WorldWideScience

Sample records for deployed service members

  1. Service Members' Experiences in Staying Connected With Family While Deployed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Susan W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the communication issues experienced by service members staying connected with families while deployed. Qualitative design guided data collection using interviews with 20 key informants who had been deployed in Iraq or Afghanistan. Inductive content analysis and NVivo software enabled data analysis. From the data, 5 main themes emerged: Creating Normalcy Through Connecting With Others; Understanding the Spoken and Unspoken; Connecting and Disconnecting; Changing Sense of Self; and Sustaining a Common Bond. A collective understanding of common communication challenges emerged that had an impact on service member/family relationships, mission focus, and safety.

  2. Military hospitalizations among deployed US service members following anthrax vaccination, 1998-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Timothy Steven; Sato, Paul A; Smith, Tyler Clain; Wang, Linda Zhenling; Reed, Robert John; Ryan, Margaret Angela Kappel

    2006-01-01

    Safety concerns have confronted the Department of Defense Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program since inception in 1998. To determine if anthrax vaccination was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization, a historical cohort study utilizing pre- and post-anthrax-vaccination hospitalizations was undertaken and analyzed with Cox proportional hazards models. The study population consisted of 170,723 active duty US service members who were anthrax-vaccinated and deployed during the time period January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2001. Study outcomes included hospitalizations due to any-cause, 14 broad International Classification of Diseases diagnostic categories, autoimmune organ specific and organ non-specific hospitalizations, and asthma. After adjustment, anthrax vaccination was associated with significantly fewer hospitalizations for any-cause, diseases of the blood and blood forming organs, and diseases of the respiratory system. Comparing anthrax post-vaccination hospitalization experience with the pre-vaccination period resulted in no significant increased hazard for any of the hospitalization outcomes studied. Although there was no apparent increase in risk of morbidity in this study population, the relationship between anthrax vaccine and deployment on health outcomes among US service members needs further study.

  3. Otologic assessment of blast and nonblast injury in returning Middle East-deployed service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anil; Ayala, Marco; Capra, Gregory; Fox, David; Hoffer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To determine if tympanic membrane perforation offers any protection from inner ear damage and determine the incidence and pattern of otologic blast injury in military personnel returning from deployment. Retrospective analysis of US service members injured in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom from October 2006 to October 2007. One-hundred ten blast-injured patients were compared to 54 nonblast-injured patients returning from deployment. Data captured included audiogram results, presence of tympanic membrane perforation, demographic data, location and nature of injury, loss of consciousness, sleep disturbance, confusion, and symptoms of headache, dizziness, memory loss, and tinnitus. Of 110 blast-injured patients, 18 patients suffered tympanic membrane perforation (16%), of which nine patients suffered bilateral tympanic membrane perforation (8%). Blast patients suffered more hearing loss than controls as measured by pure-tone averages of varying speech reception frequencies and at 6,000 Hz. Of the blast patients who recorded an audiogram, nearly 24% suffered moderate to profound hearing loss. There was no statistically significant difference in hearing outcomes between blast-injured patients with tympanic membrane perforations and those without; however, when comparing patients with unilateral perforations with their contralateral ear, there was a difference in hearing thresholds at 6,000 Hz. There was a significantly increased risk of tinnitus, memory loss, headache, and dizziness between blast-injured patients compared to controls. Due to its violent nature, blast exposure causes greater neuro-otological manifestations and deserves prompt otologic evaluation. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Determinants of Mental Health Services Utilization Among Deployed Service Members and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-11

    patients range from less severe (e.g. bone fractures) to very severe (e.g. amputations and head injuries), but all of them represent a high risk population...symptoms of illness and utilize healthcare services at a higher rate than men (Narrow et al., 2000; Rieker and Bird , 2000; Verbrugge, 1990). Beneficiary

  5. Postdeployment Hospitalizations among Service Members Deployed in Support of the Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    10 ICD-9-CM diagnoses. For these analyses, only the first hospitalization for the targeted diagnosis or group of diagnoses was included.Outcomes To...injuries or illnesses that may be found after deploy- ment. Other categories such as neoplasms, found the most frequent diagnosis of uterine leiomyoma...phic lateral sclerosis, or fibromyalgia associated with Persian Gulf War service? An examination of Department of Defense hospitalization data. Am J

  6. Dwell Time and Psychological Screening Outcomes Among Military Service Members With Multiple Combat Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    on mental health outcomes and should be exam- ined to identify key determinants of resilience. The issues of a dwell-titTie policy and whether certain...Gahm GA, Swanson RD, Duma SJ; Association between number of deployments to Iraq and niental health screening outcomes in US Army soldiers. J Clin

  7. Trajectories of Trauma Symptoms and Resilience in Deployed US Military Service Members: Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Akaike information criterion 71 637.96 69 472.81 68 532.31 67 784.48 66 735.33 Bayesian information criterion 71...50.001 Multiple deployers (n=4394) Akaike information criterion 89 371.29 86 409.24 84 755.68 83 830.92 83 038.46 Bayesian information criterion 89 428.78...693.12 69 546.36 68 611.99 67 882.55 66 864.05 Sample size-adjusted Bayesian information criterion 71 664.52 69 508.23 68 570.69 67 831.71 66

  8. Personality traits as moderators of the associations between deployment experiences and PTSD symptoms in OEF/OIF service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caska, Catherine M; Renshaw, Keith D

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined traits from the five-factor model of personality as moderators of the associations of combat and aftermath of battle experiences with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 214 National Guard/Reserve service members deployed to operations enduring and Iraqi freedom. Extraversion significantly moderated the associations of both combat experiences and aftermath of battle experiences with PTSD severity, with associations weakening as levels of extraversion increased. The relation between aftermath of battle experiences and PTSD was also moderated by the other four personality factors, with the relation being weaker at higher levels of agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness, and lower levels of neuroticism. These results suggest that personality traits may impact individual responses to war trauma, particularly war-related experiences that are not directly threatening to one's safety (i.e., aftermath of battle events vs. actual combat events). Although this investigation was cross-sectional, these findings indicate that personality traits are an important risk/resiliency factor to consider in people's responses to traumatic events.

  9. Low validity of self-report in identifying recent mental health diagnosis among U.S. service members completing Pre-Deployment Health Assessment (PreDHA and deployed to Afghanistan, 2007: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevin Remington L

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1998, the U.S. Armed Forces has used the mandatory Pre-Deployment Health Assessment (PreDHA screening questionnaire as a means of assessing the health and suitability of U.S. service members for deployment. Limited data exists to quantify the validity of the self-reported PreDHA. This study was conducted to assess the validity of self-reporting in PreDHA to identify deployed service members who have had a recent mental health disorder diagnosis. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 15,195 U.S. service members deployed in support of combat and reconstruction operations in Afghanistan. The Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS, the DoD's longitudinal medical surveillance database, was queried to identify cases among the cohort with a recent diagnosis of a pertinent mental health disorder and to obtain those subjects' responses to the PreDHA. Results Of the study cohort, 11,179 (73.6% subjects had a PreDHA available within the DMSS at the time of analysis. A total of 615 subjects (4.0% had one or more mental health disorder diagnoses during the pre-deployment period. Out the 615 subjects with diagnosed mental health disorders, 465 had a PreDHA. Among these, only 224, not quite half, answered in the affirmative to the PreDHA question: "During the past year, have you sought counseling or care for your mental health?" Conclusion This study demonstrates that the self-reported PreDHA has low validity for identifying service members with diagnosed mental health disorders. The development of electronic decision-support systems which automatically screen electronic health records to identify high-risk service members may prove a valuable component of improved pre-deployment screening processes.

  10. Epidemiology of Genitourinary Injuries among Male U.S. Service Members Deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan: Early Findings from the Trauma Outcomes and Urogenital Health (TOUGH) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janak, Judson C; Orman, Jean A; Soderdahl, Douglas W; Hudak, Steven J

    2017-02-01

    In this study we report the number, nature and severity of genitourinary injuries among male U.S. service members deployed to Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. This retrospective cross-sectional study of the Department of Defense Trauma Registry used ICD-9-CM codes to identify service members with genitourinary injuries, and used Abbreviated Injury Scale codes to determine injury severity, genitourinary organs injured and comorbid injuries. From October 2001 to August 2013, 1,367 male U.S. service members sustained 1 or more genitourinary injuries. The majority of injuries involved the external genitalia (1,000, 73.2%), including the scrotum (760, 55.6%), testes (451, 33.0%), penis (423, 31%) and/or urethra (125, 9.1%). Overall more than a third of service members with genitourinary injury sustained at least 1 severe genitourinary injury (502, 36.7%). Loss of 1 or both testes was documented in 146 men, including 129 (9.4%) unilateral orchiectomies and 17 (1.2%) bilateral orchiectomies. Common comorbid injuries included traumatic brain injury (549, 40.2%), pelvic fracture (341, 25.0%), colorectal injury (297, 21.7%) and lower extremity amputations (387, 28.7%). An unprecedented number of U.S. service members sustained genitourinary injury while deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. Further study is needed to describe the long-term impact of genitourinary injury and determine the potential need for novel treatments to improve sexual, urinary and/or reproductive function among service members with severe genital injury. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Complex Deployed Responsive Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Glenn; McLening, Marc; Caldwell, Nigel; Thompson, Rob

    A pizza restaurant must provide product, in the form of the food and drink, and service in the way this is delivered to the customer. Providing this has distinct operational challenges, but what if the restaurant also provides a home delivery service? The service becomes deployed as the customer is no-longer co-located with the production area. The business challenge is complicated as service needs to be delivered within a geographic region, to time or the pizza will be cold, and within a cost that is not ­prohibitive. It must also be responsive to short term demand; needing to balance the number of staff it has available to undertake deliveries against a forecast of demand.

  12. Using Information from the Electronic Health Record to Improve Measurement of Unemployment in Service Members and Veterans with mTBI and Post-Deployment Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillahunt-Aspillaga, Christina; Finch, Dezon; Massengale, Jill; Kretzmer, Tracy; Luther, Stephen L.; McCart, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this pilot study is 1) to develop an annotation schema and a training set of annotated notes to support the future development of a natural language processing (NLP) system to automatically extract employment information, and 2) to determine if information about employment status, goals and work-related challenges reported by service members and Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and post-deployment stress can be identified in the Electronic Health Record (EHR). Design Retrospective cohort study using data from selected progress notes stored in the EHR. Setting Post-deployment Rehabilitation and Evaluation Program (PREP), an in-patient rehabilitation program for Veterans with TBI at the James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa, Florida. Participants Service members and Veterans with TBI who participated in the PREP program (N = 60). Main Outcome Measures Documentation of employment status, goals, and work-related challenges reported by service members and recorded in the EHR. Results Two hundred notes were examined and unique vocational information was found indicating a variety of self-reported employment challenges. Current employment status and future vocational goals along with information about cognitive, physical, and behavioral symptoms that may affect return-to-work were extracted from the EHR. The annotation schema developed for this study provides an excellent tool upon which NLP studies can be developed. Conclusions Information related to employment status and vocational history is stored in text notes in the EHR system. Information stored in text does not lend itself to easy extraction or summarization for research and rehabilitation planning purposes. Development of NLP systems to automatically extract text-based employment information provides data that may improve the understanding and measurement of employment in this important cohort. PMID:25541956

  13. Energy drink consumption and its association with sleep problems among U.S. service members on a combat deployment - Afghanistan, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Beverages marketed as energy drinks have become a popular form of caffeine consumption targeted at young males, with some brands containing the caffeine equivalent of 1-3 cups of coffee or cans of soda. Energy drinks also include other ingredients intended to boost physical energy or mental alertness, such as herbal substances, amino acids, sugars, and sugar derivatives; however, caffeine is the main active ingredient. Approximately 6% of adolescent and young adult males in U.S. civilian and military populations consume energy drinks daily. These products generally are unregulated and can have negative side effects (e.g., caffeine intoxication, overdose, withdrawal, and poor interactions with alcohol). Paradoxically, excess consumption also can increase sleep problems and daytime sleepiness, which can impair performance. To determine the extent of energy drink use and the association with sleep problems and sleepiness during combat operations, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research analyzed data collected by Joint Mental Health Advisory Team 7 (J-MHAT 7) to Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan in 2010. The analysis showed that 44.8% of deployed service members consumed at least one energy drink daily, with 13.9% drinking three or more a day. No differences by age or rank were found. Service members drinking three or more energy drinks a day were significantly more likely to report sleeping ≤4 hours a night on average than those consuming two drinks or fewer. Those who drank three or more drinks a day also were more likely to report sleep disruption related to stress and illness and were more likely to fall asleep during briefings or on guard duty. Service members should be educated regarding the potential adverse effects of excessive energy drink consumption on sleep and mission performance and should be encouraged to moderate their energy drink consumption in combat environments.

  14. How Deployments Affect Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Press, 1977. Janowitz, Morris , The Professional Soldier, New York: Free Press, 1960. Jex, Steve, and Paul Bliese, “Efficacy as a Moderator of the...Forces & Society, Vol. 16, No. 3, Spring 1990, pp. 385–403. Segal, David, David Rohall, Joseph Jones, and Angela Manos , “Meeting the Missions of the...Socioeconomics,” Armed Forces & Society, Vol. 19, Summer 1993, pp. 511–531. Shils, Edward A., and Morris Janowitz, “Cohesion and Disintegration in the

  15. Optimizing and Validating a Brief Assessment for Identifying Children of Service Members at Risk for Psychological Health Problems Following Parent Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    health and development at pre- mid- and 2 post-timepoints. Children participate through doll and puppet play interview. Teacher ratings of the child ...symptomatology or behavior. Child adjustment from parent, teacher, and child perspectives are one of the key outcomes of the study. Child developmental ...completed by Service Members and spouses as a measure of preschool children’s development of age appropriate skills in interacting with peers. Preschool

  16. A Comparative Study of United States Service Members With and Without a History of Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization on Post Deployment Trauma, Depression, and Hazardous Alcohol Use Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    34! Post-Deployment Health Reassessment (PDHRA) ....................................... 36! Human Subjects Protection...this thesis. The Methods section outlines the research design, sample, measures, procedures, human subjects protection, and data analytic approach...disorder hospitalization rates were greater than the hospitalization rates reported for diagnostic categories associated with pregnancy and childbirth (4

  17. The Association of Predeployment and Deployment-Related Factors on Dimensions of Postdeployment Wellness in U.S. Military Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    to a wellness model.10,11 Premature deaths due to modifiable lifestyle factors, such as obesity and smoking, and the increasing costs of health care...smoking, and not being obese were predictive of being well. Much research has found that making these lifestyle choices promotes positive health, which is...consistent with being well.44,45,47,49 It may be important to encourage deployers to maintain or develop these positive lifestyle choices to help

  18. Assessment of a Post-deployment Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program for National Guard Members and Supporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Jeffrey F.; Widner, Greg; Shroff, Manan; Matthieu, Monica; Balan, Sundari; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; Price, Rumi Kato

    2014-01-01

    The Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program (YRRP) was created to meet the needs of National Guard members and their families throughout the deployment cycle. This study examined the perceived utility of the YRRP’s delivery of information and assistance during the post-deployment reintegration period by National Guard members and accompanying supporters who were mostly spouses. Over 22 months, from 10 YRRP events, 683 service members and 411 supporters completed questionnaires immediately after the YRRP. We analyzed questions on information and help provision, timeliness and concerns related to education, employment, legal, family, and health. Service members and supporters most often endorsed education needs being met (76.8% and 78.2% respectively) and were least likely to endorse legal needs being met (63.5% and 60% respectively). Significantly more supporters than service members (p < 0.0001) reported that the YRRP was the first time they learned of available services across all domains. Service members were significantly more likely than supporters to report concerns about education, employment, and health; while supporters were significantly more likely to report concerns about family. Results suggest the YRRP fills gaps in supporter knowledge and provides needed information and resources to most National Guard families 2-4 months after a deployment. PMID:25373071

  19. Challenges to Deploy Service Design in Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akasaka, Fumiya; Ohno, Takehiko; Jensen, Mika Yasuoka

    2016-01-01

    More and more companies are applying service design approaches to develop services and products. Not every project, however, has achieved its goals. In many cases, difficulties arise from organizational issues such as organization structure and evaluation system. In this research, we held workshops...... where success and failure factors of service design projects in organization are presented. By analysing the results, we construct a model that explains the “difficulties of deploying the service design approach in organization.” On the basis of the model, this paper discusses the challenges...... to the deployment of the service design approach in organizations....

  20. Service Creation and Deployment in Converged Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soler, José

    This monograph (Early Experiences related to Service Creation & Deployment in Converged Networks) presents different experiences related to architectures and mechanisms for deployment of telephony services, understood as especial features complementing the basic voice service. The context...... for these experiences is the transition of telecommunication (telephony) networks from circuit switched based systems towards packet based ones. The text of this monograph proceeds, unaltered for the most, from the author’s PhD thesis “Framework for Deployment of Advanced Telecommunication Services in Current...... and Future Converged Networks”, carried out at the Technical University of Denmark in the period [April 2002-April 2005]. Even though the technologies presented in the text have evolved from that period until now, the presented scenarios and setups are still valid as interesting initial steps in the realm....

  1. Mental Health Disorders, Suicide Risk, and Treatment seeking among Formerly Deployed National Guardand Reserve Service Member seen in Non VA Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    service use, alcohol misuse, suicidal thoughts, and stressful life events were more common among National Guard and Reserve veterans, compared to...to reach our originally planned sample size. Action to be taken:  We have reached out to leaders of student veteran...organizations at over 30 colleges and universities in the central and northeastern PA areas to help with recruitment of the National/Guard Reserve cohort

  2. Integrated personal health and care services deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villalba, E.; Casas, I.; Abadie, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The deployment and adoption of Integrated Personal Health and Care Services in Europe has been slow and fragmented. There have been many initiatives and projects of this kind in different European regions, many of which have not gone beyond the pilot stage. We investigated the necessary...... conditions for mainstreaming these services into care provision. Methods: We conducted a qualitative analysis of 27 Telehealth, Telecare and Integrated Personal Health System projects, implemented across 20 regions in eight European countries. The analysis was based on Suter’s ten key principles...... for successful health systems integration. Results: Out of the 27 cases, we focused on 11 which continued beyond the pilot stage. The key facilitators that are necessary for successful deployment and adoption in the European regions of our study are reorganisation of services, patient focus, governance...

  3. The challenges of reintegration for service members and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danish, Steven J; Antonides, Bradley J

    2013-10-01

    The ongoing wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have posed a number of reintegration challenges to service members. Much of the research focuses on those service members experiencing psychological problems and being treated at the VA. In this article, we contend that much of the distress service members experience occurs following deployment and is a consequence of the difficulties encountered during their efforts to successfully reintegrate into their families and communities. We propose a new conceptual framework for intervening in this reintegration distress that is psycho-educational in nature as well as a new delivery model for providing such services. An example of this new intervention framework is presented.

  4. Quality function deployment: application to rehabilitation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einspruch, E M; Omachonu, V K; Einspruch, N G

    1996-01-01

    Describes how the challenge of providing rehabilitative services at reasonable costs is beginning to mount. The management of quality in rehabilitative services is therefore gaining increasing attention in the health care arena. States that if a link is implied between the above stated goal and customer satisfaction, it is imperative to evaluate quality or customer satisfaction in the context of the patient's experience. Describes the quality function deployment (QFD) system and how it leads to a better understanding of the customer's needs and wants. Explores the process of applying the concept of QFD to physical therapy.

  5. Severe Neuropsychiatric Reaction in a Deployed Military Member after Prophylactic Mefloquine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan L. Peterson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of military personnel who have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan have reported a number of combat-related psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and traumatic brain injury. This case report involves a 27-year-old male active-duty US military service member who developed severe depression, psychotic hallucinations, and neuropsychological sequelae following the prophylactic use of the antimalarial medication mefloquine hydrochloride. The patient had a recent history of depression and was taking antidepressant medications at the time of his deployment to the Middle East. Psychiatrists and other health care providers should be aware of the possible neuropsychiatric side effects of mefloquine in deployed military personnel and should consider the use of other medications for malaria prophylaxis in those individuals who may be at increased risk for side effects.

  6. Integrated personal health and care services deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villalba, E.; Casas, I.; Abadie, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The deployment and adoption of Integrated Personal Health and Care Services in Europe has been slow and fragmented. There have been many initiatives and projects of this kind in different European regions, many of which have not gone beyond the pilot stage. We investigated the necessa...... of Integrated Personal Health and Care Services in European regions has increased. Further research will reveal the weight of each facilitator and which combinations of facilitators lead to rapid adoption.......Objectives: The deployment and adoption of Integrated Personal Health and Care Services in Europe has been slow and fragmented. There have been many initiatives and projects of this kind in different European regions, many of which have not gone beyond the pilot stage. We investigated the necessary...... conditions for mainstreaming these services into care provision. Methods: We conducted a qualitative analysis of 27 Telehealth, Telecare and Integrated Personal Health System projects, implemented across 20 regions in eight European countries. The analysis was based on Suter’s ten key principles...

  7. Deployment of Multicriteria Decision System for National Youth Service Corps (NYSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afolayan A. Obiniyi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available National Youth Service Corps deployment programme is the process of deploying corps members to their places of primary assignment. This paper focused on the use of multicriteria decision system for deployment exercise of corps members to their places of primary assignment instead of manual method. The model was developed using corps membersí disciplines, genders and tribes among others and requests from organisations. The Multicriteria decision system was implemented using Windows, Apache, MySQL and Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP Apache as the web server, PHP as script language, MySQL as the relational database system with windows as operating system and it made use of a single client called the web browser. It is expected that the Multicriteria decision system will increase the efficiency, accuracy and timely posting of the Corps members and that the National youth service corps official should implement the use of the system for their deployment exercise.

  8. Number of deployments, relationship satisfaction and perpetration of partner violence among U.S. Navy members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michelle L; Stambaugh, Leyla; Milletich, Robert J; Veprinsky, Anna; Snell, Alicia K

    2015-08-01

    The present brief report examined whether number of deployments, relationship satisfaction, and the interaction between number of deployments and relationship satisfaction predicted Navy members' reports of perpetrating physical partner violence. Participants were 80 U.S. Navy members assigned to an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer anticipating an 8-month deployment after Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom. The effect that the number of deployments had on perpetrating physical partner violence diminished as relationship satisfaction increased. Results suggest the importance of designing domestic violence intervention and treatment efforts toward those who report high levels of deployment and low relationship satisfaction.

  9. A Concept Analysis of Stigma Perceived by Military Service Members Who Seek Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Stephen H A; Morgan, Brenda J; Parshall, Mark B

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this concept analysis is to clarify military service members' stigma associated with seeking mental health services (MHS). Since 2001, over 2 million military service members have been deployed for or assigned to support military operations. Many service members develop a mental health concern during or after a deployment. Although researchers have assessed perceptions of stigma associated with accessing MHS, defining stigma is difficult, and conceptual clarity regarding stigma is lagging behind studies focused on its effects. Stigma was explored using Walker and Avant's method of concept analysis. Thirty articles were found in the PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, and PubMed databases and selected for inclusion and synthesis. Military service member stigma is a set of beliefs, based on the member's military and prior civilian enculturation, that seeking MHS would be discrediting or embarrassing, cause harm to career progression, or cause peers or superiors to have decreased confidence in the member's ability to perform assigned duties. Nurses are ideally suited and situated to play an important role in decreasing stigma inhibiting service members from seeking MHS. Healthcare providers and civilian and uniformed leaders must communicate the value of seeking MHS to ensure service members' health, unit readiness, and overall force preparedness. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Using Quality Function Deployment to Improve Reference Services Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Long Chang

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Much research has been conducted regarding how reference librarians can evaluate and improve the quality of the answers they provide to users' inquiries. There has been considerably less discussion, however, concerning how to improve the quality of the delivery of those answers, and to upgrade the overall quality of reference services as a whole. Suggestions for improving the quality of service contained within the business literature may be applied to improve library services as well. In this paper the use of Quality Function Deployment (QFD as a tool for improving reference services quality is explored and an adapted framework referred to as service quality function deployment is proposed.

  11. The Millennium Cohort Study: Answering Long-Term Health Concerns of US Military Service Members by Integrating Longitudinal Survey Data with Military Health System Records. Part 2. Pre-Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    determining if diagnoses of pulmonary diseases are changing over time. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus are major causes of cardiovascular disease...deployment, combat exposures, and mental health conditions were studied in relationship to newly reported diabetes mellitus . A total of 44,754...chronic bronchitis or emphysema (1% vs. 1 %) and asthma (1% vs. 1 %) among deployers compared to nondeployers. These data suggest that ground-troop

  12. Military service absences and family members' mental health: A timeline followback assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Aubrey J; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-08-01

    Although military service, and particularly absence due to deployment, has been linked to risk for depression and anxiety among some spouses and children of active duty service members, there is limited research to explain the heterogeneity in family members' reactions to military service stressors. The current investigation introduces the Timeline Followback Military Family Interview (TFMFI) as a clinically useful strategy to collect detailed time-linked information about the service member's absences. Two dimensions of parent absence--the extent to which absences coincide with important family events and cumulative time absent--were tested as potential risks to family members' mental health. Data from 70 mother-adolescent pairs revealed that the number of important family events missed by the service member was linked to elevated youth symptoms of depression, even when accounting for the number of deployments and cumulative duration of the service member's absence. However, youth who reported more frequent contact with the service member during absences were buffered from the effects of extensive absence. Mothers' symptoms were associated with the cumulative duration of the service members' time away, but not with family events missed by the service member. These results identify circumstances that increase the risk for mental health symptoms associated with military family life. The TFMFI provides an interview-based strategy for clinicians wishing to understand military family members' lived experience during periods of service-member absence. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Utility communication networks and services specification, deployment and operation

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This CIGRE green book begins by addressing the specification and provision of communication services in the context of operational applications for electrical power utilities, before subsequently providing guidelines on the deployment or transformation of networks to deliver these specific communication services. Lastly, it demonstrates how these networks and their services can be monitored, operated, and maintained to ensure that the requisite high level of service quality is consistently achieved.

  14. Comparative Cloud Deployment and Service Orchestration Process Using Juju Charms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Raj

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This age is known as a service oriented age due to the globalization and advancement in technology day by day which lead business developers to deploy their services over the cloud. It lead to the development of new platform that has the capability to easily cope with the business expectations and has introduced a tough competition between the platform providers. These days Services like IaaS hasbeen provided by many cloud service providers along with PaaS and SaaS. We provide a comparative study in between the types of platform (open source cloud platform as OpenStack and proprietary basedplatform as Eucalyptus for deployment of IaaS , which has taken into consideration the size of deployment, manageability and fault tolerance, API provisioning /support, performance, compatibility withother platforms and types of services to be hosted. We discussed here about two high demanding IaaS platform provided by OpenStack and Eucalyptus. Both of the platform providers are competitive in termsof deployment of IaaS and service provisioning to its big clients. We also discussed here about the tools that can be used with these cloud platforms to easily install services on these clouds.

  15. Student and Nonstudent National Guard Service Members/Veterans and Their Use of Services for Mental Health Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Erin E.; Bohnert, Kipling M.; Walters, Heather M.; Ganoczy, Dara; Valenstein, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare mental health symptoms and service utilization among returning student and nonstudent service members/veterans (SM/Vs). Participants: SM/Vs (N = 1,439) were predominately white (83%) men (92%), half were over age 30 (48%), and 24% were students. Methods: SM/Vs completed surveys 6 months post deployment (October 2011-July…

  16. Quality Function Deployment: Application to Chemotherapy Unit Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Hashemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today’s healthcare organizations are challenged by pressures to meet growing population demands and enhance community health through improving service quality. Quality function deployment is one of the widely-used customerdriven approaches for health services development. In the current study, quality function deployment is used to improve the quality of chemotherapy unit services. Methods: First, we identified chemotherapy outpatient unit patients as chemotherapy unit customers. Then, the Delphi technique and component factor analysis with orthogonal rotation was employed to determine their expectations. Thereafter, data envelopment analysis was performed to specify user priorities. We determined the relationships between patients’ expectations and service elements through expert group consensus using the Delphi method and the relationships between service elements by Pearson correlation. Finally, simple and compound priorities of the service elements were derived by matrix calculation. Results: Chemotherapy unit patients had four main expectations: access, suitable hotel services, satisfactory and effective relationships, and clinical services. The chemotherapy unit has six key service elements of equipment, materials, human resources, physical space, basic facilities, and communication and training. There were four-level relationships between the patients’ expectations and service elements, with mostly significant correlations between service elements. According to the findings, the functional group of basic facilities was the most critical factor, followed by materials. Conclusion: The findings of the current study can be a general guideline as well as a scientific, structured framework for chemotherapy unit decision makers in order to improve chemotherapy unit services.

  17. Abstraction Layer For Development And Deployment Of Cloud Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh Minh Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will present an abstraction layer for cloud computing, which intends to simplify the manipulation with virtual machines in clouds for easy and controlled development and deployment of cloud services. It also ensures interoperability between different cloud infrastructures and allows developers to create cloud appliances easily via inheritance mechanisms.

  18. Service Delivery Platforms Developing and Deploying Converged Multimedia Services

    CERN Document Server

    Ahson, Syed A

    2011-01-01

    In the telecommunications industry, it is becoming increasingly important for operators to quickly provide a service delivery platform. This book discusses the fundamental requirements of service delivery platforms, evaluating their basic functions and feasibility. Starting with content and media in modern networks, the text presents the entire user experience, including requirements for the user terminal, supporting systems, broadcasting, and networks. Expert contributors explore the evolving role of service delivery platforms, explaining various applications and delivery mechanisms, providin

  19. Predictors of Army National Guard and Reserve members' use of Veteran Health Administration health care after demobilizing from OEF/OIF deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alex H S; Chen, Cheng; Mohr, Beth A; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

    2014-10-01

    This study described rates and predictors of Army National Guard and Army Reserve members' enrollment in and utilization of Veteran Health Administration (VHA) services in the 365 days following demobilization from an index deployment. We also explored regional and VHA facility variation in serving eligible members in their catchment areas. The sample included 125,434 Army National Guard and 48,423 Army Reserve members who demobilized after a deployment ending between FY 2008 and FY 2011. Demographic, geographic, deployment, and Military Health System eligibility were derived from Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System and "Contingency Tracking System" data. The VHA National Patient Care Databases were used to ascertain VHA utilization and status (e.g., enrollee, TRICARE). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate predictors of VHA utilization as an enrollee in the year following demobilization. Of the study members demobilizing during the observation period, 56.9% of Army National Guard members and 45.7% of Army Reserve members utilized VHA as an enrollee within 12 months. Demographic, regional, health coverage, and deployment-related factors were associated with VHA enrollment and utilization, and significant variation by VHA facility was found. These findings can be useful in the design of specific outreach efforts to improve linkage from the Military Health System to the VHA.

  20. A Novel Deployment Method for Communication-Intensive Applications in Service Clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Chuanchang Liu; Jingqi Yang

    2014-01-01

    The service platforms are migrating to clouds for reasonably solving long construction periods, low resource utilizations, and isolated constructions of service platforms. However, when the migration is conducted in service clouds, there is a little focus of deploying communication-intensive applications in previous deployment methods. To address this problem, this paper proposed the combination of the online deployment and the offline deployment for deploying communication-intensive applicat...

  1. When a Service Member May Be at Risk for Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... issue for service members and their loved ones. Stress that never seems to let up can affect anyone, and some service members may be at greater risk for suicide than others. Factors may include: Being a young, ...

  2. A Brief Exposure-Based Intervention for Service Members with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Maria M.; Litz, Brett T.; Gray, Matt J.; Lebowitz, Leslie; Nash, William; Conoscenti, Lauren; Amidon, Amy; Lang, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    The growing number of service members in need of mental health care requires that empirically based interventions be tailored to the unique demands and exigencies of this population. We discuss a 6-session intervention for combat-related PTSD designed to foster willingness to engage with and disclose difficult deployment memories through a…

  3. Invisible Wounds: Serving Service Members and Veterans with PTSD and TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Disability, 2009

    2009-01-01

    More than 1.6 million American service members have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). As of December 2008, more than 4,000 troops have been killed and over 30,000 have returned from a combat zone with visible wounds and a range of permanent disabilities. In addition, an…

  4. 76 FR 80902 - Senior Executive Service; Performance Review Board; Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... on performance appraisals assigned to individual members of the agency's Senior Executive Service... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tonya Turner, Deputy Associate Director for Human Resources, Court Services... SUPERVISION AGENCY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Senior Executive Service; Performance Review Board;...

  5. Spouses/Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    promotion causing excessive stress . 7 4. Service members sacrificing their own personal health to try to meet demands of military and family (e.g...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-2-0113 TITLE: Spouses/ Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Keith D...SUBTITLE Spouses/ Family Members of Service Members at Risk for PTSD or Suicide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0113 5c. PROGRAM

  6. Perceived stress, heart rate, and blood pressure among adolescents with family members deployed in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Vernon A; Davis, Harry; Treiber, Frank A

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the impact of the 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom on heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) and self-reported stress levels among three groups of self-categorized adolescents: (1) military dependents with family members deployed; (2) military dependents with no family members deployed; (3) civilian dependents. At the onset and end of the "major hostilities" of Operation Iraqi Freedom, 121 adolescents (mean age = 15.8 +/- 1.1 years) completed questionnaires evaluating the psychological impact of the war and were evaluated for HR and BP. The military deployed dependents exhibited significantly higher HR than other groups at both evaluations (both p < 0.04). Ethnicity by group interactions indicated that European American-deployed dependents had higher stress scores at both time points (p < 0.02). Military dependent European Americans exhibited higher systolic BP compared to the other groups on the second evaluation (p < 0.03).

  7. Attitudes Toward Automated Information Retrieval Services Among RASD Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitecki, Danuta A.

    1976-01-01

    Summary of survey of the American Library Association Reference and Adult Services Division (RASD) members concerning attitudes toward, need for, and preferences in acquiring information on automated information retrieval services. (KP)

  8. 47 CFR 51.231 - Provision of information on advanced services deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provision of information on advanced services... of information on advanced services deployment. (a) An incumbent LEC must provide to requesting...) Uses in determining which services can be deployed; and information with respect to the...

  9. A novel deployment method for communication-intensive applications in service clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanchang; Yang, Jingqi

    2014-01-01

    The service platforms are migrating to clouds for reasonably solving long construction periods, low resource utilizations, and isolated constructions of service platforms. However, when the migration is conducted in service clouds, there is a little focus of deploying communication-intensive applications in previous deployment methods. To address this problem, this paper proposed the combination of the online deployment and the offline deployment for deploying communication-intensive applications in service clouds. Firstly, the system architecture was designed for implementing the communication-aware deployment method for communication-intensive applications in service clouds. Secondly, in the online-deployment algorithm and the offline-deployment algorithm, service instances were deployed in an optimal cloud node based on the communication overhead which is determined by the communication traffic between services, as well as the communication performance between cloud nodes. Finally, the experimental results demonstrated that the proposed methods deployed communication-intensive applications effectively with lower latency and lower load compared with existing algorithms.

  10. Anger problems and posttraumatic stress disorder in male and female National Guard and Reserve Service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen, Miranda; Rathod, Sujit D; Cohen, Gregory; Sampson, Laura; Ursano, Robert; Gifford, Robert; Fullerton, Carol; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Anger is a common problem among veterans and has been associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study aimed to improve understanding of how anger and PTSD co-occur by examining gender differences and differences by whether the triggering traumatic event is deployment-related vs. civilian-related in current service members. A representative cohort of Reserve and National Guard service personnel (n = 1293) were interviewed to assess for deployment- or civilian-related traumas, PTSD, and anger. The prevalence of self-reported anger problems was estimated among male (n = 1036) and female (n = 257) service members. Log Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to estimate the associations of problems with anger with PTSD and PTSD symptom severity for men and women. Self-reported anger problems were common among male (53.0%) and female (51.3%) service members. Adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) showed associations between anger and PTSD connected to both civilian- and deployment-related traumas (PR were 1.77 (95% CI 1.52-2.05) and 1.85 (95% CI 1.62-2.12), respectively). PTSD symptom severity was also associated with anger. This study was cross-sectional and so a causal relationship between PTSD and anger cannot be established. Problems with anger are common among male and female current Guard and Reserve members. These findings suggest that anger treatment should be made available to current service members and that clinicians should assess anger problems irrespective of gender. Future research should examine the effectiveness of anger treatment protocols by gender.

  11. 47 CFR 59.3 - Information concerning deployment of new services and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information concerning deployment of new services and equipment. 59.3 Section 59.3 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INFRASTRUCTURE SHARING § 59.3 Information concerning deployment...

  12. CERN´s Library: members of the Scientific Information Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The Scientific Information Service in the Education and Technology Transfer division is responsible for maintaining and updating the CERN Library and Scientific Archives. The members of the group are pictured here in CERN's central library.

  13. Predictors of well-being in the lives of student service members and veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williston, Sarah Krill; Roemer, Lizabeth

    2017-06-15

    The current study examined predictors of well-being, including quality of life and academic engagement, in a sample of student service members and veteran college students. Eighty-seven student service members/veterans (SSM/V) completed an online survey containing questions about post-deployment social support, emotion regulation skills, psychological distress, academic engagement, quality of life, and demographics. Participants were recruited from September 2012 through May 2014. Results provided partial support for the proposed bi-directional mediational relations between post-deployment social support and emotion regulation predicting to quality of life and academic engagement. Path models indicated that both post-deployment social support and emotion regulation skills partially mediated the relation with quality of life while accounting for the effect of psychological distress, and that emotion regulation skills fully mediated the relation between social support and academic engagement. These findings suggest that both social support and emotion regulation skills may be useful targets for health promotion and intervention efforts for this population. Limitations and clinical implications for the development of on-campus SSM/V focused health promotion services are discussed.

  14. A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Postdeployment Parenting Intervention for Service Members and Their Families With Very Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Ellen R; Paris, Ruth; Emmert-Aronson, Ben; Ross, Abigail; Acker, Michelle

    2016-10-06

    Objective: Parenting through the deployment cycle presents unique stressors for military families. To date, few evidence-based and military-specific parenting programs are available to support parenting through cycles of deployment separation and reintegration, especially for National Guard/Reserve members. The purpose of this research was to test the efficacy of a parenting program developed specifically to support military families during reintegration. Method: Within 1 year of returning from deployment to Afghanistan or Iraq, 115 service members with very young children were randomly assigned to receive either the Strong Families Strong Forces Parenting Program at baseline or after a 12-week waiting period. Using a home-based modality, service members, at-home parents, and their young child were assessed at baseline, 3 months posttreatment/wait period, and 6 months from baseline. Results: Service member parents in Strong Families evidenced greater reductions in parenting stress and mental health distress relative to those in the waitlist comparison group. Service members with more posttraumatic stress symptoms reported higher levels of perceived parental efficacy in the intervention group than service members in the comparison group. Intervention also resulted in enhanced parental reflective capacity, including increased curiosity and interest in the young child among those in the intervention group relative to comparison. Conclusion: Service member parents and their spouses demonstrated high interest in participating in a postdeployment parenting program targeting families with very young children. Findings point to the feasibility, appeal, and efficacy of Strong Families in this initial trial and suggest promise for implementation in broader military and community service systems. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Personal technology use by U.S. military service members and veterans: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nigel E; Wheeler, William M

    2015-04-01

    Although personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, computers, and tablets, increasingly are being leveraged as vehicles for health in the civilian world, almost nothing is known about personal technology use in the U.S. military. In 2012 we conducted a unique survey of personal technologies used by U.S. military service members. However, with the rapidly growing sophistication of personal technology and changes in consumer habits, that knowledge must be continuously updated to be useful. Accordingly, we recently surveyed new samples of active duty service members, National Guard and Reserve, and veterans. We collected data by online surveys in 2013 from 239 active, inactive, and former service members. Online surveys were completed in-person via laptop computers at a large military installation and remotely via Web-based surveys posted on the Army Knowledge Online Web site and on a Defense Center Facebook social media channel. We measured high rates of personal technology use by service members at home across popular electronic media. The most dramatic change since our earlier survey was the tremendous increase in mobile phone use at home for a wide variety of purposes. Participants also reported moderate non-work uses of computers and tablets while on recent deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, but almost no mobile phone use, ostensibly because of military restrictions in the war zone. These latest results will enable researchers and technology developers target their efforts on the most promising and popular technologies for psychological health in the military.

  16. Who Do We Deploy for Psychological Operations: A Function Profile for TPT Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    intrinsic motivation. The competences in the function profile for TPT members are: information gathering, reporting and analyzing ( cognitive ...Persoonijkheidskenmerken zijn karaktertrekken en eigenschappen die mensen maken wie ze zijn. In de psychologie wordt vaak de volgende definitie van...worden van vragenlijsten. In de psychologie bestaan gestandaardiseerde vragenlijsten voor het meten van verschillende persoonlijkheidstrekken. Er zijn

  17. Third molar-related morbidity in deployed Service personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, J; McColl, E; Cross, B; McCormick, R J

    2010-08-28

    The minimisation of disease and non-battle injury (DNBI) is essential for maintaining efficiency in a fighting force. Third molar-related morbidity is a common cause of DNBI. With extended lines of communication in current military deployments, travelling for dental care is often subject to significant danger. Military dental officers in Afghanistan and Iraq recorded data on patients presenting with third molar pathology. Related previous history was obtained from the individual and from the military dental records. Three hundred and three individuals presented during the 23 month study period; 27.7% were unable to access care immediately, most commonly citing work pressure or lack of safe transport. Of those needing to travel, 70% were moved by helicopter. Pericoronitis was diagnosed in 84.4% of cases, 20.6% of these teeth being extracted; 53.5% of patients reported no prior symptoms, 22.7% with two or more episodes. There was documented evidence in military dental records of previous problems in 29.2% of cases. 11.3% had previously been listed for extraction of the presenting tooth. Dental treatment for troops in combat situations is fraught with difficulty. Special consideration must be given to the management of third molars in military personnel.

  18. Deploying and sharing U-Compare workflows as web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontonatsios, Georgios; Korkontzelos, Ioannis; Kolluru, Balakrishna; Thompson, Paul; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2013-02-18

    U-Compare is a text mining platform that allows the construction, evaluation and comparison of text mining workflows. U-Compare contains a large library of components that are tuned to the biomedical domain. Users can rapidly develop biomedical text mining workflows by mixing and matching U-Compare's components. Workflows developed using U-Compare can be exported and sent to other users who, in turn, can import and re-use them. However, the resulting workflows are standalone applications, i.e., software tools that run and are accessible only via a local machine, and that can only be run with the U-Compare platform. We address the above issues by extending U-Compare to convert standalone workflows into web services automatically, via a two-click process. The resulting web services can be registered on a central server and made publicly available. Alternatively, users can make web services available on their own servers, after installing the web application framework, which is part of the extension to U-Compare. We have performed a user-oriented evaluation of the proposed extension, by asking users who have tested the enhanced functionality of U-Compare to complete questionnaires that assess its functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency and maintainability. The results obtained reveal that the new functionality is well received by users. The web services produced by U-Compare are built on top of open standards, i.e., REST and SOAP protocols, and therefore, they are decoupled from the underlying platform. Exported workflows can be integrated with any application that supports these open standards. We demonstrate how the newly extended U-Compare enhances the cross-platform interoperability of workflows, by seamlessly importing a number of text mining workflow web services exported from U-Compare into Taverna, i.e., a generic scientific workflow construction platform.

  19. Easing reintegration: telephone support groups for spouses of returning Iraq and Afghanistan service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Linda Olivia; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Graney, Marshall J; Zuber, Jeffrey; Burns, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Spouses of returning Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom, OIF) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom, OEF) military service members report increased depression and anxiety post deployment as they work to reintegrate the family and service member. Reconnecting the family, renegotiating roles that have shifted, reestablishing communication patterns, and dealing with mental health concerns are all tasks that spouses must undertake as part of reintegration. We tested telephone support groups focusing on helping spouses with these basic reintegration tasks. Year-long telephone support groups focused on education, skills building (communication skills, problem solving training, cognitive behavioral techniques, stress management), and support. Spouse depression and anxiety were decreased and perceived social support was increased during the course of the study. In subgroup analyses, spouses with husbands whose injuries caused care difficulties had a positive response to the intervention. However, they were more likely to be depressed, be anxious, and have less social support compared to participants who had husbands who had no injury or whose injury did not cause care difficulty. Study findings suggest that this well-established, high-access intervention can help improve quality of life for military spouses who are struggling with reintegration of the service member and family.

  20. Enhance Internet Banking Service Quality with Quality Function Deployment Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Michel SAHUT; Kucerova, Zuzana

    2003-01-01

    Internet banking providers tend to introduce to consumers as many services as possible very often without knowing what the customers really want and expect from them. Within the traditional banking environment it was almost impossible to monitor and record data on second-by-second actions and interactions with the customers. The fact is that the electronic environment allows Internet banking providers to capture enormous amount of information about customer behaviour during the whole process ...

  1. Investigating the Attitudes and Views of the Librarians and Faculty members of Shiraz University over deploying Wi-Fi in Academic Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Mehrad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance and wide scope of Wi-Fi applications within academic environs in developed countries and its use in library services, its utilization within academic libraries in Iran is felt. While presenting Wi-Fi networks, the present study employed a survey of librarians and faculty members in Shiraz University to investigate their the outlook and viewpoints regarding the deployment of such networks in academic libraries. Findings demonstrated that librarians are very inclined to use Wi-Fi in library services such as listing, shelf-reading and OPAC and demand comprehensive network coverage throughout the entire library spaces. Meanwhile, faculty members expressed the necessity of increasing use of such networks all over the campus and remote access to library resources. Generally given the outcome of the present investigation, although Wi-Fi application in libraries is a novel and emerging phenomenon yet to catch on in Iran, librarians, researchers and professors are very keen about its use and application within academic environments.

  2. Using architecture and technology to promote improved quality of life for military service members with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquina, Paul F; Pasquina, Lavinia Fici; Anderson-Barnes, Victoria C; Giuggio, Jeffrey S; Cooper, Rory A

    2010-02-01

    Today, injured service members are surviving wounds that would have been fatal in previous wars. A recent RAND report estimates that approximately 320,000 service members may have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) during deployment, and it is not uncommon for a soldier to sustain multiple associated injuries such as limb loss, paralysis, sensory loss, and psychological damage. As a result, many military service members and their families face significant challenges returning to a high quality of independent life. The architectural concepts of universal design (UD) and evidence-based design (EBD) are gaining interest as an integral part of the rehabilitation process of veterans with TBI. This article examines the possibilities presented by UD and EBD in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, in terms of high-end building and interior design quality, and possible technological options for individuals with disabilities.

