce such microstructures could be the implantation of focused high-energy boron ions, although boron fluences are limited by the damage produced in diamond. In this work, the effect of focused high-energy boron ion implantation in single crystals of diamond is studied under different irradiation fluences and conditions. Micro-Raman spectra of the sample were measured before and after annealing at 1000 °C as a function of irradiation fluence, for both superficial and buried boron implantation, to assess the changes in the diamond lattice by the creation of vacancies and defects and their degree of recovery after annealing.

  8. Homo-epitaxial diamond film growth on ion implanted diamond substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kostidis, L.I.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The nucleation of CVD diamond is a complicated process, governed by many interrelated parameters. In the present work we attempt to elucidate the effect of strain on the growth of a homo-epitaxial CVD diamond. We have employed laterally confined high dose (MeV) Helium ion implantation to produce surface swelling of the substrate. The strain is enhanced by the lateral confinement of the implanted region to squares of 100 x 100 {mu}m{sup 2}. After ion implantation, micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to map the surface strain. The substrates were then inserted into a CVD reactor and a CVD diamond film was grown upon them. Since the strained regions were laterally confined, it was then possible to monitor the effect of strain on diamond nucleation. The substrates were also analysed using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Proton induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Ion Beam induced Luminescence (IBIL). 7 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Evaluation of freestanding boron-doped diamond grown by chemical vapour deposition as substrates for vertical power electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issaoui, R.; Achard, J.; Tallaire, A.; Silva, F.; Gicquel, A. [LSPM-CNRS (formerly LIMHP), Universite Paris 13, 99, Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Bisaro, R.; Servet, B.; Garry, G. [Thales Research and Technology France, Campus de Polytechnique, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, F-91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Barjon, J. [GEMaC-CNRS, Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin Batiment Fermat, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2012-03-19

    In this study, 4 x 4 mm{sup 2} freestanding boron-doped diamond single crystals with thickness up to 260 {mu}m have been fabricated by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition. The boron concentrations measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy were 10{sup 18} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} which is in a good agreement with the values calculated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, thus indicating that almost all incorporated boron is electrically active. The dependence of lattice parameters and crystal mosaicity on boron concentrations have also been extracted from high resolution x-ray diffraction experiments on (004) planes. The widths of x-ray rocking curves have globally shown the high quality of the material despite a substantial broadening of the peak, indicating a decrease of structural quality with increasing boron doping levels. Finally, the suitability of these crystals for the development of vertical power electronic devices has been confirmed by four-point probe measurements from which electrical resistivities as low as 0.26 {Omega} cm have been obtained.

  10. Optical properties of bias-induced CH sub 4 -H sub 2 plasma for diamond film deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, X D; Zhou, H Y; Wen, X H; Li, D

    2002-01-01

    Methane (CH sub 4) and hydrogen (H sub 2) reactive gas mixture has been in situ investigated in a hot filament diamond chemical vapor deposition reactor with a negatively variable biasing voltage applied to the hot filament with respect to the substrate using infrared absorption spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy. It is found that CH sub 4 converts increasingly to C sub 2 H sub 2 upon raising the filament temperature in a pure thermal activation state, no optical emission of species is observed. Upon bias application, both CH sub 4 and C sub 2 H sub 2 in infrared (IR) absorption intensity decrease with increasing bias current, even the IR absorption intensity of C sub 2 H sub 2 decreases more rapidly than that of CH sub 4. Meanwhile, the clear emission lines indexed to H, CH, and CH sup + appear in the optical emission spectrum obtained, showing that a large amount of excited radicals are produced in the gas phase after applying bias. It is believed that the further generation of activated radical...

