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Sample records for depleted uranium lead

  1. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects; Uranium, uranium appauvri, effets biologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  2. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney A. Katz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U, and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles. Such weapons were used by the military in the Persian Gulf, the Balkans and elsewhere. The testing of depleted uranium weapons and their use in combat has resulted in environmental contamination and human exposure. Although the chemical and the toxicological behaviors of depleted uranium are essentially the same as those of natural uranium, the respective chemical forms and isotopic compositions in which they usually occur are different. The chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium can injure biological systems. Normal functioning of the kidney, liver, lung, and heart can be adversely affected by depleted uranium intoxication. The focus of this review is on the chemical and toxicological properties of depleted and natural uranium and some of the possible consequences from long term, low dose exposure to depleted uranium in the environment.

  3. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

  4. Depleted uranium: Metabolic disruptor?; Uranium appauvri: perturbateur metabolique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souidi, Maamar; Dublineau, Isabelle; Lestaevel, Philippe [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN, Direction de la radioprotection de l' homme, Laboratoire de radiotoxicologie experimentale, Service de radiobiologie et d' epidemiologie, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    The presence of uranium in the environment can lead to long-term contamination of the food chain and of water intended for human consumption and thus raises many questions about the scientific and societal consequences of this exposure on population health. Although the biological effects of chronic low-level exposure are poorly understood, results of various recent studies show that contamination by depleted uranium (DU) induces subtle but significant biological effects at the molecular level in organs including the brain, liver, kidneys and testicles. For the first time, it has been demonstrated that DU induces effects on several metabolic pathways, including those metabolizing vitamin D, cholesterol, steroid hormones, acetylcholine and xenobiotics. This evidence strongly suggests that DU might well interfere with many metabolic pathways. It might thus contribute, together with other man-made substances in the environment, to increased health risks in some regions. (authors)

  5. Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Bao-Guo; Gu, Ji-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical, reactor core melting and nuclear fuel leaking accidents have troubled fission reactors for decades, and greatly limit their extensive applications. Now these troubles are still open. Here we first show a possible perfect reactor, Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor which is no above accident trouble. We found this reactor could be realized in practical applications in terms of all of the scientific principle, principle of operation, technology, and engineering. Our results demonstrate how these reactors can possess and realize extraordinary excellent characteristics, no prompt critical, long-term safe and stable operation with negative feedback, closed uranium-plutonium cycle chain within the vessel, normal operation only with depleted-uranium, and depleted-uranium high burnup in reality, to realize with fission nuclear energy sufficiently satisfying humanity long-term energy resource needs, as well as thoroughly solve the challenges of nuclear criticality safety, uranium resource insuffic...

  6. Carcinogenesis of Depleted Uranium Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-02-01

    P. W. Morrow, B. J. Panner and R. B. Baggs (eds.): Nephrotoxicity of Uranyl Fluoride and Reversibility of Renal Injury in the Rat. NUREG /CR-4951...Accidental Exposure to Uranium Hexafluoride. NUREG /CR-5566, PNL-7328, Prepared for U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC, 1990. Foulkes, E. C...Hydrolysis Products of Uranium Hexafluoride, NUREG /CR-2268, RH, Prepared for Division of Health Siting and Waste Management, Washington, DC, 1982. 20 Nothdurft

  7. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  8. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  9. Ecological and corrosion behavior of depleted uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Mirjana D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution with radionuclides, particularly uranium and its decay products is a serious global problem. The current scientific studies estimated that the contamination originating from TENORM, caused by nuclear and non-nuclear technologies, has significantly increased natural level of radioactivity in the last thirty years. During the last decades all the more were talking about the "new pollutant" - depleted uranium (DU, which has been used in anti-tank penetrators because of its high density, penetration and pyrophoric properties. It is estimated that during the Gulf War, the war in Bosnia and Yugoslavia and during the invasion of Iraq, 1.4 million missiles with depleted uranium was fired. During the NATO aggression against the ex Yugoslavia in 1999., 112 locations in Kosovo and Metohija, 12 locations in southern Serbia and two locations in Montenegro were bombed. On this occasion, approximately 10 tons of depleted uranium were entered into the environment, mainly on land, where the degree of contamination ranged from 200 Bq / kg to 235 000 Bq/kg, which is up to 1000 times higher than the natural level. Fourteen years ago there was very little information about the behavior of ecological systems damaged by DU penetrators fired. Today, unfortunately, we are increasingly faced with the ―invisible threat" of depleted uranium, which has a strong radioactive and hemotoxic impact on human health. Present paper provides a detailed overview of the current understanding of corrosion and corrosion behavior of DU and environmental factors that control corrosion, together with indicators of environmental impact in order to highlight areas that need further attention in developing remediation programs.

  10. Depleted Uranium Penetrators : Hazards and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Rao

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The depleted uranium (DU alloy is a state-of-the-art material for kinetic energy penetrators due to its superior ballistic performance. Several countries use DU penetrators in their main battle tanks. There is no gamma radiation hazard to the crew members from stowage of DO rounds. Open air firing can result in environmental contamination and associated hazards due to airborne particles containing essentially U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ and UO/sub 2/. Inhalation of polluted air only through respirators or nose masks and refraining form ingestion of water or food materials from contaminated environment are safety measures for avoiding exposure to uranium and its toxicity. Infusion of sodium bicarbonate helps in urinary excretion of uranium that may have entered the body.

  11. Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

    2000-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

  12. A modern depleted uranium manufacturing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagula, T.A.

    1995-07-01

    The Specific Manufacturing Capabilities (SMC) Project located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and operated by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. (LMIT) for the Department of Energy (DOE) manufactures depleted uranium for use in the U.S. Army MIA2 Abrams Heavy Tank Armor Program. Since 1986, SMC has fabricated more than 12 million pounds of depleted uranium (DU) products in a multitude of shapes and sizes with varying metallurgical properties while maintaining security, environmental, health and safety requirements. During initial facility design in the early 1980`s, emphasis on employee safety, radiation control and environmental consciousness was gaining momentum throughout the DOE complex. This fact coupled with security and production requirements forced design efforts to focus on incorporating automation, local containment and computerized material accountability at all work stations. The result was a fully automated production facility engineered to manufacture DU armor packages with virtually no human contact while maintaining security, traceability and quality requirements. This hands off approach to handling depleted uranium resulted in minimal radiation exposures and employee injuries. Construction of the manufacturing facility was complete in early 1986 with the first armor package certified in October 1986. Rolling facility construction was completed in 1987 with the first certified plate produced in the fall of 1988. Since 1988 the rolling and manufacturing facilities have delivered more than 2600 armor packages on schedule with 100% final product quality acceptance. During this period there was an annual average of only 2.2 lost time incidents and a single individual maximum radiation exposure of 150 mrem. SMC is an example of designing and operating a facility that meets regulatory requirements with respect to national security, radiation control and personnel safety while achieving production schedules and product quality.

  13. Uranium and the use of depleted uranium in weaponry; L'uranium et les armes a l'uranium appauvri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, R

    2000-07-01

    In this brief report the author shows that the use of shells involving a load of depleted uranium might lead to lasting hazards to civil population and environment. These hazards come from the part of the shell that has been dispersed as contaminating radioactive dusts. The author describes some features of radioactivity and highlights the role of Uranium-238 as a provider of energy to the planet. (A.C.)

  14. 77 FR 53236 - Proposed International Isotopes Fluorine Extraction Process and Depleted Uranium Deconversion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... COMMISSION Proposed International Isotopes Fluorine Extraction Process and Depleted Uranium Deconversion... International Isotopes Fluorine Extraction Process and Depleted Uranium Deconversion Plant (INIS) in Lea County... construction, operation, and decommissioning of a fluorine extraction and depleted uranium...

  15. The International Science and Politics of Depleted Uranium (Briefing charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Cabrera 3 mrem/y These results for non- carcinogenic risks indicate that there are no adverse impacts expected due to chemical exposure to DU. Iraq...on the health effects of uranium (to include depleted uranium) • The dose makes the poison • Uranium is a weak carcinogen • There are safe levels of...blatant lies”* “ Tobacco industry hired- gun”* * Haleakala Times – December 4th, 2007 What I Actually Do … Science Real The Press • Rediscovers the issue

  16. Radiation survey and decontamination of cape Arza from depleted uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukotić Perko

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the action of NATO A-10 airplanes in 1999, the cape Arza, Serbia and Montenegro was contaminated by depleted uranium. The clean-up operations were undertaken at the site, and 242 uranium projectiles and their 49 larger fragments were removed from the cape. That is about 85% of the total number of projectiles by which Arza was contaminated. Here are described details of the applied procedures and results of the soil radioactivity measurements after decontamination.

  17. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR FORMED PROJECTILE OF DEPLETED URANIUM ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋顺成; 高平; 才鸿年

    2003-01-01

    The numerical simulation for forming projectile of depleted uranium alloy with the SPH ( Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic ) algorithm was presented. In the computations the artificial pressures of detonation were used, i. e. , the spatial distribution and time distribution were given artificially. To describe the deformed behaviors of the depleted uranium alloy under high pressure and high strain rate, the Johnson-Cook model of materials was introduced. From the numerical simulation the formed projectile velocity,projectile geometry and the minimum of the height of detonation are obtained.

  18. Uranium: myths and realities the depleted uranium; Uranio: Mitos y realidades. El caso del uranio emprobrecido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, G.

    2001-07-01

    Uranium is an element whose name causes worry. The uranium properties are very unknown for people. However the element plays an important roll in the Earth as responsible of numerous natural phenomena, which are vital for life evolution. An example of the low knowledge about uranium has been the Balkan syndrome. A relation between cancers and the use of depleted uranium in ammunition in the Balkan War has been pretended to be established. From the beginning, this hypothesis could have been discarded as it has been confirmed and stated in recent reports of UNEP Commissions who have studied this matter. (Author)

  19. Depleted uranium hexafluoride: The source material for advanced shielding systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cooley, C.R. [Department of Technology, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability problem in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. DOE is evaluating several options for the disposition of this UF{sub 6}, including continued storage, disposal, and recycle into a product. Based on studies conducted to date, the most feasible recycle option for the depleted uranium is shielding in low-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, or vitrified high-level waste containers. Estimates for the cost of disposal, using existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion depending on factors such as the disposal site and the applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Advanced technologies can reduce these costs, but UF{sub 6} disposal still represents large future costs. This paper describes an application for depleted uranium in which depleted uranium hexafluoride is converted into an oxide and then into a heavy aggregate. The heavy uranium aggregate is combined with conventional concrete materials to form an ultra high density concrete, DUCRETE, weighing more than 400 lb/ft{sup 3}. DUCRETE can be used as shielding in spent nuclear fuel/high-level waste casks at a cost comparable to the lower of the disposal cost estimates. Consequently, the case can be made that DUCRETE shielded casks are an alternative to disposal. In this case, a beneficial long term solution is attained for much less than the combined cost of independently providing shielded casks and disposing of the depleted uranium. Furthermore, if disposal is avoided, the political problems associated with selection of a disposal location are also avoided. Other studies have also shown cost benefits for low level waste shielded disposal containers.

  20. DURABILITY OF DEPLETED URANIUM AGGREGATES (DUAGG) IN DUCRETE SHIELDING APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattus, Catherine H.; Dole, Leslie R.

    2003-02-27

    The depleted uranium (DU) inventory in the United States exceeds 500,000 metric tonnes. To evaluate the possibilities for reuse of this stockpile of DU, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has created a research and development program to address the disposition of its DU(1). One potential use for this stockpile material is in the fabrication of nuclear shielding casks for the storage, transport, and disposal of spent nuclear fuels. The use of the DU-based shielding would reduce the size and weight of the casks while allowing a level of protection from neutrons and gamma rays comparable to that afforded by steel and concrete. DUAGG (depleted uranium aggregate) is formed of depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2) sintered with a synthetic-basalt-based binder. This study was designed to investigate possible deleterious reactions that could occur between the cement paste and the DUAGG. After 13 months of exposure to a cement pore solution, no deleterious expansive mineral phases were observed to form either with the DUO2 or with the simulated-basalt sintering phases. In the early stages of these exposure tests, Oak Ridge National Laboratory preliminary results confirm that the surface reactions of this aggregate proceed more slowly than expected. This finding may indicate that DUAGG/DUCRETE (depleted uranium concrete) casks could have service lives sufficient to meet the projected needs of DOE and the commercial nuclear power industry.

  1. High pressure elasticity and thermal properties of depleted uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, M. K.; Velisavljevic, N.

    2016-04-01

    Studies of the phase diagram of uranium have revealed a wealth of high pressure and temperature phases. Under ambient conditions the crystal structure is well defined up to 100 gigapascals (GPa), but very little information on thermal conduction or elasticity is available over this same range. This work has applied ultrasonic interferometry to determine the elasticity, mechanical, and thermal properties of depleted uranium to 4.5 GPa. Results show general strengthening with applied load, including an overall increase in acoustic thermal conductivity. Further implications are discussed within. This work presents the first high pressure studies of the elasticity and thermal properties of depleted uranium metal and the first real-world application of a previously developed containment system for making such measurements.

  2. Location, Identification, and Size Distribution of Depleted Uranium Grains in Reservoir Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, D.; Fleischer, R. L.; Albert, E. A.; Arnason, J. G.

    2006-05-01

    The location, isotopic composition, and size distribution of uranium-rich grains in sediment layers can be identified by analysis of etched particle tracks. Samples are pressed against track detectors, irradiated with thermal neutrons, and the detectors are chemically etched to reveal fission tracks. The total track abundance from the sample is a measure of the U-235 content; hence, if the bulk uranium (mostly U-238) has been measured, the two sets of results give the depletion or enrichment of the uranium. Each uranium-rich particle produces a sunburst of tracks where the number of tracks is proportional to the size of the particle. From 1958 to 1984, National Lead Industries processed depleted uranium (DU) at its plant in Colonie, NY (just west of Albany). Radioactive materials, principally DU, that were emitted from its exhaust stacks have been found 40 km away (Dietz, 1981). We have studied a sediment core taken by Arnason and Fletcher (2003, 2004) from a small body of water, the Patroon Reservoir, which is 1 km east-southeast of the National Lead plant. Examination of portions of that core demonstrates the usefulness of induced nuclear tracks (1) to locate microscopic high-uranium grains for further mineralogical study ; (2) to determine the size distribution of uranium grains; and (3) to help analyze the average isotopic depletion of the uranium when total U concentrations are known. We infer that the size of DU particles in the sediment was controlled by both atmospheric transport from stack to reservoir and fluvial transport within the reservoir.

  3. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) depleted uranium waste boxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-08-27

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) allows the one-time shipment of ten metal boxes and one wooden box containing depleted uranium material from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the burial grounds in the 200 West Area for disposal. This SEP provides the analyses and operational controls necessary to demonstrate that the shipment will be safe for the onsite worker and the public.

  4. Distribution of uranium, thorium, and isotopic composition of uranium in soil samples of south Serbia: Evidence of depleted uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo Sarata Kumar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and thermal ionization mass spectrom - etry were used to measure concentration of uranium and thorium as well as isotopic composition of uranium respectively in soil samples collected around south Serbia. An analytical method was established for a routine sample preparation procedure for uranium and thorium. Uranium was chemically separated and purified from soil samples by anion exchange resin and UTEVA extraction chromatography and its isotopic composition was measured using a thermal ionization mass spectrometry. There was a little deviation of U/Th ratio from the average values in some soil samples. Presence of 236U as well as depleted uranium was observed in 235U/238U ratio measurement in the same soil sample.

  5. The distribution of depleted uranium contamination in Colonie, NY, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, N.S., E-mail: nsl3@alumni.leicester.ac.uk [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N. [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.R. [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-20

    Uranium oxide particles were dispersed into the environment from a factory in Colonie (NY, USA) by prevailing winds during the 1960s and '70s. Uranium concentrations and isotope ratios from bulk soil samples have been accurately measured using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) without the need for analyte separation chemistry. The natural range of uranium concentrations in the Colonie soils has been estimated as 0.7-2.1 {mu}g g{sup -1}, with a weighted geometric mean of 1.05 {mu}g g{sup -1}; the contaminated soil samples comprise uranium up to 500 {+-} 40 {mu}g g{sup -1}. A plot of {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U against {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratios describes a mixing line between natural uranium and depleted uranium (DU) in bulk soil samples; scatter from this line can be accounted for by heterogeneity in the DU particulate. The end-member of DU compositions aggregated in these bulk samples comprises (2.05 {+-} 0.06) x 10{sup -3235}U/{sup 238}U, (3.2 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -5236}U/{sup 238}U, and (7.1 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6234}U/{sup 238}U. The analytical method is sensitive to as little as 50 ng g{sup -1} DU mixed with the natural uranium occurring in these soils. The contamination footprint has been mapped northward from site, and at least one third of the uranium in a soil sample from the surface 5 cm, collected 5.1 km NNW of the site, is DU. The distribution of contamination within the surface soil horizon follows a trend of exponential decrease with depth, which can be approximated by a simple diffusion model. Bioturbation by earthworms can account for dispersal of contaminant from the soil surface, in the form of primary uranium oxide particulates, and uranyl species that are adsorbed to organic matter. Considering this distribution, the total mass of uranium contamination emitted from the factory is estimated to be c. 4.8 tonnes.

  6. Selection of a management strategy for depleted uranium hexafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, S.E.; Hanrahan, E.J.; Bradley, C.E.

    1995-09-06

    A consequence of the uranium enrichment process used in the United States (US) is the accumulation of a significant amount of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Currently, approximately 560,000 metric tons of the material are stored at three different sites. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently initiated a program to consider alternative strategies for the cost-effective and environmentally safe long-term management of this inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}. The program involves a technology and engineering assessment of proposed management options (use/reuse, conversion, storage, or disposal) and an analysis of the potential environmental impacts and life-cycle costs of alternative management strategies. The information obtained from the studies will be used by the DOE to select a preferred long-term management strategy. The selection and implementation of a management strategy will involve consideration of a number of important issues such as environmental, health, and safety effects; the balancing of risks versus costs in a context of reduced government spending; socioeconomic implications, including effects on the domestic and international uranium industry; the technical status of proposed uses or technologies; and public involvement in the decision making process. Because of its provisions for considering a wide range of relevant issues and involving the public, this program has become a model for future DOE materials disposition programs. This paper presents an overview of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. Technical findings of the program to date are presented, and major issues involved in selecting and implementing a management strategy are discussed.

  7. Hormetic effect induced by depleted uranium in zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.Y.P. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Cheng, S.H., E-mail: bhcheng@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Biomedical Sciences, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Studied hormetic effect induced by uranium (U) in embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio). • Hormesis observed at 24 hpf for exposures to 10 μg/l of depleted U (DU). • Hormesis not observed before 30 hpf for exposures to 100 μg/l of DU. • Hormetic effect induced in zebrafish embryos in a dose-and time-dependent manner. - Abstract: The present work studied the hormetic effect induced by uranium (U) in embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) using apoptosis as the biological endpoint. Hormetic effect is characterized by biphasic dose-response relationships showing a low-dose stimulation and a high-dose inhibition. Embryos were dechorionated at 4 h post fertilization (hpf), and were then exposed to 10 or 100 μg/l depleted uranium (DU) in uranyl acetate solutions from 5 to 6 hpf. For exposures to 10 μg/l DU, the amounts of apoptotic signals in the embryos were significantly increased at 20 hpf but were significantly decreased at 24 hpf, which demonstrated the presence of U-induced hormesis. For exposures to 100 μg/l DU, the amounts of apoptotic signals in the embryos were significantly increased at 20, 24 and 30 hpf. Hormetic effect was not shown but its occurrence between 30 and 48 hpf could not be ruled out. In conclusion, hormetic effect could be induced in zebrafish embryos in a concentration- and time-dependent manner.

  8. Cost Analysis of Remediation Systems for Depleted Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Ownership Cost ERDC/EL TR-14-5 xii US United States WBS Work Breakdown Structure WHA Tungsten Heavy Alloys WHO World Health Organization yd...fact, the DU long rod kinetic energy penetrators outperform their modern conventional Tungsten Heavy Alloys ( WHA ) counterparts by about 8-10...Depleted uranium has a density of 18.9 g/cm3 versus 17.6 g/cm3 of WHA . Also, DU has a high rate of deformation, which allows it to “self-sharpen

  9. Depleted uranium storage and disposal trade study: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hightower, J.R.; Trabalka, J.R.

    2000-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to: identify the most desirable forms for conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for extended storage, identify the most desirable forms for conversion of DUF6 for disposal, evaluate the comparative costs for extended storage or disposal of the various forms, review benefits of the proposed plasma conversion process, estimate simplified life-cycle costs (LCCs) for five scenarios that entail either disposal or beneficial reuse, and determine whether an overall optimal form for conversion of DUF6 can be selected given current uncertainty about the endpoints (specific disposal site/technology or reuse options).

  10. Evaluating the effectiveness of dilution of the recovered uranium with depleted uranium and low-enriched uranium to obtain fuel for VVER reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. Yu; Sulaberidze, G. A.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of the recovered uranium enrichment in a cascade of gas centrifuges with three feed flows (depleted uranium, low-enriched uranium, recovered uranium) with simultaneous dilution of U-232,234,236 isotopes was shown. A series of numerical experiments were performed for different content of U-235 in low-enriched uranium. It has been demonstrated that the selected combination of diluents can simultaneously reduce the cost of separative work and the consumption of natural uranium, not only with respect to the previously used multi-flow cascade schemes, but also in comparison to the standard cascade for uranium enrichment.

  11. Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols: A review from an epidemiological perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Panikkar Bindu; Brugge Doug; Hindin Rita

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Depleted uranium is being used increasingly often as a component of munitions in military conflicts. Military personnel, civilians and the DU munitions producers are being exposed to the DU aerosols that are generated. Methods We reviewed toxicological data on both natural and depleted uranium. We included peer reviewed studies and gray literature on birth malformations due to natural and depleted uranium. Our approach was to assess the "weight of evidence" with respect to...

  12. Kr ion irradiation study of the depleted-uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Kirk, M. A.; Rest, J.; Allen, T. R.; Wachs, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fuel development for the reduced enrichment research and test reactor (RERTR) program is tasked with the development of new low enrichment uranium nuclear fuels that can be employed to replace existing high enrichment uranium fuels currently used in some research reactors throughout the world. For dispersion type fuels, radiation stability of the fuel-cladding interaction product has a strong impact on fuel performance. Three depleted-uranium alloys are cast for the radiation stability studies of the fuel-cladding interaction product using Kr ion irradiation to investigate radiation damage from fission products. SEM analysis indicates the presence of the phases of interest: U(Al, Si) 3, (U, Mo)(Al, Si) 3, UMo 2Al 20, U 6Mo 4Al 43 and UAl 4. Irradiations of TEM disc samples were conducted with 500 keV Kr ions at 200 °C to ion doses up to 2.5 × 10 19 ions/m 2 (˜10 dpa) with an Kr ion flux of 10 16 ions/m 2/s (˜4.0 × 10 -3 dpa/s). Microstructural evolution of the phases relevant to fuel-cladding interaction products was investigated using transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Depleted-Uranium Weapons the Whys and Wherefores

    CERN Document Server

    Gsponer, A

    2003-01-01

    The only military application in which present-day depleted-uranium (DU) alloys out-perform tungsten alloys is long-rod penetration into a main battle-tank's armor. However, this advantage is only on the order of 10% and disappearing when the comparison is made in terms of actual lethality of complete anti-tank systems instead of laboratory-type steel penetration capability. Therefore, new micro- and nano-engineered tungsten alloys may soon out-perform existing DU alloys, enabling the production of tungsten munition which will be better than uranium munition, and whose overall life-cycle cost will be less due to the absence of the problems related to the radioactivity of uranium. The reasons why DU weapons have been introduced and used are analysed from the perspective that their radioactivity must have played an important role in the decision making process. It is found that DU weapons belong to the diffuse category of low-radiological-impact nuclear weapons to which emerging types of low-yield, i.e., fourth...

  14. Repository criticality control for {sup 233}U using depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Elam, K.R.; Hopper, C.M.

    1999-07-01

    The US is evaluating methods for the disposition of excess weapons-usable {sup 233}U, including disposal in a repository. Isotopic dilution studies were undertaken to determine how much depleted uranium (DU) would need to be added to the {sup 233}U to minimize the potential for nuclear criticality in a repository. Numerical evaluations were conducted to determine the nuclear equivalence of different {sup 235}U enrichments to {sup 233}U isotopically diluted with DU containing 0.2 wt% {sup 235}U. A homogeneous system of silicon dioxide, water, {sup 233}U, and DU, in which the ratio of each component was varied, was used to determine the conditions of maximum nuclear reactivity. In terms of preventing nuclear criticality in a repository, there are three important limits from these calculations. 1. Criticality safe in any nonnuclear system: The required isotopic dilution to ensure criticality under all conditions, except in the presence of man-made nuclear materials (beryllium, etc.), is {approximately}1.0% {sup 235}U in {sup 238}U. The equivalent {sup 233}U enrichment level is 0.53 wt% {sup 233}U in DU. 2. Critically safe in natural systems: The lowest {sup 235}U enrichment found in a natural reactor at shutdown was {approximately}1.3%. French studies, based on the characteristics of natural uranium ore bodies, indicate that a minimum enrichment of {approximately}1.28% {sup 235}U is required for criticality. These data suggest that nuclear criticality from migrating uranium is not realistic unless the {sup 235}U enrichments exceed {approximately}1.3%, which is a result that is equivalent to 0.72% {sup 233}U in DU. 3. Criticality safety equivalent to light water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF): The {sup 233}U can be diluted with DU so that the uranium criticality characteristics match SNF uranium. Whatever repository criticality controls are used for SNF can then be used for {sup 233}U. The average LWR SNF assay (after decay of plutonium isotopes to uranium

  15. Measured and calculated fast neutron spectra in a depleted uranium and lithium hydride shielded reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, G. P.; Mueller, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of MeV neutron were made at the surface of a lithium hydride and depleted uranium shielded reactor. Four shield configurations were considered: these were assembled progressively with cylindrical shells of 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, and 3-centimeter-thick depleted uranium. Measurements were made with a NE-218 scintillation spectrometer; proton pulse height distributions were differentiated to obtain neutron spectra. Calculations were made using the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DOT and ENDF/B (version 3) cross sections. Good agreement between measured and calculated spectral shape was observed. Absolute measured and calculated fluxes were within 50 percent of one another; observed discrepancies in absolute flux may be due to cross section errors.

  16. Military use of depleted uranium assessment of prolonged population exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Giannardi, C

    2001-01-01

    This work is an exposure assessment for a population living in an area contaminated by use of depleted uranium (DU) weapons. RESRAD 5.91 code is used to evaluate the average effective dose delivered from 1, 10, 20 cm depths of contaminated soil, in a residential farmer scenario. Critical pathway and group are identified in soil inhalation or ingestion and children playing with the soil, respectively. From available information on DU released on targeted sites, both critical and average exposure can leave to toxicological hazards; annual dose limit for population can be exceeded on short-term period (years) for soil inhalation. As a consequence, in targeted sites cleaning up must be planned on the basis of measured concentration, when available, while special cautions have to be adopted altogether to reduce unaware exposures, taking into account the amount of the avertable dose.

  17. Hormetic effect induced by depleted uranium in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C Y P; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2016-06-01

    The present work studied the hormetic effect induced by uranium (U) in embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) using apoptosis as the biological endpoint. Hormetic effect is characterized by biphasic dose-response relationships showing a low-dose stimulation and a high-dose inhibition. Embryos were dechorionated at 4h post fertilization (hpf), and were then exposed to 10 or 100μg/l depleted uranium (DU) in uranyl acetate solutions from 5 to 6 hpf. For exposures to 10μg/l DU, the amounts of apoptotic signals in the embryos were significantly increased at 20 hpf but were significantly decreased at 24 hpf, which demonstrated the presence of U-induced hormesis. For exposures to 100μg/l DU, the amounts of apoptotic signals in the embryos were significantly increased at 20, 24 and 30 hpf. Hormetic effect was not shown but its occurrence between 30 and 48 hpf could not be ruled out. In conclusion, hormetic effect could be induced in zebrafish embryos in a concentration- and time-dependent manner.

  18. Environmental behaviour and bioavailability of Depleted Uranium (DU) material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeh, U.; Gerstmann, U.; Schimmack, W.; Szymczak, W.; Li, W.B.; Hoellriegl, V.; Roth, P.; Paretzke, H.G. [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Inst. of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    This work was performed to assess a possible health risk of depleted uranium (DU) for residents and KFOR personnel serving on the Balkans. Therefore, the environmental behaviour and bioavailability of DU material have been explored. In order to investigate the environmental impact of DU ammunition, leaching experiments were carried out. DU penetrators were buried in soil filled in columns. The soil was irrigated (16 mm/week) and the uranium isotopes {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U which were washed out and transported into the eluate were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). After one year, an average of 1.7% of the original DU material corroded. About 40% of the corrosion products were located on the surface of the penetrator, 60% were recovered in the soil. On the other hand, only very small amounts of the DU material could be found in the eluate (about 1 ppm per year) suggesting a low solubility of DU and the corrosion products and/or a strong sorption to the soil. In another part of the study, the solubility of DU material in human body fluids was investigated to assess the bioavailability after oral intake and inhalation of DU particles. Therefore, DU corrosion products were powdered and incubated in artificial gastric juice and simulated lung fluid. About three-fourths of the DU material was dissolved in artificial gastric juice after 30 minutes. This fraction could not be increased, even when the incubation time was extended to 120 minutes. The dissolution of DU material in artificial lung fluid showed a distinct bi-phasic course with a readily soluble fraction and a fraction of very low solubility. These findings suggest that the DU corrosion products consist mainly of two types of uranium oxides, hexavalent and fast soluble compounds and tetravalent compounds with low solubility. Additional measurements with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) of DU corrosion material support this conclusion. The resulting

  19. Genotoxic and inflammatory effects of depleted uranium particles inhaled by rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monleau, Marjorie; De Méo, Michel; Paquet, François; Chazel, Valérie; Duménil, Gérard; Donnadieu-Claraz, Marie

    2006-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a radioactive heavy metal coming from the nuclear industry and used in numerous military applications. Uranium inhalation can lead to the development of fibrosis and neoplasia in the lungs. As little is known concerning the molecular processes leading to these pathological effects, some of the events in terms of genotoxicity and inflammation were investigated in rats exposed to DU by inhalation. Our results show that exposure to DU by inhalation resulted in DNA strand breaks in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cells and in increase of inflammatory cytokine expression and production of hydroperoxides in lung tissue suggesting that the DNA damage was in part a consequence of the inflammatory processes and oxidative stress. The effects seemed to be linked to the doses, were independent of the solubility of uranium compounds and correlating with the type of inhalation. Repeated inhalations seemed to induce an effect of potentiation in BAL cells and also in kidney cells. Comet assay in neutral conditions revealed that DNA damage in BAL cells was composed partly by double strands breaks suggesting that radiation could contribute to DU genotoxic effects in vivo. All these in vivo results contribute to a better understanding of the pathological effect of DU inhalation.

  20. Contamination by depleted uranium (Du) in South Serbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, L. [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Dept. of Physics and Biophysics, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Serbia); Todorovic, J. [Environmental And Radiation Protection Laboratory, Institute Of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Serbia); Bozic, P.; Stevanovic, Z. [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Belgrade, Dept. Of Pathology And Biochemistry, Serbia and Montenegro (Serbia)

    2006-07-01

    The paper present the results of the study on D.U. (depleted uranium) contamination in the environment and possible effects on animal healths in the region o f Bujanovac. Samples of soil, feed, leaves, grass, lichen, moss, honey and water were collected randomly in 2003/2004 in the vicinity of the target area (500-1000 m) and 5 km from the target area. Activity of the radionuclides ({sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 7}Be) in soils, grass, lichen, moss and honey was determined on Hp Ge detector (Canberra, relative efficiency 23%) by standard gamma spectrometry. Total alpha and beta activity in water was determined on proportional alpha/beta counter (Canberra 2400, efficiency for alpha emitters 11%, efficiency for beta emitters 30%). Non significantly higher values of concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U were measured in the immediate vicinity of the targeted site, but {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio in soils indicated the natural origin of uranium. On both sites the contents of radionuclides in soils were in the range of values measured in soils in Belgrade (2002-2005), at the mountain Stara Planina (1999) and in the region. The soil was found to be poor in potassium. In mosses and lichen, high concentrations of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 7}Be, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb were found, while in leaves and grass there were lower concentrations of K, due to soil poor in K. As for uranium, there were no significant variations due to the sites, and {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios were close to values measured in vegetation in the vicinity of power plants 0.07-0.08. In honey, both {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U were below the minimal detectable concentrations. Total alpha and total beta activities measured in water showed no significant differences between the sites, and the obtained values were in range of the permissible values for drinking water in S.M.N. (total alpha activity <0

  1. The corrosion of depleted uranium in terrestrial and marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, C; Milodowski, A E; Baker, A C

    2014-02-01

    Depleted Uranium alloyed with titanium is used in armour penetrating munitions that have been fired in a number of conflict zones and testing ranges including the UK ranges at Kirkcudbright and Eskmeals. The study presented here evaluates the corrosion of DU alloy cylinders in soil on these two UK ranges and in the adjacent marine environment of the Solway Firth. The estimated mean initial corrosion rates and times for complete corrosion range from 0.13 to 1.9 g cm(-2) y(-1) and 2.5-48 years respectively depending on the particular physical and geochemical environment. The marine environment at the experimental site was very turbulent. This may have caused the scouring of corrosion products and given rise to a different geochemical environment from that which could be easily duplicated in laboratory experiments. The rate of mass loss was found to vary through time in one soil environment and this is hypothesised to be due to pitting increasing the surface area, followed by a build up of corrosion products inhibiting further corrosion. This indicates that early time measurements of mass loss or corrosion rate may be poor indicators of late time corrosion behaviour, potentially giving rise to incorrect estimates of time to complete corrosion. The DU alloy placed in apparently the same geochemical environment, for the same period of time, can experience very different amounts of corrosion and mass loss, indicating that even small variations in the corrosion environment can have a significant effect. These effects are more significant than other experimental errors and variations in initial surface area.

  2. Radiation exposure from depleted uranium: The radiation bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexandra C; Rivas, Rafael; Tesoro, Leonard; Kovalenko, Gregor; Kovaric, Nikola; Pavlovic, Peter; Brenner, David

    2017-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a radioactive heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Published data from our laboratory have demonstrated that DU exposure in vitro to immortalized human osteoblast cells (HOS) is both neoplastically transforming and genotoxic. In vivo studies have also demonstrated that DU is leukemogenic and genotoxic. DU possesses both a radiological (alpha particle) and chemical (metal) component but is generally considered a chemical biohazard. Studies have shown that alpha particle radiation does play a role in DU's toxic effects. Evidence has accumulated that non-irradiated cells in the vicinity of irradiated cells can have a response to ionization events. The purpose of this study was to determine if these "bystander effects" play a role in DU's toxic and neoplastic effects using HOS cells. We investigated the bystander responses between DU-exposed cells and non-exposed cells by co-culturing the two equal populations. Decreased cell survival and increased neoplastic transformation were observed in the non-DU exposed cells following 4 or 24h co-culture. In contrast Ni (II)- or Cr(VI)- exposed cells were unable to alter those biological effects in non-Ni(II) or non-Cr(VI) exposed co-cultured cells. Transfer experiments using medium from the DU-exposed and non-exposed co-cultured cells was able to cause adverse biological responses in cells; these results demonstrated that a factor (s) is secreted into the co-culture medium which is involved in this DU-associated bystander effect. This novel effect of DU exposure could have implications for radiation risk and for health risk assessment associated with DU exposure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Uranium bioaccumulation and biological disorders induced in zebrafish (Danio rerio) after a depleted uranium waterborne exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barillet, Sabrina, E-mail: sabrina.barillet@free.f [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, IRSN (Institute for Radiological protection and Nuclear Safety), DEI/SECRE/LRE, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP 3, 13115 St-Paul-Lez-Durance cedex (France); Adam-Guillermin, Christelle, E-mail: christelle.adam-guillermin@irsn.f [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, IRSN (Institute for Radiological protection and Nuclear Safety), DEI/SECRE/LRE, Cadarache, Bat 186, BP 3, 13115 St-Paul-Lez-Durance cedex (France); Palluel, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.palluel@ineris.f [Ecotoxicological Risk Assessment Unit, INERIS (National Institute for Industrial Environment and Risks), Parc technologique ALATA, 60 550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Porcher, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.porcher@ineris.f [Ecotoxicological Risk Assessment Unit, INERIS (National Institute for Industrial Environment and Risks), Parc technologique ALATA, 60 550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Devaux, Alain, E-mail: alain.devaux@entpe.f [Universite de Lyon, INRA, EFPA-SA, Environmental Science Laboratory (LSE), ENTPE, 69518 Vaulx en Velin cedex (France)

    2011-02-15

    Because of its toxicity and its ubiquity within aquatic compartments, uranium (U) represents a significant hazard to aquatic species such as fish. In a previous study, we investigated some biological responses in zebrafish either exposed to depleted or to enriched U (i.e., to different radiological activities). However, results required further experiments to better understand biological responses. Moreover, we failed to clearly demonstrate a significant relationship between biological effects and U radiological activity. We therefore chose to herein examine U bioaccumulation and induced effects in zebrafish according to a chemical dose-response approach. Results showed that U is highly bioconcentrated in fish, according to a time- and concentration-dependent model. Additionally, hepatic antioxidant defenses, red blood cells DNA integrity and brain acetylcholinesterase activity were found to be significantly altered. Generally, the higher the U concentration, the sooner and/or the greater the effect, suggesting a close relationship between accumulation and effect. - Research highlights: Depleted U bioconcentration factor is of about 1000 in zebrafish exposed to 20 {mu}g/L. Hepatic antioxidant disorders are noticed as soon as the first hours of exposure. DNA damage is induced in red blood cells after 20 d of exposure to 500 {mu}g DU/L. The brain cholinergic system (AChE activity) is impacted. - This study demonstrates that U is highly bioaccumulated in fish, resulting in biological disorders such as hepatic oxidative stress as well as genotoxic and neurotoxic events.

  4. Depleted uranium analysis in blood by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, T.I.; Xu, H.; Ejnik, J.W.; Mullick, F.G.; Squibb, K.; McDiarmid, M.A.; Centeno, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report depleted uranium (DU) analysis in whole blood samples. Internal exposure to DU causes increased uranium levels as well as change in the uranium isotopic composition in blood specimen. For identification of DU exposure we used the 235U/238U ratio in blood samples, which ranges from 0.00725 for natural uranium to 0.002 for depleted uranium. Uranium quantification and isotopic composition analysis were performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For method validation we used eight spiked blood samples with known uranium concentrations and isotopic composition. The detection limit for quantification was determined to be 4 ng L-1 uranium in whole blood. The data reproduced within 1-5% RSD and an accuracy of 1-4%. In order to achieve a 235U/238U ratio range of 0.00698-0.00752% with 99.7% confidence limit a minimum whole blood uranium concentration of 60 ng L??1 was required. An additional 10 samples from a cohort of veterans exposed to DU in Gulf War I were analyzed with no knowledge of their medical history. The measured 235U/ 238U ratios in the blood samples were used to identify the presence or absence of DU exposure within this patient group. ?? 2009 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Characterization of Depleted-Uranium Strength and Damage Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, III, George T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chen, Shuh-Rong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bronkhorst, Curt A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dennis-Koller, Darcie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cerreta, Ellen K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cady, Carl M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McCabe, Rodney J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Addessio, Francis L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schraad, Mark W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thoma, Dan J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lopez, Mike F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mason, Thomas A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Papin, Pallas A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trujillo, Carl P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Korzekwa, Deniece R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luscher, Darby J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hixson, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maudlin, Paul J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelly, A. M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2012-12-17

    The intent of this report is to document the status of our knowledge of the mechanical and damage behavior of Depleted Uranium(DU hereafter). This report briefly summaries the motivation of the experimental and modeling research conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory(LANL) on DU since the early 1980’s and thereafter the current experimental data quantifying the strength and damage behavior of DU as a function of a number of experimental variables including processing, strain rate, temperature, stress state, and shock prestraining. The effect of shock prestraining on the structure-property response of DU is described and the effect on post-shock mechanical behavior of DU is discussed. The constitutive experimental data utilized to support the derivation of two constitutive strength (plasticity) models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) models, for both annealed and shock prestrained DU are detailed and the Taylor cylinder validation tests and finite-element modeling (FEM) utilized to validate these strength models is discussed. The similarities and differences in the PTW and MTS model descriptions for DU are discussed for both the annealed and shock prestrained conditions. Quasi-static tensile data as a function of triaxial constraint and spallation test data are described. An appendix additionally briefly describes low-pressure equation-of-state data for DU utilized to support the spallation experiments. The constitutive behavior of DU screw/bolt material is presented. The response of DU subjected to dynamic tensile extrusion testing as a function of temperature is also described. This integrated experimental technique is planned to provide an additional validation test in the future. The damage data as a function of triaxiality, tensile and spallation data, is thereafter utilized to support derivation of the Tensile Plasticity (TEPLA) damage model and simulations for comparison to the DU spallation data are presented

  6. Metallothionein deficiency aggravates depleted uranium-induced nephrotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yuhui; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Liu, Cong; Li, Hong; Liu, Jing; Ren, Jiong; Yang, Zhangyou [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury, Institute of Combined Injury, Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, No. 30 Gaotanyan Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400038 (China); Peng, Shuangqing [Evaluation and Research Center for Toxicology, Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, Academy of Military Medical Science, 20 Dongdajie Street, Fengtai District, Beijing 100071 (China); Wang, Weidong, E-mail: wwdwyl@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Li, Rong, E-mail: yuhui_hao@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury, Institute of Combined Injury, Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, No. 30 Gaotanyan Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been widely used in both civilian and military activities, and the kidney is the main target organ of DU during acute high-dose exposures. In this study, the nephrotoxicity caused by DU in metallothionein-1/2-null mice (MT −/−) and corresponding wild-type (MT +/+) mice was investigated to determine any associations with MT. Each MT −/− or MT +/+ mouse was pretreated with a single dose of DU (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) or an equivalent volume of saline. After 4 days of DU administration, kidney changes were assessed. After DU exposure, serum creatinine and serum urea nitrogen in MT −/− mice significantly increased than in MT +/+ mice, with more severe kidney pathological damage. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, and generation of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde increased in MT −/− mice. The apoptosis rate in MT −/− mice significantly increased, with a significant increase in both Bax and caspase 3 and a decrease in Bcl-2. Furthermore, sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) and sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) were significantly reduced after DU exposure, and the change of SGLT was more evident in MT −/− mice. Finally, exogenous MT was used to evaluate the correlation between kidney changes induced by DU and MT doses in MT −/− mice. The results showed that, the pathological damage and cell apoptosis decreased, and SOD and SGLT levels increased with increasing dose of MT. In conclusion, MT deficiency aggravated DU-induced nephrotoxicity, and the molecular mechanisms appeared to be related to the increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, and decreased SGLT expression. - Highlights: • MT −/− and MT +/+ mice were used to evaluate nephrotoxicity of DU. • Renal damage was more evident in the MT −/− mice after exposure to DU. • Exogenous MT also protects against DU-induced nephrotoxicity. • MT deficiency induced more ROS and apoptosis after exposure to

  7. A critical look at UNEP reports concerning depleted uranium on Yugoslav territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković Marko M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical look at UNEP Reports concerning depleted uranium on Yugoslav territory is presented in this paper. The subjects of the analysis are summarized as remarks high-lighting the following three points: (a those concerning the use of terms significant and insignificant doses (risks, (b those concerning the use of 1 mSv as a border between these two risk types and (c those concerning the composition of ex pert UNEP Teams investigating the depleted uranium issue. To start with, the assumption that it should be possible to express the risks (con sequences caused by the in take of depleted uranium ( by ingestion/ inhalation and/ or external exposure to b and g rays from depleted uranium as insignificant or significant for comparison purposes is, in our view, in collision with the linear non thresh old hypothesis, still valid in the radiation protection field. Secondly, the limit of 1 mSv per year as a reference dose level between insignificant and significant risks (con sequences is not accept able in the case of military depleted uranium contamination. This is because the reference level of 1 mSv, according to the ICRP Recommendation, can be used in the optimization of radiation protection as an additional annual dose limit for members of the public solely for useful practices. Military usage of depleted uranium can not be classified as being useful for both sides - the culprit and the victim alike. Our third objection concerns the composition of ex pert UNEP teams for Kosovo (Desk Assessment Group, Scientific Reviewer Group, and UNEP Scientific Mission as not being representative enough, bearing in mind all UN member-countries. This last objection may be rather difficult to understand for any one viewing it from the perspective other than that of the victims.

  8. An Environmental Assessment for Open Air Testing of Munitions Involving Depleted Uranium at MICOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-15

    34 Department of the Army Pamphlet No. 200-1, (April 1975). 12. Wayne C. Hanson, Feline R. Miera, Jr., "Continued Studies of Long-Term Ecological Effects of...Exposure to Uranium," LASL Report, LA-6742 AFATL-TR-77-35, (June 1971). 13. Wayne C. Hanson, Feline R. Miera, Jr., "Long-Term Ecological Effects of...Exposure to Uranium," LA-6269 UC-11 ’July 1976). 14. Wayne C. Hanson, " Ecological Considerations of Depleted Uranium Munitions," LA-5559 (June 1974). 15

  9. Selective Dissolution and Recovery of Depleted Uranium from Armor Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-05

    25 ION EXCHANGE ............................................ 25 Resin Properties ................................... 25...H2PO4 ) 2H3PO4" Resin Properties The extraction of uranium from the 4M HC1:7M R3 PO4 acid solvent was successfully demonstrated with the ion exchange

  10. Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The technology assessment report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoller, J.N.; Rosen, R.S.; Holliday, M.A. [and others

    1995-06-30

    With the publication of a Request for Recommendations and Advance Notice of Intent in the November 10, 1994 Federal Register, the Department of Energy initiated a program to assess alternative strategies for the long-term management or use of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This Request was made to help ensure that, by seeking as many recommendations as possible, Department management considers reasonable options in the long-range management strategy. The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program consists of three major program elements: Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and an Environmental Impact Statement. This Technology Assessment Report is the first part of the Engineering Analysis Project, and assesses recommendations from interested persons, industry, and Government agencies for potential uses for the depleted uranium hexafluoride stored at the gaseous diffusion plants in Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. Technologies that could facilitate the long-term management of this material are also assessed. The purpose of the Technology Assessment Report is to present the results of the evaluation of these recommendations. Department management will decide which recommendations will receive further study and evaluation.