  3. Flexible Web service infrastructure for the development and deployment of predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Rajarshi

    2008-02-01

    The development of predictive statistical models is a common task in the field of drug design. The process of developing such models involves two main steps: building the model and then deploying the model. Traditionally such models have been deployed using Web page interfaces. This approach restricts the user to using the specified Web page, and using the model in other ways can be cumbersome. In this paper we present a flexible and generalizable approach to the deployment of predictive models, based on a Web service infrastructure using R. The infrastructure described allows one to access the functionality of these models using a variety of approaches ranging from Web pages to workflow tools. We highlight the advantages of this infrastructure by developing and subsequently deploying random forest models for two data sets.

  4. Supporting Collaborative Model and Data Service Development and Deployment with DevOps

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, O.

    2016-12-01

    Adopting DevOps practices for model service development and deployment enables a community to engage in service-oriented modeling and data management. The Cloud Services Integration Platform (CSIP) developed the last 5 years at Colorado State University provides for collaborative integration of environmental models into scalable model and data services as a micro-services platform with API and deployment infrastructure. Originally developed to support USDA natural resource applications, it proved suitable for a wider range of applications in the environmental modeling domain. While extending its scope and visibility it became apparent community integration and adequate work flow support through the full model development and application cycle drove successful outcomes.DevOps provide best practices, tools, and organizational structures to optimize the transition from model service development to deployment by minimizing the (i) operational burden and (ii) turnaround time for modelers. We have developed and implemented a methodology to fully automate a suite of applications for application lifecycle management, version control, continuous integration, container management, and container scaling to enable model and data service developers in various institutions to collaboratively build, run, deploy, test, and scale services within minutes.To date more than 160 model and data services are available for applications in hydrology (PRMS, Hydrotools, CFA, ESP), water and wind erosion prediction (WEPP, WEPS, RUSLE2), soil quality trends (SCI, STIR), water quality analysis (SWAT-CP, WQM, CFA, AgES-W), stream degradation assessment (SWAT-DEG), hydraulics (cross-section), and grazing management (GRAS). In addition, supporting data services include soil (SSURGO), ecological site (ESIS), climate (CLIGEN, WINDGEN), land management and crop rotations (LMOD), and pesticides (WQM), developed using this workflow automation and decentralized governance.

  5. Military Service Member and Veteran Reintegration: A Conceptual Analysis, Unified Definition, and Key Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Fisher, Michael P; Blevins, Cara L

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) may experience a variety of stress-related disorders and challenges when reintegrating from the military to the community. Facilitating the reintegration, transition, readjustment and coping, and community integration, of MSMVs is a societal priority. To date, research addressing MSMV reintegration has not identified a comprehensive definition of the term or defined the broader context within which the process of reintegration occurs although both are needed to promote valid and reliable measurement of reintegration and clarify related challenges, processes, and their impact on outcomes. Therefore, this principle-based concept analysis sought to review existing empirical reintegration measurement instruments and identify the problems and needs of MSMV reintegration to provide a unified definition of reintegration to guide future research, clinical practice, and related services. We identified 1,459 articles in the health and social sciences literature, published between 1990 and 2015, by searching multiple electronic databases. Screening of abstracts and full text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 117 articles for review. Two investigators used constant conceptual comparison to evaluate relevant articles independently. We examined the term reintegration and related terms (i.e., transition, readjustment, community integration) identifying trends in their use over time, analyzed the eight reintegration survey instruments, and synthesized service member and veteran self-reported challenges and needs for reintegration. More reintegration research was published during the last 5 years (n = 373) than in the previous 10 years combined (n = 130). The research suggests coping with life stresses plays an integral role in military service member and veteran post-deployment reintegration. Key domains of reintegration include individual, interpersonal, community organizations, and societal factors

  6. Military Service Member and Veteran Reintegration: A Conceptual Analysis, Unified Definition, and Key Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A.; Fisher, Michael P.; Blevins, Cara L.

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) may experience a variety of stress-related disorders and challenges when reintegrating from the military to the community. Facilitating the reintegration, transition, readjustment and coping, and community integration, of MSMVs is a societal priority. To date, research addressing MSMV reintegration has not identified a comprehensive definition of the term or defined the broader context within which the process of reintegration occurs although both are needed to promote valid and reliable measurement of reintegration and clarify related challenges, processes, and their impact on outcomes. Therefore, this principle-based concept analysis sought to review existing empirical reintegration measurement instruments and identify the problems and needs of MSMV reintegration to provide a unified definition of reintegration to guide future research, clinical practice, and related services. We identified 1,459 articles in the health and social sciences literature, published between 1990 and 2015, by searching multiple electronic databases. Screening of abstracts and full text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 117 articles for review. Two investigators used constant conceptual comparison to evaluate relevant articles independently. We examined the term reintegration and related terms (i.e., transition, readjustment, community integration) identifying trends in their use over time, analyzed the eight reintegration survey instruments, and synthesized service member and veteran self-reported challenges and needs for reintegration. More reintegration research was published during the last 5 years (n = 373) than in the previous 10 years combined (n = 130). The research suggests coping with life stresses plays an integral role in military service member and veteran post-deployment reintegration. Key domains of reintegration include individual, interpersonal, community organizations, and societal factors

  7. Deployment of e-health services - a business model engineering strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijl, Björn; Nieuwenhuis, Lambertus Johannes Maria; Huis in 't Veld, M.H.A.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2010-01-01

    We designed a business model for deploying a myofeedback-based teletreatment service. An iterative and combined qualitative and quantitative action design approach was used for developing the business model and the related value network. Insights from surveys, desk research, expert interviews,

  8. Service platform for rapid development and deployment of context-Aware, mobile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pokraev, S.V.; Koolwaaij, J.; Setten, van M.; Broens, T.H.F.; Dockhorn Costa, P.; Wibbels, M.; Ebben, P.; Strating, P.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a web services-based platform that facilitates and speeds up the development and deployment of context-aware, integrated mobile speech and data applications. The platform is capable of handling different types of context and offers sophisticated personalization mechanisms. T

  9. Deployment of e-health services – a business model engineering strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijl, Björn; Nieuwenhuis, Lambert J.M.; Huis in 't Veld, Rianne M.H.A.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M.R.

    2010-01-01

    We designed a business model for deploying a myofeedback-based teletreatment service. An iterative and combined qualitative and quantitative action design approach was used for developing the business model and the related value network. Insights from surveys, desk research, expert interviews, works

  10. Student and Nonstudent National Guard Service Members/Veterans and Their Use of Services for Mental Health Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Erin E; Bohnert, Kipling M; Walters, Heather M; Ganoczy, Dara; Valenstein, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    To compare mental health symptoms and service utilization among returning student and nonstudent service members/veterans (SM/Vs). SM/Vs (N = 1,439) were predominately white (83%) men (92%), half were over age 30 (48%), and 24% were students. SM/Vs completed surveys 6 months post deployment (October 2011-July 2013). Students and nonstudent SM/Vs did not differ in positive screens for depression, anxiety, hazardous drinking, or posttraumatic stress disorder. Students (n = 81) and nonstudents (n = 265) with mental health symptoms had low levels of mental health service use (eg, Department of Veterans Affairs [VA], civilian, or military facilities), at 47% and 57%. respectively. Fewer students used VA mental health services. Common barriers to treatment seeking included not wanting treatment on military records and embarrassment. Like other returning SM/Vs, student SM/Vs have unmet mental health needs. The discrepancy between potential need and treatment seeking suggests that colleges might be helpful in further facilitating mental health service use for student SM/Vs.

  11. JClarens: A Java Framework for Developing and Deploying Web Services for Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, M; Van Lingen, F; Newman, H; Bunn, J; Ali, A; McClatchey, R; Anjum, A; Azim, T; Rehman, W; Khan, F; In, J U; Thomas, Michael; Steenberg, Conrad; Lingen, Frank van; Newman, Harvey; Bunn, Julian; Ali, Arshad; Clatchey, Richard Mc; Anjum, Ashiq; Azim, Tahir; Rehman, Waqas ur; Khan, Faisal; In, Jang Uk

    2005-01-01

    High Energy Physics (HEP) and other scientific communities have adopted Service Oriented Architectures (SOA) as part of a larger Grid computing effort. This effort involves the integration of many legacy applications and programming libraries into a SOA framework. The Grid Analysis Environment (GAE) is such a service oriented architecture based on the Clarens Grid Services Framework and is being developed as part of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). Clarens provides a set of authorization, access control, and discovery services, as well as XMLRPC and SOAP access to all deployed services. Two implementations of the Clarens Web Services Framework (Python and Java) offer integration possibilities for a wide range of programming languages. This paper describes the Java implementation of the Clarens Web Services Framework called JClarens. and several web services of interest to the scientific and Grid community that hav...

  12. Open-standards rich media mobile platform & rapid deployment service creation tool

    OpenAIRE

    Cody, RL; Tsekleves, E; Cosmas, J

    2008-01-01

    This paper builds upon the work carried out by Brunel University in the field of "Fast Prototyping And Semi-automated User Interface And Application Generation for Converged Broadcast and Cellular Terminals" [1]. This work involved the development of a service creation application for interactive services on mobile devices and methodologies and tools to speed up and deskill the deployment process. This paper aims at further enhancing these tools and presents an enhanced open standards referen...

  13. [The method of quality function deployment --QFD-- in nursing services planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, L M; Evora, Y D; Boan, F S

    2000-10-01

    "Focus on the client" is the posture that must be adopted in order to offer quality products. Based on the Total Quality Management approach, the Quality Function Deployment method (QFD) is a tool to achieve this goal. The purpose of this study is to create a proposal for planning the nursing services following the steps and actions of this methodology. The basic procedure was to survey the necessity of 106 hospitalized patients. Data were deployed using the seventeen steps proposed. Results showed that the interaction is more important than the technique according to the clients and also that this method enables the implementation of quality in nursing care.

  14. 75 FR 16445 - Request for Nominations for Members to Serve on the National Technical Information Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... National Technical Information Service Request for Nominations for Members to Serve on the National Technical Information Service Advisory Board AGENCY: National Technical Information Service; Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Technical Information Service (NTIS) is seeking five...

  15. Research on data pre-deployment in information service flow of digital ocean cloud computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Suixiang; XU Lingyu; DONG Han; WANG Lei; WU Shaochun; QIAO Baiyou; WANG Guoren

    2014-01-01

    Data pre-deployment in the HDFS (Hadoop distributed file systems) is more complicated than that in tradi-tional file systems. There are many key issues need to be addressed, such as determining the target location of the data prefetching, the amount of data to be prefetched, the balance between data prefetching services and normal data accesses. Aiming to solve these problems, we employ the characteristics of digital ocean information service flows and propose a deployment scheme which combines input data prefetching with output data oriented storage strategies. The method achieves the parallelism of data preparation and data processing, thereby massively reducing I/O time cost of digital ocean cloud computing platforms when pro-cessing multi-source information synergistic tasks. The experimental results show that the scheme has a higher degree of parallelism than traditional Hadoop mechanisms, shortens the waiting time of a running service node, and significantly reduces data access conflicts.

  16. Configuration, Deployment, and Scheduling Models for Management and Optimization of Patrol Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a decision support system (DSS and its models for patrol service center (PSC. PSC plays an important role in public security and emergency management. The configuration, deployment, and scheduling of resources of PSC are important for improving the efficiency of patrol-related resources, service quantity, and emergency response capability. A series of decision-making models of the DSS are studied. First, the criteria and models are proposed for configuring and deploying PSCs; second, three types of models for incremental, direct, and redeployment optimization are built in views for decisions aiming at PSC configuration, deployment, and scheduling problems; third, considering three typical patrol-related service scenarios (alarm assignment, main road blockade, and besiege program, three scheduling models are built, respectively, for PSC-related service and coordination of multiple PSCs. This work contributes to the literature on patrol services and network optimization problems in the following aspects: based on a series of models, a DSS framework is designed for PSCs; the models are formulated for resource management and scheduling upon geography information system; coordination strategies among close PSCs are incorporated into decision models. These features are examined in integration manners. The assessment criteria and optimization models studied in the paper are beneficial for building DSSs for PSC.

  17. Staff members with 25 years’ service at CERN in 2009

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    The 62 staff members who are celebrating 25 years' service at CERN in 2009 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 17 November. ARNAUDON Luca/BE BEL Jean-François/TE BERTINELLI Francesco/TE BLAND Alastair/BE BLOCH Philippe/PH BORCIER Luc/EN BRUNEL Xavier/PH BURKIMSHER Paul/EN CAMPI Domenico/PH CATTAI Ariella/PH DALIN Jean-Michel/EN DANGOISSE Claude/IT DAVIDS Daniel/EN DI MAIO Franck/BE FERRARI Claude/EN FISCHER Klaus/TE FOLLEY Adrian/PH FORMENTI Fabio/TE GATIGNON Laurentius/EN GIACHINO Rossano/BE GONIDEC Allain/PH GRAFSTROM Per/PH HANCOCK Steven/BE HATCH Mark/PH HEMMER Frederic/IT HOURICAN Michael/TE ...

  18. Resilient Warrior: A Stress Management Group to Improve Psychological Health in Service Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Louisa G; Bui, Eric; Baier, Allison L; Mehta, Darshan H; Denninger, John W; Fricchione, Gregory L; Casey, Aggie; Kagan, Leslee; Park, Elyse R; Simon, Naomi M

    2015-11-01

    Many veterans deployed after 9/11/2001 are impacted by subthreshold levels of posttraumatic stress, anxiety, or other psychological health problems that may interfere with successful reintegration. Conventional treatments, including medication and trauma-focused individual psychotherapies, may not be optimally adapted, accepted, or effective to treat these subsyndromal symptoms. We developed "Resilient Warrior," a 4-session, group-based, mind-body stress-management and resilience program targeted to build skills and assessed whether its format was accessible and acceptable, and potentially efficacious, to support resilience among service members. From April 2014 to October 2014, 15 participants (53.3% women; mean age=36.6 y; SD=6.2) were surveyed for program acceptability and feasibility and completed self-reported psychological health outcomes before and after program participation. The majority (71.4%) of participants reported that the program included the right number of sessions, and all of them reported that it was helpful and relevant and that they would recommend it to others. While changes in self-reported resilience were only marginal, participation was associated with improvements in depressive symptoms, perceived stress, anxiety, and general sense of self efficacy. These pilot data provide preliminary support that "Resilient Warrior," a group-based, stress reduction and resilience program, may improve psychological health in service members even when delivered in community settings. Randomized controlled trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to establish efficacy and effectiveness for this program.

  19. Student service members/veterans on campus: Challenges for reintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsari, Brian; Yurasek, Ali; Miller, Mary Beth; Murphy, James G; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E; Martens, Matthew P; Darcy, Monica G; Carey, Kate B

    2017-01-01

    Many returning OIF/OEF/OND Veterans are seeking higher education in an effort to develop a meaningful career and financial stability. Evidence suggests that student service members/veterans (SSM/Vs) are experiencing less academic success than other students. The purpose of this review is to identify the unique challenges of SSM/Vs and evaluate current campus efforts to facilitate their retention and academic performance. With a focus on SSM/Vs attending colleges and universities, we obtained 57 peer-reviewed and 73 gray literature records published between 2001 and 2015. The current SSM/V literature contains an abundance of gray literature, and the empirical research tends to be limited by cross-sectional design and small sample sizes. SSM/Vs encounter significant personal and environmental challenges when transitioning from the military to college campuses. A variety of services have been developed to address the needs of the SSM/V population, but the efficacy of these services remains largely unknown. In conclusion, there is a clear need to provide education to faculty, students, and staff regarding the experiences of SSM/Vs. Efforts to enhance screening for, availability of, and SSM/V engagement in mental health services would also be beneficial, as would improved availability of and SSM/V access to academic support. All future programs designed to address the unique challenges of SSM/Vs in the academic environment should also be systematically implemented and evaluated. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Deployment of e-health services - a business model engineering strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijl, Björn; Nieuwenhuis, Lambert J M; Huis in 't Veld, Rianne M H A; Hermens, Hermie J; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M R

    2010-01-01

    We designed a business model for deploying a myofeedback-based teletreatment service. An iterative and combined qualitative and quantitative action design approach was used for developing the business model and the related value network. Insights from surveys, desk research, expert interviews, workshops and quantitative modelling were combined to produce the first business model and then to refine it in three design cycles. The business model engineering strategy provided important insights which led to an improved, more viable and feasible business model and related value network design. Based on this experience, we conclude that the process of early stage business model engineering reduces risk and produces substantial savings in costs and resources related to service deployment.

  1. Quality function deployment (QFD in the development of training projects: an exploratory study for service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Dias Junior

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Training is important in preparing employees. The Quality Function Deployment (QFD is an effective method to systematically translate customer requirements into project specifications. This study presents the use of QFD method in development of training project. It is a qualitative research conducted in the industry services company. The results show that the use of QFD is an effective alternative for managers to develop or improve their training projects.

  2. A systematic review of help-seeking and mental health service utilization among military service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, Melanie A; Stanley, Ian H; Schneider, Matthew E; Joiner, Thomas E

    2017-04-01

    Research has demonstrated that military service members are at elevated risk for a range of psychiatric problems, and mental health services use is a conduit to symptom reduction and remission. Nonetheless, there is a notable underutilization of mental health services in this population. This systematic review aimed to identify and critically examine: (1) rates of service use; (2) barriers and facilitators to care; and (3) programs and interventions designed to enhance willingness to seek care and increase help-seeking behaviors among current military personnel (e.g., active duty, National Guard, Reserve). Overall, 111 peer-reviewed articles were identified for inclusion. Across studies, the rate of past-year service use among service members with mental health problems during the same time frame was 29.3% based on weighted averages. Studies identified common barriers to care (e.g., concerns regarding stigma, career impact) and facilitators to care (e.g., positive attitudes toward treatment, family/friend support, military leadership support) among this population. Although programs (e.g., screening, gatekeeper training) have been developed to reduce these barriers, leverage facilitators, and encourage service use, further research is needed to empirically test the effectiveness of these interventions in increasing rates of service utilization. Critical areas for future research on treatment engagement among this high-risk population are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Deploying culture as a defence against incompetence: The unconscious dynamics of public service work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peliwe P. Mnguni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The intractability of public service delivery and a polarised societal landscape heighten anxiety and reinforce a propensity for public service organisations to be used for defensive purposes.Research purpose: This article employs social defense theory to explore manifestations of anxiety and defense within South African public service organisations.Motivation for the study: Dominant discourse on public service institutions over-relies on political, sociological and public administration theories and tends to ignore psychosocial explanations. Further, whilst the psychodynamics of social service work are generally understood, the unconscious dynamics of generic public service work remain under-theorised. Research design, approach and method: This conceptual article draws on my personal observations as a reflective citizen and experiences as a consultant to government departments.Main findings: Herein, an argument is advanced that the deployment of ill-qualified party loyalists to key positions in the public service is perverse: it serves as a collective defense against the impossible aspects of the task at hand. The appointees, in turn, deploy organisational processes to defend against feelings of incompetence and the inevitability of failure. This practice, coupled with acute resource constraints, sets up front line staff for scapegoating.Practical/managerial implications: An appreciation of the multiple meanings of public service work and the defensive role played by public institutions stands to inform purposeful change towards sustainable public service organisational practice.Contribution/value-add: The discussion seeks to contribute to attempts that employ systems psychodynamics to make sense of anxiety and defense within organisations in general and public service institutions in particular.

  4. Deployment of Directory Service for IEEE N Bus Test System Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Amal; Sil, Jaya

    2008-10-01

    Exchanging information over Internet and Intranet becomes a defacto standard in computer applications, among various users and organizations. Distributed system study, e-governance etc require transparent information exchange between applications, constituencies, manufacturers, and vendors. To serve these purposes database system is needed for storing system data and other relevant information. Directory service, which is a specialized database along with access protocol, could be the single solution since it runs over TCP/IP, supported by all POSIX compliance platforms and is based on open standard. This paper describes a way to deploy directory service, to store IEEE n bus test system data and integrating load flow program with it.

  5. Honoring their service: behavioral health services in North Carolina for military service members, veterans, and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Bratcher, Kimberly M; Martin, Grier; Purcell, William R; Watson, Michael; Silberman, Pam

    2011-01-01

    The North Carolina Institute of Medicine Task Force on Behavioral Health Services for the Military and Their Families examined the adequacy of Medicaid- and state-funded services for mental health conditions, developmental disabilities (including traumatic brain injury), and substance abuse that are currently available in North Carolina to military service members, veterans, and their families. The task force determined that there are several gaps in services and made 13 recommendations related to federal, state, and local community resources. This article reviews the work of the task force and current efforts to improve services in North Carolina.

  6. Integrated care services: lessons learned from the deployment of the NEXES project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carme Hernandez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify barriers to deployment of four articulated Integrated Care Services supported by Information Technologies in three European sites. The four services covered the entire spectrum of severity of illness. The project targeted chronic patients with obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiac failure and/or type II diabetes mellitus.Setting: One health care sector in Spain (Barcelona (n = 11.382; six municipalities in Norway (Trondheim (n = 450; and one hospital in Greece (Athens (n = 388.Method: The four services were: (i Home-based long-term maintenance of rehabilitation effects (n = 337; (ii Enhanced Care for frail patients, n = 1340; (iii Home Hospitalization and Early Discharge (n = 2404; and Support for remote diagnosis (forced spirometry testing in primary care (Support (n = 8139. Both randomized controlled trials and pragmatic study designs were combined. Two technological approaches were compared. The Model for Assessment of Telemedicine applications was adopted.Results: The project demonstrated: (i Sustainability of training effects over time in chronic patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (p < 0.01; (ii Enhanced care and fewer hospitalizations in chronic respiratory patients (p < 0.05; (iii Reduced in-hospital days for all types of patients (p < 0.001 in Home Hospitalization/Early Discharge; and (iv Increased quality of testing (p < 0.01 for patients with respiratory symptoms in Support, with marked differences among sites.Conclusions: The four integrated care services showed high potential to enhance health outcomes with cost-containment. Change management, technological approach and legal issues were major factors modulating the success of the deployment. The project generated a business plan to foster service sustainability and health innovation. Deployment strategies require site-specific adaptations.

  7. Integrated care services: lessons learned from the deployment of the NEXES project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carme Hernandez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify barriers to deployment of four articulated Integrated Care Services supported by Information Technologies in three European sites. The four services covered the entire spectrum of severity of illness. The project targeted chronic patients with obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiac failure and/or type II diabetes mellitus. Setting: One health care sector in Spain (Barcelona (n = 11.382; six municipalities in Norway (Trondheim (n = 450; and one hospital in Greece (Athens (n = 388. Method: The four services were: (i Home-based long-term maintenance of rehabilitation effects (n = 337; (ii Enhanced Care for frail patients, n = 1340; (iii Home Hospitalization and Early Discharge (n = 2404; and Support for remote diagnosis (forced spirometry testing in primary care (Support (n = 8139. Both randomized controlled trials and pragmatic study designs were combined. Two technological approaches were compared. The Model for Assessment of Telemedicine applications was adopted. Results: The project demonstrated: (i Sustainability of training effects over time in chronic patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (p < 0.01; (ii Enhanced care and fewer hospitalizations in chronic respiratory patients (p < 0.05; (iii Reduced in-hospital days for all types of patients (p < 0.001 in Home Hospitalization/Early Discharge; and (iv Increased quality of testing (p < 0.01 for patients with respiratory symptoms in Support, with marked differences among sites. Conclusions: The four integrated care services showed high potential to enhance health outcomes with cost-containment. Change management, technological approach and legal issues were major factors modulating the success of the deployment. The project generated a business plan to foster service sustainability and health innovation. Deployment strategies require site-specific adaptations.

  8. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The following staff members with 25 years' service in 2003 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 20 November 2003: ALLIOD Patrick/ATGESCHONKE Gunther/AB AYMON Marcel/HRGLASER Maurice/EP BAUDET Serge/TISHUGOT Bernard/AB BENOIT-JEANNIN Brigitte/SPLJOUVE Christian/AT BERRY Peter/HRJULLIARD André/ST BIERI Catherine/STLAFAGE Patrice/ST BLANC Didier/STLAJUST Danièle/DSU BLANC Michel/ITLEGRAND Dominique/AT BOCH Guy/ITLONG Serge/EST BONZANO Roberto/STLYONNET André/EP BURCKHART Doris/EPMALOD-DOGNIN Jean-Pierre/ST BURNS Alan/ABMAURY Stephan/AC BURTIN Gérard/ABMILES John/AT CARENA Wisla/EPMONET René/EST CASTEL André/ESTMULLER André/TIS CLIFF Frank/HRPERREAL Pierre/AT CUCCURU Giovanni/ATPETERSEN Jørgen/EP DAMIANI Michel/ABPETIT Patrick/EP DELUCINGE Evelyne/ATPIERRE Patrice/AB DHOTE Patrick/SPLROUX Jacques/EP FLUCKIGER François/ITSAMYN Dirk/EP FORESTE Antonio/ESTSAVIOZ Jean Jacques/AB FRAIS...

  9. Web Service for Calculating the Probability of Returning a Loan – De-sign, Implementation and Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian VASILEV

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of designing, creating, implementing and deploying a real web service. A basic theory approach is used to analyze the implementation of web services. An existing profit model is used. Its business logic is integrated within a web ser-vice. Another desktop application is created to demonstrate the use of the recently created web service. This study shows a methodology for fast development and deployment of web services. The methodology has wide practical implications – in credit institutions and banks when giving a loan. This study is the first of its kind to show the design, implementation and deployment of a web service for calculating the probability of returning a loan. The methodology may be used for the encapsulation of other business logic into web services.

  10. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Seth D. Messinger...SUBTITLE Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service- Social Reintegration of Service Me Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord...communities and cultural identities that is key to long-term success . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Spinal Cord Injury, Community Reintegration , Qualitative

  11. Increasing Treatment Seeking Among At-Risk Service Members Returning from Warzones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0032 TITLE: Increasing Treatment Seeking Among At- Risk Service Members Returning from Warzones PRINCIPAL...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-2-0032 Increasing Treatment Seeking Among At- Risk Service Members Returning from Warzones 5b...include area code) Nothing listed 15 USAMRMC 2 Abstract Increasing Treatment Seeking Among At- Risk Service Members Returning from Warzones PI

  12. Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-17

    AND SUBTITLE Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Testimony Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members...Jennie W. Wenger1 The RAND Corporation Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans2 Before the Committees on

  13. Reasons for deploying an e-reader loan service at the UOC Library

    OpenAIRE

    Zuñiga Ruiz, Anna; López-Pérez, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The presentation will focus on the reasons for deploying an e-reader loan service at a virtual university library as a part of an e-learning support system to aid user mobility, concentration of documentary and electronic resources, and ICT skills acquisition, using the example of the UOC pilot project and its subsequent consolidation. E-reader devices at the UOC are an extension of the Virtual Campus. They are offered as a tool to aid user mobility, access to documentary and electronic resou...

  14. Resilient Warrior: A Stress Management Group to Improve Psychological Health in Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Eric; Baier, Allison L.; Mehta, Darshan H.; Denninger, John W.; Fricchione, Gregory L.; Casey, Aggie; Kagan, Leslee; Park, Elyse R.; Simon, Naomi M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many veterans deployed after 9/11/2001 are impacted by subthreshold levels of posttraumatic stress, anxiety, or other psychological health problems that may interfere with successful reintegration. Conventional treatments, including medication and trauma-focused individual psychotherapies, may not be optimally adapted, accepted, or effective to treat these subsyndromal symptoms. Methods: We developed “Resilient Warrior,” a 4-session, group-based, mind-body stress-management and resilience program targeted to build skills and assessed whether its format was accessible and acceptable, and potentially efficacious, to support resilience among service members. Results: From April 2014 to October 2014, 15 participants (53.3% women; mean age=36.6 y; SD=6.2) were surveyed for program acceptability and feasibility and completed self-reported psychological health outcomes before and after program participation. The majority (71.4%) of participants reported that the program included the right number of sessions, and all of them reported that it was helpful and relevant and that they would recommend it to others. While changes in self-reported resilience were only marginal, participation was associated with improvements in depressive symptoms, perceived stress, anxiety, and general sense of self efficacy. Conclusion: These pilot data provide preliminary support that “Resilient Warrior,” a group-based, stress reduction and resilience program, may improve psychological health in service members even when delivered in community settings. Randomized controlled trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to establish efficacy and effectiveness for this program. PMID:26665021

  15. Web-services-based resource discovery model and service deployment on HealthGrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer, Aisha; Stergioulas, Lampros K

    2010-05-01

    HealthGrids represent the next generation of advanced healthcare IT and hold the promise to untangle complex healthcare-data problems by integrating health information systems and healthcare entities. Healthcare could benefit from a new delivery approach using HealthGrids to better meet the biomedical and health-related needs. Specialized services are needed to provide unified discovery of and ubiquitous access to available HealthGrid resources. The different types of services available on HealthGrids are classified into two levels, the operational-level services and the management-level services. This paper takes a fresh approach to address the problems of resource discovery in HealthGrids based on Web services (WS) and WS technologies and proposes a WS-based resource discovery model.

  16. 75 FR 74091 - Senior Executive Service (SES) Performance Review Board; Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Pamela S. Pope, Human Resources Services Division (NAH), National Archives... Board shall review the initial appraisal of a senior executive's performance by the supervisor and... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Senior Executive Service (SES) Performance Review Board; Members AGENCY:...

  17. 75 FR 6729 - Senior Executive Service (SES) Performance Review Board; Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Pamela S. Pope, Human Resources Services Division (NAH), National Archives... Board shall review the initial appraisal of a senior executive's performance by the supervisor and... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Senior Executive Service (SES) Performance Review Board; Members AGENCY:...

  18. Military service, deployments, and exposures in relation to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis etiology and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, John D; Kamel, Freya

    2015-01-01

    Rates of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have been reported to be higher among US military veterans, who currently number more than 21 million, but the causal factor(s) has not been identified. We conducted a review to examine the weight of evidence for associations between military service, deployments, and exposures and ALS etiology and survival. Thirty articles or abstracts published through 2013 were reviewed. Although the current evidence suggests a positive association with ALS etiology, it is too limited to draw firm conclusions regarding associations between military service and ALS etiology or survival. Some evidence suggests that deployment to the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War may be associated with ALS etiology, but there is currently no strong evidence that any particular military exposure is associated with ALS etiology. Future studies should address the limitations of previous ones, such as reliance on mortality as a surrogate for incidence, a dearth of survival analyses, lack of clinical data, low statistical power, and limited exposure assessment. The Genes and Environmental Exposures in Veterans with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (GENEVA) Study is one such study, but additional research is needed to determine whether military-related factors are associated with ALS and to assess potential prevention strategies.

  19. The consumer revolution arrives. Using smart customer service to attract, educate, & retain satisfied members & lower costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, K

    1994-06-01

    Across the country, managed care organizations pursue ways to enhance customer service and maintain member satisfaction, without breaking the bank by authorizing unnecessary services. One method gaining popularity is reducing customer demand for inappropriate services through education. Approaches include welcome-to-the-plan calls, member education, automated and in-person answer lines, and 24-hour telephone coverage. Several firms have recognized the need for such services, and offer them to HMOs on an outsourcing basis, with generally positive results.

  20. Adaptive software architecture based on confident HCI for the deployment of sensitive services in Smart Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Barbas, Mario; Pau, Iván; Martín-Ruiz, María Luisa; Seoane, Fernando

    2015-03-25

    Smart spaces foster the development of natural and appropriate forms of human-computer interaction by taking advantage of home customization. The interaction potential of the Smart Home, which is a special type of smart space, is of particular interest in fields in which the acceptance of new technologies is limited and restrictive. The integration of smart home design patterns with sensitive solutions can increase user acceptance. In this paper, we present the main challenges that have been identified in the literature for the successful deployment of sensitive services (e.g., telemedicine and assistive services) in smart spaces and a software architecture that models the functionalities of a Smart Home platform that are required to maintain and support such sensitive services. This architecture emphasizes user interaction as a key concept to facilitate the acceptance of sensitive services by end-users and utilizes activity theory to support its innovative design. The application of activity theory to the architecture eases the handling of novel concepts, such as understanding of the system by patients at home or the affordability of assistive services. Finally, we provide a proof-of-concept implementation of the architecture and compare the results with other architectures from the literature.

  1. Adaptive Software Architecture Based on Confident HCI for the Deployment of Sensitive Services in Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Vega-Barbas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Smart spaces foster the development of natural and appropriate forms of human-computer interaction by taking advantage of home customization. The interaction potential of the Smart Home, which is a special type of smart space, is of particular interest in fields in which the acceptance of new technologies is limited and restrictive. The integration of smart home design patterns with sensitive solutions can increase user acceptance. In this paper, we present the main challenges that have been identified in the literature for the successful deployment of sensitive services (e.g., telemedicine and assistive services in smart spaces and a software architecture that models the functionalities of a Smart Home platform that are required to maintain and support such sensitive services. This architecture emphasizes user interaction as a key concept to facilitate the acceptance of sensitive services by end-users and utilizes activity theory to support its innovative design. The application of activity theory to the architecture eases the handling of novel concepts, such as understanding of the system by patients at home or the affordability of assistive services. Finally, we provide a proof-of-concept implementation of the architecture and compare the results with other architectures from the literature.

  2. Adaptive Software Architecture Based on Confident HCI for the Deployment of Sensitive Services in Smart Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Barbas, Mario; Pau, Iván; Martín-Ruiz, María Luisa; Seoane, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Smart spaces foster the development of natural and appropriate forms of human-computer interaction by taking advantage of home customization. The interaction potential of the Smart Home, which is a special type of smart space, is of particular interest in fields in which the acceptance of new technologies is limited and restrictive. The integration of smart home design patterns with sensitive solutions can increase user acceptance. In this paper, we present the main challenges that have been identified in the literature for the successful deployment of sensitive services (e.g., telemedicine and assistive services) in smart spaces and a software architecture that models the functionalities of a Smart Home platform that are required to maintain and support such sensitive services. This architecture emphasizes user interaction as a key concept to facilitate the acceptance of sensitive services by end-users and utilizes activity theory to support its innovative design. The application of activity theory to the architecture eases the handling of novel concepts, such as understanding of the system by patients at home or the affordability of assistive services. Finally, we provide a proof-of-concept implementation of the architecture and compare the results with other architectures from the literature. PMID:25815449

  3. Evaluation of the Separation of Service Members Who Made a Report of Sexual Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-09

    member’s NDMC diagnosis made by a physiatrist or PhD level psychologist ? 153 (93%) 85 (99%) 42 (100%) 49 (80%) 329 (93%) Did diagnosis include...statement / judgment from physiatrist or PhD-level psychologist the service member’s disorder was so severe the service member’s ability to function...IDP Area Was service member’s diagnosis corroborated by peer psychiatrist or PhD-level psychologist or higher level mental health professional? N/A

  4. 12 CFR 250.403 - Service of member bank and real estate investment company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Service of member bank and real estate... Glass-Steagall Act § 250.403 Service of member bank and real estate investment company. (a) The Board recently considered two inquiries regarding the question whether proposed real estate investment companies...

  5. 75 FR 47515 - Identification (ID) Cards for Members of the Uniformed Services, Their Dependents, and Other...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... Services, Their Dependents, and Other Eligible Individuals AGENCY: Office of the Under Secretary of Defense... DoD ID cards. The ID cards shall be issued to uniformed service members, their dependents, and other.... The general policy for comments and other submissions from members of the public is to make...

  6. Military service member and veteran reintegration: A critical review and adapted ecological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Blevins, Cara L; Fisher, Michael P; Magruder, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) experience a wide range of stress-related disorders in addition to social and occupational difficulties when reintegrating to the community. Facilitating reintegration of MSMVs following deployment is a societal priority. With an objective of identifying challenges and facilitators for reintegration of MSMVs of the current war era, we critically review and identify gaps in the literature. We searched 8 electronic databases and identified 1,764 articles. Screening of abstracts and full-text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 186 articles for review. Two investigators evaluating relevant articles independently found a lack of clear definition or comprehensive theorizing about MSMV reintegration. To address these gaps, we linked the findings from the literature to provide a unified definition of reintegration and adapted the social ecological systems theory to guide research and practice aimed at MSMV reintegration. Furthermore, we identified individual, interpersonal, community, and societal challenges related to reintegration. The 186 studies published from 2001 (the start of the current war era) to 2015 included 6 experimental studies or clinical trials. Most studies do not adequately account for context or more than a narrow set of potential influences on MSMV reintegration. Little evidence was found that evaluated interventions for health conditions, rehabilitation, and employment, or effective models of integrated delivery systems. We recommend an ecological model of MSMV reintegration to advance research and practice processes and outcomes at 4 levels (individual, interpersonal, organizational, and societal). (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Employing Our Veterans. Part 2. Service Member Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    one common website that will consolidate the web based resources available to the transitioning veteran. 3. Professional outplacement service...consolidate the web based resources available to the transitioning veteran. 3. Professional outplacement service providers should be used to enhance the

  8. Military Hospitalizations among Deployed US Service Members Following Anthrax Vaccination, 1998-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    and hospitalizations for a wide range of outcomes. Cox propor- tional hazards models could not be run for systemic lupus erythematosus , fibromyalgia...sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus , or fibromyalgia. Vaccine safety within military populations remains an important issue, and further study is...be- known severe adverse health effects, excluding mortality and pregnancy -related outcomes, associated with anthrax vaccination. Outcomes were

  9. Deployment Experiences and Motor Vehicle Crashes Among U.S. Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    ever told a participant they have hearing loss/ tinnitus . A positive screen for the aggregate physical health symptoms covariate was based on...including screening positive for major depression or panic or anxiety (using stand- ardized scoring algorithms on the PHQ21–23); medication use for anxiety...stress, or depression ; or screening positive for PTSD Table 1. Baseline characteristics of study participants by MVC status 6 months after returning

  10. The Temporal Relationship Between Intrafamilial Violence, Deployment, and Serious Mental Illness in US Army Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    maltreatment (physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and neglect), severity of abuse, drug and alcohol involvement, perpetrator characteristics, and...for covariates, the predicted probability of linkage to a substantiated FAP report was higher for physical abuse than for sexual abuse, 25.8%, 95% CI...symptoms, physiological reactivity, alcohol problems, and aggression among military veterans. Journal of abnormal psychology 2007;116(3):498. 5. Taylor CM

  11. The Temporal Relationship Between Intrafamilial Violence, Deployment, and Serious Mental Illness in US Army Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Personality Disorders 301.3 Explosive Personality Disorder 301.4 Obsessive Compulsive Disorder 301.5 Histrionic Personality Disorder 301.6...Conversion Disorder 306 Physiological malfunction arising from mental factors Dissociative disorders 300.6 Depersonalization Disorder 300.10...created unique stressors on military families. While evidence suggests that military families themselves are not at increased risk for intrafamilial

  12. Network's cardiology data help member groups benchmark performance, market services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Data-driven cardiac network improves outcomes, reduces costs. Thirty-seven high-volume network member hospitals are using detailed demographic, procedure, and outcomes data in benchmarking and marketing efforts, and network physicians are using the aggregate data on 120,000 angioplasty and bypass procedures in research studies. Here are the details, plus sample reports.

  13. Managing Customer-Centric Information: The Challenges of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Deployment in Service Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Martin R. Fellenz; Mairead Brady

    2010-01-01

    Despite many years of business-orientated information and communication technology (ICT) deployment, contemporary organisations continue to struggle with customer-centric implementation of new technologies that are profitable and contribute to sustainable service business success. This paper reviews the difficulties inherent in using ICTs to manage customer-related information, and identifies the particular challenges for customer-centric deployment of ICTs. It provides a model of different l...

  14. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    The 38 staff members who are celebrating 25 years at CERN in 2010 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 21 October. ASBURY David IT HEGARTY Seamus HR BAUDRENGHIEN Philippe BE ISNARD Christian IT BERGSMA Felix PH JONES Robert IT BERNAL Jean-Manuel TE JOUBERJEAN Franck IT BERRIG Olav Ejner BE LAGRANGE Thierry FP BONT Hillebrand GS MARIN Antonio BE BOURGEOIS Nicolas PH MESENGE Pascal EN BOURREL Thierry EN MISSIAEN Dominique   BE ...

  15. AmI and Deployment Considerations in AAL Services Provision for Elderly Independent Living: The MonAMI Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Ibarz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The MonAMI project aims to investigate the feasibility of the deployment of open platforms for Ambient Assisted Living (AAL services provision based on Ambient Intelligence (AmI and to test user acceptance and the usability of the services. Services were designed to provide support in the areas of environmental control, security, well-being and leisure. These services were installed and evaluated in a Spanish geriatric residence. The participants included elderly persons with disabilities, nursing home care givers and informal carers. The concept of the open platform proved to be satisfactory for the provision of the services in a context aware framework. Furthermore, the usability of the technology was viewed positively and the overall results indicate that this system has the potential to prolong independent living at home for elderly people with disabilities. Deployment was proven successful and awareness of open-platform AAL service delivery was raised in local communities throughout Europe.

  16. Keeping engaged during deployment : The interplay between self-efficacy, family support, and threat exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delahaij, R.; Kamphuis, W.; Berg, C.E. van den

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the importance of 2 resilience resources for service members’ ability to deal with threat during deployment. Military self-efficacy and family support were measured before deployment and related to work engagement and burnout levels of service members during deployment. We hy

  17. Mental health among reserve component military service members and veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Gregory H; Fink, David S; Sampson, Laura; Galea, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Since 2001, the US military has increasingly relied on National Guard and reserve component forces to meet operational demands. Differences in preparation and military engagement experiences between active component and reserve component forces have long suggested that the psychiatric consequences of military engagement differ by component. We conducted a systematic review of prevalence and new onset of psychiatric disorders among reserve component forces and a meta-analysis of prevalence estimates comparing reserve component and active component forces, and we documented stage-sequential drivers of psychiatric burden among reserve component forces. We identified 27 reports from 19 unique samples published between 1985 and 2012: 9 studies reporting on the reserve component alone and 10 reporting on both the reserve component and the active component. The pooled prevalence for alcohol use disorders of 14.5% (95% confidence interval: 12.7, 15.2) among the reserve component was higher than that of 11.7% (95% confidence interval: 10.9, 12.6) among the active component, while there were no component differences for depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. We observed substantial heterogeneity in prevalence estimates reported by the reserve component. Published studies suggest that stage-sequential risk factors throughout the deployment cycle predicted alcohol use disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and, to a lesser degree, depression. Improved and more standardized documentation of the mental health burden, as well as study of explanatory factors within a life-course framework, is necessary to inform mitigating strategies and to reduce psychiatric burden among reserve component forces.

  18. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2012

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    The 27 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2012 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 2 November.   BARRIN Laurence  -  PH BILLEN Ronald  -  BE BOUCHÉ Jean-Marc  -  HR BURKHARDT Helmut  -  BE CARLIER Etienne  -  TE CASS Antony  -  IT CHAN KWOK CHEON Anne Belinda  -  IT CHARRUE Pierre  -  BE COLLIER Paul  -  BE CUENCA PEREZ Antonio  -  GS DE JONGHE Jurgen  -  GS DEFERT Philippe  -  IT ELSENER Konrad  -  PH FROIDEVAUX Daniel  -  PH GRIGGS Christopher  -  PH MATHEYS Jean-Pol  -  HR MEIJERS Franciscus  -  PH MERTENS Volker  -  TE METRAL Gabriel  -  BE NECCA Rene  -  EN PACE Alberto&...

  19. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 34 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2006 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 1st November. BELLEMAN Jeroen / AB BERTOLA Dominique / DSU BOLDI Armand / TS BOLLET André / AT BRANDT Daniel / DSU CACCIOPPOLI Michel /TS CALDERONE Antonino / TS CLARET René /TS COSSEY PUGET Françoise / PH DALEXANDRO Noël / AT DECOMBAZ Michel / TS DELLA NEGRA Michel / PH DINIUS Arend / AB FOSTER David / IT FROMM Christine / DSU GROS Daniel / TS GUDET Denis / TS LEWIS Julian / AB MAPELLI Livio / PH MASSON Albert / TS MOINE Catherine / PH MÜLLER Hans / PH ODIER Patrick / AB PANMAN Jaap / PH POOLE John / AB PROLA-TESSAUR Maureen / AT RAPHOZ Jean-Pierre / IT ROSTANT Jeanne / PH RUGO Erminio / AB VAN HERWIJNEN Eric / PH WERNER Per / PH WILDNER Elena / AT WILKINSON Jonathan / DSU WISZNIOWSKI Thierry / AB

  20. Celebrating staff members with 25 years of service

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The 27 staff members who are celebrating 25 years at CERN in 2011 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 8 November.     Alvarez-Gaume Luis PH   Arruat Michel BE   Bonneau Pierre EN   Bordry Frederick TE   Camporesi Tiziano PH   Chevallay Eric EN   De Rijk Gijsbertus TE   Denuziere Dominique TE   Divia Roberto PH   Esteveny Laure DG   Giguet Jean-Michel BE   Haug Friedrich TE   Herr Werner BE   Jones Peter IT   Jonker Michael TE   Jost Beat PH   Linssen Lucie PH   Mage-Granados Patricia DG   Martinez Yanez Pablo BE   N...

  1. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    The 30 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2015 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 10 December.        Renaud Barillere EN   Edgar Birker  DG   Sergio Calatroni  TE   Paola Catapano  DG   Christophe  Delamare GS   Philippe Farthouat  PH   Roger Forty  PH   Yves Gaillard   TE   Clara Gaspar  PH   Jean-Christophe  Gayde  EN   Hubert   Gerwig PH   Simone  Giani PH   Jean-Pierre Granchelli  EN   Juan Guijarro  IT   Helene Haller  PH   John Harvey  PH   Vincenzo Innocente PH ...