  11. Sensitivity of chemical vapor deposition diamonds to DD and DT neutrons at OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabadi, N. V. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Sio, H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Glebov, V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Gatu Johnson, M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; MacPhee, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Frenje, J. A. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Li, C. K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Seguin, F. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Forrest, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Knauer, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Rinderknecht, H. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA

    2016-08-09

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) detector at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is used routinely to measure nuclear bang-times in inertial confinement fusion implosions. The active detector medium in pTOF is a chemical vapor deposition diamond. Calibration of the detectors sensitivity to neutrons and protons would allow measurement of nuclear bang times and hot spot areal density (ρR) on a single diagnostic. This study utilizes data collected at both NIF and Omega in an attempt to determine pTOF’s absolute sensitivity to neutrons. At Omega pTOF’s sensitivity to DT-n is found to be stable to within 8% at different bias voltages. At the NIF pTOF’s sensitivity to DD-n varies by up to 59%. This variability must be decreased substantially for pTOF to function as a neutron yield detector at the NIF. Some possible causes of this variability are ruled out.

  12. Electrochemically deposited Cu2O cubic particles on boron doped diamond substrate as efficient photocathode for solar hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrokefalos, Christos K.; Hasan, Maksudul; Rohan, James F.; Compton, Richard G.; Foord, John S.

    2017-06-01

    Herein, we report a novel photocathode for the water splitting reaction. The electrochemical deposition of Cu2O particles on boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes and the subsequent decoration with NiO nanoparticles by a dip coating method to act as co-catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction is described. The morphology analysis by scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that Cu2O particles are cubic and decorated sporadically with NiO nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the electronic interaction at the interface between Cu2O and NiO through a binding energy shift of the main Cu 2p peak. The photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance of NiO-Cu2O/BDD showed a much higher current density (-0.33 mA/cm2) and photoconversion efficiency (0.28%) compared to the unmodified Cu2O/BDD electrode, which are only -0.12 mA/cm2 and 0.06%, respectively. The enhancement in PEC performance is attributable to the synergy of NiO as an electron conduction mediator leading to the enhanced charge separation and transfer to the reaction interface for hydrogen evolution as evidenced by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and charge carrier density calculation. Stability tests showed that the NiO nanoparticles loading content on Cu2O surface is a crucial parameter in this regard.

  13. Industrial diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  14. Study of nitrogen doping behavior in diamond film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-ji; YANG Bao-he; SUN Da-zhi; JIN Zeng-sun

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped diamond films have been synthesized by EA-CVD (electron assisted chemical vapor deposition) technique.The quality and nitrogen impurity states of the diamond films are characterized by SEM, raman spectroscopy, XPS and EPRspectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the morphology changes from well-defined facets to cauliflower-like structures,the content of amorphous carbon increases and the quality drops with increasing the nitrogen flow rate. Furthermore, in thefilms, it can be observed that nitrogen impurity exists in the forms of Ns0, [N-V]0 and [N-V]-1. The contents of [N-V]0 and[N-V]-1 are lower when the nitrogen flow rate is relatively high, and the concentration of Ns0 varies from 15 ppm to 483 ppm.

  15. Improvement on Diamond Nucleation Treated by Pulsed Arc Discharge Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马志斌; 万军; 汪建华; 张文文

    2004-01-01

    A technique of improvement on diamond nucleation based on pulsed arc discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure was developed. The pulsed arc discharge was induced respectively by nitrogen, argon and methanol gas. After the arc plasma pretreatment, a nucleation density higher than 1010 cm-2 may be obtained subsequently in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a mirror-polished silicon substrate without any other mechanical treatment. The effects of the arc discharge plasma on the diamond nucleation were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and Raman spectroscopy. The enhancement of nucleation is postulated to be a result of the formation of carbonlike phase materials or nitrogenation on the substrate surface without surface defect produced by arc discharge.