  11. Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The technology assessment report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoller, J.N.; Rosen, R.S.; Holliday, M.A. [and others

    1995-06-30

    With the publication of a Request for Recommendations and Advance Notice of Intent in the November 10, 1994 Federal Register, the Department of Energy initiated a program to assess alternative strategies for the long-term management or use of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This Request was made to help ensure that, by seeking as many recommendations as possible, Department management considers reasonable options in the long-range management strategy. The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program consists of three major program elements: Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and an Environmental Impact Statement. This Technology Assessment Report is the first part of the Engineering Analysis Project, and assesses recommendations from interested persons, industry, and Government agencies for potential uses for the depleted uranium hexafluoride stored at the gaseous diffusion plants in Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. Technologies that could facilitate the long-term management of this material are also assessed. The purpose of the Technology Assessment Report is to present the results of the evaluation of these recommendations. Department management will decide which recommendations will receive further study and evaluation. These Appendices contain the Federal Register Notice, comments on evaluation factors, independent technical reviewers resumes, independent technical reviewers manual, and technology information packages.

  12. Environmental acceptability of high-performance alternatives for depleted uranium penetrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerley, C.R.; Easterly, C.E.; Eckerman, K.F. [and others

    1996-08-01

    The Army`s environmental strategy for investigating material substitution and management is to measure system environmental gains/losses in all phases of the material management life cycle from cradle to grave. This study is the first in a series of new investigations, applying material life cycle concepts, to evaluate whether there are environmental benefits from increasing the use of tungsten as an alternative to depleted uranium (DU) in Kinetic Energy Penetrators (KEPs). Current military armor penetrators use DU and tungsten as base materials. Although DU alloys have provided the highest performance of any high-density alloy deployed against enemy heavy armor, its low-level radioactivity poses a number of environmental risks. These risks include exposures to the military and civilian population from inhalation, ingestion, and injection of particles. Depleted uranium is well known to be chemically toxic (kidney toxicity), and workplace exposure levels are based on its renal toxicity. Waste materials containing DU fragments are classified as low-level radioactive waste and are regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These characteristics of DU do not preclude its use in KEPs. However, long-term management challenges associated with KEP deployment and improved public perceptions about environmental risks from military activities might be well served by a serious effort to identify, develop, and substitute alternative materials that meet performance objectives and involve fewer environmental risks. Tungsten, a leading candidate base material for KEPS, is potentially such a material because it is not radioactive. Tungsten is less well studied, however, with respect to health impacts and other environmental risks. The present study is designed to contribute to the understanding of the environmental behavior of tungsten by synthesizing available information that is relevant to its potential use as a penetrator.

  13. Tables for determining lead, uranium, and thorium isotope ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, E.

    1974-01-01

    Tables for determining lead, uranium, and thorium isotope ages are presented in the form of computer printouts. Decay constants, analytical expressions for the functions evaluated, and the precision of the calculations are briefly discussed.

  14. ZPR-3 Assembly 11 : A cylindrical sssembly of highly enriched uranium and depleted uranium with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 12 atom % and a depleted uranium reflector.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, R. M.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; National Security; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

    2010-09-30

    Over a period of 30 years, more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited for nuclear data validation and to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. A number of the Argonne ZPR/ZPPR critical assemblies have been evaluated as ICSBEP and IRPhEP benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. ZPR-3 Assembly 11 (ZPR-3/11) was designed as a fast reactor physics benchmark experiment with an average core {sup 235}U enrichment of approximately 12 at.% and a depleted uranium reflector. Approximately 79.7% of the total fissions in this assembly occur above 100 keV, approximately 20.3% occur below 100 keV, and essentially none below 0.625 eV - thus the classification as a 'fast' assembly. This assembly is Fast Reactor Benchmark No. 8 in the Cross Section Evaluation

  15. 10 CFR 34.67 - Records of leak testing of sealed sources and devices containing depleted uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of leak testing of sealed sources and devices containing depleted uranium. 34.67 Section 34.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL... Requirements § 34.67 Records of leak testing of sealed sources and devices containing depleted uranium....

  16. Determination of natural and depleted uranium in urine at the ppt level: an interlaboratory analytical exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agostino, P.A. [Defence R and D Canada - Suffield, Medicine Hat, Alberta (Canada); Ough, E.A. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Glover, S.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vallerand, A.L.

    2002-10-15

    An analytical exercise was initiated in order to determine those analytical procedures with the capacity to measure uranium isotope ratios ({sup 238}U/{sup 235}U) in urine samples containing less that 1{mu} uranium /L urine. A host laboratory was tasked with the preparation of six sets (12 samples per set) of synthetic urine samples spiked with varying amounts of natural and depleted (0.2% {sup 235}U) uranium. The sets of samples contained total uranium in the range 25 ng U/L urine to 770 ng U/L urine, with isotope ratios ({sup 238}U/{sup 235}U) from 137.9 (natural uranium) to 215 ({approx}50% depleted uranium). Sets of samples were shipped to five testing laboratories (four Canadian and one European) for total and isotopic assay. The techniques employed in the analyses included sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-SF-MS), quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-Q-MS), thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). Full results were obtained from three testing labs (ICP-SF-MS, ICP-Q-MS and TIMS). Their results, plus partial results from the NAA lab, have been included in this report. Total uranium and isotope ratio results obtained from ICP-SF-MS and ICP-Q-MS were in good agreement with the host lab values. Neutron activation analysis and TIMS reported total uranium concentrations that differed from the host lab. An incomplete set of isotopic ratios was obtained from the NAA lab with some results reporting enriched uranium (%{sup 235}U > 0.7). Based on the reported results, the four analytical procedures were ranked: ICP-SF-MS (1), ICP-Q-MS (2), TIMS (3) and NAA (4). (author)

  17. Radiological assessment of depleted uranium impact locations in Iraq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.; Brown, R. [Dstl Environmental Sciences Dept., Crescent Road, Alverstoke, Gosport, Hants PO12 2DL (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Although the monitoring that could be carried out during this brief reconnaissance was neither entirely systematic nor completely representative of overall environmental conditions, it is interesting to compare the activity concentrations of D.U. (depleted uranium) found in this work with what would be considered benchmark quantities. This has been done in some of the following sections, but it must be recognised that the data is not of the quality needed for robust generalised statements about D.U. contamination or any possible health consequences. D.U. mainly consists of {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 234}U. All of these isotopes have different radioactive decay characteristics and therefore different dose per unit intake factors. However, for dose assessment purposes, it can easily be shown that the assumption that D.U. is composed entirely of {sup 238}U will result in an insignificant error in estimating the likely magnitude of any radiation dose. For example, for the limiting (i.e. highest) dose per unit intake factors given in ICRP 72 [2] for each isotope, this assumption gives rise to differences of about 1% and 10% for inhalation and ingestion respectively. This approximation has been used in the following discussions. 7.2 General observations Four D.U. contaminated tanks and one anti-aircraft gun were located and surveyed during the reconnaissance, together with two areas of contaminated land. There were also visual indications of D.U. impacts on two other tanks and an armored personnel carrier, but time constraints and hazards from unstable structures and unexploded ordnance prevented investigation of these vehicles. The most surprising finding was that there was relatively little loose contamination on or in the tanks. A more detailed interpretation of the results follows. 7.3 Smear samples All smears were subject to {alpha} and {beta} counting and the results of the {alpha} counting converted to an equivalent removable surface contamination level

  18. Lichens as biomonitors of uranium and other trace elements in an area of Kosovo heavily shelled with depleted uranium rounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lella, Luigi A.; Frati, Luisa; Loppi, Stefano; Protano, Giuseppe; Riccobono, Francesco

    This paper reports the results of a study using lichens as biomonitors to investigate the small-scale environmental distribution of uranium and other trace elements in an area of Kosovo (Djakovica) heavily shelled with depleted uranium (DU) anti-tank ammunition. The results of total uranium concentrations showed great variability and species-specific differences, mainly due to differences in the exposed surface area of the lichens. The uranium concentrations in lichen samples were rather similar at a site heavily shelled with DU ammunition and at a control site. Unexpectedly, the highest uranium concentrations were found at the control site. The observed U distribution can be explained by contamination of lichen thalli by soil particles. The soil geochemistry was similar at the two sampling sites. The 235U/ 238U ratios in the soil samples suggested a modest DU contribution only at the heavily shelled site. Measurements of U isotopes in lichens did not reveal DU pollution at the control site. The U isotopic ratios in lichens at the shelled site showed variable figures; only two samples were clearly contaminated by DU. There were no signs of contamination by other trace elements.

  19. Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols: A review from an epidemiological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panikkar Bindu

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depleted uranium is being used increasingly often as a component of munitions in military conflicts. Military personnel, civilians and the DU munitions producers are being exposed to the DU aerosols that are generated. Methods We reviewed toxicological data on both natural and depleted uranium. We included peer reviewed studies and gray literature on birth malformations due to natural and depleted uranium. Our approach was to assess the "weight of evidence" with respect to teratogenicity of depleted uranium. Results Animal studies firmly support the possibility that DU is a teratogen. While the detailed pathways by which environmental DU can be internalized and reach reproductive cells are not yet fully elucidated, again, the evidence supports plausibility. To date, human epidemiological data include case examples, disease registry records, a case-control study and prospective longitudinal studies. Discussion The two most significant challenges to establishing a causal pathway between (human parental DU exposure and the birth of offspring with defects are: i distinguishing the role of DU from that of exposure to other potential teratogens; ii documentation on the individual level of extent of parental DU exposure. Studies that use biomarkers, none yet reported, can help address the latter challenge. Thoughtful triangulation of the results of multiple studies (epidemiological and other of DU teratogenicity contributes to disentangling the roles of various potentially teratogenic parental exposures. This paper is just such an endeavor. Conclusion In aggregate the human epidemiological evidence is consistent with increased risk of birth defects in offspring of persons exposed to DU.

  20. Health surveillance of personnel engaged in decontamination of depleted uranium contaminated regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djurovic, B. [Military Medical Academy, Radiological Protection Dept., Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Spasic-Jokic, V. [ESLA Accelerator Installation, Lab. of Physics, VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Fortuna, D.; Milenkovic, M. [NBH Military Educational Center, Krusevac, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia)

    2006-07-01

    After the NATO actions against Serbia and Montenegro, 112 locations were highly contaminated with depleted uranium-112 locations in Kosovo, 7 in the south of Serbia and 1 in Montenegro. Contaminated regions were marked, isolated and some of them decontaminated. In this paper we present the health surveillance protocol created for personnel engaged in decontamination of contaminated regions of Pljackovica and Bratoselce. They were examined and selected before decontamination and only healthy professionals (36 and 28) were engaged. Examination included: general clinical assessment, complete blood count with differential white blood cells; biochemical analysis of blood and urine, specifically renal and liver functions tests, cytogenetic tests (chromosomal aberration and micronucleus test), and laser fluorometry of 24-h urine sample and gamma spectrometry of the same if the levels were elevated. After the decontamination in the first group no clinical or biochemical changes were found, but in 3 of 36 were found unstable chromosomal aberrations. In the second group, in 3 of 28 were found unstable chromosomal aberrations and in 3 of them laser fluorometry analysis showed elevated levels of uranium (>3 {mu}g/l in two, and >5 {mu}g/l in one of them). Gamma spectrometry showed that it was not depleted, but naturally occurring uranium. Additionally performed analysis showed they were from the same village which is in the zone of highly elevated uranium level in ground and water. Three months later no chromosomal changes were found. (authors)

  1. Geological conditions of safe long-term storage and disposal of depleted uranium hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverov, N. P.; Velichkin, V. I.; Omel'Yanenko, B. I.; Yudintsev, S. V.; Tagirov, B. R.

    2010-08-01

    The production of enriched uranium used in nuclear weapons and fuel for atomic power plants is accompanied by the formation of depleted uranium (DU), the amount of which annually increases by 35-40 kt. To date, more than 1.6 Mt DU has accumulated in the world. The main DU mass is stored as environ-mentally hazardous uranium hexafluoride (UF6), which is highly volatile and soluble in water with the formation of hydrofluoric acid. To ensure safe UF6 storage, it is necessary to convert this compound in chemically stable phases. The industrial reprocessing of UF6 into U3O8 and HF implemented in France is highly expensive. We substantiate the expediency of long-term storage of depleted uranium hexafluoride in underground repositories localized in limestone. On the basis of geochemical data and thermodynamic calculations, we show that interaction in the steel container-UF6-limestone-groundwater system gives rise to the development of a slightly alkaline reductive medium favorable for chemical reaction with formation of uraninite (UO2) and fluorite (CaF2). The proposed engineering solution not only ensures safe DU storage but also makes it possible to produce uraninite, which can be utilized, if necessary, in fast-neutron reactors. In the course of further investigations aimed at safe maintenance of DU, it is necessary to study the kinetics of conversion of UF6 into stable phases, involving laboratory and field experiments.

  2. Development of a Novel Depleted Uranium Treatment Process at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates-Anderson, D; Bowers, J; Laue, C; Fitch, T

    2007-01-22

    A three-stage process was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to treat potentially pyrophoric depleted uranium metal wastes. The three-stage process includes waste sorting/rinsing, acid dissolution of the waste metal with a hydrochloric and phosphoric acid solution, and solidification of the neutralized residuals from the second stage with clay. The final product is a solid waste form that can be transported to and disposed of at a permitted low-level radioactive waste disposal site.

  3. Estimation of terrorist attack resistibility of dual-purpose cask TP-117 with DU (depleted uranium) gamma shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, O.G.; Matveev, V.Z.; Morenko, A.I.; Il' kaev, R.I.; Shapovalov, V.I. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center - All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Report is devoted to numerical research of dual-purpose unified cask (used for SFA transportation and storage) resistance to terrorist attacks. High resistance of dual-purpose unified cask has been achieved due to the unique design-technological solutions and implementation of depleted uranium in cask construction. In suggested variant of construction depleted uranium fulfils functions of shielding and constructional material. It is used both in metallic and cermet form (basing on steel and depleted uranium dioxide). Implementation of depleted uranium in cask construction allows maximal load in existing overall dimensions of the cask. At the same time: 1) all safety requirements (IAEA) are met, 2) dual-purpose cask with SFA has high resistance to terrorist attacks.

  4. The Evolution of Depleted Uranium as an Environmental Risk Factor: Lessons from Other Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne E. Briner

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Depleted uranium (DU is used in both civilian and military applications. Civilian uses are primarily limited to ballast and counterweights in ships and aircraft with limited risk of environmental release. The very nature of the military use of DU releases DU into the environment. DU released into the environment from military use takes the form of large fragments that are chemically unchanged and dust in the form of oxides. DU dust is nearly insoluble, respirable and shows little mobility in the soil. Exposure to DU occurs primarily from inhalation of dust and possible hand to mouth activity. Toxicity of DU is believed to be primarily chemical in nature with radiological activity being a lesser problem. DU has been shown to have a variety of behavioral and neurological effects in experimental animals. DU has been used the Balkans, Afghanistan, and both Iraq wars and there is a high probability of its use in future conflicts. Further, other nations are developing DU weaponry; some of these nations may use DU with a greater radiological risk than those currently in use. The toxicity of DU has been studied mostly as an issue of the health of military personnel. However, many tons of DU have been left in the former theater of war and indigenous populations continue to be exposed to DU, primarily in the form of dust. Little epidemiological data exists concerning the impact of DU on these groups. It may be possible to extrapolate what the effects of DU may be on indigenous groups by examining the data on similar metals. DU has many similarities to lead in its route of exposure, chemistry, metabolic fate, target organs, and effect of experimental animals. Studies should be conducted on indigenous groups using lead as a model when ascertaining if DU has an adverse effect.

  5. Applications of Depleted Uranium in the first and second Persian Gulf Wars: a review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhamid Behrouzi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depleted uranium (DU is a byproduct of natural uranium enrichment process. Its unique characteristics (e.g. high density caused to use in civilian and military fields extensively. In the military fields, DU is used in the bullets and projectiles war hats. The munitions containing DU were used in the recent wars, more strikingly in the Middle East region (first and second Persian Gulf wars, and Afghanistan. Due to its biological impacts, this study aimed to assess biological effects of DU using scientometrics by investigating papers indexed in Pubmed from 1990-2008, to reveal the number and type of articles and also the important dimensions of DU biological impacts as well as the core issues. Methods: In this descriptive epidemiologic study, quantitative methods (counting frequency of words and scientometrics were used. Sample size was the total of the articles indexed in Pubmed during 1991- 2008, containing the terms "Gulf War" and "Depleted Uranium" in their title or keywords. Results: The most compromised body systems were urinary, nervous and cardiovascular. Other systems such as endocrine, musculoskeletal, immune and respiratory were also mentioned. Conclusion: Highly controversial results which have been stated in the surveyed articles about DU biological and environmental impacts caused the authors to recommend long term investigations for assessing its effects on recurrence to reveal potential late effects of DU.

  6. Medical effects of internal contamination with actinides: further controversy on depleted uranium and radioactive warfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durakovic, Asaf

    2016-05-01

    The Nuclear Age began in 1945 with testing in New Mexico, USA, and the subsequent bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Regardless of attempts to limit the development of nuclear weapons, the current world arsenal has reached the staggering dimensions and presents a significant concern for the biosphere and mankind. In an explosion of a nuclear weapon, over 400 radioactive isotopes are released into the biosphere, 40 of which pose potential dangers including iodine, cesium, alkaline earths, and actinides. The immediate health effects of nuclear explosions include thermal, mechanical, and acute radiation syndrome. Long-term effects include radioactive fallout, internal contamination, and long-term genotoxicity. The current controversial concern over depleted uranium's somatic and genetic toxicity is still a subject of worldwide sustained research. The host of data generated in the past decades has demonstrated conflicting findings, with the most recent evidence showing that its genotoxicity is greater than previously considered. Of particular concern are the osteotropic properties of uranium isotopes due to their final retention in the crystals of exchangeable and nonexchangeable bone as well as their proximity to pluripotent stem cells. Depleted uranium remains an unresolved issue in both warfare and the search for alternative energy sources.

  7. ZPR-3 Assembly 6F : A spherical assembly of highly enriched uranium, depleted uranium, aluminum and steel with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 47 atom %.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, R. M.; McKnight, R. D; Schaefer, R. W.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-09-30

    Over a period of 30 years, more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited for nuclear data validation and to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. A number of the Argonne ZPR/ZPPR critical assemblies have been evaluated as ICSBEP and IRPhEP benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. ZPR-3 Assembly 6 consisted of six phases, A through F. In each phase a critical configuration was constructed to simulate a very simple shape such as a slab, cylinder or sphere that could be analyzed with the limited analytical tools available in the 1950s. In each case the configuration consisted of a core region of metal plates surrounded by a thick depleted uranium metal reflector. The average compositions of the core configurations were essentially identical in phases A - F. ZPR-3

  8. The state of knowledge about the potential risks associated to depleted uranium used in weapons; Etat des connaissances sur les risques potentiels associes a l'uranium appauvri utilise dans les armes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    This document brigs back the actual knowledge on uranium and its chemical and radiological toxicity. It pays particular attention to discuss the elements allowing to assess the risks linked to the man exposure to depleted uranium. (N.C.)

  9. The re-enrichment of depleted uranium tails in the US versus de-conversion and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deinert, M.R.; Schneider, E.A. [Department of Mechancial Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C2200, Austin, TX 1 University Station, C2200 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    International consumption of uranium currently outpaces production by nearly a factor of two. Secondary supplies from dismantled nuclear weapons, along with civilian and governmental stockpiles, are being used to make up the difference but supplies are limited. However, large amounts of {sup 235}U are contained in the depleted uranium tails left over from past uranium enrichment. The usability of these inhomogeneous uranium supplies depends on their isotopics and the cost of SWU. In the US the current plan is to de-convert depleted uranium tails and to dispose of them in a low level nuclear repository [1]. We present data on cost of re-enriching depleted uranium tails in the US inventory and compare its cost to the disposal option currently under consideration. Historically, the majority of commercial nuclear power has been generated using light-water reactors (LWRs) burning low enriched uranium. While research into technologies that could close the nuclear fuel cycle continues in the US and elsewhere, the maturity and economic competitiveness of LWRs will make them a major presence for decades to come. Because of this, global demand for uranium is likely to remain strong and its future price uncertain, with acceptable alternatives to mined natural uranium being of significant interest as a result. At present, substitutes include down-blending of highly enriched uranium, uranium released from government or utility stockpiles, enrichable depleted uranium (DU) and reprocessable uranium (RU) from spent LWR fuel (SF) [2]. The decision of whether to mine fresh uranium or exploit alternative sources is largely a matter of economics. Depleted uranium stockpiles have a variable {sup 235}U composition and would typically require additional enrichment beyond what is needed for manufacturing LWR fuel from natural uranium. As a result, the price of using DU depends on the costs of enrichment, DU cylinder transport from storage to the enrichment plant, UF{sub 6} tails storage

  10. Remediation of soils contaminated with particulate depleted uranium by multi stage chemical extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crean, Daniel E. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Centre for Radiochemistry Research, School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Livens, Francis R.; Sajih, Mustafa [Centre for Radiochemistry Research, School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Stennett, Martin C. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia N. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hyatt, Neil C., E-mail: n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Batch leaching was examined to remediate soils contaminated with munitions depleted uranium. • Site specific maximum extraction was 42–50% total U in single batch with NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}. • Analysis of residues revealed partial leaching and secondary carbonate phases. • Sequential batch leaching alternating between NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3} and citric acid was designed. • Site specific extraction was increased to 68–87% total U in three batch steps. -- Abstract: Contamination of soils with depleted uranium (DU) from munitions firing occurs in conflict zones and at test firing sites. This study reports the development of a chemical extraction methodology for remediation of soils contaminated with particulate DU. Uranium phases in soils from two sites at a UK firing range, MOD Eskmeals, were characterised by electron microscopy and sequential extraction. Uranium rich particles with characteristic spherical morphologies were observed in soils, consistent with other instances of DU munitions contamination. Batch extraction efficiencies for aqueous ammonium bicarbonate (42–50% total DU extracted), citric acid (30–42% total DU) and sulphuric acid (13–19% total DU) were evaluated. Characterisation of residues from bicarbonate-treated soils by synchrotron microfocus X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed partially leached U(IV)-oxide particles and some secondary uranyl-carbonate phases. Based on these data, a multi-stage extraction scheme was developed utilising leaching in ammonium bicarbonate followed by citric acid to dissolve secondary carbonate species. Site specific U extraction was improved to 68–87% total U by the application of this methodology, potentially providing a route to efficient DU decontamination using low cost, environmentally compatible reagents.

  11. Potential behavior of depleted uranium penetrators under shipping and bulk storage accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, J.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Scherpelz, R.I.

    1985-03-01

    An investigation of the potential hazard from airborne releases of depleted uranium (DU) from the Army's M829 munitions was conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The study included: (1) assessing the characteristics of DU oxide from an April 1983 burn test, (2) postulating conditions of specific accident situations, and (3) reviewing laboratory and theoretical studies of oxidation and airborne transport of DU from accidents. Results of the experimental measurements of the DU oxides were combined with atmospheric transport models and lung and kidney exposure data to help establish reasonable exclusion boundaries to protect personnel and the public at an accident site. 121 references, 44 figures, 30 tables.

  12. Assessing the risk from the depleted uranium weapons used in Operation Allied Force

    CERN Document Server

    Liolios, T E

    1999-01-01

    The conflict in Yugoslavia has been a source of great concern for the neighboring countries, about the radiological and toxic hazard posed by the alleged presence of depleted uranium in NATO weapons. In the present study a worst-case scenario is assumed mainly to assess the risk for Greece and other neighboring countries of Yugoslavia at similar distances . The risk of the weapons currently in use is proved to be negligible at distances greater than 100 Km. For shorter distances classified data of weapons composition are needed to obtain a reliable assessment.

  13. Effect of niobium element on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of depleted uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanping; Wu, Quanwen; Zhu, Shengfa; Pu, Zhen; Zhang, Yanzhi; Wang, Qinguo; Lang, Dingmu; Zhang, Yuping

    2016-09-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has many military and civilian uses. However, its high chemical reactivity limits its application. The effect of Nb content on corrosion behavior of DU is evaluated by scanning Kelvin probe and electrochemical corrosion measurements. The Volta potential value of DU and U-2.5 wt% Nb is about the same level, the Volta potential value of U-5.7 wt% Nb has a rise of 370mVSHE in comparison with DU. The polarization current of U-5.7 wt% Nb alloy is about an order of magnitude of that of DU. The Nb2O5 is the protective layer for the U-Nb alloys. The negative potential of Nb-depleted α phase is the main reason of the poor corrosion resistance of DU and U-2.5 wt% Nb alloy.

  14. Bioaccumulation and biological effects in the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to natural and depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovanetti, Anna, E-mail: anna.giovanetti@enea.i [ENEA, Institute of Radiation Protection, CR Casaccia Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Fesenko, Sergey [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agency' s Laboratories Seibersdorf, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Cozzella, Maria L. [ENEA, National Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation, CR Casaccia Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Asencio, Lisbet D. [Centro de Estudios Ambientales, Carretera a Castillo de Jagua, CP. 59350 C. Nuclear, Cienfuegos (Cuba); Sansone, Umberto [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agency' s Laboratories Seibersdorf, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    The accumulations of both natural (U) and depleted (DU) uranium in the earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were studied to evaluate corresponding biological effects. Concentrations of metals in the experimental soil ranged from 1.86 to 600 mg kg{sup -1}. Five biological endpoints: mortality, animals' weight increasing, lysosomal membrane stability by measuring the neutral red retention time (the NRRT), histological changes and genetic effects (Comet assay) were used to evaluate biological effects in the earthworms after 7 and 28 days of exposure. No effects have been observed in terms of mortality or weight reduction. Cytotoxic and genetic effects were identified at quite low U concentrations. For some of these endpoints, in particular for genetic effects, the dose (U concentration)-effect relationships have been found to be non-linear. The results have also shown a statistically significant higher level of impact on the earthworms exposed to natural U compared to depleted U.

  15. Remediation of soils contaminated with particulate depleted uranium by multi stage chemical extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crean, Daniel E; Livens, Francis R; Sajih, Mustafa; Stennett, Martin C; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia N; Hyatt, Neil C

    2013-12-15

    Contamination of soils with depleted uranium (DU) from munitions firing occurs in conflict zones and at test firing sites. This study reports the development of a chemical extraction methodology for remediation of soils contaminated with particulate DU. Uranium phases in soils from two sites at a UK firing range, MOD Eskmeals, were characterised by electron microscopy and sequential extraction. Uranium rich particles with characteristic spherical morphologies were observed in soils, consistent with other instances of DU munitions contamination. Batch extraction efficiencies for aqueous ammonium bicarbonate (42-50% total DU extracted), citric acid (30-42% total DU) and sulphuric acid (13-19% total DU) were evaluated. Characterisation of residues from bicarbonate-treated soils by synchrotron microfocus X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed partially leached U(IV)-oxide particles and some secondary uranyl-carbonate phases. Based on these data, a multi-stage extraction scheme was developed utilising leaching in ammonium bicarbonate followed by citric acid to dissolve secondary carbonate species. Site specific U extraction was improved to 68-87% total U by the application of this methodology, potentially providing a route to efficient DU decontamination using low cost, environmentally compatible reagents.

  16. Effects of depleted uranium on the health and survival of Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhne, W.W.; Caldwell, C.A.; Gould, W.R.; Fresquez, P.R.; Finger, S.

    2002-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been used as a substitute for the fissionable enriched uranium component of atomic weapons tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) (Los Alamos, NM, USA) since the early 1950s, resulting in considerable concentrations of DU in the soils within the test sites. Although the movement of DU into major aquatic systems has been shown to be minimal, there are many small-order ephemeral streams and areas of standing water in canyons throughout LANL that may be affected by inputs of DU via runoff, erosion, and leaching. Ninety-six-hour acute and 7-d chronic toxicity assays were conducted to measure the toxicity of DU on survival and reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia. A 14-d water-only assay was conducted to measure survival and growth of Hyalella azteca. The estimated median lethal concentration (LC50) to produce 50% mortality of the test population for the 96-h Ceriodaphnia dubia assay was 10.50 mg/L. Reproductive effects occurred at a lowest-observable-effect concentration ???3.91 mg/L with a no-observable-effect concentration of 1.97 mg/L. The estimated 14-d LC50 for the Hyalella azteca assay was 1.52 mg/L No significant relationship was detected between growth and DU concentrations. Concentrations at which toxicity effects were observed in this study for both invertebrates exceeded concentrations of total uranium observed in runoff from LANL lands. Thus, it is likely that current runoff levels of uranium do not pose a threat to these types of aquatic invertebrates.

  17. Epi-genetics modifications induced by a depleted uranium exposure in the zebra fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gombeau, K.; Pereira, S.; Adam-Guillermin, C. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO (France); Bourdineaud, J.P. [UMR CNRS 5805 EPOC (France); Ravanat, J.L. [INAC/Scib UMR E3 CEA-UJF (France)

    2014-07-01

    The work presented here integrates in the general framework of assessment of effects of chronic exposure to low doses of radionuclides. This evaluation necessarily involves the study of the mechanisms of toxic action at the cellular or subcellular level, in order to better understand the processes of propagation of effects to the level of the populations or ecosystems. As such, the question of the mechanisms underlying the trans-generational effects and the adaptive capacity of organisms is central, both in humans and in animal species. Epigenetic refer to changes in gene function that do not involve changes in DNA sequence, and which are transmitted in a hereditary manner by mitosis or meiosis. The latter plays a key role in these trans-generational effects. Among these changes, DNA-methylation is one of the most studied epigenetic parameters. This work is part of a PhD, included in the European COMET project (Euratom 7. Framework Program), and focuses on epigenetic modifications induced in zebra fish after a chronic exposure to radionuclides. Male and female fishes were exposed to 2 and 20 μg.L{sup -1} of depleted uranium for 24 days. After 7 and 24 days of exposure, brain, gonads, and eyes were collected in order to study changes in DNA methylation. In addition, genotoxicity was measured by the γH2AX assay. The overall changes in DNA methylation were studied by AFLP-MS and HPLC-MS, in order to know if the exposure to depleted uranium changes the global status of DNA methylation. We have found a decrease in the global level of methylation in the eyes of males after 24 days of exposure, the diminution being much more important and significant at the higher concentration of exposure (11.79 ± 3.62 against 52.43 ± 3.01 for controls) This study will be refined by analyzing the methylation of specific regions of the genome, because it represent the sequences of genes involved in major physiological functions and that may be subject to variations in the methylation

  18. Remediation application strategies for depleted uranium contaminated soils at the US Army Yuma Proving Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandel, D.S.; Medina, S.M.; Weidner, J.R.

    1994-03-01

    The US Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), located in the southwest portion of Arizona conducts firing of projectiles into the Gunpoint (GP-20) firing range. The penetrators are composed of titanium and DU. The purpose of this project was to determine feasible cleanup technologies and disposal alternatives for the cleanup of the depleted uranium (DU) contaminated soils at YPG. The project was split up into several tasks that include (a) collecting and analyzing samples representative of the GP-20 soils, (b) evaluating the data results, (c) conducting a literature search of existing proven technologies for soil remediation, and (0) making final recommendations for implementation of this technology to the site. As a result of this study, several alternatives for the separation, treatment, and disposal procedures are identified that would result in meeting the cleanup levels defined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for unrestricted use of soils and would result in a significant cost savings over the life of the firing range.

  19. Depleted uranium mobility across a weapons testing site: isotopic investigation of porewater, earthworms, and soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Ian W; Graham, Margaret C; MacKenzie, Angus B; Ellam, Robert M; Farmer, John G

    2008-12-15

    The mobility and bioavailability of depleted uranium (DU) in soils at a UK Ministry of Defence (UK MoD) weapons testing range were investigated. Soil and vegetation were collected near a test-firing position and at eight points along a transect line extending approximately 200 m down-slope, perpendicular to the firing line, toward a small stream. Earthworms and porewaters were subsequently separated from the soils and both total filtered porewater (weapons test-firing operations was more labile and more bioavailable than naturally occurring U in the soils at the testing range. Importantly, DU was shown to be present in soil porewater even at a distance of approximately 185 m from the test-firing position and, along the extent of the transect was apparently associated with organic colloids.

  20. Manufacturing Process Development to Produce Depleted Uranium Wire for EBAM Feedstock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, David John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clarke, Kester Diederik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coughlin, Daniel Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Jeffrey E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-06-30

    Wire produced from depleted uranium (DU) is needed as feedstock for the Electron-Beam Additive Manufacturing (EBAM) process. The goal is to produce long lengths of DU wire with round or rectangular cross section, nominally 1.5 mm (0.060 inches). It was found that rolling methods, rather than swaging or drawing, are preferable for production of intermediate quantities of DU wire. Trials with grooveless rolling have shown that it is suitable for initial reductions of large stock. Initial trials with grooved rolling have been successful, for certain materials. Modified square grooves (square round-bottom vee grooves) with 12.5 % reduction of area per pass have been selected for the reduction process.

  1. Stability of dilute solutions of uranium, lead, and thorium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkey, R.G.

    1954-01-01

    Standard solutions and samples containing a few micrograms of metallic ions per milliliter are frequently used in determination of trace elements. It is important to know whether the concentrations of such solutions remain constant from day to day. The stability of dilute solutions of three metallic ions-uranium, lead, and thorium-has been investigated. Solutions containing concentrations of metallic ions, ranging from 1000 to 0.1 ?? per milliliter, were allowed to stand for approximately 2.5 months, and then the metallic ion content of those solutions that had lost strength was determined. Both adsorption and hydrolysis variously influenced the solute loss, but the minimum pH at which loss of concentration of lead and uranium occurred seemed to coincide with the pH at which the hydrolyzed metal ions began to precipitate. No increase in the stability of the solutions was obtained by substituting polyethylene containers for borosilicate glass. The solutions that lost strength could not be restored promptly to the original concentration by manual means, such as shaking them vigorously for several minutes.

  2. 大鼠吸入贫铀气溶胶后体内铀的分布%Distribution of uranium in rata inhaled with depleted uranium aerosols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘秀颉; 杨陟华; 曹珍山; 李平; 刘刚; 陈忠民; 魏菡; 朱茂祥

    2009-01-01

    目的 建立贫铀(depleted uranium,Du)气溶胶吸人动物模型,观察气溶胶吸入后Du在重要组织器官的蓄积情况.方法 采用大鼠吸入DU气溶胶的实验模型,分别在吸入后的30、90、180、270、360和540 d,采用激光时间分辨发光分析法测定肺脏、肾脏、股骨、肝脏、心脏、脑、脾脏和胸腺等的铀含量.结果 DU气溶胶吸人后高低剂量组大鼠肺铀含量分别为(499 833.3±14 214.8)ng/g及(25 424.0 ±6193.4)ng/g,明显高于未吸入组(28.8±13.9)ng/g(P<0.05).吸入30 d后,肺、股骨及肾中的铀含量明显升高,随时间逐渐下降;吸入60 d起,肝脏、大脑、心脏、胸腺、脾脏中铀含量高于对照组,铀含量呈先升高后降低的两相分布.铀含量以肺脏、股骨、大脑、胸腺中较高,肾次之,肝、心脏、脾较少.结论 DU气溶胶吸入后,铀可在肺、肾、股骨、肝脏、大脑、心脏、胸腺、脾脏等分布,其中肺、股骨、大脑、胸腺及肾脏中高浓度铀的存在提示上述器官是DU损伤的潜在靶器官.%Objective To investigate the distribution of uranium in rats after inhalation with depleted uranium aerosols. Methods The depleted uranium aerosols were inhaled by Wistar rats. At 30, 90, 180, 270, 360, and 540 d after inhalation, the rata were sacrificed and tissue samples were collected. The contents of uranium in lung, kidney, liver, heart, brain, thighbone, spleen and thymus were measured by laser time-dependent spectroscopy analysis. Resulits The uranium contents of lung increased in the high-dosc and low-dose groups [(499833.3 ± 14214.8) ng/g and (25 424.0 ± 6193.4)ng/g, respectively] after inhalation, and significantly differed from the control (28.8 ± 13.9)ng/g, (P < 0.05).At 30 d after inhalation, the contents of uranium in lung, kidney and thighbone were higher than those of control, and then decreased time-dependently. At 60 d, the contents of uranium in liver, heart, brain, spleen and thymus were higher

  3. Observation of radiation-specific damage in cells exposed to depleted uranium: hprt gene mutation frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Alexandra C. [Science Research Departments, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)], E-mail: millera@afrri.usuhs.mil; Stewart, Michael; Rivas, Rafael [Science Research Departments, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Marino, Steve; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 W. 168th St. VC11-215, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Shi Lin [Science Research Departments, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Published data from our laboratory have demonstrated that DU exposure in vitro to immortalized human osteoblast cells (HOS) is both neoplastically transforming and genotoxic. Recent animal studies have also shown that DU is leukemogenic and genotoxic. DU possesses both a radiological (alpha particle) and chemical (metal) component. Since DU has a low specific activity in comparison to natural uranium, it is not considered to be a significant radiological hazard. The potential contribution of radiation to DU-induced biological effects is unknown, and the involvement of radiation in DU-induced biological effects could have significant implications for current risk estimates for internalized DU exposure. The purpose of the current study was to measure the induction of mutagenic damage in V79 cells and to determine if radiation plays a role in the induction of that damage. Mutagenicity at the hypoxanthine (guanine) phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) locus was measured by selection with 6-thioguanine. There was a dose-dependent increase in mutagenic response following DU exposure (10-50{mu}m); the average increase in mutagenicity above background ranged from 2.54{+-}1.19 to 8.75{+-}1.8(P<0.05). Using the same concentration (25{mu}M) of two uranyl nitrate compounds that have different uranium isotopic concentrations and, therefore, different specific activities, we examined the effect on hprt mutant frequency in vitro. V79 cells were exposed to either {sup 238}U-uranyl nitrate, specific activity 0.33{mu}Ci/g, or DU-uranyl nitrate, specific activity 0.44{mu}Ci/g, delivered at a concentration of 25{mu}M for 24 h. Results showed, that at equal uranium concentration, a 1.33-fold increase in specific activity resulted in a 1.27{+-}0.11-fold (P<0.05) increase in hprt mutant frequency. Taken together these data support earlier results showing that radiation can play a role in DU

  4. ZPR-3 Assembly 12 : A cylindrical assembly of highly enriched uranium, depleted uranium and graphite with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 21 atom %.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, R. M.; McKnight, R. D.; Perel, R. L.; Wagschal, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Racah Inst. of Physics

    2010-09-30

    Over a period of 30 years, more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited for nuclear data validation and to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. A number of the Argonne ZPR/ZPPR critical assemblies have been evaluated as ICSBEP and IRPhEP benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. ZPR-3 Assembly 12 (ZPR-3/12) was designed as a fast reactor physics benchmark experiment with an average core {sup 235}U enrichment of approximately 21 at.%. Approximately 68.9% of the total fissions in this assembly occur above 100 keV, approximately 31.1% occur below 100 keV, and essentially none below 0.625 eV - thus the classification as a 'fast' assembly. This assembly is Fast Reactor Benchmark No. 9 in the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) Benchmark

  5. Combined effects of alpha particles and depleted uranium on Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Candy Y.P.; Pereira, Sandrine; Cheng, Shuk Han; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The combined effects of low-dose or high-dose alpha particles and depleted uranium (DU) in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were studied. Three schemes were examined—(i) [ILUL]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure, (ii) [IHUH]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure and (iii) [IHUL]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure—in which Zebrafish embryos were irradiated with alpha particles at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) and/or exposed to uranium at 5–6 hpf. The results were also compared with our previous work, which studied the effects of [ILUH]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure. When the Zebrafish embryos developed to 24 hpf, the apoptotic signals in the entire embryos, used as the biological endpoint for this study, were quantified. Our results showed that [ILUL] and [IHUL] led to antagonistic effects, whereas [IHUH] led to an additive effect. The effect found for the previously studied case of [ILUH] was difficult to define because it was synergistic with reference to the 100 µg/l DU exposure, but it was antagonistic with reference to the 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose. All the findings regarding the four different schemes showed that the combined effects critically depended on the dose response to each individual stressor. We also qualitatively explained these findings in terms of promotion of early death of cells predisposed to spontaneous transformation by alpha particles, interacting with the delay in cell death resulting from various concentrations of DU exposure. PMID:26937024

  6. Determination of Depleted Uranium in Environmental Bio-monitor Samples and Soil from Target sites in Western Balkan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sarata K.; Enomoto, Hiroko; Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Ujić, Predrag; Čeliković, Igor; Žunić, Zora S.

    2008-08-01

    Lichen and Moss are widely used to assess the atmospheric pollution by heavy metals and radionuclides. In this paper, we report results of uranium and its isotope ratios using mass spectrometric measurements (followed by chemical separation procedure) for mosses, lichens and soil samples from a depleted uranium (DU) target site in western Balkan region. Samples were collected in 2003 from Han Pijesak (Republika Srpska in Bosnia and Hercegovina). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements show the presence of high concentration of uranium in some samples. Concentration of uranium in moss samples ranged from 5.2-755.43 Bq/Kg. We have determined 235U/238U isotope ratio using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) from the samples with high uranium content and the ratios are in the range of 0.002097-0.002380. TIMS measurement confirms presence of DU in some samples. However, we have not noticed any traces of DU in samples containing lesser amount of uranium or from any samples from the living environment of same area.

  7. Preconceptual design studies and cost data of depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E

    1999-07-26

    One of the more important legacies left with the Department of Energy (DOE) after the privatization of the United States Enrichment Corporation is the large inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) is responsible for the long-term management of some 700,000 metric tons of DUF6 stored at the sites of the two gaseous diffusion plants located at Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The DUF6 management program resides in NE's Office of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management. The current DUF6 program has largely focused on the ongoing maintenance of the cylinders containing DUF6. However, the long-term management and eventual disposition of DUF6 is the subject of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) and Public Law 105-204. The first step for future use or disposition is to convert the material, which requires construction and long-term operation of one or more conversion plants. To help inform the DUF6 program's planning activities, it was necessary to perform design and cost studies of likely DUF6 conversion plants at the preconceptual level, beyond the PEIS considerations but not as detailed as required for conceptual designs of actual plants. This report contains the final results from such a preconceptual design study project. In this fast track, three month effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Bechtel National Incorporated developed and evaluated seven different preconceptual design cases for a single plant. The preconceptual design, schedules, costs, and issues associated with specific DUF6 conversion approaches, operating periods, and ownership options were evaluated based on criteria established by DOE. The single-plant conversion options studied were similar to the dry-conversion process alternatives from the PEIS. For each of the seven cases considered, this report contains

  8. Evaluation of the Acceptability of Potential Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Products at the Envirocare Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.

    2001-01-11

    The purpose of this report is to review and document the capability of potential products of depleted UF{sub 6} conversion to meet the current waste acceptance criteria and other regulatory requirements for disposal at the facility in Clive, Utah, owned by Envirocare of Utah, Inc. The investigation was conducted by identifying issues potentially related to disposal of depleted uranium (DU) products at Envirocare and conducting an initial analysis of them. Discussions were then held with representatives of Envirocare, the state of Utah (which is a NRC Agreement State and, thus, is the cognizant regulatory authority for Envirocare), and DOE Oak Ridge Operations. Provisional issue resolution was then established based on the analysis and discussions and documented in a draft report. The draft report was then reviewed by those providing information and revisions were made, which resulted in this document. Issues that were examined for resolution were (1) license receipt limits for U isotopes; (2) DU product classification as Class A waste; (3) use of non-DOE disposal sites for disposal of DOE material; (4) historical NRC views; (5) definition of chemical reactivity; (6) presence of mobile radionuclides; and (7) National Environmental Policy Act coverage of disposal. The conclusion of this analysis is that an amendment to the Envirocare license issued on October 5, 2000, has reduced the uncertainties regarding disposal of the DU product at Envirocare to the point that they are now comparable with uncertainties associated with the disposal of the DU product at the Nevada Test Site that were discussed in an earlier report.

  9. Lead abundance in the uranium star CS 31082-001

    CERN Document Server

    Plez, B; Cayrel, R; Spite, M; Barbuy, B; Beers, T C; Bonifacio, P; Primas, F; Nordström, B

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper we were able to measure the abundance of uranium and thorium in the very-metal poor halo giant BPS CS 31082-001, but only obtained an upper limit for the abundance of lead (Pb). We have got from ESO 17 hours of additional exposure on this star in order to secure a detection of the minimum amount of lead expected to be present in CS 31082-001, the amount arising from the decay of the original content of Th and U in the star. We report here this successful detection. We find an LTE abundance log(Pb/H)+12=-0.55 \\pm 0.15 dex, one dex below the upper limits given by other authors for the similar stars CS 22892-052 and BD +17d3248, also enhanced in r-process elements. From the observed present abundances of Th and U in the star, the expected amount of Pb produced by the decay of 232Th, and 238U alone, over 12-15 Gyr is -0.73\\pm 0.17 dex. The decay of 235U is more difficult to estimate, but is probably slightly below the contribution of 238U, making the contribution of the 3 actinides only slight...