  2. The Army Spouse: Perceptions of Educational Needs during Deployment and Nondeployment Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alicia G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare educational needs and goals during deployment and nondeployment of spouses of active-duty Army service members. The sample consisted of spouses of active-duty military service members from the Army brigades who had recently returned from a deployment or who were experiencing a deployment…

  3. The Use of National Youth Service Corp Members to Build AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Use of National Youth Service Corp Members to Build AIDS Competent ... for Rural Youth (HP4RY), funded by the Global Health Research Initiative (Canada). It began ... Using the AIDS Competent Community (ACC) model developed by ...

  4. Staff members with 25 years’ service at CERN in 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 24 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2007 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 11 October. Mr.\tBLEUS Baudouin\tAB Mr.\tBRUNEL Bernard\tPH Mr.\tCAILLET Norbert\tHR Dr.\tCASPERS Friedhelm\tAB Mr.\tCHEVRET Thierry\tTS Mr.\tCUMER Gérard\tTS Mrs.\tDA COSTA Maryse\tIT Mrs.\tDELAMARE Catherine\tIT Mr.\tERIKSSON Tommy\tAB Mrs.\tFOFFANO Susan\tIT Mr.\tGONZALEZ José Luis\tAB Mr.\tHUTCHINS Stephen\tAB Dr.\tKLEMPT Wolfgang\tPH Mr.\tLEVRIER François\tTS Dr.\tMARCHIORO Alessandro\tPH Mr.\tNORMANN Lasse\tAB Dr.\tRAICH Ulrich\tAB Mr.\tREBUT Michel\tPH Mr.\tRUSSO Aniello\tAT Dr.\tSTAMPFLI Lorenz\tDSU Mrs.\tTUUVA Martine\tTS Dr.\tWEISZ Sylvain\tTS Mr.\tYVON Guy\tAB Mr.\tZIEGLER Patrice\tTS

  5. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The 74 staff members who have spent 25 years at CERN in 2005 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 22 November. ADRIAN Gilbert / AB ALLIOD Marie-Noëlle / AB ANTOINET Gérard / SC AUBERT Marc / TS AUQUIER Christian / SC BAIRD Simon / AB BARRAS Suzanne / PH BAUD Richard / AT BELLONI Jean / SC BERTUOL Gilbert / SC BLANC Jean-Luc / AB BONVALLET Guy / SC BOSSUS Patrice / SC BROERE Johannes / AB BRU Yvon / TS BURDAIRON Alain / TS CANARD Philippe / AT CAVALLO Patrice / SC CHARRA Patrick / PH CHATAIGNEAU Marc / SC COLIN Gilles / SC DAHLEN Pierre / AB DE GROOT Johannes / PH DEDOBBELER Bernard / TS DELCAMBRE Jean Pierre / SC DELENCLOS Yves / TS DEROYER Patrick / SC DESBISSONS Christian / SC DRAPER Mick / AB DROUX Pascal / FI DUCASTEL Claude / TS DUMUR Alain / SC FOCKER Gerrit / AB FOFFANO Giuseppe / TS FORRAT Isabelle / IT FREI Marie-José / DSU FRESSARD Michel / TS GAGNIERE Daniel / TS GIUDICI Pierre-Ange / PH GOICOECHEA Bernard / TS GUEHO Alain / TS GUENEHEC François / SC JE...

  6. Increasing Treatment Seeking Among at-Risk Service Members Returning from Warzones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    stakeholders place on developing and implementing a comprehensive program to reduce suicide among U.S. service members and Veterans. Rates of suicide ...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We propose a randomized controlled clinical trial of 1,200 military service members who are at increased risk for suicide but...by phone, and has been shown to promote treatment-seeking including in a preliminary study of OEF/OIF Veterans with elevated posttraumatic stress

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Student Service Member/Veteran and Civilian Student Drinking Motives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Shawn D; Barry, Adam E

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the nature and correlates of 252 student service members'/military veteran and civilian college students' drinking motivations. Data was collected via electronic survey. Results revealed no differences between military affiliated and civilian students in mean levels of alcohol motivations. However, the links between alcohol motives and problem drinking differed for these two groups of students. Specifically, coping motivations were linked to problem drinking for student service members/veterans but not civilian students.

  8. Rights of Conscience Protections for Armed Forces Service Members and Their Chaplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-22

    Navy and Air Force were still in the process of updating their regulations regarding protections of the rights of conscience, passage of Section 533...No. DODIG-2015-148 J U LY 2 2 , 2 0 1 5 Rights of Conscience Protections for Armed Forces Service Members and Their Chaplains Report...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Rights of Conscience Protections for Armed Forces Service Members and

  9. Staff members with 25 years’ service at CERN in 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The 47 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2008 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 24 October. Mr.\tAllen\tDavid John\tAB Dr.\tBailey\tRoger\tAB Mr.\tBlas\tAlfred\tAB Mr.\tBobbio\tPiero\tAB Dr.\tBona\tMaurizio\tSC Mr.\tBrachet\tJean-Pierre\tTS Dr.\tBurckhart\tHelfried\tPH Miss\tButtay\tCatherine\tFI Mr.\tCatherall\tRichard\tAB Mr.\tCoin\tAndré-Yvon\tTS Dr.\tCornelis\tKarel\tAB Dr.\tDavenport\tMartyn\tPH Mr.\tDehavay\tClaude\tAB Mr.\tDenblyden\tJean-Loup\tPH Mr.\tDenis\tBernard\tDSU Mr.\tDuret\tMax\tAT Mr.\tEvans\tJohn\tIT Mrs.\tFavrot\tVéronique\tIT Mr.\tFowler\tAntony\tAB Mrs.\tGalmant\tCatherine\tAB Mr.\tGuillaume\tJean-Claude\tTS Mrs.\tJerdelet\tJocelyne\tDSU Dr.\tKostro\tKrzysztof\tAB Mr.\tKuczerowski\tJoseph\tAB Mr.\tLappe\tJean-Pierre\tTS Mrs.\tLaverrière\tCatherine\tSC Mr.\tLeggiero\tLuigi\tTS Mr.\tManglunki\tDjango\tAB Mr.\tMartens\tReinoud\tIT Mr.\tMartinez\tGeorges\tSC Mr.\tMonchalin\tPhilippe\tSC Mr.\tMoret\tPhilippe\tDSU Mr.\tOlesen\tGert\tPH Mr.\tPasinelli\tSergi...

  10. Sociodemographic Correlates of Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors Among College Student Service Members/Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Craig J; Bryan, AnnaBelle O

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to quantify the lifetime, past-year, and past-month incidence rates of suicidal ideation, planning, and attempts; frequency of suicide attempts; and suicide attempt methods among college student service members/veterans. Four hundred twenty-two college student service members/veterans completing an online survey from January to October 2013. An anonymous online survey was conducted. Lifetime incidence rates were 33.4% (ideation), 13.7% (plan), and 6.9% (attempt). Past-year incidence rates were 14.7% (ideation), 3.6% (plan), and 0.7% (attempt). Past-month incidence rates were 7.6% (ideation), 1.9% (plan), and 0.5% (attempt). Rates among student service member/veterans were similar to general college student population rates. Native American student service members/veterans report significantly increased rates of ideation, plans, and attempts. Observed rates of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among student service members/veterans are comparable to general college study rates, but Native American student service members/veterans demonstrate increased risk.

  11. An Analytical Framework of a Deployment Strategy for Cloud Computing Services: A Case Study of Academic Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing has become a popular topic for exploration in both academic and industrial research in recent years. In this paper, network behavior is analyzed to assess and compare the costs and risks associated with traditional local servers versus those associated with cloud computing to determine the appropriate deployment strategy. An analytic framework of a deployment strategy that involves two mathematical models and the analytical hierarchy process is proposed to analyze the costs and service level agreements of services involving using traditional local servers and platform as service platforms in the cloud. Two websites are used as test sites to analyze the costs and risks of deploying services in Google App Engine (GAE (1 the website of Information and Finance of Management (IFM at the National Chiao Tung University (NCTU and (2 the NCTU website. If the examined websites were deployed in GAE, NCTU would save over 83.34% of the costs associated with using a traditional local server with low risk. Therefore, both the IFM and NCTU websites can be served appropriately in the cloud. Based on this strategy, a suggestion is proposed for managers and professionals.

  12. The Higher Education Landscape for US Student Service Members and Veterans in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Stacie; Sternberg, Martina; Wadsworth, Shelley MacDermid; Vaughan, Joyce; Carlson, Rhiannon; Dansie, Elizabeth; Mohrbacher, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008 or "New GI Bill" has resulted in rising enrollment and related demand for services by students in the USA. We examined current supports for student service members and veterans at institutions of higher education in Indiana in the context of this national trend. We employed…

  13. Telehealth Forging Ahead: Overcoming Barriers in Licensure to Improve Access to Care for Service Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Ambrose Stout

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The telehealth initiatives of the Department of Defense (DoD and Veterans’ Health Administration (VHA continue to test the limits of technology to provide the best care to our service members, veterans and their families.  The DoD and VHA have credentialing systems in place to allow clinical practice between facilities. New legislation in the form of the Servicemembers’ Telemedicine and E-Health Portability (STEP Act will potentially expand telehealth clinical services across state lines into the homes of our service members and veterans.

  14. Deployable geodesic truss structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Simonton, J. Wayne (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A deployable geodesic truss structure which can be deployed from a stowed state to an erected state is described. The truss structure includes a series of bays, each bay having sets of battens connected by longitudinal cross members which give the bay its axial and torsional stiffness. The cross members are hinged at their mid point by a joint so that the cross members are foldable for deployment or collapsing. The bays are deployed and stabilized by actuator means connected between the mid point joints of the cross members. Hinged longerons may be provided to also connect the sets of battens and to collapse for stowing with the rest of the truss structure.

  15. Training and deployment of lay refugee/internally displaced persons to provide basic health services in camps: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Ehiri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Training of lay refugees/internally displaced persons (IDPs and deploying them to provide basic health services to other women, children, and families in camps is perceived to be associated with public health benefits. However, there is limited evidence to support this hypothesis. Objectives: To assess the effects of interventions to train and deploy lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Methods: PubMed, Science and Social Science Citation Indices, PsycINFO, EMBASE, POPLINE, CINAHL, and reference lists of relevant articles were searched (from inception to June 30, 2014 with the aim of identifying studies that reported the effects of interventions that trained and deployed lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Two investigators independently reviewed all titles and abstracts to identify potentially relevant articles. Discrepancies were resolved by repeated review, discussion, and consensus. Study quality assessment was undertaken using standard protocols. Results: Ten studies (five cross-sectional, four pre-post, and one post-test only conducted in Africa (Guinea and Tanzania, Central America (Belize, and Asia (Myanmar were included. The studies demonstrated some positive impact on population health associated with training and deployment of trained lay refugees/IDPs as health workers in camps. Reported effects included increased service coverage, increased knowledge about disease symptoms and prevention, increased adoption of improved treatment seeking and protective behaviors, increased uptake of services, and improved access to reproductive health information. One study, which assessed the effect of peer refugee health education on sexual and reproductive health, did not demonstrate a marked reduction in unintended pregnancies among refugee/IDP women. Conclusion: Although

  16. Training and deployment of lay refugee/internally displaced persons to provide basic health services in camps: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehiri, John E; Gunn, Jayleen K L; Center, Katherine E; Li, Ying; Rouhani, Mae; Ezeanolue, Echezona E

    2014-01-01

    Training of lay refugees/internally displaced persons (IDPs) and deploying them to provide basic health services to other women, children, and families in camps is perceived to be associated with public health benefits. However, there is limited evidence to support this hypothesis. To assess the effects of interventions to train and deploy lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. PubMed, Science and Social Science Citation Indices, PsycINFO, EMBASE, POPLINE, CINAHL, and reference lists of relevant articles were searched (from inception to June 30, 2014) with the aim of identifying studies that reported the effects of interventions that trained and deployed lay refugees and/or IDPs for the provision of basic health service to other women, children, and families in camps. Two investigators independently reviewed all titles and abstracts to identify potentially relevant articles. Discrepancies were resolved by repeated review, discussion, and consensus. Study quality assessment was undertaken using standard protocols. Ten studies (five cross-sectional, four pre-post, and one post-test only) conducted in Africa (Guinea and Tanzania), Central America (Belize), and Asia (Myanmar) were included. The studies demonstrated some positive impact on population health associated with training and deployment of trained lay refugees/IDPs as health workers in camps. Reported effects included increased service coverage, increased knowledge about disease symptoms and prevention, increased adoption of improved treatment seeking and protective behaviors, increased uptake of services, and improved access to reproductive health information. One study, which assessed the effect of peer refugee health education on sexual and reproductive health, did not demonstrate a marked reduction in unintended pregnancies among refugee/IDP women. Although available evidence suggests a positive impact of training and deployment

  17. An Exploratory Study of Student Service Members/Veterans' Mental Health Characteristics by Sexual Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelts, Michael D; Albright, David L

    2015-01-01

    Explore the mental health differences of student veterans by sexual orientation. Student service members/veterans (N = 702) from the Fall 2011 National College Health Assessment. Descriptive statistics and 2-sample proportion and mean tests were used to compare mental health characteristics. Student veterans who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or unsure had higher levels of mental health symptoms and treatment. Results suggest a need for continued examination of student service members/veterans as related to disparities in mental health by sexual orientation.

  18. Mental health in Japanese members of the United Nations peacekeeping contingent in the Golan Heights: effects of deployment and the Middle East situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, Takehito; Shimizu, Kunio; Masaki, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Nobuhisa; Sugawara, Mariko; Tsunoda, Tomoya; Kikuchi, Akihito; Yamamoto, Taisuke; Toda, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Soichiro; Takahashi, Yoshitomo; Oryu, Takashi; Ogasawara, Tsuneyuki; Ogata, Katsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluates the mental health of Japan Self-Defense Force (JSDF) members of the peacekeeping contingent in the Golan Heights before and since the Second Gulf War between 1998 and 2003. Before the war, the General Health Questionnaire 30 (GHQ30) scores during and after duty tended to be lower than those before duty; all scores were lower than those of adult Japanese men in general. After the war, GHQ30 scores did not significantly change between before, during, and after duty. Manifest Anxiety Scale (MAS) scores were not significantly different between groups. Stressors identified included problems with foreign language and familial matters at home. Post war stressors included work content and relationships with collaborating foreign army units. These findings suggest that the mental health of contingent members remained stable, with some variation in mental health conditions influenced by the situation in the Middle East. This study suggests that the stable mental condition of JSDF personnel during their deployment in the absence of combat, and that this could be enhanced by education about mental health issues and by providing counseling support to their families.

  19. Deployable centralizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grubelich, Mark C.; Su, Jiann-Cherng; Knudsen, Steven D.

    2017-02-28

    A centralizer assembly is disclosed that allows for the assembly to be deployed in-situ. The centralizer assembly includes flexible members that can be extended into the well bore in situ by the initiation of a gas generating device. The centralizer assembly can support a large load carrying capability compared to a traditional bow spring with little or no installation drag. Additionally, larger displacements can be produced to centralize an extremely deviated casing.

  20. Internal Stress Monitoring of In-Service Structural Steel Members with Ultrasonic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuohua Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Internal stress in structural steel members is an important parameter for steel structures in their design, construction, and service stages. However, it is hard to measure via traditional approaches. Among the existing non-destructive testing (NDT methods, the ultrasonic method has received the most research attention. Longitudinal critically refracted (Lcr waves, which propagate parallel to the surface of the material within an effective depth, have shown great potential as an effective stress measurement approach. This paper presents a systematic non-destructive evaluation method to determine the internal stress in in-service structural steel members using Lcr waves. Based on theory of acoustoelasticity, a stress evaluation formula is derived. Factor of stress to acoustic time difference is used to describe the relationship between stress and measurable acoustic results. A testing facility is developed and used to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method. Two steel members are measured by using the proposed method and the traditional strain gauge method for verification. Parametric studies are performed on three steel members and the aluminum plate to investigate the factors that influence the testing results. The results show that the proposed method is effective and accurate for determining stress in in-service structural steel members.

  1. Mental Health Symptoms among Student Service Members/Veterans and Civilian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Sandi D.; Branscum, Adam J.; Bovbjerg, Viktor E.; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate if and to what extent student service members/veterans differ from civilian college students in the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of poor mental health. Participants: The Fall 2011 implementation of the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment included 27,774…

  2. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0811 TITLE: Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service- Members and Veterans with SCI PRINCIPAL...criteria to include all veterans as well as civilians. 8 Products DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PAPER Long-term community reintegration ...2014 Presentation on rehabilitation outcomes and community reintegration experiences of servicemembers and veterans with extremity amputation or

  3. Posttraumatic Stress and Growth in Student Service Members and Veterans: The Role of Personal Growth Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowa, Dominika; Robitschek, Christine; Harmon, Kevin Andrew; Shigemoto, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the extent to which personal growth initiative (PGI) may predict posttraumatic stress and growth in student service members/veterans (SSM/V). Participants: Participants were 136 SSM/V (79% men) representing multiple branches of the armed forces. Forty-four percent of participants reported having combat experience.…

  4. Cross-sectional analysis of Dutch repatriated service members from Southern Afghanistan (2003–2014)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, Eelco; Hoencamp, Rigo; Van Dongen, Thijs; Leenen, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Background: A systematic analysis of the complete medical support organization of the Dutch Armed Forces regarding repatriated service members from Afghanistan has not been performed so far. Methods: All information were collated in a specifically designed electronic database and gathered from the a

  5. The Children of Military Service Members: Challenges, Supports, and Future Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pedro, Kris M. Tunac; Astor, Ron Avi; Benbenishty, Rami; Estrada, Jose; Smith, Gabrielle R. Dejoie; Esqueda, Monica Christina

    2011-01-01

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have led to concerning psychological, behavioral, and academic outcomes for children in military families. Of the 1.2 million school-aged children of military service members, only 86,000 actually attend schools administered by the Department of Defense on military installations throughout the world. The remaining…

  6. Combat and Operational Stress: Minimizing Its Adverse Effects on Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-18

    effects of stress. It named and described coping techniques such as relaxation techniques, self-suggestion, meditation , and inoculation as ways to minimize...This includes training service members on how to use biofeedback techniques and implementing these methods to reduce stress. Second, DoD should

  7. Mental Health Symptoms among Student Service Members/Veterans and Civilian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Sandi D.; Branscum, Adam J.; Bovbjerg, Viktor E.; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate if and to what extent student service members/veterans differ from civilian college students in the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of poor mental health. Participants: The Fall 2011 implementation of the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment included 27,774…

  8. 77 FR 25861 - Establishing Principles of Excellence for Educational Institutions Serving Service Members...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... enrollment, provide prospective students who are eligible to receive Federal military and veterans... educational institutions; (b) inform students who are eligible to receive Federal military and veterans... access to disability counseling) to assist service member and veteran students and their families with...

  9. Mental Health and Self-Directed Violence among Student Service Members/Veterans in Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosnich, John R.; Kopacz, Marek S.; McCarten, Janet; Bossarte, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Using a sample of student service members/veterans, the current study aimed to examine the prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses and suicide-related outcomes and the association of hazardous duty with mental health. Participants: Data are from the Fall 2011 National College Health Assessment (N = 27,774). Methods: Logistic regression was…

  10. The Impact of Adopting a Mainstreamed Model of Service Provision: The Experiences of University Staff Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harryba, Sophia A.; Knight, Shirlee-ann

    2013-01-01

    A qualitative case study examined the challenges of service provision and utilization regarding international students at an Australian university. Using a Social Constructivist Grounded Theory methodology, 73 participants were interviewed, including 38 staff members (16 academic, 22 non-academic), 25 international students, and 10 domestic…

  11. An Analysis of Community Pharmacy Shared Faculty Members' Contributions to Teaching, Service, and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Jennifer L; Akinwale, Tolu P; Adams, Alex J; McGivney, Melissa Somma

    2016-09-25

    Objective. To identify community pharmacy shared faculty members across the United States and to describe their roles and responsibilities in terms of teaching, service, and scholarship. Methods. This study was a mixed-methods analysis using surveys and key informant interviews. Results. Twenty-two faculty members completed the survey; nine were interviewed. Their major roles and responsibilities included teaching in community-based and experiential learning courses, precepting students and/or residents, being actively involved in professional organizations, providing patient care while leading innovation, and disseminating findings through scholarship. Conclusion. Community pharmacy shared faculty members contribute to their academic institutions and community pharmacy organizations by educating learners, providing direct patient care, and advancing community practice through innovation and service to the profession. Findings of this study can be used as a guide for academic institutions and community pharmacy organizations interested in partnering to develop a community pharmacy shared faculty position.

  12. The Alcohol Use and Associated Mental Health Problems of Student Service Members/Veterans in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Adam E.; Whiteman, Shawn; Wadswroth, Shelley Macdermid; Hitt, Stacie

    2012-01-01

    Aims: This study examined: (a) whether student service members/veterans attending college drank more frequently or in greater quantities than non-service peers; and (b) whether links between student service members/veterans' alcohol use and mental health-related outcomes differed from civilian students.Methods: Participants included 145 student…

  13. United States military service members and their tattoos: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lande, R Gregory; Bahroo, Bhagwan A; Soumoff, Alyssa

    2013-08-01

    To explore the characteristics of military service tattoos a descriptive study was conducted at Walter Reed Army Medical Center to collect information from a convenience sample. An investigator-developed questionnaire provided the data for this study. Over the ensuing 12 month-period the researchers collected 126 questionnaires. Typical respondents were enlisted men with at least one deployment to an area of combat operations. Among the respondents, 57% acquired their tattoos before their deployment. One-quarter of the respondents reported only one tattoo, leaving the majority with multiple tattoos. Men received their first tattoo at an earlier age than women. The most common tattoo listed a person's name. Respondents did not regret their tattoos and rarely acquired the body art under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Little evidence was found to support a connection between tattoos and deployment. Few regretted their decisions and most all approached the tattoo experience free of any mind-altering substance. All this seems to suggest that military tattoos are a well-accepted means of self-expression.

  14. Exploring Student Service Members/Veterans Social Support and Campus Climate in the Context of Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Love

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Now that the financial needs of post 9/11 student service members/veterans have begun to be addressed, the attention has shifted to disabilities and recovery strategies of student service members/veterans. Therefore, in a cross sectional design, this study electronically surveyed 189 enrolled student service members/veterans attending a large urban state university about their experiences of returning to school. Specifically, this study described the students’ rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD and alcohol abuse, perceived stress, adaptive and non-adaptive coping strategies, social support, participation in campus activities, and perceived campus climate. Moreover, correlates of recovery were examined. Although the majority of the returning students were doing well, 36.1% reported a high level of stress, 15.1% reported a high level of anger, 17.3% reported active symptoms of PTSD, and 27.1% screened positive for alcohol problems. Social networks were found to be the most salient factor in recovery. The study’s limitations are discussed and specific support strategies are presented that can be employed by disability services, counseling services and college administrators.

  15. Design & Deploy Web 2.0 enable services over Next Generation Network Platform

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtaria, Kamaljit I; 10.5121/ijdms.2010.2305

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Networks (NGN) aims to integrate for IP-based telecom infrastructures and provide most advance & high speed emerging value added services. NGN capable to provide higher innovative services, these services will able to integrate communication and Web service into a single platform. IP Multimedia Subsystem, a NGN leading technology, enables a variety of NGN-compliant communications services to interoperate while being accessed through different kinds of access networks, preferably broadband. IMS–NGN services essential by both consumer and corporate users are by now used to access services, even communications services through the web and web-based communities and social networks, It is key for success of IMS-based services to be provided with efficient web access, so users can benefit from those new services by using web-based applications and user interfaces, not only NGN-IMS User Equipments and SIP protocol. Many Service are under planning which provided only under convergence of ...

  16. 77 FR 54783 - Improving Access to Mental Health Services for Veterans, Service Members, and Military Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... strategies to support collaborative research to address suicide prevention. (c) The Departments of Defense..., Veterans Affairs, and Homeland Security to expand suicide prevention strategies and take steps to meet the... members, and their families. Sec. 2. Suicide Prevention. (a) By December 31, 2012, the Department of...

  17. A Middleware Based Approach to Dynamically Deploy Location Based Services onto Heterogeneous Mobile Devices Using Bluetooth in Indoor Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Pampa; Sen, Rijurekha; Das, Pradip K.

    Several methods for providing location based service (LBS) to mobile devices in indoor environment using wireless technologies like WLAN, RFID and Bluetooth have been proposed, implemented and evaluated. However, most of them do not focus on heterogeneity of mobile platforms, memory constraint of mobile devices, the adaptability of client or device to the new services it discovers whenever it reaches a new location. In this paper, we have proposed a Middleware based approach of LBS provision in the indoor environment, where a Bluetooth enabled Base Station (BS) detects Bluetooth enabled mobile devices and pushes a proper client application only to those devices that belong to some registered subscriber of LBS. This dynamic deployment enables the mobile clients to access any new service without having preinstalled interface to that service beforehand and thus the client's memory consumption is reduced. Our proposed work also addresses the other issues like authenticating the clients before providing them LBSs and introducing paid services. We have evaluated its performance in term of file transfer time with respect to file size and throughput with respect to distance. Experimental results on service consumption time by the mobile client for different services are also presented.

  18. Deployment Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    family/unit briefings (to include POA/wills/ consumer law /insurance war clauses) - Provide fill-in-blank sheets to send coordinators of pre- deployment...services. 2. SGLI designations and "By Law" implications. 3. Wills for both spouses. 4. Powers of Attorney. 5. Consumer law issues. 1-7 B. Typically...Relief Act JA 261 Real Property Guide JA 262 Wills Guide JA 263 Family Law Guide JA 265 Consumer Law Guide JA 267 Legal Assistance Office Directory

  19. AN ANALYSIS ON THE DETERMINANTS OF SERVICE QUALITY PERCEIVED BY MEMBERS OF THE FITNESS CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir YILDIZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, it is aimed to determine the determinants of service quality perceived by fitness center members. Scanning model from quantitative research methods was used in the research. The study group consisted of 301 women and 390 men in total 691 members who participated the research voluntarily and were selected through an easily accessible sample. The "Sport-Fitness Centers Perceived Service Quality Scale (SFC-PSQS" developed by Uçan (2007 was used in the study. In the analysis of the data, independent t-test, correlation analysis and logistic regression tests were applied. According to obtained findings, significant and moderate relationships were determined between service quality sub-dimensions in positive direction whereas Independent T test results showed that service quality perceptions of participants who evaluated the program as expensive were found to be significantly lower in all sub-dimensions. Considering the logistic regression results, it was determined that variable of "physical environment quality" from perceived service quality sub-dimensions had an effect on the level of program fees of the members. It seems that 1 unit increase in physical environment quality variable caused 6.1% decrease in "program fee prediction" related to odds value. It can be stated that 11% of the total variance of program fee levels predicts perceived service quality. As a result, it is considered that only one factor cannot be effective in ensuring the continuity of sport-fitness center customers and the sustainability of the business. This is because factors such as customer expectations, equipment, experience of fitness center, customer loyalty, physical appearance that may affect individual consumer satisfaction are important factors.

  20. Staff Members with more than 25 years service at CERN in 2001 and 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Staff Members with 25 years service in 2002 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honnor on the 20th November 2002 : Baulet Yves / ST, Bornand Michel / SL, Burdet Georges / ST, Carena Francesco / EP, Chanut Robert / LHC, Chauchaix Bruno / SL, Chevrier François / SL, Chohan Vinod / LHC, Dahlerup-Petersen Knud / LHC, De Gennaro Michele Silvano / IT, De Rujula Alvaro / TH, Dury Jean-Marie / SL, Ferrara Sergio / TH, Fraser Gordon / ETT, Kolly Michel / ST, Korda Gwendoline / DSU, Lager Michel / ST, Michelon Jean-Claude / SL, Montuelle Jean / IT, Naudi Andre John / FI, Seis Irene / IT, Vascotto Alessandro / EP, Vernamonte Donatino / ST, Von Rüden Wolfgang / IT, Vullierme Bruno / LHC. Staff members with 25 years service in 2001 were also invited: Datta-Cockerill Sudeshna / HR, Frost-Ainley Lio / IT, Laurent Moniek / HR, Saban Roberto / AC.

  1. Staff Members with more than 25 years service at CERN in 2001 and 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Staff Members with 25 years service in 2002 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honnor on the 20th November 2002 : Baulet Yves / ST Bornand Michel / SL Burdet Georges / ST Carena Francesco / EP Chanut Robert / LHC Chauchaix Bruno / SL Chevrier François / SL Chohan Vinod / LHC Dahlerup-Petersen Knud / LHC De Gennaro Michele Silvano / IT De Rujula Alvaro / TH Dury Jean-Marie / SL Ferrara Sergio / TH Fraser Gordon / ETT Kolly Michel / ST Korda Gwendoline / DSU Lager Michel / ST Michelon Jean-Claude / SL Montuelle Jean / IT Naudi Andre John / FI Seis Irene / IT Vascotto Alessandro / EP Vernamonte Donatino / ST Von Rüden Wolfgang / IT Vullierme Bruno / LHC Staff members with 25 years service in 2001 were also invited: Datta-Cockerill Sudeshna / HR Frost-Ainley Lio / IT Laurent Moniek / HR Saban Roberto / AC

  2. The impact of attachment style on posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in postdeployed service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolas, Sandra M; Arata-Maiers, Rachel; Hildebrandt, Erika J; Maiers, Alan J; Mason, Shawn T; Baker, Monty T

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of attachment style on self-reported posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a population of service members (N=561). Active duty, postdeployment service members completed anonymous questionnaires including 2 measures of adult attachment and the PTSD checklist-military as a measure of PTSD symptoms. Results confirmed the central hypothesis that attachment style was related to reported PTSD symptoms. Secure attachment style was associated with less reported PTSD symptoms and therefore may be involved in mechanisms associated with protection from developing PTSD after experiencing wartime trauma. Results were consistent when tested across continuous and dichotomous assessments that captured diagnostic criteria. This study demonstrates a significant relationship between attachment style and PTSD symptoms within a military population, potentially providing the basis for future research in this area.

  3. Psychiatric Worker and Family Members: Pathways Towards Co-Operation Networks within Psychiatric Assistance Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Silvia

    2014-03-04

    The family's role in patient care was greatly altered by Law 180. This law, introduced in Italy in 1978, led to a gradual phasing out of custodial treatment for psychiatric patients. This different mindset, which views the family as an alternative to institutionalization, leads to it being seen as an essential entity in the setting up of community service dynamics. We interviewed health professionals in order to understand obstacles of collaboration between family members and mental health care workers. The goal was to uncover actions that promote collaboration and help build alliances between families and psychiatric workers. Results showed that health professionals view the family as a therapeutic resource. Despite this view, family members were rarely included in patient treatment. The reasons is: the structures have a theoretical orientation of collaboration with the family but, for nurses not are organized a few meeting spaces with family members. Services should create moments, such as multi-family groups or groups of information, managed by nurses and not only by doctors. These occasions it might facilitate the knowledge between professionals and family members.

  4. Supporting Readiness: Ensuring Excellent PTSD and Depression Care for Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    care for PTSD and depression are needed RAND results suggest that the MHS is a leader in providing timely outpatient follow -up after a psychiatric...the Military Health System. The DoD is positioned to be a leader in providing high-quality, evidence-based care for PTSD and depression. ...diagnoses can have a significant impact on service members and their families—yet little is known about the quality of care the Military Health

  5. Eyeglass Benefits: Consideration of Frame of Choice for Retired Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-20

    the TRICARE optical benefit emerged as the most beneficial policy option. However, DoD policymakers must weigh all options to determine their best...for general dental (non- orthodontic ) care. Premiums are automatically deducted from the service member’s retired military pay (Prospective...benefit emerged as the best policy option. Although any of the expansion options would address the retirees’ desire for more contemporary eyewear, the

  6. Opioid Use Patterns Among Active Duty Service Members and Civilians: 2006 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-06

    population-level research in opioid use could be very useful for comparing different populations. It is unclear if the seasonal effect observed is a remnant of...the 11 out of I2-month TRICARE enrollment requirement or some other factor. However, we included a seasonal factor in each time series analysis. This...US Total Retail Prescriptions (IMS Health) -- Active Duty Service MembersTotal Prescriptions (TRICARE) Figure 3. Monthly forecasted number versus

  7. The Development and Implications of Peer Emotional Support for Student Service Members/Veterans and Civilian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; Barry, Adam E.; Mroczek, Daniel K.; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    Student service members/veterans represent a growing population on college campuses. Despite this growth, scholarly investigations into their health- and adjustment-related issues are almost nonexistent. The limited research that is available suggests that student service members/veterans may have trouble connecting with their civilian…

  8. Neuropsychological outcome from blast versus non-blast: mild traumatic brain injury in U.S. military service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rael T; Pancholi, Sonal; Brickell, Tracey A; Sakura, Sara; Bhagwat, Aditya; Merritt, Victoria; French, Louis M

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the neuropsychological outcome from blast-related versus non-blast related mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Participants were 56 U.S. military service members who sustained an MTBI, divided into two groups based on mechanism of injury: (a) non-blast related (Non-blast; n = 21), and (b) blast plus secondary blunt trauma (Blast Plus; n = 35). All participants had sustained their injury in theatre whilst deployed during Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom. Patients had been seen for neuropsychological evaluation at Walter Reed Army Medical Center on average 4.4 months (SD = 4.1) post-injury. Measures included 14 clinical scales from the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) and 12 common neurocognitive measures. For the PAI, there were no significant differences between groups on all scales (p > .05). However, medium effect sizes were found for the Depression (d = .49) and Stress (d = .47) scales (i.e., Blast Plus > Non-blast). On the neurocognitive measures, after controlling for the influence of psychological distress (i.e., Depression, Stress), there were no differences between the Non-blast and Blast Plus groups on all measures. These findings provide little evidence to suggest that blast exposure plus secondary blunt trauma results in worse cognitive or psychological recovery than blunt trauma alone. (JINS, 2012, 18, 595-605).

  9. The effect of pulsed electromagnetic frequency therapy on health-related quality of life in military service members with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayback-Beebe, Ann Marie; Yoder, Linda H; Goff, Brandon J; Arzola, Sonya; Weidlich, Christopher

    2017-07-20

    In the U.S. military, chronic low back pain is among the most frequent complaints for medical visits, lost work time, and attrition from active duty and the deployed setting by service members. The aim of this pilot study was to determine whether adjunctive treatment with pulsed electromagnetic frequency (PEMF) produced significant variability in chronic low back pain symptoms and secondary health-related quality of life, mental health and disability outcomes. Prospective, randomized pilot study with repeated measures at baseline, post-treatment, and 1 month follow-up for two groups: usual care (UC) vs. UC + PEMF. In a convenience sample of 75 service members, health-related quality of life mental and physical component scores were significant: F(2, 104) = 4.20, p = .018 (η(2) = .075) and F(2, 104) = 4.75, p = .011 (η(2) = .084), respectively; as was anxiety symptom severity: F(2, 104) = 5.28, p = .007 (η(2) = .092). Adjunctive treatment with PEMF demonstrated improvements in service members' overall physical health-related quality of life with expected, yet statistically nonsignificant improvements in reported pain and LBP-related disability. There were significant between group differences in anxiety symptom severity with higher symptoms reported by the UC + PEMF group, surprising findings that warrant further investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. ANALYSIS OF THE ISSUES OF EFFECTIVE BROADBAND MEDIA SERVICES DEPLOYMENT IN THE COMPUTER COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.S.S.Riaz Ahamed

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Fast Internet access barely scratches the surface of the powers of broadband, DSL, and IP technology, which, combined in broadband media services, will connect people and businesses around the world like never before. Broadband media services will put the consumer in total control by enabling personal, custom, on-demand viewing of entertainment, e-learning, video games, and other types of content. Individuals will choose what they want to hear, see, or be entertained by on their own, and people will no longer have to plan around preconceived broadcast schedules for home entertainment. A broadband media service provides endless possibilities for consumers to choose and personalize their entertainment and infotainment. A brief history tracing the evolution of broadband media services will be presented, along with descriptions of multimedia standards, potential services, and the roles of the various entities involved in creating broadband media services–network providers, content providers, services providers, and businesses and consumers.

  11. Analysis of the method quality function deployment "qfd" in preventive services police

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Soares de Freitas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite of the significant contribution of QFD for the construction of the theoretical framework for managing the development of new products and services, there is an embryonic implementation in the public sector. The purpose of this article is to analyze the application of the method in the context of public safety, and the study was delimited to the School Patrol in the Military Police of Minas Gerais. Action research was the research strategy chosen and qualitative and quantitative methods were used to collect and analyze data. The QFD method proved to be effective for: systematize a large set of internal and external corporate information, facilitating the subsequent planning of policing; promote a dynamic oriented and structured in encounters between police and the community; identify the needs of public school and prioritize activities policing which better fulfill these desires; and to understand the ability of service of a School Patrol Unit. Moreover, the police service has a unique set of characteristics that partially hindered planning service by QFD. This service does not have a specific market niche, being a service of law and not by purchase. Also relies on legal aspects and regulates behaviors, generating rejection. Although this particular nature, two factors favored the application of the method: the institutionalization of the philosophy of community policing in the organization and to familiarizing officers with management concepts and quality. The final conclusion is that the QFD method was presented as a promising tool for improving the quality of Brazilian public services.

  12. Medicare Advantage Members' Expected Out-Of-Pocket Spending For Inpatient And Skilled Nursing Facility Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Laura M; Grebla, Regina C; Mor, Vincent; Trivedi, Amal N

    2015-06-01

    Inpatient and skilled nursing facility (SNF) cost sharing in Medicare Advantage (MA) plans may reduce unnecessary use of these services. However, large out-of-pocket expenses potentially limit access to care and encourage beneficiaries at high risk of needing inpatient and postacute care to avoid or leave MA plans. In 2011 new federal regulations restricted inpatient and skilled nursing facility cost sharing and mandated limits on out-of-pocket spending in MA plans. After these regulations, MA members in plans with low premiums averaged $1,758 in expected out-of-pocket spending for an episode of seven hospital days and twenty skilled nursing facility days. Among members with the same low-premium plan in 2010 and 2011, 36 percent of members belonged to plans that added an out-of-pocket spending limit in 2011. However, these members also had a $293 increase in average cost sharing for an inpatient and skilled nursing facility episode, possibly to offset plans' expenses in financing out-of-pocket limits. Some MA beneficiaries may still have difficulty affording acute and postacute care despite greater regulation of cost sharing.

  13. Deploying mutation impact text-mining software with the SADI Semantic Web Services framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazanov, Alexandre; Laurila, Jonas Bergman; Baker, Christopher J O

    2011-01-01

    Mutation impact extraction is an important task designed to harvest relevant annotations from scientific documents for reuse in multiple contexts. Our previous work on text mining for mutation impacts resulted in (i) the development of a GATE-based pipeline that mines texts for information about impacts of mutations on proteins, (ii) the population of this information into our OWL DL mutation impact ontology, and (iii) establishing an experimental semantic database for storing the results of text mining. This article explores the possibility of using the SADI framework as a medium for publishing our mutation impact software and data. SADI is a set of conventions for creating web services with semantic descriptions that facilitate automatic discovery and orchestration. We describe a case study exploring and demonstrating the utility of the SADI approach in our context. We describe several SADI services we created based on our text mining API and data, and demonstrate how they can be used in a number of biologically meaningful scenarios through a SPARQL interface (SHARE) to SADI services. In all cases we pay special attention to the integration of mutation impact services with external SADI services providing information about related biological entities, such as proteins, pathways, and drugs. We have identified that SADI provides an effective way of exposing our mutation impact data such that it can be leveraged by a variety of stakeholders in multiple use cases. The solutions we provide for our use cases can serve as examples to potential SADI adopters trying to solve similar integration problems.

  14. Intimate partner violence among female service members and veterans: information and resources available through military and non-military websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy; Joshi, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of women's roles in the military, the number of female service members and veterans has increased. Considerable knowledge about intimate partner violence (IPV) in civilian couples exists but little is known about IPV among female service members and veterans. Prevalence rates of IPV range from 17% to 39% for female service members, and 21.9% to 74% for veterans. Most service members and veterans indicated using the Internet at least occasionally and expressed willingness to seek information about services via the Internet. Informed by data, we conducted a systematic review of military (Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps) and non-military (Veterans Affairs and Google) websites to explore the availability and presentation of information and resources related to IPV. The websites search revealed a variety of resources and information available, and important differences between sites with regard to what and how information is presented. Implications for practice and further research are discussed.

  15. Deploying the Win TR-20 computational engine as a web service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite its simplicity and limitations, the runoff curve number method remains a widely-used hydrologic modeling tool, and its use through the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) computer application WinTR-20 is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. To facilitate timely up...

  16. Qualitative Phenomenological Study of Data Management Information System Deployments: Financial Services Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Dannie J.

    2014-01-01

    The qualitative phenomenological study explored the lived experiences of financial services industry change managers to understand the genesis of low data management information system project adoption rates. The goal of the study was to find methods to improve data management information system adoption rates. The participant pool consisted of 19…

  17. Qualitative Phenomenological Study of Data Management Information System Deployments: Financial Services Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Dannie J.

    2014-01-01

    The qualitative phenomenological study explored the lived experiences of financial services industry change managers to understand the genesis of low data management information system project adoption rates. The goal of the study was to find methods to improve data management information system adoption rates. The participant pool consisted of 19…

  18. Behavioral Health and Adjustment to College Life for Student Service Members/Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Lawrence; Braue, Lawrence A; Stire, Sheryl; Gum, Amber M; Cross, Brittany L; Brown, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of student service members/veterans (SSM/Vs) are enrolling in college. However, little is known about how their previous military experience affects their adjustment to this new role. The present study tested the hypothesis that SSM/Vs who report adjustment problems in college have a higher incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and other behavioral health problems compared with those who do not report adjustment problems. SSM/Vs (N = 173) at a large, southeastern, public university completed online surveys that included well-validated screens measuring substance use, depression, PTSD, and other mental disorders. Those reporting difficulties adjusting to university life (28%) reported significantly higher frequencies of behavioral and health problems while in the military, and significantly higher levels of PTSD, depression, and mental health disorders, but no difference in substance use. Implications for improved behavioral health screening and coordination of university behavioral health services with veterans' health systems are discussed.

  19. Community Reintegration Problems Among Veterans and Active Duty Service Members With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarity, Suzanne; Barnett, Scott D; Lamberty, Greg; Kretzmer, Tracy; Powell-Cope, Gail; Patel, Nitin; Nakase-Richardson, Risa

    To examine community reintegration problems among Veterans and military service members with mild or moderate/severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at 1 year postinjury and to identify unique predictors that may contribute to these difficulties. VA Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. Participants were 154 inpatients enrolled in the VA TBI Model Systems Program with available injury severity data (mild = 28.6%; moderate/severe = 71.4%) and 1-year postinjury outcome data. Prospective, longitudinal cohort. Community reintegration outcomes included independent driving, employability, and general community participation. Additional measures assessed depression, posttraumatic stress, and cognitive and motor functioning. In the mild TBI (mTBI) group, posttraumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms were associated with lower levels of various community reintegration outcomes. In the moderate/severe TBI group, cognition and motor skills were significantly associated with lower levels of community participation, independent driving, and employability. Community reintegration is problematic for Veterans and active duty service members with a history of TBI. Unique comorbidities across injury severity groups inhibit full reintegration into the community. These findings highlight the ongoing rehabilitation needs of persons with TBI, specifically evidence-based mental healthcare, in comprehensive rehabilitation programs consistent with a chronic disease management model.

  20. The impact of fathers' military deployment on child adjustment. The support needs of primary school children and their families separated during active military service: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pexton, Sharon; Farrants, Jacqui; Yule, William

    2017-09-01

    Although direct exposure to war-related trauma negatively impacts children's psychological well-being, little is known about this impact within the context of parental military deployment to a combat zone and 'indirect' experience of the effects of armed conflict. This study investigates the impact of father's military deployment to Afghanistan on child well-being in primary schoolchildren and compares measures of adjustment with a matched group of children with fathers deployed on military training (non-combat) deployment. Data were collected within primary schools in 2011-2012 from 52 children aged 8-11 years with fathers deploying to Afghanistan ( n = 26) and fathers deploying on military training ( n = 26) via self-completion of questionnaires assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression, stress and levels of self-esteem. Data were collected in both groups, at pre-, mid- and post-parental deployment. Class teachers and parents (non-deployed) completed a measure of child behaviour and parents completed a measure of parenting stress and general health. Unexpectedly child adjustment difficulties were not significantly raised in children whose parents deployed to Afghanistan. Ratings of behavioural difficulties and depression were low in both groups. However, clinically elevated levels of anxiety and stress symptoms were reported by both groups of children at each stage of deployment. No associations between parental stress, parental mental health and child adjustment were found. High levels of children's anxiety and stress reported during fathers' active military service warrant further investigation. Implications for school and health monitoring and CAMHS community liaison work are discussed.

  1. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Service Members: Life After Don't Ask, Don't Tell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbach, Jeremy T; Castro, Carl Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual service members can serve openly in the military with the repeal of the Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy. The fate of transgender service members remains uncertain as the policy preventing them from serving in the military remains under review. The health care needs of these populations remain for the most part unknown, with total acceptance and integration in the military yet to be achieved. In this paper, we review the literature on the health care needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) service members, relying heavily on what is known about LGBT civilian and veteran populations. Significant research gaps about the health care needs of LGBT service members are identified, along with recommendations for closing those gaps. In addition, recommendations for improving LGBT acceptance and integration within the military are provided.