  16. PREFACE: Science's gem: diamond science 2009 Science's gem: diamond science 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainwood, Alison; Newton, Mark E.; Stoneham, Marshall

    2009-09-01

    diamond's exceptional properties for quantum information processing [2], a topic on which there have been many recent papers, and where a diamond colour centre single photon source is already commercially available. Biomedical applications of diamond are recognised, partly tribological and partly electrochemical, but lie outside the present group of papers. Processing and controlling diamond surfaces and interfaces with other materials in their environment are critical steps en route to exploitation. Boron-doped diamond has already found application in electro-analysis and in the bulk oxidation of dissolved species in solution [3]. Energy-related applications—ranging from high-power electronics [3] to a potential first wall of fusion reactors [4]—are further exciting potential applications. Even small and ugly diamonds have value. Their mechanical properties [5] dominate, with significant niche applications such as thermal sinks. The major applications for diamond to date exploit only a fraction of diamond's special properties: visual for status diamonds, and mechanical for working diamonds. Diamond physics reaches well beyond the usual laboratory, to the geological diamond formation processes in the Earth's mantle. Characterization of natural gem diamonds [6, 7] is one part of the detective story that allows us to understand the conditions under which they formed. It was only half a century ago that the scientific and technological challenges of diamond synthesis were met systematically. Today, most of the recent research on diamond has concentrated on synthetics, whether created using high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) techniques or chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The HPHT synthesis of diamond has advanced dramatically [8, 9] to the extent that dislocation birefringence [10] can be largely eliminated. In silicon technology, the elimination of dislocations was a major step in microelectronics. Now, even diamond can be synthesised containing virtually no

  17. Direct coating adherent diamond films on Fe-based alloy substrate: the roles of Al, Cr in enhancing interfacial adhesion and promoting diamond growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X J; He, L L; Li, Y S; Yang, Q; Hirose, A

    2013-08-14

    Direct CVD deposition of dense, continuous, and adherent diamond films on conventional Fe-based alloys has long been considered impossible. The current study demonstrates that such a deposition can be realized on Al, Cr-modified Fe-based alloy substrate (FeAl or FeCrAl). To clarify the fundamental mechanism of Al, Cr in promoting diamond growth and enhancing interfacial adhesion, fine structure and chemical analysis around the diamond film-substrate interface have been comprehensively characterized by transmission electron microscopy. An intermediate graphite layer forms on those Al-free substrates such as pure Fe and FeCr, which significantly deteriorates the interfacial adhesion of diamond. In contrast, such a graphite layer is absent on the FeAl and FeCrAl substrates, whereas a very thin Al-rich amorphous oxide sublayer is always identified between the diamond film and substrate interface. These comparative results indicate that the Al-rich interfacial oxide layer acts as an effective barrier to prevent the formation of graphite phase and consequently enhance diamond growth and adhesion. The adhesion of diamond film formed on FeCrAl is especially superior to that formed on FeAl substrate. This can be further attributed to a synergetic effect including the reduced fraction of Al and the decreased substrate thermal-expansion coefficient on FeCrAl in comparison with FeAl, and a mechanical interlocking effect due to the formation of interfacial chromium carbides. Accordingly, a mechanism model is proposed to account for the different interfacial adhesion of diamond grown on the various Fe-based substrates.

  18. Laser reflection spot as a pattern in a diamond coating – a microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORDANA S. RISTIĆ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond coatings were deposited by the synchronous and coupled action of a hot filament CVD method and a pulsed CO2 laser in spectro-absorbing and spectro-non-absorbing diamond precursor atmospheres. The obtained coatings were structured/patterned, i.e., they were comprised of uncovered, bare locations. An extra effect observed only in the spectro-active diamond precursor atmosphere was the creation of another laser spot in the coating – a reflection spot. In order to establish the practical usability of the latter one, extensive microscopic investigations were performed with consideration of the morphology changes in the spot of the direct laser beam. Normal incidence SEM images of this spot showed a smooth surface, without any pulse radiation damage. AFM imaging revealed the actual surface condition and gave precise data on the surface characteristics.