  10. Products of in Situ Corrosion of Depleted Uranium Ammunition in Bosnia and Herzegovina Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuheng; von Gunten, Konstantin; Bartova, Barbora; Meisser, Nicolas; Astner, Markus; Burger, Mario; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-11-15

    Hundreds of tons of depleted uranium (DU) ammunition were used in previous armed conflicts in Iraq, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Serbia/Kosovo. The majority (>90%) of DU penetrators miss their target and, if left in the environment, corrode in these postconflict zones. Thus, the best way to understand the fate of bulk DU material in the environment is to characterize the corrosion products of intact DU penetrators under field conditions for extended periods of time. However, such studies are scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we characterized corrosion products formed from two intact DU penetrators that remained in soils in Bosnia and Herzegovina for over seven years. We used a combination of X-ray powder diffraction, electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that metaschoepite (UO3(H2O)2) was a main component of the two DU corrosion products. Moreover, studtite ((UO2)O2(H2O)2·2(H2O)) and becquerelite (Ca(UO2)6O4(OH)6·8(H2O)) were also identified in the corrosion products. Their formation through transformation of metaschoepite was a result of the geochemical conditions under which the penetrators corroded. Moreover, we propose that the transformation of metaschoepite to becquerelite or studtite in the DU corrosion products would decrease the potential for mobilization of U from corroded DU penetrators exposed to similar environments in postconflict areas.

  11. Modeling exposure to depleted uranium in support of decommissioning at Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebinger, M.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Oxenburg, T.P. [Army Test and Evaluation Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Jefferson Proving Ground was used by the US Army Test and Evaluation Command for testing of depleted uranium munitions and closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This paper integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

  12. Measures of genotoxicity in Gulf war I veterans exposed to depleted uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDiarmid, Melissa A; Albertini, Richard J; Tucker, James D; Vacek, Pamela M; Carter, Elizabeth W; Bakhmutsky, Marina V; Oliver, Marc S; Engelhardt, Susan M; Squibb, Katherine S

    2011-08-01

    Exposure to depleted uranium (DU), an alpha-emitting heavy metal, has prompted the inclusion of markers of genotoxicity in the long-term medical surveillance of a cohort of DU-exposed Gulf War veterans followed since 1994. Using urine U (uU) concentration as the measure of U body burden, the cohort has been stratified into low-u (genotoxicity [micronuclei (MN), chromosome aberrations, and MFs of HPRT and PIGA] were examined. There were no statistically significant differences in any outcome measure when results were compared between the low- vs. high-U groups. However, modeling of the HPRT MF results suggests a possible threshold effect for MFs occurring in the highest U exposed cohort members. Mutational spectral analysis of HPRT mutations is underway to clarify a potential clonal vs. a threshold uU effect to explain this observation. This study provides a comprehensive evaluation of a human population chronically exposed to DU and demonstrates a relatively weak genotoxic effect of the DU exposure. These results may explain the lack of clear epidemiologic evidence for U carcinogenicity in humans. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Modulated Tool-Path Chip Breaking For Depleted Uranium Machining Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkman, W. E.; Babelay Jr., E. F.; Smith, K. S.; Assaid T. S.; McFarland, J. T.; Tursky, D. A.

    2010-04-15

    Turning operations involving depleted uranium frequently generate long, stringy chips that present a hazard to both the machinist and the machine tool. While a variety of chip-breaking techniques are available, they generally depend on a mechanism that increases the bending of the chip or the introduction of a one dimensional vibration that produces an interrupted cutting pattern. Unfortunately, neither of these approaches is particularly effective when making a 'light depth-of-cut' on a contoured workpiece. The historical solution to this problem has been for the machinist to use long-handled tweezers to 'pull the chip' and try to keep it submerged in the chip pan; however, this approach is not practical for all machining operations. This paper discusses a research project involving the Y-12 National Security Complex and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in which unique, oscillatory part programs are used to continuously create an interrupted cut that generates pre-defined, user-selectable chip lengths.

  14. Applications of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Risk Data to Military Combat Risk Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daxon, Eric G.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Melanson, Mark A.; Roszell, Laurie E.

    2009-03-01

    Risks to personnel engaged in military operations include not only the threat of enemy firepower but also risks from exposure to other hazards such as radiation. Combatant commanders of the U. S. Army carefully weigh risks of casualties before implementing battlefield actions using an established paradigm that take these risks into consideration. As a result of the inclusion of depleted uranium (DU) anti-armor ammunition in the conventional (non-nuclear) weapons arsenal, the potential for exposure to DU aerosols and its associated chemical and radiological effects becomes an element of the commanders’ risk assessment. The Capstone DU Aerosol Study measured the range of likely DU oxide aerosol concentrations created inside a combat vehicle perforated with a DU munition, and the Capstone Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) estimated the associated doses and calculated risks. This paper focuses on the development of a scientific approach to adapt the risks from DU’s non uniform dose distribution within the body using the current U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) radiation risk management approach. The approach developed equates the Radiation Exposure Status (RES) categories to the estimated radiological risks of DU and makes use of the Capstone-developed Renal Effects Group (REG) as a measure of chemical risk from DU intake. Recommendations are provided for modifying Army guidance and policy in order to better encompass the potential risks from DU aerosol inhalation during military operations.

  15. Proceedings of a workshop on uses of depleted uranium in storage, transportation and repository facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    A workshop on the potential uses of depleted uranium (DU) in the repository was organized to coordinate the planning of future activities. The attendees, the original workshop objective and the agenda are provided in Appendices A, B and C. After some opening remarks and discussions, the objectives of the workshop were revised to: (1) exchange information and views on the status of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities related to repository design and planning; (2) exchange information on DU management and planning; (3) identify potential uses of DU in the storage, transportation, and disposal of high-level waste and spent fuel; and (4) define the future activities that would be needed if potential uses were to be further evaluated and developed. This summary of the workshop is intended to be an integrated resource for planning of any future work related to DU use in the repository. The synopsis of the first day`s presentations is provided in Appendix D. Copies of slides from each presenter are presented in Appendix E.

  16. Advancing Performance Assessment for Disposal of Depleted Uranium at Clive Utah - 12493

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Paul; Tauxe, John; Perona, Ralph; Lee, Robert; Catlett, Kate; Balshi, Mike; Fitzgerald, Mark; McDermott, Greg [Neptune and Company, Inc., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Shrum, Dan; McCandless, Sean; Sobocinski, Robert; Rogers, Vern [EnergySolutions, LLC, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A Performance Assessment (PA) for disposal of depleted uranium (DU) waste has recently been completed for a potential disposal facility at Clive in northwestern Utah. For the purposes of this PA, 'DU waste' includes uranium oxides of all naturally-occurring isotopes, though depleted in U-235, varying quantities of other radionuclides introduced to the uranium enrichment process in the form of used nuclear reactor fuel (reactor returns), and decay products of all of these radionuclides. The PA will be used by the State of Utah to inform an approval decision for disposal of DU waste at the facility, and will be available to federal regulators as they revisit rulemaking for the disposal of DU. The specific performance objectives of the Clive DU PA relate to annual individual radiation dose within a 10,000-year performance period, groundwater concentrations of specific radionuclides within a 500-year compliance period, and site stability in the longer term. Fate and transport processes that underlie the PA model include radioactive decay and ingrowth, diffusion in gaseous and water phases, water advection in unsaturated and saturated zones, transport caused by plant and animal activity, cover naturalization, natural and anthropogenic erosion, and air dispersion. Fate and transport models were used to support the dose assessment and the evaluation of groundwater concentrations. Exposure assessment was based on site-specific scenarios, since the traditional human exposure scenarios suggested by DOE and NRC guidance are unrealistic for this site. Because the U-238 in DU waste reaches peak radioactivity (secular equilibrium) after 2 million years (My) following its separation, the PA must also evaluate the impact of climate change cycles, including the return of pluvial lakes such as Lake Bonneville. The first draft of the PA has been submitted to the State of Utah for review. The results of this preliminary analysis indicate that doses are very low for the site

  17. Measurement and analysis of the 238U(n, 2n) reaction rate in depleted uranium/polyethylene shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Xiao-Song; LIU Rong; LU Xin-Xin; JIANG Li; WEN Zhong-Wei; HAN Zi-Jie

    2012-01-01

    In order to check the conceptual design of the subcritical blanket in a fnsion-fission hybrid reactor,a depleted uranium/polyethylene simulation device with alternate shells has been established.The measurement of the 238U(n,2n) reaction rate was carried out using an activation technique,by measuring the 208 keV γ rays emitted from 237 U.The self-absorption of depleted uranium foils with different thicknesses was experimentally corrected.The distribution of the 238U(n,2n) reaction rate at 90° to the incident D+ beam was obtained,with uncertainty between 5.3% and 6.0%.The experiment was analyzed using MCNP5 code with the ENDF/BVI library,and the calculated results are all about 5% higher than the measured results.

  18. Using Volcanic Ash to Remove Dissolved Uranium and Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, David S.; Cuero, Raul G.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have shown that significant fractions of uranium, lead, and possibly other toxic and/or radioactive substances can be removed from an aqueous solution by simply exposing the solution, at ambient temperature, to a treatment medium that includes weathered volcanic ash from Pu'u Nene, which is a cinder cone on the Island of Hawaii. Heretofore, this specific volcanic ash has been used for an entirely different purpose: simulating the spectral properties of Martian soil. The treatment medium can consist of the volcanic ash alone or in combination with chitosan, which is a natural polymer that can be produced from seafood waste or easily extracted from fungi, some bacteria, and some algae. The medium is harmless to plants and animals and, because of the abundance and natural origin of its ingredient( s), is inexpensive. The medium can be used in a variety of ways and settings: it can be incorporated into water-filtration systems; placed in contact or mixed with water-containing solids (e.g., soils and sludges); immersed in bodies of water (e.g., reservoirs, lakes, rivers, or wells); or placed in and around nuclear power plants, mines, and farm fields.

  19. Measurements of daily urinary uranium excretion in German peacekeeping personnel and residents of the Kosovo region to assess potential intakes of depleted uranium (DU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeh, U. [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)]. E-mail: uwe.oeh@gsf.de; Priest, N.D. [Middlesex University, School of Health and Social Sciences, Queensway, Enfield, EN3 4SA (United Kingdom); Roth, P. [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Ragnarsdottir, K.V. [University of Bristol, Department of Earth Sciences, Bristol, BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Li, W.B. [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Hoellriegl, V. [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Thirlwall, M.F. [Royal Holloway University of London, Department of Geology, Egham, TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Michalke, B. [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Giussani, A. [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, and INFN, Sezione di Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Schramel, P. [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Paretzke, H.G. [GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2007-08-01

    Following the end of the Kosovo conflict, in June 1999, a study was instigated to evaluate whether there was a cause for concern of health risk from depleted uranium (DU) to German peacekeeping personnel serving in the Balkans. In addition, the investigations were extended to residents of Kosovo and southern Serbia, who lived in areas where DU ammunitions were deployed. In order to assess a possible DU intake, both the urinary uranium excretion of volunteer residents and water samples were collected and analysed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). More than 1300 urine samples from peacekeeping personnel and unexposed controls of different genders and age were analysed to determine uranium excretion parameters. The urine measurements for 113 unexposed subjects revealed a daily uranium excretion rate with a geometric mean of 13.9 ng/d (geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 2.17). The analysis of 1228 urine samples from the peacekeeping personnel resulted in a geometric mean of 12.8 ng/d (GSD = 2.60). It follows that both unexposed controls and peacekeeping personnel excreted similar amounts of uranium. Inter-subject variation in uranium excretion was high and no significant age-specific differences were found. The second part of the study monitored 24 h urine samples provided by selected residents of Kosovo and adjacent regions of Serbia compared to controls from Munich, Germany. Total uranium and isotope ratios were measured in order to determine DU content. {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratios were within {+-} 0.3% of the natural value, and {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U was less than 2 x 10{sup -7}, indicating no significant DU in any of the urine samples provided, despite total uranium excretion being relatively high in some cases. Measurements of ground and tap water samples from regions where DU munitions were deployed did not show any contamination with DU, except in one sample. It is concluded that both peacekeeping personnel and residents serving or

  20. Solid state speciation and potential bioavailability of depleted uranium particles from Kosovo and Kuwait

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, O.C. [Isotope Laboratory, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 As (Norway)], E-mail: ole-christian.lind@umb.no; Salbu, B.; Skipperud, L. [Isotope Laboratory, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 As (Norway); Janssens, K.; Jaroszewicz, J.; De Nolf, W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-04-15

    A combination of synchrotron radiation based X-ray microscopic techniques ({mu}-XRF, {mu}-XANES, {mu}-XRD) applied on single depleted uranium (DU) particles and semi-bulk leaching experiments has been employed to link the potential bioavailability of DU particles to site-specific particle characteristics. The oxidation states and crystallographic forms of U in DU particles have been determined for individual particles isolated from selected samples collected at different sites in Kosovo and Kuwait that were contaminated by DU ammunition during the 1999 Balkan conflict and the 1991 Gulf war. Furthermore, small soil or sand samples heavily contaminated with DU particles were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal fluid (0.16 M HCl) extractions. Characteristics of DU particles in Kosovo soils collected in 2000 and in Kuwait soils collected in 2002 varied significantly depending on the release scenario and to some extent on weathering conditions. Oxidized U (+6) was determined in large, fragile and bright yellow DU particles released during fire at a DU ammunition storage facility and crystalline phases such as schoepite (UO{sub 3}.2.25H{sub 2}O), dehydrated schoepite (UO{sub 3}.0.75H{sub 2}O) and metaschoepite (UO{sub 3}.2.0H{sub 2}O) were identified. As expected, these DU particles were rapidly dissolved in 0.16 M HCl (84 {+-} 3% extracted after 2 h) indicating a high degree of potential mobility and bioavailability. In contrast, the 2 h extraction of samples contaminated with DU particles originating either from corrosion of unspent DU penetrators or from impacted DU ammunition appeared to be much slower (20-30%) as uranium was less oxidized (+4 to +6). Crystalline phases such as UO{sub 2}, UC and metallic U or U-Ti alloy were determined in impacted DU particles from Kosovo and Kuwait, while the UO{sub 2,34} phase, only determined in particles from Kosovo, could reflect a more corrosive environment. Although the results are based on a limited number of DU particles

  1. Toxicity of uranium and lead on osteoblastic bone cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, S.; Thiebault, C.; Carriere, M.; Gouget, B. [CEA Saclay, CNRS, UMR9956, Lab Pierre Sue, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Malaval, L. [INSERM, 42023 Saint Etienne (France)

    2007-07-01

    Bone is one of the main retention organs affected by uranium (U) and lead (Pb). Intoxications have been documented to inhibit bone formation and impair bone modeling and remodeling. However, only few studies dealt with cellular and molecular mechanisms of their toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute cytotoxicity of U and Pb and their phenotypic effects on ROS17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. The most likely forms of the toxics in contact with cells after blood contamination were selected for cell exposure. Results show that whatever their speciation, bone cells are always more sensitive to Pb than to U. Moreover, Pb is toxic when it is left free in the exposure medium or when it is complexed with bicarbonate, cysteine or citrate, but not with albumin or phosphate. U is more cytotoxic when it is complexed with transferrin than with bicarbonate. A direct correlation between toxicity and cellular accumulation could be observed. Beside, exposure of U or Pb to bone cells induces a speciation-dependant variation of RNA expression of two markers of bone formation and mineralization: osteocalcin (OCN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP). OCN and BSP-expression could be activated in sub-toxic condition, respectively, by Pb-albumin (1.6-fold) and U-bicarbonate (2.3-fold). In the meantime, U-transferrin and Pb-citrate lead to an inhibition of the two markers. This study shows a complex mechanism of toxicity of two heavy metals with a significant phenotypic impact on osteoblastic cells highly dependant on metal speciation which controls cell accumulation. (authors)

  2. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations in sheep from the area contaminated by depleted uranium during NATO air strikes in 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fišter Svetlana L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of cytogenetic studies in sheep from the region of Bujanovac that was contaminated by depleted uranium during the NATO air strikes in 1999. The study was conducted on sheep blood lymphocytes, in order to determine the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and to assess the presence of genetic risk as a result of the possible impact of depleted uranium. Blood samples for lymphocyte cultures were taken at random from the 20 animals of the households in the village of Borovac, near Bujanovac. The animals were chosen because they were pastured, fed, and watered in the NATO bombing area. With the purpose of comparing the results two control groups were cytogenetically analyzed, each consisted of 20 sheep from Zemun and Ovča, two northern localities that were not contaminated with depleted uranium. The established structural chromosomal changes were of breaks and gap types, and their frequencies in sheep of all surveyed localities were within the range of basic level values that are commonly found in the sheep lymphocyte cultures analyses. Significant differences are apparent between the values defined in the sheep from Bujanovac compared to those obtained in the sheep from the northern locality (Zemun, probably as a result of breeding of animals in the farm conditions and their being less exposed to the impact of environmental agents. There were neither elevated values of polyploid and aneuploid cells nor significant differences between the sites. According to earlier known data, depleted uranium was below the detection limit of the method applied both in the soil and feed given to cytogenetically analyzed animals. Based on the low-level changes that are in the range of the basic level changes, commonly observed in sheep lymphocytes control cultures, it cannot be said with certainty that it was depleted uranium that caused the changes, or that it is wide-spread in the region of Bujanovac. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke

  3. Phytotoxicity of depleted uranium on three grasses characteristic of different successional stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M.C.; McLendon, T. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In response to a paucity of data on the chemical toxicity of uranium to plants, a factorial experiment employing five uranium concentrations (0, 50, 500, 5,000, 25,000 ppm) and three moisture levels (high, medium, low) was performed using three native grasses. Buchloe dactyloides, Schizachyrium scoparium, and Aristida longiseta were grown in monocultures and every mixture of two species under all combinations of uranium and moisture levels. This design allows for the analysis of uranium effects, as well as possible compound effects due to moisture stress. Several measures of plant health and viability were made, including: percent emergence, survivability of seedlings and mature plants, root and shoot biomass, number of spikelets, and uranium concentrations of leaves, seeds and roots. No significant differences between uranium levels were observed in terms of emergence and seedling survival. Effects are evident for plant biomass and longterm survivability.

  4. Environmental radiation monitoring plan for depleted uranium and beryllium areas, Yuma Proving Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-05-11

    This Environmental Radiation Monitoring Plan (ERM) discusses sampling soils, vegetation, and biota for depleted uranium (DU) and beryllium (Be) at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG). The existing ERM plan was used and modified to more adequately assess the potential of DU and Be migration through the YPG ecosystem. The potential pathways for DU and Be migration are discussed and include soil to vegetation, soil to animals, vegetation to animals, animals to animals, and animals to man. Sample collection will show DU deposition and will be used to estimate DU migration. The number of samples from each area varies and depends on if the firing range of interest is currently used for DU testing (GP 17A) or if the range is not used currently for DU testing (GP 20). Twenty to thirty-five individual mammals or lizards will be sampled from each transect. Air samples and samples of dust in the air fall will be collected in three locations in the active ranges. Thirty to forty-five sediment samples will be collected from different locations in the arroys near the impact areas. DU and Be sampling in the Hard Impact and Soft Impact areas changed only slightly from the existing ERM. The modifications are changes in sample locations, addition of two sediment transport locations, addition of vegetation samples, mammal samples, and air sampling from three to five positions on the impact areas. Analysis of samples for DU or total U by inductively-coupled mass spectroscopy (ICP/MS), cc spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis (NAA), and kinetic phosphorimetric analysis (KPA) are discussed, and analysis for Be by ICP/MS are recommended. Acquiring total U (no isotope data) from a large number of samples and analysis of those samples with relatively high total U concentrations results in fewer isotopic identifications but more information on U distribution. From previous studies, total U concentrations greater than about 3 times natural background are usually DU by isotopic confirmation.

  5. Evaluation of depleted uranium in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds, Arizona. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.H.; Myers, O.B.; Bestgen, H.T.; Jenkins, D.G. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1995-01-01

    This report represents an evaluation of depleted uranium (DU) introduced into the environment at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG), Maryland and Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) Arizona. This was a cooperative project between the Environmental Sciences and Statistical Analyses Groups at LANL and with the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University. The project represents a unique approach to assessing the environmental impact of DU in two dissimilar ecosystems. Ecological exposure models were created for each ecosystem and sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were conducted to identify exposure pathways which were most influential in the fate and transport of DU in the environment. Research included field sampling, field exposure experiment, and laboratory experiments. The first section addresses DU at the APG site. Chapter topics include bioenergetics-based food web model; field exposure experiments; bioconcentration by phytoplankton and the toxicity of U to zooplankton; physical processes governing the desorption of uranium from sediment to water; transfer of uranium from sediment to benthic invertebrates; spead of adsorpion by benthic invertebrates; uptake of uranium by fish. The final section of the report addresses DU at the YPG site. Chapters include the following information: Du transport processes and pathway model; field studies of performance of exposure model; uptake and elimination rates for kangaroo rates; chemical toxicity in kangaroo rat kidneys.

  6. Biokinetics and dosimetry of depleted uranium (DU) in rats implanted with DU fragments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilmette, Ray A.; Hahn, Fletcher F.; Durbin, P. W.

    2004-01-01

    A number of U. S. veterans of the Persian Gulf War were wounded with depleted uranium (DU) metal fragments as a result of 'friendly fire' incidents, in which Abrams tanks and Bradley fighting vehicles were struck by DU anti-armor munitions. Some of the crew members who survived were left with multiple small fragments of DU in their muscles and soft tissues. The number, size and location of the fragments made them inoperable in general, and therefore subject to long-term retention. Because there was inadequate data to predict the potential carcinogenicity of DU fragments in soft tissues, Hahn et al. (2003) conducted a lifespan cancer study in rats. As part of that study, a number of rats were maintained to study the biokinetics and dosimetry of DU implanted intramuscularly in male Wistar rats. Typically, four metal fragments, either as cylindrical pellets or square wafers were implanted into the biceps femoris muscles of the rats. Urine samples were collected periodically during their lifespans, and DU was analyzed in kidneys and eviscerated carcass (minus the implant sites) at death. The daily DU urinary excretion rate increased steeply during the first 30 d after implantation peaking at about 90 d at 3-10 x 10{sup -3}%/d. During the first 150 d, the average excretion rate was 2.4 x 10{sup -3}%/d, decreasing thereafter to about 1 x 10{sup -3}%/d. Serial radiographs were made of the wound sites to monitor gross morphologic changes in the DU implant and the surrounding tissue. As early as 1 w after implantation, radiographs showed the presence of surface corrosion and small, dense bodies near the original implant, presumably DU. This corrosion from the surface of the implant continued with time, but did not result in an increasing amount of DU reaching the blood and urine after the first 3 mo. During this 3-mo period, connective tissue capsules formed around the implants, and are hypothesized to have reduced the access of DU to tissue fluids by limiting the

  7. Temporal Variations in Surface Concentrations of Terrestrial Lead 210 and Uranium 235 Radionucleides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimori, M.

    We have started to measure the surface concentrations of terrestrial radionucleides of lead 210 and uranium 235 in Tokyo (N35, E139) in 2002. Lead 210 which is a daughter nucleus of Rn-222 (uranium series) emits 46 keV gamma-ray with a half-life of 22.4 years, while uranium 235 (actinium series) emits a gamma-ray at 186 keV with a half-life of 0.7 billion years. The present measurement of the surface concentration of lead 210 exhibits two peaks in spring and fall, similar to the beryllium 7 seasonal variations, while the uranium 235 concentration does not vary with time within statistical errors. These two terrestrial radionucleides exhibit different temporal variations on the surface. We discuss possible explanations for the differences in the temporal variations from a point of view of differences in their altitude distribution.

  8. Electrically Heated Testing of the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) Experiment Using a Depleted Uranium Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sanzi, James

    2017-01-01

    The Kilopower project aims to develop and demonstrate scalable fission-based power technology for systems capable of delivering 110 kW of electric power with a specific power ranging from 2.5 - 6.5 Wkg. This technology could enable high power science missions or could be used to provide surface power for manned missions to the Moon or Mars. NASA has partnered with the Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos National Labs, and Y-12 National Security Complex to develop and test a prototypic reactor and power system using existing facilities and infrastructure. This technology demonstration, referred to as the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling TechnologY (KRUSTY), will undergo nuclear ground testing in the summer of 2017 at the Nevada Test Site. The 1 kWe variation of the Kilopower system was chosen for the KRUSTY demonstration. The concept for the 1 kWe flight system consist of a 4 kWt highly enriched Uranium-Molybdenum reactor operating at 800 degrees Celsius coupled to sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes deliver heat to the hot ends of eight 125 W Stirling convertors producing a net electrical output of 1 kW. Waste heat is rejected using titanium-water heat pipes coupled to carbon composite radiator panels. The KRUSTY test, based on this design, uses a prototypic highly enriched uranium-molybdenum core coupled to prototypic sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes transfer heat to two Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E2s) and six thermal simulators, which simulate the thermal draw of full scale power conversion units. Thermal simulators and Stirling engines are gas cooled. The most recent project milestone was the completion of non-nuclear system level testing using an electrically heated depleted uranium (non-fissioning) reactor core simulator. System level testing at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) has validated performance predictions and has demonstrated system level operation and control in a test configuration that replicates the one

  9. Observation of radiation-specific damage in human cells exposed to depleted uranium: dicentric frequency and neoplastic transformation as endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A C; Xu, J; Stewart, M; Brooks, K; Hodge, S; Shi, L; Page, N; McClain, D

    2002-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Published data from our laboratory have demonstrated that DU exposure in vitro to immortalised human osteoblast cells (HOS) is both neoplastically transforming and genotoxic. DU possesses both a radiological (alpha-particle) and chemical (metal) component. Since DU has a low specific activity in comparison to natural uranium, it is not considered to be a significant radiological hazard. The potential contribution of radiation to DU-induced biological effects is unknown and the involvement of radiation in DU-induced biological effects could have significant implications for current risk estimates for internalised DU exposure. Two approaches were used to address this question. The frequency of dicentrics was measured in HOS cells following DU exposure in vitro. Data demonstrated that DU exposure (50 microM, 24 h) induced a significant elevation in dicentric frequency in vitro in contrast to incubation with the heavy metals, nickel and tungsten which did not increase dicentric frequency above background levels. Using the same concentration (50 microM) of three uranyl nitrate compounds that have different uranium isotopic concentrations and therefore, different specific activities, the effect on neoplastic transformation in vitro was examined. HOS cells were exposed to one of three-uranyl nitrate compounds (238U-uranyl nitrate, specific activity 0.33 microCi.g-1; DU-uranyl nitrate, specific activity 0.44 microCi.g-1; and 235U-uranyl nitrate, specific activity 2.2 microCi.g-1) delivered at a concentration of 50 microM for 24 h. Results showed, at equal uranium concentration, there was a specific activity dependent increase in neoplastic transformation frequency. Taken together these data suggest that radiation can play a role in DU-induced biological effects in vitro.

  10. Observation of radiation-specific damage in human cells exposed to depleted uranium: dicentric frequency and neoplastic transformation as endpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.C.; Xu, J.; Stewart, M.; Brooks, K.; Hodge, S.; Shi, L.; Page, M.; McClain, D

    2002-07-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Published data from our laboratory have demonstrated that DU exposure in vitro to immortalised human osteoblast cells (HOS) is both neoplastically transforming and genotoxic. DU possesses both a radiological (alpha-particle) and chemical (metal) component. Since DU has a low specific activity in comparison to natural uranium, it is not considered to be a significant radiological hazard. The potential contribution of radiation to DU-induced biological effects is unknown and the involvement of radiation in DU-induced biological effects could have significant implication for current risk estimates for internalised DU exposure. Two approaches were used to address this question. The frequency of dicentrics was measured in HOS cells following DU exposure in vitro. Data demonstrated that DU exposure (50 {mu}M, 24h) induced a significant elevation in dicentric frequency in vitro in contrast to incubation with the heavy metals, nickel and tungsten which did not increase dicentric frequency above background levels. Using the same concentration (50 {mu}M) of three uranyl nitrate compounds that have different uranium isotopic concentrations and therefore, different specific activities, the effect on neoplastic transformation in vitro was examined. HOS cells were exposed to one of three-uranyl nitrate compounds ({sup 238}U-uranyl nitrate, specific activity 0.33 {mu}Ci.g{sup -1}: DU-uranyl nitrate, specific activity 0.44 {mu}Ci.g{sup -1}: and {sup 235}U-uranyl nitrate, specific activity 2.2 {mu}Ci.g{sup -1}) delivered at a concentration of 50 {mu}M for 24 h. Results showed, at equal uranium concentration, there was a specific activity dependent increase in neoplastic transformation frequency. Taken together these data suggest that radiation can play a role in DU-induced biological effects in vitro. (author)

  11. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vanta, E.B. [Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  12. Determination of {sup 236}U and transuranium elements in depleted uranium ammunition by {alpha}-spectrometry and ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desideri, D.; Meli, M.A.; Roselli, C.; Testa, C. [General Chemistry Institute, Urbino University, Urbino (Italy); Boulyga, S.F.; Becker, J.S. [Central Department of Analytical Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2002-11-01

    It is well known that ammunition containing depleted uranium (DU) was used by NATO during the Balkan conflict. To evaluate the origin of DU (the enrichment of natural uranium or the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel) it is necessary to directly detect the presence of activation products ({sup 236}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 237}Np) in the ammunition. In this work the analysis of actinides by {alpha}-spectrometry was compared with that by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after selective separation of ultratraces of transuranium elements from the uranium matrix. {sup 242}Pu and {sup 243}Am were added to calculate the chemical yield. Plutonium was separated from uranium by extraction chromatography, using tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), with a decontamination factor higher than 10{sup 6}; after elution plutonium was determined by ICP-MS ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu) and {alpha}-spectrometry ({sup 239+240}Pu) after electroplating. The concentration of Pu in two DU penetrator samples was 7 x 10{sup -12} g g{sup -1} and 2 x 10{sup -11} g g{sup -1}. The {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu isotope ratio in one penetrator sample (0.12{+-}0.04) was significantly lower than the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu ratios found in two soil samples from Kosovo (0.35{+-}0.10 and 0.27{+-}0.07). {sup 241}Am was separated by extraction chromatography, using di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP), with a decontamination factor as high as 10{sup 7}. The concentration of {sup 241}Am in the penetrator samples was 2.7 x 10{sup -14} g g{sup -1} and <9.4 x 10{sup -15} g g{sup -1}. In addition {sup 237}Np was detected at ultratrace levels. In general, ICP-MS and {alpha}-spectrometry results were in good agreement.The presence of anthropogenic radionuclides ({sup 236}U, {sup 239}Pu,{sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 237}Np) in the penetrators indicates that at least part of the uranium originated from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. Because the concentrations of

  13. Determination of (236)U and transuranium elements in depleted uranium ammunition by alpha-spectrometry and ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desideri, D; Meli, M A; Roselli, C; Testa, C; Boulyga, S F; Becker, J S

    2002-11-01

    It is well known that ammunition containing depleted uranium (DU) was used by NATO during the Balkan conflict. To evaluate the origin of DU (the enrichment of natural uranium or the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel) it is necessary to directly detect the presence of activation products ((236)U, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Am, and (237)Np) in the ammunition. In this work the analysis of actinides by alpha-spectrometry was compared with that by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after selective separation of ultratraces of transuranium elements from the uranium matrix. (242)Pu and (243)Am were added to calculate the chemical yield. Plutonium was separated from uranium by extraction chromatography, using tri- n-octylamine (TNOA), with a decontamination factor higher than 10(6); after elution plutonium was determined by ICP-MS ((239)Pu and (240)Pu) and alpha-spectrometry ((239+240)Pu) after electroplating. The concentration of Pu in two DU penetrator samples was 7 x 10(-12) g g(-1) and 2 x 10(-11) g g(-1). The (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotope ratio in one penetrator sample (0.12+/-0.04) was significantly lower than the (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratios found in two soil samples from Kosovo (0.35+/-0.10 and 0.27+/-0.07). (241)Am was separated by extraction chromatography, using di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP), with a decontamination factor as high as 10(7). The concentration of (241)Am in the penetrator samples was 2.7 x 10(-14) g g(-1) and <9.4 x 10(-15) g g(-1). In addition (237)Np was detected at ultratrace levels. In general, ICP-MS and alpha-spectrometry results were in good agreement. The presence of anthropogenic radionuclides ((236)U, (239)Pu,(240)Pu, (241)Am, and (237)Np) in the penetrators indicates that at least part of the uranium originated from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. Because the concentrations of radionuclides are very low, their radiotoxicological effect is negligible.

  14. Determination of Natural and Depleted Uranium in Urine at the ppt Level: An Interlaboratory Analytical Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Q-MS) la spectrom6trie de masse A ionisation thermique (TIMS) et l’analyse par activation neutronique (NAA). Des rrsultats complets ont 6t6 obtenus de...laboratoire h6te. L’analyse par activation neutronique et TIMS enregistraient des concentrations d’uranium total qui diffrraient de celles du laboratoire...Q-MS) la spectromdtrie de masse h ionisation thermique (TIMS) et l’analyse par activation neutronique (NAA). RWsultats: Des ensembles de 12

  15. A comparison of delayed radiobiological effects of depleted-uranium munitions versus fourth-generation nuclear weapons

    CERN Document Server

    Gsponer, A; Vitale, B; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre; Vitale, Bruno

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the radiological burden due to the battle-field use of circa 400 tons of depleted-uranium munitions in Iraq (and of about 40 tons in Yugoslavia) is comparable to that arising from the hypothetical battle-field use of more than 600 kt (respectively 60 kt) of high-explosive equivalent pure-fusion fourth-generation nuclear weapons. Despite the limited knowledge openly available on existing and future nuclear weapons, there is sufficient published information on their physical principles and radiological effects to make such a comparison. In fact, it is shown that this comparison can be made with very simple and convincing arguments so that the main technical conclusions of the paper are undisputable -- although it would be worthwhile to supplement the hand calculations presented in the paper by more detailed computer simulations in order to consolidate the conclusions and refute any possible objections.

  16. In Vitro Immune Toxicity of Depleted Uranium: Effects on Murine Macrophages, CD4+ T Cells, and Gene Expression Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Bin; Fleming, James T.; Schultz, Terry W.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process and shares chemical properties with natural and enriched uranium. To investigate the toxic effects of environmental DU exposure on the immune system, we examined the influences of DU (in the form of uranyl nitrate) on viability and immune function as well as cytokine gene expression in murine peritoneal macrophages and splenic CD4+ T cells. Macrophages and CD4+ T cells were exposed to various concentrations of DU, and cell death via apoptosis and necrosis was analyzed using annexin-V/propidium iodide assay. DU cytotoxicity in both cell types was concentration dependent, with macrophage apoptosis and necrosis occurring within 24 hr at 100 μM DU exposure, whereas CD4+ T cells underwent cell death at 500 μM DU exposure. Noncytotoxic concentrations for macrophages and CD4+ T cells were determined as 50 and 100 μM, respectively. Lymphoproliferation analysis indicated that macrophage accessory cell function was altered with 200 μM DU after exposure times as short as 2 hr. Microarray and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that DU alters gene expression patterns in both cell types. The most differentially expressed genes were related to signal transduction, such as c-jun, NF-κ Bp65, neurotrophic factors (e.g., Mdk), chemokine and chemokine receptors (e.g., TECK/CCL25), and interleukins such as IL-10 and IL-5, indicating a possible involvement of DU in cancer development, autoimmune diseases, and T helper 2 polarization of T cells. The results are a first step in identifying molecular targets for the toxicity of DU and the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms for the immune modulation ability of DU. PMID:16393663

  17. Depleted uranium contamination by inhalation exposure and its detection after approximately 20 years: implications for human health assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Randall R; Horstwood, Matthew; Arnason, John G; Chenery, Simon; Brewer, Tim; Lloyd, Nicholas S; Carpenter, David O

    2008-02-01

    Inhaled depleted uranium (DU) aerosols are recognised as a distinct human health hazard and DU has been suggested to be responsible in part for illness in both military and civilian populations that may have been exposed. This study aimed to develop and use a testing procedure capable of detecting an individual's historic milligram-quantity aerosol exposure to DU up to 20 years after the event. This method was applied to individuals associated with or living proximal to a DU munitions plant in Colonie New York that were likely to have had a significant DU aerosol inhalation exposure, in order to improve DU-exposure screening reliability and gain insight into the residence time of DU in humans. We show using sensitive mass spectrometric techniques that when exposure to aerosol has been unambiguous and in sufficient quantity, urinary excretion of DU can be detected more than 20 years after primary DU inhalation contamination ceased, even when DU constitutes only approximately 1% of the total excreted uranium. It seems reasonable to conclude that a chronically DU-exposed population exists within the contamination 'footprint' of the munitions plant in Colonie, New York. The method allows even a modest DU exposure to be identified where other less sensitive methods would have failed entirely. This should allow better assessment of historical exposure incidence than currently exists.

  18. Depleted uranium contamination by inhalation exposure and its detection after {approx} 20 years: Implications for human health assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrish, Randall R. [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Notts, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rrp@nigl.nerc.ac.uk; Horstwood, Matthew [NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Notts, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Arnason, John G. [Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany NY 12222 (United States); Chenery, Simon [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Notts, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Brewer, Tim [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Lloyd, Nicholas S. [Department of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Notts, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Carpenter, David O. [Institute for Health and the Environment, University at Albany, Five University Place, Room A217, Rensselaer, NY 12144-3456 (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Inhaled depleted uranium (DU) aerosols are recognised as a distinct human health hazard and DU has been suggested to be responsible in part for illness in both military and civilian populations that may have been exposed. This study aimed to develop and use a testing procedure capable of detecting an individual's historic milligram-quantity aerosol exposure to DU up to 20 years after the event. This method was applied to individuals associated with or living proximal to a DU munitions plant in Colonie New York that were likely to have had a significant DU aerosol inhalation exposure, in order to improve DU-exposure screening reliability and gain insight into the residence time of DU in humans. We show using sensitive mass spectrometric techniques that when exposure to aerosol has been unambiguous and in sufficient quantity, urinary excretion of DU can be detected more than 20 years after primary DU inhalation contamination ceased, even when DU constitutes only {approx} 1% of the total excreted uranium. It seems reasonable to conclude that a chronically DU-exposed population exists within the contamination 'footprint' of the munitions plant in Colonie, New York. The method allows even a modest DU exposure to be identified where other less sensitive methods would have failed entirely. This should allow better assessment of historical exposure incidence than currently exists.

  19. Safe and Cheap and Abundant and Clean Fission Energy Resource:Perfect and Feasible Gen-Ⅴ Molten-salt Depleted-uranium Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Bao-guo; DONG; Pei; GU; Ji-yuan

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical,reactor core melting and nuclear fuel leaking accidents have troubled fission reactors for decades,and greatly limit their extensive applications.Now these troubles are still open.Here we first show a possible perfect reactor,Molten-salt Depleted-uranium Reactor

  20. Feasibility study on consolidation of Fernald Environmental Management Project depleted uranium materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-30

    In 1991, the DOE made a decision to close the FMPC located in Fernald, Ohio, and end its production mission. The site was renamed FEMP to reflect Fernald`s mission change from uranium production to environmental restoration. As a result of this change, the inventory of strategic uranium materials maintained at Fernald by DOE DP will need to be relocated to other DOE sites. Although considered a liability to the Fernald Plant due to its current D and D mission, the FEMP DU represents a potentially valuable DOE resource. Recognizing its value, it may be important for the DOE to consolidate the material at one site and place it in a safe long-term storage condition until a future DOE programmatic requirement materializes. In August 1995, the DOE Office of Nuclear Weapons Management requested, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) to assess the feasibility of consolidating the FEMP DU materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). This feasibility study examines various phases associated with the consolidation of the FEMP DU at the ORR. If useful short-term applications for the DU fail to materialize, then long-term storage (up to 50 years) would need to be provided. Phases examined in this report include DU material value; potential uses; sampling; packaging and transportation; material control and accountability; environmental, health and safety issues; storage; project management; noneconomic factors; schedule; and cost.

  1. The application of laser two-way depletion model in AVLIS for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changjiang Yu [The Institution of Physics and Chemistry Engineering in Nuclear Industry, Tianjin (China); Min Yan; Dewu Wang; Chuntong Ying [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing, BJ (China). Dept. of Engineering Physics

    1996-12-31

    We propose a two-way depletion model to be applied in AVLIS, and the problem of small isotope shifts is avoided. The higher selectivity and lower waste composition can be obtained disregarding the power broadening effect. This model makes the product and waste compositions ({sup C} p and {sup C} w) of AVLIS satisfy the requirements {sup c} p > 3.5%, {sup C} w < 0.25 easily. (author) 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. A novel hohlraum with ultrathin depleted-uranium-nitride coating layer for low hard x-ray emission and high radiation temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Liang; Xing, Peifeng; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Taimin; Kuang, Longyu; Li, Zhichao; Li, Renguo; Wu, Zheqing; Jing, Longfei; Zhang, Wenhai; Zhan, Xiayu; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Bobi; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Jie; Huo, Wenyi; Lan, Ke

    2014-01-01

    An ultra-thin layer of uranium nitrides (UN) has been coated on the inner surface of the depleted uranium hohlraum (DUH), which has been proved by our experiment can prevent the oxidization of Uranium (U) effectively. Comparative experiments between the novel depleted uranium hohlraum and pure golden (Au) hohlraum are implemented on Shenguang III prototype laser facility. Under the laser intensity of 6*10^14 W/cm2, we observe that, the hard x-ray (> 1.8 keV) fraction of this uranium hohlraum decreases by 61% and the peak intensity of total x-ray flux (0.1 keV ~ 5 keV) increases by 5%. Two dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED are exploited to interpret the above observations. Our result for the first time indicates the advantage of the UN-coated DUH in generating the uniform x-ray field with a quasi Planckian spectrum and thus has important implications in optimizing the ignition hohlraum design.

  3. Application of lead and strontium isotope ratio measurements for the origin assessment of uranium ore concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Zsolt; Wallenius, Maria; Mayer, Klaus; Keegan, Elizabeth; Millet, Sylvain

    2009-10-15

    Lead and strontium isotope ratios were used for the origin assessment of uranium ore concentrates (yellow cakes) for nuclear forensic purposes. A simple and low-background sample preparation method was developed for the simultaneous separation of the analytes followed by the measurement of the isotope ratios by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The lead isotopic composition of the ore concentrates suggests applicability for the verification of the source of the nuclear material and by the use of the radiogenic (207)Pb/(206)Pb ratio the age of the raw ore material can be calculated. However, during data interpretation, the relatively high variation of the lead isotopic composition within the mine site and the generally high contribution of natural lead as technological contamination have to be carefully taken into account. The (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratio is less prone to the variation within one mine site and less affected by the production process, thus it was found to be a more purposeful indicator for the origin assessment and source verification than the lead. The lead and strontium isotope ratios measured and the methodology developed provide information on the initial raw uranium ore used, and thus they can be used for source attribution of the uranium ore concentrates.

  4. Long-term fate of depleted uranium at Aberdeen and Yuma Proving Grounds: Human health and ecological risk assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Beckman, R.J.; Myers, O.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kennedy, P.L.; Clements, W.; Bestgen, H.T. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate and long-term consequences of depleted uranium (DU) in the environment at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) for the Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) of the US Army. Specifically, we examined the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to humans and ecosystems caused by exposure to DU at both installations. We developed contaminant transport models of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at APG and terrestrial ecosystems at YPG to assess potential adverse effects from DU exposure. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of the initial models showed the portions of the models that most influenced predicted DU concentrations, and the results of the sensitivity analyses were fundamental tools in designing field sampling campaigns at both installations. Results of uranium (U) isotope analyses of field samples provided data to evaluate the source of U in the environment and the toxicological and radiological doses to different ecosystem components and to humans. Probabilistic doses were estimated from the field data, and DU was identified in several components of the food chain at APG and YPG. Dose estimates from APG data indicated that U or DU uptake was insufficient to cause adverse toxicological or radiological effects. Dose estimates from YPG data indicated that U or DU uptake is insufficient to cause radiological effects in ecosystem components or in humans, but toxicological effects in small mammals (e.g., kangaroo rats and pocket mice) may occur from U or DU ingestion. The results of this study were used to modify environmental radiation monitoring plans at APG and YPG to ensure collection of adequate data for ongoing ecological and human health risk assessments.

  5. Phytotoxicity of depleted uranium on three grasses characteristic of different successional stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M.C. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); McLendon, T. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    1997-05-01

    In response to a paucity of data on the chemical toxicity of uranium (U) to plants, a factorial experiment employing five U concentrations (0, 50, 500, 5000, 25,000 mg kg{sup -1}) and three moisture regimes (low, medium, and high) was performed using three native grasses. Buchloe dactyloides (buffalograss; mid/late-seral), Schizachyrium scoparium (little bluestem; late-seral), and Aristida purpurea (purple threeawn; early/mid-seral) were grown in monocultures and as a mixture of two species under all combinations of U and moisture levels. This design allowed for the analysis of U effects, as well as possible interactions with moisture stress. Several measures of plant health and viability were made, including: percent emergence, plant survival, shoot biomass, and number and weight of inflorescences. Decreases in plant biomass, fecundity, and long-term survivability were observed only at the highest U level (25 000 mg kg{sup -1}). No significant differences (P < 0.05) between the U treatment levels were observed in terms of seedling emergence and survival. Drought stress also negatively impacted survival and biomass, but acted independently of U stress. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. How toxic is the depleted uranium to crayfish Procambarus clarkii compared with cadmium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kaddissi, Simone; Simon, Olivier; Elia, Antonia Concetta; Gonzalez, Patrice; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Frelon, Sandrine; Legeay, Alexia

    2016-02-01

    Due to a lack of information on the assessment of uranium's (U) toxicity, our work aimed to compare the effects of U on the crayfish Procambarus clarkii with those of the well documented metal: cadmium (Cd). Accumulation and impacts at different levels of biological organization were assessed after acute (40 µM Cd or U; 4-10 days) and chronic (0.1 µM Cd or U; 30-60 days) exposures. The survival rates demonstrated the high tolerance of this species toward both metals and showed that Cd had a greater effect on the sustainability of crayfish. The concentration levels of Cd and U accumulated in gills and hepatopancreas were compared between both conditions. Distinctions in the adsorption capacities and the mobility of the contaminants were suspected. Differences in the detoxification mechanisms of both metals using transmission electron microscopy equiped with an energy dispersive X-ray were also pointed out. In contrast, comparison between the histological structures of contaminated hepatopancreas showed similar symptoms. Principal component analyses revealed different impacts of each metal on the oxidative balance and mitochondria using enzymatic activities and gene expression levels as endpoints. The observation that U seemed to generate more oxidative stress than Cd in our conditions of exposure is discussed.