  2. Indications of Recruitment Challenges in Research with U.S. Military Service Members: A ClinicalTrials.gov Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Wendy A; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2017-03-01

    The success of military-relevant health research often depends on recruiting adequate numbers of U.S. military service members as research participants. Researchers have reported difficulties in recruiting service member research participants. Reviews of ClinicalTrials.gov, an online clinical trial registry of publicly and privately sponsored studies, have identified challenges in participant recruitment and barriers to study completion in various research populations. The purpose of this study was to identify indications of difficulty recruiting U.S. military service members as research participants based on data from study records in ClinicalTrials.gov. Records of studies starting between 2005 and 2014 were collected from ClinicalTrials.gov and updated through January 2016. Three hundred and two studies that included ≥25% U.S. military service member research participants were (1) compared to a comparison group of 302 studies, each with <5% service member participants and (2) compared by the proportion of service member participants within studies in the military group ("many" ≥25% but <100% service members and "all" 100% service members). Groups were evaluated and compared for recruitment status; reasons for study withdrawal, termination, or suspension; achievement of ≥85% of the anticipated enrollment; and differences in achieving recruitment goals according to study sponsor. Twelve percent of studies in the military group had been withdrawn, terminated, or suspended; enrollment and funding problems were the most common reasons. The comparison group had 11% of studies withdrawn, terminated, or suspended; the most common reasons were enrollment problems and sponsor decision. All study groups had indications of difficulty adequately achieving participant enrollment goals. Among studies with known anticipated and actual enrollment, approximately half in both the military group (47.9%) and comparison group (50.3%) achieved ≥85% of the anticipated enrollment

  3. 26 CFR 31.3121(i)-4 - Computation of remuneration for service performed by certain members of religious orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...)(1) (relating to definition of wages), include as such individual's remuneration for such service the... requires its members to take a vow of poverty and which has made an election under section 3121(r). Under... order which requires its members to take a vow of poverty and which has made an election under section...

  4. Using Citygml to Deploy Smart-City Services for Urban Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandi, F.; De Amicis, R.; Piffer, S.; Soave, M.; Cadzow, S.; Gonzalez Boix, E.; D'Hont, E.

    2013-05-01

    The rapid technological evolution, which is characterizing all the disciplines involved within the wide concept of smart cities, becomes a key factor to trigger true user-driven innovation. In this context 3D city models will play an increasingly important role in our daily lives and become an essential part of the modern city information infrastructure (Spatial Data Infrastructure). The goal of this paper is to introduce the i-SCOPE (interoperable Smart City services through an Open Platform for urban Ecosystems) project methodology and implementations together with key technologies and open standards. Based on interoperable 3D CityGML UIMs, the aim of i-Scope is to deliver an open platform on top of which it possible to develop, within different domains, various "smart city" services. Moreover, in i-SCOPE different issues, transcending the mere technological domain, are being tackled, including aspects dealing with social and environmental issues. Indeed several tasks including citizen awareness, crowd source and voluntary based data collection as well as privacy issue concerning involved people should be considered.

  5. From Programs to Systems: Deploying Implementation Science and Practice for Sustained Real World Effectiveness in Services for Children and Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghate, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of knowledge of effective practice, especially into "usual care" settings, remains challenging. This article argues that to close this gap we need to recognize the particular challenges of whole-system improvement. We need to move beyond a limited focus on individual programs and experimental research on their effectiveness. The rapidly developing field of implementation science and practice (ISP) provides a particular lens and a set of important constructs that can helpfully accelerate progress. A review of selected key constructs and distinctive features of ISP, including recognizing invisible system infrastructure, co-construction involving active collaboration between stakeholders, and attention to active implementation, supports for providers beyond education and training. Key aspects of an implementation lens likely to be most helpful in sustaining effectiveness include assisting innovators to identify and accommodate the architecture of existing systems, understand the implementation process as a series of distinct but nonlinear stages, identify implementation outcomes as prerequisites for treatment outcomes, and analyse implementation challenges using frameworks of implementation drivers. In complex adaptive systems, how services are implemented may matter more than their specific content, and how services align and adapt to local context may determine their sustained usefulness. To improve implementation-relevant research, we need better process evaluation and cannot rely on experimental methods that do not capture complex systemic contexts. Deployment of an implementation lens may perhaps help to avoid future "rigor mortis," enabling more productively flexible and integrative approaches to both program design and evaluation.

  6. DSM-5 Criteria and Its Implications for Diagnosing PTSD in Military Service Members and Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guina, Jeffrey; Welton, Randon S; Broderick, Pamela J; Correll, Terry L; Peirson, Ryan P

    2016-05-01

    This review addresses how changes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) criteria has the potential to affect the care and careers of those who have served in the military, where the diagnosis often determines fitness for duty and veterans' benefits. PTSD criteria changes were intended to integrate new knowledge acquired since previous DSM editions. Many believe the changes will improve diagnosis and treatment, but some worry these could have negative clinical, occupational, and legal consequences. We analyze the changes in classification, trauma definition, symptoms, symptom clusters, and subtypes and possible impacts on the military (e.g., over- and under-diagnosis, "drone" video exposure, subthreshold PTSD, and secondary PTSD). We also discuss critiques and proposals for future changes. Our objectives are to improve the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of those service members who have survived trauma and to improve policies related to the military mental healthcare and disability systems.

  7. Risk Factors for Anticipatory Grief in Family Members of Terminally Ill Veterans Receiving Palliative Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Laurie A; Clark, Karen A; Ali, Khatidja S; Gibson, Benjamin W; Smigelsky, Melissa A; Neimeyer, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Anticipatory grief is the process associated with grieving the loss of loved ones in advance of their inevitable death. Because anticipatory grief has been associated with a variety of outcomes, risk factors for this condition deserve closer consideration. Fifty-seven family members of terminally ill, hospice-eligible veterans receiving palliative care services completed measures assessing psychosocial factors and conditions. Elevated anticipatory grief was found in families characterized by relational dependency, lower education, and poor grief-specific support, who also experienced discomfort with closeness and intimacy, neuroticism, spiritual crisis, and an inability to make sense of the loss. Thus, in this sample, anticipatory grief appears to be part of a cluster of factors and associated distress that call for early monitoring and possible intervention.

  8. Posttraumatic stress and growth in student service members and veterans: The role of personal growth initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowa, Dominika; Robitschek, Christine; Harmon, Kevin Andrew; Shigemoto, Yuki

    2016-10-01

    This study explored the extent to which personal growth initiative (PGI) may predict posttraumatic stress and growth in student service members/veterans (SSM/V). Participants were 136 SSM/V (79% men) representing multiple branches of the armed forces. Forty-four percent of participants reported having combat experience. Data collection occurred from October 2013 to February 2014. Data were collected via a Web-based survey that included demographics and measures of personal growth initiative, posttraumatic stress, posttraumatic growth, and perceived social support. Results indicated that PGI is not a unique predictor of posttraumatic stress but is a unique predictor of higher levels of posttraumatic growth. PGI appears to be at least as important as perceived social support in facilitating growth in SSM/V. This study provides further evidence for PGI's potential to facilitate growth after a traumatic event.

  9. Why Women Join the Military: Enlistment Decisions and Postdeployment Experiences of Service Members and Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankowski, Mariann; Tower, Leslie E; Brandt, Cynthia A; Mattocks, Kristin

    2015-10-01

    Over the past three decades women's enlistment has continued to increase. In an effort to help social workers better meet the needs of female veterans, this study sought to learn women's enlistment motivations and postdeployment experiences. This qualitative study was nested within the Women Veterans Cohort Study. Using a semistructured interview guide, authors interviewed 18 enlisted female service members and veterans. The themes that emerged, based on grounded theory, included not only opportunity and calling, but also outcomes. Unexpectedly, enlistment resulted in a professional military career, with over half of the participants making the military their life's work. Further study on the motivation, retention, and the reintegration needs of women postmilitary is necessary, particularly with military recruitment targets of 20 percent women by the year 2020 and the increased awareness of the military as a potentially hostile work environment for women.

  10. 45 CFR 2522.485 - How do I calculate my program's budgeted Corporation cost per member service year (MSY)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How do I calculate my program's budgeted Corporation cost per member service year (MSY)? 2522.485 Section 2522.485 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE AMERICORPS PARTICIPANTS, PROGRAMS, AND APPLICANTS Selection...

  11. 77 FR 22324 - Correction-Solicitation for Nominations for Members of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Correction--Solicitation for Nominations for Members of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) The original date of publication for...

  12. Rapid Deployment of International Tele-Intensive Care Unit Services in War-Torn Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moughrabieh, Anas; Weinert, Craig

    2016-02-01

    The conflict in Syria has created the largest humanitarian emergency of the twenty-first century. The 4-year Syrian conflict has destroyed hospitals and severely reduced the capacity of intensive care units (ICUs) and on-site intensivists. The crisis has triggered attempts from abroad to support the medical care of severely injured and acutely ill civilians inside Syria, including application of telemedicine. Within the United States, tele-ICU programs have been operating for more than a decade, albeit with high start-up costs and generally long development times. With the benefit of lessons drawn from those domestic models, the Syria Tele-ICU program was launched in December 2012 to manage the care of ICU patients in parts of Syria by using inexpensive, off-the-shelf video cameras, free social media applications, and a volunteer network of Arabic-speaking intensivists in North America and Europe. Within 1 year, 90 patients per month in three ICUs were receiving tele-ICU services. At the end of 2015, a network of approximately 20 participating intensivists was providing clinical decision support 24 hours per day to five civilian ICUs in Syria. The volunteer clinicians manage patients at a distance of more than 6,000 miles, separated by seven or eight time zones between North America and Syria. The program is implementing a cloud-based electronic medical record for physician documentation and a medication administration record for nurses. There are virtual chat rooms for patient rounds, radiology review, and trainee teaching. The early success of the program shows how a small number of committed physicians can use inexpensive equipment spawned by the Internet revolution to support from afar civilian health care delivery in a high-conflict country.

  13. A Value-Critical Choice Analysis of a Policy to Prevent Suicide in Veterans and Service Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, Donna L; Schuman, Donald L

    2016-10-01

    A few years after the advent of the Global War on Terror, veteran and service member suicide emerged on the national forefront as a public health issue of significant concern. This social policy analysis applies a value-critical choice model to the military suicide prevention provisions mandated by Section 2 of Exec. Order No. 13625 (2012): Improving Access to Mental Health Services for Veterans, Service Members, and Military Families. Results reveal that the suicide prevention provisions mandated by the order have not been fully and effectively implemented and the goal of reducing military suicide remains elusive.

  14. Student Service Members and Veterans Who Access Pastoral Care for the Purposes of Mental Health Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacz, Marek S; Karras, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    (1) Describe the demographic characteristics of student service members and veterans (SSM/V) who seek pastoral care for mental health support; and (2) evaluate patterns of access to mental health care providers among pastoral care users and nonusers. Respondents to the Fall 2011 National College Health Assessment who reported a history of military service and ever having sought mental health care (n = 331). Differences between groups were examined using chi-square and Student's t tests. Adjusted odds ratios were estimated using ordinal logistic regression. One-third of participants used pastoral care. Users were more likely to be male and older. No significant differences were noted for race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, or exposure to hazardous duty. Users had a greater than 6-fold increase in proportional odds of accessing multiple providers. Many SSM/V look to pastoral care for mental health support. Colleges should consider incorporating a pastoral care component into specialized health care programs provided to SSM/V.

  15. Resilient Warrior: A Stress Management Group to Improve Psychological Health in Service Members

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sylvia, Louisa G; Bui, Eric; Baier, Allison L; Mehta, Darshan H; Denninger, John W; Fricchione, Gregory L; Casey, Aggie; Kagan, Leslee; Park, Elyse R; Simon, Naomi M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many veterans deployed after 9/11/2001 are impacted by subthreshold levels of post-traumatic stress, anxiety, or other psychological health problems that may interfere with successful reintegration...

  16. Study of a flowerlike deployable structure:

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ani; Liu, Heping; Li, Cheng; Wang, Yongfan

    2013-01-01

    A deployable structure is a kind of mechanism that can be folded and deployed automatically. It is able to form required shape or curved surface after deployment. In this paper, a flowerlike deployable structure, which forms a circle plane after deployment, was studied. First, the required circle plane was decomposed to determine the shapes of the members. Then the relation expressions were set up, which include the structural dimensions of the members and how to calculate the volume of the m...

  17. Tourniquet use in combat-injured service members: a link with heterotopic ossification?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaacson BM

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brad M Isaacson,1,2 Thomas M Swanson,1,2,4 Benjamin K Potter,4 Paul F Pasquina2,3 1The Henry M Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, 2The Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, 3Department of Rehabilitation, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 4Department of Orthopaedics, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA Abstract: Tourniquet use during Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF has contributed to the high survival rate of combat-injured service members. While preservation of a life – even at the potential expense of a limb – should always take precedence, delayed perfusion in traumatized residual limbs may alter the proliferation, differentiation, and function of endothelial and osteoprogenitor cells. Given the synergistic relationship between angiogenesis and osteogenesis, and the influence of environmental conditions on bone formation, hypoxic conditions from tourniquets may in part explain the higher frequency of heterotopic ossification (HO present during OIF/OEF. Determining a correlation between tourniquet usage/duration on subsequent HO formation remains challenging. Long-term retrospective investigations have been limited, since the United States Army's Institute of Surgical Research did not standardized tourniquet issuance until July 2004. Thus, associating tourniquet-induced HO in previous military conflicts is not feasible, since poor medical documentation and inadequate application of these medical devices prevent large-scale meta-analyses. Therefore, this article focuses on the basics of bone biology and how tourniquet usage following combat trauma may impact osteogenesis, and subsequently, ectopic bone formation. Keywords: heterotopic ossification, osteogenesis, combat, trauma, ectopic bone, osteoprogenitor cells, Operation Iraqi

  18. Preliminary findings of cortical thickness abnormalities in blast injured service members and their relationship to clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, D F; York, G E; Reid, M W; Cooper, D B; Jones, L; Robin, D A; Kennedy, J E; Lewis, J

    2014-03-01

    Though cortical abnormalities have been demonstrated in moderate and severe traumatic brain injured (TBI) patients, there have been no studies examining cortical changes following blast related mild TBI (mTBI). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects and functional relevance of blast mTBI on cortical thickness in a small cohort of carefully screened blast injured US Service Members (SM). Twelve SM with mTBI acquired through blast injury were compared to 11 demographically matched control SM without TBI. Both mTBI and control participants were active duty and had completed a combat deployment. Subjects underwent MRI examination and the T1 weighted anatomic images were processed using the FreeSurfer suite of tools. Cortical thickness maps were compared between groups and examined for relationships with time since injury (TSI). Utilizing a large database of functional imaging results (BrainMap), significant regions of interest (ROI) were used to determine the behavioral profiles most consistently associated with the specific ROI. In addition, clinical variables were examined as part of post-hoc analysis of functional relevance. Group comparisons controlling for age demonstrated several significant clusters of cortical thinning for the blast injured SM. After multiple comparisons correction (False Discovery Rate (FDR)), two left hemisphere clusters remained significant (left superior temporal (STG) and frontal (SFG) gyri). No clusters were significantly correlated with TSI after FDR correction. Behavioral analysis for the STG and SFG clusters demonstrated three significant behavioral/cognitive sub-domains, each associated with audition and language. Blast injured SMs demonstrated distinct areas of cortical thinning in the STG and SFG. These areas have been previously shown to be associated with audition and language. Post-hoc analyses of clinical records demonstrated significant abnormal audiology reports for the blast injured SM suggesting that the

  19. Development of CRIS: measure of community reintegration of injured service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Plow, Matthew; Jette, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Identification and prevention of community reintegration problems of veterans is an important public health mandate. However, no veteran-specific measure exists. Study purposes were to (1) develop the Community Reintegration for Service Members (CRIS) measure and (2) test the validity and reliability of the measure. Formative research identified challenges in community reintegration postdeployment. The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health participation domain guided item-bank development. Items were refined through cognitive interviews and clinician consultation. Pilot studies with 126 veterans examined unidimensionality, internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity. Three unidimensional CRIS scales were developed. Working subjects had better CRIS scores then unemployed subjects. Subjects with posttraumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, or mental health problems had worse scores than subjects without these conditions. The correlations between the CRIS and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey scales of role physical, role emotional, and social functioning were 0.44-0.80. CRIS has strong reliability, conceptual integrity, and construct validity.

  20. 32 CFR 728.54 - U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS), other than members of the uniformed services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS), other than... FACILITIES Beneficiaries of Other Federal Agencies § 728.54 U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS), other than... 43 (Contract Health Service Purchase Order for Hospital Services Rendered) or HRSA form 64...

  1. Assessment Practices of Multi-Disciplinary School Team Members in Determining Special Education Services for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Garrett; O'Neill, Rob; Bermingham, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team members were surveyed to identify the frequency with which they use recommended assessment practices, how they interpret assessment information, and their confidence working with English Language Learners (ELLs) for the purpose of determining possible eligibility to receive special education services. Results of this study…

  2. Prazosin for Prophylaxis of Chronic Post Traumatic Headaches in OEF/OIF/OND Service Members and Veterans with Mild TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0060 TITLE: Prazosin for Prophylaxis of Chronic Post -Traumatic Headaches in OEF/OIF/OND Service Members and Veterans...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sept 2015 – 29 Sept 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prazosin for Prophylaxis of Chronic Post -Traumatic...5 5. Changes/Problems...................................................................................... 5 6. Products

  3. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dental services for... Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.166 Dental services for... domiciliary care pursuant to the provisions of §§ 17.46 and 17.47, will be furnished such dental services...

  4. The Benefits and Risks of Energy Drinks in Young Adults and Military Service Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Julianne; Eshel, Inbal; Marion, Donald W

    2017-07-01

    Energy drinks (EDs) have become an integral part of the young adult, athletic, and military culture. Many athletes are convinced that EDs enhance performance, and service members as well as college students frequently use EDs as stimulants to counter sleep deprivation, or to improve academic performance. However, concerns have been raised by some military leaders about potential adverse effects of EDs. A needs assessment survey of a convenience sample of military health care providers was conducted and identified EDs as a top knowledge need for those providers working in the area of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The instrument demonstrated high interitem consistency (Cronbach's α > .80). To further explore the state of knowledge on EDs, and to prompt further discussion of ED use and how it may related to military treatment protocols and supporting educational products, we conducted a literature review of English language publications listed in the National Library of Medicine using the search term "energy drinks" and published during the last 5 years to determine what is known about EDs in terms of their potential benefits and health risks. The active ingredients in most EDs are caffeine, and to a lesser extent taurine and sugars. Several reports suggest that the combination of these ingredients is more active than the caffeine alone. Despite the positive attributes of EDs, there are increasing reports of serious and potentially life-threatening side effects. Most recently there also has been a dramatic increase in the use of ED/alcohol combination drinks, and there are preliminary studies that suggest important adverse effects with this combination. A 2013 National Institutes of Health expert workshop concluded that more clinical studies are needed to clearly define the health risks associated with ED use. The needs assessment points to a desire for more ED knowledge of health providers working with TBI patients. A few key themes emerged from the exploratory

  5. 一种基于ODE的服务组合自动化部署方案%An Automatic Deployment Scheme for Service Composition Based on ODE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金仙力; 杨庚

    2012-01-01

    通过对Apache ODE结构以及部署、执行BPEL流程的原理分析,提出一种Apache ODE引擎环境下服务组合的自动化部署方案.实例测试结果表明了该方案的可行性与有效性.%Based on the analysis of the structure and the deployment of Apache ODE and the principle of BPEL process execution, this paper proposes an automatic deployment scheme for service composition in the environment of Apache ODE engine. The results of example test show that this scheme is feasible and valid.

  6. Incidence of hiatal hernia in service members, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Francis L; Taubman, Stephen B

    2016-08-01

    From 2005 through 2014, a total of 27,276 active component service members had incident diagnoses of hiatal hernia documented in their medical records. The overall incidence rate was 19.7 cases per 10,000 person-years (p-yrs); annual incidence rates ranged from 16.5 to 22.2 cases per 10,000 p-yrs. Rates overall increased monotonically with increasing age and were higher among Air Force and Army members, officers, and healthcare workers than their respective counterparts. During the surveillance period, the 27,276 service members who had incident diagnoses of hiatal hernia accounted for 44,092 hiatal hernia-related encounters overall (1.6 encounters per case). Among all incident cases, 235 (0.86%) had surgical repairs documented during the period. The frequency of surgical treatment of hiatal hernias among military members mirrored the low frequency in U.S. civilian practice. During 2010-2014, most surgical procedures (79%) were accomplished via laparoscopic approaches. The incidence rates of hiatal hernia diagnoses reported here likely greatly underestimate the true incidence in U.S. military populations. Reasons for the underestimates and comparisons with other populations are discussed.

  7. Comparison of the Trivalent Live Attenuated vs. Inactivated Influenza Vaccines Among U.S. Military Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    by ANSI Std Z39-18 A.A. Eick et al. / Vaccine 27 (2009) 3568–3575 3569 in comparison to TIV among military service members. The few population-based...Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota), South Atlantic ( Delaware , Florida, Georgia, Mary- land, North Carolina, South Carolina... adolescents with asthma. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2006;25:860–9. [5] Ohmit SE, Victor JC, Rotthoff JR, Teich ER, Truscon RK, Baum LL, et al. Prevention of

  8. 26 CFR 31.3121(i)-2 - Computation of remuneration for service performed by an individual as a member of a uniformed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation of remuneration for service... remuneration for service performed by an individual as a member of a uniformed service. In the case of an... individual's remuneration for such service only his basic pay as described in section 102(10) of...

  9. The analysis of a World War I U.S. service member's dental remains recovered in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Calvin Y

    2014-11-01

    In October 2009, the grave of an unknown World War I (WWI) U.S. service member was exhumed in Rembercourt-Sur-Mad Village, in the Lorraine Region of France. The skeletal remains and material evidence were accessioned into the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command's (JPAC) Central Identification Laboratory (CIL). The personnel records for the associated casualty were requested, received, and reviewed. A dental profile was present among the service member's personal information. There were multiple points of concordance between the dental records of the associated casualty, and the recovered dental remains to include eight restored teeth, 15 unrestored teeth, and three antemortem missing teeth. Distinctive restorations which compared favorably included a porcelain crown and multiple gold foil fillings. All lines of evidence (historical, material evidence/personal effects, anthropological, and dental) and the circumstances of loss compared positively with the associated casualty. On April 1, 2010, the previously unaccounted-for U.S. service member was positively identified and on June 23, 2010, was buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery.

  10. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)(1)-1 - Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of... COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3401(a)(1)-1 Remuneration of... as a result of such service. Remuneration paid for active service as a member of the Armed Forces...

  11. Hotel clinic-based diarrheal and respiratory disease surveillance in U.S. service members participating in Operation Bright Star in Egypt, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebeny, Peter J; Nakhla, Isabelle; Moustafa, Manal; Bruton, Jody A; Cline, Joanne; Hawk, Douglas; El-Mohammady, Hanan; Nada, Rania A; Ahmed, Salwa F; Pimentel, Guillermo; Young, Sylvia Y N

    2012-08-01

    We conducted clinic-based, influenza-like illness and diarrheal disease surveillance among U.S. service members participating in Operation Bright Star 2009. Epidemiologic data and samples were collected. Nasopharyngeal swab specimens were tested for viruses, and feces was tested for microbiologic, immunologic, and molecular diagnostics. A survey was used to collect self-reported data. From 1,529 surveys, 41% reported diarrheal disease and 25% reported respiratory illness (incidence rate = 62 of 100 versus 37 of 100 person-months; incidence rate ratio = 1.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.5-1.9). Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was identified in 74% (69 of 93) of fecal samples. In the influenza-like illness case series, 17% (9 of 52) were positive for influenza A; all were positive for pandemic (pH1N1) 2009 virus. Rates of decreased work performance reported by patients with diarrhea and influenza-like illness were similar (46% versus 48%; P = 0.8). Diarrheal diseases and respiratory illness remain common among deployed military personnel, with important operational impact. Despite an ongoing influenza pandemic, diarrheal disease incidence was higher than that of respiratory illness.

  12. Toward Complete Inclusion: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Military Service Members after Repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aford, Brandon; Lee, Shawna J

    2016-07-01

    The 2010 repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell (DADT) is one example of how U.S. public policy has shifted toward greater inclusion of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals. The repeal of DADT reversed the practice of discharging LGB service members on the basis of sexual identity. LGB service members may now serve their country without fear of direct repercussions stemming from sexual identity. Though it is a statutory step toward parity, DADT repeal does not address a number of cultural and institutional inequities that continue to hinder full inclusion of sexual minority service members. Notably, as discussed in this article, DADT largely ignores issues facing the transgender population. This study examines remaining inequities and their ramifications for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender service members and their families. The article concludes with practice and policy recommendations for culturally competent social work practice with military service members across the sexual identity spectrum.

  13. 5 CFR 2635.103 - Applicability to members of the uniformed services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... services. 2635.103 Section 2635.103 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH General Provisions § 2635.103... of the uniformed services shall issue regulations defining the ethical conduct obligations...

  14. Additional Actions Needed to Mitigate Risks of Unsuitable Life Insurance Sales to Junior Enlisted Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    three stated they purchased the product in a hotel lobby outside Osan Air Base, Korea; and • one did not provide the location where he purchased...at which a kiosk in front of the store displayed the insurance agency’s name and the sign, “Attention Military Members Register to Win.” The

  15. DEFINITION OF PUBLIC SERVICE OBLIGATION POTENTIAL IN THE NEW EU MEMBER STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin HROMÁDKA

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with public service obligation, a form of state aid that applies to air services. The paper first provides general information on the European legislation applying to this form of state aid, and elaborates the legal framework and general principles. The second part is dedicated to a comparison of a similar subsidizing programme in the USA and Australia. An examination of current imposed public service obligation routes in Europe is provided in the following section. The coefficients defining the number of imposed PSO routes per various geo-economic variables have been defined.

  16. The use of National Youth Service Corp members to build AIDS competent communities in rural Edo State Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omorodion, Francisca; Akpede, Ese; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Agbontean-Eghafona, Kokunre; Onokerhoraye, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    This paper focuses on the community component of a larger action research project on HIV Prevention for Rural Youth (HP4RY), funded by the Global Health Research Initiative (Canada). It began with ethnographic research in 10 communities selected using geographic representative sampling and random assignment to one of three research arms. Using the AIDS Competent Community (ACC) model developed by Catherine Campbell, the ethnographic research identified factors in six domains that contributed to youth vulnerability to HIV infection. This was followed by recruitment, training and deployment of three overlapping cohorts of young adults (n = 40) serving in Nigeria's National Youth Service Corp (NYSC), to mobilize youth and adults in the communities to increase communities' AIDS competence over a nearly 2 year period. Monthly reports of these Corpers, observations of a Field Coordinator, and community feedback supported the conclusion that communities moved towards greater AIDS competence and reduction in youth vulnerability to HIV infection.

  17. THE TECHNOLOGICAL ISSUES AND IMPACT OF INTELLIGENT NETWORK STRATEGIES AND ITS RAPID DEPLOYMENT OF SERVICES IN THE COMMUNICATION NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.S.S.Riaz Ahamed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the IN was to enhance the core telephony services offered by traditional telecommunications networks, which usually amounted to making and receiving voice calls, sometimes with call divert. This core would then provide a basis upon which operators could build services in addition to those already present on astandard telephone exchange. Using the intelligent network (IN approach for supporting telecommunications services enables the use of productivity-enhancing techniques for the creation of new services. Rather than creating new services by cutting fresh software code, modules of service-independent logic can be arranged using graphical user interfaces. As a result, advanced telecommunications services, which are independent of the central switch, can be created more quickly than ever.

  18. Effective Delivery of Transition Assistance to Air Force Members Leaving the Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    assistance—defense outplacement referral system and transition bulletin board Transitional healthcare benefits and conversion health policies Extended use... Outplacement ," Personnel Journal, May 1994. 9 See Note 7, this chapter. 3-6 Service Departments Transition Assistance Programs coordinates all on...Each JAC provides a full range of outplacement counseling services similar to those found in private industry. Their role has been described as

  19. A Brief Intervention to Reduce Suicide Risk in Military Service Members and Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Fort Detrick, MD. Ghahramanlou-Holloway, M. (2014, April). Treatment needs of suicidal military personnel and family members. Invited...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-09-2-0129 TITLE: A Brief Intervention to Reduce Suicide Risk in Military...3. DATES COVERED 25 Sep 2013 to 24 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Brief Intervention to Reduce Suicide Risk in Military 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  20. Coming home: A prospective study of family reintegration following deployment to a war zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderrama-Durbin, Christina; Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Osborne, Laura J; Snyder, Douglas K; Talcott, G Wayne; Slep, Amy M Smith; Heyman, Richard E; Tatum, JoLyn; Baker, Monty; Cassidy, Daniel; Sonnek, Scott

    2015-08-01

    The consequences of deployment extend beyond the service member to impact the entire family. The current investigation evaluated the unique challenges of family reintegration for partnered service members using a prospective design. In total, 76 partnered service members who deployed on a year-long, high-risk mission to Iraq were assessed across the entirety of the deployment cycle, i.e., pre-, during, and postdeployment. At follow-up, nearly 1 in 5 partnered service members reported moderate to severe difficulties in multiple aspects of family reintegration. Prospective interpersonal indicators such as preparations for deployment as a couple, shared commitment to the military, and predeployment relationship distress predicted postdeployment family reintegration difficulties. Significant interpersonal risk factors were medium to large in their effect sizes. Airmen's willingness to disclose deployment- and combat-related experiences, and postdeployment relationship distress served as concurrent interpersonal correlates of difficulties with family reintegration. Intrapersonal factors, including posttraumatic stress symptoms and alcohol misuse were concurrently related to challenges with family reintegration; predeployment alcohol misuse also predicted subsequent family reintegration difficulties. Additional analyses indicated that pre- and postdeployment relationship distress, combat disclosure, and postdeployment alcohol misuse each contributed to family reintegration when controlling for other intra- and interpersonal risk factors. Implications for prevention and early intervention strategies as well as future research are discussed.

  1. Research productivity of members of IADR Behavioral Sciences and Health Services Research Group: relationship to professional and personal factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Heima, Masahiro; Tomar, Scott; Kunzel, Carol

    2008-10-01

    This report describes the research productivity of the members of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Behavioral Sciences and Health Services Research Group and examines personal and professional factors related to greater productivity. The findings from previous studies suggested there might be gender discrimination in opportunities for women faculty. Members on the active membership list for this IADR group were surveyed by email. Most were dentists, and three-quarters had external funding for their research. The primary outcome measure was the number of self-reported published articles in PubMed in the preceding twenty-four months. The mean number of these publications was 4.9 (SD=5.1). Gender and time in research were the best predictors of research productivity of this population. There was no difference in time for research between the men and women in this study. Controlling for gender, the best single predictor of research productivity remained percent time spent in research. Overall, the members of the IADR group spent almost three times as much time in research and were more than twice as productive as faculty members as a whole as described in earlier studies. In view of the current emphasis in many countries on addressing the social and behavioral determinants of oral health disparities, the productivity of this area of dental research is very important. Trends toward clinically oriented, non-research-intensive dental schools in the United States and reductions in time and funding available to conduct research should be of concern.

  2. Consumer-operated service program members' explanatory models of mental illness and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Janet M

    2014-10-01

    Incorporating individuals' understandings and explanations of mental illness into service delivery offers benefits relating to increased service relevance and meaning. Existing research delineates explanatory models of mental illness held by individuals in home, outpatient, and hospital-based contexts; research on models held by those in peer-support contexts is notably absent. In this article, I describe themes identified within and across explanatory models of mental illness and recovery held by mental health consumers (N = 24) at one peer center, referred to as a consumer-operated service center (COSP). Participants held explanatory models inclusive of both developmental stressors and biomedical causes, consistent with a stress-diathesis model (although no participant explicitly referenced such). Explicit incorporation of stress-diathesis constructs into programming at this COSP offers the potential of increasing service meaning and relevance. Identifying and incorporating shared meanings across individuals' understandings of mental illness likewise can increase relevance and meaning for particular subgroups of service users. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Staff members of community services for people with intellectual disability and severe mental illness: values, attitudes, and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Eugene; Gafter-Shor, Adi; Perelman-Hayim, Moran

    2013-11-01

    The study focused on the connections between the value preferences, attitudes toward community living, and burnout among staff members of community services for people with intellectual disability (n=126) and severe mental illness (n=96) in Israel. A higher preference for the self-transcendence values and a lower preference for the self-enhancement values were associated with the staff members' positive attitudes toward their clients' empowerment, a higher sense of similarity, and a negative attitude toward exclusion. In addition, a higher preference for the self-transcendence values and a lower preference for the self-enhancement values were associated with a lower level of depersonalization and a higher sense of professional accomplishment. Finally, a more positive attitude toward empowerment, a higher sense of similarity, and a more negative attitude toward exclusion were associated with a lower level of burnout. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Framework for Deploying Client/Server Distributed Database System for effective Human Resource Information Management Systems in Imo State Civil Service of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiah Ahaiwe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The information system is an integrated system that holds financial and personnel records of persons working in various branches of Imo state civil service. The purpose is to harmonize operations, reduce or if possible eliminate redundancy and control the introduction of “ghost workers” and fraud in pension management. In this research work, an attempt is made to design a frame work for deploying a client/server distributed database system for a human resource information management system with a scope on Imo state civil service in Nigeria. The system consists of a relational database of personnel variables which could be shared by various levels of management in all the ministries’ and their branches located all over the state. The server is expected to be hosted in the accountant general’s office. The system is capable of handling recruitment and promotions issues, training, monthly remunerations, pension and gratuity issues, and employment history, etc.

  5. Sustaining Service Members and Their Families: Exploring Opportunities for Efficiency and Joint Provision of Services Using Nonappropriated Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-31

    system as a reduction in autonomy. We were able to provide feedback to OSD and personnel during the change process itself (which was ongoing...created. This group, officially known as the NAF Accounting Working Group (NAF AWG) because its portfolio addresses the broad range of policies, reports...service and incorporated their feedback on our assumptions for benefits offered, terms of ben- efit plans, benefit plan costs, benefit plan participants

  6. 78 FR 51275 - Members of Senior Executive Service Performance Review Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ..., Privacy, Governmental Liaison and Disclosure (PGLD) James P. Clifford, Director, Compliance (W&I) Debra A..., Criminal Investigation (CI) Shenita L. Hicks, Director, Examination (SB/SE) Debra S. Holland, Deputy... Information Officer (IT) Debra L. Nelson, Director, Management Services (IT) Nina E. Olson, National...

  7. Military Personnel: Medical, Family Support, and Educational Services Are Available for Exceptional Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-16

    pediatric care, are available through the military health system at the proposed location. Due to this consideration, each military service assigns...EFMP. Conditions that require adaptive equipment (e.g., wheelchair , hearing aid, home oxygen therapy, home ventilator), assistive technology devices...e.g., communication devices) or environmental and architectural considerations (e.g., wheelchair accessibility) are also included. (See app. III for

  8. Experiences of Two Multidisciplinary Team Members of Systemic Consultations in a Community Learning Disability Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Clair; Viljoen, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Background: Systemic approaches can be useful in working with people with learning disabilities and their network. The evidence base for these approaches within the field of learning disabilities, however, is currently limited. Materials and Methods: This article presents part of a service evaluation of systemic consultations in a Community…

  9. 75 FR 51168 - Members of Senior Executive Service Performance Review Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Implementation (SB/ SE) Robin DelRey Jenkins, Director, Business Systems Planning (SB/SE) Rebecca Mack Johnson.... Kane, Deputy Chief Financial Officer Frank M. Keith, Jr., Chief, Communications and Liaison Lois G.... Stipek, Director, Customer Accounts Services (W&I) Keith V. Taylor, Director, Human Resources...

  10. 77 FR 63417 - Senior Executive Service; Departmental Performance Review Board Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... Secretary for Terrorist Financing Mark Mazur, Assistant Secretary for Tax Policy Richard L. Gregg, Fiscal..., Commissioner, Financial Management Service and Bureau of the Public Debt Wanda J. Rogers, Deputy Commissioner... Pamela J. Gardiner, Deputy Director, Bureau of Engraving and Printing Richard A. Peterson,...

  11. Assessing the Student, Faculty, and Community Partner in Academic Service-Learning: A Categorization of Surveys Posted Online at Campus Compact Member Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Susan; Anderson-Lain, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Service-learning is an instructional strategy used by faculty at hundreds of institutions, including those that are members of Campus Compact, an organization committed to service-learning and community/civic engagement. For this study, researchers examined a variety of online survey assessment tools used in service-learning projects. The…

  12. State of the Science Review: Advances in Pain Management in Wounded Service Members over a Decade at War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) ion channel, a peripheral pain genera- tor.60 TRPV1 is highly localized on nociceptive sensory neu- rons and their peripheral...models of nociceptive and neuropathic pain . Eur J Pain . 2010;14(8): 814 21. 36. McKeon GP, Pacharinsak C, Long CT, Howard AM, Jampachaisri K, Yeomans DC...State of the science review: Advances in pain management in wounded service members over a decade at war John L. Clifford, PhD, Marcie Fowler, PhD

  13. Occupational driving as a risk factor for low back pain in active-duty military service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Jeffrey B; Orchowski, Joseph R; Scher, Danielle L; Owens, Brett D; Burks, Robert; Belmont, Philip J

    2014-04-01

    Although occupational driving has been associated with low back pain, little has been reported on the incidence rates for this disorder. To determine the incidence rate and demographic risk factors of low back pain in an ethnically diverse and physically active population of US military vehicle operators. Retrospective database analysis. All active-duty military service members between 1998 and 2006. Low back pain requiring visit to a health-care provider. A query was performed using the US Defense Medical Epidemiology Database for the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code for low back pain (724.20). Multivariate Poisson regression analysis was used to estimate the rate of low back pain among military vehicle operators and control subjects per 1,000 person-years, while controlling for sex, race, rank, service, age, and marital status. A total of 8,447,167 person-years of data were investigated. The overall unadjusted low back pain incidence rate for military members whose occupation is vehicle operator was 54.2 per 1,000 person-years. Compared with service members with other occupations, motor vehicle operators had a significantly increased adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) for low back pain of 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.17). Female motor vehicle operators, compared with males, had a significantly increased adjusted IRR for low back pain of 1.45 (95% CI 1.39-1.52). With senior enlisted as the referent category, the junior enlisted rank group of motor vehicle operators had a significantly increased adjusted IRR for low back pain: 1.60 (95% CI 1.52-1.70). Compared with Marine service members, those motor vehicle operators in both the Army, 2.74 (95% CI 2.60-2.89), and the Air Force, 1.98 (95% CI 1.84-2.14), had a significantly increased adjusted IRR for low back pain. The adjusted IRRs for the less than 20-year and more than 40-year age groups, compared with the 30- to 39-year age group, were 1.24 (1

  14. US Military Service Members Vaccinated Against Smallpox in 2003 and 2004 Experience a Slightly Higher Risk of Hospitalization Postvaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    conditions 18 0.0 7 0.0 1.92 0.79, 4.69 280 Iron deficiency anemias 16 0.0 7 0.0 1.52 0.60, 3.84 288 Diseases of white blood cells 11 0.0 6 0.0 1.43...public release: distribution is unlimited. Naval Health Research Center 140 Sylvester Road San Diego, California 92106 This article appeared...Naval Health Research Center US Military Service Members Vaccinated Against Smallpox in 2003 and 2004 Experience a Slightly Higher Risk of

  15. Iron Status of Deployed Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    iron status indicators, as Hb concentration and serum ferritin were higher in women reporting amenorrhea as compared to those without...associated with diminished iron status. In female volunteers, menstruation affected iron status indicators, as Hb concentration and serum ferritin were...Participants were categorized as ID if they presented with >2 of the following 3 indicators of abnormal iron status: serum ferritin < 12 ng/mL,

  16. Early Warning Signs of Suicide in Service Members Who Engage in Unauthorized Acts of Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    sexual assault in male veterans. Psychological Services, 12(4), 384-393. Shneidman, E. S. (1996). The Suicidal Mind. New York, NY: Oxford University...1) psychological issues of depression, anxiety, hopelessness, a mental health diagnosis, and participation in treatment, (2) physical changes and...behavior such as assaults, death, stalking, domestic violence, kidnapping, workplace violence/threats, and sexual assault, and (3) Both suicidal and

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Student Service Member/Veteran and Civilian Student Drinking Motives

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; Barry, Adam E

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the nature and correlates of 252 student service members’/military veteran and civilian college students’ drinking motivations. Data was collected via electronic survey. Results revealed no differences between military affiliated and civilian students in mean levels of alcohol motivations. However, the links between alcohol motives and problem drinking differed for these two groups of students. Specifically, coping motivations were linked to problem drinking for stu...

  18. Deploying OpenStack

    CERN Document Server

    Pepple, Ken

    2011-01-01

    OpenStack was created with the audacious goal of being the ubiquitous software choice for building public and private cloud infrastructures. In just over a year, it's become the most talked-about project in open source. This concise book introduces OpenStack's general design and primary software components in detail, and shows you how to start using it to build cloud infrastructures. If you're a developer, technologist, or system administrator familiar with cloud offerings such as Rackspace Cloud or Amazon Web Services, Deploying OpenStack shows you how to obtain and deploy OpenStack softwar

  19. Dental students and faculty members' attitudes towards care for underserved patients and community service: do community-based dental education and voluntary service-learning matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volvovsky, Mariya; Vodopyanov, Dmitry; Inglehart, Marita R

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore 1) how students across the four years of a dental curriculum differed in attitudes towards underserved patients and community service at the beginning and end of each school year; 2) how these attitudes changed as a function of participating in required vs. voluntary community-based activities; and 3) what attitudes faculty members held about the effects of community service-learning on students. Surveys were distributed to 440 students at one dental school at the beginning and end of the school year. The overall response rate for those surveys was 75 percent, with variations among classes: first year, 94 percent; second year, 92 percent; third year, 69 percent; and fourth year, 43 percent. Survey data were also collected from twenty-two students (out of a possible forty-seven) who participated in voluntary service-learning and from fifty-four faculty members (out of approximately 150). The results showed that, at the beginning of the year, the first-year students' attitudes were more positive than the responses of students in all other cohorts. However, at the end of the year, their attitudes were less positive. Participating in voluntary service-learning improved students' attitudes towards treating underserved patients only in the short run, and experiencing ten weeks of community-based dental education did not improve their attitudes. The faculty respondents' attitudes, however, were quite positive. The decrease in students' positive attitudes towards treating underserved patients and participating in community service should raise questions about why this loss of idealism occurred.

  20. Incidence of abdominal hernias in service members, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Francis L; Taubman, Stephen B

    2016-08-01

    From 1 January 2005 through 31 December 2014, a total of 87,480 incident diagnoses of the five types of abdominal hernia (incidence rate 63.3 cases per 10,000 person-years) were documented in the health records of 72,404 active component service members. The overall incidence rate of inguinal hernias among males was six times the rate among females. However, incidence rates of femoral, ventral/incisional, and umbilical hernias were higher among females than males. During the 10-year interval, annual incidence rates for most of the five types of hernia trended downward, but rates increased for umbilical hernias in both males and females and for ventral/ incisional hernias among females. For most types of hernia, the incidence rates tended to be higher among the older age groups. Health records documented 35,624 surgical procedures whose descriptions corresponded to the types of hernia diagnoses in the service members. Most repair procedures were performed in outpatient settings. The proportion of surgical procedures performed via laparoscopy increased during the period, but the majority of operations were open procedures. The limitations to the generalizability of the findings in this study are discussed.

  1. Reintegration After Deployment: Supporting Citizen Warriors and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    families. Achieving Reintegration Success RAND researchers administered a survey and conducted interviews with service members and spouses. The...responses indicated that families with successful reintegration experiences share common traits. These families felt ready for deployment, had good...Department of Defense (DoD) can use these findings to empower families to be active, effective architects of their own reintegration success . Doing so is

  2. M ANAGEMENT OF CONTEXT - AWARE SOFTWARE RESOURCES DEPLOYED I N A CLOUD ENVIRONMENT FOR IMPROVING QUALITY OF MOBILE CLOUD SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohame M oham m adi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In cloud computing environments, context information is continuously created by context providers and consumed by the applications on mobile devices. An important characteristic of cloud - based context aware services is meeting the service level agreements (SLAs to deliver a certain quality of service (Qos , s uch as guarantees on response time or price. The response time to a request of context - aware software is affected by loading extensive context data from multiple resources on the chosen server. Therefore, the speed of such software would be decreased durin g execution time. Hence, proper scheduling of such services is indispensable because the customers are faced with time constraints. In this research, a new schedul ing algorithm for context aware services is proposed which is based on classifying similar co ntext consumers and dynamically scoring the requests to improve the performance of the server hosting highly - requested context - aware software while reducing costs of cloud provider. The approach is evaluated via simulation and comparison with gi - FIFO sched uling algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed app roach

  3. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    potential future space-based mission through large-scale, ground-based testing. Full-scale deployment testing of two petal segments combined with...capture data for incorporation into larger analysis models. Stability testing of two full-scale composite strongback segments , including in a relevant...errors. The NuSTAR project opted for a metrology and adjustment system, which had many advantages for the project and few disadvantages . Because a

  4. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  5. Concepts of multifaceted social support in operational work in the lives of South African Police Service members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masefako A. Gumani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The extensive role that social support plays in the lives of South African Police Service (SAPS members outside of the expected work networks of professionals and colleagues should be further studied to reflect on the benefits received when handling the stressful and traumatic effects of operational work.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to describe the concepts of multifaceted social support network systems as perceived by SAPS members in the context of the Vhembe District (South Africa in assisting them to deal with the effects of their operational work.Motivation for the study: There is still a call in social research to focus on the influence of different functions and sources of social support.Research design, approach and method: A descriptive phenomenological research design was used, and 20 SAPS participants were selected through purposive sampling. Unstructured,face-to-face interviews, field notes, telephone follow-ups and diaries were used to collect data which was subsequently analysed through phenomenological explication.Main findings: The results show that social support is not a linear process but is multifaceted,depending on specific operational settings. Furthermore, the social support network system identified is informed by the values of communal living in the Vhembe District as well as in the operational context in which the SAPS members work.Practical/managerial implications: The SAPS should help initiate and involve, during the debriefing of operational members, types and functions of social support that are dependent on organisational and community contexts.Contribution/value-add: This study makes a meaningful contribution to understanding that social support in the SAPS operational context is different from other contexts.