  19. Friction and Wear Performance of Boron Doped, Undoped Microcrystalline and Fine Grained Composite Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinchang; WANG Liang; SHEN Bin; SUN Fanghong

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have attracted more attentions due to their excellent mechanical properties. Whereas as-fabricated traditional diamond films in the previous studies don’t have enough adhesion or surface smoothness, which seriously impact their friction and wear performance, and thus limit their applications under extremely harsh conditions. A boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond (BD-UM-FGCD) film is fabricated by a three-step method adopting hot filament CVD (HFCVD) method in the present study, presenting outstanding comprehensive performance, including the good adhesion between the substrate and the underlying boron doped diamond (BDD) layer, the extremely high hardness of the middle undoped microcrystalline diamond (UMCD) layer, as well as the low surface roughness and favorable polished convenience of the surface fine grained diamond (FGD) layer. The friction and wear behavior of this composite film sliding against low-carbon steel and silicon nitride balls are studied on a ball-on-plate rotational friction tester. Besides, its wear rate is further evaluated under a severer condition using an inner-hole polishing apparatus, with low-carbon steel wire as the counterpart. The test results show that the BD-UM-FGCD film performs very small friction coefficient and great friction behavior owing to its high surface smoothness, and meanwhile it also has excellent wear resistance because of the relatively high hardness of the surface FGD film and the extremely high hardness of the middle UMCD film. Moreover, under the industrial conditions for producing low-carbon steel wires, this composite film can sufficiently prolong the working lifetime of the drawing dies and improve their application effects. This research develops a novel composite diamond films owning great comprehensive properties, which have great potentials as protecting coatings on working surfaces of the wear-resistant and anti

  20. Friction and wear performance of boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinchang; Wang, Liang; Shen, Bin; Sun, Fanghong

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have attracted more attentions due to their excellent mechanical properties. Whereas as-fabricated traditional diamond films in the previous studies don't have enough adhesion or surface smoothness, which seriously impact their friction and wear performance, and thus limit their applications under extremely harsh conditions. A boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond (BD-UM-FGCD) film is fabricated by a three-step method adopting hot filament CVD (HFCVD) method in the present study, presenting outstanding comprehensive performance, including the good adhesion between the substrate and the underlying boron doped diamond (BDD) layer, the extremely high hardness of the middle undoped microcrystalline diamond (UMCD) layer, as well as the low surface roughness and favorable polished convenience of the surface fine grained diamond (FGD) layer. The friction and wear behavior of this composite film sliding against low-carbon steel and silicon nitride balls are studied on a ball-on-plate rotational friction tester. Besides, its wear rate is further evaluated under a severer condition using an inner-hole polishing apparatus, with low-carbon steel wire as the counterpart. The test results show that the BD-UM-FGCD film performs very small friction coefficient and great friction behavior owing to its high surface smoothness, and meanwhile it also has excellent wear resistance because of the relatively high hardness of the surface FGD film and the extremely high hardness of the middle UMCD film. Moreover, under the industrial conditions for producing low-carbon steel wires, this composite film can sufficiently prolong the working lifetime of the drawing dies and improve their application effects. This research develops a novel composite diamond films owning great comprehensive properties, which have great potentials as protecting coatings on working surfaces of the wear-resistant and anti

  1. Chemical bonding structural analysis of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gima, Hiroki; Zkria, Abdelrahman; Katamune, Yūki; Ohtani, Ryota; Koizumi, Satoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped ultra-nanocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared in hydrogen and nitrogen mixed-gas atmospheres by coaxial arc plasma deposition with graphite targets were studied electrically and chemical-bonding-structurally. The electrical conductivity was increased by nitrogen doping, accompanied by the production of n-type conduction. From X-ray photoemission, near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure, hydrogen forward-scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectral results, it is expected that hydrogen atoms that terminate diamond grain boundaries will be partially replaced by nitrogen atoms and, consequently, π C–N and C=N bonds that easily generate free electrons will be formed at grain boundaries.

  2. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon films deposited by filtered carbon vacuum arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Fong, Walton; Kulkarni, Ashok; Ryan, Francis W.; Bhatia, C. Singh

    2001-07-13

    Ultrathin (< 5 nm) hard carbon films are of great interest to the magnetic storage industry as the areal density approaches 100 Gbit/in{sup 2}. These films are used as overcoats to protect the magnetic layers on disk media and the active elements of the read-write slider. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films can be produced by filtered cathodic arc deposition, but the films will only be accepted by the storage industry only if the ''macroparticle'' issue has been solved. Better plasma filters have been developed over recent years. Emphasis is put on the promising twist filter system - a compact, open structure that operates with pulsed arcs and high magnetic field. Based on corrosion tests it is shown that the macroparticle reduction by the twist filter is satisfactory for this demanding application, while plasma throughput is very high. Ultrathin hard carbon films have been synthesized using S-filter and twist filter systems. Film properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, wear, and corrosion resistance have been tested.