  7. Hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to gamma radiation and depleted uranium singly and in combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, You, E-mail: yso@niva.no [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway); Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Evensen, Øystein [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Department of Basic Sciences and Aquatic Medicine, P.O. Box 8146 Dep., N-0033 Oslo (Norway); Lind, Ole Christian [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Rosseland, Bjørn Olav [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management (INA), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); and others

    2016-08-15

    Radionuclides are a special group of substances posing both radiological and chemical hazards to organisms. As a preliminary approach to understand the combined effects of radionuclides, exposure studies were designed using gamma radiation (Gamma) and depleted uranium (DU) as stressors, representing a combination of radiological (radiation) and chemical (metal) exposure. Juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were exposed to 70 mGy external Gamma dose delivered over the first 5 h of a 48 h period (14 mGy/h), 0.25 mg/L DU were exposed continuously for 48 h and the combination of the two stressors (Combi). Water and tissue concentrations of U were determined to assess the exposure quality and DU bioaccumulation. Hepatic gene expression changes were determined using microarrays in combination with quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Effects at the higher physiological levels were determined as plasma glucose (general stress) and hepatic histological changes. The results show that bioaccumulation of DU was observed after both single DU and the combined exposure. Global transcriptional analysis showed that 3122, 2303 and 3460 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were significantly regulated by exposure to gamma, DU and Combi, respectively. Among these, 349 genes were commonly regulated by all treatments, while the majority was found to be treatment-specific. Functional analysis of DEGs revealed that the stressors displayed similar mode of action (MoA) across treatments such as induction of oxidative stress, DNA damage and disturbance of oxidative phosphorylation, but also stressor-specific mechanisms such as cellular stress and injury, metabolic disorder, programmed cell death, immune response. No changes in plasma glucose level as an indicator of general stress and hepatic histological changes were observed. Although no direct linkage was successfully established between molecular responses and adverse effects at the organism

  8. Effects of depleted uranium on the reproductive success and F1 generation survival of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourrachot, Stéphanie [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Brion, François [Institut National de l’Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Unité d’évaluation des risques écotoxicologiques, BP2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Pereira, Sandrine; Floriani, Magali; Camilleri, Virginie; Cavalié, Isabelle [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Palluel, Olivier [Institut National de l’Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Unité d’évaluation des risques écotoxicologiques, BP2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Adam-Guillermin, Christelle, E-mail: christelle.adam-guillermin@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The effect of depleted uranium on zebrafish reproduction was studied. • An inhibition of egg production and an increase of F1 embryo mortality were observed. • Decreased circulating concentration of vitellogenin was observed in females. • Increased DNA damages were observed in parent gonads and in embryos. • U environmental concentration impairs reproduction and genetic integrity of fish. - Abstract: Despite the well-characterized occurrence of uranium (U) in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the chronic exposure of fish to low levels of U and its potential effect on reproduction. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of environmental concentrations of depleted U on the reproductive output of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and on survival and development of the F1 embryo-larvae following parental exposure to U. For that purpose, sexually mature male and female zebrafish were exposed to 20 and 250 μg/L of U for 14 days and allowed to reproduce in clean water during a further 14-day period. At all sampling times, whole-body vitellogenin concentrations and gonad histology were analyzed to investigate the effects of U exposure on these reproductive endpoints. In addition, accumulation of U in the gonads and its genotoxic effect on male and female gonad cells were quantified. The results showed that U strongly affected the capability of fish to reproduce and to generate viable individuals as evidenced by the inhibition of egg production and the increased rate of mortality of the F1 embryos. Interestingly, U exposure resulted in decreased circulating concentrations of vitellogenin in females. Increased concentrations of U were observed in gonads and eggs, which were most likely responsible for the genotoxic effects seen in fish gonads and in embryos exposed maternally to U. Altogether, these findings highlight the negative effect of environmentally relevant concentrations of U which alter the reproductive

  9. Effect of frequency on fretting wear behavior of Ti/TiN multilayer film on depleted uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Ping; Li, Zheng-Yang; Zhu, Sheng-Fa; Lu, Lei; Cai, Zhen-Bing

    2017-01-01

    The Ti/TiN multi-layer film was prepared on the depleted uranium (DU) substrate by cathodic arc ion plating equipment. The character of multi-layer film was studied by SEM, XRD and AES, revealed that the surface was composed of small compact particle and the cross-section had a multi-layer structure. The fretting wear performance under different frequencies was performed by a MFT-6000 machine with a ball-on-plate configuration. The wear morphology was analyzed by white light interferometer, OM and SEM with an EDX. The result shows the Ti/TiN multi-layer film could greatly improve the fretting wear performance compared to the DU substrate. The fretting wear running and damaged behavior are strongly dependent on the film and test frequency. The fretting region of DU substrate and Ti/TiN multi-layer under low test frequency is gross slip. With the increase of test frequency, the fretting region of Ti/TiN multi-layer change from gross slip to mixed fretting, then to partial slip.

  10. Method for measuring prompt gamma-rays generated by D-T neutrons bombarding a depleted uranium spherical shell

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Jianguo; Jiang, Li; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Xinwei; Ye, Bangjiao; Zhu, Tonghua

    2015-01-01

    The prompt gamma-ray spectrum from depleted uranium (DU) spherical shells induced by 14 MeV D-T neutrons is measured. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation gives the largest prompt gamma flux with the optimal thickness of the DU spherical shells 3-5 cm and the optimal frequency of neutron pulse 1 MHz. The method of time of flight and pulse shape coincidence with energy (DC-TOF) is proposed, and the subtraction of the background gamma-rays discussed in detail. The electron recoil spectrum and time spectrum of the prompt gamma-rays are obtained based on a 2"*2" BC501A liquid scintillator detector. The energy spectrum and time spectrum of prompt gamma-rays are obtained based on an iterative unfolding method that can remove the influence of {\\gamma}-rays response matrix and pulsed neutron shape. The measured time spectrum and the calculated results are roughly consistent with each other. Experimental prompt gamma-ray spectrum in the 0.4-3 MeV energy region agree well with MC simulation based on the ENDF/BVI.5 library, and ...

  11. Depleted uranium risk assessment for Jefferson Proving Ground using data from environmental monitoring and site characterization. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1996-10-01

    This report documents the third risk assessment completed for the depleted uranium (DU) munitions testing range at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG), Indiana, for the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation command. Jefferson Proving Ground was closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act and the testing mission was moved to Yuma Proving Ground. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This report integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

  12. Method for measuring prompt γ-rays generated by D-T neutrons bombarding a depleted uranium spherical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian-Guo; Lai, Cai-Feng; Jiang, Li; Liu, Rong Zhang, Xin-Wei; Ye, Bang-Jiao; Zhu, Tong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The prompt γ-ray spectrum from depleted uranium (DU) spherical shells induced by 14 MeV D-T neutrons is measured. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation gives the largest prompt γ flux with the optimal thickness of the DU spherical shells 3-5 cm and the optimal frequency of neutron pulse 1 MHz. The method of time of flight and pulse shape coincidence with energy (DC-TOF) is proposed, and the subtraction of the background γ-rays discussed in detail. The electron recoil spectrum and time spectrum of the prompt γ-rays are obtained based on a 2″×2″ BC501A liquid scintillator detector. The energy spectrum and time spectrum of prompt γ-rays are obtained based on an iterative unfolding method that can remove the influence of γ-rays response matrix and pulsed neutron shape. The measured time spectrum and the calculated results are roughly consistent with each other. Experimental prompt γ-ray spectrum in the 0.4-3 MeV energy region agrees well with MC simulation based on the ENDF/BVI.5 library, and the discrepancies for the integral quantities of γ-rays of energy 0.4-1 MeV and 1-3 MeV are 9.2% and 1.1%, respectively. Supported by National Special Magnetic Confinement Fusion Energy Research, China (2015GB108001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (91226104)

  13. Summary Report of Depleted Uranium (DU) Survey Actions at Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), Airspace Region 63B, Active Target Complex 10 (63-10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-15

    AND ADDRESS(ES) USAF School of Aerospace Medicine Occupational & Environmental Health Dept/OEC 2510 Fifth St. Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7913... Medicine (USAFSAM), dose rate, count rate, bioenvironmental engineering, permit, depleted uranium, DU, GAU-8, A-10, Nevada, Nellis, NTTR, testing range, U...AFIERA, AFIOH, ACC , GR-460, RS-700, Model 2221, surveillance, walkover, aerosol, sampling, drainage, GPS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  14. Acute MUS81 depletion leads to replication fork slowing and a constitutive DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Meichun; Wang, Xiaohui; Palmai-Pallag, Timea;

    2015-01-01

    The MUS81 protein belongs to a conserved family of DNA structure-specific nucleases that play important roles in DNA replication and repair. Inactivation of the Mus81 gene in mice has no major deleterious consequences for embryonic development, although cancer susceptibility has been reported. We...... have investigated the role of MUS81 in human cells by acutely depleting the protein using shRNAs. We found that MUS81 depletion from human fibroblasts leads to accumulation of ssDNA and a constitutive DNA damage response that ultimately activates cellular senescence. Moreover, we show that MUS81...... is required for efficient replication fork progression during an unperturbed S-phase, and for recovery of productive replication following replication stalling. These results demonstrate essential roles for the MUS81 nuclease in maintenance of replication fork integrity....

  15. Screening of plant species for phytoremediation of uranium, thorium, barium, nickel, strontium and lead contaminated soils from a uranium mill tailings repository in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-yue; Hu, Nan; Ding, De-xin; Zheng, Ji-fang; Liu, Yu-long; Wang, Yong-dong; Nie, Xiao-qin

    2011-06-01

    The concentrations of uranium, thorium, barium, nickel, strontium and lead in the samples of the tailings and plant species collected from a uranium mill tailings repository in South China were analyzed. Then, the removal capability of a plant for a target element was assessed. It was found that Phragmites australis had the greatest removal capabilities for uranium (820 μg), thorium (103 μg) and lead (1,870 μg). Miscanthus floridulus had the greatest removal capabilities for barium (3,730 μg) and nickel (667 μg), and Parthenocissus quinquefolia had the greatest removal capability for strontium (3,920 μg). In this study, a novel coefficient, termed as phytoremediation factor (PF), was proposed, for the first time, to assess the potential of a plant to be used in phytoremediation of a target element contaminated soil. Phragmites australis has the highest PFs for uranium (16.6), thorium (8.68), barium (10.0) and lead (10.5). Miscanthus floridulus has the highest PF for Ni (25.0). Broussonetia papyrifera and Parthenocissus quinquefolia have the relatively high PFs for strontium (28.1 and 25.4, respectively). On the basis of the definition for a hyperaccumulator, only Cyperus iria and Parthenocissus quinquefolia satisfied the criteria for hyperaccumulator of uranium (36.4 μg/g) and strontium (190 μg/g), and could be the candidates for phytoremediation of uranium and strontium contaminated soils. The results show that the PF has advantage over the hyperaccumulator in reflecting the removal capabilities of a plant for a target element, and is more adequate for assessing the potential of a plant to be used in phytoremediation than conventional method.

  16. Preliminary Study of Lead-Oxide Cooled Fast Reactor with Natural Uranium as an Input Fuel with Reactor Shuffling Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmudah, Rida SN; Su’ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    A preliminary study of lead-oxide cooled fast reactor with natural uranium as an input fuel using reactor shuffling strategy has been conducted. In this study, reactor core is divided into four zone with the same volume, each zone use different uranium enrichment. The enrichment number is estimated so that in the end of reactor’s operation, we only need to add natural uranium as the fresh input fuel. This study used UN-PuN as the fuel and lead oxide as the coolant. Several parameter studies have been conducted to determine the most suitable input condition. It is confirmed in this study that with fuel : cladding : coolant ratio of 53 : 10 : 37, and uranium enrichment in the first to the fourth zone of 0%, 6.25%, 7.5% and 8%, respectively, the reactor can operate as long as 20 years of operation with terminal k-eff of 1.0004.

  17. Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-5012 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 1997 i0i4 090 12a. DISTRIBUTION/ AVAILABILTY ...cancers was low in the face of an increasing usage of such protheses.3 The assessment also included failed attempts to isolate "precancerous" cells from...Springer Verlag, 1973. 26. Fisher DR, Swint MJ, Kathren RL (eds.): Evaluation of Health Effects in Sequoyah Fuels Corporation Workers from Accidental

  18. Short-term hepatic effects of depleted uranium on xenobiotic and bile acid metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueguen, Y.; Souidi, M.; Baudelin, C.; Dudoignon, N.; Grison, S.; Dublineau, I.; Marquette, C.; Voisin, P.; Gourmelon, P.; Aigueperse, J. [Direction de la RadioProtection de l' Homme, Service de Radiobiologie et d' Epidemiologie. IRSN, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, B.P. No. 17, Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2006-04-15

    The toxicity of uranium has been demonstrated in different organs, including the kidneys, skeleton, central nervous system, and liver. However, few works have investigated the biological effects of uranium contamination on important metabolic function in the liver. In vivo studies were conducted to evaluate its effects on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes involved in the metabolism of cholesterol and xenobiotics in the rat liver. The effects of depleted uranium (DU) contamination on Sprague-Dawley were measured at 1 and 3 days after exposure. Biochemical indicators characterizing liver and kidney functions were measured in the plasma. The DU affected bile acid CYP activity: 7{alpha}-hydroxycholesterol plasma level decreased by 52% at day 3 whereas microsomal CYP7A1 activity in the liver did not change significantly and mitochondrial CYP27A1 activity quintupled at day 1. Gene expression of the nuclear receptors related to lipid metabolism (FXR and LXR) also changed, while PPAR{alpha} mRNA levels did not. The increased mRNA levels of the xenobiotic-metabolizing CYP3A enzyme at day 3 may be caused by feedback up-regulation due to the decreased CYP3A activity at day 1. CAR mRNA levels, which tripled on day 1, may be involved in this up-regulation, while mRNA levels of PXR did not change. These results indicate that high levels of depleted uranium, acting through modulation of the CYP enzymes and some of their nuclear receptors, affect the hepatic metabolism of bile acids and xenobiotics. (orig.)

  19. The determination of low lead levels in the bone of lead-depleted mice by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iavicoli, I.; Carelli, G.; Castellino, N. [Univ. Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma (Italy). Inst. of Occupational Health; Schlemmer, G. [Bodenseewerk Perkin-Elmer und Co. GmbH, Ueberlingen (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    Low lead levels in the femurs of mice fed with a lead-depleted diet have been determined by use of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction. The method is based on the use of Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/Pd as matrix modifier which enables significant reduction of the spectral interferences prevalent if chemical modifiers based on NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} with either Ca or Mg are used for samples rich in Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} matrix. The method was developed and validated by use of the NIST standard reference material 1486 bone. Bones were decomposed in a pressurized microwave-heated system using 70% nitric acid. Forty-three mice femurs, with a mass of 74.62 {+-} 12.54 mg, were dissolved in concentrated nitric acid. The lead results found in SRM 1486 (1.25 {+-} 0.15 {mu}g g{sup -1}, n = 9) were in good agreement with the certificate (1.335 {+-} 0.014 {mu}g g{sup -1}). Recoveries of 200 ng lead added to the SRM before or after digestion were 99.0 {+-} 1.4% and 98.5 {+-} 1.6%, respectively. The lead detection limit in bone samples is 0.06 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry mass. This method is, therefore, suitable for the determination of very low lead levels (0.06-0.20 {mu}g Pb kg{sup -1} bone) in the femurs of mice fed a diet with lead level of < 20 {mu}g kg{sup -1}. (orig.)

  20. The potential importance of frost flowers, recycling on snow, and open leads for Ozone Depletion Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Piot

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available We present model studies with the one-dimensional model MISTRA to investigate the potential role of frost flowers, recycling on snow, and open leads in the depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic spring. In our model, we assumed frost flower aerosols to be the major source of bromine. We show that a major ozone depletion event can be satisfactorily reproduced only if the recycling on snow of deposited bromine into gas phase bromine is assumed. In the model, this cycling is more efficient than the bromine explosion process and maintains sufficiently high levels of bromine to deplete ozone down to few nmol mol−1 within four days. We assessed the influence of different surface combinations (open lead/frost flowers on the chemistry in the model. Results showed noticeable modifications affecting the composition of aerosols and the deposition velocities. A model run with a series of coupled frost flower fields and open leads, separated by large areas of snow, showed results comparable with field observations. In addition, we studied the effects of modified temperature of either the frost flower field or the ambient airmass. A warmer frost flower field increases the relative humidity and the aerosol deposition rate. The deposition/re-emission process gains in importance, inducing more reactive bromine in the gas phase, and a stronger ozone depletion. A decrease of 1 K in airmass temperature shows in our model that the aerosol uptake capacities of all gas phase species substantially increases, leading to enhanced uptake of acids from the gas phase. Consequently, the so-called bromine explosion accelerated and O3 mixing ratios decreased. In our model representation, variations in wind speed affected the aerosol source function and influenced the amount of bromine in the atmosphere and thus the ozone depletion strength. Recent studies have suggested the important role of the precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3

  1. The potential importance of frost flowers, recycling on snow, and open leads for ozone depletion events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Piot

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present model studies with the one-dimensional model MISTRA to investigate the potential role of frost flowers, recycling on snow, and open leads in the depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic spring. In our model, we assumed frost flower aerosols to be the major source of bromine. We show that a major ozone depletion event can be satisfactorily reproduced only if the recycling on snow of deposited bromine into gas phase bromine is assumed. In the model, this cycling is more efficient than the bromine explosion process and maintains sufficiently high levels of bromine to deplete ozone down to few nmol mol−1 within four days. We assessed the influence of different surface combinations (open lead/frost flowers on the chemistry in the model. Results showed noticeable modifications affecting the composition of aerosols and the deposition velocities. A model run with a series of coupled frost flower fields and open leads, separated by large areas of snow, showed results comparable with field observations. In addition, we studied the effects of modified temperature of either the frost flower field or the ambient airmass. A warmer frost flower field increases the relative humidity and the aerosol deposition rate. The deposition/re-emission process gains in importance, inducing more reactive bromine in the gas phase, and a stronger ozone depletion. A decrease of 1K in airmass temperature shows in our model that the aerosol uptake capacities of all gas phase species substantially increases, leading to enhanced uptake of acids from the gas phase. Consequently, the so-called bromine explosion accelerated and O3 mixing ratios decreased. In our model representation, variations in wind speed affected the aerosol source function and influenced the amount of bromine in the atmosphere and thus the ozone depletion strength. Recent studies have suggested the important role of the precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3

  2. Exposure to depleted uranium does not alter the co-expression of HER-2/neu and p53 in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Toriahi Kaswer M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amongst the extensive literature on immunohistochemical profile of breast cancer, very little is found on populations exposed to a potential risk factor such as depleted uranium. This study looked at the immunohistochemical expression of HER-2/neu (c-erbB2 and p53 in different histological types of breast cancer found in the middle Euphrates region of Iraq, where the population has been exposed to high levels of depleted uranium. Findings The present investigation was performed over a period starting from September 2008 to April 2009. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks from 70 patients with breast cancer (62 ductal and 8 lobular carcinoma were included in this study. A group of 25 patients with fibroadenoma was included as a comparative group, and 20 samples of normal breast tissue sections were used as controls. Labeled streptavidin-biotin (LSAB+ complex method was employed for immunohistochemical detection of HER-2/neu and p53. The detection rate of HER-2/neu and p53 immunohistochemical expression were 47.14% and 35.71% respectively in malignant tumors; expression was negative in the comparative and control groups (p HER-2/neu immunostaining was significantly associated with histological type, tumor size, nodal involvement, and recurrence of breast carcinoma (p p Both biomarkers were positively correlated with each other. Furthermore, all the cases that co-expressed both HER-2/neu and p53 showed the most unfavorable biopathological profile. Conclusion P53 and HER-2/neu over-expression play an important role in pathogenesis of breast carcinoma. The findings indicate that in regions exposed to high levels of depleted uranium, although p53 and HER-2/neu overexpression are both high, correlation of their expression with age, grade, tumor size, recurrence and lymph node involvement is similar to studies that have been conducted on populations not exposed to depleted uranium. HER-2/neu expression in breast cancer was higher

  3. 40 CFR 421.320 - Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary uranium subcategory. 421.320 Section 421.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Uranium Subcategory § 421.320 Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium... uranium (including depleted uranium) by secondary uranium facilities....

  4. Provisional zircon and monazite uranium-lead geochronology for selected rocks from Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Ratcliffe, Nicholas M.; Walsh, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the results of zircon and monazite uranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronologic analyses of 24 rock samples. The samples in this study were collected from mapped exposures identified while conducting either new, detailed (1:24,000-scale) geologic quadrangle mapping or reconnaissance mapping, both of which were used for compilation of the bedrock geologic map of Vermont. All of the collected samples were judged to be igneous rocks (either intrusive or extrusive) on the basis of field relations and geochemistry. The one exception is the Okemo Quartzite on Ludlow Mountain. These geochronologic data were used to supplement regional correlations between igneous suites on the basis of similar geochemistry and geologic mapping.

  5. Separase phosphosite mutation leads to genome instability and primordial germ cell depletion during oogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xu

    Full Text Available To ensure equal chromosome segregation and the stability of the genome during cell division, Separase is strictly regulated primarily by Securin binding and inhibitory phosphorylation. By generating a mouse model that contained a mutation to the inhibitory phosphosite of Separase, we demonstrated that mice of both sexes are infertile. We showed that Separase deregulation leads to chromosome mis-segregation, genome instability, and eventually apoptosis of primordial germ cells (PGCs during embryonic oogenesis. Although the PGCs of mutant male mice were completely depleted, a population of PGCs from mutant females survived Separase deregulation. The surviving PGCs completed oogenesis but produced deficient initial follicles. These results indicate a sexual dimorphism effect on PGCs from Separase deregulation, which may be correlated with a gender-specific discrepancy of Securin. Our results reveal that Separase phospho-regulation is critical for genome stability in oogenesis. Furthermore, we provided the first evidence of a pre-zygotic mitotic chromosome segregation error resulting from Separase deregulation, whose sex-specific differences may be a reason for the sexual dimorphism of aneuploidy in gametogenesis.

  6. DNA damage triggers a chronic auto-inflammatory response leading to fat depletion in NER progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakasilioti, Ismene; Kamileri, Irene; Chatzinikolaou, Georgia; Kosteas, Theodoros; Vergadi, Eleni; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Tsamardinos, Iannis; Rozgaja, Tania A; Siakouli, Sandra; Tsatsanis, Christos; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Garinis, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipodystrophies represent a group of heterogeneous disorders characterized by loss of fat tissue. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using mice carrying an ERCC1-XPF DNA repair defect systematically or in adipocytes, we show that DNA damage signaling triggers a chronic auto-inflammatory response leading to fat depletion. Ercc1−/− and aP2-Ercc1f/− fat depots show extensive gene expression similarities to lipodystrophic Pparγldi/+ animals along with focal areas of ruptured basement membrane, the reappearance of primary cilia, necrosis, fibrosis and a marked decrease in adiposity. We find that persistent DNA damage in aP2-Ercc1f/− fat depots and in adipocytes ex vivo trigger the induction of pro-inflammatory factors by promoting transcriptionally active histone marks and the dissociation of nuclear receptor co-repressor complexes from promoters; the response is cell-autonomous and requires ATM. Thus, persistent DNA damage-driven auto-inflammation plays a causative role in adipose tissue degeneration with important ramifications for progressive lipodystrophies and natural aging. PMID:24011075

  7. DNA damage triggers a chronic autoinflammatory response, leading to fat depletion in NER progeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakasilioti, Ismene; Kamileri, Irene; Chatzinikolaou, Georgia; Kosteas, Theodoros; Vergadi, Eleni; Robinson, Andria Rasile; Tsamardinos, Iannis; Rozgaja, Tania A; Siakouli, Sandra; Tsatsanis, Christos; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Garinis, George A

    2013-09-03

    Lipodystrophies represent a group of heterogeneous disorders characterized by loss of fat tissue. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using mice carrying an ERCC1-XPF DNA repair defect systematically or in adipocytes, we show that DNA damage signaling triggers a chronic autoinflammatory response leading to fat depletion. Ercc1-/- and aP2-Ercc1F/- fat depots show extensive gene expression similarities to lipodystrophic Pparγ(ldi/+) animals, focal areas of ruptured basement membrane, the reappearance of primary cilia, necrosis, fibrosis, and a marked decrease in adiposity. We find that persistent DNA damage in aP2-Ercc1F/- fat depots and in adipocytes ex vivo triggers the induction of proinflammatory factors by promoting transcriptionally active histone marks and the dissociation of nuclear receptor corepressor complexes from promoters; the response is cell autonomous and requires ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Thus, persistent DNA damage-driven autoinflammation plays a causative role in adipose tissue degeneration, with important ramifications for progressive lipodystrophies and natural aging.

  8. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of prompt gamma-ray spectra from depleted uranium under D-T neutron irradiation and electron recoil spectra in a liquid scintillator detector

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Jianguo; Liu, Rong; Zhu, Tonghua; Zhang, Xinwei; Ye, Bangjiao

    2015-01-01

    To overcome the problem of inefficient computing time and unreliable results in MCNP5 calculation, a two-step method is adopted to calculate the energy deposition of prompt gamma-rays in detectors for depleted uranium spherical shells under D-T neutrons irradiation. In the first step, the gamma-ray spectrum for energy below 7 MeV is calculated by MCNP5 code; secondly, the electron recoil spectrum in a BC501A liquid scintillator detector is simulated based on EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code with the gamma-ray spectrum from the first step as input. The comparison of calculated results with experimental ones shows that the simulations agree well with experiment in the energy region 0.4-3 MeV for the prompt gamma-ray spectrum and below 4 MeVee for the electron recoil spectrum. The reliability of the two-step method in this work is validated.

  10. Determination of depleted uranium in fish: validation of a confirmatory method by dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ilio, S; Violante, N; Senofonte, O; Petrucci, F

    2007-08-06

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process for nuclear fuel. According to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, a confirmatory method for the quantification of DU in freeze-dried fish was developed by isotope ratio dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (IR-DRC-ICP-MS). A preliminary study was performed to determine the following parameters: instrumental detection limit (IDL), isotopic ratio measurement limit (IRML), percentage of DU (P(DU)) in presence of natural uranium (NU) and limit of quantification (LoQ(DU)). The analyses were carried out by means of IR-DRC-ICP-MS. Ammonia was the reaction gas used for the dynamic reaction cell. In addition, a sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (SF-ICP-MS) was employed to calculate the within-laboratory reproducibility. For the confirmatory method the following parameters were determined: (a) trueness; (b) precision; (c) critical concentrations alpha and beta (CC(alpha), CC(beta)); (d) specificity; (e) stability. Trueness was assessed by using the recovery tests. The recovery and within-laboratory reproducibility were determined by fortifying the blank digested solution of dogfish tissue: six aliquots were fortified at 1, 1.5 and 2 times the LOQ(DU) with 25.0, 37.5 and 50.0 ng L(-1) or 4.16, 6.24, 8.32 microg kg(-1) with a recovery of -8.2, +9.5 and +9.6%, respectively and a within-laboratory reproducibility (three analytical run) of 15.5, 8.0 and 11.0%, respectively. The results for the decision limit and the detection capability were: CC(alpha) = 11.69 ng L(-1) and CC(beta) = 19.8 ng L(-1). The digested solutions resulted to be stable during testing time (60 days) and the method can be considered highly specific as well.

  11. Non-destructive field measurement of the ratio /sup 235/U//sup 238/U in depleted to moderately enriched uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balagna, J.P.; Cowan, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    The exploration of a natural reactor site is expedited by prompt measurement of /sup 235/U to /sup 238/U ratios near the mining operation. An instrument has been constructed which uses the relative fission rates of /sup 235/U and /sup 238/U in fast and moderated neutron spectra to measure the isotopic ratio. This device can be placed in the field and allows continuous monitoring of ore as a rich deposit of uranium is mined. With rapid return of isotopic information to the operator it is possible to locate a fossil reactor before it has been destroyed. The relative fast neutron and slow neutron fission rates induced in uranium which is depleted to moderately enriched in /sup 235/U may be used to measure the isotopic ratio /sup 235/U//sup 238/U quickly and nondestructively with a relative error of a few percent. When a neutron source such as /sup 252/Cf is used, the measurements may be made in the field.

  12. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

  13. Archean rocks in antarctica: 2.5-billion-year uranium-lead ages of pegmatites in enderby land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grew, E S; Manton, W I

    1979-10-26

    Uranium-lead isotopic data indicate that the granulite-facies Napier complex of Enderby Land, Antarctica, was cut by charnockitic pegmatites 2.5 billion years ago and by pegmatites lacking hypersthene 0.52 billion years ago. The 4-bil-lion-years lead-lead ages (whole rock) reported for the Napier complex are rejected since these leads developed in three stages. Reconstructions of Gondwanaland suggest that the Napier complex may be a continuation of the Archean granulitic terrain of southern India.

  14. Tissue depletion of taurine accelerates skeletal muscle senescence and leads to early death in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Ito

    Full Text Available Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid is found in milimolar concentrations in mammalian tissues. One of its main functions is osmoregulation; however, it also exhibits cytoprotective activity by diminishing injury caused by stress and disease. Taurine depletion is associated with several defects, many of which are found in the aging animal, suggesting that taurine might exert anti-aging actions. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the hypothesis that taurine depletion accelerates aging by reducing longevity and accelerating aging-associated tissue damage. Tissue taurine depletion in taurine transporter knockout (TauTKO mouse was found to shorten lifespan and accelerate skeletal muscle histological and functional defects, including an increase in central nuclei containing myotubes, a reduction in mitochondrial complex 1 activity and an induction in an aging biomarker, Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 inhibitor A (p16INK4a. Tissue taurine depletion also enhances unfolded protein response (UPR, which may be associated with an improvement in protein folding by taurine. Our data reveal that tissue taurine depletion affects longevity and cellular senescence; an effect possibly linked to a disturbance in protein folding.

  15. The Concentration and Distribution of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Air on Illeginni Island at Kwajalein Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Gouveia, F J; Lindman, T R; Yakuma, S C

    2006-04-27

    Re-entry vehicles on missiles launched at Vandenberg Air Force base in California re-enter at the Western Test Range, the Regan Test Site (RTS) at Kwajalein Atoll. An environmental Assessment (EA) was written at the beginning of the program to assess potential impact of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be), the major RV materials of interest from a health and environmental perspective. The chemical and structural form of DU and Be in RVs is such that they are insoluble in soil water and sea water. Consequently, residual concentrations of DU and Be observed in soil on the island are not expected to be toxic to plant life because there is essentially no soil to plant uptake. Similarly, due to their insolubility in sea water there is no uptake of either element by marine biota including fish, mollusks, shellfish and sea mammals. No increase in either element has been observed in sea life around Illeginni Island where deposition of DU and Be has occurred. The critical terrestrial exposure pathway for U and Be is inhalation. Concentration of both elements in air over the test period (1989 to 2006) is lower by a factor of 10,000 than the most restrictive U.S. guideline for the general public. Uranium concentrations in air are also lower by factors of 10 to 100 than concentrations of U in air in the U.S. measured by the EPA (Keith et al., 1999). U and Be concentrations in air downwind of deposition areas on Illeginni Island are essentially indistinguishable from natural background concentrations of U in air at the atolls. Thus, there are no health related issues associated with people using the island.

  16. Mechanisms controlling lateral and vertical porewater migration of depleted uranium (DU) at two UK weapons testing sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Margaret C; Oliver, Ian W; MacKenzie, Angus B; Ellam, Robert M; Farmer, John G

    2011-04-15

    Uranium associations with colloidal and truly dissolved soil porewater components from two Ministry of Defence Firing Ranges in the UK were investigated. Porewater samples from 2-cm depth intervals for three soil cores from each of the Dundrennan and Eskmeals ranges were fractionated using centrifugal ultrafiltration (UF) and gel electrophoresis (GE). Soil porewaters from a transect running downslope from the Dundrennan firing area towards a stream (Dunrod Burn) were examined similarly. Uranium concentrations and isotopic composition were determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Multi-Collector-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS), respectively. The soils at Dundrennan were Fe- and Al-rich clay-loam soils whilst at Eskmeals, they were Fe- and Al-poor sandy soils; both, however, had similar organic matter contents due to the presence of a near-surface peaty layer at Eskmeals. These compositional features influenced the porewater composition and indeed the associations of U (and DU). In general, at Dundrennan, U was split between large (100kDa-0.2μm) and small (3-30kDa) organic colloids whilst at Eskmeals, U was mainly in the small colloidal and truly dissolved fractions. Especially below 10cm depth, association with large Fe/Al/organic colloids was considered to be a precursor to the removal of U from the Dundrennan porewaters to the solid phase. In contrast, the association of U with small organic colloids was largely responsible for inhibiting attenuation in the Eskmeals soils. Lateral migration of U (and DU) through near-surface Dundrennan soils will involve both large and small colloids but, at depth, transport of the smaller amounts of U remaining in the porewaters may involve large colloids only. For one of the Dundrennan cores the importance of redox-related processes for the re-mobilisation of DU was also indicated as Mn(IV) reduction resulted in the release of both Mn(II) and U(VI) into the truly

  17. Effect of the militarily-relevant heavy metals, depleted uranium and heavy metal tungsten-alloy on gene expression in human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexandra C; Brooks, Kia; Smith, Jan; Page, Natalie

    2004-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) and heavy-metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) are dense heavy-metals used primarily in military applications. Chemically similar to natural uranium, but depleted of the higher activity 235U and 234U isotopes, DU is a low specific activity, high-density heavy metal. In contrast, the non-radioactive HMTAs are composed of a mixture of tungsten (91-93%), nickel (3-5%), and cobalt (2-4%) particles. The use of DU and HMTAs in military munitions could result in their internalization in humans. Limited data exist however, regarding the long-term health effects of internalized DU and HMTAs in humans. Both DU and HMTAs possess a tumorigenic transforming potential and are genotoxic and mutagenic in vitro. Using insoluble DU-UO2 and a reconstituted mixture of tungsten, nickel, cobalt (rWNiCo), we tested their ability to induce stress genes in thirteen different recombinant cell lines generated from human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2). The commercially available CAT-Tox (L) cellular assay consists of a panel of cell lines stably transfected with reporter genes consisting of a coding sequence for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) under transcriptional control by mammalian stress gene regulatory sequences. DU, (5-50 microg/ml) produced a complex profile of activity demonstrating significant dose-dependent induction of the hMTIIA FOS, p53RE, Gadd153, Gadd45, NFkappaBRE, CRE, HSP70, RARE, and GRP78 promoters. The rWNiCo mixture (5-50 microg/ml) showed dose-related induction of the GSTYA, hMTIIA, p53RE, FOS, NFkappaBRE, HSP70, and CRE promoters. An examination of the pure metals, tungsten (W), nickel (Ni), and cobalt (Co), comprising the rWNiCo mixture, demonstrated that each metal exhibited a similar pattern of gene induction, but at a significantly decreased magnitude than that of the rWNiCo mixture. These data showed a synergistic activation of gene expression by the metals in the rWNiCo mixture. Our data show for the first time that DU and rWNiCo can

  18. Rubidium isotopes in primitive chondrites: Constraints on Earth's volatile element depletion and lead isotope evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, O.; Mezger, K.; van Westrenen, W.

    2011-05-01

    The bulk silicate Earth (BSE) shows substantial deficits in volatile elements compared to CI-chondrites and solar abundances. These deficits could be caused by pre-accretionary depletion in the solar nebula during condensation of solids, or by later heat-driven evaporation during collision of small bodies that later accreted to form the Earth. The latter is considered to result in isotope fractionation for elements with low condensation temperatures that correlates with the degree of depletion. Here, we report first high-precision isotope ratio measurements of the moderately volatile and lithophile trace element Rb. Data from seventeen chondrite meteorites show that their Rb isotope abundances are nearly indistinguishable from Earth, not deviating more than 1 per mil in their 87Rb/85Rb. The almost uniform solar system Rb isotope pool suggests incomplete condensation or evaporation in a single stage is unlikely to be the cause of the volatile element deficit of the Earth. As Rb and Pb have similar condensation temperatures, we use their different degrees of depletion in the BSE to address the mechanisms and timing of terrestrial volatile depletion. The Rb isotope data are consistent with a scenario in which the volatile budget of the Earth was generated by a mixture of a highly volatile-element depleted early Proto-Earth with undepleted material in the course of terrestrial accretion. Observed Pb and Rb abundances and U-Pb and Rb-Sr isotope systematics suggest that volatile addition occurred at approximately the same time at which last core-mantle equilibration was achieved. In line with previous suggestions, this last equilibration involved a second stage of Pb (but not Rb) depletion from the BSE. The timing of this second Pb loss event can be constrained to ~ 110 Ma after the start of the solar system. This model supports a scenario with core storage of Pb in the aftermath of a putative Moon forming giant impact that also delivered the bulk of the volatile

  19. Uranium, Thorium, Potassium Contents of Materials in the Homestake Underground, Lead, SD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggenthen, W.; Smith, A.

    2008-12-01

    The uranium, thorium, and potassium contents (UTK) of materials in the underground laboratory at the Homestake DUSEL in Lead, SD, can significantly affect the radioactive backgrounds experienced by detectors in physics experiments planned for the facility. Many highly sensitive experiments require low activities both in terms of direct gamma and neutron radiation as well as radon that might emanate from the materials. Specific issues requiring characterization include evaluation of the rock in which laboratory rooms will be emplaced, the design of the cement and aggregate used in shotcreting the laboratory areas used for the physics experiments, estimates of requirements for shielding from radiation from the country rock, and estimates of radon emanation. The rocks of most importance from this standpoint in the laboratory underground include the Poorman Formation, the Yates Member of the Poorman Formation, and Tertiary igneous rocks. The laboratory at the 7400 level currently is planned for construction in the Yates, whereas the laboratories at the 4850 level are scheduled for construction in both the general Poorman Fm. and the Yates. The UTK contents of Poorman and Yates from the underground are generally very low (0.1 - 0.2 ppm U and 0.2 - 0.4 ppm Th). Rhyolitic intrusive rocks, which occur as thin dikes in the vicinity of the 4850 level laboratory, have substantially higher values that are reflective of their more silicic nature with typical U values in the range of 8 - 9 ppm. Many of the laboratory rooms for the detector experiments will have walls that have been shotcreted and floors finished with concrete. The concrete consists of at least two components, the cement and the aggregate. The choices for cement material are limited by local availability but the UTK content is in the 3 ppm range for U. Analyses of potential aggregates show that sources of aggregate from standard regional aggregate resources appear to have higher values of UTK content than is

  20. The use of depleted uranium ammunition under contemporary international law: is there a need for a treaty-based ban on DU weapons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrmann, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article examines whether the use of Depleted Uranium (DU) munitions can be considered illegal under current public international law. The analysis covers the law of arms control and focuses in particular on international humanitarian law. The article argues that DU ammunition cannot be addressed adequately under existing treaty based weapon bans, such as the Chemical Weapons Convention, due to the fact that DU does not meet the criteria required to trigger the applicability of those treaties. Furthermore, it is argued that continuing uncertainties regarding the effects of DU munitions impedes a reliable review of the legality of their use under various principles of international law, including the prohibition on employing indiscriminate weapons; the prohibition on weapons that are intended, or may be expected, to cause widespread, long-term and severe damage to the natural environment; and the prohibition on causing unnecessary suffering or superfluous injury. All of these principles require complete knowledge of the effects of the weapon in question. Nevertheless, the author argues that the same uncertainty places restrictions on the use of DU under the precautionary principle. The paper concludes with an examination of whether or not there is a need for--and if so whether there is a possibility of achieving--a Convention that comprehensively outlaws the use, transfer and stockpiling of DU weapons, as proposed by some non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

  1. Depletion of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 leads to epigenetic modifications of telomerase (TERT gene in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    Full Text Available Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD-dependent deacetylase that is implicated in plethora of biological processes, including metabolism, aging, stress response, and tumorigenesis. Telomerase (TERT is essential for telomere maintenance. Activation of TERT is considered a crucial step in tumorigenesis, and therefore it is a potential therapeutic target against cancer. We have recently found that SIRT1 expression is highly elevated in hepatocellular carcinoma, and the depletion of SIRT1 leads to substantial reduction in TERT mRNA and protein expression. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of SIRT1-dependent TERT expression remains uncharacterized. Here, we elucidated if SIRT1 regulates TERT expression via transcriptional, epigenetic and post-transcriptional mechanisms. We report that depletion of SIRT1 does not lead to significant change in transcriptional activity and CpG methylation patterns of the TERT promoter, nor does it affect mRNA stability or 3'-UTR regulation of TERT. Intriguingly, depletion of SIRT1 is associated with substantial induction of acetylated histone H3-K9 and reduction of trimethyl H3-K9 at the TERT gene, which are known to be associated with gene activation. Our data revealed that SIRT1 regulates histone acetylation and methylation at the TERT promoter. We postulated that SIRT1 may regulate TERT expression via long-range interaction, or via yet unidentified histone modifications.

  2. RNase J depletion leads to massive changes in mRNA abundance in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redko, Yulia; Galtier, Eloïse; Arnion, Hélène; Darfeuille, Fabien; Sismeiro, Odile; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Médigue, Claudine; Weiman, Marion; Cruveiller, Stéphane; De Reuse, Hilde

    2016-01-01

    Degradation of RNA as an intermediate message between genes and corresponding proteins is important for rapid attenuation of gene expression and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. This process is controlled by ribonucleases that have different target specificities. In the bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori, an exo- and endoribonuclease RNase J is essential for growth. To explore the role of RNase J in H. pylori, we identified its putative targets at a global scale using next generation RNA sequencing. We found that strong depletion for RNase J led to a massive increase in the steady-state levels of non-rRNAs. mRNAs and RNAs antisense to open reading frames were most affected with over 80% increased more than 2-fold. Non-coding RNAs expressed in the intergenic regions were much less affected by RNase J depletion. Northern blotting of selected messenger and non-coding RNAs validated these results. Globally, our data suggest that RNase J of H. pylori is a major RNase involved in degradation of most cellular RNAs.

  3. Determination of lead, uranium, thorium, and thallium in silicate glass standard materials by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, I.L.; Garner, E.L.; Gramlich, J.W.; Moore, L.J.; Murphy, T.J.; Machlan, L.A.; Shields, W.R.; Tatsumoto, M.; Knight, R.J.

    1973-01-01

    A set of four standard glasses has been prepared which have been doped with 61 different elements at the 500-, 50-, 1-, and 0.02-ppm level. The concentrations of lead, uranium, thorium, and thallium have been determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry at a number of points in each of the glasses. The results obtained from independent determinations in two laboratories demonstrate the homogeneity of the samples and that precision of the order of 0.5% (95% L.E.) may be obtained by the method even at the 20-ppb level for these elements. The chemical and mass spectrometric procedures necessary are presented.

  4. Depletion of cyclophilins B and C leads to dysregulation of endoplasmic reticulum redox homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocki, Pawel; Chapman, Daniel C; Beach, Lori A; Williams, David B

    2014-08-15

    Protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum is assisted by molecular chaperones and folding catalysts that include members of the protein-disulfide isomerase and peptidyl-prolyl isomerase families. In this report, we examined the contributions of the cyclophilin subset of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases to protein folding and identified cyclophilin C as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cyclophilin in addition to cyclophilin B. Using albumin and transferrin as models of cis-proline-containing proteins in human hepatoma cells, we found that combined knockdown of cyclophilins B and C delayed transferrin secretion but surprisingly resulted in more efficient oxidative folding and secretion of albumin. Examination of the oxidation status of ER protein-disulfide isomerase family members revealed a shift to a more oxidized state. This was accompanied by a >5-fold elevation in the ratio of oxidized to total glutathione. This "hyperoxidation" phenotype could be duplicated by incubating cells with the cyclophilin inhibitor cyclosporine A, a treatment that triggered efficient ER depletion of cyclophilins B and C by inducing their secretion to the medium. To identify the pathway responsible for ER hyperoxidation, we individually depleted several enzymes that are known or suspected to deliver oxidizing equivalents to the ER: Ero1αβ, VKOR, PRDX4, or QSOX1. Remarkably, none of these enzymes contributed to the elevated oxidized to total glutathione ratio induced by cyclosporine A treatment. These findings establish cyclophilin C as an ER cyclophilin, demonstrate the novel involvement of cyclophilins B and C in ER redox homeostasis, and suggest the existence of an additional ER oxidative pathway that is modulated by ER cyclophilins.

  5. In vivo measurements of lead-210 for assessing cumulative radon exposure in uranium miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilmette, R.A.; Laurer, G.R. [New York Univ. Inst. of Environmental Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States); Lambert, W.E.; Gilliland, F.D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    It has long been recognized that a major contributor to the uncertainty in risk analysis of lung cancer in uranium and other hard rock miners is the estimation of total radon progeny exposure of individual miners under study. These uncertainties arise from the fact that only a limited number of measurements of airborne {sup 222}Rn progeny concentrations were made in the mines during the times that the miners were being exposed, and that dosimeters capable of integrating the Rn progeny exposures of the miners did not exist. Historically, the cumulative exposures for individual uranium and other hard rock miners have been calculated by combining the employee`s work history, which may or may not have included time spent at different jobs within the mines and at different locations within the mines, with whatever periodic measurements of Rn and Rn progeny were available. The amount and quality of the measurement data varied enormously from mine to mine and from population to population. Because the quality of the exposure data collected during the period of active mining in the United STates cannot now be altered substantially, significant improvement in individual miner exposure estimates is only likely to be achieved if a new cumulative exposure metric is developed and implemented. The decay chain of Rn includes the production of {sup 210}Pb, which can accumulate in the skeleton in amounts proportional to the intake of Rn progeny. We hypothesize that the in vivo measurement of {sup 210}Pb in the skulls of miners will provide such a metric. In summary, the primary purpose of this pilot study to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring {sup 210}Pb in the heads of former uranium miners has been accomplished.