  6. Characterization of spinal injuries sustained by American service members killed in Iraq and Afghanistan: a study of 2,089 instances of spine trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Newcomb, Ronald L; Pallis, Mark P; Cleveland, Andrew W; Serrano, Jose A; Bader, Julia O; Waterman, Brian R; Belmont, Philip J

    2013-04-01

    This study sought to characterize spine injuries among soldiers killed in Iraq or Afghanistan whose autopsy results were stored by the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System. The Armed Forces Medical Examiner System data set was queried to identify American military personnel who sustained a spine injury in conjunction with wounds that resulted in death during deployment in Iraq or Afghanistan from 2003 to 2011. Demographic and injury-specific characteristics were abstracted for each individual identified. The raw incidence of spinal injuries was calculated and correlations were drawn between the presence of spinal trauma and military specialty, mechanism and manner of injury, and wounds in other body regions. Significant associations were also sought for specific injury patterns, including spinal cord injury, atlantooccipital injury, low lumbar vertebral fractures, and lumbosacral dissociation. Statistical calculations were performed using χ statistic, z test, t test with Satterthwaite correction, and multivariate logistic regression. Among 5,424 deceased service members, 2,089 (38.5%) were found to have sustained at least one spinal injury. Sixty-seven percent of all fatalities with spinal injury were caused by explosion, while 15% occurred by gunshot. Spinal fracture was the most common type of injury (n = 2,328), while spinal dislocations occurred in 378, and vertebral column transection occurred in 223. Fifty-two percent sustained at least one cervical spine injury, and spinal cord injury occurred in 40%. Spinal cord injuries were more likely to occur as a result of gunshot (p injuries (p spinal injury risk and the periods 2003 to 2007 and 2008 to 2011, although atlantooccipital injuries and spinal cord injury were significantly reduced beginning in 2008 (p spinal trauma in modern warfare seems to be higher than previously reported. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  7. Quasi-static Deployment Simulation for Deployable Space Truss Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈务军; 付功义; 何艳丽; 董石麟

    2004-01-01

    A new method was proposed for quasi-static deployment analysis of deployable space truss structures. The structure is assumed a rigid assembly, whose constraints are classified as three categories:rigid member constraint, joint-attached kinematic constraint and boundary constraint. And their geometric constraint equations and derivative matrices are formulated. The basis of the null space and M-P inverse of the geometric constraint matrix are employed to determine the solution for quasi-static deployment analysis. The influence introduced by higher terms of constraints is evaluated subsequently. The numerical tests show that the new method is efficient.

  8. Physician-based emergency medical service deployment characteristics in severe traumatic brain injury : A Dutch multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franschman, G.; Andriessen, T. M. J. C.; Boer, C.; Van der Naalt, J.; Horn, J.; Haitsma, I.; Vos, P. E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Prehospital guidelines advise advanced life support in all patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the Netherlands, it is recommended that prehospital advanced life support is particularly provided by a physician-based helicopter emergency medical service (P-HEMS) in addi

  9. A strategy for providing electronic library services to members of the AGATE Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. Garth

    1995-01-01

    In November, 1992, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin established a Task Force to evaluate conditions which have lead to the precipitous decline of the US General Aviation System and to recommend actions needed to re-establish US leadership in General Aviation. The Task Force Report and a report by Dr. Bruce J. Holmes, Manager of the General Aviation/Commuter Office at NASA Langley Research Center provided the directions for the formation of the Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE), a consortium of government, industry and university committed to the revitalization of the US General Aviation Industry. One of the recommendations of the Task Force Report was that 'a central repository of information should be created to disseminate NASA research as well as other domestic and foreign aeronautical research that has been accomplished, is ongoing or is planned... A user friendly environment should be created.' This paper describes technical and logistic issues and recommends a plan for providing technical information to members of the AGATE Consortium. It is recommended that the General Aviation office establish and maintain an electronic literature page on the AGATE server. This page should provide a user friendly interface to existing technical report and index servers identified in the report and listed in the Recommendations section. A page should also be provided which gives links to Web resources. A list of specific resources is provided in the Recommendations section. Links should also be provided to a page with tips on searching, a form to provide for feedback and suggestions from users for other resources. Finally, a page should be maintained which provides pointers to other resources like the LaRCsim workstation simulation software which is avail from LaRC at no cost. The developments of the Web is very dynamic. These developments should be monitored regularly by the GA staff and links to additional resources should be provided on the server as

  10. Development, deployment and usability of a point-of-care decision support system for chronic disease management using the recently-approved HL7 decision support service standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobach, David F; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Anstrom, Kevin J; Russell, Michael L; Woods, Peter; Smith, Dwight

    2007-01-01

    Clinical decision support is recognized as one potential remedy for the growing crisis in healthcare quality in the United States and other industrialized nations. While decision support systems have been shown to improve care quality and reduce errors, these systems are not widely available. This lack of availability arises in part because most decision support systems are not portable or scalable. The Health Level 7 international standard development organization recently adopted a draft standard known as the Decision Support Service standard to facilitate the implementation of clinical decision support systems using software services. In this paper, we report the first implementation of a clinical decision support system using this new standard. This system provides point-of-care chronic disease management for diabetes and other conditions and is deployed throughout a large regional health system. We also report process measures and usability data concerning the system. Use of the Decision Support Service standard provides a portable and scalable approach to clinical decision support that could facilitate the more extensive use of decision support systems.

  11. Using the Six Action Shoes to Foster Creativity and Innovation Among Some Nigerian National Youth Service Corps Members

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rotimi A.Animasahun

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the importance of creativity and innovation to mankind and wondered that despite the fact that every human being has a deposit of creativity in him/her that could make individuals to live successfully in life, many still live an idle, fruitless, confused, and frustrated life. This is often common among the youths who are expected to be the future leaders of the nation, hence, the problem of unemployment has aggravated to an alarming level leading to an incessant high rate of crime in Nigeria due to the fact that people have failed to nurture and develop their creativity. The study therefore investigated the effect of the Six Action Shoes creativity technique in fostering creativity and innovative skills among the National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) members in Nigeria. The study made use of pre-test/post-test quasi experimental design whereby a randomly selected sample of 70 members of the NYSC cutting across the six geo-political zones in Nigeria whose ages ranged from 21-30 (M= 26.4) were randomly selected from two local government areas of Oyo State. They were assigned to the experimental and control groups based on balloting. Both groups responded to a creativity and innovation rating scale to collect their pre-test as well as post-test scores. The experimental group was subjected to six weeks of training in the utilization of the Six Action Shoes lasting for two hours per week, while the control group waited for their turn later. At the end of the exercise, the 35 members in the experimental group remained intact, while only 32 members in the control group completed the exercise. The one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to test the only hypothesis generated for the study at the 0.05 level of significance. The result showed that there was a significant main effect of treatment on the Youth Corps' creativity and innovative skills, which means that the participants exposed to treatment scored significantly better than

  12. The road to recovery and rehabilitation for injured service members with limb loss: a focus on Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Brad M; Weeks, Sharon R; Pasquina, Paul F; Webster, Joseph B; Beck, James P; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2010-01-01

    Amputation of an extremity due to traumatic injury or a vascular occlusive disease is a life-altering event that occurs when limb salvage is not possible. While an amputation is viewed as a life saving procedure clinically, limb deficiency may result in an immediate loss in social, physical and financial well-being for the patient. Military personnel returning from Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom face unique challenges due to short residual limbs, unplanned amputations, high incidences of multiple limb loss, and accustomed activity levels prior to an amputation. The primary rehabilitation goal for these individuals is to provide them with an expedited recovery and progressive reintroduction into the civilian or active duty population. It is the purpose of this review to discuss the most frequent rehabilitation hardships service members endure following combat related trauma and future of prosthetic limb technology.

  13. Volumetric and shape analyses of subcortical structures in United States service members with mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, David F; Wade, Benjamin S C; Velez, Carmen S; Drennon, Ann Marie; Bolzenius, Jacob; Gutman, Boris A; Thompson, Paul M; Lewis, Jeffrey D; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Bigler, Erin D; Shenton, Martha E; Ritter, John L; York, Gerald E

    2016-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant health concern. The majority who sustain mTBI recover, although ~20 % continue to experience symptoms that can interfere with quality of life. Accordingly, there is a critical need to improve diagnosis, prognostic accuracy, and monitoring (recovery trajectory over time) of mTBI. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been successfully utilized to examine TBI. One promising improvement over standard volumetric approaches is to analyze high-dimensional shape characteristics of brain structures. In this study, subcortical shape and volume in 76 Service Members with mTBI was compared to 59 Service Members with orthopedic injury (OI) and 17 with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) only. FreeSurfer was used to quantify structures from T1-weighted 3 T MRI data. Radial distance (RD) and Jacobian determinant (JD) were defined vertex-wise on parametric mesh-representations of subcortical structures. Linear regression was used to model associations between morphometry (volume and shape), TBI status, and time since injury (TSI) correcting for age, sex, intracranial volume, and level of education. Volumetric data was not significantly different between the groups. JD was significantly increased in the accumbens and caudate and significantly reduced in the thalamus of mTBI participants. Additional significant associations were noted between RD of the amygdala and TSI. Positive trend-level associations between TSI and the amygdala and accumbens were observed, while a negative association was observed for third ventricle. Our findings may aid in the initial diagnosis of mTBI, provide biological targets for functional examination, and elucidate regions that may continue remodeling after injury.

  14. Interconnection Assessment Methodology and Cost Benefit Analysis for High-Penetration PV Deployment in the Arizona Public Service System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggu, Murali; Giraldez, Julieta; Harris, Tom; Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas; Lisell, Lars; Narang, David

    2015-06-14

    In an effort to better understand the impacts of high penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) generators on distribution systems, Arizona Public Service and its partners completed a multi-year project to develop the tools and knowledge base needed to safely and reliably integrate high penetrations of utility- and residential-scale PV. Building upon the APS Community Power Project-Flagstaff Pilot, this project investigates the impact of PV on a representative feeder in northeast Flagstaff. To quantify and catalog the effects of the estimated 1.3 MW of PV that will be installed on the feeder (both smaller units at homes and large, centrally located systems), high-speed weather and electrical data acquisition systems and digital 'smart' meters were designed and installed to facilitate monitoring and to build and validate comprehensive, high-resolution models of the distribution system. These models are being developed to analyze the impacts of PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including coordination and anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/VAr control schemes. This paper continues from a paper presented at the 2014 IEEE PVSC conference that described feeder model evaluation and high penetration advanced scenario analysis, specifically feeder reconfiguration. This paper presents results from Phase 5 of the project. Specifically, the paper discusses tool automation; interconnection assessment methodology and cost benefit analysis.

  15. An empirical study of adopting mobile healthcare service: the family's perspective on the healthcare needs of their elderly members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Wen-Yuan; Hung, Ming-Chien

    2010-01-01

    In an aging society, the issue of increased medical costs troubles both government agencies and families with aging parents. Many elderly people require long-term care, and the medical and financial problems associated with long-term care worry their entire family. Mobile healthcare service (MHS) has been widely applied by medical practitioners and researchers for years. Unfortunately, the elderly often fear both the technology and the cost its use incurs; hence, they seldom actively adopt MHS without the prompting and support of other family members. This study highlights this issue of long-term healthcare for the elderly and extracts the factors affecting their family's intentions in adopting MHS. Based on the integration of the Theory of Planned Behavior and the Technology Acceptance Model, the factors associated with the family's intention of the aging people toward MHS are explored. Data were collected from 200 students in the "Job Master" track in a local "Executive Master of Business Administration" program. Half of them had at least one immediate family member who was older than 65 years of age. A partial least squares (PLS) analysis shows that "attitude" significantly affected the behavioral intention of adopting MHS, and "perceived usefulness" and "perceived ease-of-use" had an indirect effect via "attitude." The PLS model explains the variance in intention (64.1%), attitude (58.1%), and perceived usefulness (33.8%). Overall, this study shows that attitude was an important determinant of MHS adoption. Gender also significantly affected the relationship between attitude and behavioral intention to adopt MHS.

  16. The Effect of Binaural Beat Technology on the Cardiovascular Stress Response in Military Service Members With Postdeployment Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, MeLisa A; Dadds, Stephanie; Burns, Debra S; Glaser, Dale; Moore, Angelo D

    2017-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of embedded theta brainwave frequency in music using binaural beat technology (BBT) compared to music alone on the cardiovascular stress response in military service members with postdeployment stress. A double-blinded, randomized, pre- and postintervention trial. Seventy-four military services members with complaint of postdeployment stress were randomized to either music with BBT or music alone. Each group listened to their respective intervention for a minimum of 30 min at bedtime for three consecutive nights a week for a total of 4 weeks. A 20-min pre- and postintervention heart rate variability (HRV) stress test and daily perceived stress via diaries assessed intervention efficacy. There was a statistical difference (p = .01) in low-frequency HRV between the music with BBT group compared to the music only group. The average low-frequency HRV decreased in the music with BBT group 2.5 ms(2) /Hz, while in the music only group it increased 7.99 ms(2) /Hz. There was also a significant difference (p = .01) in the high-frequency HRV measures, with the music with BBT group showing an increase in HRV by 2.5 ms(2) /Hz compared to the music only group, which decreased by 7.64 ms(2) /Hz. There were significant (p = .01) differences found in total power measures, with the music only group decreasing by 1,113.64 ms(2) /Hz compared to 26.68 ms(2) /Hz for the music with BBT group. Finally, daily diaries consistently showed that participants who used BBT reported less stress over the course of the 4 weeks. When placed under an acute stressor, participants who used music with embedded BBT showed a decrease in sympathetic responses and an increase in parasympathetic responses, while participants who used music alone had the opposite effect. The use of BBT in the theta brainwave frequency embedded into music decreases physical and psychological indications of stress. BBT embedded with beta and delta frequencies may improve cognitive functioning and sleep

  17. Space deployable truss structure design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyner, J. V., Jr.; Tobey, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The development status of the deployable box truss structure is summarized. Potential applications for this structural system are described. Structural and component design requirements derived from these applications are discussed. Components of prototype 4.6 m cubes which incorporate graphite/epoxy structural members, fittings, and mechanisms are described. The benefits of the component designs and their respective manufacturing processes are presented.

  18. The Potential Effects of the Defense Business Board Military Compensation Task Group’s 2011 Recommendations on Active-Duty Service Member Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    period. For the High-3 version of the current plan, NPV is defined as the lump-sum equivalent of the total pension annuities paid from the time of...only 37.5% of the lump-sum equivalent of total annuities received under the current DB plan. Likewise, for an enlisted service member, this value...only 37.5% of the lump-sum equivalent of total annuities received under the current DB vi plan. Likewise, for an enlisted service member, this value

  19. Smokeless Tobacco use Related to Military Deployment, Cigarettes and Mental Health Symptoms in a Large, Prospective Cohort Study Among US Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control...OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by...Prev Med 1994; 23: 235–41. 8. Klesges R. C., Haddock C. K., Chang C. F., Talcott G. W., Lando H. A. The association of smoking and the cost of

  20. Optimizing and Validating a Brief Assessment for Identifying Children of Service Members at Risk for Psychological Health Problems Following Parent Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Applied Psychosocial Measurement,1, 385-401. Rocissano, L., Slade, A., & Lynch, V. (1987). Dyadic synchrony and toddler compliance. Developmental...properties of the PTSD Checklist (PCL-C, PCL-S, PCL-M, PCL-PR). In B. H. Stamm (Ed.), Measurement of stress, trauma , and adaptation (pp. 250–252). Lutherville, MD: Sidran Foundation & Press. 10

  1. Tow-Dimensionally Deployable "SHDF" Truss

    OpenAIRE

    ONODA, Junjiro; WATANABE, Naoyudi; Ichida, Kazuo; HASHIMOTO, Yasuo; NAKADA, Atsushi; Saito, Hisashi; 小野田, 淳次郎

    1988-01-01

    The present paper describes a newly invented two-dimensionally deployable truss structure named SHDF, which has no articulated members. The most significant feature of SHDF truss is the very small number of the mechanisms to be actuated and locked at the deployment. A globally flat functional model actuated by tiny electromagnetic motors was designed and fabricated. The model demonstrated its practicality and virtually synchronized smooth motion in deploy/fold tests. Subsequently, the model w...

  2. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)(9)-1 - Remuneration for services performed by a minister of a church or a member of a religious order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remuneration for services performed by a minister of a church or a member of a religious order. 31.3401(a)(9)-1 Section 31.3401(a)(9)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES...

  3. Self-deploying photovoltaic power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A lightweight flexible photovoltaic (PV) blanket is attached to a support structure of initially stowed telescoping members. The deployment mechanism comprises a series of extendable and rotatable columns. As these columns are extended the PV blanket is deployed to its proper configuration.

  4. DIaaS: Data-Intensive workflows as a service - Enabling easy composition and deployment of data-intensive workflows on Virtual Research Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, R.; Ferreira da Silva, R.; Deelman, E.; Atkinson, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present the Data-Intensive workflows as a Service (DIaaS) model for enabling easy data-intensive workflow composition and deployment on clouds using containers. DIaaS model backbone is Asterism, an integrated solution for running data-intensive stream-based applications on heterogeneous systems, which combines the benefits of dispel4py with Pegasus workflow systems. The stream-based executions of an Asterism workflow are managed by dispel4py, while the data movement between different e-Infrastructures, and the coordination of the application execution are automatically managed by Pegasus. DIaaS combines Asterism framework with Docker containers to provide an integrated, complete, easy-to-use, portable approach to run data-intensive workflows on distributed platforms. Three containers integrate the DIaaS model: a Pegasus node, and an MPI and an Apache Storm clusters. Container images are described as Dockerfiles (available online at http://github.com/dispel4py/pegasus_dispel4py), linked to Docker Hub for providing continuous integration (automated image builds), and image storing and sharing. In this model, all required software (workflow systems and execution engines) for running scientific applications are packed into the containers, which significantly reduces the effort (and possible human errors) required by scientists or VRE administrators to build such systems. The most common use of DIaaS will be to act as a backend of VREs or Scientific Gateways to run data-intensive applications, deploying cloud resources upon request. We have demonstrated the feasibility of DIaaS using the data-intensive seismic ambient noise cross-correlation application (Figure 1). The application preprocesses (Phase1) and cross-correlates (Phase2) traces from several seismic stations. The application is submitted via Pegasus (Container1), and Phase1 and Phase2 are executed in the MPI (Container2) and Storm (Container3) clusters respectively. Although both phases could be executed

  5. Senior Executive Service. Reasons Why Career Members Left in Fiscal Year 1985. Fact Sheet for the Honorable Vic Fazio, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    This fact sheet reports findings of an investigation of the reported difficulties experienced by federal agencies in retaining career members of the Senior Executive Service (SES). These responses to a mailed questionnaire are highlighted: (1) the most important reasons for leaving are agency-specific (dissatisfaction with top management,…

  6. Performance test of dosimetric services in the EU member states and Switzerland for the routine assessment of individual doses (photon, beta and neutron)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordy, J.M.; Stadtmann, H.; Ambrosi, P.

    2000-01-01

    The results are given of a consolidated performance test for whole-body, and extremity personal dosemeters broadly representative of those in use in the EU member states and Switzerland. Beta, photon and neutron personal dosemeters were used to assess the routine services ability to determine...

  7. Military service member and veteran self reports of efficacy of cranial electrotherapy stimulation for anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, insomnia, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Daniel L; Price, Larry R; Nichols, Francine; Marksberry, Jeffrey A; Platoni, Katherine T

    2014-01-01

    Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) is being prescribed for service members and veterans for the treatment of anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), insomnia and depression. The purpose of this study was to examine service members' and veterans' perceptions of the effectiveness and safety of CES treatment. Service members and veterans (N=1,514) who had obtained a CES device through the Department of Defense or Veterans Affairs Medical Center from 2006-2011 were invited to participate in the web based survey via email. One hundred fifty-two participants returned questionnaires. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Participants reported clinical improvement of 25% or more from using CES for anxiety (66.7%), PTSD (62.5%), insomnia (65.3%) and depression (53.9%). The majority of these participants reported clinical improvement of 50% or more. Respondents also perceived CES to be safe (99.0%). Those individuals who were not taking any prescription medication rated CES more effective than the combined CES and prescription medication group. CES provides service members and veterans with a safe, noninvasive, nondrug, easy to use treatment for anxiety, PTSD, insomnia, and depression that can be used in the clinical setting or self-directed at home.

  8. Decision-making experiences of family members of older adults with moderate dementia towards community and residential care home services: a grounded theory study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Low, Lisa Pau; Lam, Lai Wah; Fan, Kim Pong

    2017-06-05

    Caring and supporting older people with dementia have become a major public health priority. Recent reports have also revealed a diminishing number of family carers to provide dementia care in the future. Carers who are engaged in the caring role are known to bear significant psychological, practical and economic challenges as the disease advances over time. Seemingly, evidence indicates that the burden of care can be relieved by formal services. This study aims to explore decision-making experiences of family members of older adults with moderate dementia towards the use of community support (CS) and residential care home (RCH) services. A large multi-site constructivist grounded theory in a range of non-government organizations and a private aged home will frame this Hong Kong study. Purposive sampling will begin the recruitment of family members, followed by theoretical sampling. It is estimated that more than 100 family members using CS and RCH services will participate in an interview. The process of successive constant comparative analysis will be undertaken. The final product, a theory, will generate an integrated and comprehensive conceptual understanding which will explain the processes associated with decision-making of family members for dementia sufferers. Deeper understanding of issues including, but not exclusive to, service needs, expectations and hopes among family carers for improving service support to serve dementia sufferers in CS and RCH services will also be revealed. Importantly, this study seeks to illustrate the practical and strategic aspects of the theory and how it may be useful to transfer its applicability to various service settings to better support those who deliver formal and informal care to the dementia population.

  9. Deployable and retractable telescoping tubular structure development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    A new deployable and retractable telescoping boom capable of high deployed stiffness and strength is described. Deployment and retraction functions are controlled by simple, reliable, and fail-safe latches between the tubular segments. The latch and a BI-STEM (Storable Tubular Extendible Member) actuator work together to eliminate the need for the segments to overlap when deployed. This yields an unusually lightweight boom and compact launch configuration. An aluminum space-flight prototype with three joints displays zero structural deadband, low hysteresis, and high damping. The development approach and difficulties are discussed. Test results provide a joint model for sizing flight booms of any diameter and length.

  10. Resilient Family Processes, Personal Reintegration, and Subjective Well-Being Outcomes for Military Personnel and Their Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Malissa A; O'Neal, Catherine W; Conley, Kate M; Mancini, Jay A

    2017-06-15

    Deployment affects not just the service members, but also their family members back home. Accordingly, this study examined how resilient family processes during a deployment (i.e., frequency of communication and household management) were related to the personal reintegration of each family member (i.e., how well each family member begins to "feel like oneself again" after a deployment), as well as several indicators of subjective well-being. Drawing from the family attachment network model (Riggs & Riggs, 2011), the present study collected survey data from 273 service members, their partners, and their adolescent children. Resilient family processes during the deployment itself (i.e., frequency of communication, household management), postdeployment positive and negative personal reintegration, and several indicators of well-being were assessed. Frequency of communication was related to personal reintegration for service members, while household management was related to personal reintegration for nondeployed partners; both factors were related to personal reintegration for adolescents. Negative and positive personal reintegration related to a variety of subjective well-being outcomes for each individual family member. Interindividual (i.e., crossover) effects were also found, particularly between adolescents and nondeployed partners. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Finding Their Way Back In: Family Reintegration Following Guard Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messecar, Deborah C

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe deployed National Guard members' and their families' perceptions of their experience with family reintegration, and the causes and conditions of challenges reintegration presents after deployment. A total of 26 National Guard members and 19 family members participated in individual (n = 22), couples (n = 6), or focus group (n = 17) interviews. In-depth interviews were used to assess needs and maximize input from military families regarding deployment-related experiences and reintegration issues. Qualitative coding and analysis of data were completed using NVivo. Finding their way back in is the key process that the military members must complete to successfully reestablish their desired social connections with the family and reclaim their place within the family. Several conditions shape the degree of challenges with reintegration that veterans and their family will encounter. These include preparation for deployment, length and type of deployment, communication during deployment, and finally, awareness of how deployment changes the military member and the family. Support resources dedicated to providing National Guard members and their families with assistance in preparing for deployments and educating them about the importance of communication during deployment should be maintained and expanded. Broader educational efforts that increase awareness of what to expect regarding how deployment changes the military member and the family are needed. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. Joints in deployable space truss structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, M.

    1988-01-01

    Since the response of deployable structural concepts being considered for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) backup structure will be dominated by the response of joints, the joint characteristics are significant. An overview is given of the research activities at LaRC on the static behavior of joints for deployable space truss structures. Since a pin-clevis-type joint will be utilized in deployable structures, an experimental research program to characterize the joint parameters which affect stiffness was conducted. An experimental research program was conducted on a second type of joint, referred to as a near-center latch joint. It was used in the center of members on the deployable truss structure for the Control of Flexible Structures (COFS) flight experiment. The test results of the near-center latch joint and the member with the joints indicated that the stiffness of the near-center joint is linear and stiffer than the stiffness of the total member, and that non-linearities in the stiffness characteristics of the total member were due to bending introduced at the ends of the member. The resulting data indicates that stiff linear folding joints can be designed and that bending load paths should be avoided whenever possible. In summary, for deployable structures, special attention to the joint and the structure design is required to minimize the undesirable structural non-linearities.

  13. Reliability, validity and administrative burden of the community reintegration of injured service members computer adaptive test (CRIS-CAT”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resnik Linda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Computer Adaptive Test version of the Community Reintegration of Injured Service Members measure (CRIS-CAT consists of three scales measuring Extent of, Perceived Limitations in, and Satisfaction with community integration. The CRIS-CAT was developed using item response theory methods. The purposes of this study were to assess the reliability, concurrent, known group and predictive validity and respondent burden of the CRIS-CAT. The CRIS-CAT was developed using item response theory methods. The purposes of this study were to assess the reliability, concurrent, known group and predictive validity and respondent burden of the CRIS-CAT. Methods This was a three-part study that included a 1 a cross-sectional field study of 517 homeless, employed, and Operation Enduring Freedom / Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF Veterans; who completed all items in the CRIS item set, 2 a cohort study with one year follow-up study of 135 OEF/OIF Veterans, and 3 a 50-person study of CRIS-CAT administration. Conditional reliability of simulated CAT scores was calculated from the field study data, and concurrent validity and known group validity were examined using Pearson product correlations and ANOVAs. Data from the cohort were used to examine the ability of the CRIS-CAT to predict key one year outcomes. Data from the CRIS-CAT administration study were used to calculate ICC (2,1 minimum detectable change (MDC, and average number of items used during CAT administration. Results Reliability scores for all scales were above 0.75, but decreased at both ends of the score continuum. CRIS-CAT scores were correlated with concurrent validity indicators and differed significantly between the three Veteran groups (P 0.9. MDCs were 5.9, 6.2, and 3.6, respectively for Extent, Perceived and Satisfaction subscales. Number of items (mn, SD administered at Visit 1 were 14.6 (3.8 10.9 (2.7 and 10.4 (1.7 respectively for Extent, Perceived and Satisfaction

  14. Characterizing high-velocity angular vestibulo-ocular reflex function in service members post-blast exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Matthew R; Shelhamer, Mark J; Schubert, Michael C

    2011-02-01

    Blasts (explosions) are the most common mechanism of injury in modern warfare. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and dizziness are common sequelae associated with blasts, and many service members (SMs) report symptoms worsen with activity. The purpose of this study was to measure angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain (aVOR) of blast-exposed SMs with TBI during head impulse testing. We also assessed their symptoms during exertion. Twenty-four SMs recovering from TBI were prospectively assigned to one of two groups based on the presence or absence of dizziness. Wireless monocular scleral search coil and rate sensor were used to characterize active and passive yaw and pitch head and eye rotations. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to monitor symptoms during fast walking/running. For active yaw head impulses, aVOR gains were significantly lower in the symptomatic group (0.79 ± 0.15) versus asymptomatic (0.87 ± 0.18), but not for passive head rotation. For pitch head rotation, the symptomatic group had both active (0.915 ± 0.24) and passive (0.878 ± 0.22) aVOR gains lower than the asymptomatic group (active 1.03 ± 0.27, passive 0.97 ± 0.23). Some SMs had elevated aVOR gain. VAS scores for all symptoms were highest during exertion. Our data suggest symptomatic SMs with TBI as a result of blast have varied aVOR gain during high-velocity head impulses and provide compelling evidence of pathology affecting the vestibular system. Potential loci of injury in this population include the following: disruption of pathways relaying vestibular efference signals, differential destruction of type I vestibular hair cells, or selective damage to irregular afferent pathways-any of which may explain the common discrepancy between reports of vestibular-like symptoms and laboratory testing results. Significantly reduced pitch aVOR in symptomatic SMs and peak symptom severity during exertional testing support earlier findings in the chronic blast-exposed active duty SMs.

  15. THE QUALITY OF COMMERCIAL SERVICES – A BAROMETER OF THE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE OF THE DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL MEMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan – Franc Valeriu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The enterprises' offensive in various markets is focused on a. package of "services" that integrates - more than ever before - the observance of terms and vivid contacts between enterprises and customers. Metaphorically, we could say that services rendere

  16. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Reserve Select; TRICARE Dental Program; Early Eligibility for TRICARE for Certain Reserve Component Members. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-15

    TRICARE Reserve Select (TRS) is a premium-based TRICARE health plan available for purchase worldwide by qualified members of the Ready Reserve and by qualified survivors of TRS members. TRICARE Dental Program (TDP) is a premium-based TRICARE dental plan available for purchase worldwide by qualified Service members. This final rule revises requirements and procedures for the TRS program to specify the appropriate actuarial basis for calculating premiums in addition to making other minor clarifying administrative changes. For a member who is involuntarily separated from the Selected Reserve under other than adverse conditions this final rule provides a time-limited exception that allows TRS coverage in effect to continue for up to 180 days after the date on which the member is separated from the Selected Reserve and TDP coverage in effect to continue for no less than 180 days after the separation date. It also expands early TRICARE eligibility for certain Reserve Component members from a maximum of 90 days to a maximum of 180 days prior to activation in support of a contingency operation for more than 30 days.

  17. 75 FR 69094 - Solicitation for Nominations for Members of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.... Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). The USPSTF, a standing, independent panel of non-Federal experts...://USPreventiveServicesTaskForce.org ). Dated: November 1, 2010. Carolyn M. Clancy, AHRQ Director. BILLING...

  18. "The stress will kill you": prisoner reentry as experienced by family members and the urgent need for support services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Suzanne M; Crawford, Amelia; Fields, Julie; Smith, Horace; Harris, Richard; Matson, Pamela

    2014-08-01

    The role of incarceration and community reentry after incarceration has been studied extensively for individual and community health; however, little attention has been given to the experiences of individuals who provide support to those in reentry. Through a community-academic partnership, seven focus groups were conducted with 39 individuals supporting a family member in reentry in the summer of 2012. The primary objectives of the focus groups were to explore community experiences and perspectives regarding providing support during a family member's reentry from a period of incarceration and any desired support for themselves during this time. Five themes emerged under a metatheme of stress, indicating that family members experience acute stress as a result of family reentry that adds to the chronic stress they already endure. Programs that acknowledge the difficult role of family members as supporters during an individual's reentry and provide support to them are desperately needed.

  19. Technology-enabled services for older people living at home independently: lessons for public long-term care authorities in the EU Member States

    OpenAIRE

    CARRETERO GOMEZ STEPHANIE

    2015-01-01

    This report collects six policy lessons to support public authorities at all levels of the EU Member States for the adequate implementation and use of new technologies in the field of long-term care service provision for older people. These policy lessons have been obtained through the ICT-AGE research project carried out by the JRC-IPTS and funded by DG EMPL, based on the cross-analysis of good practices of technology-enabled services to help older people live independently at home. These le...

  20. Research on Open-Source VoIP Technologies for NGN Service Platform Deployment%利用开源VoIP技术建设NGN业务平台的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏雷; 汪少敏; 钟青峰

    2012-01-01

    Open-source VoIP technologies can be employed to setup VoIP platforms by deploying open-source software on x86 servers, which have many advantages such as low cost, flexibility and openness. The usage of open-source VoIP technologies in NGN service platform deployment helps to reduce carrier's investment, shorten service deployment cycle and improve the duplicability of service platform. In the paper, the architecture of NGN service platform deployed by open-source VoIP technologies is proposed based on comprehensive survey and detailed analysis. A typical example is also provided to evaluate the feasibility and advantages of the proposed NGN service platform deployment method.%开源VoIP技术是一种利用开源软件部署在x86服务器上形成专业VoIP平台的解决方案,具有低成本性、高可用性、灵活性和开放性的优势.利用开源VoIP技术建设NGN业务平台能很好地解决目前运营商建设方式中建设维护成本较高、新业务部署周期较长、可复制性不高的问题.本文在全面分析开源VoIP平台解决方案的基础上,结合电信运营商业务平台的现状,深入研究了开源技术在电信运营商业务平台建设中的应用,提出了利用开源VoIP技术构建NGN业务平台的架构,给出了一个实现范例,评估了利用开源VoIP技术构建NGN业务平台的可用性和优势.

  1. Combination of Extracorporeal Life Support and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Treatment of ARDS in Combat Casualties and Evacuation of Service Members with ARDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Combat Casualties and Evacuation of Service Members with ARDS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mauricio Rojas CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Pittsburgh...UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Pittsburgh. 3520 Fifth Ave. 3 3520 FIFTH AVEPITTSBURGH PA 15213...is to complete a series of preclinical studies in large animal models using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) alone or in combination with

  2. Information from the Legal Service and the HR Department for members of the personnel residing in France

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Declaration of income for 2006 Members of the personnel are invited to take note of the following information on the procedure for completing the 2006 declaration of income form, which must be returned by 31st May 2007 at the latest. Who is required to complete the form? Where can it be obtained? All members of the personnel1 residing in France, whether or not they are of French nationality2, are required to complete a declaration of income form for 2006 according to the following instructions and to return a signed copy to their local tax office by 31st May 2007 at the latest. Members of the personnel should receive a 2006 income declaration form at the end of April/ beginning of May. Failing this, they should procure one from their local tax office, public finance office ('Trésorerie') or town hall or download one from the Finance Ministry's website (www.finances.gouv.fr ). Completing the declaration form Members of the personnel must compete a HARD-COPY FORM only.It is not possible to make a decla...

  3. Information from the Legal Service and the HR Department for members of the personnel residing in FRANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Declaration of income for 2006 Members of the personnel are invited to take note of the following information on the procedure for completing the 2006 declaration of income form, which must be returned by 31st May 2007 at the latest. Who is required to complete the form? Where can it be obtained? All members of the personnel1 residing in France, whether or not they are of French nationality2, are required to complete a declaration of income form for 2006 according to the following instructions and to return a signed copy to their local tax office by 31st May 2007 at the latest. Members of the personnel should receive a 2006 income declaration form at the end of April/ beginning of May. Failing this, they should procure one from their local tax office, public finance office ('Trésorerie') or town hall or download one from the Finance Ministry's website (www.finances.gouv.fr ). Completing the declaration form Members of the personnel must compete a HARD-COPY FORM only.It is not possible to make a decla...

  4. 77 FR 18823 - Solicitation for Nominations for Members of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Solicits nominations for new members of USPSTF. SUMMARY: The Agency for Healthcare... evidence review; 2. Clinical prevention, health promotion and primary health care; and 3. Implementation of... adequate time to contribute substantively to the work products of the USPSTF. DATES: All nominations...

  5. Primary care team working in Ireland: a qualitative exploration of team members' experiences in a new primary care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Norelee; Armstrong, Claire; Woodward, Oonagh; Cullen, Walter

    2015-07-01

    Team working is an integral aspect of primary care, but barriers to effective team working can limit the effectiveness of a primary care team (PCT). The establishment of new PCTs in Ireland provides an excellent opportunity to explore team working in action. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of team members working in a PCT. Team members (n = 19) from two PCTs were interviewed from May to June 2010 using a semi-structured interview guide. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were analysed using NVivo (version 8). Thematic analysis was used to explore the data. We identified five main themes that described the experiences of the team members. The themes were support for primary care, managing change, communication, evolution of roles and benefits of team working. Team members were generally supportive of primary care and had experienced benefits to their practice and to the care of their patients from participation in the team. Regular team meetings enabled communication and discussion of complex cases. Despite the significant scope for role conflict due to the varied employment arrangements of the team members, neither role nor interpersonal conflict was evident in the teams studied. In addition, despite the unusual team structure in Irish PCTs - where there is no formally appointed team leader or manager - general issues around team working and its benefits and challenges were very similar to those found in other international studies. This suggests, in contrast to some studies, that some aspects of the leadership role may not be as important in successful PCT functioning as previously thought. Nonetheless, team leadership was identified as an important issue in the further development of the teams.

  6. Field guide to quick deployment thermocouples

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Instructions for quick deployment of thermocouples to measure fire intensity at Kulm Wetland Management District as part of the Fire Intensity Monitoring survey....

  7. A Comparison of US and Japanese Dental Restorative Care Present on Service Members Recovered from the WWII Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Calvin Y

    2017-02-20

    The documentation of dental materials used in the USA during the WWII era is readily available, while references for the Japanese are minimal. It was therefore important to build a photographic database of Japanese restorative care which could be utilized as a comparison tool for the deployed odontologist. The dental restorative care of approximately 400 US and 100 Japanese sets of remains was evaluated. Both countries share many similar restorative techniques to include collared crowns, full-coverage restorations, cantilever bridge/pontics to close spaces; restorative materials such as amalgam, gold, and zinc phosphate (temporary) restorations; and removable prostheses. The dental restorative materials most commonly used by US dentists include the amalgam and silicate cement, while the full-coverage crown was the type of restoration most frequently seen on the Japanese remains. Silicates, porcelain and replaceable crowns, and partial-coverage prepared crowns were not observed on the recovered Japanese remains.

  8. Assessment of a postdeployment Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program for National Guard members and supporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Widner, Greg; Shroff, Manan; Matthieu, Monica; Balan, Sundari; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; Price, Rumi K

    2014-11-01

    The Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program (YRRP) was created to meet the needs of National Guard members and their families throughout the deployment cycle. This study examined the perceived utility of the YRRP's delivery of information and assistance during the postdeployment reintegration period by National Guard members and accompanying supporters who were mostly spouses. Over 22 months, from 10 YRRP events, 683 service members and 411 supporters completed questionnaires immediately after the YRRP. We analyzed questions on information and avenues for help, timeliness and concerns related to education, employment, legal, family, and health. Service members and supporters most often endorsed information delivery on education being met (76.8% and 78.2%, respectively) and were least likely to endorse legal information delivery (63.5% and 60%, respectively). Significantly more supporters than service members (p < 0.0001) reported that the YRRP was the first time they learned of available services across all domains. Service members were significantly more likely than supporters to report concerns about education, employment, and health, while supporters were significantly more likely to report concerns about family. Results suggest the YRRP fills gaps in supporter knowledge and provides needed information and resources to most National Guard families 2 to 4 months after a deployment.

  9. Review of the Provision of Job Placement Assistance and Related Employment Services to Members of the Reserve Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Agnes Gereben Schaefer, Neil Brian Carey, Lindsay Daugherty, Ian P. Cook, Spencer Case Review of the Provision of Job Placement Assistance and...vi Review of the Provision of Job Placement Assistance to Members of the Reserve Components APPENDIXES A. Summary Table of Federal Job Assistance...National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015, Section 583, December 19, 2014. x Review of the Provision of Job Placement Assistance to

  10. Synchronously Deployable Truss Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Structure lightweight, readily deployed, and has reliable joints. New truss concept, designated as "pac truss," developed. Features easy deployment without need for complex mechanisms. Structures of this type deployed in free flight by controlled release of stored energy in torsional springs at selected hinges located throughout structure. Double-folding technique used in beam model applicable to flat planar trusses, allowing structures of large expanse to fold into compact packages and be deployed for space-platform applications.

  11. Solar array deployment mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  12. Mastering Windows 7 Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Aidan; van Surksum, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Get professional-level instruction on Windows 7 deployment tools Enterprise-level operating system deployment is challenging and requires knowledge of specific tools. It is expected that Windows 7 will be extensively deployed in businesses worldwide. This comprehensive Sybex guide provides thorough coverage of the Microsoft deployment tools that were specifically created for Windows 7, preparing system administrators, MIS professionals, and corporate programmers to tackle the task effectively.Companies worldwide are expected to deploy Windows 7 as their enterprise operating system; system admi

  13. The effect of military deployment on mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyk-Jensen, Stéphanie; Weatherall, Cecilie Dohlmann; W. Jepsen, Peter

    In this paper we estimate the causal effect of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health. To handle the selection bias problem, we use longitudinal data for deployed and non-deployed eligible men in a difference-in-differences setting. Using pair-wise matching, we impute deployment dates...... for important variables like intelligence tests and family background. We find significant adverse effects of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health service use. Highlights: - Causal effect of military deployment on soldiers’ use of mental health service - Using a difference-in-differences approach...... - First evidence relying on administrative records of measures of mental health service use - Significant adverse effects of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health service use....

  14. The effect of military deployment on mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyk-Jensen, Stéphanie; Weatherall, Cecilie Dohlmann; W. Jepsen, Peter

    In this paper we estimate the causal effect of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health. To handle the selection bias problem, we use longitudinal data for deployed and non-deployed eligible men in a difference-in-differences setting. Using pair-wise matching, we impute deployment dates...... for important variables like intelligence tests and family background. We find significant adverse effects of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health service use. Highlights: - Causal effect of military deployment on soldiers’ use of mental health service - Using a difference-in-differences approach...... - First evidence relying on administrative records of measures of mental health service use - Significant adverse effects of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health service use....

  15. Access to Behavioral Health Care for Geographically Remote Service Members and Dependents in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    medication adherence, provided counseling regarding sleep hygiene and avoiding alcohol and caffeine, and relayed feedback to primary care providers...Officer Candidate School or Merchant Marine Academy) K non-Appropriated Fund dod employee L Lighthouse service M nongovernment agency personnel

  16. Returning Home from Iraq and Afghanistan: Assessment of Readjustment Needs of Veterans, Service Members, and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    et al., 1998, 2000, 2002; Yehuda et al., 1995). Samuelson et al. (2006) compared neuropsychologic functioning in veterans who had PTSD (37), who...National Findings. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Samuelson , K. W., T. C. Neylan, T. J. Metzler, M

  17. Three-year outcome following moderate-to-severe TBI in U.S. military service members: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickell, Tracey A; Lange, Rael T; French, Louis M

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the prospective course of neurobehavioral symptom reporting and health-related quality of life within the first 3 years following moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were 52 U.S. service members who were evaluated following a moderate-to-severe TBI sustained in the combat theater during Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom (90.4%), or from other noncombat-related incidents. Participants completed the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder-Checklist within 3 months postinjury, and at least one follow-up telephone interview at 12 (n = 27), 24 (n = 31), or 36 months (n = 22) postinjury. Approximately half of the sample (41.9%-63.0%) reported "persistent" symptoms from baseline to follow-up. A substantial minority also "improved" (22.2%-31.8%) or "developed" new symptoms (3.7%-16.1%). Ongoing physical and mental health problems were also reported. The number of service members receiving mental health treatment significantly reduced between 12 and 36 months postinjury (48.1%-18.2%), while complaints of bodily pain significantly increased (40.7%-68.2%). Despite ongoing symptom reporting, few reported suicidal/homicidal ideation (6.5%-9.1%), and a substantial majority reported good/excellent health status (74.1%-90.9%) and satisfaction with their life (81.5%-90.9%). Continued support and care for all service members who sustain a combat-related moderate-to-severe TBI is recommended, regardless of the presence or absence of symptom reporting within the first few months postinjury.

  18. Medial knee joint contact force in the intact limb during walking in recently ambulatory service members with unilateral limb loss: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross H. Miller

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Individuals with unilateral lower limb amputation have a high risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA in their intact limb as they age. This risk may be related to joint loading experienced earlier in life. We hypothesized that loading during walking would be greater in the intact limb of young US military service members with limb loss than in controls with no limb loss. Methods Cross-sectional instrumented gait analysis at self-selected walking speeds with a limb loss group (N = 10, age 27 ± 5 years, 170 ± 36 days since last surgery including five service members with transtibial limb loss and five with transfemoral limb loss, all walking independently with their first prosthesis for approximately two months. Controls (N = 10, age 30 ± 4 years were service members with no overt demographical risk factors for knee OA. 3D inverse dynamics modeling was performed to calculate joint moments and medial knee joint contact forces (JCF were calculated using a reduction-based musculoskeletal modeling method and expressed relative to body weight (BW. Results Peak JCF and maximum JCF loading rate were significantly greater in limb loss (184% BW, 2,469% BW/s vs. controls (157% BW, 1,985% BW/s, with large effect sizes. Results were robust to probabilistic perturbations to the knee model parameters. Discussion Assuming these data are reflective of joint loading experienced in daily life, they support a “mechanical overloading” hypothesis for the risk of developing knee OA in the intact limb of limb loss subjects. Examination of the evolution of gait mechanics, joint loading, and joint health over time, as well as interventions to reduce load or strengthen the ability of the joint to withstand loads, is warranted.

  19. Predicting the density of structural timber members in service. The combine use of wood cores and drill resistance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Condea, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Drilling devices is used to get information about the cross-section properties and internal defects of structural members. Drill resistance is correlated with density which is often used to predict the mechanical properties of timber elements. However in situ a regression curve cannot be obtained and pre-existent curves provides unreliable predictions. The present paper proposes a procedure for in situ “calibration” of drill resistance data. The “calibration” is based on density values from wood cores taken in the close vicinity of drill holes. Two approaches were tested. One approach based on a regression curve built using wood cores density and drill resistance values obtained from a limited number of members. The other approach uses the information of one wood core to “calibrate” the drill resistance profile taken at the same member. Following this procedure a density prediction is obtained showing a low mean percentage error and a medium coefficient of determination.Los dispositivos de perforación se utilizan a menudo para obtener información sobre las propiedades de la sección transversal y defectos internos de los elementos estructurales de madera. La resistencia a la perforación se correlaciona con la densidad que, a menudo, se utiliza para obtener la predicción de las propiedades mecánicas de los elementos de madera. Sin embargo, una curva de regresión no puede ser obtenida in situ y las curvas de preexistentes proporcionan predicciones poco fiables. En el presente trabajo se propone un procedimiento de “calibración” in situ de los datos de resistencia de perforación obtenidos en cada caso. La “calibración” se basa en los valores de densidad de pequeñas probetas de madera tomadas en las inmediaciones de los taladros. Para ello se plantean 2 métodos: Un primer enfoque basado en obtener una curva de regresión a partir de los valores de densidad de pequeñas probetas de madera y los valores de resistencia a

  20. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Vermetten

    2014-08-01

    members. Conclusion: This analysis demonstrated that in all five partners state-of-the-art preventative mental healthcare was included in the last deployment in Afghanistan, including a positive approach towards strengthening the mental resilience, a focus on self-regulatory skills and self-empowerment, and several initiatives that were well-integrated in a military context. These initiatives were partly/completely implemented by the military/colleagues/supervisors and applicable during several phases of the deployment cycle. Important new developments in operational mental health support are recognition of the role of social leadership and enhancement of operational peer support. This requires awareness of mental problems that will contribute to reduction of the barriers to care in case of problems. Finally, comparing mental health support services across countries can contribute to optimal preparation for the challenges of military deployment.