  3. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon films deposited by filtered carbon vacuum arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Fong, Walton; Kulkarni, Ashok; Ryan, Francis W.; Bhatia, C. Singh

    2001-07-13

    Ultrathin (< 5 nm) hard carbon films are of great interest to the magnetic storage industry as the areal density approaches 100 Gbit/in{sup 2}. These films are used as overcoats to protect the magnetic layers on disk media and the active elements of the read-write slider. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films can be produced by filtered cathodic arc deposition, but the films will only be accepted by the storage industry only if the ''macroparticle'' issue has been solved. Better plasma filters have been developed over recent years. Emphasis is put on the promising twist filter system - a compact, open structure that operates with pulsed arcs and high magnetic field. Based on corrosion tests it is shown that the macroparticle reduction by the twist filter is satisfactory for this demanding application, while plasma throughput is very high. Ultrathin hard carbon films have been synthesized using S-filter and twist filter systems. Film properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, wear, and corrosion resistance have been tested.

  4. Improvement of radiation stability of semi-insulating gallium arsenide crystals by deposition of diamond-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyui, N. I.; Lozinskii, V. B.; Liptuga, A. I.; Izotov, V. Yu.; Han, Wei; Liu, Bingbing

    2016-12-01

    We studied the properties of optical elements for the IR spectral range based on semi-insulating gallium arsenide (SI-GaAs) and antireflecting diamond-like carbon films (DLCF). Particular attention has been paid to the effect of penetrating γ-radiation on transmission of the developed optical elements. A Co60 source and step-by-step gaining of γ-irradiation dose were used for treatment of both an initial SI-GaAs crystal and DLCF/SI-GaAs structures. It was shown that DLCF deposition essentially increases degradation resistance of the SI-GaAs-based optical elements to γ-radiation. Particularly, the transmittance of the DLCF/SI-GaAs structure after γ-irradiation with a dose 9ṡ104 Gy even exceeds that of initial structures. The possible mechanism that explains the effect of γ-radiation on the SI-GaAs crystals and the DLCF/SI-GaAs structures at different irradiation doses was proposed. The effect of small doses is responsible for non-monotonic transmission changes in both SI-GaAs crystals and DLCF/SI-GaAs structures. At further increasing the γ-irradiation dose, the variation of properties of both DLCF and SI-GaAs crystal influences on the transmission of DLCF/SI-GaAs system. At high γ-irradiation dose 1.4ṡ105 Gy, passivation of radiation defects in the SI-GaAs bulk by hydrogen diffused from DLCF leads to increasing the degradation resistance of the SI-GaAs crystals coated with DLCF as compared with the crystals without DLCF.

  5. Nucleation, growth and acoustic properties of thin film diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Whitfield, M D

    1999-01-01

    emission spectroscopy has been used to study the influence of substrate bias on the microwave plasma during diamond nucleation. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have recently emerged as promising near term applications for currently available CVD diamond however little is known about the propagation of acoustic waves in this material; a detailed study of the influence of film characteristics on acoustic propagation in free standing CVD diamond films has been undertaken using the techniques of laser ultrasonic analysis. The unusual combination of extreme properties possessed by diamond could benefit a wide range of applications. Thus far practical utilisation of this material has remained difficult and consequently limited; natural and synthetic crystals are unsuitable forms for many uses; particularly electronic applications which ideally require large area, single crystal substrates. Emerging CVD methods for the growth of thin film diamond offer a practical alternative; although nucleation on non-diamond ...