  6. Taurine depletion caused by knocking out the taurine transporter gene leads to cardiomyopathy with cardiac atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi; Kimura, Yasushi; Uozumi, Yoriko; Takai, Mika; Muraoka, Satoko; Matsuda, Takahisa; Ueki, Kei; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Schaffer, Stephen W; Fujio, Yasushi; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-01

    The sulfur-containing beta-amino acid, taurine, is the most abundant free amino acid in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Although its physiological function has not been established, it is thought to play an important role in ion movement, calcium handling, osmoregulation and cytoprotection. To begin examining the physiological function of taurine, we generated taurine transporter- (TauT-) knockout mice (TauTKO), which exhibited a deficiency in myocardial and skeletal muscle taurine content compared with their wild-type littermates. The TauTKO heart underwent ventricular remodeling, characterized by reductions in ventricular wall thickness and cardiac atrophy accompanied with the smaller cardiomyocytes. Associated with the structural changes in the heart was a reduction in cardiac output and increased expression of heart cardiac failure (fetal) marker genes, such as ANP, BNP and beta-MHC. Moreover, ultrastructural damage to the myofilaments and mitochondria was observed. Further, the skeletal muscle of the TauTKO mice also exhibited decreased cell volume, structural defects and a reduction of exercise endurance capacity. Importantly, the expression of Hsp70, ATA2 and S100A4, which are upregulated by osmotic stress, was elevated in both heart and skeletal muscle of the TauTKO mice. Taurine depletion causes cardiomyocyte atrophy, mitochondrial and myofiber damage and cardiac dysfunction, effects likely related to the actions of taurine. Our data suggest that multiple actions of taurine, including osmoregulation, regulation of mitochondrial protein expression and inhibition of apoptosis, collectively ensure proper maintenance of cardiac and skeletal muscular structure and function.

  7. The impact of homologous recombination repair deficiency on depleted uranium clastogenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells: XRCC3 protects cells from chromosome aberrations, but increases chromosome fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth Street, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Joyce, Kellie [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Xie, Hong [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth Street, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Falank, Carolyne [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • The role of homologous recombination repair in DU-induced toxicity was examined. • Loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. • XRCC3 protects cell from DU-induced chromosome breaks and fusions. • XRCC3 plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation of the X chromosome. - Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is extensively used in both industry and military applications. The potential for civilian and military personnel exposure to DU is rising, but there are limited data on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. Previous laboratory research indicates DU is a potential carcinogen, but epidemiological studies remain inconclusive. DU is genotoxic, inducing DNA double strand breaks, chromosome damage and mutations, but the mechanisms of genotoxicity or repair pathways involved in protecting cells against DU-induced damage remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of homologous recombination repair deficiency on DU-induced genotoxicity using RAD51D and XRCC3-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Cells deficient in XRCC3 (irs1SF) exhibited similar cytotoxicity after DU exposure compared to wild-type (AA8) and XRCC3-complemented (1SFwt8) cells, but DU induced more break-type and fusion-type lesions in XRCC3-deficient cells compared to wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Surprisingly, loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. DU induced selective X-chromosome fragmentation irrespective of RAD51D status, but loss of XRCC3 nearly eliminated fragmentation observed after DU exposure in wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Thus, XRCC3, but not RAD51D, protects cells from DU-induced breaks and fusions and also plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation.

  8. Evolution of sociality in spiders leads to depleted genomic diversity at both population and species levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settepani, V; Schou, M F; Greve, M; Grinsted, L; Bechsgaard, J; Bilde, T

    2017-08-01

    Across several animal taxa, the evolution of sociality involves a suite of characteristics, a "social syndrome," that includes cooperative breeding, reproductive skew, primary female-biased sex ratio, and the transition from outcrossing to inbreeding mating system, factors that are expected to reduce effective population size (Ne). This social syndrome may be favoured by short-term benefits but come with long-term costs, because the reduction in Ne amplifies loss of genetic diversity by genetic drift, ultimately restricting the potential of populations to respond to environmental change. To investigate the consequences of this social life form on genetic diversity, we used a comparative RAD-sequencing approach to estimate genomewide diversity in spider species that differ in level of sociality, reproductive skew and mating system. We analysed multiple populations of three independent sister-species pairs of social inbreeding and subsocial outcrossing Stegodyphus spiders, and a subsocial outgroup. Heterozygosity and within-population diversity were sixfold to 10-fold lower in social compared to subsocial species, and demographic modelling revealed a tenfold reduction in Ne of social populations. Species-wide genetic diversity depends on population divergence and the viability of genetic lineages. Population genomic patterns were consistent with high lineage turnover, which homogenizes the genetic structure that builds up between inbreeding populations, ultimately depleting genetic diversity at the species level. Indeed, species-wide genetic diversity of social species was 5-8 times lower than that of subsocial species. The repeated evolution of species with this social syndrome is associated with severe loss of genomewide diversity, likely to limit their evolutionary potential. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. 贫化铀球装置内的238U(n,2n)反应率实验研究%Measurement of 238 U(n,2n) Reaction Rate in Depleted Uranium Sphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱传新; 牟云峰; 郑普; 王新华; 郭海萍; 何铁

    2015-01-01

    采用两套不同尺寸的贫化铀球装置开展了装置内部的238 U (n ,2n)反应率实验研究,利用PD‐300加速器D‐T中子源辐照实验装置,源强变化采用伴随粒子法监测,238 U圆片放置在实验装置的45°孔道内,分布在距中子源不同距离处,辐照结束后,采用 HPGe探测器测量238 U圆片活化γ射线。实验结果与蒙特卡罗程序模拟计算结果进行了比较和分析。结果表明,238 U (n ,2n)反应率实验结果与模拟计算值较吻合,238 U (n ,2n)反应率随球体半径 r的增加,近似服从e- ar/r2分布规律。%The 238 U (n ,2n) reaction rates of two depleted uranium spheres were meas‐ured .The depleted uranium spheres were irradiated by D‐T neutron at PD‐300 accelera‐tor .The intensity of neutron source was monitored by the associated‐alpha particles from the T (d ,n)He reaction .After radiation ,the activated gamma rays of uranium foils in the 45° hole of uranium spheres were measured using HPGe detector .The 238 U(n ,2n) reaction rates of two depleted uranium spheres were calculated using Monte‐Carlo simu‐lation .It shows that the 238 U(n ,2n) reaction rates from experiments are agreed with the calculations .The change of 238 U(n ,2n) reaction rate with the radius r of depleted urani‐um sphere is obeyed approximately the distribution of e - ar/r2 .

  10. Transcriptomic effects of depleted uranium on acetylcholine and cholesterol metabolisms in Alzheimer's disease model; Effets transcriptomiques de l'uranium appauvri sur les metabolismes de l'acetylcholine et du cholesterol chez un modele de maladie d'Alzheimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestaevel, Ph.; Bensoussan, H.; Racine, R.; Airault, F.; Gourmelon, P.; Souidi, M. [Direction de la radioprotection de l' Homme, service de radiobiologie et d' epidemiologie, laboratoire de radiotoxicologie experimentale, institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire, BP no 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France)

    2011-02-15

    Some heavy metals, or aluminium, could participate in the development of Alzheimer disease (AD). Depleted uranium (DU), another heavy metal, modulates the cholinergic system and the cholesterol metabolism in the brain of rats, but without neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to determine what happens in organisms exposed to DU that will/are developing the AD. This study was thus performed on a transgenic mouse model for human amyloid precursor protein (APP), the Tg2576 strain. The possible effects of DU through drinking water (20 mg/L) over an 8-month period were analyzed on acetylcholine and cholesterol metabolisms at gene level in the cerebral cortex. The mRNA levels of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABC A1) decreased in control Tg2576 mice in comparison with wild-type mice (respectively -89%, -86% and -44%, p < 0.05). Chronic exposure of Tg2576 mice to DU increased mRNA levels of ChAT (+189%, p < 0.05), VAChT (+120%, p < 0.05) and ABC A1 (+52%, p < 0.05) compared to control Tg2576 mice. Overall, these modifications of acetylcholine and cholesterol metabolisms did not lead to increased disturbances that are specific of AD, suggesting that chronic DU exposure did not worsen the pathology in this experimental model. (authors)

  11. Disposition of Depleted Uranium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, J.L.

    2001-08-13

    This document summarizes environmental information which has been collected up to June 1983 at Savannah River Plant. Of particular interest is an updating of dose estimates from changes in methodology of calculation, lower cesium transport estimates from Steel Creek, and new sports fish consumption data for the Savannah River. The status of various permitting requirements are also discussed.

  12. Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year

  13. The Rosetta Stone of isotope science and the uranium/lead system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laeter, John

    2011-01-01

    The nucleosynthetic characteristics of U and Pb, together with the interconnectivity between these elements by two radioactive decay chains, are the foundation on which the U/Pb system was able to make a unique contribution to isotope science. The Rosetta Stone is an ancient Egyptian tablet that enabled previously indecipherable hieroglyphics to be translated. In a similar manner, the isotopic investigation of the U/Pb system, by a variety of mass spectrometric instrumentation, has led to our knowledge of the age of the Earth and contributed to thermochronology. In a similar manner, climate change information has been garnered by utilizing the U-Disequilibrium Series to measure the ages of marine archives. The impact of Pb in the environment has been demonstrated in human health, particularly at the peak of leaded petrol consumption in motor vehicles in the 1970s. Variations in the isotopic composition of lead in samples enable the source of the lead to be "fingerprinted" so as to trace the history of the Pb in ice cores and aerosols. The discovery of nuclear fission of (235)U led to the development of nuclear reactors and the isotopic investigation of the Oklo natural reactors. The mass spectrometer is the modern Rosetta Stone of isotope science, which has enabled the isotopic hieroglyphics of the U/Pb system to be investigated to reveal new horizons in our understanding of nature, and to address a number of societal and environmental problems.

  14. Drug repurposing: sulfasalazine sensitizes gliomas to gamma knife radiosurgery by blocking cystine uptake through system Xc-, leading to glutathione depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleire, L; Skeie, B S; Netland, I A; Førde, H E; Dodoo, E; Selheim, F; Leiss, L; Heggdal, J I; Pedersen, P-H; Wang, J; Enger, P Ø

    2015-12-03

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are aggressive brain tumors that always recur after radiotherapy. Cystine, mainly provided by the system X(c)(-) antiporter, is a requirement for glioma cell synthesis of glutathione (GSH) which has a critical role in scavenging free radicals, for example, after radiotherapy. Thus, we hypothesized that the X(c)(-)-inhibitor sulfasalazine (SAS) could potentiate the efficacy of radiotherapy against gliomas. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of system X(c)(-), xCT, was uniformly expressed in a panel of 30 human GBM biopsies. SAS treatment significantly reduced cystine uptake and GSH levels, whereas it significantly increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in glioma cells in vitro. Furthermore, SAS and radiation synergistically increased DNA double-strand breaks and increased glioma cell death, whereas adding the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) reversed cell death. Moreover, SAS and gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) synergistically prolonged survival in nude rats harboring human GBM xenografts, compared with controls or either treatment alone. In conclusion, SAS effectively blocks cystine uptake in glioma cells in vitro, leading to GSH depletion and increased ROS levels, DNA damage and cell death. Moreover, it potentiates the anti-tumor efficacy of GKRS in rats with human GBM xenografts, providing a survival benefit. Thus, SAS may have a role as a radiosensitizer to enhance the efficacy of current radiotherapies for glioma patients.

  15. Methods to Reduce Sand Ejecta from Projectile Impact - a Scaled Study with the Goal of Application to Depleted Uranium Penetrator Catch Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    organization provided high-speed camera support. This work was conducted under the general supervision of Andy Martin , Chief, EP-E, and Warren...bomb attack: Studies with uranium and metal stimulants. Environmental Progress 26(1):94-103. Ormo, J., M. Lindstrom , A. Lepinette, J. Martinez-Frias

  16. Geochemistry of manganese, iron, uranium, lead-210 and major ions in the Susquehanna River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    The change in water composition accompanying a change in discharge of large streams and the Susquehanna River results from the change in the proportions of the total flow composed of type waters of constant composition. This change in the flow proportions is due to the different hydrologic responses to precipitation inputs of basins underlain by different single rock types. The in-river precipitation of mine-drainage-injected Mn and Fe was studied at a pH of approximately 7. For Mn the removal from solution appears to be first order. The rate constant is 10/sup 3/ times greater than the extrapolated autocatalytic rate constant of previous laboratory experiments. The study of the removal of Fe from solution yields a first order rate constant consistent with previous laboratory experiments. Lead-210 was used as a natural tracer to study the fate of trace metals.

  17. 贫铀经口慢性染毒对小鼠肠道菌群多样性的影响%The diversity of intestinal microbiota in mice after chronic oral exposure to depleted uranium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任泂; 唐欢; 魏泓; 郝玉徽; 刘晶; 李蓉; 粟永萍

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察贫铀经口慢性染毒对小鼠肠道菌群多样性的影响.方法 通过将不同剂量的贫铀混入饲料中饲养小鼠,以小鼠肝脏和肾脏铀含量作为判断贫铀在动物体内蓄积的指标,建立贫铀经口慢性染毒小鼠模型,观察各组小鼠之间的体重变化,对各组小鼠进行基于细菌16S rRNA V6-V8区的PCR-DGGE分析.结果 食入贫铀的各组小鼠肝脏和肾脏铀含量显著高于对照组(P<0.05),各组小鼠体重差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),各组小鼠V6-V8区DGGE图谱的丰富度和多样性指数差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 贫铀经口慢性染毒对小鼠肠道菌群多样性无显著影响.%Objective To assess the diversity of intestinal microbiota in mice after chronic oral exposure to depleted uranium ( DU). Method SPF grade KM mice were exposed to DU in food at different doses for four months to generate mice model of chronic oral exposure to DU. The uranium content in the livers and kidneys as well as the body weight in each group were tested. PCR-DCGE based on the V6-V8 region of bacterial 16S rRNA was performed. The richness and the Shannon-Wiener index were analyzed to compare the effect of exposure to DU on the diversity of mice intestinal microflo-ra. Result The uranium contents in the livers and kidneys of each group of experimental mice were found significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.05 ). No obvious difference of body weight was observed in each groups of mice ( P < 0.05). Compared to the control mice, neither richness nor Shannon-Wiener index of DGGE profiles of V6-V8 region was found significantly changed in the experimental mice. Conclusion No obvious difference of diversity of mice intestinal microbiota was detected after chronic oral exposure to depleted uranium.

  18. Induction of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 by cholesterol depletion leads to the conversion of proMMP-2 into active MMP-2 in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangmin; Oh, Jang-Hee; Lee, Youngae; Lee, Jeongyoon; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2010-01-31

    Cholesterol is one of major components of cell membrane and plays a role in vesicular trafficking and cellular signaling. We investigated the effects of cholesterol on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activation in human dermal fibroblasts. We found that tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) expression and active form MMP-2 (64 kD) were dose-dependently increased by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD), a cholesterol depletion agent. In contrast, cholesterol depletion-induced TIMP-2 expression and MMP-2 activation were suppressed by cholesterol repletion. Then we investigated the regulatory mechanism of TIMP-2 expression by cholesterol depletion. We found that the phosphorylation of JNK as well as ERK was significantly increased by cholesterol depletion. Moreover, cholesterol depletion-induced TIMP-2 expression and MMP-2 activation was significantly decreased by MEK inhibitor U0126, and JNK inhibitor SP600125, respectively. While a low dose of recombinant TIMP-2 (100 ng/ml) increased the level of active MMP-2 (64 kD), the high dose of TIMP-2 (>or=200 ng/ml) decreased the level of active MMP-2 (64 kD). Taken together, we suggest that the induction of TIMP-2 by cholesterol depletion leads to the conversion of proMMP-2 (72 kD) into active MMP-2 (64 kD) in human dermal fibroblasts.

  19. Dicer1 depletion in male germ cells leads to infertility due to cumulative meiotic and spermiogenic defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Romero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spermatogenesis is a complex biological process that requires a highly specialized control of gene expression. In the past decade, small non-coding RNAs have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. DICER1, an RNAse III endonuclease, is essential for the biogenesis of several classes of small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs, but is also critical for the degradation of toxic transposable elements. In this study, we investigated to which extent DICER1 is required for germ cell development and the progress of spermatogenesis in mice. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that the selective ablation of Dicer1 at the early onset of male germ cell development leads to infertility, due to multiple cumulative defects at the meiotic and post-meiotic stages culminating with the absence of functional spermatozoa. Alterations were observed in the first spermatogenic wave and include delayed progression of spermatocytes to prophase I and increased apoptosis, resulting in a reduced number of round spermatids. The transition from round to mature spermatozoa was also severely affected, since the few spermatozoa formed in mutant animals were immobile and misshapen, exhibiting morphological defects of the head and flagellum. We also found evidence that the expression of transposable elements of the SINE family is up-regulated in Dicer1-depleted spermatocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that DICER1 is dispensable for spermatogonial stem cell renewal and mitotic proliferation, but is required for germ cell differentiation through the meiotic and haploid phases of spermatogenesis.

  20. Arsenic, iron, lead, manganese, and uranium concentrations in private bedrock wells in southeastern New Hampshire, 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah M.; Belaval, Marcel; Ayotte, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Trace metals, such as arsenic, iron, lead, manganese, and uranium, in groundwater used for drinking have long been a concern because of the potential adverse effects on human health and the aesthetic or nuisance problems that some present. Moderate to high concentrations of the trace metal arsenic have been identified in drinking water from groundwater sources in southeastern New Hampshire, a rapidly growing region of the State (Montgomery and others, 2003). During the past decade (2000–10), southeastern New Hampshire, which is composed of Hillsborough, Rockingham, and Strafford Counties, has grown in population by nearly 48,700 (or 6.4 percent) to 819,100. These three counties contain 62 percent of the State’s population but encompass only about 22 percent of the land area (New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning, 2011). According to a 2005 water-use study (Hayes and Horn, 2009), about 39 percent of the population in these three counties in southeastern New Hampshire uses private wells as sources of drinking water, and these wells are not required by the State to be routinely tested for trace metals or other contaminants. Some trace metals have associated human-health benchmarks or nonhealth guidelines that have been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate public water supplies. The EPA has established a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L) for arsenic (As) and a MCL of 30 μg/L for uranium (U) because of associated health risks (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2012). Iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) are essential for human health, but Mn at high doses may have adverse cognitive effects in children (Bouchard and others, 2011; Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 2012); therefore, the EPA has issued a lifetime health advisory (LHA) of 300 μg/L for Mn. Recommended secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCLs) for Fe (300 μg/L) and Mn (50 μg/L) were established primarily as

  1. The cytotoxicity of lead and uranium on rat osteoblastic cells is highly dependent on chemical speciation and cellular accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, S.; Carriere, M.; Thiebault, C.; Gouget, B. [CEA Saclay, CNRS - UMR9956, Lab Pierre Sue, F-91198 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Malval, L. [INSERM, E366, Lab Biol Tissue Osseux, St Etienne, (France)

    2007-07-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Uranium (U) and lead (Pb), as other heavy metals, present a strong chemical toxicity. After blood contamination, U and Pb, complexed with proteins or inorganic molecules are conveyed to target organs, the skeleton being the major long-term storage site. Once in bones, both metals are incorporated in the hydroxyapatite matrix by substitution with calcium. They can thus be released during re-modelling, which explains in part their toxicity. Although the clinical effects of these metals are well known, the cellular mechanisms of their action are not well understood. To investigate the biological effects of U and Pb acute exposure on osteoblasts, ROS17/2.8 cells were exposed to Pb or U [0-1 mM] for 24 h. The most relevant chemical and physical states, namely the most likely forms (species) of the toxics in contact with cells after blood contamination were selected for cell exposure. For each metal species, Pb and U toxicity were assessed through cell viability assay. The results show that whatever the speciation, U chemical toxicity to bone cells is far lower than Pb toxicity. Pb appears to be cytotoxic when left free in the exposure medium or when it is complexed with bicarbonate, cysteine or citrate, but not with albumin or phosphate (an insoluble form of Pb). In order to explain these differences in sensitivity between different metals and metal chemical species, time-course and dose-response curves of cellular accumulation at lethal or sub-lethal doses were drawn by direct elemental analysis of metal concentrations in digested cell pellets, using Inductive Coupling Plasma Mass Spectroscopy. These showed a clear correlation between toxicity and cellular accumulation. Also, Pb induces an inhibition of ALP activity after 24 h exposure to sub-lethal doses, which is speciation-dependent and again correlates with cellular accumulation. Phenotypic effects of U are under investigation. In addition, electron-microscopic observation of

  2. Coenzyme depletion by members of the aerolysin family of pore-forming toxins leads to diminished ATP levels and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennessey, Christine M; Ivie, Susan E; McClain, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that a variety of bacterial pore-forming toxins induce cell death through a process of programmed necrosis characterized by the rapid depletion of cellular ATP. However, events leading to the necrosis and depletion of ATP are not thoroughly understood. We demonstrate that ATP-depletion induced by two pore-forming toxins, the Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin and the Aeromonas hydrophila aerolysin toxin, is associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. To gain further insight into the toxin-induced metabolic changes contributing to necrosis and depletion of ATP, we analyzed the biochemical profiles of 251 distinct compounds by GC/MS or LC/MS/MS following exposure of a human kidney cell line to the epsilon-toxin. As expected, numerous biochemicals were seen to increase or decrease in response to epsilon-toxin. However, the pattern of these changes was consistent with the toxin-induced disruption of major energy-producing pathways in the cell including disruptions to the beta-oxidation of lipids. In particular, treatment with epsilon-toxin led to decreased levels of key coenzymes required for energy production including carnitine, NAD (and NADH), and coenzyme A. Independent biochemical assays confirmed that epsilon-toxin and aerolysin induced the rapid decrease of these coenzymes or their synthetic precursors. Incubation of cells with NADH or carnitine-enriched medium helped protect cells from toxin-induced ATP depletion and cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that members of the aerolysin family of pore-forming toxins lead to decreased levels of essential coenzymes required for energy production. The resulting loss of energy substrates is expected to contribute to dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and ultimately cell death.

  3. Determination of trace element concentrations and stable lead, uranium and thorium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS in NORM and NORM-polluted sample leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, J L; Villa, M; Hurtado, S; García-Tenorio, R

    2012-02-29

    This work focuses on the monitoring of the potential pollution in scenarios that involve NORM-related industrial activities (environmental or in-door scenarios). The objective was to develop a method to determine extent and origin of the contamination, suitable for monitoring (i.e. simple, fast and economical) and avoiding the use of too many different instruments. It is presented a radiochemical method that allows the determination of trace element concentrations and 206Pb/207Pb/208Pb, 238U/234U and 232Th/230Th isotope ratios using a single sample aliquot and a single instrument (ICP-QMS). Eichrom UTEVA® extraction chromatography minicolumns were used to separate uranium and thorium in sample leachates. Independent ICP-MS determinations of uranium and thorium isotope ratios were carried out afterwards. Previously a small aliquot of the leachate was used for the determination of trace element concentrations and lead isotope ratios. Several radiochemical arrangements were tested to get maximum performances and simplicity of the method. The performances of the method were studied in terms of chemical yields of uranium and thorium and removal of the potentially interfering elements. The established method was applied to samples from a chemical industry and sediments collected in a NORM-polluted scenario. The results obtained from our method allowed us to infer not only the extent, but also the sources of the contamination in the area. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Depletion of the polyamines spermidine and spermine by overexpression of spermidine/spermine N¹-acetyltransferase 1 (SAT1) leads to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Swati; Mandal, Ajeet; Park, Myung Hee

    2015-06-15

    The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine are intimately involved in the regulation of cellular growth and viability. Transduction of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells with an adenovirus encoding a key polyamine catabolic enzyme, spermidine N¹-acetyltransferase 1 (SSAT1)/SAT1 (AdSAT1), leads to a rapid depletion of spermidine and spermine, arrest in cell growth and a decline in cell viability. Annexin V/propidium iodide FACS analyses, terminal uridine nucleotide end-labelling (TUNEL) and caspase 3 assays showed a clear indication of apoptosis in AdSAT1-transduced cells (at 24-72 h), but not in cells transduced with GFP-encoding adenovirus (AdGFP). Apoptosis in the polyamine-depleted cells occurs by the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway, as evidenced by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, increase in pro-apoptotic Bax, decrease in anti-apoptotic Bcl-xl, Bcl2 and Mcl-1 and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, upon transduction with AdSAT1. Moreover, TEM images of AdSAT1-transduced cells revealed morphological changes commonly associated with apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, nuclear fragmentation, mitochondrial alteration, vacuolization and membrane blebbing. The apoptosis appears to result largely from depletion of the polyamines spermidine and spermine, as the polyamine analogues α-methylspermidine (α-MeSpd) and N¹,N¹²-dimethylspermine (Me₂Spm) that are not substrates for SAT1 could partially restore growth and prevent apoptosis of AdSAT1-transduced cells. Inhibition of polyamine oxidases did not restore the growth of AdSAT1-transduced cells or block apoptosis, suggesting that the growth arrest and apoptosis were not induced by oxidative stress resulting from accelerated polyamine catabolism. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that the depletion of the polyamines spermidine and spermine leads to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. © The Authors Journal compilation © 2015 Biochemical Society.

  5. Concetration and Distribution of Depleted Uranium (DU) and Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Air on Illeginni Island at Kwajalein Atoll after the Final Land-Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Gouveia, F J; Kehl, S R; Lindman, T R; Yakuma, S C

    2010-04-22

    Re-entry vehicles on missiles launched from Vandenberg Air Force base in California re-enter at the Western Test Range, the Regan Test Site (RTS) at Kwajalein Atoll. An Environmental Assessment (EA) was written at the beginning of the program to assess potential impact of DU and Be, the major RV materials of interest from a health and environmental perspective, for both ocean and land impacts. The chemical and structural form of Be and DU in RVs is such that they are insoluble in soil water and seawater. Thus, they are not toxic to plant life on the isalnd (no soil to plant uptake.) Similarly, due to their insolubility in sea water there is no uptake of either element by fish, mollusks, shellfish, sea mammals, etc. No increase in either element has been observed in sea life around Illeginnin Island where deposition of DU and Be has occured. The critical terrestrial exposure pathway for U and Be is inhalation. Concentration of both elements in air over the test period (1989 to 2006) is lower by a factor of nearly 10,000 than the most restrictive U.S. guideline for the general public. Uranium concentrations in air are also lower by factors of 10 to 100 than concentrations of U in air in the U.S. measured by the EPA (Keith et al., 1999). U and Be concentrations in air downwind of deposition areas on Illeginni Island are essentially indistinguishable from natural background concentrations of U in air at the atolls. Thus, there are no health related issues associated with people using the island.

  6. Sem-EDXRF and ICP-MS investigation of the morphological and chemical composition of depleted uranium particles from Kuwait areas affected by the 1991 Gulf War

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danesi, P.R.; Burns, K.; Campbell, M.; Ciurapinski, A.; Donohue, D.; Admon, U.; Burkart, W. [International Atomic Energy Agency Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Selected soil samples collected in Kuwait locations where residues of DU ammunition existed as a legacy of the 1991 Gulf War, have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence detector (SEM- EDXRF) with the objective to identify the presence of DU particles and characterize their shape and size. The isotopic and total bulk concentrations of uranium in the samples were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry. The samples studied by SEM-EDXRF were prepared by gently tapping an aluminum stab covered with a doubled-sided adhesive carbon disk, thereby ensuring that the physical integrity of the samples was maintained. The results have indicted that soil collected just below ({approx} 5 cm) corroded DU penetrators contained several DU oxide particles (isotopic ratio {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U = 0.0021) ranging in size from 1 to 10 microns (approximate geometrical diameter) having an irregular shape. The particles are most likely corrosion products from the DU penetrators. Some particles are imbedded in a larger matrix containing aluminum oxide (corrosion product of the penetrator jacket) and silica (sand). Swipes collected inside holes in tanks hit by DU ammunition, using ultra-pure cotton cloths, have indicated the presence of many small DU particles in the range 1 to 10 microns. In this case the particles were found to contain also small quantities of Fe, probably the results on alloying process occurring when the DU penetrators impact with the tank armor. (author)

  7. Determination of trace element concentrations and stable lead, uranium and thorium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS in NORM and NORM-polluted sample leachates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, J.L., E-mail: ppmasb@us.es [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, EPS, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Villa, M. [Servicio de Radioisotopos, Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion (CITIUS), Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes 4b, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, ETS de Arquitectura, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Hurtado, S. [Servicio de Radioisotopos, Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion (CITIUS), Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes 4b, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Garcia-Tenorio, R. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, ETS de Arquitectura, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2012-02-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polluted sediment and NORM samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An efficient yet fast process allowing multi-parametric determinations in <3 days. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trace element concentrations, Pb, Th and U isotope ratios with a single instrument. - Abstract: This work focuses on the monitoring of the potential pollution in scenarios that involve NORM-related industrial activities (environmental or in-door scenarios). The objective was to develop a method to determine extent and origin of the contamination, suitable for monitoring (i.e. simple, fast and economical) and avoiding the use of too many different instruments. It is presented a radiochemical method that allows the determination of trace element concentrations and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb/{sup 208}Pb, {sup 238}U/{sup 234}U and {sup 232}Th/{sup 230}Th isotope ratios using a single sample aliquot and a single instrument (ICP-QMS). Eichrom UTEVA{sup Registered-Sign} extraction chromatography minicolumns were used to separate uranium and thorium in sample leachates. Independent ICP-MS determinations of uranium and thorium isotope ratios were carried out afterwards. Previously a small aliquot of the leachate was used for the determination of trace element concentrations and lead isotope ratios. Several radiochemical arrangements were tested to get maximum performances and simplicity of the method. The performances of the method were studied in terms of chemical yields of uranium and thorium and removal of the potentially interfering elements. The established method was applied to samples from a chemical industry and sediments collected in a NORM-polluted scenario. The results obtained from our method allowed us to infer not only the extent, but also the sources of the contamination in the area.

  8. In Situ Biostimulation at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site: Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Long, P.

    2005-12-01

    In situ biostimulation at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site: Multicomponent Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Modeling Field experiments conducted at a former uranium mill tailings site in western Colorado are being used to investigate microbially mediated immobilization of uranium as a potential future remediation option for such sites. While the general principle of biostimulating microbial communities to reduce aqueous hexavalent uranium to immobile uraninite has been demonstrated in the laboratory and field, the ability to predictably engineer long lasting immobilization will require a more complete understanding of field-scale processes and properties. For this study, numerical simulation of the flow field, geochemical conditions, and micriobial communities is used to interpret field-scale biogeochemical reactive transport observed during experiments performed in 2002 to 2004. One key issue is identifying bioavailable Fe(III) oxide, which is the principal electron acceptor utilized by the acetate- oxidizing Geobacter sp. These organisms are responsible for uranium bioreduction that results in the removal of sufficient U(VI) to lower uranium groundwater concentrations to at or near applicable standards. The depletion of bioavailable Fe(III) leads to succession by sulfate reducers that are considerably less effective at uranium bioreduction. An important modeling consideration are the abiotic reactions (e.g., mineral precipitation and dissolution, aqueous and surface complexation) involving the Fe(II) and sulfide produced during biostimulation. These components, strongly associated with the solid phases, may play an important role in the evolving reactivity of the mineral surfaces that are likely to impact long-term uranium immobilization.

  9. CIITA enhances HIV-1 attachment to CD4+ T cells leading to enhanced infection and cell depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kristen A; Kelley, Lauren N; Nekorchuk, Michael D; Jones, James H; Hahn, Amy B; de Noronha, Carlos M C; Harton, Jonathan A; Duus, Karen M

    2010-12-01

    Activated CD4(+) T cells are more susceptible to HIV infection than resting T cells; the reason for this remains unresolved. Induction of CIITA and subsequent expression of the MHC class II isotype HLA-DR are hallmarks of CD4(+) T cell activation; therefore, we investigated the role of CIITA expression in T cells during HIV infection. CIITA-expressing SupT1 cells display enhanced virion attachment in a gp160/CD4-dependent manner, which results in increased HIV infection, virus release, and T cell depletion. Although increased attachment and infection of T cells correlated with HLA-DR surface expression, Ab blocking, transient expression of HLA-DR without CIITA, and short hairpin RNA knockdown demonstrate that HLA-DR does not directly enhance susceptibility of CIITA-expressing cells to HIV infection. Further analysis of the remaining MHC class II isotypes, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ, MHC class I isotypes, HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C, and the class II Ag presentation genes, invariant chain and HLA-DM, demonstrate that these proteins likely do not contribute to CIITA enhancement of HIV infection. Finally, we demonstrate that in activated primary CD4(+) T cells as HLA-DR/CIITA expression increases there is a corresponding increase in virion attachment. Overall, this work suggests that induction of CIITA expression upon CD4(+) T cell activation contributes to enhanced attachment, infection, virus release, and cell death through an undefined CIITA transcription product that may serve as a new antiviral target.

  10. Determination of transfer factors of uranium, thorium, radium and lead from soil to agricultural product in Japan for estimating internal radiation dose through ingestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Tomozo [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Tashiro, Yoshikazu; Fujinaga, Hideshi [Sumitomo Metal Mining Co. Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishii, Tomoaki; Gunji, Yasuyoshi [Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    2002-09-01

    The transfer factors (TFs) of uranium (U), thorium (Th), radium (Ra) and lead (Pb) from soil to agricultural products were determined in order to estimate the internal radiation dose to the human body through ingestion. Samples of rice, potato, onion, cabbage, mandarin orange, spinach, apple and soil were collected from various districts in Japan. After appropriate pretreatment of the samples, concentrations in the sample solutions were measured by Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) (for U, Th and Pb) and liquid scintillation counter (for Ra). It was recognized that TFs were 4.9 x 10{sup -6} (apple) and 3.6 x 10{sup -4} (spinach) for U, 2.8 x 10{sup -6} (apple) and 2.3 x 10{sup -4} (spinach) for Th, and 4.0 x 10{sup -3} (hulled rice), 7.0 x 10{sup -5} (onion) and 5.0 x 10{sup -3} (hulled rice) for Pb. The TF of Ra, however, was not determined due to detection limitations. TF values obtained in the present study range from the same order of magnitude to 1/100 compared to the data in Technical Report Series No.364 (TRS364) as reported by IAEA. It was revealed that the internal radiation dose caused by the intake of uranium series radioactive nuclides through agricultural food ingestion was 16 {mu}Sv/y, where Pb was the most contributory nuclide. (author)

  11. 贫铀/聚乙烯交替球壳中裂变反应率的测量与分析%Measurement and Analysis of Fission Rate in Alternate Depleted Uranium/Polyethylene Shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严小松; 羊奕伟; 朱通华; 刘荣; 鹿心鑫; 蒋励

    2013-01-01

    In order to check the conceptual design of the subcritical blanket in fusion-fission hybrid reactor, an integral experiment was carried out in alternate depleted uranium/polyethylene shells with 14 MeV neutron using activation technique. The 238U(n,f) and 235U(n,f) reaction rates at 90?direction to the incident D beam were determined by measuring the 293. 3 keV y ray emitted from I43Ce which is generated by 238U(n,f) and 235U(n,f) reactions. The experiment was simulated using MCNP5 code with ENDF/B-Ⅵ library, and the calculated 238U(n,f) and 235U(n,f) reaction rates are generally 5% higher than experimental results.%为校验次临界能源堆的概念设计,采用活化法在贫铀/聚乙烯球壳交替装置上开展14 MeV中子学积分实验.用HPGe探测器测量238U(n,f)及235U(n,f)反应的裂变碎片143Ce衰变产生的293.3 keV特征γ射线,得到装置中与入射D粒子束成90°方向上的238U(n,f)及235U(n,f)反应率分布,相对不确定度为5.1%~6.9%.采用MCNP5程序在ENDF/B-Ⅵ库下进行模拟计算,计算结果较实验结果高约5%.

  12. Ghrelin protects against depleted uranium-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells through oxidative stress-mediated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuhui; Liu, Cong; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Li, Hong; Yang, Zhangyou; Liu, Jing; Wang, Weidong; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) mainly accumulates in the bone over the long term. Osteoblast cells are responsible for the formation of bone, and they are sensitive to DU damage. However, studies investigating methods of reducing DU damage in osteoblasts are rarely reported. Ghrelin is a stomach hormone that stimulates growth hormones released from the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and it is believed to play an important physiological role in bone metabolism. This study evaluates the impact of ghrelin on DU-induced apoptosis of the osteoblast MC3T3-E1 and investigates its underlying mechanisms. The results show that ghrelin relieved the intracellular oxidative stress induced by DU, eliminated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced lipid peroxidation by increasing intracellular GSH levels; in addition, ghrelin effectively suppressed apoptosis, enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibited cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation after DU exposure. Moreover, ghrelin significantly reduced the expression of DU-induced phosphorylated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). A specific inhibitor (SB203580) or specific siRNA of p38-MAPK could significantly suppress DU-induced apoptosis and related signals, whereas ROS production was not affected. In addition, ghrelin receptor inhibition could reduce the anti-apoptosis effect of ghrelin on DU and reverse the effect of ghrelin on intracellular ROS and p38-MAPK after DU exposure. These results suggest that ghrelin can suppress DU-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells, reduce DU-induced oxidative stress by interacting with its receptor, and inhibit downstream p38-MAPK activation, thereby suppressing the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway.

  13. Non-severe burn injury leads to depletion of bone volume that can be ameliorated by inhibiting TNF-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Emily; Kular, Jasreen; Xu, Jiake; Wood, Fiona; Fear, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Bone loss after severe burn injury is well established, and is thought to be a consequence of the severe hyper-metabolic response as well as changes in cytokine and glucocorticoid levels that decrease bone synthesis and increase rate of loss. However, 90% of presentations are for non-severe burns which do not elicit this response. Little is known about whether these non-severe injuries may also affect bone tissue, and whether other mechanisms may be involved. To investigate whether bone loss occurs after a non-severe burn injury we used a mouse model of an approximately 8% total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness burn and micro-CT. We also assessed whether blocking TNF-α after a burn injury by administration of an antibody could modulate the impacts of the burn on bone tissue. There was a significant loss of trabecular bone volume of (3.27% compared to 5.27%, p=0.0051) after non-severe burn injury. Trabecular number was significantly decreased (0.57/mm after injury compared to 1.02/mm controls, p=0.0051) and spacing increased after burn injury (0.40 compared to 0.28, p=0.0083). Anti-TNF-α antibodies significantly improved trabecular bone volume (8.53%, p=0.0034) and number after burn injury (1.28/mm, p=0.0034). There was no significant change observed in cortical bone after burn injury or administration of anti-TNF-α antibodies. These findings show that non-severe burn injury can lead to changes in bone metabolism. Monitoring bone density in patients with non-severe injuries and interventions to limit the impacts of the inflammatory storm may benefit patient recovery and outcomes.

  14. ELECTROLYSIS OF THORIUM AND URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, W.N.

    1960-09-01

    An electrolytic method is given for obtaining pure thorium, uranium, and thorium-uranium alloys. The electrolytic cell comprises a cathode composed of a metal selected from the class consisting of zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, an anode composed of at least one of the metals selected from the group consisting of thorium and uranium in an impure state, and an electrolyte composed of a fused salt containing at least one of the salts of the metals selected from the class consisting of thorium, uranium. zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. Electrolysis of the fused salt while the cathode is maintained in the molten condition deposits thorium, uranium, or thorium-uranium alloys in pure form in the molten cathode which thereafter may be separated from the molten cathode product by distillation.

  15. Radiochemical Analysis Methodology for uranium Depletion Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scatena-Wachel DE

    2007-01-09

    This report provides sufficient material for a test sponsor with little or no radiochemistry background to understand and follow physics irradiation test program execution. Most irradiation test programs employ similar techniques and the general details provided here can be applied to the analysis of other irradiated sample types. Aspects of program management directly affecting analysis quality are also provided. This report is not an in-depth treatise on the vast field of radiochemical analysis techniques and related topics such as quality control. Instrumental technology is a very fast growing field and dramatic improvements are made each year, thus the instrumentation described in this report is no longer cutting edge technology. Much of the background material is still applicable and useful for the analysis of older experiments and also for subcontractors who still retain the older instrumentation.

  16. Multifactorial Assessment of Depleted Uranium Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    reveal the presence of a mild to minimal background nephropathy common in older animals (Percy and Barthold, 1993), of equal severity in both...Harper, C. and R. Butterworth (2002). Nutritional and metabolic disorders. Greenfield’s Neuropathology. D. I. Graham and P. L. Lantos. London, Arnold...coincided with Cr and BUN changes suggesting a protein losing nephropathy . Lesions included dose related acute tubular necrosis and proliferative

  17. Health Effects of Embedded Depleted Uranium Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    formation; however, there is little information Several important unanswered questions can be ad- regarding DU exposure and DNA damage. A deter- dressed ...the human maternal weight gain and fetal body weights at GD 18 placenta, little correlation has been shown be- [I]. Soft tissue and skeletal examination...nium on prenatal development, several studies have equal to or greater than the maternal liver concen- been conducted to evaluate the effects of

  18. Chronic uranium exposure and growth toxicity for phytoplankton. Dose-effect relationship: first comparison of chemical and radiological toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbin, R.; Pradines, C.; Garnier-Laplace, J. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    The bioavailability of uranium for freshwater organisms, as for other dissolved metals, is closely linked to chemical speciation in solution (U aqueous speciation undergoes tremendous changes in the presence of ligands commonly found in natural waters e.g. carbonate, phosphate, hydroxide and natural organic matter). For the studied chemical domain, short-term uranium uptake experiments have already shown that the free uranyl ion concentration [UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}] is a good predictor of uranium uptake by the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, as predicted by the Free Ion Activity Model. In agreement with these results, acidic pH and low ligands concentrations in water enhance uranium bioavailability and consequently its potential chronic effects on phytoplankton. Moreover, uranium is known to be both radio-toxic and chemo-toxic. The use of different isotopes of uranium allows to expose organisms to different radiological doses for the same molar concentration: e.g. for a given element concentration (chemical dose), replacing depleted U by U-233 obviously leads to an enhanced radiological delivered dose to organisms (x10{sup 4}). In this work we established relationships between uranium doses (depleted uranium and 233-U ) and effect on the growth rate of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Uranium bioaccumulation was also monitored. Growth rate was measured both in classical batch (0-72 hrs) and continuous (turbidostat) cultures, the latter protocol allowing medium renewal to diminish exudates accumulation and speciation changes in the medium. The differences in effects will be, if possible, related to the development of defence mechanisms against the formation of reactive oxygen species (forms of glutathione) and the production of phyto-chelatins (small peptides rich in cystein that play an important role in the homeostasis and the detoxication of metals in cells). (author)

  19. 77 FR 12880 - Uranium From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... COMMISSION Uranium From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five... investigation on uranium from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to... Publication 4307 (February 2012), entitled Uranium from Russia: Investigation No. 731-TA-539-C (Third...

  20. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found? Who is at risk? What are the health effects of lead? Get educational material about lead Get certified as a Lead Abatement Worker, or other abatement discipline Lead in drinking water Lead air pollution Test your child Check and maintain your home ...

  1. Lead isotope evidence for recent uranium mobility in geological formations of Brazil: implications for radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, S.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada); Babinski, M. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Marinho, M.M. [Companhia Baiana de Pesquisa Mineral (CBPM), Salvador (Brazil); Barbosa, J.S.F. [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador (Brazil); Sato, I.M.; Salvador, V.L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1999-03-01

    Lead-lead isotope data from whole rock samples are used to investigate the recent (last few million years) mobility of U and Th. The method is based on the comparison of the calculated present day U and Th concentrations required to yield the Pb isotope composition in the samples with the actual present day concentrations of U and Th obtained by direct measurement. The geological formations studied include the Neoproterozoic carbonate sediments of the Bambui Group, Archean/Paleoproterozoic granite-greenstone terrain of the Contendas-Mirante Complex and a Proterozoic ortho-gneisses hosting U deposit in Lagoa Real. All these formations are in the Sao Francisco Craton, Brazil. The data show high U mobility in the carbonate sediments and in the deformed ortho-gneisses set in a ductile shear zone. Infiltration of groundwater through fault zones seems to have facilitated the U mobility. The Pb isotope approach is a useful technique complementing U-series disequilibrium studies and may be included for site characterization studies for radioactive waste disposal. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. Disruption of the CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE DEFICIENT1 gene leads to cytochrome c oxidase depletion and reorchestrated respiratory metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Jennifer; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Macherel, David; Benamar, Abdelilah; Belcram, Katia; Quadrado, Martine; Arnal, Nadège; Mireau, Hakim

    2014-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the last respiratory complex of the electron transfer chain in mitochondria and is responsible for transferring electrons to oxygen, the final acceptor, in the classical respiratory pathway. The essentiality of this step makes it that depletion in complex IV leads to lethality, thereby impeding studies on complex IV assembly and respiration plasticity in plants. Here, we characterized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) embryo-lethal mutant lines impaired in the expression of the CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE DEFICIENT1 (COD1) gene, which encodes a mitochondria-localized PentatricoPeptide Repeat protein. Although unable to germinate under usual conditions, cod1 homozygous embryos could be rescued from immature seeds and developed in vitro into slow-growing bush-like plantlets devoid of a root system. cod1 mutants were defective in C-to-U editing events in cytochrome oxidase subunit2 and NADH dehydrogenase subunit4 transcripts, encoding subunits of respiratory complex IV and I, respectively, and consequently lacked cytochrome c oxidase activity. We further show that respiratory oxygen consumption by cod1 plantlets is exclusively associated with alternative oxidase activity and that alternative NADH dehydrogenases are also up-regulated in these plants. The metabolomics pattern of cod1 mutants was also deeply altered, suggesting that alternative metabolic pathways compensated for the probable resulting restriction in NADH oxidation. Being the first complex IV-deficient mutants described in higher plants, cod1 lines should be instrumental to future studies on respiration homeostasis.