  1. Automobile or Other Conveyance and Adaptive Equipment Certificate of Eligibility for Veterans or Members of the Armed Forces With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Connected to Military Service. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-13

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) published an Interim Final Rule on February 25, 2015, to amend its adjudication regulations to provide a certificate of eligibility for financial assistance in the purchase of an automobile or other conveyance and adaptive equipment for all veterans with service-connected amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and servicemembers serving on active duty with ALS. The amendment authorized automatic issuance of a certificate of eligibility for financial assistance in the purchase of an automobile or other conveyance and adaptive equipment to all veterans with service-connected ALS and members of the Armed Forces serving on active duty with ALS. The intent of this final rule is to confirm the amendment made by the interim final rule without change.

  2. Project for Establishing a Selected Dissemination of Information Service for the Faculty Members at Education and Psychology Faculty, University of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Fadaei

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The project aim was to establish an SDI (Selected Dissemination of Information service for the faculty members at University of Tehran, faculty of psychology and education. The project was carried out during the 2006-2007 period. First, a three stage survey was conducted to identify the information needs which were then served using a current awareness service over the period. Findings confirmed that the SDI project significantly impacted on the faculty information seeking behavior. Furthermore, there had been evidence supporting the fact that it has also influenced the quality of instruction by facilitating the overall efficacy of information sources collected. It was the intent of researchers to expand this project at later stages to include all humanities faculties in the university and if possible at a national level.

  3. The Influence of Medical Evaluation Board Status on Symptom Reporting Among Service Members with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-21

    the 59th Clinical Research Division may pay for your basic journal publishing charges (to include costs for tables and black and white photos). We...Graduate Health Sciences Education (GHSE) (SGS O&M); SGS R&D; Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP); Defense Medical Research & Development...This should be accomplished no later than 30 days before fina l clearance Is required to publish/present your materials. If you have any questions or

  4. Design and operation of a deployable truss structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, K.

    1984-01-01

    A concept for the one dimensional deployable truss structure is presented. The deployed configuration of the structure consists of the repetition of a longitudinal octahedral truss module. The principal mechanical feature of the truss is that the lateral members comprising the lateral triangular truss are telescoping beams. Contracting of the lateral members results in the deployment of the truss structure. The geometric transformation of this truss of variable geometry is presented. Both simultaneous and sequential modes of transformation are possible. The validity of the transformation applied to the deployment is verified through design of a conceptual model.

  5. Developing a quantitative measurement system for assessing heterotopic ossification and monitoring the bioelectric metrics from electrically induced osseointegration in the residual limb of service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Brad M; Stinstra, Jeroen G; MacLeod, Rob S; Pasquina, Paul F; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2010-09-01

    Poor prosthetic fit is often the result of heterotopic ossification (HO), a frequent problem following blast injuries for returning service members. Osseointegration technology offers an advantage for individuals with significant HO and poor socket tolerance by using direct skeletal attachment of a prosthesis to the distal residual limb, but remains limited due to prolonged post-operative rehabilitation regimens. Therefore, electrical stimulation has been proposed as a catalyst for expediting skeletal attachment and the bioelectric effects of HO were evaluated using finite element analysis in 11 servicemen with transfemoral amputations. Retrospective computed tomography (CT) scans provided accurate reconstructions, and volume conductor models demonstrated the variability in residual limb anatomy and necessity for patient-specific modeling to characterize electrical field variance if patients were to undergo a theoretical osseointegration of a prosthesis. In this investigation, the volume of HO was statistically significant when selecting the optimal potential difference for enhanced skeletal fixation, since higher HO volumes required increased voltages at the periprosthetic bone (p = 0.024, r = 0.670). Results from Spearman's rho correlations also indicated that the age of the subject and volume of HO were statistically significant and inversely proportional, in which younger service members had a higher frequency of HO (p = 0.041, r = -0.622). This study demonstrates that the volume of HO and age may affect the voltage threshold necessary to improve current osseointegration procedures.

  6. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  7. Behavioral Health and Service Use Among Civilian Wives of Service Members and Veterans: Evidence from the National Survey of Drug Use and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Version IV ( APA , 2000). The following four behavioral health service use outcomes were examined...Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, revised 4th ed., Washington, D.C., 2000. APA —See American Psychiatric Association. Brown, Ryan Andrew, Grant N...ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for

  8. Hearing loss associated with US military combat deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy S Wells

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to define the risk of hearing loss among US military members in relation to their deployment experiences. Data were drawn from the Millennium Cohort Study. Self-reported data and objective military service data were used to assess exposures and outcomes. Among all 48,540 participants, 7.5% self-reported new-onset hearing loss. Self-reported hearing loss showed moderate to substantial agreement (k = 0.57-0.69 with objective audiometric measures. New-onset hearing loss was associated with combat deployment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.49-1.77, as well as male sex and older age. Among deployers, new-onset hearing loss was also associated with proximity to improvised explosive devices (AOR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.62-2.73 and with experiencing a combat-related head injury (AOR = 6.88, 95% CI = 3.77-12.54. These findings have implications for health care and disability planning, as well as for prevention programs.

  9. US military service members vaccinated against smallpox in 2003 and 2004 experience a slightly higher risk of hospitalization postvaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Isabel G; Smith, Tyler C; Smith, Besa; Wells, Timothy S; Reed, Robert J; Ryan, Margaret A K

    2008-07-29

    This study explores adverse events severe enough to warrant hospitalization that may have been associated with receiving the smallpox vaccine in conjunction with military service. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify the risk of hospitalization among US active-duty military personnel during a 1-year period following receipt of the smallpox vaccine. The reference group consisted of active-duty military personnel who also received the smallpox vaccine after the conclusion of their health care observation period, allowing for comparison to a temporally and demographically similar population. The risk of hospitalization was slightly elevated among the postvaccine group for any-cause hospitalization and for hospitalization in several broad diagnostic categories. Hospitalizations for asthma, autoimmune diseases, and myopericarditis, were more likely in the postvaccine group. The increased risk of hospitalization for varied outcomes does not necessarily imply a cause-effect relationship, but it does offer areas for more focused study, using longitudinal data to explore the long-term impact of smallpox vaccination on the health of young adults.

  10. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  11. Effects of deployment on health behaviours in military forces: A review of longitudinal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pietrzak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Earlier studies indicating that operational deployment affects health behaviours among military personnel and veterans generally lacked final conclusiveness due to cross-sectional or retrospective design. Aim: The aim of this study is to review longitudinal studies investigating whether military service, in particular operational deployment, affects health behaviours, specifically alcohol misuse, smoking, eating disorders and obesity. Methods: A MEDLINE database search was performed, using relevant keywords and MESH terms. The US Millennium Cohort study website was used to obtain the list of relevant publications. Only studies with prospective longitudinal cohort design, conducted on military or veteran populations of developed countries serving after the Vietnam War and investigating health behaviours and health markers such as excessive drinking, smoking, disordered eating and body weight were included. Results: Six studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria, three that resulted from the US Millennium Cohort study and three that investigated other military populations. Deployment with combat exposure was the most significant factor affecting health behaviours of military personnel. Excessive drinking among US military personnel increased significantly in those deployed that were exposed to combat, especially among Reserve and National Guard members and in the youngest age groups, but was not affected by deployment without combat exposure. Among British military personnel, total alcohol consumption increased with time, was higher for those deployed compared to non-deployed, and highest in those who experienced war related stress. Smoking in the US military increased among those deployed, particularly among those with prolonged and multiple deployments or with combat exposure. Among British military personnel, smoking rates declined. Body weight increased for the majority of US military personnel, but disordered eating was reported

  12. 基于多目标遗传算法的云服务部署优化方法%Cloud service deployment optimization method based on multi-objective genetic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颉斌; 杨扬; 旷毅

    2016-01-01

    将服务部署优化问题建模为多目标组合优化问题。在多目标遗传算法的基础上,把部署方案转换为基因编码,用轮盘赌选择机制选择个体,用单点交叉算子产生新的子代,并以设定的概率发生变异。对合适个体考虑支配值和稀疏值设计适应度函数;对不合适个体根据支配值和SLA冲突设计适应度函数。最后给出了优化过程。通过仿真实验可以看出:随着迭代次数的增加,适应度值及各个优化指标值逐渐收敛于一个固定且较优值,说明利用设计的优化算法,能使各个优化目标值较快地收敛到一个较优解,能较好地帮助基础设施即服务(SaaS )提供商在部署应用服务时进行有效规划和决策。%The optimization of service deployment was modeled as multi‐objective composition optimi‐zation .On the basis of multi‐objective genetic algorithm ,deployment solutions were converted to gene codes ;individuals were selected by roulette mechanism ;new generations were produced by single point crossover operator ;variations were appeared in preset probability .The fitness function for fit individuals was based on dominant value and sparse value ,while this function for unfit individuals was based on dominant value and SLA collisions .The optimization process was also proposed .In simula‐tion experiment the fitness value and other evaluations converge at a fixed and general optimal value gradually when iteration number increases .It shows that the optimization method in this paper can help multi‐objective values converge at a general optimal value and give help to infrastructure as a service(SaaS) provider on planning and decision of service deployment .

  13. Peace-building and reconciliation dividends of integrated health services delivery in post-conflict Burundi: qualitative assessments of providers and community members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Cathryn; Edward, Anbrasi

    2015-01-01

    While demonstrating causality remains challenging, several 'health-peace' mechanisms have been proposed to describe how health systems contribute to peace-building and stability in post-conflict settings. A qualitative study was undertaken in southern Burundi to identify drivers of social tension and reconciliation in the catchment area of Village Health Works, a health services organisation. Key informant interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in early 2014 with a total of one hundred and twenty community members and staff representing a range of conflict and recovery experience. Themes emerging from these interviews indicated mechanisms at the individual, household, community, and regional levels through which health provision mitigates tensions and promotes social cohesion. This peace dividend was amplified by the clinic's integrated model, which facilitates further community interaction through economic, agricultural and education programmes. Land pressure and the marginalisation of repatriated refugees were cited as drivers of local tension.

  14. The psychometric properties of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) in a clinical sample of active duty military service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Damon; Francis, Joseph P; Tafrate, Raymond Chip

    2005-11-01

    The increasing prominence of the construct of readiness to change in the field of substance abuse treatment has led to the development of instruments designed to assess the construct. We examined the psychometric properties of one such instrument, the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), in a sample of treatment-seeking, active duty, U.S. military service members diagnosed with alcohol and/or drug dependence. A principal components analysis of the items was consistent with the tridimensional structure of the SOCRATES found among treatment-seeking civilians but resulted in a 14-item scale, as opposed to the 19-item version found for civilians. Normative data, in the form of means and decile rankings for the SOCRATES subscales, for substance-dependent military patients are provided to complement those available for civilian patients. Future research should examine the concurrent and predictive validity of the scale.

  15. Measles and mumps among service members and other beneficiaries of the U.S. Military Health System, January 2007-December 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Denise O; Clark, Leslie L; Hunt, Devin J; O'Donnell, Francis L

    2015-02-01

    Measles and mumps are highly communicable infectious diseases whose causative viruses are spread through airborne droplets and infected surfaces. Individuals at highest risk are infants and unvaccinated individuals. Despite effective vaccines, there have been recent increases in incidence in the U.S. of both infections. During the surveillance period, there were 14 confirmed measles cases and 99 confirmed mumps cases among U.S. military members and other beneficiaries of the U.S. Military Health System. Only one of the confirmed cases of measles was in a service member. Children aged 5 years and younger accounted for the greatest proportion of confirmed measles cases (50.0%); the greatest proportions of confirmed mumps cases were for children aged 1-5 years and adults aged 26-30 years (22.2% and 17.2%, respectively). California had more cases of both measles and mumps than any other state. Recent trends in measles and mumps in civilian populations in the U.S. highlight the importance of primary and booster vaccinations.

  16. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  17. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  18. Educators Supporting Families in Times of Crisis: Military Reserve Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Judy; Vannest, Kimberly J.

    2008-01-01

    With the large number of National Guard members and reservists being deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, public educators find themselves endeavoring to support the emotional and academic needs of military children and their families. Military children may exhibit behavioral and emotional difficulties during these deployments. Educator awareness of…

  19. Convected transient analysis for large space structures maneuver and deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housner, J.

    1984-01-01

    Convected-transient analysis techniques in the finite-element method are used to investigate the deployment and maneuver of large spacecraft structures with multiple-member flexible trusses and frames. Numerical results are presented for several sample problems.

  20. Evaluation of field dental equipment in a deployment environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, David G; Ehrlich, A Dale; Ragain, James C; Lyles, Mark B; Roberts, Howard W

    2006-03-01

    Dental officers and technicians must have reliable, durable, well-performing field dental equipment to enable them to provide dental care to deployed troops in operational environments. Unfortunately, no organized program exists to test such equipment before its purchase and use in the field. This article presents the results of a project conducted by the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research and the Air Force Dental Evaluation and Consultation Service to evaluate commercially available field dental equipment through laboratory testing and clinical-user evaluations in theater. The purpose of this 2-year project was to identify the best-performing and most cost-effective field dental equipment for possible future procurement. Initial laboratory testing was performed at the Naval Institute for Dental and Biomedical Research, and the equipment was then shipped to Kuwait for in-theater environmental and clinical-user testing. A seven-member scientific team of military dental officers and technicians was deployed for 1 month to perform in-theater testing under regional environmental conditions and to coordinate clinical-user evaluations. The testing provided beneficial results by identifying equipment that performed properly and equipment that exhibited shortcomings serious enough to render it inadequate for operational use. It is recommended that the project serve as a model for future testing and evaluation of medical/dental equipment by all of the military services.

  1. Injuries due to firearms and air guns among U.S. military members not participating in overseas combat operations, 2002-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    During 2002-2011, active component U.S. service members sustained 4,657 firearm-related injuries in circumstances other than deployment to the wars in Iraq/Afghanistan; 35 percent of the injuries were fatal. The highest firearm-related injury rates reflected service members in law enforcement/security and combat occupations. Of fatal injuries, 28 percent and 24 percent were suicides and homicides, respectively; among service members 30 and older, 84 percent of noncombat firearm-related deaths were suicides and 14 percent were homicides. In circumstances other than war, rates of both fatal and nonfatal firearm- related injuries are much lower among military members than civilian males aged 18-44. During the period, rates of nonfatal firearm-related injuries among non-deployed military members increased sharply, peaking in 2008. The trend reflects that among U.S. civilian males aged 18-44. However, firearm-related fatality rates were stable among civilians but increased among military members. The increase in rates of firearm-related fatalities among non-deployed military members reflects the increase in rates of suicides by firearms. Rates of injuries due to BB, pellet or paintball guns also increased during the period.

  2. Missed opportunity to screen and diagnose PTSD and depression among deploying shipboard US military personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Braden R.; Michael, Nelson L.; Scott, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are significant risks for suicide and other adverse events among US military personnel, but prevalence data among ship-assigned personnel at the onset of deployment are unknown. Aims To determine the prevalence of shipboard personnel who screen positive for PTSD and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) at the onset of deployment, and also those who reported these diagnoses made by a physician or healthcare professional in the year prior to deployment. Method Active-duty ship-assigned personnel (N = 2078) completed anonymous assessments at the beginning of deployment. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D; score of ≥22), and PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Checklist–Civilian Version (PCL-C; both score and symptom criteria were used). Results In total, 7.3% (n = 151 of 2076) screened positive for PTSD and 22% (n = 461 of 2078) for MDD at deployment onset. Only 6% and 15% of those who screened positive for PTSD or MDD, respectively, had been diagnosed by a healthcare professional in the past year. Conclusions Missed opportunities for mental healthcare among screen-positive shipboard personnel reduce the benefits associated with early identification and linkage to care. Improved methods of mental health screening that promote early recognition and referral to care may mitigate psychiatric events in theatre. Declaration of interest This work was performed as part of the official duties of the authors as military service members or employees of the US Government. Copyright and usage This work was prepared by military service members or employees of the US Government as part of their official duties. As such, copyright protection is not available for this work (Title 17, USC, §105). PMID:27713833

  3. Deploying and Configuring the ODI Agent as a Windows Service by the Open Source Tools of YAJSW%使用开源工具YAJSW将ODIAgent发布为Windows系统服务

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玮

    2015-01-01

    Considering the problems of starting ODI agent manually,such as the complex and cumbersome methods of starting up,and the lack of convenience for ODI data integration projects in need of full day operation and a lot of manual intervention,we proposed the use of open source tools YAJSW(Yet Another Java Service Wrapper),which can deploy the ODI agent as a windows service.In this way,we can start or stop the agent directly in the window,and the agent can be started up automatically when the server restarted.%针对在ODI中手动启动Agent的方法复杂、繁琐,对于需要全天运行的ODI数据集成项目来说非常不方便,需要大量的人工干预,本文提出了使用开源工具YAJSW(Yet Another Java Service Wrapper)将ODI Agent发布为Windows服务,直接在Windows的服务窗口中实现对所发布的Agent进行启停和系统重启后服务的自动启动。

  4. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  5. Stratospheric Deployment Parafoil Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Stratospheric Deployment Parafoil is a proposed technology that will be designed and tested to provide a greatly superior parachute precision delivery system...

  6. Influence of family members on utilization of maternal health care services among teen and adult pregnant women in Kathmandu, Nepal: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Priti; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Shrestha, Amir Babu; Pradhan, Neelam

    2014-12-23

    In some developing countries a woman's decision to utilize maternal health care services is not made by the woman herself but by other family members. The perception of family members regarding who is the most influential person for making the decision to utilize these services is inconclusive. Hence, this study aimed to determine the perceived influential person on utilization of antenatal care (ANC) and delivery care services among teen, young adult and adult pregnant women from the perspective of the woman themselves, their husband and their mother-in-law, identify the factors associated with the woman being the most influential person, and assess the level of agreement between the woman's and her husband's response to the woman being the most influential person. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Paropakar Maternity and Women's Hospital and Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital. Purposive sampling technique was used to select 315 women of which 105 were from each age group and their accompanied husbands (n = 315) and mothers-in-law (n = 315). The proportion of perceived influential person and mean priority score of the perceived influence with its 95% confidence interval was calculated. The factors associated with the woman perceived as the most influential person were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression model. The agreement was analyzed using kappa statistic. Among teens and young adults and their husband and mother-in-law, the woman's husband was perceived as the most influential person. Among adults, the most influential person for ANC was the woman herself but for delivery care was the woman's husband. A woman of adult age, having a non-indigenous ethnicity or who was not referred was more likely to perceive herself as the most influential person in the decision to utilize delivery care. A fair to poor level of agreement was found on the perception of the most influential person for ANC and delivery care utilization. Both women and their

  7. Growing a professional network to over 3000 members in less than 4 years: evaluation of InspireNet, British Columbia's virtual nursing health services research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Noreen; Atherton, Pat; Borycki, Elizabeth; Mickelson, Grace; Cordeiro, Jennifer; Novak Lauscher, Helen; Black, Agnes

    2014-02-21

    Use of Web 2.0 and social media technologies has become a new area of research among health professionals. Much of this work has focused on the use of technologies for health self-management and the ways technologies support communication between care providers and consumers. This paper addresses a new use of technology in providing a platform for health professionals to support professional development, increase knowledge utilization, and promote formal/informal professional communication. Specifically, we report on factors necessary to attract and sustain health professionals' use of a network designed to increase nurses' interest in and use of health services research and to support knowledge utilization activities in British Columbia, Canada. "InspireNet", a virtual professional network for health professionals, is a living laboratory permitting documentation of when and how professionals take up Web 2.0 and social media. Ongoing evaluation documents our experiences in establishing, operating, and evaluating this network. Overall evaluation methods included (1) tracking website use, (2) conducting two member surveys, and (3) soliciting member feedback through focus groups and interviews with those who participated in electronic communities of practice (eCoPs) and other stakeholders. These data have been used to learn about the types of support that seem relevant to network growth. Network growth exceeded all expectations. Members engaged with varying aspects of the network's virtual technologies, such as teams of professionals sharing a common interest, research teams conducting their work, and instructional webinars open to network members. Members used wikis, blogs, and discussion groups to support professional work, as well as a members' database with contact information and areas of interest. The database is accessed approximately 10 times per day. InspireNet public blog posts are accessed roughly 500 times each. At the time of writing, 21 research teams

  8. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang; Hugo Rodrigue; Sung-Hoon Ahn

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and sim...

  9. Long-term community reintegration: concepts, outcomes and dilemmas in the case of a military service member with a spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Heather Ann; Lysack, Cathy; Luborsky, Mark R; Messinger, Seth D

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing knowledge about medical and functional recovery in clinical settings, the long-term issue of community reintegration with a spinal cord injury (SCI) in the military context remains virtually unexamined. Thus, the U.S. Department of Defense created the SCI Qualitative Research Program to advance knowledge about service members' reintegration into civilian life. The purpose of this paper is to better characterize the long-term outcomes related to the community participation experienced and desired vis-à-vis a case study of a military veteran who suffered a service-related traumatic SCI. An in-depth anthropological interview was used with Jake, a 28-year old marine with a service-related C5/C6 SCI. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Three significant themes were identified: opportunities for better engaging socially meaningful others may not be adequately included in so-called "client-centered" interventions; how management of the social self in inter-personal interactions and public spaces is critical to gaining broader societal acceptance; and how meaningful age normative relationships and activities are essential to establish lasting inclusive social connections. Jake's case challenges existing models of rehabilitation predominantly focused on physical capacity building. Study findings point to the need for rehabilitation to invest more resources in efforts to address the existential and social elements of long-term social reintegration. Implications for Rehabilitation Both the veteran with SCI and their meaningful support network face challenges socially reintegrating after injury and rehabilitation. Empowering clients to envision future possibilities in terms of family, intimate relationships, and meaningful work are important to successful long-term social reintegration. Addressing the existential desires and social capacities of the individual may be as important as addressing physical functioning skills after SCI.

  10. Clevis joint for deployable space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates generally to pin clevis joints, and more particularly, to zero play pin clevis joints for connecting structural members of a deployable space structure. A joint includes a pin, a tang, and a shackle. The pin is tapered at the same angle as the bores extending through the projections of the shackle and the tang. A spring washer biases the tang onto the tapered sidewall of the pin. The invention solves the free play problem associated with deployable space structures by using a tapered pin which is held in tapered holes by the spring washers.

  11. Impact of deploying multiple point-of-care tests with a 'sample first' approach on a sexual health clinical care pathway. A service evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding-Esch, Emma M; Nori, Achyuta V; Hegazi, Aseel; Pond, Marcus J; Okolo, Olanike; Nardone, Anthony; Lowndes, Catherine M; Hay, Phillip; Sadiq, S Tariq

    2017-09-01

    To assess clinical service value of STI point-of-care test (POCT) use in a 'sample first' clinical pathway (patients providing samples on arrival at clinic, before clinician consultation). Specific outcomes were: patient acceptability; whether a rapid nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) for Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae (CT/NG) could be used as a POCT in practice; feasibility of non-NAAT POCT implementation for Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV); impact on patient diagnosis and treatment. Service evaluation in a south London sexual health clinic. Symptomatic female and male patients and sexual contacts of CT/NG-positive individuals provided samples for diagnostic testing on clinic arrival, prior to clinical consultation. Tests included routine culture and microscopy; CT/NG (GeneXpert) NAAT; non-NAAT POCTs for TV and BV. All 70 (35 males, 35 females) patients approached participated. The 'sample first' pathway was acceptable, with >90% reporting they were happy to give samples on arrival and receive results in the same visit. Non-NAAT POCT results were available for all patients prior to leaving clinic; rapid CT/NG results were available for only 21.4% (15/70; 5 males, 10 females) of patients prior to leaving clinic. Known negative CT/NG results led to two females avoiding presumptive treatment, and one male receiving treatment directed at possible Mycoplasma genitalium infection causing non-gonococcal urethritis. Non-NAAT POCTs detected more positives than routine microscopy (TV 3 vs 2; BV 24 vs 7), resulting in more patients receiving treatment. A 'sample first' clinical pathway to enable multiple POCT use was acceptable to patients and feasible in a busy sexual health clinic, but rapid CT/NG processing time was too long to enable POCT use. There is need for further development to improve test processing times to enable POC use of rapid NAATs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  12. Informing mental health policies and services in the EMR: cost-effective deployment of human resources to deliver integrated community-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivbijaro, G; Patel, V; Chisholm, D; Goldberg, D; Khoja, T A M; Edwards, T M; Enum, Y; Kolkiewic, L A

    2015-09-28

    For EMR countries to deliver the expectations of the Global Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 & the ongoing move towards universal health coverage, all health & social care providers need to innovate and transform their services to provide evidence-based health care that is accessible, cost-effective & with the best patient outcomes. For the primary and community workforce, this includes general medical practitioners, practice & community nurses, community social workers, housing officers, lay health workers, nongovernmental organizations & civil society, including community spiritual leaders/healers. This paper brings together the current best evidence to support transformation & discusses key approaches to achieve this, including skill mix and/or task shifting and integrated care. The important factors that need to be in place to support skill mix/task shifting and good integrated care are outlined with reference to EMR countries.

  13. How Military Families Respond Before, During and After Deployment: Findings from the RAND Deployment Life Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    applied only to children younger than 11, not to teenagers . Neither teens’ parents nor the youths themselves reported behavioral difficulties. But...engage in different behaviors around deployments. These associations emerged even after controlling for family characteristics at the time of...rather than self -reported symptoms, might help mitigate problems before they can affect multiple family members. • Addressing problems around the time

  14. Synchronously deployable truss structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor); Mikulas, M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A collapsible-expandable truss structure, including first and second spaced surface truss layers having an attached core layer is described. The surface truss layers are composed of a plurality of linear struts arranged in multiple triangular configurations. Each linear strut is hinged at the center and hinge connected at each end to a nodular joint. A passive spring serves as the expansion force to move the folded struts from a stowed collapsed position to a deployed operative final truss configuration. A damper controls the rate of spring expansion for the synchronized deployment of the truss as the folded configuration is released for deployment by the restrain belts. The truss is synchronously extended under the control of motor driven spools.

  15. Mining Deployment Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čech, Jozef

    2016-09-01

    The deployment problem, researched primarily in the military sector, is emerging in some other industries, mining included. The principal decision is how to deploy some activities in space and time to achieve desired outcome while complying with certain requirements or limits. Requirements and limits are on the side constraints, while minimizing costs or maximizing some benefits are on the side of objectives. A model with application to mining of polymetallic deposit is presented. To obtain quick and immediate decision solutions for a mining engineer with experimental possibilities is the main intention of a computer-based tool. The task is to determine strategic deployment of mining activities on a deposit, meeting planned output from the mine and at the same time complying with limited reserves and haulage capacities. Priorities and benefits can be formulated by the planner.

  16. Evaluation of a Family-Centered Prevention Intervention for Military Children and Families Facing Wartime Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, William R.; Woodward, Kirsten; Glover, Dorie; Leskin, Gregory A.; Bursch, Brenda; Pynoos, Robert; Beardslee, William

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the Families OverComing Under Stress program, which provides resiliency training designed to enhance family psychological health in US military families affected by combat- and deployment-related stress. Methods. We performed a secondary analysis of Families OverComing Under Stress program evaluation data that was collected between July 2008 and February 2010 at 11 military installations in the United States and Japan. We present data at baseline for 488 unique families (742 parents and 873 children) and pre–post outcomes for 331 families. Results. Family members reported high levels of satisfaction with the program and positive impact on parent–child indicators. Psychological distress levels were elevated for service members, civilian parents, and children at program entry compared with community norms. Change scores showed significant improvements across all measures for service member and civilian parents and their children (P < .001). Conclusions. Evaluation data provided preliminary support for a strength-based, trauma-informed military family prevention program to promote resiliency and mitigate the impact of wartime deployment stress. PMID:22033756

  17. The influence of the dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder on treatment efficacy in female veterans and active duty service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Erika J; Lunney, Carole A; Schnurr, Paula P

    2016-01-01

    A dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was recently added to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) and is thought to be associated with poor PTSD treatment response. We used latent growth curve modeling to examine data from a randomized controlled trial of prolonged exposure and present-centered therapy for PTSD in a sample of 284 female veterans and active duty service members with PTSD to test the association between the dissociative subtype and treatment response. Individuals with the dissociative subtype (defined using latent profile analysis) had a flatter slope (p = .008) compared with those with high PTSD symptoms and no dissociation, such that the former group showed, on average, a 9.75 (95% confidence interval [-16.94, -2.57]) lesser decrease in PTSD severity scores on the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (Blake et al., 1995) over the course of the trial. However, this effect was small in magnitude. Dissociative symptoms decreased markedly among those with the subtype, though neither treatment explicitly addressed such symptoms. There were no differences as a function of treatment type. Results raise doubt about the common clinical perception that exposure therapy is not effective or appropriate for individuals who have PTSD and dissociation, and provide empirical support for the use of exposure treatment for individuals with the dissociative subtype of PTSD. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Examining the Effects of Self-reported Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Positive Relations With Others on Self-regulated Learning for Student Service Members/Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Bryan M; Middleton, Michael J; Hildebrandt, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationships between self-reported posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, perceived positive relations with others, self-regulation strategy use, and academic motivation among student service members/veterans (SSM/V) enrolled in postsecondary education. SSM/V (N = 214), defined as veterans, active duty, or National Guard/Reservists of the US military, enrolled at 5 different institutions in Fall 2012. Data were collected using an online questionnaire that included standardized measures of PTSD symptoms, perceived quality of personal relations, academic self-regulation strategy use, and academic motivation. PTSD symptoms were associated with lower self-efficacy for learning and maladaptive academic goal orientation. Additionally, PTSD symptoms were associated with lower effort regulation (ie, persistence) during academic work. Endorsement of more positive relations moderated the deleterious relationship between PTSD symptoms and maladaptive goal orientation. The results suggest that postsecondary personnel adopt a social-cognitive framework to develop social, mental health, and academic supports for SSM/V with PTSD.

  19. Comparison of Body Composition Assessed by Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and BMI in Current and Former U.S. Navy Service Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath G Gasier

    Full Text Available Little is known of the diagnostic accuracy of BMI in classifying obesity in active duty military personnel and those that previously served. Thus, the primary objectives were to determine the relationship between lean and fat mass, and body fat percentage (BF% with BMI, and assess the agreement between BMI and BF% in defining obesity.Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 462 males (20-91 years old who currently or previously served in the U.S. Navy. A BMI of ≥ 30 kg/m2 and a BF% ≥ 25% were used for obesity classification.The mean BMI (± SD and BF% were 28.8 ± 4.1 and 28.9 ± 6.6%, respectively, with BF% increasing with age. Lean mass, fat mass, and BF% were significantly correlated with BMI for all age groups. The exact agreement of obesity defined by BMI and BF% was fair (61%, however, 38% were misclassified by a BMI cut-off of 30 when obesity was defined by BF%.From this data we determined that there is a good correlation between body composition and BMI, and fair agreement between BMI and BF% in classifying obesity in a group of current and former U.S. Navy service members. However, as observed in the general population, a significant proportion of individuals with excess fat are misclassified by BMI cutoffs.

  20. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  1. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  2. Why don't some women attend antenatal and postnatal care services?: a qualitative study of community members' perspectives in Garut, Sukabumi and Ciamis districts of West Java Province, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titaley, Christiana R; Hunter, Cynthia L; Heywood, Peter; Dibley, Michael J

    2010-10-12

    Antenatal, delivery and postnatal care services are amongst the recommended interventions aimed at preventing maternal and newborn deaths worldwide. West Java is one of the provinces of Java Island in Indonesia with a high proportion of home deliveries, a low attendance of four antenatal services and a low postnatal care uptake. This paper aims to explore community members' perspectives on antenatal and postnatal care services, including reasons for using or not using these services, the services received during antenatal and postnatal care, and cultural practices during antenatal and postnatal periods in Garut, Sukabumi and Ciamis districts of West Java province. A qualitative study was conducted from March to July 2009 in six villages in three districts of West Java province. Twenty focus group discussions (FGDs) and 165 in-depth interviews were carried out involving a total of 295 respondents. The guidelines for FGDs and in-depth interviews included the topics of community experiences with antenatal and postnatal care services, reasons for not attending the services, and cultural practices during antenatal and postnatal periods. Our study found that the main reason women attended antenatal and postnatal care services was to ensure the safe health of both mother and infant. Financial difficulty emerged as the major issue among women who did not fulfil the minimum requirements of four antenatal care services or two postnatal care services within the first month after delivery. This was related to the cost of health services, transportation costs, or both. In remote areas, the limited availability of health services was also a problem, especially if the village midwife frequently travelled out of the village. The distances from health facilities, in addition to poor road conditions were major concerns, particularly for those living in remote areas. Lack of community awareness about the importance of these services was also found, as some community members perceived

  3. Why don't some women attend antenatal and postnatal care services?: a qualitative study of community members' perspectives in Garut, Sukabumi and Ciamis districts of West Java Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heywood Peter

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antenatal, delivery and postnatal care services are amongst the recommended interventions aimed at preventing maternal and newborn deaths worldwide. West Java is one of the provinces of Java Island in Indonesia with a high proportion of home deliveries, a low attendance of four antenatal services and a low postnatal care uptake. This paper aims to explore community members' perspectives on antenatal and postnatal care services, including reasons for using or not using these services, the services received during antenatal and postnatal care, and cultural practices during antenatal and postnatal periods in Garut, Sukabumi and Ciamis districts of West Java province. Methods A qualitative study was conducted from March to July 2009 in six villages in three districts of West Java province. Twenty focus group discussions (FGDs and 165 in-depth interviews were carried out involving a total of 295 respondents. The guidelines for FGDs and in-depth interviews included the topics of community experiences with antenatal and postnatal care services, reasons for not attending the services, and cultural practices during antenatal and postnatal periods. Results Our study found that the main reason women attended antenatal and postnatal care services was to ensure the safe health of both mother and infant. Financial difficulty emerged as the major issue among women who did not fulfil the minimum requirements of four antenatal care services or two postnatal care services within the first month after delivery. This was related to the cost of health services, transportation costs, or both. In remote areas, the limited availability of health services was also a problem, especially if the village midwife frequently travelled out of the village. The distances from health facilities, in addition to poor road conditions were major concerns, particularly for those living in remote areas. Lack of community awareness about the importance of these

  4. Large, Easily Deployable Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agan, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    Study of concepts for large space structures will interest those designing scaffolding, radio towers, rescue equipment, and prefabricated shelters. Double-fold, double-cell module was selected for further design and for zero gravity testing. Concept is viable for deployment by humans outside space vehicle as well as by remotely operated manipulator.

  5. Deployment & Market Transformation (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    NREL's deployment and market transformation (D and MT) activities encompass the laboratory's full range of technologies, which span the energy efficiency and renewable energy spectrum. NREL staff educates partners on how they can advance sustainable energy applications and also provides clients with best practices for reducing barriers to innovation and market transformation.

  6. Deploying Node.js

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquali, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    If you are an intermediate or advanced developer deploying your Node.js applications, then this book is for you. If you have already built a Node application or module and want to take your knowledge to the next level, this book will help you find your way.

  7. Application of the ADAMS program to deployable space truss structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleson, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The need for a computer program to perform kinematic and dynamic analyses of large truss structures while deploying from a packaged configuration in space led to the evaluation of several existing programs. ADAMS (automatic dynamic analysis of mechanical systems), a generalized program from performing the dynamic simulation of mechanical systems undergoing large displacements, is applied to two concepts of deployable space antenna units. One concept is a one cube folding unit of Martin Marietta's Box Truss Antenna and the other is a tetrahedral truss unit of a Tetrahedral Truss Antenna. Adequate evaluation of dynamic forces during member latch-up into the deployed configuration is not yet available from the present version of ADAMS since it is limited to the assembly of rigid bodies. Included is a method for estimating the maximum bending stress in a surface member at latch-up. Results include member displacement and velocity responses during extension and an example of member bending stresses at latch-up.

  8. After the Post-9/11 GI Bill: A Profile of Military Service Members and Veterans Enrolled in Undergraduate and Graduate Education. Stats in Brief. NCES 2016-435

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Alexandria Walton; Bentz, Alexander; Dekker, Remmert; Paslov, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill took effect on August 1, 2009, increasing the education benefits available to military service members who served after September 10, 2001. A previous National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) study used national data collected in 2007-08 to profile military undergraduate and graduate students who received benefits…

  9. A Research on Knowledge Services of Supply Chain Members Based on Lean Thinking%精益思想视域下的供应链成员知识服务研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚伟; 张自豪; 佟泽华

    2015-01-01

    基于精益思想的视角,采用文献分析方法,对供应链成员知识服务研究现状进行梳理,对成员知识服务存在的问题进行剖析。针对相应问题,将知识服务流程归纳为需求表征、知识集成、知识融合及显性化、知识服务反馈4个环节,并将精益思想融入供应链成员知识服务中,构建了成员知识服务的精益模型,设计了“宏观链—微观环”的组合方式,并提出了实施策略,即知识需求确定,知识流分析,知识产品价值拉动和服务过程优化。%Based on the perspective of Lean Thinking , using the method of literature analysis , and com-bing the research status of the knowledge services in supply chain members , the issues of the knowledge services in supply chain members are analyzed .In accordance with the corresponding problems , knowl-edge services processes , which can be summed up as demand representation , knowledge integration , knowledge fusion and externalization , knowledge services feedback , and lean thinking , are incorporated into the knowledge services in supply chain members .Then a lean model of the knowledge services in sup-ply chain members is built , a“macro-chain-micro-ring” combination designed , and the corresponding im-plementation strategy put forward which includes the requirements definition , knowledge flow analysis , knowledge product value driving and service process optimization .

  10. Mechanism Design and Testing of a Self-Deploying Structure Using Flexible Composite Tape Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footdale, Joseph N.; Murphey, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    The detailed mechanical design of a novel deployable support structure that positions and tensions a membrane optic for space imagining applications is presented. This is a complex three-dimensional deployment using freely deploying rollable composite tape spring booms that become load bearing structural members at full deployment. The deployment tests successfully demonstrate a new architecture based on rolled and freely deployed composite tape spring members that achieve simultaneous deployment without mechanical synchronization. Proper design of the flexible component mounting interface and constraint systems, which were critical in achieving a functioning unit, are described. These flexible composite components have much potential for advancing the state of the art in deployable structures, but have yet to be widely adopted. This paper demonstrates the feasibility and advantages of implementing flexible composite components, including the design details on how to integrate with required traditional mechanisms.

  11. Market and Policy Barriers to Energy Storage Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Currier, Aileen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hernandez, Jacquelynne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ma, Ookie [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Kirby, Brendan [Consultant

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies can provide numerous grid services; there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, cross-cutting barriers and technology barriers.

  12. 46 CFR 11.213 - Sea service as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States and on vessels owned by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... part. There are also other ratings such as electrician, hull technician, or damage controlman which may... service obtained on submarines is creditable, as if it were surface vessel service, for deck and engineer... endorsements, submarine service may be creditable if at least 25 percent of all service submitted for...

  13. Dedicated Deployable Aerobraking Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Knarr, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    A dedicated deployable aerobraking structure concept was developed that significantly increases the effective area of a spacecraft during aerobraking by up to a factor of 5 or more (depending on spacecraft size) without substantially increasing total spacecraft mass. Increasing the effective aerobraking area of a spacecraft (without significantly increasing spacecraft mass) results in a corresponding reduction in the time required for aerobraking. For example, if the effective area of a spacecraft is doubled, the time required for aerobraking is roughly reduced to half the previous value. The dedicated deployable aerobraking structure thus enables significantly shorter aerobraking phases, which results in reduced mission cost, risk, and allows science operations to begin earlier in the mission.

  14. Heterogeneous Deployment Analysis for Cost-Effective Mobile Network Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coletti, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The plethora of connected devices, such as attractive smartphones, data dongles and 3G/4G built-in tablet computers, has brought mobile operators to face increasing demand in mobile broadband traffic and services. In addition to the roll-out of Long Term Evolution (LTE), the deployment of small low...... available at the macro layer for wireless backhaul. The main goal is to investigate the LTE downlink performance of different deployment configurations, focusing on spectrum allocation schemes and deployment strategies that are needed to maximize network coverage. Differently from most studies using...... statistical models of deployment areas, the performance analysis is carried out in the form of operator case studies for large-scale deployment scenarios, including realistic macro network layouts and inhomogeneous spatial traffic distributions. Deployment of small cells is performed by means of proposed...

  15. Monitoring of returnees from Ebola-affected areas: lessons learned based on the experience of French armed forces deployed in Guinea, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manet, Ghislain; Bédubourg, Gabriel; Velut, Guillaume; de Laval, Franck; Mayet, Aurélie; Dia, Aissata; Berger, Franck; Quentin, Benoît; Meynard, Jean-Baptiste; Michel, Rémy; Duron, Sandrine

    2017-08-31

    During the 2014-15 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa, French armed forces were involved in the treatment and management of Ebola patients in Guinea. The constant flow of military personnel returning from their deployment posed a risk of secondary dissemination of the Ebola virus. Our objective was to describe the follow-up of returning service members that was implemented to prevent this risk of dissemination in France. For the French military, a specific complementary follow-up was added to the national monitoring to take into account the need for a detailed record for follow-up of returning military personnel and to keep the military chain of command informed. All the 410 service members deployed in Guinea underwent monitoring among whom 22 were suspected of EVD. Three of them were considered as possible EVD cases but none of them was tested positive for EVD. The monitoring organized for French service members deployed in Guinea made it possible to follow all exposed military personnel after their return, know their health status on a near real-time basis and be aware of all alerts. To reach this goal the collaboration with French national health agencies was necessary and should be improved in the future.

  16. Profile Report: ASHA Member Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Armin D.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The American School Health Association (ASHA) surveyed its members who were nurses to identify their needs for improved member programs and services. Recommendations include that the needs of both school-based nurses and those with administrative roles be considered independently for annual meeting programs. (JN)

  17. Hearing Loss Associated with US Military Combat Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    To define the risk of hearing loss among military members in relation to their deployment experiences, data were drawn from the Millennium Cohort...reported new-onset hearing loss . Self-reported hearing loss showed moderate to substantial agreement (k = 0.57-0.69) with objective audiometric measures...New-onset hearing loss was associated with combat deployment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.49-1.77). Among

  18. Finite element analysis of a deployable space structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, D. V.

    1982-01-01

    To assess the dynamic characteristics of a deployable space truss, a finite element model of the Scientific Applications Space Platform (SASP) truss has been formulated. The model incorporates all additional degrees of freedom associated with the pin-jointed members. Comparison of results with SPAR models of the truss show that the joints of the deployable truss significantly affect the vibrational modes of the structure only if the truss is relatively short.

  19. 7 CFR 930.28 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... alternate member may not act in the place and stead of such member. In the event a member and his or her... group (grower or handler) as the member. In the event of the death, removal, resignation...

  20. 7 CFR 929.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... absence of such member and may perform such other duties as assigned. In the event of the death, removal... member is selected and has qualified. In the event both a member and alternate member from the...

  1. Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Hill; Kenneth Nemeth; Gary Garrett; Kimberly Sams

    2009-01-31

    The Southern States Energy Board's (SSEB) 'Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies' program began on June 1, 2003, and was completed on January 31, 2009. The project proved beneficial in providing state decision-makers with information that assisted them in removing barriers or implementing incentives to deploy clean coal technologies. This was accomplished through two specific tasks: (1) domestic energy security and diversity; and (2) the energy-water interface. Milestones accomplished during the project period are: (1) Presentations to Annual Meetings of SSEB Members, Associate Member Meetings, and the Gasification Technologies Council. (2) Energy: Water reports - (A) Regional Efforts to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies: Impacts and Implications for Water Supply and Quality. June 2004. (B) Energy-Water Interface Challenges: Coal Bed Methane and Mine Pool Water Characterization in the Southern States Region. 2004. (C) Freshwater Availability and Constraints on Thermoelectric Power Generation in the Southeast U.S. June 2008. (3) Blackwater Interactive Tabletop Exercise - Decatur, Georgia April 2007. (4) Blackwater Report: Blackwater: Energy and Water Interdependency Issues: Best Practices and Lessons Learned. August 2007. (5) Blackwater Report: BLACKWATER: Energy Water Interdependency Issues REPORT SUMMARY. April 2008.

  2. Incidence of Campylobacter infections among service members of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces and among other beneficiaries of the Military Health System, 2000-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report reviews the incidence of illness due to Campylobacter bacteria based on diagnoses recorded in healthcare records and reported through the Armed Forces reportable medical event (RME) system. During 2000-2013, incident cases of Campylobacter infection were diagnosed in 1,393 active component service members, 188 members of the reserve component, and 3,891 retirees and family members. Among members of the active component, incidence rates tended to be higher among females, those aged 40 years or older, members of the Army and Air Force, and offi cers. Incidence rates declined from 2002 through 2007 but have risen steadily since, especially from 2010 through 2013. Among retirees and family members, the highest numbers of cases were diagnosed among those aged 5 years or younger and those aged 75 years or older. Cases identifi ed through RME reports (n=2,938) showed the highest numbers of cases in May-August, especially July, and that cases reported from Fort Shafter, HI, accounted for 20% of all cases. Measures and precautions important in preventing Campylobacter infections as well as other food- and waterborne infections are discussed.