  6. First dose-map measured with a polycrystalline diamond 2D dosimeter under an intensity modulated radiotherapy beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaringella, M., E-mail: scaringella@gmail.com [Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, Firenze (Italy); Zani, M. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Firenze (Italy); Baldi, A. [Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Firenze (Italy); Pace, E.; Sio, A. de [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Talamonti, C. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sperimentali e Cliniche, Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of bidimensional dosimeter made on a 2.5×2.5 cm{sup 2} active area polycrystalline Chemical Vapour Deposited (pCVD) diamond film, equipped with a matrix of 12×12 contacts connected to the read-out electronics, has been used to evaluate a map of dose under Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) fields for a possible application in pre-treatment verifications of cancer treatments. Tests have been performed under a 6–10 MVRX beams with IMRT fields for prostate and breast cancer. Measurements have been taken by measuring the 144 pixels in different positions, obtained by shifting the device along the x/y axes to span a total map of 14.4×10 cm{sup 2}. Results show that absorbed doses measured by our pCVD diamond device are consistent with those calculated by the Treatment Planning System (TPS)

  7. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Mengdi; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H2), which reacted with WF6 at the substrate to deposit W. The

  8. A finite element analysis of the effects of geometrical shape on the elastic properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond nanowire

    OpenAIRE

    Garuma Abdisa Denu; Zongchen Liu; Jiao Fu; Hongxing Wang

    2017-01-01

    We report the effect of geometrical shape of diamond nanowire on its mechanical properties. Finite element modeling using COMSOL Multiphysics software is used to simulate various diamond nanowire with circular, square, rectangular, hexagonal and triangular cross-sections. A bending test under concentrated load applied at one of the free ends is simulated using FEM. The force response of the nanowire under different loading is studied for the various cross-sections. The dimensions of each cros...

  9. Enhancing the plasma illumination behaviour of microplasma devices using microcrystalline/ultra-nanocrystalline hybrid diamond materials as cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tinghsun; Lou, Shiucheng; Chen, Huangchin; Chen, Chulung; Lee, Chiyoung; Tai, Nyanhwa; Lin, Inan

    2013-08-21

    The properties of capacity-type microplasma devices were significantly enhanced due to the utilisation of hybrid diamond films as cathodes. The performance of the microplasma devices was closely correlated with the electron field emission (EFE) properties of the diamond cathode materials. The nanoemitters, which were prepared by growing duplex-structured diamond films [microcrystalline diamond (MCD)/ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD)] on Si-pyramid templates via a two-step microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MPE-CVD) process, exhibited improved EFE properties (E0 = 5.99 V μm(-1), J(e) = 1.10 mA cm(-2) at 8.50 V μm(-1) applied field), resulting in superior microplasma device performance (with a lower threshold field of 200 V mm(-1) and a higher plasma current density of 7.80 mA cm(-2)) in comparison with UNCD film devices prepared using a single-step MPE-CVD process. The superior EFE properties of the duplex-structured MCD-UNCD films relative to those of the UNCD films can be attributed to the unique granular structure of the diamond films. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the MCD-UNCD films consisted of abundant graphitic phases located at the periphery of large diamond aggregates and at the boundaries between the ultra-small diamond grains. The presence of the graphite phase is presumed to be the prime factor that renders these films more conductive and causes these films to exhibit higher EFE properties, thus resulting in the improved plasma illumination properties of the microplasma devices.

  10. Study of an H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} moderate pressure microwave plasma used for diamond deposition: modelling and IR tuneable diode laser diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, G [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, CNRS UPR 1311, Universite Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Hassouni, K [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, CNRS UPR 1311, Universite Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Stancu, G D [INP-Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Mechold, L [Laser Components GmbH, Werner-von-Siemens-Str. 15, 82140 Olching (Germany); Roepcke, J [INP-Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Gicquel, A [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, CNRS UPR 1311, Universite Paris 13, 99 av. J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2005-08-01