  3. Uranium-lead isotope systematics and apparent ages of zircons and other minerals in precambrian granitic rocks, Granite Mountains, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, K. R.; Stuckless, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Zircon suites from the two main types of granite in the Granite Mountains, Wyoming, yielded concordia-intercept ages of 2,640??20 m.y. for a red, foliated granite (granite of Long Creek Mountain) and 2,595??40 m.y. for the much larger mass of the granite of Lankin Dome. These ages are statistically distinct (40??20 m.y. difference) and are consistent with observed chemical and textural differences. The lower intercepts of the zircon chords of 50??40 and 100+ 75 m.y. for the granite of Long Creek Mountain and granite of Lankin Dome, respectively, are not consistent with reasonable continuous diffusion lead-loss curves but do correspond well with the known (Laramide) time of uplift of the rocks. Epidote, zircon, and apatite from silicified and epidotized zones in the granites all record at least one postcrystallization disturbance in addition to the Laramide event and do not define a unique age of silicification and epidotization. The lower limit of ???2,500 m.y. provided by the least disturbed epidote, however, suggests that these rocks were probably formed by deuteric processes shortly after emplacement of the granite of the Lankin Dome. The earlier of the two disturbances that affected the minerals of the silicified-epidotized rock can be bracketed between 1,350 and 2,240 m.y. ago and is probably the same event that lowered mineral K-Ar and ages in the region. Zircon suites from both types of granite show well-defined linear correlations among U content, common-Pb content, and degree of discordance. One of the zircon suites has an extremely high common-Pb content (up to 180 ppm) and exhibits a component of radiogenic-Pb loss that is apparently unrelated to radiation damage. ?? 1978 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayedtype hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Hoffmann, Ute; Bach, Emil;

    2016-01-01

    , this approach could be relevant for advancing the understanding of Tregs in inflammatory arthritis. Selective depletion of Tregs was achieved using a Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse, which expresses the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under control of the Foxp3 gene. Anti...... with synchronised onset, 100% penetrance and low variation. We investigate the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in DTHA through selective depletion of Tregs and the role of IL-17 in connection with Treg depletion. Given the relevance of Tregs in RA, and the possibility of developing Treg-directed therapies...

  5. New french uranium mineral species; Nouvelles especes uraniferes francaises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branche, G.; Chervet, J.; Guillemin, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. du Fort de Chatillon, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1952-07-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; {beta} uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the {alpha} uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [French] Dans ce travail, les auteurs etudient les nouveaux mineraux uraniferes francais: parsonsite et renardite, phosphates hydrates de plomb et d'uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrate d'uranium et de plomb uranopilite: sulfate d'uranium hydrate; bayleyite: carbonate d'uranium et de magnesium hydrate; {beta} uranolite: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate. Pour tous ces mineraux, les auteurs donnent les caracteres cristallographiques, optiques, et les analyses chimiques quantitatives. Par contre, les especes suivantes, tres rares dans les gites francais, n'ont pas permis d'effectuer d'analyses quantitatives. Ce sont: l'ianthinite: oxyde uraneux hydrate; l'{alpha} uranotile: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate; le bassetite: phosphate d'uranium et de fer hydrate; la hosphuranylite: phosphate duranium hydrate; la becquerelite: oxyde d'uranium hydrate; la curite: oxyde d'uranium

  6. 纳米厚度贫铀/Au多层膜的制备及特性研究%Preparation and characteristic study of nanometer thickness depleted uranium / Au multilayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易泰民; 邢丕峰; 杜凯; 郑凤成; 杨蒙生; 谢军; 李朝阳

    2012-01-01

    理论和实验研究表明,纳米厚度周期调制的贫铀(DU)/Au多层膜材料具有高效的激光x射线转换效率.采用交替磁控溅射制备纳米厚度的DU/Au平面多层周期结构,通过白光干涉仪、扫描电子显微镜、X射线光电子能谱对DU/Au多层膜的几何参数、表面形貌、成分以及界面形貌进行表征.实验结果表明:8nm为Au连续成膜的厚度阈值,结合理论计算最优化原子配比,选取DU层厚度为30nm、Au层厚度为8nm的调制周期结构;实测周期厚度为37nm;扫描电子显微镜照片显示DU/Au分层明显;X射线光电子能谱深度刻蚀分析表明DU/Au界面处存在扩散,DU,Au,O三者原子比为73:26:1;由于团簇效应,Au原子4f电子结合能向高能端移动,没有观察到DU相应的电子结合能移动现象.%Modeling and experimental results show that the depleted uranium (DU) and Au "cocktail" nanometer multilayer will improve the X-ray conversion efficiency by reducing energy loss to penetration of the X-ray into the hohlraum wall. DU/Au multilayer plane film is deposited by magnetron sputtering through alternately rotating substrate in front of separate DU and Au sources. The geometry parameter, surface topography, atomic concentration and interface structure of DU/Au multilayer are characterized by white light interferometer, scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Au film becomes continuous when its thickness reaches 8 nm. Combining with theoretical modeling results, 30 nm DU and 8 nm Au multilayer is chosen. The periodic thickness of DU/Au is measured to be about 37 nm. Well-defined Du/Au interface is observed by SEM. Diffusion at DU/Au interface is observed by XPS. The atomic concentration ratio of DU, Au, O is 73:26:1. The binding energy of Au 4f of 8 nm thickness Au film shifts toward high-energy tail about by 0.6 eV. Similar phenomena are unfound

  7. Nuclear toxicology file: impact of uranium on the vertebrae reproduction; Dossier toxicologie nucleaire: impact de l'uranium sur la reproduction des vertebres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barillet, S.; Carriere, M. [CEA Saclay, IRAMIS, Lab. Pierre Sue, Groupe Toxicologie Humaine et Environnementale-CNRS, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2008-09-15

    Studies led on rats showed an achievement on the reproductive system. The effects on the progeny were also studied with some depleted uranium.The depleted uranium can cross the placental barrier and to affect the development of embryos to the rat. Teratogen effects were also observed. For the strongest tested dose (50 mg / kg /day during 9 days is approximately 20 % of the lethal dose), an embryonic mortality was observed. Below this dose, the foetal toxicity was resulted by a decrease of the weight and the size of the foetus associated with malformations and disturbances in the different stages of development. For high doses (25 mg / kg / day) the number of alive fetuses, the growth and the development as well as their survival were considerably affected. Concerning the uranium effects on the foetal testicle, the first results seem to indicate a particular sensitivity of the human male gonad with regard to the foetal testicle of mouse. The effects on the follicle genesis in vivo and on the oocytes in vitro have been studied. The modification of the rhythm of the oocyte meiosis observed in vitro, could occur in pre-ovulation follicles and lead to the ovulation of oocytes capable of being fertilized but incapable of normal embryonic development. A particular attention must be thus worn to the girls and to the women susceptible to be exposed to not negligible quantities of uranium. (N.C.)

  8. The terrestrial uranium isotope cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Morten B; Elliott, Tim; Freymuth, Heye; Sims, Kenneth W W; Niu, Yaoling; Kelley, Katherine A

    2015-01-15

    Changing conditions on the Earth's surface can have a remarkable influence on the composition of its overwhelmingly more massive interior. The global distribution of uranium is a notable example. In early Earth history, the continental crust was enriched in uranium. Yet after the initial rise in atmospheric oxygen, about 2.4 billion years ago, the aqueous mobility of oxidized uranium resulted in its significant transport to the oceans and, ultimately, by means of subduction, back to the mantle. Here we explore the isotopic characteristics of this global uranium cycle. We show that the subducted flux of uranium is isotopically distinct, with high (238)U/(235)U ratios, as a result of alteration processes at the bottom of an oxic ocean. We also find that mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORBs) have (238)U/(235)U ratios higher than does the bulk Earth, confirming the widespread pollution of the upper mantle with this recycled uranium. Although many ocean island basalts (OIBs) are argued to contain a recycled component, their uranium isotopic compositions do not differ from those of the bulk Earth. Because subducted uranium was probably isotopically unfractionated before full oceanic oxidation, about 600 million years ago, this observation reflects the greater antiquity of OIB sources. Elemental and isotope systematics of uranium in OIBs are strikingly consistent with previous OIB lead model ages, indicating that these mantle reservoirs formed between 2.4 and 1.8 billion years ago. In contrast, the uranium isotopic composition of MORB requires the convective stirring of recycled uranium throughout the upper mantle within the past 600 million years.

  9. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Appendix I Appendix II Tables Figures State Programs Alabama Alaska Arizona ... Tool Kit Resources Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Training Center (HHLPPTC) Training Tracks File Formats Help: ...

  10. Release of uranium from candidate wasteforms

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, N.; Harrison, M.; Brogden, M,; Hanson, B

    2012-01-01

    Large volumes of depleted natural and low-enriched uranium exist in the UK waste inventory. This work reports on initial investigations of the leaching performance of candidate glass and cement encapsulation matrices containing UO3 powder as well as that of uranium oxide powders. The surface areas of UO3 powder and the monolith samples of UO3 conditioned in the glass and cement matrices were very different making leaching comparisons difficult. The results showed that for both types of monoli...

  11. Small indels induced by CRISPR/Cas9 in the 5' region of microRNA lead to its depletion and Drosha processing retardance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qian; Meng, Xing; Meng, Lingwei; Chang, Nannan; Xiong, Jingwei; Cao, Huiqing; Liang, Zicai

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA knockout by genome editing technologies is promising. In order to extend the application of the technology and to investigate the function of a specific miRNA, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to deplete human miR-93 from a cluster by targeting its 5' region in HeLa cells. Various small indels were induced in the targeted region containing the Drosha processing site and seed sequences. Interestingly, we found that even a single nucleotide deletion led to complete knockout of the target miRNA with high specificity. Functional knockout was confirmed by phenotype analysis. Furthermore, de novo microRNAs were not found by RNA-seq. Nevertheless, expression of the pri-microRNAs was increased. When combined with structural analysis, the data indicated that biogenesis was impaired. Altogether, we showed that small indels in the 5' region of a microRNA result in sequence depletion as well as Drosha processing retard.

  12. Domestic utility attitudes toward foreign uranium supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    The current embargo on the enrichment of foreign-origin uranium for use in domestic utilization facilities is scheduled to be removed in 1984. The pending removal of this embargo, complicated by a depressed worldwide market for uranium, has prompted consideration of a new or extended embargo within the US Government. As part of its on-going data collection activities, Nuclear Resources International (NRI) has surveyed 50 domestic utility/utility holding companies (representing 60 lead operator-utilities) on their foreign uranium purchase strategies and intentions. The most recent survey was conducted in early May 1981. A number of qualitative observations were made during the course of the survey. The major observations are: domestic utility views toward foreign uranium purchase are dynamic; all but three utilities had some considered foreign purchase strategy; some utilities have problems with buying foreign uranium from particular countries; an inducement is often required by some utilities to buy foreign uranium; opinions varied among utilities concerning the viability of the domestic uranium industry; and many utilities could have foreign uranium fed through their domestic uranium contracts (indirect purchases). The above observations are expanded in the final section of the report. However, it should be noted that two of the observations are particularly important and should be seriously considered in formulation of foreign uranium import restrictions. These important observations are the dynamic nature of the subject matter and the potentially large and imbalanced effect the indirect purchases could have on utility foreign uranium procurement.

  13. The neurotoxicology of uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinocourt, Céline; Legrand, Marie; Dublineau, Isabelle; Lestaevel, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The brain is a target of environmental toxic pollutants that impair cerebral functions. Uranium is present in the environment as a result of natural deposits and release by human applications. The first part of this review describes the passage of uranium into the brain, and its effects on neurological functions and cognitive abilities. Very few human studies have looked at its cognitive effects. Experimental studies show that after exposure, uranium can reach the brain and lead to neurobehavioral impairments, including increased locomotor activity, perturbation of the sleep-wake cycle, decreased memory, and increased anxiety. The mechanisms underlying these neurobehavioral disturbances are not clearly understood. It is evident that there must be more than one toxic mechanism and that it might include different targets in the brain. In the second part, we therefore review the principal mechanisms that have been investigated in experimental models: imbalance of the anti/pro-oxidant system and neurochemical and neurophysiological pathways. Uranium effects are clearly specific according to brain area, dose, and time. Nonetheless, this review demonstrates the paucity of data about its effects on developmental processes and the need for more attention to the consequences of exposure during development.

  14. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  15. Long-term ecological effects of exposure to uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, W.C.; Miera, F.R. Jr.

    1976-03-01

    The consequences of releasing natural and depleted uranium to terrestrial ecosystems during development and testing of depleted uranium munitions were investigated. At Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, soil at various distances from armor plate target butts struck by depleted uranium penetrators was sampled. The upper 5 cm of soil at the target bases contained an average of 800 ppM of depleted uranium, about 30 times as much as soil at 5- to 10-cm depth, indicating some vertical movement of depleted uranium. Samples collected beyond about 20 m from the targets showed near-background natural uranium levels, about 1.3 +- 0.3 ..mu..g/g or ppM. Two explosives-testing areas at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) were selected because of their use history. E-F Site soil averaged 2400 ppM of uranium in the upper 5 cm and 1600 ppM at 5-10 cm. Lower Slobovia Site soil from two subplots averaged about 2.5 and 0.6 percent of the E-F Site concentrations. Important uranium concentration differences with depth and distance from detonation points were ascribed to the different explosive tests conducted in each area. E-F Site vegetation samples contained about 320 ppM of uranium in November 1974 and about 125 ppM in June 1975. Small mammals trapped in the study areas in November contained a maximum of 210 ppM of uranium in the gastrointestinal tract contents, 24 ppM in the pelt, and 4 ppM in the remaining carcass. In June, maximum concentrations were 110, 50, and 2 ppM in similar samples and 6 ppM in lungs. These data emphasized the importance of resuspension of respirable particles in the upper few millimeters of soil as a contamination mechanism for several components of the LASL ecosystem.

  16. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayedtype hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Hoffmann, Ute; Bach, Emil

    2016-01-01

    bone remodelling and increased production of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased production of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Anti-IL-17 mAb treatment demonstrated that IL-17 is important for disease severity in both the presence and absence of Tregs, and that IL-17 blockade is able...... to rescue mice from the exacerbated disease caused by Treg depletion and caused a reduction in RANKL, IL-6 and the number of neutrophils. We show that Tregs are important for the containment of inflammation and bone remodelling in DTHA. To our knowledge, this is the first study using the Foxp3-DTR...

  17. 用放射性示踪法研究分离铀和铅、铋%A study on the extraction and separation of lead and bismuth from uranium by radiotracer method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦芝; 郭俊盛; 甘再国; 马桃桃; 王秀英

    2001-01-01

    用放射性示踪法研究了TBP-苯体系对铀和铅、铋的萃取分离。实验结果表明,在6mol/LHNO3介质中用TBP-苯作为萃取剂可使铀和铅、铋达到定量分离。阴离子交换法对铀进一步纯化后,利用分子电镀法制得厚度为500μg/cm2的233U同位素靶。%The extraction and separation of uranium from lead and bismuthwith TBP-benzene was studied by radiotracer technique. The experimental results demonstrated that using TBP-benzene as an extracting solvent in 6mol/L HNO3 could quantitatively remove the impurities of lead and bismuth from uranium。After purification of uranium, 233U isotopic target with thickness of 500μg/cm2 was obtained by means of molecular electrodeposition.

  18. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of uranium and thorium powders and uranium ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judge, Elizabeth J. [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Barefield, James E., E-mail: jbarefield@lanl.gov [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Berg, John M. [Manufacturing Engineering and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Clegg, Samuel M.; Havrilla, George J.; Montoya, Velma M.; Le, Loan A.; Lopez, Leon N. [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze depleted uranium and thorium oxide powders and uranium ore as a potential rapid in situ analysis technique in nuclear production facilities, environmental sampling, and in-field forensic applications. Material such as pressed pellets and metals, has been extensively studied using LIBS due to the high density of the material and more stable laser-induced plasma formation. Powders, on the other hand, are difficult to analyze using LIBS since ejection and removal of the powder occur in the laser interaction region. The capability of analyzing powders is important in allowing for rapid analysis of suspicious materials, environmental samples, or trace contamination on surfaces since it most closely represents field samples (soil, small particles, debris etc.). The rapid, in situ analysis of samples, including nuclear materials, also reduces costs in sample collection, transportation, sample preparation, and analysis time. Here we demonstrate the detection of actinides in oxide powders and within a uranium ore sample as both pressed pellets and powders on carbon adhesive discs for spectral comparison. The acquired LIBS spectra for both forms of the samples differ in overall intensity but yield a similar distribution of atomic emission spectral lines. - Highlights: • LIBS analysis of mixed actinide samples: depleted uranium oxide and thorium oxide • LIBS analysis of actinide samples in powder form on carbon adhesive discs • Detection of uranium in a complex matrix (uranium ore) as a precursor to analyzing uranium in environmental samples.

  19. Uranium industry in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Current state of uranium industry in Canada has been considered. It is shown that in Canada, which is the major supplier of uranium, new methods of prospecting, mining and processing of uranium are developed and the old ones are improved. Owing to automation and mechanization a higher labour productivity in uranium ore mining is achieved. The uranium industry of Canada can satisfy the future demands in uranium but introduction of any new improvement will depend completely on the rate of nuclear power development.

  20. 78 FR 75579 - Low Enriched Uranium From France

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... COMMISSION Low Enriched Uranium From France Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on low enriched uranium from France would be likely to lead to continuation or...), entitled Low Enriched Uranium from France: Investigation No. 731-TA-909 (Second Review). By order of...

  1. Radionuclide inventories : ORIGEN2.2 isotopic depletion calculation for high burnup low-enriched uranium and weapons-grade mixed-oxide pressurized-water reactor fuel assemblies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Ross, Kyle W. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James Dean; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory computer code, ORIGEN2.2 (CCC-371, 2002), was used to obtain the elemental composition of irradiated low-enriched uranium (LEU)/mixed-oxide (MOX) pressurized-water reactor fuel assemblies. Described in this report are the input parameters for the ORIGEN2.2 calculations. The rationale for performing the ORIGEN2.2 calculation was to generate inventories to be used to populate MELCOR radionuclide classes. Therefore the ORIGEN2.2 output was subsequently manipulated. The procedures performed in this data reduction process are also described herein. A listing of the ORIGEN2.2 input deck for two-cycle MOX is provided in the appendix. The final output from this data reduction process was three tables containing the radionuclide inventories for LEU/MOX in elemental form. Masses, thermal powers, and activities were reported for each category.

  2. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O' Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-06-07

    This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

  3. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  4. Analysis of uranium isotope separation by redox chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujine, S.; Naruse, Y.; Shiba, K.

    1983-09-01

    Uranium isotope separation by redox chromatography is analytically studied. The periodic withdrawal of products and tails and the introduction of natural feed are simulated on the assumption of a square cascade for a uranium adsorption band. The influences on the separative power and the lead time until product withdrawal are investigated by varying the magnitude of the isotope separation factor, uranium band length, tails concentration, and so on. Simulating calculations indicate that using ion-exchange resins to achieve uranium isotope separation requires a very long lead time for the production of highly enriched uranium.

  5. Activation of SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} by trivalent uranium leading to sulfite/dithionite and carbonate/oxalate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Anna-Corina; Heinemann, Frank W.; Meyer, Karsten [Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Inorganic Chemistry, Erlangen (Germany); Kefalidis, Christos E.; Maron, Laurent [LPCNO, Universite de Toulouse, INSA Toulouse (France); Roesky, Peter W. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-10-13

    The first sulfite [{(("n"P","M"eArO)_3tacn)U"I"V}{sub 2}(μ-κ{sup 1}:κ{sup 2}-SO{sub 3})] (tacn=triazacyclononane) and dithionite [{(("n"P","M"eArO)_3tacn)U"I"V}{sub 2}(μ-κ{sup 2}:κ{sup 2}-S{sub 2}O{sub 4})] complexes of uranium from reaction with gaseous SO{sub 2} have been prepared. Additionally, the reductive activation of CO{sub 2} was investigated with respect to the rare oxalate [{(("n"P","M"eArO)_3tacn)U"I"V}{sub 2}(μ-κ{sup 2}:κ{sup 2}-C{sub 2}O{sub 4})] formation. This ultimately provides the unique S{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2-}/C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2-} and SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} complex pairs. All new complexes were characterized by a combination of single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, UV/Vis/NIR electronic absorption, IR vibrational, and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, as well as magnetization (VT SQUID) studies. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to gain further insight into the reaction mechanisms. All observations, together with DFT, support the assumption that SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} show similar (dithionite/oxalate) to analogous (sulfite/carbonate) activation behavior with uranium complexes. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Investigation of Space and Energy Distributions of Neutrons Generated in Lead Target and Uranium Blanket of the Electronuclear System "Energy plus Transmutation" under Irradiation with Protons at 1.5 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuk, I V; Krivopustov, M I; Sosnin, A N; Chultem, D; Vestmaer, V; Tumendelger, T; Zaveryukha, O S; Pavlyuk, A B

    2002-01-01

    The work contains the results of space-energy distributions of neutrons in U/Pb assembly, consisting of extended lead target and the model of natural uranium blanket irradiated with relativistic protons at 1.5 GeV. The research is carried out in the framework of a series of experiments using the model of subcritical heterogeneous electronuclear system at the Laboratory of High Energies, JINR, Dubna ("Investigation of Physical Aspects of Electronuclear Method of Energy Production and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste Using Beams from JINR Synchrophasotron/Nuclotron" - project "Energy plus Transmutation"). The results of measurements and calculations of ^{235}U, ^{238}U and ^{232}Th fission rate distributions as well as threshold spectral indexes {\\bar\\sigma_f^{^{232}Th}}/{\\bar\\sigma_f^{^{235}U}} and {\\bar\\sigma_f^{^{238}U}}/{\\bar\\sigma_f^{^{235}U}} along the radius of the target and model uranium blanket are presented. The results of measurements and calculations of ^{234}U, ^{236}U and ^{237}Np fission rate ...

  7. Effect of N2 Flow on Microstructure and Properties of CrNx Film Prepared by Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering on the Surface of Depleted Uranium%氮流量对贫铀表面磁控溅射CrNx薄膜结构与性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱生发; 吴艳萍; 刘天伟; 杨锁龙; 唐凯; 魏强

    2012-01-01

    The chemical nature of depleted uranium is very active and susceptible to oxidation in nature environment. CrN, films were prepared by unbalanced magnetron sputtering ion plating at different N2 flow on the surface of depleted uranium to improve its corrosion resistance. The surface morphology, phase structure, chemical state and corrosion behavior of CrN, films were characterized by SEM, XRD, XPS, and polarization curves {Ell). The results show that, phase structure of CrNx film prepared at 10 sccm N2 flow is composed primarily of the bcc α-Cr. With the increasing of N2 flow, the phase structures transform to HCP-Cr2N and fee CrN, which preferred orientation transforms from Cr(110) to Cr2N(111) and CrN(200). When N2 flow increases from 10 sccm to 50 sccm, the Cr2p3/2 XPS peaks move toward high binding energy side, the content of metal Cr decreases and the content of nitride chromium increases. When N2 flow increases to 30 sccm, CrN, film has fine grain and better density, its corrosion potential increases to 550 mV and corrosion current density decreases two orders of magnitude. After deposited CrN, film by unbalanced magnetron sputtering, the corrosion resistance of depleted uranium is effectively improved.%金属铀的化学性质十分活泼,极易发生氧化腐蚀.为改善基体的抗腐蚀性能,采用非平衡磁控溅射技术在金属铀表面制备了不同氮含量的CrNx薄膜.采用扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、X射线衍射技术(XRD)、X射线光电子能谱(XPS)、动电位极化曲线,分别研究了薄膜形貌、物相结构、表面元素化学价态及抗腐蚀性能.结果表明,当氮流量为10 sccm时薄膜主要为体心立方的α-Cr,随氮流量的增大,薄膜转化为六方Cr2N和立方CrN结构,其择优取向由Cr(110)转化为Cr2N(111)及CrN(200),金属态Cr的含量逐渐减少,氮化态Cr的含量增多,Cr2p3/2的结合能峰位逐渐向高结合能方向移动.CrNx薄膜呈纤维状结构,当氮流量增大到30 sccm

  8. 一维贫铀/聚乙烯交替系统中D-T中子诱发的232Th(n,γ)反应率的测定与分析%Determination of 232Th(n, γ) reaction rate induced by D-T neutrons in one-dimensional alternate depleted uranium/p olyethylene shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    羊奕伟; 刘荣; 蒋励; 鹿心鑫; 王玫; 严小松

    2014-01-01

    A series of neutron integral fundamental researches of thorium nuclear data in set-ups containing thorium samples is carried out. One-dimensional alternate depleted uranium/polyethylene shells containing thorium samples are constructed by referring to the conceptual design of fusion-fission hybrid reactor, where a D-T neutron source driven by accelerator is used to simulate the fusion core of the reactor. 232Th (n,γ) reaction rates in samples located at different positions in the shells are measured in 5% uncertainty by using activated thorium sample decay γ-ray off-line measurement technique. The results show that the moderation of polyethylene to 14.1 MeV neutron will efficiently increase the capture rate of thorium, and the depleted uranium is also conducible to this increase obviously. The comparison between our measured data and the results available from mainstream nuclear data bank shows that the calculation results from ENDF/B-VI.6 and JENDL-3.3 are around 6% higher than the experimental results, while the newer ENDF/B-VII.0 will achieve better results, around 4% higher than the experimental results. We recommend the ENDF/B-VII.0 to be used in one-dimensional alternate depleted uranium/polyethylene shells related conceptual design when calculating the 232Th (n,γ) reaction rate.%开展了钍样品装置内钍核参数的积分中子学基础研究.参考混合堆概念设计搭建了内部放置了钍样品的一维贫铀/聚乙烯交替系统装置,采用加速器D-T中子源模拟聚变堆芯,利用前期开发的离线伽马测量方法测定了不同位置、不同中子谱情况下的232Th (n,γ)反应率,不确定度约为5%.结果显示,聚乙烯对14.1 MeV中子的慢化作用可有效提升钍俘获率,且贫铀对钍俘获率也有显著提升作用.实验结果与主流核数据库计算结果的对比显示, ENDF/B-VI.6和JENDL-3.3数据库的计算值比实验值平均约大6%,而较新的ENDF/B-VII.0数据库的计

  9. Effect of Shim Arm Depletion in the NBSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson A. H.; Brown N.; Diamond, D.J.

    2013-02-22

    The cadmium shim arms in the NBSR undergo burnup during reactor operation and hence, require periodic replacement. Presently, the shim arms are replaced after every 25 cycles to guarantee they can maintain sufficient shutdown margin. Two prior reports document the expected change in the 113Cd distribution because of the shim arm depletion. One set of calculations was for the present high-enriched uranium fuel and the other for the low-enriched uranium fuel when it was in the COMP7 configuration (7 inch fuel length vs. the present 11 inch length). The depleted 113Cd distributions calculated for these cores were applied to the current design for an equilibrium low-enriched uranium core. This report details the predicted effects, if any, of shim arm depletion on the shim arm worth, the shutdown margin, power distributions and kinetics parameters.

  10. Depletion of autophagy-related genes ATG3 and ATG5 in Tenebrio molitor leads to decreased survivability against an intracellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindwa, Hamisi; Jo, Yong Hun; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Noh, Mi Young; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Iksoo; Han, Yeon Soo; Lee, Yong Seok; Lee, Bok Luel; Kim, Nam Jung

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involved in physiological and developmental processes including cell survival, death, and innate immunity. Homologues of most of 36 originally discovered autophagy-related (ATG) genes in yeast have been characterized in higher eukaryotes including insects. In this study, the homologues of ATG3 (TmATG3) and ATG5 (TmATG5) were isolated from the coleopteran beetle, Tenebrio molitor by expressed sequence tag and RNAseq approaches. The cDNA of TmATG3 and TmATG5 comprise open-reading frame sizes of 963 and 792 bp encoding polypeptides of 320 and 263 amino acid residues, respectively. TmATG3 and TmATG5 mRNA are expressed in all developmental stages, and mainly in fat body and hemocytes of larvae. TmATG3 and TmATG5 showed an overall sequence identity of 58-95% to other insect Atg proteins. There exist clear one-to-one orthologs of TmATG3 and TmATG5 in Tribolium and that they clustered together in the gene tree. Depletion of TmATG3 and TmATG5 by RNA interference led to a significant reduction in survival ability of T. molitor larvae against an intracellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes. Six days post-Listeria challenge, the survival rate in the dsEGFP-injected (where EGFP is enhanced green fluorescent protein) control larvae was significantly higher (55%) compared to 4 and 3% for TmATG3 and TmATG5 double-stranded RNA injected larvae, respectively. These data suggested that TmATG3 and TmATG5 may play putative role in mediating autophagy-based clearance of Listeria in T. molitor model.

  11. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  12. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  13. Depletion of intense fields

    CERN Document Server

    Seipt, D; Marklund, M; Bulanov, S S

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of charged particles and photons with intense electromagnetic fields gives rise to multi-photon Compton and Breit-Wheeler processes. These are usually described in the framework of the external field approximation, where the electromagnetic field is assumed to have infinite energy. However, the multi-photon nature of these processes implies the absorption of a significant number of photons, which scales as the external field amplitude cubed. As a result, the interaction of a highly charged electron bunch with an intense laser pulse can lead to significant depletion of the laser pulse energy, thus rendering the external field approximation invalid. We provide relevant estimates for this depletion and find it to become important in the interaction between fields of amplitude $a_0 \\sim 10^3$ and electron bunches with charges of the order of nC.

  14. Depletion of Intense Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipt, D.; Heinzl, T.; Marklund, M.; Bulanov, S. S.

    2017-04-01

    The interaction of charged particles and photons with intense electromagnetic fields gives rise to multiphoton Compton and Breit-Wheeler processes. These are usually described in the framework of the external field approximation, where the electromagnetic field is assumed to have infinite energy. However, the multiphoton nature of these processes implies the absorption of a significant number of photons, which scales as the external field amplitude cubed. As a result, the interaction of a highly charged electron bunch with an intense laser pulse can lead to significant depletion of the laser pulse energy, thus rendering the external field approximation invalid. We provide relevant estimates for this depletion and find it to become important in the interaction between fields of amplitude a0˜1 03 and electron bunches with charges of the order of 10 nC.

  15. Revised uranium--plutonium cycle PWR and BWR models for the ORIGEN computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A. G.; Bjerke, M. A.; Morrison, G. W.; Petrie, L. M.

    1978-09-01

    Reactor physics calculations and literature searches have been conducted, leading to the creation of revised enriched-uranium and enriched-uranium/mixed-oxide-fueled PWR and BWR reactor models for the ORIGEN computer code. These ORIGEN reactor models are based on cross sections that have been taken directly from the reactor physics codes and eliminate the need to make adjustments in uncorrected cross sections in order to obtain correct depletion results. Revised values of the ORIGEN flux parameters THERM, RES, and FAST were calculated along with new parameters related to the activation of fuel-assembly structural materials not located in the active fuel zone. Recommended fuel and structural material masses and compositions are presented. A summary of the new ORIGEN reactor models is given.

  16. Uranium induces oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Kumar, Felix; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Sharma, Chidananda S.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T. [Texas Southern University, Molecular Neurotoxicology Laboratory/Proteomics Core, Department of Biology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, antitank weapons, tank armor, and also as a pigment to color ceramics and glass. Effective management of waste uranium compounds is necessary to prevent exposure to avoid adverse health effects on the population. Health risks associated with uranium exposure includes kidney disease and respiratory disorders. In addition, several published results have shown uranium or depleted uranium causes DNA damage, mutagenicity, cancer and neurological defects. In the current study, uranium toxicity was evaluated in rat lung epithelial cells. The study shows uranium induces significant oxidative stress in rat lung epithelial cells followed by concomitant decrease in the antioxidant potential of the cells. Treatment with uranium to rat lung epithelial cells also decreased cell proliferation after 72 h in culture. The decrease in cell proliferation was attributed to loss of total glutathione and superoxide dismutase in the presence of uranium. Thus the results indicate the ineffectiveness of antioxidant system's response to the oxidative stress induced by uranium in the cells. (orig.)

  17. Efficacy of Biostimulation for Uranium Sequestration: Coupled Effects Sediment/Groundwater Geochemistry and Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Singh, G.; Pruden, A.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Hochella, M. F., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    A systematic flow-through column study was conducted using sediments and groundwater from the subsurface at the U.S. Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, Colorado, to better understand the efficacy of uranium removal from the groundwater with and without biostimulation in the form of acetate amendments. The interactive effects of acetate amendment, groundwater/sediment geochemistry, and intrinsic bacterial community composition were evaluated using four types of sediments, collected from different uranium-contaminated (D08, LQ107, CD) or non-contaminated (RABS) aquifers. Subtle variations in the sediments' geochemistry in terms of mineral compositions, particle sizes, redox conditions, and metal(loid) co-contaminants had a marked effect on the uranium removal efficiency, following a descending trend of D08 (~ 90 to 95%) >> RABS (~ 20 to 25) ≥ LQ107 (~ 15 to 20%) > CD (~ -10 to 0%). Overall, biostimulation of the sediments with acetate drove deeper anoxic conditions and observable shifts in bacterial population structures. The abundance of dissimilatory sulfate-reduction genes (i.e., drsA), markers of sulfate-reducing bacteria, were highest in the sediments that performed best in terms of uranium removal. By comparison, no obvious associations were found between the uranium removal efficiency and the abundance of typical iron-reducing microorganisms, e.g., Geobacter spp. In the sediments where bacterial biomass was relatively low and sulfate-reduction was not detected (i.e., CD), abiotic adsorption onto fine mineral surfaces such as phyllosilates likely played a dominant role in the attenuation of aqueous uranium. In these scenarios, however, acetate amendment induced significant remobilization of the sequestered uranium and other heavy metals (e.g., strontium), leading to zero or negative uranium removal efficiencies (i.e., CD). The results of this study suggest that reductive immobilization of uranium can be

  18. The end of cheap uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10±2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58±4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54±5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41±5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a worldwide nuclear energy phase-out is in order. If such a slow global phase-out is not voluntarily effected, the end of the present cheap uranium supply situation will be unavoidable. The result will be that some countries will simply be unable to afford sufficient uranium fuel at that point, which implies involuntary and perhaps chaotic nuclear phase-outs in those countries involving brownouts, blackouts, and worse.

  19. Morphology Characterization of Uranium Particles From Laser Ablated Uranium Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In the study, metallic uranium and uranium dioxide material were ablated by laser beam in order to simulate the process of forming the uranium particles in pyrochemical process. The morphology characteristic of uranium particles and the surface of

  20. The End of Cheap Uranium

    CERN Document Server

    Dittmar, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a world...

  1. Uranium industry annual 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  2. Uranium Provinces in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Three uranium provinces are recognized in China, the Southeast China uranium province, the Northeast China-lnner Mongolia uranium province and the Northwest China (Xinjiang) uranium province. The latter two promise good potential for uranium resources and are major exploration target areas in recent years. There are two major types of uranium deposits: the Phanerozoic hydrothermal type (vein type) and the Meso-Cenozoic sandstone type in different proportions in the three uranium provinces. The most important reason or prerequisite for the formation of these uranium provinces is that Precambrian uranium-enriched old basement or its broken parts (median massifs) exists or once existed in these regions, and underwent strong tectonomagmatic activation during Phanerozoic time. Uranium was mobilized from the old basement and migrated upwards to the upper structural level together with the acidic magma originating from anatexis and the primary fluids, which were then mixed with meteoric water and resulted in the formation of Phanerozoic hydrothermal uranium deposits under extensional tectonic environments. Erosion of uraniferous rocks and pre-existing uranium deposits during the Meso-Cenozoic brought about the removal of uranium into young sedimentary basins. When those basins were uplifted and slightly deformed by later tectonic activity, roll-type uranium deposits were formed as a result of redox in permeable sandstone strata.

  3. Uranium industry annual 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  4. (JASR) Vol. 12, No. 2, 2012 DEPLETING FOREST RESOURCES OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    undisturbed lands leading to depletion of the forest cover and increase on the sand dunes .... depletion of the ozone layer leading to a rise in global temperature. ... Nigeria has good correlation with greenhouse gas emission which can cause ...

  5. Depletion of the SR-Related Protein TbRRM1 Leads to Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis-Like Death in Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Gabriela V.; Moretti, Georgina; Tekiel, Valeria S.; Sánchez, Daniel O.

    2015-01-01

    Arginine-Serine (RS) domain-containing proteins are RNA binding proteins with multiple functions in RNA metabolism. In mammalian cells this group of proteins is also implicated in regulation and coordination of cell cycle and apoptosis. In trypanosomes, an early branching group within the eukaryotic lineage, this group of proteins is represented by 3 members, two of them are SR proteins and have been recently shown to be involved in rRNA processing as well as in pre-mRNA splicing and stability. Here we report our findings on the 3rd member, the SR-related protein TbRRM1. In the present study, we showed that TbRRM1 ablation by RNA-interference in T. brucei procyclic cells leads to cell-cycle block, abnormal cell elongation compatible with the nozzle phenotype and cell death by an apoptosis-like mechanism. Our results expand the role of the trypanosomal RS-domain containing proteins in key cellular processes such as cell cycle and apoptosis-like death, roles also carried out by the mammalian SR proteins, and thus suggesting a conserved function in this phylogenetically conserved protein family. PMID:26284933

  6. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Olson, R.S.; Kerlinger, H.O.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for recovering uranium values from uranium bearing phosphate solutions such as are encountered in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers. The solution is first treated with a reducing agent to obtain all the uranium in the tetravalent state. Following this reduction, the solution is treated to co-precipitate the rcduced uranium as a fluoride, together with other insoluble fluorides, thereby accomplishing a substantially complete recovery of even trace amounts of uranium from the phosphate solution. This precipitate usually takes the form of a complex fluoride precipitate, and after appropriate pre-treatment, the uranium fluorides are leached from this precipitate and rccovered from the leach solution.

  7. Preliminary investigation of the elemental variation and diagenesis of a tabular uranium deposit, La Sal Mine, San Juan County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Robert A.; Campbell, John A.

    1976-01-01

    Ore in the La Sal mine, San Juan County, Utah, occurs as a typical tabular-type uranium deposit of the-Colorado Plateau. Uranium-vanadium occurs in the Salt Wash Member of the Jurassic Morrison Formation. Chemical and petrographic analyses were used to determine elemental variation and diagenetic aspects across the orebody. Vanadium is concentrated in the dark clay matrix, which constitutes visible ore. Uranium content is greater above the vanadium zone. Calcium, carbonate carbon, and lead show greater than fifty-fold increase across the ore zone, whereas copper and organic carbon show only a several-fold increase. Large molybdenum concentrations are present in and above the tabular layer, and large selenium concentrations occur below the uranium zone within the richest vanadium zone. Iron is enriched in the vanadium horizon. Chromium is depleted from above the ore and strongly enriched below. Elements that vary directly with the vanadium content include magnesium, iron, selenium, zirconium, strontium, titanium, lead, boron, yttrium, and scandium. The diagenetic sequence is as follows: (1) formation of secondary quartz overgrowths as cement; (2) infilling and lining of remaining pores with amber opaline material; (3) formation of vanadium-rich clay matrix, which has replaced overgrowths as well as quartz grains; (4) replacement of overgrowths and detrital grains by calcite; (5) infilling of pores with barite and the introduction of pyrite and marcasite.

  8. Uranium quantification in semen by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Todor I; Ejnik, John W; Guandalini, Gustavo; Xu, Hanna; Hoover, Dennis; Anderson, Larry; Squibb, Katherine; McDiarmid, Melissa A; Centeno, Jose A

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report uranium analysis for human semen samples. Uranium quantification was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No additives, such as chymotrypsin or bovine serum albumin, were used for semen liquefaction, as they showed significant uranium content. For method validation we spiked 2g aliquots of pooled control semen at three different levels of uranium: low at 5 pg/g, medium at 50 pg/g, and high at 1000 pg/g. The detection limit was determined to be 0.8 pg/g uranium in human semen. The data reproduced within 1.4-7% RSD and spike recoveries were 97-100%. The uranium level of the unspiked, pooled control semen was 2.9 pg/g of semen (n=10). In addition six semen samples from a cohort of Veterans exposed to depleted uranium (DU) in the 1991 Gulf War were analyzed with no knowledge of their exposure history. Uranium levels in the Veterans' semen samples ranged from undetectable (<0.8 pg/g) to 3350 pg/g. This wide concentration range for uranium in semen is consistent with known differences in current DU body burdens in these individuals, some of whom have retained embedded DU fragments.

  9. Uranium quantification in semen by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Todor; Ejnik, John W.; Guandalini, Gustavo S.; Xu, Hanna; Hoover, Dennis; Anderson, Larry W.; Squibb, Katherine; McDiarmid, Melissa A.; Centeno, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report uranium analysis for human semen samples. Uranium quantification was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No additives, such as chymotrypsin or bovine serum albumin, were used for semen liquefaction, as they showed significant uranium content. For method validation we spiked 2 g aliquots of pooled control semen at three different levels of uranium: low at 5 pg/g, medium at 50 pg/g, and high at 1000 pg/g. The detection limit was determined to be 0.8 pg/g uranium in human semen. The data reproduced within 1.4–7% RSD and spike recoveries were 97–100%. The uranium level of the unspiked, pooled control semen was 2.9 pg/g of semen (n = 10). In addition six semen samples from a cohort of Veterans exposed to depleted uranium (DU) in the 1991 Gulf War were analyzed with no knowledge of their exposure history. Uranium levels in the Veterans’ semen samples ranged from undetectable (<0.8 pg/g) to 3350 pg/g. This wide concentration range for uranium in semen is consistent with known differences in current DU body burdens in these individuals, some of whom have retained embedded DU fragments.

  10. Cathodoluminescence of uranium oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winer, K.; Colmenares, C.; Wooten, F.

    1984-08-09

    The cathodoluminescence of uranium oxide surfaces prepared in-situ from clean uranium exposed to dry oxygen was studied. The broad asymmetric peak observed at 470 nm is attributed to F-center excitation.

  11. Uranium Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — An integral part of Y‑12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium...

  12. Uranium industry annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  13. Charge depletion in organic heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, T. W.; Lo, M. F.; Lee, S. T.; Lee, C. S.

    2012-03-01

    Until now two types of organic-organic heterojunction (OHJ) have been observed in P-N junctions formed between undoped-organic semiconductors. Charge-transfers across OHJs are either negligible or showing electron transfer from P-type to N-type materials, leading to charges accumulation near the interface. Here, we observed that junction of 4,4',4''-tris(2-methylphenyl-phenylamino)triphenylamine (m-MTDATA)/bathocuproine (BCP) show the third-behavior. Electrons in BCP (N-type) transfer to m-MTDATA (P-type), leading to depletion of mobile majority carriers near the junction. While "depletion junctions" are typical in inorganic semiconductors, there are no reports in undoped-OHJ. Formation mechanism of depletion OHJs and fundamental differences between inorganic and organic HJs are discussed.

  14. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen gas formed by aqueous corrosion of metallic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonnesbeck, J.

    2000-03-20

    Three unirradiated EBR-II blanket fuel samples containing depleted uranium metal were corrosion tested in simulated J-13 well water at 90 C. The corrosion rate of the blanket uranium metal was then determined relative to H{sub 2} formation. Corrosion of one of the samples was interrupted prior to complete oxidation of the uranium metal and the solid corrosion product was analyzed for UO{sub 2} and UH{sub 3}.

  15. Uranium and free trade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-08-01

    This report was prepared by a working group of the Committee on International Trade in Uranium of the Uranium Institute. The report describes the general benefits of free trade and their relevance in the uranium market, and compares government restrictions on Western world uranium trade with those in other commodity markets. It is not directly concerned with restrictions designed to discourage nuclear weapons proliferation. The Uranium Institute and its members fully support the objective of nuclear non-proliferation. The report takes as given the current non-proliferation regime and focuses on economic and commercial restrictions imposed by governments on international trade in uranium, recognising that governments will always have a special interest in uranium trade owing to its potential weapons use. (author).

  16. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed....

  17. Depleting depletion: Polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Debashish; Marques, Carlos; Stuehn, Torsten; Kremer, Kurt

    A polymer collapses in a solvent when the solvent particles dislike monomers more than the repulsion between monomers. This leads to an effective attraction between monomers, also referred to as depletion induced attraction. This attraction is the key factor behind standard polymer collapse in poor solvents. Strikingly, even if a polymer exhibits poor solvent condition in two different solvents, it can also swell in mixtures of these two poor solvents. This collapse-swelling-collapse scenario is displayed by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in aqueous alcohol. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a thermodynamically consistent generic model and theoretical arguments, we unveil the microscopic origin of this phenomenon. Our analysis suggests that a subtle interplay of the bulk solution properties and the local depletion forces reduces depletion effects, thus dictating polymer swelling in poor solvent mixtures.

  18. Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the Colonie Site, Colonie, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, D.

    1996-05-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the Colonie site located in Colonie, New York. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The site became contaminated with radioactive material as a result of operations conducted by National Lead (NL) Industries from 1958 to 1984; these activities included brass foundry operations, electroplating of metal products, machining of various components using depleted uranium, and limited work with small amounts of enriched uranium and thorium. The Colonie site comprises the former NL Industries property, now designated the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS), and 56 vicinity properties contaminated by fallout from airborne emissions; 53 of the vicinity properties were previously remediated between 1984 and 1988. In 1984, DOE accepted ownership of the CISS property from NL Industries. Residual radioactive material guidelines for individual radionuclides and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation; RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines.