  3. Human resources issues and Australian Disaster Medical Assistance Teams: results of a national survey of team members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Aitken

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calls for disaster medical assistance teams (DMATs are likely to continue in response to international disasters. As part of a national survey, this study was designed to evaluate Australian DMAT experience in relation to the human resources issues associated with deployment. Methods: Data was collected via an anonymous mailed survey distributed via State and Territory representatives on the Australian Health Protection Committee, who identified team members associated with Australian DMAT deployments from the 2004 South East Asian Tsunami disaster. Results: The response rate for this survey was 50% (59/118. Most personnel had deployed to the Asian Tsunami affected areas with DMAT members having significant clinical and international experience. While all except one respondent stated they received a full orientation prior to deployment, only 34% of respondents (20/59 felt their role was clearly defined pre deployment. Approximately 56% (33/59 felt their actual role matched their intended role and that their clinical background was well suited to their tasks. Most respondents were prepared to be available for deployment for 1 month (34%, 20/59. The most common period of notice needed to deploy was 6–12 hours for 29% (17/59 followed by 12–24 hours for 24% (14/59. The preferred period of overseas deployment was 14–21 days (46%, 27/59 followed by 1 month (25%, 15/59 and the optimum shift period was felt to be 12 hours by 66% (39/59. The majority felt that there was both adequate pay (71%, 42/59 and adequate indemnity (66%, 39/59. Almost half (49%, 29/59 stated it was better to work with people from the same hospital and, while most felt their deployment could be easily covered by staff from their workplace (56%, 33/59 and caused an inconvenience to their colleagues (51%, 30/59, it was less likely to interrupt service delivery in their workplace (10%, 6/59 or cause an inconvenience to patients (9%, 5/59. Deployment was felt to

  4. Self-Deployable Membrane Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.; Willis, Paul B.; Tan, Seng C.

    2010-01-01

    Currently existing approaches for deployment of large, ultra-lightweight gossamer structures in space rely typically upon electromechanical mechanisms and mechanically expandable or inflatable booms for deployment and to maintain them in a fully deployed, operational configuration. These support structures, with the associated deployment mechanisms, launch restraints, inflation systems, and controls, can comprise more than 90 percent of the total mass budget. In addition, they significantly increase the stowage volume, cost, and complexity. A CHEM (cold hibernated elastic memory) membrane structure without any deployable mechanism and support booms/structure is deployed by using shape memory and elastic recovery. The use of CHEM micro-foams reinforced with carbon nanotubes is considered for thin-membrane structure applications. In this advanced structural concept, the CHEM membrane structure is warmed up to allow packaging and stowing prior to launch, and then cooled to induce hibernation of the internal restoring forces. In space, the membrane remembers its original shape and size when warmed up. After the internal restoring forces deploy the structure, it is then cooled to achieve rigidization. For this type of structure, the solar radiation could be utilized as the heat energy used for deployment and space ambient temperature for rigidization. The overall simplicity of the CHEM self-deployable membrane is one of its greatest assets. In present approaches to space-deployable structures, the stow age and deployment are difficult and challenging, and introduce a significant risk, heavy mass, and high cost. Simple procedures provided by CHEM membrane greatly simplify the overall end-to-end process for designing, fabricating, deploying, and rigidizing large structures. The CHEM membrane avoids the complexities associated with other methods for deploying and rigidizing structures by eliminating deployable booms, deployment mechanisms, and inflation and control systems

  5. Joint for deployable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craighead, N. D., II; Preliasco, R. J.; Hult, T. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A joint is described for connecting a pair of beams to pivot them between positions in alignment or beside one another, which is of light weight and which operates in a controlled manner. The joint includes a pair of fittings and at least one center link having opposite ends pivotally connected to opposite fittings and having axes that pass through centerplates of the fittings. A control link having opposite ends pivotally connected to the different fittings controls their relative orientations, and a toggle assemly holds the fittings in the deployed configuration wherein they are aligned. The fittings have stops that lie on one side of the centerplane opposite the toggle assembly.

  6. A Utility-Scale Deployment Project of Behind-the-Meter Energy Storage for Use in Ancillary Services, Energy Resiliency, Grid Infrastructure Investment Deferment, and Demand-Response Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Joseph Nathanael

    Electric utilities are increasingly incentivized to integrate new renewable energy generation resources to their systems; however, operations-related issues arise due to the non-dispatchable and stochastic nature of these renewable energy sources. These characteristics lead to a variety of issues for utilities, among which are voltage fluctuations, balancing dispatch against ramping events, short-duration power fluctuations, and the need to invest in peaking generation facilities just to accommodate the renewable energy. A traditional solution to these issues is to employ renewable generation-following techniques using either newly constructed gas peaking plants, or by shifting existing generation resources to this following responsibility. Unfortunately, use of these traditional methods introduces a new set of issues; namely, wear-and-tear due to more frequent cycling, reduced capacity factors, decreased plant efficiency, and additional investment in large-scale captital infrastructure. This thesis proposes an alternate solution: a utility-owned and utility-managed battery energy storage system sited on residential customer premises, deployed at scale to create a 200MW / 1320MWh distributed network of Residential Battery Energy Storage Systems (ResBESS). In partnership with Portland General Electric (PGE) stakeholders, a conceptual design was prepared for a ResBESS unit, a laboratory prototype of a single such storage system was constructed, and an alpha prototype is now being installed in a field demonstration project in Milwaukie, Oregon within PGE's service territory. The motivations, design constraints, and design methodology of the laboratory prototype are presented and discussed, and preliminary work from the field prototype build is examined to demonstrate the results of the thesis project.

  7. 7 CFR 985.25 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING ORDER REGULATING THE... member's absence, (b) in the event of the member's death, removal, resignation, or...

  8. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  9. Guam: U.S. Defense Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Gates Views Growth Under Way in Guam,” American Forces Press Service, May 30, 2008. 2 Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, speech at Shangri-La Hotel ...crises; and sea lines of communication (SLOCs), particularly through the Straits of Malacca . Combat aircraft on Guam can reach Taiwan, Japan, Philippines...Remarks by retired Lieutenant General, USMC, George Trautman III, at Heritage Foundation, May 3, 2012. Guam: U.S. Defense Deployments Congressional

  10. Thermally stable deployable structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegg, Colleen M.

    1988-01-01

    A deployable structure which meets stringent thermal and strength requirements in a space environment was developed. A mast with a very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was required to limit the movement from thermal distortion over the temperature range of -200 C to 80 C to .064 cm (.025 in). In addition, a high bending strength over the temperature range and weight less than 18.1 kg (40 lbs) was needed. To meet all of the requirements, a composite, near-zero CTE structure was developed. The measured average CTE over the temperature range for the mast was .70 x .000001/C (.38 x .000001/F). The design also has the advantage of being adjustable to attain other specific CTE if desired.

  11. Forward Deployed Robotic Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendle, Bruce E., Jr.; Bornstein, Jonathan A.

    2000-07-01

    Forward Deployed Robotic Unit (FDRU) is a core science and technology objective of the US Army, which will demonstrate the impact of autonomous systems on all phases of future land warfare. It will develop, integrate and demonstrate technology required to achieve robotic and fire control capabilities for future land combat vehicles, e.g., Future Combat Systems, using a system of systems approach that culminates in a field demonstration in 2005. It will also provide the required unmanned assets and conduct the demonstration. Battle Lab Warfighting Experiments and data analysis required to understand the effects of unmanned assets on combat operations. The US Army Tank- Automotive & Armaments Command and the US Army Research Laboratory are teaming in an effort to leverage prior technology achievements in the areas of autonomous mobility, architecture, sensor and robotics system integration; advance the state-of-the-art in these areas; and to provide field demonstration/application of the technologies.

  12. Deployable Pipe-Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawidzki, Machi

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a concept of deployable Pipe-Z (dPZ): a modular structural system which takes advantage of the robustness of rigid-panel mechanism and allows to create free-form links which are also reconfigurable and deployable. The concept presented can be applied for building habitats and infrastructures for human exploration of oceans and outer space. dPZ structures can adapt to changing requirements e.g. mission objectives, crew condition and technological developments. Furthermore, such lightweight and adaptable structural concept can assist in sustainable exploration development. After brief introduction, the concept of Pipe-Z (PZ) is presented. Next, the reconfigurability of PZ is explained and illustrated with continuous and collision-free transition from a PZ forming a Trefoil knot to a Figure-eight knot. The following sections introduce, explain and illustrate the folding mechanism of a single foldable Pipe-Z module (fPZM) and entire dPZ structure. The latter is illustrated with asynchronous (delayed) unfolding of a relatively complex Unknot. Several applications of PZ are suggested, namely for underwater and deep-space and surface habitats, for permanent, but in particular, temporary or emergency passages. As an example, a scenario of a failure of one of the modules of the International Space Station is presented where a rigid structure of 40 fPZMs bypasses the "dead link". A low-fidelity prototype of a 6-module octagonal dPZ is presented; several folding schemes including concentric toric rings are demonstrated. Practical issues of pressurization and packing are briefly discussed.

  13. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(8)-1 - Services performed by a minister of a church or a member of a religious order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... old-age, survivors, and disability insurance system established by title II of the Social Security Act... duly ordained minister, is engaged to perform service as chaplain at N University. M devotes his entire... spiritual counsel to the university students, and teaching a class in religion. M is performing service...

  14. The Deployment Life Study: Methodological Overview and Baseline Sample Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    service members and spouses are also asked whether the service member or spouse is pregnant or trying to get pregnant, whether the pregnancy was...more drinks for women ) in the past 30 days. All items come from the 2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. – Illegal drugs. Abuse of illegal...Tobacco use is assessed with three items that ask service members and spouses the number of days they smoked part or all of a cigarette (in the past 30

  15. CMS software deployment on OSG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B; Avery, P [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Thomas, M [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wuerthwein, F [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)], E-mail: bockjoo@phys.ufl.edu, E-mail: thomas@hep.caltech.edu, E-mail: avery@phys.ufl.edu, E-mail: fkw@fnal.gov

    2008-07-15

    A set of software deployment tools has been developed for the installation, verification, and removal of a CMS software release. The tools that are mainly targeted for the deployment on the OSG have the features of instant release deployment, corrective resubmission of the initial installation job, and an independent web-based deployment portal with Grid security infrastructure login mechanism. We have been deploying over 500 installations and found the tools are reliable and adaptable to cope with problems with changes in the Grid computing environment and the software releases. We present the design of the tools, statistics that we gathered during the operation of the tools, and our experience with the CMS software deployment on the OSG Grid computing environment.

  16. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermetten, Eric; Greenberg, Neil; Boeschoten, Manon A.; Delahaije, Roos; Jetly, Rakesh; Castro, Carl A.; McFarlane, Alexander C.

    2014-01-01

    . Instead, by default, mental healthcare professionals acted to support the leader and peer led “after action” reviews. All countries provided professional mental support close to the front line, aimed at early detection and early return to normal activities within the unit. All countries deployed a mental health support team that consisted of a range of mental health staff including psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses, and chaplains. There was no overall consensus in the allocation of mental health disciplines in theatre. All countries (except the US) provided troops with a third location decompression (TLD) stop after deployment, which aimed to recognize what the deployed units had been through and to prepare them for transition home. The US conducted in-garrison ‘decompression’, or ‘reintegration training’ in the US, with a similiar focus to TLD. All had a reasonably comparable infrastructure in the field of mental healthcare. Shared bottlenecks across countries included perceived stigma and barriers to care around mental health problems as well as the need for improving the awareness and recognition of mental health problems among service members. Conclusion This analysis demonstrated that in all five partners state-of-the-art preventative mental healthcare was included in the last deployment in Afghanistan, including a positive approach towards strengthening the mental resilience, a focus on self-regulatory skills and self-empowerment, and several initiatives that were well-integrated in a military context. These initiatives were partly/completely implemented by the military/colleagues/supervisors and applicable during several phases of the deployment cycle. Important new developments in operational mental health support are recognition of the role of social leadership and enhancement of operational peer support. This requires awareness of mental problems that will contribute to reduction of the barriers to care in case of

  17. Family Reintegration Following Guard Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    expectations is a key process that has to occur for successful reintegration of the veteran back into the family. Both parties have to work out their...describe veterans and families perceptions of: Aim 1. Their experience with family reintegration and the challenges reintegration presents; Aim 2...deployment, and post deployment shape the degree of challenges with reintegration that a veteran and their family will encounter. Pre-deployment, the

  18. Design optimization of deployable wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Pradeep

    Morphing technology is an important aspect of UAV design, particularly in regards to deployable systems. The design of such system has an important impact on the vehicle's performance. The primary focus of the present research work was to determine the most optimum deployable wing design from 3 competing designs and develop one of the deployable wing designs to test in the research facility. A Matlab code was developed to optimize 3 deployable wing concepts inflatable, inflatable telescopic and rigid-folding wings based on a sequential optimization strategy. The constraints that were part of the code include the packaging constraints during its stowed state, fixed length of the deployed section and the minimum L/D constraint. This code resulted in determining the optimum weight of all the 3 designs, the most optimum weight design is the inflatable wing design. This is a result of the flexible skin material and also due to no rigid parts in the deployed wing section. Another goal of the research involved developing an inflatable telescopic wing. The prototype was tested in a wind tunnel, while the actual wing was tested in the altitude chamber to determine the deployment speed, input pressure, analyze and predict the deployment sequence and behavior of the wing at such high wind speeds and altitudes ranging from 60,000 ft to 90,000 ft. Results from these tests allowed us to conclude the deployment sequence of the telescopic wing followed from the root to the tip section. The results were used to analyze the deployment time of the wing. As expected the deployment time decreased with an increase in input pressure. The results also show us that as the altitude increases, the deployment speed of the wing also increased. This was demonstrated when the wing was tested at a maximum altitude pressure of 90,000ft, well above the design altitude of 60,000ft.

  19. Towards Deployable DDoS Defense for Web Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, Prateek; Hu, Yih-Chun; Caesar, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks form one of the most serious threats that plague the Internet today. However, despite over a decade of research, and the existence of several proposals to address this problem, there has been little progress to date on actual adoption. In this work, we argue that adoption would be simplified by lowering the cost of deployment. Towards this goal, we present Mirage, an approach to DDoS defense that lowers the cost of adoption. Mirage achieves comparable performance to other DDoS mitigation schemes while providing benefits when deployed only in the server's local network and its upstream ISP, where local business objectives may incentivize deployment. In particular, Mirage does not require source end hosts to install any software to access Mirage protected websites. Unlike previous proposals, Mirage only requires functionality from routers that is already deployed in today's routers, though this functionality may need to be scaled depending on the point of deployment....

  20. Mastering Hyper-V Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Aidan

    2010-01-01

    The only book to take an in-depth look at deploying Hyper-V. Now in its second generation, the popular Hyper-V boasts technical advances that create even more dynamic systems than ever before. This unique resource serves an authoritative guide to deploying Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V comprehensively. Step-by-step instructions demonstrate how to design a Hyper-V deployment, build a Hyper-V host environment, and design a management system with System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2.: Features real-world examples that show you how to design a Hyper-V deployment, build a Hyper-V host env

  1. Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division advances transportation innovation by being leaders in infrastructure technology, including vehicles and...

  2. Synchronously deployable double fold beam and planar truss structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Hedgepeth, John M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A deployable structure that synchronously deploys in both length and width is disclosed which is suitable for use as a structural component for orbiting space stations or large satellites. The structure is designed with maximum packing efficiency so that large structures may be collapsed and transported in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. The synchronous deployment feature allows the structure to be easily deployed in space by two astronauts, without a complex deployment mechanism. The structure is made up of interconnected structural units, each generally in the shape of a parallelepiped. The structural units are constructed of structural members connected with hinged and fixed connections at connection nodes in each corner of the parallelepiped. Diagonal members along each face of the parallelepiped provide structural rigidity and are equipped with mid-length, self-locking hinges to allow the structure to collapse. The structure is designed so that all hinged connections may be made with simple clevis-type hinges requiring only a single degree of freedom, and each hinge pin is located along the centerline of its structural member for increased strength and stiffness.

  3. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  4. A scope of the problem: Post-deployment reintegration challenges in a National Guard Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Sherrie L; Oh, Hyunsung; Redmond, Sarah A; Chicas, Joseph; Hassan, Anthony M; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    More Reserve and Guard members have been activated in the past few years than in any other time in history. In addition to the high rates of psychological and behavioral challenges among military personnel, there are other equally important post-deployment reintegration challenges. Post-deployment reintegration challenges are particularly important to Reserve and Guard members, who transition rapidly from civilian-military-civilian. This study aims to describe the scope of challenges that a battalion of National Guard members (NGM) report experiencing after returning from a one-year deployment to Iraq. This article reports data from a sample of 126 NGM who recently returned from a one-year deployment to Iraq. The scope of post-deployment problems at baseline, 3- and 6-month post-deployment are presented. Overall, the rates of post-deployment psychological and behavioral problems were elevated upon returning from deployment and remained fairly constant for up to 6 months post-deployment. Approximately 30% of respondents were unsatisfied with their relationship and upwards of 30% reported family reintegration challenges. Comparisons with similar research and implications for prevention and improvement of post-deployment quality of life are addressed.

  5. PTSD in the military: special considerations for understanding prevalence, pathophysiology and treatment following deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Yehuda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Given the unique context of warzone engagement, which may include chronic threat, multiple and lengthy deployments, and loss, there is a need to understand whether and to what extent knowledge about PTSD derived from studies of civilian trauma exposure is generalizeable to the military. This special issue on PTSD in the military addresses a range of issues and debates related to mental health in military personnel and combat veterans. This article provides an overview of the issues covered in selected contributions that have been assembled for a special volume to consider issues unique to the military. Several leading scholars and military experts have contributed papers regarding: 1 prevalence rates of PTSD and other post-deployment mental health problems in different NATO countries, 2 the search for biomarkers of PTSD and the potential applications of such findings, and 3 prevention and intervention approaches for service members and veterans. The volume includes studies that highlight the divergence in prevalence rates of PTSD and other post-deployment mental health problems across nations and that discuss potential causes and implications. Included studies also provide an overview of research conducted in military or Veteran's Affairs settings, and overarching reviews of military-wide approaches to research, promotion of resilience, and mental health interventions in the Unites States and across NATO and allied ISAF partners.

  6. Fathering after military deployment: parenting challenges and goals of fathers of young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Tova B; Dayton, Carolyn J; Erwin, Michael S; Muzik, Maria; Busuito, Alexandra; Rosenblum, Katherine L

    2014-02-01

    Although often eagerly anticipated, reunification after deployment poses challenges for families, including adjusting to the parent-soldier's return, re-establishing roles and routines, and the potentially necessary accommodation to combat-related injuries or psychological effects. Fourteen male service members, previously deployed to a combat zone, parent to at least one child under seven years of age, were interviewed about their relationships with their young children. Principles of grounded theory guided data analysis to identify key themes related to parenting young children after deployment. Participants reported significant levels of parenting stress and identified specific challenges, including difficulty reconnecting with children, adapting expectations from military to family life, and coparenting. Fathers acknowledged regret about missing an important period in their child's development and indicated a strong desire to improve their parenting skills. They described a need for support in expressing emotions, nurturing, and managing their tempers. Results affirm the need for support to military families during reintegration and demonstrate that military fathers are receptive to opportunities to engage in parenting interventions. Helping fathers understand their children's behavior in the context of age-typical responses to separation and reunion may help them to renew parent-child relationships and reengage in optimal parenting of their young children.

  7. Post-combat invincibility: violent combat experiences are associated with increased risk-taking propensity following deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D S; Cotting, Dave I; Thomas, Jeffrey L; Cox, Anthony L; McGurk, Dennis; Vo, Alexander H; Castro, Carl A; Hoge, Charles W

    2008-10-01

    Combat exposure is associated with increased rates of mental health problems such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety when Soldiers return home. Another important health consequence of combat exposure involves the potential for increased risk-taking propensity and unsafe behavior among returning service members. Survey responses regarding 37 different combat experiences were collected from 1252 US Army Soldiers immediately upon return home from combat deployment during Operation Iraqi Freedom. A second survey that included the Evaluation of Risks Scale (EVAR) and questions about recent risky behavior was administered to these same Soldiers 3 months after the initial post-deployment survey. Combat experiences were reduced to seven factors using principal components analysis and used to predict post-deployment risk-propensity scores. Although effect sizes were small, specific combat experiences, including greater exposure to violent combat, killing another person, and contact with high levels of human trauma, were predictive of greater risk-taking propensity after homecoming. Greater exposure to these combat experiences was also predictive of actual risk-related behaviors in the preceding month, including more frequent and greater quantities of alcohol use and increased verbal and physical aggression toward others. Exposure to violent combat, human trauma, and having direct responsibility for taking the life of another person may alter an individual's perceived threshold of invincibility and slightly increase the propensity to engage in risky behavior upon returning home after wartime deployment. Findings highlight the importance of education and counseling for returning service members to mitigate the public health consequences of elevated risk-propensity associated with combat exposure.

  8. Energy Harvesting Small Cell Networks: Feasibility, Deployment and Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Yuyi; Luo, Yaming; Zhang, Jun; Letaief, Khaled B.

    2015-01-01

    Small cell networks (SCNs) have attracted great attention in recent years due to their potential to meet the exponential growth of mobile data traffic and the increasing demand for better quality of service and user experience in mobile applications. Nevertheless, a wide deployment of SCNs has not happened yet because of the complexity in the network planning and optimization, as well as the high expenditure involved in deployment and operation. In particular, it is difficult to provide grid ...

  9. Device Measures Angle Of Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermakian, Joel B.

    1991-01-01

    Simple electromechanical device indicates angular position of unfolding panel during and after deployment. Resistance of potentiometer gradually increases as unfolding of solar panel about hinge moves wiper of potentiometer. At full deployment, panel pushes and opens normally closed switch. Designed for use on panel of solar photovoltaic cells in spacecraft, modified for use in other, similar position-indicating applications.

  10. Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    STRATEGIC SEALIFT SUPPORTING ARMY DEPLOYMENTS A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff...THOMPSON, MAJ, US ARMY BFA, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, Louisiana, 1994 Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 2016 Approved for...Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew

  11. Aggression in US soldiers post-deployment: Associations with combat exposure and PTSD and the moderating role of trait anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Joshua E; Quartana, Phillip J; Clarke-Walper, Kristina; Kok, Brian C; Riviere, Lyndon A

    2015-01-01

    Anger and aggression are among the most common issues reported by returning service members from combat deployments. However, the pathways between combat exposure and anger and aggression have not been comprehensively characterized. The present study aimed to characterize the relationship between trait anger, combat exposure, post-deployment PTSD, and aggression. U.S. Army soldiers (N = 2,420) were administered anonymous surveys assessing combat exposure, current PTSD symptoms and aggression, as well as trait anger items 3 months after returning from deployment to Afghanistan. PTSD symptom levels were related to aggression at higher levels of trait anger, but not evident among soldiers who had lower levels of trait anger. The pathway from combat exposure to PTSD, and then to aggression, was conditional upon levels of trait anger, such that the pathway was most evident at high levels of trait anger. This was the first study to our knowledge that concurrently modeled unconditional and conditional direct and indirect associations between combat exposure, PTSD, trait anger, and aggression. The findings can be helpful clinically and for developing screening protocols for combat exposed Soldiers. The results of this study suggest the importance of assessing and managing anger and aggression in soldiers returning from combat deployment. Anger is one of the most common complaints of returning soldiers and can have debilitating effects across all domains of functioning. It is imperative that future research efforts are directed toward understanding this phenomenon and developing and validating effective treatments for it.

  12. Performance test of dosimetric services in the EU member states and Switzerland for the routine assessment of individual doses (photon, beta and neutron)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordy, J.M.; Stadtmann, H.; Ambrosi, P.

    2000-01-01

    dosemeters were good for all fields except for R-F. Beta test results showed that many types of dosemeter were not able accurately to determine personal dose equivalent when large incident angles and low energies were encountered. Neutron dosimetry, results were very dependent on the dosemeter type...... and report personal dose equivalents. In total, 69 sets of dosemeters were entered in the test by 34 services. About 1000 dosemeters were irradiated. One purpose of the consolidated performance test and the analysis of the results was to enable the assessment of criteria for the acceptability...... of the dosimetry of routine services. It was assumed that each service would have already done a type test before performing routine dosimetry: the radiation fields were chosen to simulate, as far as possible, workplace radiation fields by mixing combining energies and incident angles. The results of photon...

  13. Performance test of dosimetric services in the EU member states and Switzerland for the routine assessment of individual doses (photon, beta and neutron)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordy, J.M.; Stadtmann, H.; Ambrosi, P.;

    2000-01-01

    of the dosimetry of routine services. It was assumed that each service would have already done a type test before performing routine dosimetry: the radiation fields were chosen to simulate, as far as possible, workplace radiation fields by mixing combining energies and incident angles. The results of photon...... dosemeters were good for all fields except for R-F. Beta test results showed that many types of dosemeter were not able accurately to determine personal dose equivalent when large incident angles and low energies were encountered. Neutron dosimetry, results were very dependent on the dosemeter type...

  14. 7 CFR 946.23 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... such member's absence. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member... the event that both a member and his or her alternate are unable to attend a Committee meeting,...

  15. 7 CFR 959.31 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... designated to do so by the member for whom he is an alternate. In the event both a member of the committee... or grower) to serve in such member's place and stead. In the event of the death, removal,...

  16. 7 CFR 923.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member, his alternate shall act for him until a successor for such member is selected and has qualified. In the event both a member of...

  17. 7 CFR 922.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements..., shall act in the place and stead of such member and perform such other duties as assigned. In the event... until a successor for such member is selected and has qualified. In the event both a member of...

  18. Deployment simulation of a deployable reflector for earth science application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaokai; Fang, Houfei; Cai, Bei; Ma, Xiaofei

    2015-10-01

    A novel mission concept namely NEXRAD-In-Space (NIS) has been developed for monitoring hurricanes, cyclones and other severe storms from a geostationary orbit. It requires a space deployable 35-meter diameter Ka-band (35 GHz) reflector. NIS can measure hurricane precipitation intensity, dynamics and its life cycle. These information is necessary for predicting the track, intensity, rain rate and hurricane-induced floods. To meet the requirements of the radar system, a Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) reflector technology has been developed and several technologies have been evaluated. However, the deployment analysis of this large size and high-precision reflector has not been investigated. For a pre-studies, a scaled tetrahedral truss reflector with spring driving deployment system has been made and tested, deployment dynamics analysis of this scaled reflector has been performed using ADAMS to understand its deployment dynamic behaviors. Eliminating the redundant constraints in the reflector system with a large number of moving parts is a challenging issue. A primitive joint and flexible struts were introduced to the analytical model and they can effectively eliminate over constraints of the model. By using a high-speed camera and a force transducer, a deployment experiment of a single-bay tetrahedral module has been conducted. With the tested results, an optimization process has been performed by using the parameter optimization module of ADAMS to obtain the parameters of the analytical model. These parameters were incorporated to the analytical model of the whole reflector. It is observed from the analysis results that the deployment process of the reflector with a fixed boundary experiences three stages. These stages are rapid deployment stage, slow deployment stage and impact stage. The insight of the force peak distributions of the reflector can help the optimization design of the structure.

  19. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(7)-2 - Service by employees who are not members of a public retirement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... public retirement system. (a) Table of contents. (b) Introduction. (c) General rule. (1) Inclusion in... required to be nonforfeitable. (c) General rule—(1) Inclusion in employment of service by employees who are... benefit provided under the Old-Age portion of the Old-Age, Survivor and Disability Insurance program...

  20. Deployable Structural Booms for Large Deployable Solar Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a new generation of large, high power deployable solar arrays has been identified as the most significant challenge facing the development of...

  1. Deployment of VoIP Technology: QoS Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Lazzez, Amor; Slimani, Thabet

    2013-01-01

    Voice over IP (VoIP) is an emerging communication service allowing voice transmission over a private or a public IP network. VoIP allows significant benefits for customers and service providers including cost savings, phone and service portability, mobility, and the integration with other applications. Nevertheless, the deployment of the VoIP technology encounters many challenges such as interoperability issues, security issues, and QoS concerns. Among these disadvantages, QoS issues are cons...

  2. Self deployable deorbiting space structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    -active or heavy device has to be brought on board the spacecraft for deploying the space structure. Allows the deployed flexible sheet surface higher than the case when SDSS is rigidly linked at the short distance from carrier structure. Ensures a reliable unfolding of deorbiting structures in zero gravity....... Provides the strain energy provoking the deployment without the need of addition of energy to the system. Eliminates the issues around successful unfolding known from other technical solutions as the frame unfolds automatically without using external energy for unfolding by using the accumulated strain...... energy in stressed configuration. Ensures that deorbiting space structure can be efficiently folded without intervention of active unfolding device....

  3. New concepts in deployable beam structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The design of deployable structures involves a complicated tradeoff of packaging efficiency, the overall mechanism associated with deploying and latching beam joints, and the requirements and complexity of the beam deployer/repacker. Three longeron deployable beams, controllable geometry beams, and hybrid deployable/erectable beam concepts are evaluated.

  4. Examination of Post-Service Health-Related Quality of Life Among Rural and Urban Military Members of The Millennium Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    on the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of U.S. veterans based on rural (versus urban) status, especially those in younger age groups, and...Committee 2009 ), especially those who are younger and recently separated from service. Previous research has found rural veterans to have lower...such as gallstones, hernia , or vertigo). Participants were then categorized by the number of diagnoses. The days hospitalized and days unable to work

  5. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Volume 2. Estimates for Department of Defense Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    restoring good order and discipline within the member’s unit. We believe it would be wise to assess service members’ sexual orientation in future studies...demographics, psychological state, command climate, attitudes and beliefs about sexual assault in the military and the nation, and other related issues. 2...for sexual assault that have been identified in prior research on civilian and military samples, with the exception of sexual orientation . We also

  6. Trajectories of health care service utilization and differences in patient characteristics among adults with specific chronic pain: analysis of health plan member claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruetsch C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Charles Ruetsch,1 Joseph Tkacz,1 Peter G Kardel,1 Andrew Howe,2 Helen Pai,2 Bennett Levitan31Health Analytics, LLC, Columbia, Maryland, 2Janssen Research & Development, Raritan, New Jersey, 3Janssen Research & Development, Titusville, New Jersey, USAIntroduction: The lack of consistency surrounding the diagnosis of chronic non-cancer pain, treatment approaches, and patient management suggests the need for further research to better characterize the chronic non-cancer pain population.Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify distinct trajectories of health care service utilization of chronic non-cancer pain patients and describe the characteristic differences between trajectory groups.Patients and methods: This study utilized the MarketScan claims databases. A total of 71,392 patients diagnosed with either low back pain or osteoarthritis between 2006 and 2009 served as the study sample. Each subject's claims data were divided into three time periods around an initial diagnosis date: pre-period, post-Year 1, and post-Year 2. Subjects were categorized as either high (H or low (L cost at each post period, resulting in the creation of four trajectory groups based on the post-Year 1 and 2 cost pattern: H-H, H-L, L-H, and L-L. Multivariate statistical tests were used to predict and discriminate between trajectory group memberships.Results: The H-H, L-H, and H-L groups each utilized significantly greater pre-period high-cost venue services, post-Year 1 outpatient services, and post-Year 1 opioids compared to the L-L group (P <0.001. Additionally, the H-H and L-H groups displayed elevated Charlson comorbidity index scores compared with the L-L group (P <0.001, with each showing increased odds of having both opioid dependence and cardiovascular disease diagnoses (P <0.01.Conclusion: This study identified patient characteristics among chronic pain patients that discriminated between different levels of post-index high-cost venue service

  7. Building Psychological Health: The Services’ Perspectives on Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    program; medical supported • Doctrine signed Dec 2010 • Training: > 200,000 trained to date • 8 courses on Navy eLearning • Formal curriculum delivered...Identify issues during post-deployment •Provide resources for issue resolution •Engage family and service members with process improvement 9 Reserve...building interventions to NSW Operators and their families in relation to screening, improving performance and creating family stability  Impact

  8. Intelligent transportation infrastructure deployment analysis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathi, A.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Harding, J.A. [Federal Highway Administration, McLean, VA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Much of the work on Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) to date has emphasized technologies, standards/protocols, architecture, user services, core infrastructure requirements, and various other technical and institutional issues. ITS implementations in the United States and elsewhere in the world have demonstrated benefits in the areas of safety, productivity, efficiency, and environmental impact. However, quantitative benefits and satisfactory cost estimates are not available or cannot be derived for many components of the ITS, whether deployed individually or in some integrated fashion. The limitations of existing analysis and evaluation capabilities coupled with the lack of strong empirical evidence presents a major knowledge and data gap for infrastructure investment decisions involving ITS alternatives. This paper describes the over-arching issues and requirements associated with the analysis capabilities required for a systematic, faithful, and rigorous evaluation of the impacts of deploying ITS in a metropolitan area. It then describes the conceptual framework of a modeling system that will provide a preliminary analysis capability to support ITS deployment analysis and evaluation.

  9. Deployable antenna kinematics using tensegrity structure design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Byron Franklin

    With vast changes in spacecraft development over the last decade, a new, cheaper approach was needed for deployable kinematic systems such as parabolic antenna reflectors. Historically, these mesh-surface reflectors have resembled folded umbrellas, with incremental redesigns utilized to save packaging size. These systems are typically over-constrained designs, the assumption being that high reliability necessary for space operations requires this level of conservatism. But with the rapid commercialization of space, smaller launch platforms and satellite buses have demanded much higher efficiency from all space equipment than can be achieved through this incremental approach. This work applies an approach called tensegrity to deployable antenna development. Kenneth Snelson, a student of R. Buckminster Fuller, invented Tensegrity structures in 1948. Such structures use a minimum number of compression members (struts); stability is maintain using tension members (ties). The novelty introduced in this work is that the ties are elastic, allowing the struts to extend or contract, and in this way changing the surface of the antenna. Previously, the University of Florida developed an approach to quantify the stability and motion of parallel manipulators. This approach was applied to deployable, tensegrity, antenna structures. Based on the kinematic analyses for the 3-3 (octahedron) and 4-4 (square anti-prism) structures, the 6-6 (hexagonal anti-prism) analysis was completed which establishes usable structural parameters. The primary objective for this work was to prove the stability of this class of deployable structures, and their potential application to space structures. The secondary objective is to define special motions for tensegrity antennas, to meet the subsystem design requirements, such as addressing multiple antenna-feed locations. This work combines the historical experiences of the artist (Snelson), the mathematician (Ball), and the space systems engineer

  10. Deployable Entry-system Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Deployable Entry-system ProjecT (ADEPT) will develop requirements for the ADEPT flight test.  Prior entry systems used high mass thermal protection...

  11. Using Deduplicating Storage for Efficient Disk Image Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Lin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many clouds and network testbeds use disk images to initialize local storage on their compute devices. Large facilities must manage thousands or more images, requiring significant amounts of storage. At the same time, to provide a good user experience, they must be able to deploy those images quickly. Driven by our experience in operating the Emulab site at the University of Utah---a long-lived and heavily-used testbed---we have created a new service for efficiently storing and deploying disk images. This service exploits the redundant data found in similar images, using deduplication to greatly reduce the amount of physical storage required. In addition to space savings, our system is also designed for highly efficient image deployment---it integrates with an existing highly-optimized disk image deployment system, Frisbee, without significantly increasing the time required to distribute and install images. In this paper, we explain the design of our system and discuss the trade-offs we made to strike a balance between efficient storage and fast disk image deployment. We also propose a new chunking algorithm, called AFC, which enables fixed-size chunking for deduplicating allocated disk sectors. Experimental results show that our system reduces storage requirements by up to 3x while imposing only a negligible runtime overhead on the end-to-end disk-deployment process.

  12. Deployment-related Respiratory Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Michael J; Rawlins, Frederic A; Forbes, Damon A; Skabelund, Andrew J; Lucero, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Military deployment to Southwest Asia since 2003 in support of Operations Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn has presented unique challenges from a pulmonary perspective. Various airborne hazards in the deployed environment include suspended geologic dusts, burn pit smoke, vehicle exhaust emissions, industrial air pollution, and isolated exposure incidents. These exposures may give rise to both acute respiratory symptoms and in some instances development of chronic lung disease. While increased respiratory symptoms during deployment are well documented, there is limited data on whether inhalation of airborne particulate matter is causally related to an increase in either common or unique pulmonary diseases. While disease processes such as acute eosinophilic pneumonia and exacerbation of preexisting asthma have been adequately documented, there is significant controversy surrounding the potential effects of deployment exposures and development of rare pulmonary disorders such as constrictive bronchiolitis. The role of smoking and related disorders has yet to be defined. This article presents the current evidence for deployment-related respiratory symptoms and ongoing Department of Defense studies. Further, it also provides general recommendations for evaluating pulmonary health in the deployed military population.

  13. A study protocol for tracking quality of life among U.S. service members wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan: the Wounded Warrior Recovery Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Susan I; Galarneau, Michael R; Luu, Bethi N; Sack, Daniel; Han, Peggy

    2014-03-01

    There is a need for more work to understand the quality of life (QOL) outcomes of survivors of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom combat injury to improve care and treatment, and prevent poor physical, psychological, and social outcomes. We describe the study design and methods of the Wounded Warrior Recovery Project, a study supported by the Department of Defense that will track close to 10,000 military personnel wounded in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. The overall objective of the 6-year longitudinal study is to track changes in QOL and describe variations in those changes as they relate to sociodemographic factors, injury characteristics, service-related factors, clinical/diagnostic measures including traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder, and medical procedures and services. The Wounded Warrior Recovery Project study will be among the first longitudinal population-based investigations of QOL outcomes after combat injury and will provide a basis upon which large-scale epidemiological studies can be conducted. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. Psychological Flexibility as a Framework for Understanding and Improving Family Reintegration Following Military Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Emily K; Moyer, Danielle N; Armelie, Aaron P

    2015-10-01

    Postdeployment reintegration may present an exceptional challenge to service members and their families; yet, overcoming this challenge seems to strengthen family relationships through a shared sense of purpose. Navigating family reintegration may be an important determinant of long-term psychological well-being. If the needs of military families are to be answered effectively, it is of critical importance to identify the skills that facilitate positive reintegration following deployment. This article proposes psychological flexibility as a group of interrelated skills that could be directly intervened on to facilitate not only resilience but also positive growth and development. This paper focuses on the conceptualization of family reintegration in terms of psychological flexibility, including common deficits observed in this population and potential goals of treatment. Video Abstract.

  15. Strategy approach for eLearning 2.0 deployment in Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oskar Casquero

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The institutionally powered Personal Learning Environment (iPLE constitutes our vision of how Web 2.0 technologies, people arrangement and data sharing could be applied for delivering open, flexible, distributed and learner-centred learning environments to university members. Based on the iPLE, this paper explores a strategy approach that universities could follow in order to deploy eLearning 2.0 tools and services. With that aim in mind, we review the patterns that Web 2.0 has successfully applied, and have been proved to encourage people to interact and to share information. Then, we present an eLearning 2.0 provisioning strategy based on iPLEs. Finally, we explain how this strategy can help translating Web 2.0 patterns to learning, and positioning universities as eLearning 2.0 providers.

  16. The Deployment of the Future Mobile Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eba’ Hamad AlMousa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the explosion of mobile services and the continuouse increase demand for a higher data traffic, a new high speed communication networks are required. Mobile networks are developing to increase the data speed and channels bandwidth inorder to meet the subscriber needs. Many attempts have been carried out to achieve the main demands of faster connectivity and download. 5G technolgy which refers to the 5th Generation Mobile Tecnology is the new mobile network that will provide the users with more features and effeciency at the finest QoS (Quality of Service. This study presents most of the experemints  and researches to deploy the new Mobile Network 5G, however it is still in its infancy stage and lacks standardization. Some of the proposed potential architecture for 5G are described in this article.

  17. Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2000-06-01

    The goal of this work is to create an integrated framework for forecasting the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER), both by electricity customers and by the various institutions within the industry itself, and for evaluating the effect of this adoption on the power system, particularly on the overall reliability and quality of electrical service to the end user. This effort and follow on contributions are intended to anticipate and explore possible patterns of DER deployment, thereby guiding technical work on microgrids towards the key technical problems. An early example of this process addressed is the question of possible DER adopting customer disconnection. A deployment scenario in which many customers disconnect from their distribution company (disco) entirely leads to a quite different set of technical problems than a scenario in which customers self generate a significant share or all of their on-site electricity requirements and additionally buy and sell energy and ancillary services (AS) locally and/or into wider markets. The exploratory work in this study suggests that the economics under which customers disconnect entirely are unlikely.

  18. Toward Governance of Cross-Cloud Application Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    de Leusse, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce the main ideas around the governance of cross-Cloud application deployment and their related concepts. It is argued that, due to the increasing complexity and nature of the Cloud market, an intermediary specialized in brokering the deployment of different components of a same application onto different Cloud products could both facilitate said deployment and in some cases improve its quality in terms of cost, security & reliability and QoS. In order to fulfill these objectives, the authors propose a high level architecture that relies on their previous work on governance of policy & rule driven distributed systems. This architecture aims at supplying five main functions of 1) translation of Service Level Agreements (SLAs) and pricing into a common shared DSL, 2) correlation of analytical data (e.g. monitoring, metering), 3) combination of Cloud products, 4) information from third parties regarding different aspects of Quality of Service (QoS) and 5) cross-Cloud a...

  19. Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C

    2012-03-21

    This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

  20. 42 CFR 93.214 - Institutional member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Institutional member. 93.214 Section 93.214 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  1. [Intersectoral experience to bridge the gap between human resources in public health and the technical-operational level for Peruvian Voluntary Military Service members].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaní-Romaní, Franco; Curisinche-Rojas, Maricela; Arteaga, Norka Rojas; Lopez, Pedro Riega; Cabezas, César

    2016-01-01

    There is a gap between human resources and technical-operational education that limits the Peruvian health system's ability to implement public health interventions. The Peruvian Ministry of Health, through the National Health Institute and the Ministry of Defense, implemented a Public Health Training Program addressed to young full-time military servicemen, on the basis of the competency profile of a public health technician. The program consists of seven thematic units given in 390 hours, 200 of which correspond to classroom and field practices. Between July 2014 and December 2015, the program has been carried out in 10 venues of the three armed forces, training and certifying 405 young servicemen. The intervention provides the military service with an additional educational benefit, making it more appealing as a chance for development and opens up a line of work in the public health sector for young people in more remote areas. This experience seeks to increase public health-trained human resources to a technical-operational level. In collaboration with regional governments, graduates are expected to be welcomed and included in the public health system.

  2. Research on Service Combination of Member Hobby for Relational Virtual Community%面向关系型虚拟社区会员兴趣主题的服务组合研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玲芳; 王成文

    2015-01-01

    Relational virtual community has showed the trend that new users are saturated while the scales are shrunk at present in China. From the service innovation perspective, the preferences of member’ s hobby are selected as the theme and semantics of the membership data and service information are ontological. Portfolio of member-service under the preference theme can be realized with the help of semantic web in order to provide some strategic support for the smooth transition of relational virtual community.%当前我国关系型虚拟社区呈现出用户新增饱和和规模缩减的趋势。从服务创新的角度,选取社区会员兴趣偏好为主题,将会员数据和服务信息语义本体化,并借助语义Web来实现偏好主题下的服务组合,以期为促进关系型虚拟社区的顺利转型提供策略支持。

  3. Do interoperable national information systems enhance availability of data to assess the effect of scale-up of HIV services on health workforce deployment in resource-limited countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluoch, Tom; Muturi, David; Kiriinya, Rose; Waruru, Anthony; Lanyo, Kevin; Nguni, Robert; Ojwang, James; Waters, Keith P; Richards, Janise

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) bears the heaviest burden of the HIV epidemic. Health workers play a critical role in the scale-up of HIV programs. SSA also has the weakest information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure globally. Implementing interoperable national health information systems (HIS) is a challenge, even in developed countries. Countries in resource-limited settings have yet to demonstrate that interoperable systems can be achieved, and can improve quality of healthcare through enhanced data availability and use in the deployment of the health workforce. We established interoperable HIS integrating a Master Facility List (MFL), District Health Information Software (DHIS2), and Human Resources Information Systems (HRIS) through application programmers interfaces (API). We abstracted data on HIV care, health workers deployment, and health facilities geo-coordinates. Over 95% of data elements were exchanged between the MFL-DHIS and HRIS-DHIS. The correlation between the number of HIV-positive clients and nurses and clinical officers in 2013 was R2=0.251 and R2=0.261 respectively. Wrong MFL codes, data type mis-match and hyphens in legacy data were key causes of data transmission errors. Lack of information exchange standards for aggregate data made programming time-consuming.

  4. Deployable truss structure advanced technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, J. E.; Dudeck, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The 5-meter technology antenna program demonstrated the overall feasibility of integrating a mesh reflector surface with a deployable truss structure to achieve a precision surface contour compatible with future, high-performance antenna requirements. Specifically, the program demonstrated: the feasibility of fabricating a precision, edge-mounted, deployable, tetrahedral truss structure; the feasibility of adjusting a truss-supported mesh reflector contour to a surface error less than 10 mils rms; and good RF test performance, which correlated well with analytical predictions. Further analysis and testing (including flight testing) programs are needed to fully verify all the technology issues, including structural dynamics, thermodynamics, control, and on-orbit RF performance, which are associated with large, deployable, truss antenna structures.

  5. Deployment of Recommender Systems: Operational and Strategic Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Abhijeet

    2011-01-01

    E-commerce firms are increasingly adopting recommendation systems to effectively target customers with products and services. The first essay examines the impact that improving a recommender system has on firms that deploy such systems. A market with customers heterogeneous in their search costs is considered. We find that in a monopoly, a firm…

  6. Simultaneous Fleet Deployment and Network Design of Liner Shipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelareh, Shahin; Pisinger, David

    A mixed integer linear programming formulation is proposed for the simultaneous design of network and fleet deployment of a liner service providers for deep-sea shipping. The underlying network design problem is based on a 4-index (5-index by considering capacity type) formulation of the hub...

  7. Deployment of Recommender Systems: Operational and Strategic Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Abhijeet

    2011-01-01

    E-commerce firms are increasingly adopting recommendation systems to effectively target customers with products and services. The first essay examines the impact that improving a recommender system has on firms that deploy such systems. A market with customers heterogeneous in their search costs is considered. We find that in a monopoly, a firm…

  8. OMV multiple deployments of lightsats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William L.; Walker, James D.

    1988-06-01

    The design and capabilities of the NASA Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are reviewed, and the potential value of the Shuttle-borne OMV for deploying lightweight satellites (lightsats) into different orbits is discussed and illustrated with extensive drawings and diagrams. Assuming 100-lb lightsats in extended GAS canisters, the OMV could separate from the Orbiter at 16 nmi and deploy six lightsats each at altitudes 430, 700, and 970 nmi before rejoining the Orbiter at 160 nmi. Also considered are configurations with 8 or 12 200-lb lightsats and the fittings for Titan-4 launch of OMV/lightsat packages.