    Infra-red tuneable diode laser spectroscopy (IR TDLAS) has been used to detect and quantify the methyl radical and three stable carbon-containing species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) in a moderate pressure microwave (f = 2.45 GHz) bell-jar reactor used for diamond films deposition. A wide range of experimental conditions was investigated, with typical pressure/power required to perform diamond deposition, i.e. pressure from 2500 to 12 000 Pa and power from 600 W to 2 kW, which means gas temperatures ranging from 2200 to 3200 K, when the power density increases from 9 to 30 W cm{sup -3}. Since TDLAS is a line of sight averaged technique, the analysis of the experimental data required the use of a one-dimensional non-equilibrium transport model that provides species density and gas temperature variations along the optical beam. This model describes the plasma in terms of 28 species/131 reactions reactive flow. The thermal non-equilibrium is described by distinguishing a first energy mode for the electron and a second one for the heavy species. Parametric studies as a function of power density and methane percentage in the gas mixture are presented. The good agreement obtained between measurement and one-dimensional radial calculations allows a validation of the thermo-chemical model, which can be used as a tool to enlighten the chemistry in the spatially non-uniform H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} microwave discharge used for diamond deposition. This is especially of interest for high power density discharge conditions that remain poorly understood.

  11. Micro-texturing into DLC/diamond coated molds and dies via high density oxygen plasma etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunata Ersyzario Edo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC and Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD-diamond films have been widely utilized not only as a hard protective coating for molds and dies but also as a functional substrate for bio-MEMS/NEMS. Micro-texturing into these hard coated molds and dies provides a productive tool to duplicate the original mother micro-patterns onto various work materials and to construct any tailored micro-textures for sensors and actuators. In the present paper, the high density oxygen plasma etching method is utilized to make micro-line and micro-groove patterns onto the DLC and diamond coatings. Our developing oxygen plasma etching system is introduced together with characterization on the plasma state during etching. In this quantitative plasma diagnosis, both the population of activated species and the electron and ion densities are identified through the emissive light spectroscopy and the Langmuir probe method. In addition, the on-line monitoring of the plasmas helps to describe the etching process. DLC coated WC (Co specimen is first employed to describe the etching mechanism by the present method. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD diamond coated WC (Co is also employed to demonstrate the reliable capacity of the present high density oxygen plasma etching. This oxygen plasma etching performance is discussed by comparison of the etching rates.

  12. Structural properties and surface wettability of Cu-containing diamond-like carbon films prepared by a hybrid linear ion beam deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Sun, Lili; Li, Xiaowei [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Xu, Sheng [Gao Hong Coating Technology Co., Ltd, Huzhou 313000 (China); Ke, Peiling [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Wang, Aiying, E-mail: aywang@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2015-06-01

    Cu-containing diamond-like carbon (Cu-DLC) films were deposited on Si/glass substrate by a hybrid ion beam deposition system. The Cu concentration (0.1–39.7 at.%) in the film was controlled by varying the sputtering current. The microstructure and composition of Cu-DLC films were investigated systematically. The surface topography, roughness and surface wettability of the films were also studied. Results indicated that with increasing the Cu concentration, the water contact angle of the films changed from 66.8° for pure carbon film to more than 104.4° for Cu-DLC films with Cu concentration larger than 24.4 at.%. In the hydrophilic region, the polar surface energy decreased from 30.54 mJ/m{sup 2} for pure carbon film to 2.48 mJ/m{sup 2} for the film with Cu 7.0 at.%. - Highlights: • Cu-containing diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by a hybrid ion beam system. • Cu-containing DLC films exhibited a wide range of water contact angle. • The water contact angles vary with the surface energies and surface roughness.

  13. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  14. Physical chemistry of evaporation and deposition of metals, alloys and their compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Eiichi

    1988-05-01

    The thermodynamics, reaction kynetics and chemical vapor deposition(CVD) process were explained on evaporation and deposition to indicate that the chemical metallurgy was effective for the process analysis of various materials, mainly for metals. Firstly, gaseous phase growth of diamond was explained, evaporated molecular species were studied, vapor species of metal compounds were illustrated and vapor pressure data were dealed with. Fundamentals on evaporation coefficient and condensation coefficient were e