  19. Geology of the Sievi, Kuru and Askola sites. Uranium mineralogy at Askola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovaara-Koivisto, M.; Read, D.; Lindberg, A.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Togneri, L.

    2009-07-01

    The natural geochemical retardation systems of radioactive elements in the Finnish bedrock are of great relevance to the Finnish nuclear waste disposal programme. It indicates the likely fate of radionuclides released from the deep repository when the chemical environment is oxidizing within its operating stage or in the event of glacial melt water percolates to the repository. In these conditions the uranium occurs in its +6 state, and it is reactive and mobile. Studying uranium migration and retention in oxidizing conditions is thus justified. Uranium migration and retention are studied with samples taken from a natural uranium deposit at Askola. Likewise the uranium migration is studied with laboratory tests. The naturally uranium-rich samples are taken from shallow depths at Askola, and thus the behaviour of uranium can be studied in oxidising conditions. In the laboratory tests uranium is released from a depleted uranium disc and allowed to migrate and retain in Kuru grey granite and Sievi altered tonalite. The uranium is expected to migrate into the rock and to precipitate there as secondary phases. The rate of uranium migration and age of the precipitates in the laboratory experiments are known, but not in the case of the natural analogue studies. The observations from both the natural analogue and the laboratory tests will be used as input data for the coupled geochemical model for uranium migration and retention. (orig.)

  20. Toxicity of uranium on renal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiebault, C.; Carriere, M.; Gouget, B. [CEA Saclay, CNRS, UMR9956, Lab Pierre Sue, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2007-07-01

    Kidney and bone are the main retention organs affected by uranium toxicity. Although the clinical effects of uranium poisoning are well known, only few studies dealt with cellular mechanisms of toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cyto- and genotoxicity of uranium (U) on renal cells. The cell death was also studied in this conditions of exposure. The effects of U were evaluated in acute and chronic exposure. The acute effects were evaluated after 24 h exposure to strong U concentrations (200-700{mu}M). The chronic exposure was observed on renal cells incubated with low U concentrations (0.1-100 {mu}M) until 70 days then with high uranium concentrations (400-500 {mu}M) during 24 h. U induces apoptosis cell death mainly by the intrinsic pathway. The high U concentrations (600-700 {mu}M) lead to necrosis. U induces DNA damages (single, double strand breaks, as well as alkali labile sites) from 300{mu}M. The cytotoxicity and intracellular accumulation of uranium were less important in cells previously exposed to low uranium concentrations when compared to non-exposed cells. In the same time, DNA damage observed after acute exposure of uranium decreased with the increase of chronic uranium concentrations. These results suggest that renal cells became resistant to uranium, probably due to a cellular transformation process. In conclusion, high U concentrations (300-700{mu}M) induce apoptosis cell death and DNA damages. Cells previously exposed to low U concentrations present also DNA damages and a cellular transformation. (authors)

  1. Uranium hexafluoride public risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

    1994-08-01

    The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

  2. Bioremediation of uranium contamination with enzymatic uranium reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic uranium reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans readily removed uranium from solution in a batch system or when D. desulfuricans was separated from the bulk of the uranium-containing water by a semipermeable membrane. Uranium reduction continued at concentrations as high as 24 mM. Of a variety of potentially inhibiting anions and metals evaluated, only high concentrations of copper inhibited uranium reduction. Freeze-dried cells, stored aerobically, reduced uranium as fast as fresh cells. D. desulfuricans reduced uranium in pH 4 and pH 7.4 mine drainage waters and in uraniumcontaining groundwaters from a contaminated Department of Energy site. Enzymatic uranium reduction has several potential advantages over other bioprocessing techniques for uranium removal, the most important of which are as follows: the ability to precipitate uranium that is in the form of a uranyl carbonate complex; high capacity for uranium removal per cell; the formation of a compact, relatively pure, uranium precipitate.

  3. Uranium conversion; Conversion de l`uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This booklet is a presentation of the activities of the Comurhex company, created in 1971 and which became a 100% Cogema`s daughter company in 1992. The Comurhex company is in charge of the conversion of natural uranium into gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). The two steps of the conversion operation are performed in the Malvesi and Pierrelatte (France) industrial sites and represent 31% (14000 t/year) of the uranium conversion capacity of western countries. The refining and UF{sub 4} production (Malvesi) and the UF{sub 6} fabrication (Pierrelatte) processes are described. Comurhex is also one of the few companies in the world which produces UF{sub 6} from the uranium of spent fuels. (J.S.)

  4. Uranium: A Dentist's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Toor, R. S. S.; Brar, G. S.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in granite and other mineral deposits. In its natural state, it consists of three isotopes (U-234, U-235 and U-238). On an average, 1% – 2% of ingested uranium is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract in adults. The absorbed uranium rapidly enters the bloodstream and forms a diffusible ionic uranyl hydrogen carbonate complex (UO2HCO3+) which is in equilibrium with a nondiffusible uranyl albumin complex. In the skeleton, the uranyl ion repla...

  5. Chemical thermodynamics of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenthe, I.; Fuger, J.; Lemire, R.J.; Muller, A.B.; Nguyen-Trung Cregu, C.; Wanner, H.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive overview on the chemical thermodynamics of those elements that are of particular importance in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems is provided. This is the first volume in a series of critical reviews to be published on this subject. The book provides an extensive compilation of chemical thermodynamic data for uranium. A description of procedures for activity corrections and uncertainty estimates is given. A critical discussion of data needed for nuclear waste management assessments, including areas where significant gaps of knowledge exist is presented. A detailed inventory of chemical thermodynamic data for inorganic compounds and complexes of uranium is listed. Data and their uncertainty limits are recommended for 74 aqueous complexes and 199 solid and 31 gaseous compounds containing uranium, and on 52 aqueous and 17 solid auxiliary species containing no uranium. The data are internally consistent and compatible with the CODATA Key Values. The book contains a detailed discussion of procedures used for activity factor corrections in aqueous solution, as well as including methods for making uncertainty estimates. The recommended data have been prepared for use in environmental geochemistry. Containing contributions written by experts the chapters cover various subject areas such a s: oxide and hydroxide compounds and complexes, the uranium nitrides, the solid uranium nitrates and the arsenic-containing uranium compounds, uranates, procedures for consistent estimation of entropies, gaseous and solid uranium halides, gaseous uranium oxides, solid phosphorous-containing uranium compounds, alkali metal uranates, uncertainties, standards and conventions, aqueous complexes, uranium minerals dealing with solubility products and ionic strength corrections. The book is intended for nuclear research establishments and consulting firms dealing with uranium mining and nuclear waste disposal, as well as academic and research institutes.

  6. Characterization of the Reproductive Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    increasing numbers of implanted DU or Ta steel pellets. Furthermore, female P1 neurobehavior, gestation weight gain, and gestation length did not differ by the...this difference was not statistically significant. Gestation length and weight gain: The length of gestation and gestation weight gain of P1 females...impregnated 30-45 days post-implantation surgery are listed in Table 20. No significant differences were found for gestation length or gestation weight

  7. Recycling/Disposal Alternatives for Depleted Uranium Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    virgin feedstock. Machining chips are prepared for recycling using a briquetting process. Thu briquetting process removes the aqueous coolant which...diameter and 2 inches thick. The briquettes are added to any given melt. Approximately 300 pounds of chips can be briquetted at one time. The... briquetting equipment is expensive; in the past (and currently), the ase of this equipment has been economical only for those facil- ities pr3cessing costly

  8. Atmosphere Assisted Machining of Depleted Uranium (DU) Penetrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    door and gas feed. -5- The task of chip handling was also designed to include the processing of chips to a briquetted form. The process of compacting was...the end of the conveyor in a protected drum. The briquetting was done manually in air while the compactor was still under construction. This particular...Inc., titanium sponge for alloying and the briquetted chips. As was briefly mentioned in Task D, a problem developed with the compacting unit designed

  9. A Review of Depleted Uranium Biological Effects: In vivo Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Chromatid Exchange Other Biomarkers DNA Adducts Micronuclei Dicentrics Simple: 1 or 2 breaks in 1 chromosome Complex: 3 or more breaks in 2 or more... Chromosomal Aberrations Control 0.25 0.03 DU 0.49 0.05 Ta 0.29 0.03 DU Genotoxicity in vivo (Sprague-Dawley Rats) Miller et al, 2003, Mil Med. 2002 Feb;167(2...Inhalation Internal Fragment Unpublished data Comparison of Inhalation versus Chronic Internal Fragment Exposure in vivo: Measurement of Chromosomal

  10. Large-Scale Physical Separation of Depleted Uranium from Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    ix RSD relative standard deviation SAFR Small Arms Firing Range US EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency WHO World Health Organization XRD X...black substance has been identified by X-ray diffraction ( XRD ) analysis as uraninite, UO2. The amorphous yellow coating is composed of uranyl ions...particle sizes. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Sampling area U c on ce nt ra tio n (m g/ kg ) CB1 CB2 CB3 CB4 Catch Box 1 Catch Box 2 Catch Box 3 Catch Box 4

  11. Depleted Uranium (DU) Follow-up Program Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    fragments Thun, 1975 = 65.1 µg U/L Dietary Limit = 0.365 µg DU Cut point = 0.1µg U/g creatinine NHANES 95th percentile = 0.043 µg U/g creatinine NHANES...analysis (HPRT, PIG - A, FISH, micronulcei) • Neurocognitive testing • Dermatologic testing for hypersensitivity to U • Focus group/risk communication...hybridization (FISH); Mean number of total mutations per subject in chromo- somes 5, 7, 11, and 13 h>l p=.08 ns ns PIG -A l>hp=.08 Micronuclei ns ns

  12. Ozone Depletion by Hydrofluorocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, M.; Fleming, E. L.; Newman, P. A.; Li, F.; Mlawer, E. J.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Bailey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are second-generation replacements for the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons and other substances that caused the 'ozone hole'. Atmospheric concentrations of HFCs are projected to increase dramatically in the coming decades. Coupled chemistry-climate simulations forced by these projections show that HFCs will impact the global atmosphere in 2050. As strong radiative forcers, HFCs modulate atmospheric temperature, thereby changing ozone-destroying catalytic cycles and enhancing the stratospheric circulation. These changes lead to a weak depletion of stratospheric ozone. Sensitivity simulations with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2D model show that HFC-125 is the most important contributor to atmospheric change in 2050, as compared with HFC-23, HFC-32, HFC-134a and HFC-143a. Incorporating the interactions between chemistry, radiation and dynamics, for a likely 2050 climate, ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for HFCs range from 4.3x10-4 to 3.5x10-2; previously HFCs were assumed to have negligible ODPs since these species lack chlorine or bromine atoms. The ozone impacts of HFCs are further investigated with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). The GEOSCCM is a three-dimensional, fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model with interactive stratospheric chemistry. Sensitivity simulations in which CO2, CFC-11 and HCFC-22 are enhanced individually are used as proxies for the atmospheric response to the HFC concentrations expected by the mid-21st century. Sensitivity simulations provide quantitative estimates of the impacts of these greenhouse gases on global total ozone, and can be used to assess their effects on the recovery of Antarctic ozone.

  13. A rapid method for determination of the isotopic composition of uranium samples by alpha spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Sanchez, A.; Tome, F.V.; Diaz Bejarano, J.; Jurado Vargas, M. (Dept. de Fisica, Univ. Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain))

    1992-03-01

    A simple method of analyzing alpha spectra from natural and enriched or depleted uranium samples is developed. The procedure is non-iterative, and takes into consideration low-energy tail and branching-ratio corrections to accurately calculate the area corresponding to each uranium isotope ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U) in the spectrum, and then the isotopic composition of the sample. A BASIC computer program, called ENURA, has been developed to perform all the necessary calculations to give the results together with their uncertainties. Several samples were prepared with different uranium concentrations made from standard solutions with known compositions, and the method was checked against the experimental measurements from these samples. Other series of uranium spectra were theoretically constructed using a given line shape in order to cover the required range of enriched or depleted uranium. (orig.).

  14. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehle, A.E.; Stevenson, J.W.

    1957-11-12

    An improved process is described for the magnesium reduction of UF/sub 4/ to produce uranium metal. In the past, there have been undesirable premature reactions between the Mg and the bomb liner or the UF/sub 4/ before the actual ignition of the bomb reaction. Since these premature reactions impair the yield of uranium metal, they have been inhibited by forming a protective film upon the particles of Mg by reacting it with hydrated uranium tetrafluoride, sodium bifluoride, uranyl fluoride, or uranium trioxide. This may be accomplished by adding about 0.5 to 2% of the additive to the bomb charge.

  15. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  16. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Cam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU, there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 215-220

  17. URANIUM-SERIES CONSTRAINTS ON RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND GROUNDWATER FLOW AT NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT, SIERRA PENA BLANCA, MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. J. Goldstein, S. Luo, T. L. Ku, and M. T. Murrell

    2006-04-01

    Uranium-series data for groundwater samples from the vicinity of the Nopal I uranium ore deposit are used to place constraints on radionuclide transport and hydrologic processes at this site, and also, by analogy, at Yucca Mountain. Decreasing uranium concentrations for wells drilled in 2003 suggest that groundwater flow rates are low (< 10 m/yr). Field tests, well productivity, and uranium isotopic constraints also suggest that groundwater flow and mixing is limited at this site. The uranium isotopic systematics for water collected in the mine adit are consistent with longer rock-water interaction times and higher uranium dissolution rates at the front of the adit where the deposit is located. Short-lived nuclide data for groundwater wells are used to calculate retardation factors that are on the order of 1,000 for radium and 10,000 to 10,000,000 for lead and polonium. Radium has enhanced mobility in adit water and fractures near the deposit.

  18. 饥饿素对贫铀所致MC3T3-E1细胞损伤的保护作用研究%Protective role of ghrelin in depleted uranium-induced damage of MC3 T3-E1 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝玉徽; 黄嘉伟; 刘聪; 李蓉

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of ghrelin on depleted uranium ( DU)-induced damage of the osteoblast MC3T3-E1. Methods MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with different doses of ghrelin for 1 h before DU (500 μM) treatment. After 24 hours,the cell via-bility,intracellular tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (StrACP),alkaline phosphatase (AKP),osteoprotegerin (OPG),solvable receptor acti-vator of nuclear factor-κB ligand ( sRANKL) ,catalase ( CAT) and reactive oxygen species ( ROS) were measured. Results After DU expo-sure,ghrelin pretreatment increased the cell viability and CAT levels,and reduced intracellular StrACP,AKP,sRANKL/OPG and ROS in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion Through maintaining the balance of OPG/RANKL and reducing the oxidative stress,ghrelin could pro-tect against DU-induced damage of MC3T3-E1 cells.%目的 评价饥饿素对贫铀(DU)所致成骨细胞(MC3T3-E1细胞)损伤的影响. 方法 不同浓度的饥饿素提前1 h预处理MC3T3-E1细胞后暴露于DU(500 μM)24 h,检测细胞存活率、细胞内抗酒石酸酸性磷酸酶(StrACP)、碱性磷酸酶(AKP)、骨保护素(OPG)、可溶性核因子-κB受体活化因子配体(sRANKL)含量以及细胞内过氧化氢酶(CAT)和活性氧(ROS)水平. 结果饥饿素预处理可明显提高DU暴露后细胞存活率及CAT含量,降低细胞内StrACP、AKP、sRANKL/OPG以及ROS水平,并且存在剂量依赖关系. 结论 饥饿素通过调节OPG/RANKL系统的失衡以及降低细胞内氧化应激,发挥对DU暴露后MC3T3-E1细胞的保护作用.

  19. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  20. Characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilescu, Maria; Pavel, Lucian Vasile; Cretescu, Igor

    2009-04-30

    Environmental contamination caused by radionuclides, in particular by uranium and its decay products is a serious problem worldwide. The development of nuclear science and technology has led to increasing nuclear waste containing uranium being released and disposed in the environment. The objective of this paper is to develop a better understanding of the techniques for the remediation of soils polluted with radionuclides (uranium in particular), considering: the chemical forms of uranium, including depleted uranium (DU) in soil and other environmental media, their characteristics and concentrations, and some of the effects on environmental and human health; research issues concerning the remediation process, the benefits and results; a better understanding of the range of uses and situations for which each is most appropriate. The paper addresses the main features of the following techniques for uranium remediation: natural attenuation, physical methods, chemical processes (chemical extraction methods from contaminated soils assisted by various suitable chelators (sodium bicarbonate, citric acid, two-stage acid leaching procedure), extraction using supercritical fluids such as solvents, permeable reactive barriers), biological processes (biomineralization and microbial reduction, phytoremediation, biosorption), and electrokinetic methods. In addition, factors affecting uranium removal from soils are furthermore reviewed including soil characteristics, pH and reagent concentration, retention time.

  1. Uranium-mediated electrocatalytic dihydrogen production from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halter, Dominik P.; Heinemann, Frank W.; Bachmann, Julien; Meyer, Karsten

    2016-02-01

    Depleted uranium is a mildly radioactive waste product that is stockpiled worldwide. The chemical reactivity of uranium complexes is well documented, including the stoichiometric activation of small molecules of biological and industrial interest such as H2O, CO2, CO, or N2 (refs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11), but catalytic transformations with actinides remain underexplored in comparison to transition-metal catalysis. For reduction of water to H2, complexes of low-valent uranium show the highest potential, but are known to react violently and uncontrollably forming stable bridging oxo or uranyl species. As a result, only a few oxidations of uranium with water have been reported so far; all stoichiometric. Catalytic H2 production, however, requires the reductive recovery of the catalyst via a challenging cleavage of the uranium-bound oxygen-containing ligand. Here we report the electrocatalytic water reduction observed with a trisaryloxide U(III) complex [((Ad,MeArO)3mes)U] (refs 18 and 19)—the first homogeneous uranium catalyst for H2 production from H2O. The catalytic cycle involves rare terminal U(IV)-OH and U(V)=O complexes, which have been isolated, characterized, and proven to be integral parts of the catalytic mechanism. The recognition of uranium compounds as potentially useful catalysts suggests new applications for such light actinides. The development of uranium-based catalysts provides new perspectives on nuclear waste management strategies, by suggesting that mildly radioactive depleted uranium—an abundant waste product of the nuclear power industry—could be a valuable resource.

  2. Uranium triflate complexes; Complexes triflates de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthet, J.C.; Ephritikhine, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules, Lab. de Chimie de Coordination, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Nierlich, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules, Lab. de Cristallochimie, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2002-02-01

    Uranium triflate complexes. We review here the different preparations of uranium triflates that we have developed in the course of these last years in our laboratory. Protonation of [U]-R and [U]-NR{sub 2} (R=alkyl) bonds with pyridinium triflate constitutes a general and efficient route towards triflate complexes. This method is very suitable for the preparation of organometallic compounds such as U(Cp){sub 3}(OTf), U(Cp){sub 2}(OTf){sub 2}(py), U(Cp{sup *}){sub 2}(OTf){sub 2}, and U(Cot)(OTf){sub 2}(py), which have been crystallographically characterised. The homoleptic species U(OTf){sub n} (n=3,4) are easily prepared by heating a mixture of uranium turnings or UH{sub 3} in triflic acid. By adjusting the temperature to 120 or 180 deg C, either U(OTf){sub 3} or U(OTf){sub 4} is isolated. Treatment of UO{sub 3} with pure or aqueous solution of triflic acid leads to the non-solvated uranyl triflate UO{sub 2}(OTf){sub 2}, which is more conveniently obtained by heating a suspension of UO{sub 3} in triflic anhydride. This reactant is an excellent dehydrating agent and enables the preparation of UO{sub 2}(OTf){sub 2} and Ce(OTf){sub 4} from the hydrated starting materials. (authors)

  3. Uranium: abundance or shortage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steyn, J. [Energy Resources International, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-09-01

    With large uranium stockpiles, particularly in the form of HEU, continuing to be the dominant factor in the world uranium market, buyers should be able to enter into attractive long-term commitments for the future. Nevertheless, producers are now able to see forward with some degree of certainty and are expected to meet their planned levels of production and demand. (author).

  4. Investigation of intranodal depletion effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forslund, P. E-mail: petri.forslund@se.abb.com; Mueller, E.; Lindahl, S

    2001-02-01

    The modeling of depletion induced intranodal effects on important neutron physical parameters in nodal diffusion theory is addressed. Consideration is given to two situations where these aspects are of particular interest, namely, in mixed oxide cores where strong interaction between uranium and plutonium mixed oxide assemblies occur, and in boiling water reactor cores where significant control rod history effects are encountered. A model based on a low order polynomial representation of intranodal cross-section spatial behaviour is considered. Two approaches for determining the constraints for the polynomial fitting procedure are applied. The first one is a conventional method employing intranodal exposure values, whereas the second model combines intranodal exposure and isotopic inventory information. Numerical studies are performed in order to evaluate the relative merits of the different models. It is demonstrated that pin power predictions are significantly influenced by intranodal effects. It is also found that the combined use of intranodal isotopic inventory and exposure distributions for estimating intranodal cross-section behaviour significantly improves the accuracy in pin powers over the more traditional approach of utilizing exposure distributions only.

  5. Uranium triamidoamine chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Benedict M; Liddle, Stephen T

    2015-07-01

    Triamidoamine (Tren) complexes of the p- and d-block elements have been well-studied, and they display a diverse array of chemistry of academic, industrial and biological significance. Such in-depth investigations are not as widespread for Tren complexes of uranium, despite the general drive to better understand the chemical behaviour of uranium by virtue of its fundamental position within the nuclear sector. However, the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes is characterised by the ability to stabilise otherwise reactive, multiply bonded main group donor atom ligands, construct uranium-metal bonds, promote small molecule activation, and support single molecule magnetism, all of which exploit the steric, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic features of the Tren ligand system. This Feature Article presents a current account of the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes.

  6. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  7. The design of long-term effective uranium bioremediation strategy using a community metabolic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, K; Ma, E; Lovley, Derek R; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2012-10-01

    Acetate amendment at uranium contaminated sites in Rifle, CO. leads to an initial bloom of Geobacter accompanied by the removal of U(VI) from the groundwater, followed by an increase of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) which are poor reducers of U(VI). One of the challenges associated with bioremediation is the decay in Geobacter abundance, which has been attributed to the depletion of bio-accessible Fe(III), motivating the investigation of simultaneous amendments of acetate and Fe(III) as an alternative bioremediation strategy. In order to understand the community metabolism of Geobacter and SRBs during artificial substrate amendment, we have created a genome-scale dynamic community model of Geobacter and SRBs using the previously described Dynamic Multi-species Metabolic Modeling framework. Optimization techniques are used to determine the optimal acetate and Fe(III) addition profile. Field-scale simulation of acetate addition accurately predicted the in situ data. The simulations suggest that batch amendment of Fe(III) along with continuous acetate addition is insufficient to promote long-term bioremediation, while continuous amendment of Fe(III) along with continuous acetate addition is sufficient to promote long-term bioremediation. By computationally minimizing the acetate and Fe(III) addition rates as well as the difference between the predicted and target uranium concentration, we showed that it is possible to maintain the uranium concentration below the environmental safety standard while minimizing the cost of chemical additions. These simulations show that simultaneous addition of acetate and Fe(III) has the potential to be an effective uranium bioremediation strategy. They also show that computational modeling of microbial community is an important tool to design effective strategies for practical applications in environmental biotechnology.

  8. LLNL Site plan for a MOX fuel lead assembly mission in support of surplus plutonium disposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, M.C.

    1997-10-01

    The principal facilities that LLNL would use to support a MOX Fuel Lead Assembly Mission are Building 332 and Building 334. Both of these buildings are within the security boundary known as the LLNL Superblock. Building 332 is the LLNL Plutonium Facility. As an operational plutonium facility, it has all the infrastructure and support services required for plutonium operations. The LLNL Plutonium Facility routinely handles kilogram quantities of plutonium and uranium. Currently, the building is limited to a plutonium inventory of 700 kilograms and a uranium inventory of 300 kilograms. Process rooms (excluding the vaults) are limited to an inventory of 20 kilograms per room. Ongoing operations include: receiving SSTS, material receipt, storage, metal machining and casting, welding, metal-to-oxide conversion, purification, molten salt operations, chlorination, oxide calcination, cold pressing and sintering, vitrification, encapsulation, chemical analysis, metallography and microprobe analysis, waste material processing, material accountability measurements, packaging, and material shipping. Building 334 is the Hardened Engineering Test Building. This building supports environmental and radiation measurements on encapsulated plutonium and uranium components. Other existing facilities that would be used to support a MOX Fuel Lead Assembly Mission include Building 335 for hardware receiving and storage and TRU and LLW waste storage and shipping facilities, and Building 331 or Building 241 for storage of depleted uranium.

  9. Performance Assessment Transport Modeling of Uranium at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Radioactive Waste

    2010-10-12

    Following is a brief summary of the assumptions that are pertinent to the radioactive isotope transport in the GoldSim Performance Assessment model of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, with special emphasis on the water-phase reactive transport of uranium, which includes depleted uranium products.

  10. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.vigier@ec.europa.eu [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laplace, Annabelle [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Renard, Catherine [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Miguirditchian, Manuel [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, Francis [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-06-15

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10{sup −4.0}, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl{sub 3} precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO{sub 2} powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation. - Highlights: • Precipitation of Uranium (III) is quantitative in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%). • The salt is oxoacid with a water dissociation constant of 10{sup −4.0} at 705 °C. • Volatility of uranium chloride is strongly reduced in reductive conditions. • Coprecipitation of U(III) and Nd(III) leads to a consecutive precipitation of the two elements.

  11. Genotoxicity of uranium contamination in embryonic zebrafish cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Sandrine, E-mail: sandrine.pereira@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DEI, SECRE, LRE, Cadarache (France); Camilleri, Virginie; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DEI, SECRE, LRE, Cadarache (France)

    2012-03-15

    Uranium is a metal used in the nuclear industry and for military applications. Studies on mammals have shown that uranium is genotoxic. However the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the genotoxicity of uranium are poorly known for other types of vertebrates such as fish. Since unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be key lesions in cell lethality, the activity of one of the major DSB-repair pathways, i.e. non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), has been evaluated in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to uranium. Genotoxicity of uranium in ZF4 cells was further assessed by comet and micronucleus assays. Exposure to uranium results in the production of DSBs a few hours after incubation. These breaks trigger the phosphorylation of H2AX proteins. We showed that the DNA-PK kinase activity, essential for NHEJ, is altered by the presence of uranium. The presence of uranium in cells disturbs but does not inhibit the repair rate of DSBs. Such a result suggests an impact of uranium upon the reparability of DSBs and the potential activation of alternative DSBs repair pathway leading to the propagation of possible misrepaired DSBs. In parallel, we performed a transmission electron microscopy analysis of cells exposed to uranium and were able to localize internalized uranium using an Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalyser. We observed the formation of precipitates in lysosome-like vesicles for 250 {mu}M of uranium in the medium. The appearance of these precipitates is concomitant with the decrease of the number of DSBs per cell. This process might be a part of a defence system whose role in counteracting cytotoxicity calls for further dedicated research.

  12. Uranium: active even at low doses; Uranium: actif meme a faible dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souidi, M.; Lestaevel, Ph.; Gueguen, Y. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Clamart (France)

    2006-11-15

    The human body, in normal conditions, contains 40 to 90 10{sup -6} grams of uranium, this quantity is mainly stored in the bones (66%), in the kidneys (8%) and in soft tissues. Man daily absorbs between 1 to 3 10{sup -6} grams of uranium. A recent experiment on rats has showed that water contaminated with low quantities of uranium (10{sup -6} grams a day and per rat) can lead to short-term memory impairment, to higher level of anxiety and to a 38% increase of the paradoxal sleep. No toxic effects on liver and kidneys have been found but it has been showed that low quantities of uranium can entail changes, in some organs, concerning the expression of the genes coding the P450 cytochromes. (A.C.)

  13. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  14. Measurement and Analysis of Fission Rates in a Spherical Mockup of Uranium and Polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Tong-Hua, Zhu; Xin-Xin, Lu; Rong, Liu; Zi-Jie, Han; Li, Jiang; Mei, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the reaction rate distribution were carried out using two kinds of Plate Micro Fission Chamber(PMFC). The first is a depleted uranium chamber and the second an enriched uranium chamber. The material in the depleted uranium chamber is strictly the same as the material in the uranium assembly. With the equation solution to conduct the isotope contribution correction, the fission rate of 238U and 235U were obtained from the fission rate of depleted uranium and enriched uranium. And then, the fission count of 238U and 235U in an individual uranium shell was obtained. In this work, MCNP5 and continuous energy cross sections ENDF/BV.0 were used for the analysis of fission rate distribution and fission count. The calculated results were compared with the experimental ones. The calculation of fission rate of DU and EU were found to agree with the measured ones within 10% except at the positions in polyethylene region and the two positions near the outer surface. Beacause the fission chamber was not co...

  15. 300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-06-30

    amendment arrival response data indicate some degree of overlap between the reactive species and thus potential for the formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., apatite formation), the efficiency of this treatment approach was relatively poor. In general, uranium performance monitoring results support the hypothesis that limited long-term treatment capacity (i.e., apatite formation) was established during the injection test. Two separate overarching issues affect the efficacy of apatite remediation for uranium sequestration within the 300 Area: 1) the efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions, and 2) the formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology. In addition, the long-term stability of uranium sequestered via apatite is dependent on the chemical speciation of uranium, surface speciation of apatite, and the mechanism of retention, which is highly susceptible to dynamic geochemical conditions. It was expected that uranium sequestration in the presence of hydroxyapatite would occur by sorption and/or surface complexation until all surface sites have been depleted, but that the high carbonate concentrations in the 300 Area would act to inhibit the transformation of sorbed uranium to chernikovite and/or autunite. Adsorption of uranium by apatite was never considered a viable approach for in situ uranium sequestration in and of itself, because by definition, this is a reversible reaction. The efficacy of uranium sequestration by apatite assumes that the adsorbed uranium would subsequently convert to autunite, or other stable uranium phases. Because this appears to not be the case in the 300 Area aquifer, even in locations near the river, apatite may have limited efficacy for the retention and long-term immobilization of uranium at the 300 Area site..

  16. Intrinsic Depletion or Not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, Beate; Bruun, Sara; Hansen, Søren;

      The presence of a depletion layer of water along extended hydrophobic interfaces, and a possibly related formation of nanobubbles, is an ongoing discussion. The phenomenon was initially reported when we, years ago, chose thick films (~300-400Å) of polystyrene as cushions between a crystalline...... giving rise to depletion layers, and the mechanisms and border conditions that control their presence and extension require still clarification. Recently, careful systematic reflectivity experiments were re-done on the same system. No depletion layers were found, and it was conjectured that the whole...

  17. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  18. Uranium Location Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata...

  19. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  20. REMOVAL AND CONCENTRATION OF URANIUM FROM WASTE MINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizângela Augusta Santos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of leaching agents, such as sodium citrate and ammonium carbonate, were assessed for the extraction of uranium from one mining residue containing 0.25% U. Concentration techniques such as precipitation and ion exchange were employed to recover the uranium from the leaching liquor. Leaching results showed maximum uranium extraction of about 40% for both reagents. The use 10 mol L-1 NaOH to precipitate the uranium from the leach liquor leads to a recovery of 62%; what was considered not satisfactory. In view of this, resins were used to concentrate the uranium from the liquor and the metal loading obtained at pH 3.9 was higher for the resin DOWEX RPU, whose maximum loading maximum capacity was 148.3 mg g-1, compared to 126.9 mg g-1 presented by the resin IRA 910 U.

  1. Metals other than uranium affected microbial community composition in a historical uranium-mining site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, Jana; Löffler, Sylvia; Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Goldfarb, Katherine C; Büchel, Georg; Hazen, Terry C; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    To understand the links between the long-term impact of uranium and other metals on microbial community composition, ground- and surface water-influenced soils varying greatly in uranium and metal concentrations were investigated at the former uranium-mining district in Ronneburg, Germany. A soil-based 16S PhyloChip approach revealed 2358 bacterial and 35 archaeal operational taxonomic units (OTU) within diverse phylogenetic groups with higher OTU numbers than at other uranium-contaminated sites, e.g., at Oak Ridge. Iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB), which have the potential to attenuate uranium and other metals by the enzymatic and/or abiotic reduction of metal ions, were found at all sites. Although soil concentrations of solid-phase uranium were high, ranging from 5 to 1569 μg·g (dry weight) soil(-1), redundancy analysis (RDA) and forward selection indicated that neither total nor bio-available uranium concentrations contributed significantly to the observed OTU distribution. Instead, microbial community composition appeared to be influenced more by redox potential. Bacterial communities were also influenced by bio-available manganese and total cobalt and cadmium concentrations. Bio-available cadmium impacted FeRB distribution while bio-available manganese and copper as well as solid-phase zinc concentrations in the soil affected SRB composition. Archaeal communities were influenced by the bio-available lead as well as total zinc and cobalt concentrations. These results suggest that (i) microbial richness was not impacted by heavy metals and radionuclides and that (ii) redox potential and secondary metal contaminants had the strongest effect on microbial community composition, as opposed to uranium, the primary source of contamination.

  2. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Marie Atkinson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rodent models of arthritis have been extensively used in the elucidation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathogenesis and are instrumental in the development of therapeutic strategies. Here we utilise delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA, a model in C57BL/6 mice affecting one paw with synchronised onset, 100% penetrance and low variation. We investigate the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs in DTHA through selective depletion of Tregs and the role of IL-17 in connection with Treg depletion. Given the relevance of Tregs in RA, and the possibility of developing Treg-directed therapies, this approach could be relevant for advancing the understanding of Tregs in inflammatory arthritis. Selective depletion of Tregs was achieved using a Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse, which expresses the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP under control of the Foxp3 gene. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibody (mAb was used for IL-17 blockade. Numbers and activation of Tregs increased in the paw and its draining lymph node in DTHA, and depletion of Tregs resulted in exacerbation of disease as shown by increased paw swelling, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, increased bone remodelling and increased production of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased production of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Anti-IL-17 mAb treatment demonstrated that IL-17 is important for disease severity in both the presence and absence of Tregs, and that IL-17 blockade is able to rescue mice from the exacerbated disease caused by Treg depletion and caused a reduction in RANKL, IL-6 and the number of neutrophils. We show that Tregs are important for the containment of inflammation and bone remodelling in DTHA. To our knowledge, this is the first study using the Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse on a C57BL/6 background for Treg depletion in an arthritis model, and we here demonstrate the usefulness of the approach to study the role of Tregs and IL-17 in

  3. 76 FR 64107 - Uranium From Russia; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Suspended...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... COMMISSION Uranium From Russia; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Suspended Investigation on Uranium From Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice... of the suspended investigation on uranium from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation...

  4. 77 FR 71626 - Low Enriched Uranium From France; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... COMMISSION Low Enriched Uranium From France; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Low Enriched Uranium From France AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... the antidumping duty order on low enriched uranium from France would be likely to lead to...

  5. 76 FR 38694 - Uranium From Russia; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Suspended Investigation on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMISSION Uranium From Russia; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Suspended Investigation on Uranium From Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... on uranium from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material...

  6. 78 FR 21416 - Low Enriched Uranium From France; Scheduling of a Full Five-year Review Concerning the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... COMMISSION Low Enriched Uranium From France; Scheduling of a Full Five-year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Low Enriched Uranium from France AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... revocation of the antidumping duty order on low enriched uranium from France would be likely to lead...

  7. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  8. Femtosecond Laser Ablation Multicollector ICPMS Analysis of Uranium Isotopes in NIST Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Springer, Kellen WE; Ward, Jesse D.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, John W.; Endres, Mackenzie C.; Hart, Garret L.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Oropeza, Dayana; Russo, Richard; Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Fahey, Albert J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2015-02-06

    We have utilized femtosecond laser ablation coupled to multi-collector inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry to measure the uranium isotopic content of NIST 61x (x=0,2,4,6) glasses. The uranium content of these glasses is a linear two-component mixing between isotopically natural uranium and the isotopically depleted spike used in preparing the glasses. Laser ablation results match extremely well, generally within a few ppm, with solution analysis following sample dissolution and chemical separation. In addition to isotopic data, sample utilization efficiency measurements indicate that over 1% of ablated uranium atoms reach a mass spectrometer detector, making this technique extremely efficient. Laser sampling also allows for spatial analysis and our data indicate that rare uranium concentration inhomogeneities exist in NIST 616 glass.

  9. Intrinsic Depletion or Not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, Beate; Bruun, Sara; Hansen, Søren;

    with an AFM (2).    The intuitive explanation for the depletion based on "hydrophobic mismatch" between the obviously hydrophilic bulk phase of water next to the hydrophobic polymer. It would thus be an intrinsic property of all interfaces between non-matching materials. The detailed physical interaction path......  The presence of a depletion layer of water along extended hydrophobic interfaces, and a possibly related formation of nanobubbles, is an ongoing discussion. The phenomenon was initially reported when we, years ago, chose thick films (~300-400Å) of polystyrene as cushions between a crystalline...

  10. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Shear-affected depletion interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    July, C.; Kleshchanok, D.; Lang, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of flow fields on the strength of the depletion interaction caused by disc-shaped depletants. At low mass concentration of discs, it is possible to continuously decrease the depth of the depletion potential by increasing the applied shear rate until the depletion force i

  12. Chelation therapy for treatment of systemic intoxication with uranium: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šömen Joksić, Agnes; Katz, Sidney A

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of naturally occurring uranium have been found in small geographic areas throughout the world. Exposure of the general public to uranium is most often by the ingestion of food and water containing natural uranium from the hydrogeological environment, but this likelihood is remote. However, the risk is increased in regions where uranium is mined, milled, processed and/or fabricated as well as in the vicinity of former battlefields where depleted uranium munitions were deployed. Exposure in such cases is by the inhalation route. Internalized uranium is a long-term hazard the toxicity of which depends upon the dose and the dose rate as well as other parameters such as the chemical form and site of deposition of the uranium and the physiology of the host. The radiological toxicity and the chemical toxicity of uranium and its compounds are responsible for kidney damage and lung cancer. The vulnerable groups are the very young and the very old, individuals predisposed to hypertension or osteoporosis and individuals with chronic kidney disease. Those subject to long-term exposure from internalized uranium are a greater risk for the long-term implications. The accumulation of uranium may be mitigated by decreasing its absorption, distribution and deposition and increasing its elimination with chelating agents. The formation of soluble chelates may enhance the mobilization of uranium deposited in tissue and expedite its transport to and elimination from the renal system. The focus of this review is on the use of chelating agents to enhance decorporation of uranium thereby reducing the risk of intoxication.

  13. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site Report on the Production and Use of Recycled Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Lewis; D. C. Barg; C. L. Bendixsen; J. P. Henscheid; D. R. Wenzel; B. L. Denning

    2000-09-01

    Recent allegations regarding radiation exposure to radionuclides present in recycled uranium sent to the gaseous diffusion plants prompted the Department of Energy to undertake a system-wide study of recycled uranium. Of particular interest, were the flowpaths from site to site operations and facilities in which exposure to plutonium, neptunium and technetium could occur, and to the workers that could receive a significant radiation dose from handling recycled uranium. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory site report is primarily concerned with two locations. Recycled uranium was produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant where highly enriched uranium was recovered from spent fuel. The other facility is the Specific Manufacturing Facility (SMC) where recycled, depleted uranium is manufactured into shapes for use by their customer. The SMC is a manufacturing facility that uses depleted uranium metal as a raw material that is then rolled and cut into shapes. There are no chemical processes that might concentrate any of the radioactive contaminant species. Recyclable depleted uranium from the SMC facility is sent to a private metallurgical facility for recasting. Analyses on the recast billets indicate that there is no change in the concentrations of transuranics as a result of the recasting process. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was built to recover high-enriched uranium from spent nuclear fuel from test reactors. The facility processed diverse types of fuel which required uniquely different fuel dissolution processes. The dissolved fuel was passed through three cycles of solvent extraction which resulted in a concentrated uranyl nitrate product. For the first half of the operating period, the uranium was shipped as the concentrated solution. For the second half of the operating period the uranium solution was thermally converted to granular, uranium trioxide solids. The dose reconstruction project has evaluated work exposure and

  14. Characterization of Uranium Contamination, Transport, and Remediation at Rocky Flats - Across Remediation into Post-Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecky, D. R.; Boylan, J.; Murrell, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Rocky Flats Site is a former nuclear weapons production facility approximately 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado. Built in 1952 and operated by the Atomic Energy Commission and then Department of Energy, the Site was remediated and closed in 2005, and is currently undergoing long-term surveillance and monitoring by the DOE Office of Legacy Management. Areas of contamination resulted from roughly fifty years of operation. Of greatest interest, surface soils were contaminated with plutonium, americium, and uranium; groundwater was contaminated with chlorinated solvents, uranium, and nitrates; and surface waters, as recipients of runoff and shallow groundwater discharge, have been contaminated by transport from both regimes. A region of economic mineralization that has been referred to as the Colorado Mineral Belt is nearby, and the Schwartzwalder uranium mine is approximately five miles upgradient of the Site. Background uranium concentrations are therefore elevated in many areas. Weapons-related activities included work with enriched and depleted uranium, contributing anthropogenic content to the environment. Using high-resolution isotopic analyses, Site-related contamination can be distinguished from natural uranium in water samples. This has been instrumental in defining remedy components, and long-term monitoring and surveillance strategies. Rocky Flats hydrology interlinks surface waters and shallow groundwater (which is very limited in volume and vertical and horizontal extent). Surface water transport pathways include several streams, constructed ponds, and facility surfaces. Shallow groundwater has no demonstrated connection to deep aquifers, and includes natural preferential pathways resulting primarily from porosity in the Rocky Flats alluvium, weathered bedrock, and discontinuous sandstones. In addition, building footings, drains, trenches, and remedial systems provide pathways for transport at the site. Removal of impermeable surfaces (buildings

  15. Understanding uranium behaviour at the Askola uranium mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokelainen, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M. [Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Markovaara-Koivisto, M. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, TKK (Finland); Read, D. [Enterpris, The Old Library, Lower Shott, Great Bookham, Surrey (United Kingdom); Lindberg, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hellmuth, K.H. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    Understanding the behaviour of uranium is essential when assessing the safety of a spent nuclear fuel repository. The geochemical behaviour of uranium, including its reactive transport chemistry, is also a matter of concern when assessing the environmental impact of uranium mining. Subsurface uranium mobility is believed to be primarily controlled by dissolution and (co)-precipitation of uranium mineral solids and adsorption to mineral surfaces. This paper describes a modelling exercise based on characterisation of samples taken from drilled cores at the uranium mineralization at Askola, Southern Finland. In the modelling exercise, current conditions are assumed to be oxidizing and saturated with groundwater. PHREEQC was used for modelling in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory database, chosen for its extensive coverage of uranium species and mineral phases. It is postulated that weathering processes near the surface have led to uranium dissolution from the primary ore, leaching out from the matrix and migrating along water-conducting fractures with subsequent re-diffusion into the rock matrix. Electron microscopy studies show that precipitated uranium occupies intra-granular fractures in feldspars and quartz. In addition, secondary uranium was found to be distributed within goethite nodules as well as around the margins of iron-containing minerals in the form of silicate and phosphate precipitates. Equilibrium modelling calculations predict that uranium would be precipitated as uranyl silicates, most likely soddyite and uranophane, in the prevailing chemical conditions beneath Lakeakallio hill. (orig.)

  16. Challenges: which uranium for tomorrow?; Enjeux: quel uranium pour apres-demain?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidaud, A.; Heuer, D.; Merle Lucotte, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie (LPSC), CNRS: UMR5821 - IN2P3 - Universite Joseph Fourier - Grenoble I - Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, 38 (France); Criqui, P.; Menanteau, Ph. [Laboratoire d' economie de la production et de l' integration internationale (LEPII) UMR 5252, CNRS-UPMF, Universite Pierre Mendes France, 38 - Saint-Martin-d' Heres (France); David, S.; Wilson, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, UMR CNRS-UPS 8608, Faculte des Sciences d' Orsay, 91 - Orsay (France); Pagel, M. [Universite de Paris-Sud 11, UMR CNRS-UPS 8148, Faculte des Sciences d' Orsay, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2009-07-01

    The author notices that the known reserves of uranium should be sufficient to supply existing reactors and new water reactors for the next decades, and that fuel recycling and reactor improvements as well as regenerator reactors should limit the pressure on these reserves. This means that nuclear physics and economics are in close relationship, that which can lead to the definition of several scenarios. They outline the importance of exploration capacities and of the evolution of the world nuclear reactor stock on a long term (by 2050) for the assessment to future uranium needs

  17. Uranium Conversion & Enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The isotopes of uranium that are found in nature, and hence in ‘fresh’ Yellowcake’, are not in relative proportions that are suitable for power or weapons applications. The goal of conversion then is to transform the U3O8 yellowcake into UF6. Conversion and enrichment of uranium is usually required to obtain material with enough 235U to be usable as fuel in a reactor or weapon. The cost, size, and complexity of practical conversion and enrichment facilities aid in nonproliferation by design.