  9. IPv6 deployment and management

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A guide for understanding, deploying, and managing Internet Protocol version 6 The growth of the Internet has created a need for more addresses than are available with Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4)-the protocol currently used to direct almost all Internet traffic. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)-the new IP version intended to ultimately succeed IPv4-will expand the addressing capacity of the Internet to support the explosive growth of users and devices on the Internet as well as add flexibility to allocating addresses and efficiency for routing traffic. IPv6 Deploy

  10. Department of Defense, Deployment Health Clinical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related to deployment health assessments, combat and operational stress programs, deployment-limiting health conditions and deployment-related exposures. Learn More In the News Experts Explore How Combat Roles May Affect Women’s Psychological Health Deployments can be 'significant stressor' ...

  11. Management of Suicide-Related Events during Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    military leadership . The data on experiences and lessons learned by various helping professionals and military leaders during their time of deployment...responsible for providing training and consultation on qualitative analysis. Ms. Keddem left her position in October 2014 and was replaced by Elisabeth...All transcriptions of digitally recorded interviews have been completed at USUHS by several research staff members who have also contributed to

  12. A Rapidly Deployable Bridge System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    A Rapidly Deployable Bridge System Gareth R. Thomas1 and Bernard J. Sia2 1ATA Engineering, 11995 El Camino Real, San Diego, CA 92130; PH (858) 480...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) ATA Engineering,11995 El Camino Real,San Diego,CA,92130 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER

  13. OMV Deployed From Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    In this 1986 artist's concept, the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV), at right, prepares to reboost the Hubble Space Telescope after being deployed from an early Space Station configuration (left). As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners, the OMV would be a remotely-controlled free-flying space tug which would place, rendezvous, dock, and retrieve orbital payloads.

  14. 7 CFR 916.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... member and perform such other duties as assigned. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or... qualified. In the event both a member of the committee and his alternate are unable to attend a...

  15. 7 CFR 915.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... and stead of such member. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a.... In the event both a member and his alternate are unable to attend a committee meeting, the...

  16. 7 CFR 925.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... program duties by the chairman or the committee. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or... and has qualified. In the event that both a member and that member's alternate are unable to attend...

  17. The US framework for understanding, preventing, and caring for the mental health needs of service members who served in combat in Afghanistan and Iraq: a brief review of the issues and the research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Andrew Castro

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the psychological health research conducted in the United States in support of combat veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan, using the Military Psychological Health Research Continuum, which includes foundational science, epidemiology, etiology, prevention and screening, treatment, follow-up care, and services research. The review is limited to those studies involving combat veterans and military families. This review discusses perplexing issues regarding the impact of combat on the mental health of service members such as risk and resilience factors of mental health, biomarkers of posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD, mental health training, psychological screening, psychological debriefing, third location decompression, combat and suicide, the usefulness of psychotherapy and drug therapy for treating PTSD, role of advanced technology, telemedicine and virtual reality, methods to reduce stigma and barriers to care, and best approaches to the dissemination of evidence-based interventions. The mental health research of special populations such as women, National Guardsmen and reservists, and military families is also presented. The review concludes by identifying future areas of research.

  18. Update: routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components, January 2008-June 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    This report contains an update through June 2013 on the results of screening for HIV infection among civilian applicants for military service and among members of the active and reserve components of the Armed Forces. Among civilian applicants, annual rates of prevalence of HIV infection showed a continuing downward trend. Rates among black, non-Hispanic applicants were higher than other racial/ethnic groups but have declined sharply since 2008. Among service members, annual rates have varied by service and component, with higher rates in the Army and Navy and lower rates in the Marine Corps and Air Force. Members of the Army and Air Force Reserves have had consistently higher rates than members of their respective active components. For both civilian applicants and service members, rates among men are notably higher than among women. The possible roles of unprotected sex and pre-deployment behaviors and the associated challenges to prevention of HIV infection are discussed.

  19. Deployment of a Grid-based Medical Imaging Application

    CERN Document Server

    Amendolia, S R; Frate, C; Gálvez, J; Hassan, W; Hauer, T; Manset, D; McClatchey, R; Odeh, M; Rogulin, D; Solomonides, T; Warren, R

    2005-01-01

    The MammoGrid project has deployed its Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA)-based Grid application in a real environment comprising actual participating hospitals. The resultant setup is currently being exploited to conduct rigorous in-house tests in the first phase before handing over the setup to the actual clinicians to get their feedback. This paper elaborates the deployment details and the experiences acquired during this phase of the project. Finally the strategy regarding migration to an upcoming middleware from EGEE project will be described. This paper concludes by highlighting some of the potential areas of future work.

  20. Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Mai, T.; Mowers, M.; Uriarte, C.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.; Martinez, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) is a deterministic optimization model of the deployment of electric power generation technologies and transmission infrastructure throughout the contiguous United States into the future. The model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, is designed to analyze the critical energy issues in the electric sector, especially with respect to potential energy policies, such as clean energy and renewable energy standards or carbon restrictions. ReEDS provides a detailed treatment of electricity-generating and electrical storage technologies and specifically addresses a variety of issues related to renewable energy technologies, including accessibility and cost of transmission, regional quality of renewable resources, seasonal and diurnal generation profiles, variability of wind and solar power, and the influence of variability on the reliability of the electrical grid. ReEDS addresses these issues through a highly discretized regional structure, explicit statistical treatment of the variability in wind and solar output over time, and consideration of ancillary services' requirements and costs.

  1. Do soldiers seek more mental health care after deployment? Analysis of mental health consultations in the Netherlands Armed Forces following deployment to Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth (Liesbeth M. Taal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Military deployment to combat zones puts military personnel to a number of physical and mental challenges that may adversely affect mental health. Until now, few studies have been performed in Europe on mental health utilization after military deployment. Objective: We compared the incidence of mental health consultations with the Military Mental Health Service (MMHS of military deployed to Afghanistan to that of non-deployed military personnel. Method: We assessed utilization of the MMHS by the full cohort of the Netherlands Armed Forces enlisted between 2008 and 2010 through linkage of mental health and human resource information systems. Results: The total population consisted of 50,508 military (18,233 deployed, 32,275 non-deployed, who accounted for 1,906 new consultations with the MMHS. The follow-up was limited to the first 2 years following deployment. We observed higher mental health care utilization in deployed vs. non-deployed military personnel; hazard ratio (HR, adjusted for sex, military branch and time in service, 1.84 [95% CI 1.61–2.11] in the first and 1.28 [1.09–1.49] in the second year after deployment. An increased risk of adjustment disorders (HR 2.59 [2.02–3.32] and 1.74 [1.30–2.32] and of anxiety disorders (2.22 [1.52–3.25] and 2.28 [1.50–3.45] including posttraumatic stress disorder (5.15 [2.55–10.40] and 5.28 [2.42–11.50], but not of mood disorders (1.33 [0.90–1.97] and 1.11 [0.68–1.82], was observed in deployed personnel in the first- and second-year post-deployment, respectively. Military personnel deployed in a unit with a higher risk of confrontation with potentially traumatic events had a higher HR (2.13 [1.84–2.47] and 1.40 [1.18–1.67]. Conclusions: Though absolute risk was low, in the first and second year following deployment to Afghanistan there was an 80 and 30% higher risk for mental health problems resulting in a consultation with the Dutch MMHS compared to military never

  2. OPENICRA: Towards A Generic Model for Automatic Deployment of Applications in the Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadhgadhi Ridha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the design and the implementation of a new generic model for automated deployment of applications in the cloud to mitigate the effects of barriers to entry, reduce the complexity of application development and simplify the process of deploying cloud services. Our proposed model, called OpenICRA, implements a layered architecture that hides the implementation details, allowing having a simple deployment process. We conducted two real case studies to validate our proposed model. Our empirical results demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed model to deploy different types of applications without any change in their source code.

  3. The cloud services innovation platform- enabling service-based environmental modelling using infrastructure-as-a-service cloud computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Service oriented architectures allow modelling engines to be hosted over the Internet abstracting physical hardware configuration and software deployments from model users. Many existing environmental models are deployed as desktop applications running on user's personal computers (PCs). Migration ...

  4. Identifying Concussion / Mild TBI in Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    more concussions o Median time between concussions equals 40 days o Based on reports from 2004-2008 in Iraq treated at Navy/Marine Corps facilities...Important because multiple concussions are often associated with slower recovery and increased risk of long-term sequelae Reference: *Wilk et...Injury Guidance 35 Screening Challenges for the Military  Concussions that occur in theater occur under unique circumstances: o In the context of

  5. Service Member Suicide and Readiness: An Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Government Printing Office, 2015), 1. 164 Libby Schweber, “Wartime Research and the Quantification of American Sociology ,” Revue d’Histoire des...the Quantification of American Sociology .” Revue d’Histoire des Sciences Humaines 1, no. 6 (2002): 65-94. Selby, Edward A., Michael D. Anestis

  6. Children of Military Service Members Resource Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    www.aap.org developed by military pediatricians and adolescent- medicine specialists, this animated film, hosted by mr. poe, is designed to provide...reported missing in action in vietnam. dove song K.L. Franklin Publisher: Prometheus Books Year: 2007 isbN: 978-1591025344 Pages: 56 this book...adolescent- medicine specialists, this film is designed for older children and adolescents to help them learn coping strategies for dealing with

  7. Physical Performance Assessment in Military Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    vital global outcomes such as quality of life , they typically lack suf- ficient resolution to fully describe disability, track gradual improve- ments...BM: Prevalence of back pain, its effect on functional ability and health-related quality of life in lower limb amputees secondary to trauma or tumour...form health survey, and the unified Parkinson disease rating scale in people with parkinsonism . Phys Ther 2008;88(6):733-746. Jason M. Wilken, PT, PhD, et al 2012, Vol 20, Supplement 1 S47

  8. Members of the Translation and Minutes Service

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    First row, from l. to r. : François Siohan, Blandine Gallone, Rosmarie Meyer and Odile Martin. Second row, from l. to r. : Jean-Paul Cazals, Bernie Meares, Lisa Morris, Martine Dubois, Brigitte Lorenz and John Pym.

  9. Lifecycle Readiness and Ship Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The physical fatigue associated with ship motions has significant consequences for today’s minimally manned ships. “Because of minimally sized...a deployment. The inefficiencies in performance may develop from lack of training, different personal aptitude, and individual’s mental or physical ...exacerbation of symptoms known as the avalanche phenomenon follows which includes: increased salivation, bodily warmth , and light- headedness” (Stevens

  10. An architecture based on SOA and virtual enterprise principles: OpenNebula for cloud deployment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mvelase, P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available by established legacy infrastructures, thus reducing the complexity of deploying cloud solutions. The author envisions a cloud-based system built on service oriented architecture (SOA) principles and virtual enterprise (VE) principles as a solution to enhancing...

  11. Hierarchical Orbital Observatory Deployable Shroud (HOODS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large deployable telescopes such as NASA's 9.2m and 16.8m segmented ATLAST systems require commensurately large deployable sunshades for thermal control and to...

  12. 物流服务供应链节点协同关系及生长演化机理分析%An Analysis of Interactions between Node Members and Co_evolution Mechanism of Logistics Service Supply Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢飞; 董千里

    2012-01-01

      为探寻物流服务供应链节点成员间协同运行与发展思路,分析了物流服务供应链协同界面及节点协同关系,借鉴种群生态学理论,构建节点协同生长模型,系统研究了物流服务供应链节点协同生长演化机理,分析结果表明物流服务供应链节点成员间的协同生长演化过程具有自组织性,成员间的协同关系不同,协同生长特性也不同。掌握协同生长演化特性,可以在实践中采取相应的措施去引导实现共存稳定协同。%  To explore the concept of collaborative operation in logistics service supply chain ,this paper investigates the interfaces and interactions between node members ,and analyzes co_evolu-tion mechanism of logistics service supply chain based on the theory of population ecology .The results show that the co_evolution process was self_organized ,and different interactions have dif-ferent characteristics .A command of these features can be helpful in adopting corresponding mea-sures to achieve a stable and harmonious collaboration .

  13. Security Support in Continuous Deployment Pipeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Faheem; Raft, Adam Johannes; Shahin, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Continuous Deployment (CD) has emerged as a new practice in the software industry to continuously and automatically deploy software changes into production. Continuous Deployment Pipeline (CDP) supports CD practice by transferring the changes from the repository to production. Since most of the C...

  14. Perceptions of deployment of Australian Army reservists by their employers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Geoffrey J; Kehoe, James

    2012-08-01

    The views and concerns of the employers of reservists sent on overseas deployments are largely unknown. A survey was conducted of 126 Australian employers who participated in Exercise Boss Lift sponsored by the Australian Defence Force, which involved a visit to their employees deployed on overseas service in the Solomon Islands and Malaysia during the period 2006-2010. Employers reported a substantial number of positive aspects of reservist deployment for both their enterprise and the individual reservist employee, including an increase in leadership, teamwork, skills, maturity, and confidence. There were 40% fewer reported negatives, which primarily concerned the costs associated with the absence of an important employee. The employers expressed needs for greater information regarding dates of absence of their reservist employee and assistance from the ADF to enable them to enhance the overall deployment. Importantly, employers sought confirmation of ways to effectively manage the transition of their reservist from military service back to their civilian roles. Some employers offered to act as advocates.

  15. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  16. 企业战略驱动的QoS属性相关Web 服务选择与部署方法%A Web Services Selection and Deployment Method Based on Enterprise Strategies and Related QoS Criteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于磊; 王智立; 戢勇; 孟洛明; 邱雪松

    2014-01-01

    Combination of business and Service Oriented Architetures (SOA) is getting more attention of enterprise decision makers. The combination employs information technology to improve the business performance of enterprises. SOA possesses the features of reusability and loose coupling, which makes business agile. However, when the managers face how to select and deploy Web services and such technical problems, enterprise,s strategic objectives are often ignored. To solve this problem, and also to consider the related service QoS criteria reflects the importance of the criteria more accurate, an improved analytic hierarchy process to balance technical and strategic decisions is proposed, which helps the enterprise managers to better use Web services to achieve enterprise strategic objectives.%将业务与面向服务的体系(SOA)结合受到企业决策者越来越高的重视,这种结合利用信息技术优势提高了企业的业务性能。SOA 具有可重用和松耦合的技术特点,可以很好地保证业务的敏捷性。然而,当面对如何选择和部署Web服务这样的技术问题时,企业的战略目标经常被忽略。为了解决该问题,同时考虑到服务QoS属性的相关性可以更准确地反映属性的重要程度,该文提出了一种改进的层次分析法来综合技术和战略方面的决策,帮助企业决策者更好地使用Web 服务实现企业战略目标。

  17. Research on testing software for rapid cloud deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanjin; Huang, Junfei; Ji, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Software testing is an important way to ensure the quality of software systems and services, but the ever-changing needs of software testing, in particular the size of the dynamic test requirements getting stronger. The traditional deployment way of testing software is complex and it is difficult to scale to meet the dynamic test requirements. With the rapid development of cloud computing technology, traditional testing software after modified can run in the cloud as well. This paper proposed building a cloud service platform based on cloud service provider, which combines several of cloud service to adapt to software testing. With this cloud service platform, software developer can run their testing software in the cloud quickly and test scale can stretch dynamically. Furthermore, it is possible to reduce the cost of testing because of the pay-for-use cloud computing.

  18. Treatment of Mental or Physical Health Problems in a Combat Zone: Comparisons of Postdeployment Mental Health and Early Separation From Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Terry L; Schmied, Emily A; Larson, Gerald E; Galarneau, Michael R; Hammer, Paul S; Quinn, Kimberly H; Schmitz, Kimberly J; Webb-Murphy, Jennifer A; Boucher, Wayne C; Edwards, Nathan K; Ly, Hoa L

    2016-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate whether being treated for mental health or nonbattle physical injury during military combat deployment was associated with higher risk for postdeployment mental disorders and poorer career outcomes than seen in the general combat-deployed population. Service members treated in theater for mental health (n = 964) or noncombat injury (n = 853) were compared with randomly sampled personnel (n = 7,220) from the general deployed population on diagnosed mental disorders and early separation from service. Deployment, medical, and career information were obtained from Department of Defense archival databases. Over half of the personnel who received mental health treatment while deployed were diagnosed with 1 or more mental disorders postdeployment and/or were separated from service before completing their full-term enlistment. This was significantly higher than expected compared to the general deployed group, adjusting for demographic/military characteristics and mental health history (adjusted odds ratios [ORs] ranging 1.62 to 2.96). Frequencies of problems also were higher in the mental health-treated group than in the group treated for nonbattle physical injuries (significant adjusted ORs ranging 1.65 to 2.58). The documented higher risks for postdeployment adjustment problems suggested that especially those treated in theater by mental health providers might benefit from postdeployment risk-reduction programs.

  19. The impact of culture clash on deployed troops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Talya; Buckman, Joshua; Dandeker, Christopher; Greenberg, Neil

    2010-12-01

    Culture plays a crucial role in the military, helping the armed forces achieve their goals. However, cultural issues can negatively affect personnel's well-being and effectiveness, especially when there is a "clash" between military and other cultures. The literature suggests there should be more training and education on individual service cultures, as well as other countries' military cultures to improve cooperation and coordination during joint operations and working in multinational forces. A greater knowledge of local cultures may help avoid offending noncombatants. When deployment ends, service personnel need more support when they transition back to civilian culture.

  20. Pre-deployment Year Mental Health Diagnoses and Treatment in Deployed Army Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Nikki R; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Mohr, Beth A; Jeffery, Diana D; Funk, Wendy; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

    2016-07-01

    We estimated the prevalence of select mental health diagnoses (MHDX) and mental health treatment (MHT), and identified characteristics associated with MHT during the pre-deployment year (365 days before deployment) in active duty Army women (N = 14,633) who returned from Iraq or Afghanistan deployments in FY2010. Pre-deployment year prevalence estimates were: 26.2 % for any select MHDX and 18.1 % for any MHT. Army women who had physical injuries since FY2002 or any behavioral health treatment between FY2002 and the pre-deployment year had increased odds of pre-deployment year MHT. During the pre-deployment year, a substantial percentage of Army women had MHDX and at least one MHT encounter or stay. Future research should determine if pre-deployment MHDX among Army women reflect vulnerability to future MHDX, or if pre-deployment MHT results in protection from chronic symptoms.

  1. SMA applications in an innovative multishot deployment mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, D.; Pedrazzoli, G.; Secci, G.; Portelli, C.

    1991-01-01

    An innovative Deployment and Retraction hinge Mechanism (DARM) in the frame of a technological program is examined. The mechanism includes two restraint/release devices, which enable it to be stable in its stowed or deployed position while sustaining all associated loads, and to carry its payload by remote command. The main characteristics of the DARM are as follows: deployment and retraction movements are spring actuated; the available amount of functional sequences is almost unlimited; and no use of electrical motors is made. These features were accomplished by: the application of a special kinematic scheme to the mechanical connection between the spring motor and the swivel head arm; and the use of shape memory alloys (SMA) actuators for both release and spring recharge functions. DARM is thus a mechanism which can find many applications in the general space scenario of in-orbit maintenance and servicing. In such a frame, the DARM typical concept, which has a design close to very simple one-shot deployment mechanisms, has a good chance to replace existing analog machines. Potential items that could be moved by DARM are: booms for satellite instruments; antenna reflector tips; entire antenna reflectors; and solar panels.

  2. 76 FR 11491 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  3. Market and policy barriers to energy storage deployment :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Currier, Aileen B.; Hernandez, Jacquelynne; Ma, Ookie; Kirby, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    Electric energy storage technologies have recently been in the spotlight, discussed as essential grid assets that can provide services to increase the reliability and resiliency of the grid, including furthering the integration of variable renewable energy resources. Though they can provide numerous grid services, there are a number of factors that restrict their current deployment. The most significant barrier to deployment is high capital costs, though several recent deployments indicate that capital costs are decreasing and energy storage may be the preferred economic alternative in certain situations. However, a number of other market and regulatory barriers persist, limiting further deployment. These barriers can be categorized into regulatory barriers, market (economic) barriers, utility and developer business model barriers, crosscutting barriers and technology barriers. This report, through interviews with stakeholders and review of regulatory filings in four regions roughly representative of the United States, identifies the key barriers restricting further energy storage development in the country. The report also includes a discussion of possible solutions to address these barriers and a review of initiatives around the country at the federal, regional and state levels that are addressing some of these issues. Energy storage could have a key role to play in the future grid, but market and regulatory issues have to be addressed to allow storage resources open market access and compensation for the services they are capable of providing. Progress has been made in this effort, but much remains to be done and will require continued engagement from regulators, policy makers, market operators, utilities, developers and manufacturers.

  4. Phoenix Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative Evaluation Report

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, C; Marks, J.; Jenq, J.; Cluett, Chris; DeBlasio, Allan; Lappin, Jane; Rakha, Hesham A.; Wunderlich, K

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the evaluation results of the Phoenix, Arizona Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative (MMDI). The MMDI was a three-year program of the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Joint Program Office of the U.S. Department of Transportation. It focused on aggressive deployment of ITS at four sites across the United States, including the metropolitan areas of San Antonio, Seattle, NY/NJ/Connecticut as well as Phoenix. The focus of the deployments was on integration of exist...

  5. Rigidizing Inflatable Deployable Dwelling (RIDD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — By combining thin thermoplastic films, woven Vectran reinforcements, and heat a reliable, deployable, rigidizing space habitat can be created. Although much research...

  6. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protection system (TPS) panels to...

  7. Low Mass Aeroshell Deployment Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) will develop new shape memory polymer (SMP) deployment mechanisms for actuating thermal protective systems (TPS) panels to...

  8. Self-Deploying Gossamer Support Structure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I results demonstrated the feasibility of using shape memory polymer composites to deploy, tension and support gossamer antennas. Cornerstone Research Group,...

  9. Platforms for Building and Deploying Applications for Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is rapidly emerging as a new paradigm for delivering IT services as utlity-oriented services on subscription-basis. The rapid development of applications and their deployment in Cloud computing environments in efficient manner is a complex task. In this article, we give a brief introduction to Cloud computing technology and Platform as a Service, we examine the offerings in this category, and provide the basis for helping readers to understand basic application platform opportunities in Cloud by technologies such as Microsoft Azure, Sales Force, Google App, and Aneka for Cloud computing. We demonstrate that Manjrasoft Aneka is a Cloud Application Platform (CAP) leveraging these concepts and allowing an easy development of Cloud ready applications on a Private/Public/Hybrid Cloud. Aneka CAP offers facilities for quickly developing Cloud applications and a modular platform where additional services can be easily integrated to extend the system capabilities, thus being at pace with the rapidly ev...

  10. 'A band of brothers'-an exploration of the range of medical ethical issues faced by British senior military clinicians on deployment to Afghanistan: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernthal, Elizabeth M; Draper, H J A; Henning, J; Kelly, J C

    2017-06-01

    To identify and explore features of ethical issues that senior clinicians faced as deployed medical directors (DMDs) to the British Field Hospital in Afghanistan as well as to determine the ethical training requirements for future deployments. A qualitative study in two phases conducted from November 2014 to June 2015. Phase 1 analysed 60 vignettes of cases that had generated ethical dilemmas for DMDs. Phase 2 included focus groups and an interview with 13 DMDs. Phase 1 identified working with limited resources, dual conflict of meeting both clinical and military obligations and consent of children as the most prevalent ethical challenges. Themes found in Phase 2 included sharing clinical responsibilities with clinicians from other countries and not knowing team members' ways of working, in addition to the themes from Phase 1. This study has drawn together examples of scenarios to form a repository that will aid future training. Recommendations included undertaking ethics training together as a team before, during and after deployment which must include all nationalities who are assigned to the same operational tour, so that different ethical views can be explored beforehand. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Scalable and fail-safe deployment of the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system Rucio

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Beermann, Thomas Alfons; Serfon, Cedric; Garonne, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This contribution details the deployment of Rucio, the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system. The main complication is that Rucio interacts with a wide variety of external services, and connects globally distributed data centres under different technological and administrative control, at an unprecedented data volume. It is therefore not possibly to create a duplicate instance of Rucio for testing or integration. Every software upgrade or configuration change is thus potentially disruptive and requires fail-safe software and automatic error recovery. Rucio uses a three-layer scaling and mitigation strategy based on quasi-realtime monitoring. This strategy mainly employs independent stateless services, automatic failover, and service migration. The technologies used for deployment and mitigation include OpenStack, Puppet, Graphite, HAProxy, Apache, and nginx. In this contribution, the reasons and design decisions for the deployment, the actual implementation, and an evaluation of all involved services and c...

  12. 75 FR 54445 - Senior Executive Service; Financial Management Service Performance Review Board (PRB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... Fiscal Service Senior Executive Service; Financial Management Service Performance Review Board (PRB) AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces the appointment of members to the Financial Management Service (FMS) Performance Review Board...

  13. Investigating Veterans' Pre-, Peri-, and Post-Deployment Experiences as Potential Risk Factors for Problem Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Seth W; Potenza, Marc N; Park, Crystal L; McKee, Sherry A; Mazure, Carolyn M; Hoff, Rani A

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Gambling disorder and its comorbid diagnoses are observed at higher rates in military veterans than in the general population. A significant research gap exists regarding the relationships of veterans' life and service experiences to problematic gambling. The present study explored pre-, peri-, and post-deployment factors associated with problem gambling in veterans. Methods Veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn (n = 738; 463 males, and 275 females) completed questionnaires via structured telephone interview. We conducted bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses exploring associations among problem-gambling severity and socio-demographic variables, psychiatric comorbidities, and 10 scales of the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory measuring experiences pre-, peri-, and post-deployment. Results Approximately 4.2% of veterans indicated at-risk or probable pathological gambling (ARPG) post-deployment (two or more DSM-IV criteria for pathological gambling). Bivariate analyses found more severe gambling in males, higher frequencies of post-traumatic stress disorder, substance dependence, traumatic brain injury, panic disorder, and depression in veterans with ARPG, and higher general harassment during deployment, and lower social support and more stressful life events post-deployment in those with ARPG. In multivariable models, both post-deployment factors remained significantly associated with ARPG. Discussion The study suggests that problem gambling among veterans is related to service experiences, and particularly to life experiences post-deployment. Conclusions Adverse service and life experiences and lack of social support may contribute to the risk of problem gambling in military veterans. Investigation of how Veterans Affairs clinical settings may serve veterans following deployment to prevent behavioral addictions is warranted.

  14. Pre-Deployment Stress, Mental Health, and Help-Seeking Behaviors Among Marines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    about service members’ pre-deployment trauma history and mental health burden, two studies found that violence exposure prior to combat is a...Extenders—selected physicians, dental officers, nurses , other medical service providers, chaplains, religious program specialists, and senior corpsmen...Exposure in Veterans with Military-Related Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Association with Current Sympatomatology,” Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

  15. Concurrent engineering: effective deployment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unny Menon

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive insight into current trends and developments in Concurrent Engineering for integrated development of products and processes with the goal of completing the entire cycle in a shorter time, at lower overall cost and with fewer engineering design changes after product release. The evolution and definition of Concurrent Engineering are addressed first, followed by a concise review of the following elements of the concurrent engineering approach to product development: Concept Development: The Front-End Process, identifying Customer Needs and Quality Function Deployment, Establishing Product Specifications, Concept Selection, Product Architecture, Design for Manufacturing, Effective Rapid Prototyping, and The Economics of Product Development. An outline of a computer-based tutorial developed by the authors and other graduate students funded by NASA ( accessible via the world-wide-web . is provided in this paper. A brief discussion of teamwork for successful concurrent engineering is included, t'ase histories of concurrent engineering implementation at North American and European companies are outlined with references to textbooks authored by Professor Menon and other writers. A comprehensive bibliography on concurrent engineering is included in the paper.

  16. Deploying drones in policing European borders : constraints and challenges for data protection and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin, Luisa; Krajcíková, K.; Zavrsnik, A.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter explores the challenges underlying the policy choice of deploying dronetechnology in the area of border surveillance, with specific reference to the surveillance of European Union (EU) Member States’ external southern borders. Border surveillance is one of the top priorities of the

  17. Deploying drones in policing European borders : constraints and challenges for data protection and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin, Luisa; Krajcíková, K.; Zavrsnik, A.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter explores the challenges underlying the policy choice of deploying dronetechnology in the area of border surveillance, with specific reference to the surveillance of European Union (EU) Member States’ external southern borders. Border surveillance is one of the top priorities of the Membe

  18. Deploying drones in policing European borders: constraints and challenges for data protection and human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin, L.; Krajcíková, K.; Zavrsnik, A.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter explores the challenges underlying the policy choice of deploying dronetechnology in the area of border surveillance, with specific reference to the surveillance of European Union (EU) Member States’ external southern borders. Border surveillance is one of the top priorities of the Membe

  19. LTE Micro-cell Deployment for High-Density Railway Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sniady, Aleksander; Kassab, Mohamed; Soler, José

    2014-01-01

    Long Term Evolution (LTE) is a serious candidate for the future releases of the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS). LTE offers more capacity and supports new communication-based applications and services for railways. Nevertheless, even with this technology, the classical macro......-cell radio deployments reach overload, especially in high-density areas, such as major train stations. In this paper, an LTE micro-cell deployment is investigated in high-density railway areas. Copenhagen Main Station is considered as a realistic deployment study case, with a set of relevant railway...

  20. Measuring and Retaining the U.S. Army’s Deployment Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    the Regu- lar Army do not affi liate with either the ARNGUS or USAR. Th e extent of this decline will depend on how reductions are applied across...if the Army believes that deployment experience is valuable, it could take measures to increase the ARNGUS or USAR affi liations of soldiers with...deployment-related experience who are leaving the Regular Army, thereby slowing that loss. Th e number of prior-service personnel who affi liate

  1. Executable Modeling of Deployment Decisions for Resource-Aware Distributed Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Tapia Tarifa, Silvia Lizeth

    2014-01-01

    The increasing popularity of virtualized services and cloud computing, offering elastic and scalable computing resources challenges software engineering methods by asking a number of new questions: How can we integrate deployment-specific information in the overall design of software applications? How can we express and compare deployment decisions in the design phase, so that performance diagnosis can happen early in the software development cycle? How do we design scalable applicatio...

  2. Technoeconomical Analysis of Macrocell and Femtocell Based HetNet under Different Deployment Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Fahad Yunas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultradense deployment of small cells is being considered as one of the key flavors of the emerging 5G cellular networks to address the future data capacity challenges. A large share of these deployments will be indoor, as this is the arena where the majority of the data traffic is believed to originate from in the future. Indoor small cell solutions (e.g., femtocell or WiFi are well positioned for delivering superior indoor coverage and capacity. However, due to relatively smaller coverage footprint compared to traditional macrocells, a very dense deployment of small cells will be needed in order to have a ubiquitous indoor coverage. Such dense deployment triggers cost and energy efficiency concerns for mobile operators. In this paper, we analyze and compare the technoeconomic performance of two deployment strategies: homogeneous macrocellular densification and heterogeneous macro-femto deployment strategy, from an indoor service provisioning perspective. Particularly, we analyze and contrast the performance of macro-femto based deployment, with varying femtocell market penetration rate and under different femtocell backhaul connectivity constraints, with that of homogeneous macrocellular densification. The results indicate superior performance of indoor femtocell based deployment as compared to macrocellular-only densification, due to better indoor coverage, radio channel conditions, and high degree of spatial reuse.

  3. The effect of military deployment on mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Stéphanie; Weatherall, Cecilie Dohlmann; W. Jepsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    on specific diagnoses such as PTSD. Another challenge is that the differences between soldiers and non-soldiers are not necessarily causal, instead possibly reflecting an underlying propensity towards active military service. Using the objective measures of hospitalizations and the purchase of mental health...... medication, this paper is the first to investigate the effect of recent military deployments on a broader measure of mental health, for a full population of Danish soldiers and a comparison group of eligible men. We exploit a panel of Danish health administrative records and use propensity score matching...... for time trends and other omitted variables affecting both groups. Overall, we find a significant and long-lasting adverse effect of military deployment on soldiers’ mental health, regardless of the comparison groups and underlying assumptions....

  4. Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks in Crop Storages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jakob Pilegaard; Green, Ole; Jacobsen, Rune Hylsberg

    2015-01-01

    of a wireless sensor network based system that provides continuous, automatic, and up-to-date information on a crop storage, while presenting the data in an easily accessible manner, is also described. The design decisions, challenges, and practical experiences from real-world large scale deployment...... ensure a good overview of the entire storage. This paper describes the challenges of providing a good network coverage, sufficient network lifetime, a physical design able to cope with the harsh environments met in deployments, and cost. How these challenges were approached in the development...... of the system are also discussed. It is concluded that the network works well for the intended application and that the intended users also see a value in the provided service....

  5. The purely functional software deployment model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolstra, E.

    2006-01-01

    Software deployment is the set of activities related to getting software components to work on the machines of end users. It includes activities such as installation, upgrading, uninstallation, and so on. Many tools have been developed to support deployment, but they all have serious limitations wi

  6. Experimental thermal mechanics of deployable boom structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predmore, R.

    1972-01-01

    An apparatus was developed for thermal distortion measurements on deployable boom structures. The calibration procedure and thermal static bending plus twist measurements are considered. The thermal mechanics test facility is described. A table is presented for several examples of spacecraft applications of thermal static distortion measurements on 3-m deployable booms.

  7. Seismic SMHD -- Rotational Sensor Development and Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laughlin, Darren [Applied Technology Associates; Pierson, Bob [Applied Technology Associates; Brune, Bob [Consultant

    2016-06-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Applied Technology Associates (ATA) are funding development and deployment of a new generation of rotational sensors for validation of rotational seismic applications. The sensors employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles with broadband response, high dynamic range, low noise floor, proven ruggedness, and high repeatability. This paper presents current status of sensor development and deployment opportunities.

  8. Users speak out on technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Mark; Prochaska, Marty; Cromer, Paul; Zewatsky, Jennifer

    2001-02-25

    This report summarizes user feedback data collected during a recent Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project: the Fluor Fernald ASTD Technology Deployment Project from May, 1999 through September, 2000. The main goal of the ASTD project was to use the ''Fernald approach'' to expedite the deployment of new or innovative technologies with superior safety, cost, and/or productivity benefits to Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Fernald approach targets technology end-users and their managers and directly involves them with hands-on demonstrations of new or innovative technologies during technology transfer sessions. The two technologies deployed through this project were the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS) and the oxy-gasoline torch. Participants of technology transfer sessions were requested to complete feedback surveys. Surveys evaluated the effectiveness of the Fernald approach to technology deployment and assessed the responsiveness of employees to new technologies. This report presents the results of those surveys.

  9. A Survey of IPv6 Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal M. Alhassoun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The next-generation Internet protocol (IPv6 was designed to overcome the limitation in IPv4 by using a 128-bit address instead of a 32-bit address. In addition to solving the address the limitations, IPv6 has many improved features. This research focused to survey IPv6 deployment all around the world. The objectives of this survey paper are to highlight the issues related to the IPv6 deployment and to look into the IPv4 to IPv6 transition mechanisms. Furthermore, provide insight on the global effort around the world to contribute in IPv6 deployment. In addition, identify the potential solutions or suggestions that could improve the IPv6 deployment rate. In order to achieve the said objectives we survey number of papers on IPv6 deployment from different countries and continents.

  10. Renewable Energy: Policy Considerations for Deploying Renewables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This information paper accompanies the IEA publication Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice (IEA, 2011a). It provides more detailed data and analysis on policies for Deploying Renewables, and is intended to complement the main publication. It provides an account of the strategic drivers underpinning renewable energy (RE) technology deployment (energy security, economic development and environment protection) and assesses RE technologies with respect to these drivers, including an estimate of GHG emissions reductions due to RE technologies. The paper also explores the different barriers to deploying renewables at a given stage of market maturity and discusses what tools policy makers can avail of to succeed in removing deployment barriers. An additional topical highlight explores the challenges associated with accelerating the diffusion of RE technologies in developing countries.

  11. Multi-purpose deployer for ITER in-vessel maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: Chang-Hwan.CHOI@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France); Tesini, Alessandro; Subramanian, Rajendran [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France); Rolfe, Alan; Mills, Simon; Scott, Robin; Froud, Tim; Haist, Bernhard; McCarron, Eddie [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ITER RH system called as the multi-purpose deployer (MPD) is introduced. • The MPD performs dust and tritium inventory control, in-service inspection. • The MPD performs leak localization, in-vessel diagnostics maintenance. • The MPD has nine degrees of freedom with a payload capacity up to 2 tons. - Abstract: The multi-purpose deployer (MPD) is a general purpose in-vessel remote handling (RH) system in the ITER RH system. The MPD provides the means for deployment and handling of in-vessel tools or components inside the vacuum vessel (VV) for dust and tritium inventory control, in-service inspection, leak localization, and in-vessel diagnostics. It also supports the operation of blanket first wall maintenance and neutral beam duct liner module maintenance operations. This paper describes the concept design of the MPD. The MPD is a cask based system, i.e. it stays in the hot cell building during the machine operation, and is deployed to the VV using the cask system for the in-vessel operations. The main part of the MPD is the articulated transporter which provides transportation and positioning of the in-vessel tools or components. The articulated transporter has nine degrees of freedom with a payload capacity up to 2 tons. The articulated transporter can cover the whole internal surface of the VV by switching between the four equatorial RH ports. Additionally it can use two non-RH equatorial ports to transfer large tools or components. A concept for in-cask tool exchange is developed which minimizes the cask transportation by allowing the MPD to stay in the VV during the tool exchange.

  12. Scientific Cluster Deployment and Recovery - Using puppet to simplify cluster management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Val; Benjamin, Doug; Yao, Yushu

    2012-12-01

    Deployment, maintenance and recovery of a scientific cluster, which has complex, specialized services, can be a time consuming task requiring the assistance of Linux system administrators, network engineers as well as domain experts. Universities and small institutions that have a part-time FTE with limited time for and knowledge of the administration of such clusters can be strained by such maintenance tasks. This current work is the result of an effort to maintain a data analysis cluster (DAC) with minimal effort by a local system administrator. The realized benefit is the scientist, who is the local system administrator, is able to focus on the data analysis instead of the intricacies of managing a cluster. Our work provides a cluster deployment and recovery process (CDRP) based on the puppet configuration engine allowing a part-time FTE to easily deploy and recover entire clusters with minimal effort. Puppet is a configuration management system (CMS) used widely in computing centers for the automatic management of resources. Domain experts use Puppet's declarative language to define reusable modules for service configuration and deployment. Our CDRP has three actors: domain experts, a cluster designer and a cluster manager. The domain experts first write the puppet modules for the cluster services. A cluster designer would then define a cluster. This includes the creation of cluster roles, mapping the services to those roles and determining the relationships between the services. Finally, a cluster manager would acquire the resources (machines, networking), enter the cluster input parameters (hostnames, IP addresses) and automatically generate deployment scripts used by puppet to configure it to act as a designated role. In the event of a machine failure, the originally generated deployment scripts along with puppet can be used to easily reconfigure a new machine. The cluster definition produced in our CDRP is an integral part of automating cluster deployment

  13. 7 CFR 924.27 - Alternate members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... such other duties as assigned. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of... qualified. In the event both a member of the committee and his alternate are unable to attend a...

  14. O método desdobramento da função qualidade - QFD - no planejamento do serviço de enfermagem O método desdoblamiento de la función calidad - QFD - en la planeación del servicio de enfermería Quality function deployment method - QFD - in the planning of nursing service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Misue Matsuda

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available "Foco no Cliente" postura a ser adotada na obtenção de produtos de qualidade. Alicerçada na abordagem da Gestão pela Qualidade Total, o Desdobramento da Função Qualidade é a ferramenta que operacionaliza essa perspectiva. Este estudo objetivou criar uma proposta de planejamento para o Serviço de Enfermagem, seguindo as etapas e ações desta metodologia, que iniciou com o levantamento das necessidades de 106 clientes hospitalizados. Através de matrizes e diagramas, os dados foram desdobrados e priorizados perfazendo as dezessete etapas propostas. O resultado mostrou que no atendimento de enfermagem, o cliente valoriza a interação à técnica e que este método possibilita implementar a qualidade."El cliente es lo primero" posición a ser adoptada en la obtención de productos de calidad. Estructurada en el abordaje de la Gestión por la Calidad Total, el Desdoblamiento de la Función Calidad, es la herramienta que operacionaliza esa perspectiva. Este estudio tuvo como objetivo crear una propuesta de planeación para el servicio de enfermería siguiendo etapas y acciones de esta metodología, que comenzó con el levantamiento de las necesidades de 106 clientes hospitalizados. A través de matrices y diagramas, los datos fueron organizados y priorizados siguiendo las 17 etapas propuestas. El resultado mostró que en la atención de enfermería, el cliente valoriza la interacción mas que la técnica y que este método posibilita la implementación de la calidad."Focus on the client" is the posture that must be adopted in order to offer quality products. Based on the Total Quality Management approach, the Quality Function Deployment method (QFD is a tool to achieve this goal. The purpose of this study is to create a proposal for planning the nursing services following the steps and actions of this methodology. The basic procedure was to survey the necessity of 106 hospitalized patients. Data were deployed using the seventeen steps

  15. The production deployment of IPv6 on WLCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, J.; Campana, S.; Chadwick, K.; Chudoba, J.; Dewhurst, A.; Eliáš, M.; Fayer, S.; Finnern, T.; Grigoras, C.; Hartmann, T.; Hoeft, B.; Idiculla, T.; Kelsey, D. P.; López Muñoz, F.; Macmahon, E.; Martelli, E.; Millar, A. P.; Nandakumar, R.; Ohrenberg, K.; Prelz, F.; Rand, D.; Sciabà, A.; Tigerstedt, U.; Voicu, R.; Walker, C. J.; Wildish, T.

    2015-12-01

    The world is rapidly running out of IPv4 addresses; the number of IPv6 end systems connected to the internet is increasing; WLCG and the LHC experiments may soon have access to worker nodes and/or virtual machines (VMs) possessing only an IPv6 routable address. The HEPiX IPv6 Working Group has been investigating, testing and planning for dual-stack services on WLCG for several years. Following feedback from our working group, many of the storage technologies in use on WLCG have recently been made IPv6-capable. This paper presents the IPv6 requirements, tests and plans of the LHC experiments together with the tests performed on the group's IPv6 test-bed. This is primarily aimed at IPv6-only worker nodes or VMs accessing several different implementations of a global dual-stack federated storage service. Finally the plans for deployment of production dual-stack WLCG services are presented.

  16. CLOUD COMPUTING AND INTERNET OF THINGS FOR SMART CITY DEPLOYMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEORGE SUCIU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud Computing represents the new method of delivering hardware and software resources to the users, Internet of Things (IoT is currently one of the most popular ICT paradigms. Both concepts can have a major impact on how we build smart or/and smarter cities. Cloud computing represents the delivery of hardware and software resources on-demand over the Internet as a Service. At the same time, the IoT concept envisions a new generation of devices (sensors, both virtual and physical that are connected to the Internet and provide different services for value-added applications. In this paper we present our view on how to deploy Cloud computing and IoT for smart or/and smarter cities. We demonstrate that data gathered from heterogeneous and distributed IoT devices can be automatically managed, handled and reused with decentralized cloud services.

  17. Team Member Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    minutes a "facilitator" obtains one idea from each member in turn and writes that idea on a flip chart . No discussion takes place during this step. 4...Step three is repeated until all ideas are listed on the flip chart . 5. Each idea is discussed. Participants seek clarification and express support

  18. Numerical simulation of deepwater deployment for offshore structures with deploying cables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡小舟; 刘少军

    2015-01-01

    Deepwater deployment of offshore structures in different sea states was investigated. The whole deployment system was modeled as a lumped mass model, and discretization scheme for cable geometry and methodology for calculating the internal and external force acting on deploying cable were presented. The deployment model suitable for the time-varying length of deploying cable was specified. The free-surface flow fields together with the ship motions were used to calculate dynamic tension in the deploying cable during deployment of the structure. The deployment of deep sea mining system which was a typical subsea working system was employed. Based on lumped mass analysis model and parameters of deep sea mining system, numerical simulations were performed, and dynamic load and dynamic amplification factor (DAF) with different cable parameters, deploying velocities and sea states were obtained. It is shown that cable parameters and amplitudes of ocean waves can significantly influence the dynamic load and DAF, and the time-varying natural period of deploying system is a dominant factor, while the effect of deploying velocity is not obvious.

  19. Rapid Deployment of a RESTful Service for Oceanographic Research Cruises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Linyun; Arko, Robert; Leadbetter, Adam

    2014-05-01

    The Ocean Data Interoperability Platform (ODIP) seeks to increase data sharing across scientific domains and international boundaries, by providing a forum to harmonize diverse regional data systems. ODIP participants from the US include the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program, whose mission is to capture, catalog, and describe the underway/environmental sensor data from US oceanographic research vessels and submit the data to public long-term archives. R2R publishes information online as Linked Open Data, making it widely available using Semantic Web standards. Each vessel, sensor, cruise, dataset, person, organization, funding award, log, report, etc, has a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI). Complex queries that federate results from other data providers are supported, using the SPARQL query language. To facilitate interoperability, R2R uses controlled vocabularies developed collaboratively by the science community (eg. SeaDataNet device categories) and published online by the NERC Vocabulary Server (NVS). In response to user feedback, we are developing a standard programming interface (API) and Web portal for R2R's Linked Open Data. The API provides a set of simple REST-type URLs that are translated on-the-fly into SPARQL queries, and supports common output formats (eg. JSON). We will demonstrate an implementation based on the Epimorphics Linked Data API (ELDA) open-source Java package. Our experience shows that constructing a simple portal with limited schema elements in this way can significantly reduce development time and maintenance complexity.

  20. Performance Optimization of Deployed Software-as-a-Service Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, C.-P.; Zaidman, A.

    2013-01-01

    Preprint submitted to Elsevier. The goal of performance maintenance is to improve the performance of a software system after delivery. As the performance of a system is often characterized by unexpected combinations of metric values, manual analysis of performance is hard in complex systems. In thi