  18. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  19. Researches on the Quantitative Calculation of Uranium Origin and the Lead Isotope Compositions of Precambrian Terrains in the Anshan-Benxi Area%鞍本地区早前寒武纪地质体铅同位素组成及铀源条件定量计算方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩军; 李林强; 李月湘; 夏毓亮

    2011-01-01

    This paper studied and compared lead isotope compositions among the different terrains, such as granites,metal deposits, and metamorphic rocks in the Anshan-Benxi area. Figure prospective plumbotectonics model, two stage common lead H-H model, and three stage model were applied to estimate the correspondent isotopic ages.The results indicated that the correspondent isotopic ages are from 2000Ma to 1600Ma. These isotope ages are similar to that of pitchblende. The lead isotope compositions correspond to the different geological settings. The abnormally high compositions of radioactive lead in the Lianshanguan granites implicited that they rich of uranium. The paleoproterozoic granite source and the metal deposit regions, with normal ore lead isotope compositions originated mainly from the metamorphic rocks of the Liaohe group, and both of them underwent the synchronized tectonic and granites remelting events in the early paleoproterozoic. The primitive uranium lost by the granitic rocks results in the uranium metallogenetic zone of the Lianshanguan area.%本文对比了鞍本地区前寒武纪铅一锌一银矿区和铀矿区的硫化物矿石和花岗岩长石Pb同位素组成,分别用矿石铅二阶段普通铅法、铅构造模式图解和全岩铅同位素组成三阶段拟合法计算了年龄和全岩原始铀含量.结果表明,矿石铅和长石铅模式年龄约为2000 Ma,在铅构造模式图上投影于2000~1600 Ma间,花岗岩和辽河群全岩拟合年龄为2000~1800 Ma;铅同位素组成显示铅-锌-银来自早元古代辽河群地层,连山关地区明显为放射性成因Pb同位素组成,源于富铀花岗岩.连山关矿石铅年龄和全岩三阶段年龄与该区铀矿床沥青铀矿的年龄基本一致;花岗岩原始铀的得失计算表明,该地区不同地质体均经历了约2000~1800 Ma花岗岩重熔改造,花岗质岩石发生了铀的丢失,是连山关地区铀矿的主要来源.

  20. Effect of uranium on proliferation and mortality of the major constitutive cell types of the skin: influence on skin barrier integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitot, F.; Spessotto, S.; Paquet, F. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Lab. de Radiotoxicologie Experimentale, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/LRTOX, Site du Tricastin - Pierrelatte (France)

    2005-07-01

    The skin is the initial barrier against mechanical, chemical or biological external stresses. It is a complex, multilayered organ. The upper layer is the epidermis that is mainly constituted by keratinocytes. The fibroblast is the major cell type of the dermis which is underlying the epidermis. In the case of an external contamination, uranium is able to diffuse through the skin [1-3] and can affect skin barrier integrity after chronic topical exposure[1, 3]. Our study tried to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to this skin alteration after uranyl nitrate contamination. Proliferation rate and mortality of primary cultures of rat skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes contaminated in vitro with different concentration of depleted-uranyl nitrate or 233-uranyl nitrate were measured. The huge difference between {sup 233}U and depleted-U specific activities, respectively 3.57 x 10{sup 8}Bq.g{sup -1} and 1.45 x 10{sup 4}Bq.g{sup -1}', allowed to distinguish cellular radiotoxicity and chemotoxicity of uranium. Concerning fibroblasts, a significant radiotoxicity of the emitted alpha particles of {sup 233}U was observed with no chemotoxicity for the lowest concentrations, i.e. 2{mu}M and 4{mu}M, of uranyl nitrate. Keratinocytes were more sensitive to both uranium radiotoxicity and chemotoxicity than fibroblasts. This can be explained by the about three times higher ability of keratinocytes to incorporate uranium compared to fibroblasts. This greater capacity of epidermal cells than dermal cells to incorporate uranium was confirmed in vivo for the hairless rat following a uranyl nitrate topical contamination. As a conclusion, the important toxic effect of uranium on keratinocyte demonstrated in our study can explain the previous observations [1, 3] that epidermis was atrophied and so skin permeability increased after an in vivo chronic topical exposure of rat skin to uranyl nitrate. These results are of great importance concerning radiation protection of exposed

  1. Potential impact of seawater uranium extraction on marine life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Gill, Gary A.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Bonheyo, George T.

    2016-02-18

    A variety of adsorbent materials have been developed to extract uranium from seawater as an alternative traditional terrestrial mining. A large-scale deployment of these adsorbents would be necessary to recover useful quantities of uranium and this raises a number of concerns regarding potential impacts on the surrounding marine environment. Two concerns are whether or not the adsorbent materials are toxic and any potentially harmful effects that may result from depleting uranium or vanadium (also highly concentrated by the adsorbents) from the local environment. To test the potential toxicity of the adsorbent with or without bound metals, Microtox assays were used to test both direct contact toxicity and the toxicity of any leachate in the seawater. The Microtox assay was chosen because it the detection of non-specific mechanisms of toxicity. Toxicity was not observed with leachates from any of 68 adsorbent materials that were tested, but direct contact with some adsorbents at very high adsorbent con-centrations exhibited toxicity. These concentrations are, however, very unlikely to be seen in the actual marine deployment. Adsor-bents that accumulated uranium and trace metals were also tested for toxicity, and no toxic effect was observed. Biofouling on the adsorbents and in columns or flumes containing the adsorbents also indicates that the adsorbents are not toxic and that there may not be an obvious deleterious effect resulting from removing uranium and vanadium from seawater. An extensive literature search was also performed to examine the potential impact of uranium and vanadium extraction from seawater on marine life using the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL’s) document analysis tool, IN-SPIRE™. Although other potential environmental effects must also be considered, results from both the Microtox assay and the literature search provide preliminary evidence that uranium extraction from seawater could be performed with minimal impact on

  2. The Case of Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambright, W. Henry

    2005-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is widely perceived as a space agency, since its inception NASA has had a mission dedicated to the home planet. Initially, this mission involved using space to better observe and predict weather and to enable worldwide communication. Meteorological and communication satellites showed the value of space for earthly endeavors in the 1960s. In 1972, NASA launched Landsat, and the era of earth-resource monitoring began. At the same time, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the environmental movement swept throughout the United States and most industrialized countries. The first Earth Day event took place in 1970, and the government generally began to pay much more attention to issues of environmental quality. Mitigating pollution became an overriding objective for many agencies. NASA's existing mission to observe planet Earth was augmented in these years and directed more toward environmental quality. In the 1980s, NASA sought to plan and establish a new environmental effort that eventuated in the 1990s with the Earth Observing System (EOS). The Agency was able to make its initial mark via atmospheric monitoring, specifically ozone depletion. An important policy stimulus in many respects, ozone depletion spawned the Montreal Protocol of 1987 (the most significant international environmental treaty then in existence). It also was an issue critical to NASA's history that served as a bridge linking NASA's weather and land-resource satellites to NASA s concern for the global changes affecting the home planet. Significantly, as a global environmental problem, ozone depletion underscored the importance of NASA's ability to observe Earth from space. Moreover, the NASA management team's ability to apply large-scale research efforts and mobilize the talents of other agencies and the private sector illuminated its role as a lead agency capable of crossing organizational boundaries as well as the science-policy divide.

  3. Effects of Riverbed Conductance on Stream Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, G.; Neupauer, R. M.; Pitlick, J.

    2012-12-01

    In the western United States and other regions of the world where growing population and changing climates are threatening water supplies, accurate modeling of potential human impacts on water resources is becoming more important. Stream depletion, the reduction of surface water flow due to the extraction of groundwater from a hydraulically connected aquifer, is one of the more direct ways that development can alter water availability, degrade water quality and endanger aquatic habitats. These factors have made the accurate modeling of stream depletion an important step in the process of installing groundwater wells in regions that are susceptible to this phenomenon. Proper estimation of stream depletion requires appropriate parameterization of aquifer and streambed hydraulic properties. Although many studies have conducted numerical investigations to determine stream depletion at specific sites, they typically do not measure streambed hydraulic conductivity (Kr), but rather assume a representative value. In this work, we establish a hypothetical model aquifer that is 2000 m by 1600 m and has a meandering stream running through its center. The Kr of the model stream is varied from 1.0x10-9 m s-1 to 1.0x10-2 m s-1 in order to determine the sensitivity of the stream depletion calculations to this parameter. It was found that when Kr is in the lower part of this range, slight changes in K¬r lead to significant impacts on the calculated stream depletion values. We vary Kr along the stream channel according to naturally occurring patterns and demonstrate that alterations of the parameter over a few orders of magnitude can affect the estimated stream depletion caused by a well at a specified location. The numerical simulations show that the mean value of Kr and its spatial variability along the channel should be realistic to develop an accurate model of stream depletion.

  4. Cytokines downregulate the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum pump Ca2+ ATPase 2b and deplete endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+, leading to induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress in pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardozo, Alessandra K; Ortis, Fernanda; Storling, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    , beta-cells showed marked sensitivity to apoptosis induced by SERCA blockers, as compared with fibroblasts. Cytokine-induced ER Ca(2+) depletion was paralleled by an NO-dependent induction of CHOP protein and activation of diverse components of the ER stress response, including activation of inositol......Cytokines and free radicals are mediators of beta-cell death in type 1 diabetes. Under in vitro conditions, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) + gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma) induce nitric oxide (NO) production and apoptosis in rodent and human pancreatic beta-cells. We have previously shown......, by microarray analysis of primary beta-cells, that IL-1beta + IFN-gamma decrease expression of the mRNA encoding for the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum pump Ca(2+) ATPase 2b (SERCA2b) while inducing expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-related and proapoptotic gene CHOP (C/EBP [CCAAT/enhancer binding...

  5. Learning about ozone depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crutzen, J. P. [Department of Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany; Oppenheimer M. [Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Stratospheric ozone depletion has been much studied as a case history in the interaction between environmental science and environmental policy. The positive influence of science on policy is often underscored, but here we review the photochemistry of ozone in order to illustrate how scientific learning has the potential to mislead policy makers. The latter may occur particularly in circumstances where limited observations are combined with simplified models of a complex system, such as may generally occur in the global change arena. Even for the well-studied case of ozone depletion, further research is needed on the dynamics of scientific learning, particularly the scientific assessment process, and how assessments influence the development of public policy.

  6. In vivo effects of a chronic contamination by uranium or cesium 137 on the pharmaceutical metabolism, of the vitamin D and cholesterol; Effets in vivo d'une contamination chronique par l'uranium ou le cesium 137 sur le metabolisme du medicament, de la vitamine D et du cholesterol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souidi, M

    2006-11-15

    In conclusion, an animal model, miming the chronic contamination of the populations exposed to the uranium, was used for the first time to show that the chronic ingestion of a weak dose of depleted uranium can affect the level of active vitamin D without modifying the mineral homeostasis. This study shows that this radionuclide can lead molecular modifications of the CYPs and the nuclear receivers involved in the metabolism of the vitamin D not only at the level of the liver and kidney but also at the level of the independent metabolism in the brain. The deficiency in vitamin D can provoke osseous diseases such as the rickets at the child and the osteomalacia at the adult. The three categories of population the most exposed to this deficiency are the infants, the pregnant women and the old persons. Strong prevalence of the vitamin D deficiency associated with a chronic exposure to uranium could lead to osseous disorders. To verify this hypothesis, it will be necessary secondly to realize this study on individuals animal models predisposed to the rickets or to the osteomalacia. (N.C.)

  7. Uranium from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregg, D.; Folkendt, M.

    1982-09-21

    A novel process for recovering uranium from seawater is proposed and some of the critical technical parameters are evaluated. The process, in summary, consists of two different options for contacting adsorbant pellets with seawater without pumping the seawater. It is expected that this will reduce the mass handling requirements, compared to pumped seawater systems, by a factor of approximately 10/sup 5/, which should also result in a large reduction in initial capital investment. Activated carbon, possibly in combination with a small amount of dissolved titanium hydroxide, is expected to be the preferred adsorbant material instead of the commonly assumed titanium hydroxide alone. The activated carbon, after exposure to seawater, can be stripped of uranium with an appropriate eluant (probably an acid) or can be burned for its heating value (possible in a power plant) leaving the uranium further enriched in its ash. The uranium, representing about 1% of the ash, is then a rich ore and would be recovered in a conventional manner. Experimental results have indicated that activated carbon, acting alone, is not adequately effective in adsorbing the uranium from seawater. We measured partition coefficients (concentration ratios) of approximately 10/sup 3/ in seawater instead of the reported values of 10/sup 5/. However, preliminary tests carried out in fresh water show considerable promise for an extraction system that uses a combination of dissolved titanium hydroxide (in minute amounts) which forms an insoluble compound with the uranyl ion, and the insoluble compound then being sorbed out on activated carbon. Such a system showed partition coefficients in excess of 10/sup 5/ in fresh water. However, the system was not tested in seawater.

  8. Uranium Potential and Regional Metallogeny in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jindai; LI Ziying

    2008-01-01

    This paper is briefly involved in distributions of China's uranium metallogenic types,provinces, regions and belts. Eight target regions have been pointed out to be worthy of prospectingfor uranium resources. The regional uranium metallogeny is discussed and great uranium potentialpointed out from many aspects. Generally speaking, there are favorable conditions for uraniummineralization and good perspective to explore for uranium resources.

  9. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  10. 31 CFR 540.309 - Natural uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Natural uranium. 540.309 Section 540... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.309 Natural uranium. The term natural uranium means uranium found...

  11. Uranium and thorium recovery in thorianite ore-preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotte, Joao V.M. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Villegas, Raul A.S.; Fukuma, Henrique T., E-mail: rvillegas@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the preliminary results of the studies aiming to develop a hydrometallurgical process to produce uranium and thorium concentrates from thorianite ore from Amapa State, Brazil. This process comprises two major parts: acid leaching and Th/U recovery using solvent extraction strategies. Thorianite ore has a typical composition of 60 - 70% of thorium, 8 - 10% lead and 7 - 10% uranium. Sulfuric acid leaching operational conditions were defined as follows: acid/ore ratio 7.5 t/t, ore size below 65 mesh (Tyler), 2 hours leaching time and temperature of 100 deg C. Leaching tests results showed that uranium and thorium recovery exceeded 95%, whereas 97% of lead ore content remained in the solid form. Uranium and thorium simultaneous solvent extraction is necessary due to high sulfate concentration in the liquor obtained from leaching, so the Primene JM-T primary anime was used for this extraction step. Aqueous raffinate from extraction containing sulfuric acid was recycled to the leaching step, reducing acid uptake around 60%, to achieve a net sulfuric acid consumption of 3 t/t of ore. Uranium and thorium simultaneous stripping was performed using sodium carbonate solution. In the aqueous stripped it was added sulfuric acid at pH 1.5, followed by a second solvent extraction step using the tertiary amine Alamine 336. The following stripping step was done with a solution of sodium chloride, resulting in a final solution of 23 g L-1 uranium. (author)

  12. Ozone-depleting Substances (ODS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This site includes all of the ozone-depleting substances (ODS) recognized by the Montreal Protocol. The data include ozone depletion potentials (ODP), global warming...

  13. San Onofre PWR Data for Code Validation of MOX Fuel Depletion Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.

    1999-09-01

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide fuel (fabricated with both uranium and plutonium isotope) discharged from reactors is of interest to the Fissile Material Disposition Program. The validation of depletion codes used to predict isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to studies concerning uranium-only fueled reactors, thus, is very important. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program was conducted to examine the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit I, during cycles 2 and 3. The data usually required as input to depletion codes, either one-dimensional or lattice codes, were taken from various sources and compiled into this report. Where data were either lacking or determined inadequate, the appropriate data were supplied from other references. The scope of the reactor operations and design data, in addition to the isotopic analyses, were considered to be of sufficient quality for depletion code validation.

  14. Acute infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus of low or high virulence leads to depletion and redistribution of WC1(+) γδ T cells in lymphoid tissues of beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Roberto A; Sakamoto, Kaori; Walz, Heather L; Brock, Kenny V; Hurley, David J

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the abundance and distribution of γδ T lymphocytes in lymphoid tissue during acute infection with high (HV) or low virulence (LV) non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in beef calves. This study was performed using tissue samples from a previous experiment in which thirty beef calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: LV [n=10; animals inoculated intranasally (IN) with LV BVDV-1a (strain SD-1)], HV [n=10; animals inoculated IN with HV BVDV-2 (strain 1373)], and control (n=10; animals inoculated with cell culture medium). On day 5 post inoculation, animals were euthanized, and samples from spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were collected to assess the abundance of WC1(+) γδ T cells. A higher proportion of calves challenged with BVDV showed signs of apoptosis and cytophagy in MLN and spleen samples compared to the control group. A significantly lower number of γδ T cells was observed in spleen and MLN from calves in HV and LV groups than in the control calves (P<0.05). In conclusion, acute infection with HV or LV BVDV resulted in depletion of WC1(+) γδ T cells in mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues at five days after challenge in beef calves. This reduction in γδ T cells in the studied lymphoid tissues could be also due to lymphocyte trafficking to other tissues.

  15. Tris(bis(trimethylsilyl)amido)uranium: Compounds with tri-, tetra-, and penta-valent uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    This trivalent uranium compound, serves as a precursor to new tri-, tetra-, and penta-valent uranium species. The geometry about the U atom is pyramidal. Lewis-base coordination compounds of U(N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sub 3/ with a one-to-one- ratio of Lewis base to uranium were isolated with pyridine, 4-dimethylamino-pyridine, 2,6-Me/sub 2/-C/sub 6/H/sub 3/NC, and TPO. Two-to-one coordination compounds were obtained with t-butylnitrile and t-butylisocyanide. Compounds with more sterically demanding bases could not be isolated. The expected decrease in U-N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/ bond length with increase in oxidation state is not observed. Reaction of ClU(N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sub 3/and Li(NH(p-tolyl)) yields the uranium (IV) dimer, U/sub 2/(N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sub 4/(..mu..-N(p-tolyl))/sub 2/. Reaction with 2,4,6-triemethylaniline produces a dimer. Analogous substitution products could not be obtained with aniline or p-toluidine. t-Bu/sub 3/CO/sup /minus//, t-Bu/sub 2/CHO/sup /minus//, and t-Bu/sub 3/SiO/sup /minus// are used to synthesize new tetravalent, mononuclear uranium compounds. Reaction of ClU(tritox)/sub 3/ with alkyllithium reagents leads to isolation of RU(tritox)/sub 3/. The reaction of U(ditox)/sub 4/ with MeLi affords the addition product U(ditox)/sub 4/(Me)Li, whose crystal structure is described. Preparation of uranium silox compounds is reported. 97 refs., 26 figs., 39 tabs.

  16. In utero depletion of fetal hematopoietic stem cells improves engraftment after neonatal transplantation in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Derderian, S. Christopher; Togarrati, P. Priya; King, Charmin; Moradi, Patriss W.; Reynaud, Damien; Czechowicz, Agnieszka; Weissman, Irving L; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2014-01-01

    In utero injection of an antibody against the c-Kit receptor can effectively deplete host HSCs in mice.In utero depletion of host HSCs leads to significantly increased engraftment after neonatal congenic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

  17. Uranium Critical Point Location Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Significant uncertainty of our present knowledge for uranium critical point parameters is under consideration. Present paper is devoted to comparative analysis of possible resolutions for the problem of uranium critical point location, as well as to discussion of plausible scheme of decisive experiment, which could resolve existing uncertainty. New calculations of gas-liquid coexistence in uranium by modern thermodynamic code are included in the analysis.

  18. Radiochemistry of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gindler, J.E.

    1962-03-01

    This volume which deals with the radiochemistry of uranium is one of a series of monographs on radiochemistry of the elements. There is included a review of the nuclear and chemical features of particular interest to the radiochemist, a discussion of problems of dissolution of a sample and counting technique, and finally, a collection of radiochemical procedures for the element as found in the literature.

  19. NGSI FY15 Final Report. Innovative Sample Preparation for in-Field Uranium Isotopic Determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Thomas M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyers, Lisa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Our FY14 Final Report included an introduction to the project, background, literature search of uranium dissolution methods, assessment of commercial off the shelf (COTS) automated sample preparation systems, as well as data and results for dissolution of bulk quantities of uranium oxides, and dissolution of uranium oxides from swipe filter materials using ammonium bifluoride (ABF). Also, discussed were reaction studies of solid ABF with uranium oxide that provided a basis for determining the ABF/uranium oxide dissolution mechanism. This report details the final experiments for optimizing dissolution of U3O8 and UO2 using ABF and steps leading to development of a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for dissolution of uranium oxides on swipe filters.

  20. METHOD FOR RECOVERING URANIUM FROM OILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, L.H.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for recovering uranium from hydrocarbon oils, wherein the uranium is principally present as UF/sub 4/. According to the invention, substantially complete removal of the uranium from the hydrocarbon oil may be effected by intimately mixing one part of acetone to about 2 to 12 parts of the hydrocarbon oil containing uranium and separating the resulting cake of uranium from the resulting mixture. The uranium in the cake may be readily recovered by burning to the oxide.

  1. URANIUM MARKET TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghei MĂRGULESCU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent UN Climate Talks in Paris have put forward the goal of limiting the global temperature rise to two degrees Celsius by the end of the century. This is providing a strong political base for expanding the nuclear power capacity because of the critical role that nuclear power plants play in the production of electricity without emissions of greenhouse gases. In all, more than a dozen countries get over 25% of their energy from nuclear power, with 437 nuclear reactors operating around the world. On top of that, there are another 71 reactors under construction, 165 planned, and 315 proposed. Global uranium demand is expected to rise 40% by 2025 and 81% by 2035. Mined supply of uranium will struggle to keep pace amid rising demand and falling secondary supplies. A cumulative supply deficit is expected to emerge by 2021 while 2016 marks a huge inflection point for the industry, beeing the first year that demand will actually exceed supplies, creating a 60,000-tonne shortfall by 2018. Over the next 10 years, we're going to see uranium prices more than double while the bull run will begin in earnest in 2016.

  2. Residual Stress Analysis in Thick Uranium Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, A M; Foreman, R J; Gallegos, G F

    2004-12-06

    Residual stress analysis was performed on thick, 1.0 to 25 {micro}m, depleted Uranium (DU) films deposited on an Al substrate by magnetron sputtering. Two distinct characterization techniques were used to measure substrate curvature before and after deposition. Stress evaluation was performed using the Benabdi/Roche equation, which is based on beam theory of a bi-layer material. The residual stress evolution was studied as a function of coating thickness and applied negative bias voltage (0-300V). The stresses developed were always compressive; however, increasing the coating thickness and applying a bias voltage presented a trend towards more tensile stresses and thus an overall reduction of residual stresses.

  3. SEPARATION OF THORIUM FROM URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, R.W.

    1959-09-01

    A description is given for the separation of thorium from uranium by forming an aqueous acidic solution containing ionic species of thorium, uranyl uranium, and hydroxylamine, flowing the solution through a column containing the phenol-formaldehyde type cation exchange resin to selectively adsorb substantially all the thorium values and a portion of the uranium values, flowing a dilute solution of hydrochloric acid through the column to desorb the uranium values, and then flowing a dilute aqueous acidic solution containing an ion, such as bisulfate, which has a complexing effect upon thortum through the column to desorb substantially all of the thorium.

  4. Uranium enrichment activities: the SILVA program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guyot, J.; Cazalet, J.; Camarcat, N.; Figuet, J.

    1994-12-31

    Through its commitment to a nuclear electricity generation policy, France holds today a specific position in the uranium enrichment market thanks to the modern multinational EURODIF gaseous diffusion plant. France has, altogether, a long-term goal in developing SILVA, a laser uranium enrichment process, based on the selective photo-ionization of U-235. After reviewing the fundamentals of SILVA (the laser system with copper vapor lasers and dye lasers and the separator system), a description of the general organization of the R and D program is provided going through basic research, subsystems assessment, production demonstrations and simulations (with the LACAN code), plant design and economics. The general schedule of SILVA is outlined, leading to the possible construction of a commercial plant. 7 figs., 11 refs.

  5. Spallation studies on shock loaded uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, D.L.; Hixson, R.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Vorthman, J.E.; Kelly, A.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissel, W.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Uranium samples at two different purity levels were used for spall strength measurements at three different stress levels. A 50 mm single-stage gas-gun was used to produce planar impact conditions using Z-cut quartz impactors. Samples of depleted uranium were taken from very high purity material and from material that had 300 ppm of carbon added. A pair of shots was done for each impact strength, one member of the pair with VISAR diagnostics and the second with soft recovery for metallographical examination. A series of increasing final stress states were chosen to effectively freeze the microstructural damage at three places in the development to full spall separation. This allowed determination of the dependence of spall mechanisms on stress level and sample purity. This report will discuss both the results of the metallurgical examination of soft recovered samples and the modeling of the free surface VISAR data. The micrographs taken from the recovered samples show brittle cracking as the spallation failure mechanism. Deformation induced twins are plentiful and obviously play a role in the spallation process. The twins are produced in the initial shock loading and, so, are present already before the fracture process begins. The 1 d characteristics code CHARADE has been used to model the free surface VISAR data.

  6. Fabrication of Cerium Oxide and Uranium Oxide Microspheres for Space Nuclear Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey A. Katalenich; Michael R. Hartman; Robert C. O' Brien

    2013-02-01

    Cerium oxide and uranium oxide microspheres are being produced via an internal gelation sol-gel method to investigate alternative fabrication routes for space nuclear fuels. Depleted uranium and non-radioactive cerium are being utilized as surrogates for plutonium-238 (Pu-238) used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators and for enriched uranium required by nuclear thermal rockets. While current methods used to produce Pu-238 fuels at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) involve the generation of fine powders that pose a respiratory hazard and have a propensity to contaminate glove boxes, the sol-gel route allows for the generation of oxide microsphere fuels through an aqueous route. The sol-gel method does not generate fine powders and may require fewer processing steps than the LANL method with less operator handling. High-quality cerium dioxide microspheres have been fabricated in the desired size range and equipment is being prepared to establish a uranium dioxide microsphere production capability.

  7. Trends in exploration and exploration equipment for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raitz, C.H.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium exploration once again is in a ''boom'' cycle. The energy needs of the OPEC and non-OPEC countries alike have created a demand for uranium which appears certain to increase in future years. In turn, this demand has stimulated a dramatic rise in both the price of uranium and the exploration activity necessary to discover new reserves. One immediate reaction to the sudden increase in uranium exploration activity has been the evaluation of old exploration methods and equipment. This paper briefly reviews some of the traditional equipment and techniques which currently are being refined and updated. Undoubtedly this equipment, complemented with good exploration planning and judgment, will continue to be relied upon for many years and will lead to the discovery of many new deposits. The paper also covers in greater detail some of the newer, less conventional techniques and equipment now being introduced for uranium exploration. These new methods may be expected to keep this country in the forefront among the uranium producers of the world.

  8. Efficiency of sepiolite in broilers diet as uranium adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrovic, Branislava M.; Lazarevic-Macanovic, Mirjana; Krstic, Nikola [University of Belgrade, Department of Radiology and Radiation Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Belgrade (Serbia); Jovanovic, Milijan [University of Belgrade, Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Belgrade (Serbia); Janackovic, Djordje [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Belgrade (Serbia); Stojanovic, Mirjana [University of Belgrade, Institute for Technology of Nuclear and Other Mineral Row Materials, Belgrade (Serbia); Mirilovic, Milorad [University of Belgrade, Department of Economics and Statistics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-05-15

    The use of phosphate mineral products in animal nutrition, as a major source of phosphor and calcium, can lead to uranium entering the food chain. The aim of the present study was to determine the protective effect of natural sepiolite and sepiolite treated with acid for broilers after oral intake of uranium. The broilers were contaminated for 7 days with 25 mg/uranyl nitrate per day. Two different adsorbents (natural sepiolite and sepiolite treated with acid) were given via gastric tube immediately after the oral administration of uranium. Natural sepiolite reduced uranium distribution by 57 % in kidney, 80 % in liver, 42 % in brain, and 56 % in muscle. A lower protective effect was observed after the administration of sepiolite treated with acid, resulting in significant damage of intestinal villi in the form of shortening, fragmentation, and necrosis, and histopathological lesions on kidney in the form of edema and abruption of epithelial cells in tubules. When broilers received only sepiolite treated with acid (no uranyl nitrate), shortening of intestinal villi occurred. Kidney injuries were evident when uranium concentrations in kidney were 0.88 and 1.25 μg/g dry weight. It is concluded that adding of natural sepiolite to the diets of broilers can reduce uranium distribution in organs by significant amount without adverse side effects. (orig.)

  9. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435( R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t ( t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275( R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t ( t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  10. Nuclear forensic analysis of uranium oxide powders interdicted in Victoria, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristo, Michael Joseph [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Keegan, Elizabeth; Colella, Michael [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Kirrawee, NSW (Australia); and others

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear forensic analysis was conducted on two uranium samples confiscated during a police investigation in Victoria, Australia. The first sample, designated NSR-F-270409-1, was a depleted uranium powder of moderate purity (∝ 1000 μg/g total elemental impurities). The chemical form of the uranium was a compound similar to K{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}O{sub 4} . 4H{sub 2}O. While aliquoting NSR-F-270409-1 for analysis, the body and head of a Tineid moth was discovered in the sample. The second sample, designated NSR-F-270409-2, was also a depleted uranium powder. It was of reasonably high purity (∝ 380 μg/g total elemental impurities). The chemical form of the uranium was primarily UO{sub 3} . 2H{sub 2}O, with minor phases of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and UO{sub 2}. While aliquoting NSR-F-270409-2 for analysis, a metal staple of unknown origin was discovered in the sample. The presence of {sup 236}U and {sup 232}U in both samples indicates that the uranium feed stocks for these samples experienced a neutron flux at some point in their history. The reactor burn-up calculated from the isotopic composition of the uranium is consistent with that of spent fuel from natural uranium (NU) fueled Pu production. These nuclear forensic conclusions allow us to categorically exclude Australia as the origin of the material and greatly reduce the number of candidate sources.

  11. Analysis of the Reuse of Uranium Recovered from the Reprocessing of Commercial LWR Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [ORNL; Trowbridge, Lee D [ORNL; Renier, John-Paul [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Williams, Kent Alan [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL

    2009-02-01

    This report provides an analysis of the factors involved in the reuse of uranium recovered from commercial light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuels (1) by reenrichment and recycling as fuel to LWRs and/or (2) by recycling directly as fuel to heavy-water-reactors (HWRs), such as the CANDU (registered trade name for the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor). Reuse is an attractive alternative to the current Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) baseline plan, which stores the reprocessed uranium (RU) for an uncertain future or attempts to dispose of it as 'greater-than-Class C' waste. Considering that the open fuel cycle currently deployed in the United States already creates a huge excess quantity of depleted uranium, the closed fuel cycle should enable the recycle of the major components of spent fuel, such as the uranium and the hazardous, long-lived transuranic (TRU) actinides, as well as the managed disposal of fission product wastes. Compared with the GNEP baseline scenario, the reuse of RU in the uranium fuel cycle has a number of potential advantages: (1) avoidance of purchase costs of 11-20% of the natural uranium feed; (2) avoidance of disposal costs for a large majority of the volume of spent fuel that is reprocessed; (3) avoidance of disposal costs for a portion of the depleted uranium from the enrichment step; (4) depending on the {sup 235}U assay of the RU, possible avoidance of separative work costs; and (5) a significant increase in the production of {sup 238}Pu due to the presence of {sup 236}U, which benefits somewhat the transmutation value of the plutonium and also provides some proliferation resistance.

  12. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content; Alliages uranium-aluminium a faible teneur en aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabane, G.; Englander, M.; Lehmann, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    Uranium, as obtained after spinning in phase {gamma}, presents an heterogeneous structure with large size grains. The anisotropic structure of the metal leads to an important buckling and surface distortion of the fuel slug which is incompatible with its tubular cladding for nuclear fuel uses. Different treatments have been made to obtain an isotropic structure presenting high thermal stability (laminating, hammering and spinning in phase {alpha}) without success. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content present important advantage in respect of non allied uranium. The introduction of aluminium in the form of intermetallic compound (UAl{sub 2}) gives a better resistance to thermal fatigue. Alloys obtained from raw casting present an improved buckling and surface distortion in respect of pure uranium. This improvement is obtained with uranium containing between 0,15 and 0,5 % of aluminium. An even more improvement in thermal stability is obtained by thermal treatments of these alloys. These new characteristics are explained by the fine dispersion of the UAl{sub 2} particles in uranium. The results after treatments obtained from an alloy slug containing 0,4 % of aluminium show no buckling or surface distortion and no elongation. (M.P.)

  13. Uranium in soils and water; Uran in Boden und Wasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dienemann, Claudia; Utermann, Jens

    2012-07-15

    The report of the Umweltbundesamt (Federal Environmental Agency) on uranium in soils and water covers the following chapters: (1) Introduction. (2) Deposits and properties: Use of uranium; toxic effects on human beings, uranium in ground water and drinking water, uranium in surface waters, uranium in soils, uranium in the air. (3) Legal regulations. (4) Uranium deposits, uranium mining, polluted area recultivation. (5) Diffuse uranium entry in soils and water: uranium insertion due to fertilizers, uranium insertion due to atmospheric precipitation, uranium insertion from the air. (6) Diffuse uranium release from soils and transfer in to the food chain. (7) Conclusions and recommendations.

  14. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  15. Optimization of uranium use in light water reactors; Optimisation de l'utilisation des ressources dans les reacteurs a eau legere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greneche, D.; Lecomte, M. [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA 92 - Paris La Defense (France)

    2010-07-01

    Light water reactors are expected to produce most part of nuclear power for this century before giving way to breeder reactors so uranium resources have to be dealt with diligently. 5 ways to minimize the consumption of uranium in the fuel cycle are considered: 1) the optimization of the enrichment in order to reduce uranium tails; 2) a better use of uranium in the reactor through either higher burnups or a reduction of sterile neutron captures; 3) to get a better LWR's thermodynamical yield; 4) to improve plutonium and uranium recycling; 5) to use the stocks of existing fissile materials like depleted uranium, spent fuels, military plutonium; and 6) the development of the thorium cycle as a complement. (A.C.)

  16. Behavior of uranium under conditions of interaction of rocks and ores with subsurface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omel'Yanenko, B. I.; Petrov, V. A.; Poluektov, V. V.

    2007-10-01

    increases by orders of magnitude and subsurface water is commonly undersaturated with uranium. Uranium absorbed by secondary minerals, particularly by iron hydroxides and leucoxene, is its single stable species under oxidizing conditions. The impact of oxygen-bearing water leads to destruction of uranium ore. This process is realized simultaneously at different hypsometric levels even if the permeability of the medium is variable in both the lateral and vertical directions. As a result, intervals containing uranyl minerals and relics of primary uranium ore are combined in ore-bearing zones with intervals of completely dissolved uranium minerals. A wide halo of elevated uranium contents caused by sorption is always retained at the location of uranium ore entirely destroyed by weathering. Uranium ore commonly finds itself in the aeration zone due to technogenic subsidence of the groundwater table caused by open-pit mining or pumping out of water from underground mines. The capillary and film waters that interact with rocks and ores in this zone are supplemented by free water filtering along fractures when rain falls or snow is thawing. The interaction of uranium ore with capillary water results in oxidation of uraninite, accompanied by loosening of the mineral surface, formation of microfractures, and an increase in solubility with enrichment of capillary water in uranium up to 10-4 mol/l. Secondary U(VI) minerals, first of all, uranyl hydroxides and silicates, replace uraninite, and uranium undergoes local diffusion redistribution with its sorption by secondary minerals of host rocks. The influx of free water facilitates the complete dissolution of primary and secondary uranium minerals, the removal of uranium at the sites of groundwater discharge, and its redeposition under reducing conditions at a greater depth. It is evident that the conditions of the upper hydrodynamic zone and the aeration zone are unfit for long-term insulation of SNF and high-level wastes because

  17. Depleted zinc: Properties, application, production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, V D; Pavlov, A V; Okhotina, I A

    2009-01-01

    The addition of ZnO, depleted in the Zn-64 isotope, to the water of boiling water nuclear reactors lessens the accumulation of Co-60 on the reactor interior surfaces, reduces radioactive wastes and increases the reactor service-life because of the inhibitory action of zinc on inter-granular stress corrosion cracking. To the same effect depleted zinc in the form of acetate dihydrate is used in pressurized water reactors. Gas centrifuge isotope separation method is applied for production of depleted zinc on the industrial scale. More than 20 years of depleted zinc application history demonstrates its benefits for reduction of NPP personnel radiation exposure and combating construction materials corrosion.

  18. Manhattan Project Technical Series: The Chemistry of Uranium (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitch, E. I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Katz, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1947-03-10

    This constitutes Chapters 11 through 16, inclusive, of the Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Uranium Oxides, Sulfides, Selenides, and Tellurides; The Non-Volatile Fluorides of Uranium; Uranium Hexafluoride; Uranium-Chlorine Compounds; Bromides, Iodides, and Pseudo-Halides of Uranium; and Oxyhalides of Uranium.

  19. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N{sup 15} gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work.

  20. Chemical and radiological effects of chronic ingestion of uranium in the rat brain: biochemical impairment of dopaminergic, serotonergic and cholinergic neuro-transmissions; Effets chimique et radiologique d'une ingestion chronique d'uranium sur le cerveau du rat. Effets sur les neurotransmissions dopaminergique, serotoninergique et cholinergique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussy, C

    2005-09-15

    Uranium is an environmental ubiquitous metal-trace element. It has both chemical and radiological toxicity. After chronic ingestion, uranium can distribute in any part of the body and accumulate in the brain. The aims of this study was 1) to determine and estimate the effects of uranium on dopaminergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems and 2) to measure the uranium amount in the brain, after chronic exposure by ingestion of depleted (D.U.) or enriched (E.U.) uranium during 1.5 to 18 months at 40 mg.L{sup -1} (40 ppm) in different rat brain areas. At any time of exposure, the results show that both the neurotransmission alterations and the uranium brain accumulation were moderate, area specific, time-evolutive and depended on uranium specific activity. After D.U. exposure, monoamine perturbations are chronic and progressive. On the contrary, monoamine alterations occurred only after long term of E.U. exposure. These mono-aminergic modifications are not always dependent on uranium accumulation in brain areas. Moreover, although the cholinergic system was not affected at both 1.5 and 9 months of D.U. exposure, the alteration of ChE activity after E.U. exposure are both dependent on uranium accumulation in brain areas and on uranium specific activity. After E.U. exposure, cholinergic modification and uranium accumulation in hippocampus could partially explain the short-term memory disturbances which have been previously reported. (author)

  1. Retention and reduction of uranium on pyrite surface; Retention et reduction de l'uranium a la surface de la pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eglizaud, N

    2006-12-15

    In the hypothesis of a storage of the spent fuel in a deep geological formation, understanding the uranium dispersion in the environment is important. Pyrite is a reducing mineral present in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, the geological formation actually studied for such a storage. However, pyrite impact on uranium migration has already been poorly studied. The aim of the study was to understand the mechanisms of uranium(VI) retention and reduction on the pyrite surface (FeS{sub 2}). Solution chemistry was therefore coupled with solid spectroscopic studies (XPS and Raman spectroscopy). All uranium-pyrite interactions experiments were performed under an anoxic atmosphere, in a glove box. Pyrite dissolution under anoxic conditions releases sulfoxy-anions and iron(II), which can then be adsorbed on the pyrite surface. This adsorption was confirmed by interaction experiments using iron(II) isotopic dilution. Uranium(VI) is retained by an exchange reaction with iron(II) adsorbed on sulphur sites, with a maximal amount of sorbed uranium at pH {>=} 5.5. Cobalt(II) and europium(III) are also adsorbed on the pyrite surface above pH 5.5 confirming then that reduction is not required for species to adsorb on pyrite. When the concentration of uranium retained is lower than 4 x 10{sup -9} mol g{sup -1}, an oxidation-reduction reaction leads to the formation of a uranium (VI) (IV) mixed oxide and to solid sulphur (d.o. {>=} -I). During this reaction, iron remains mostly at the +II oxidation degree. The reaction products seem to passivate the pyrite surface: at higher amounts of retained uranium, the oxidation-reduction reaction is no longer observed. The surface is saturated by the retention of (3.4 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} of uranium(VI). Modelling of uranium sorption at high surface coverage ({>=} 4 x 10{sup -9} mol g{sup -1}) by the Langmuir model yields an adsorption constant of 8 x 10{sup 7} L mol{sup -1}. Finally, a great excess of uranium(VI) above the

  2. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium enrichment means the process...

  3. OXYGEN ISOTOPE FRACTION ATION IN URANIUM OXIDES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑永飞

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic oxygen isotope factors for uranium oxides have been calculated by means of the modified increment method.The sequence of 18O-enrichment in the uranium oxides with respect to the common rock-forming minerals is predicted as follows:spineluranium blacks≤coffiniteuranium oxides and water and between the uranium oxides and the other minerals have been obtained for 0-1200℃.The theoretical results are applicable to the isotopic geothermometry of uranium ores when pairing with other gangue minerals in hydrothermal uranium deposits.

  4. PURIFICATION OF URANIUM FROM URANIUM/MOLYBDENUM ALLOY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, R; Ann Visser, A; James Laurinat, J

    2007-10-15

    The Savannah River Site will recycle a nuclear fuel comprised of 90% uranium-10% molybdenum by weight. The process flowsheet calls for dissolution of the material in nitric acid to a uranium concentration of 15-20 g/L without the formation of precipitates. The dissolution will be followed by separation of uranium from molybdenum using solvent extraction with 7.5% tributylphosphate in n-paraffin. Testing with the fuel validated dissolution and solubility data reported in the literature. Batch distribution coefficient measurements were performed for the extraction, strip and wash stages with particular focus on the distribution of molybdenum.

  5. Ego depletion impairs implicit learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kelsey R; Sanchez, Daniel J; Wesley, Abigail H; Reber, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing) can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent.

  6. Depletable resources and the economy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijman, W.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the depletion of scarce resources. The main question to be answered is how to avoid future resource crises. After dealing with the complex relation between nature and economics, three important concepts in relation with resource depletion are discussed: steady state, ti

  7. A study of uranium uptake in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, A.; Singh, Surinder; Virk, H.S. (Guru Nanak Dev Univ., Amritsar (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1988-01-01

    A fission track technique has been used to study the uptake of uranium in Tomato Plant. Lexan plastic has been employed as the external detector for recording induced fission tracks due to uranium. The uranium uptake rate is found to increase as the growth proceeds. The uranium concentration is also determined in Phlox, Calendula and Dog Flower, grown under normal conditions. The uranium content is found to vary in different parts of the plants. (author).

  8. Uranium arc fission reactor for space propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Maya, Isaac; Vitali, Juan; Appelbaum, Jacob; Schneider, Richard T.

    1991-01-01

    Combining the proven technology of solid core reactors with uranium arc confinement and non-equilibrium ionization by fission fragments can lead to an attractive propulsion system which has a higher specific impulse than a solid core propulsion system and higher thrust than an electric propulsion systems. A preliminary study indicates that a system with 300 MW of fission power can achieve a gas exhaust velocity of 18,000 m/sec and a thrust of 10,000 Newtons utilizing a magnetohydrodynamic generator and accelerator. An experimental program is underway to examine the major mass and energy transfer issues.

  9. SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, N.N.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for separating uranium from thorium wherein the ratio of thorium to uranium is between 100 to 10,000. According to the invention the thoriumuranium mixture is dissolved in nitric acid, and the solution is prepared so as to obtain the desired concentration within a critical range of from 4 to 8 N with regard to the total nitrate due to thorium nitrate, with or without nitric acid or any nitrate salting out agent. The solution is then contacted with an ether, such as diethyl ether, whereby uranium is extracted into ihe organic phase while thorium remains in the aqueous phase.

  10. Pyrophoric behaviour of uranium hydride and uranium powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guyadec, F., E-mail: fabienne.leguyadec@cea.f [CEA Marcoule DEN/DTEC/SDTC, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze, BP 17171 (France); Genin, X.; Bayle, J.P. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DTEC/SDTC, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze, BP 17171 (France); Dugne, O. [DEN/DTEC/SGCS, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze, BP 17171 (France); Duhart-Barone, A.; Ablitzer, C. [CEA Cadarache DEN/DEC/SPUA, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France)

    2010-01-31

    Thermal stability and spontaneous ignition conditions of uranium hydride and uranium metal fine powders have been studied and observed in an original and dedicated experimental device placed inside a glove box under flowing pure argon. Pure uranium hydride powder with low amount of oxide (<0.5 wt.%) was obtained by heat treatment at low temperature in flowing Ar/5%H{sub 2}. Pure uranium powder was obtained by dehydration in flowing pure argon. Those fine powders showed spontaneous ignition at room temperature in air. An in situ CCD-camera displayed ignition associated with powder temperature measurement. Characterization of powders before and after ignition was performed by XRD measurements and SEM observations. Oxidation mechanisms are proposed.

  11. Uranium isotope separation from 1941 to the present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier-Komor, Peter, E-mail: Peter@Maier-Komor.d [Retired from Physik-Department E12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2010-02-11

    Uranium isotope separation was the key development for the preparation of highly enriched isotopes in general and thus became the seed for target development and preparation for nuclear and applied physics. In 1941 (year of birth of the author) large-scale development for uranium isotope separation was started after the US authorities were warned that NAZI Germany had started its program for enrichment of uranium and might have confiscated all uranium and uranium mines in their sphere of influence. Within the framework of the Manhattan Projects the first electromagnetic mass separators (Calutrons) were installed and further developed for high throughput. The military aim of the Navy Department was to develop nuclear propulsion for submarines with practically unlimited range. Parallel to this the army worked on the development of the atomic bomb. Also in 1941 plutonium was discovered and the production of {sup 239}Pu was included into the atomic bomb program. {sup 235}U enrichment starting with natural uranium was performed in two steps with different techniques of mass separation in Oak Ridge. The first step was gas diffusion which was limited to low enrichment. The second step for high enrichment was performed with electromagnetic mass spectrometers (Calutrons). The theory for the much more effective enrichment with centrifugal separation was developed also during the Second World War, but technical problems e.g. development of high speed ball and needle bearings could not be solved before the end of the war. Spying accelerated the development of uranium separation in the Soviet Union, but also later in China, India, Pakistan, Iran and Iraq. In this paper, the physical and chemical procedures are outlined which lead to the success of the project. Some security aspects and Non-Proliferation measures are discussed.

  12. Uranium isotope separation from 1941 to the present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier-Komor, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Uranium isotope separation was the key development for the preparation of highly enriched isotopes in general and thus became the seed for target development and preparation for nuclear and applied physics. In 1941 (year of birth of the author) large-scale development for uranium isotope separation was started after the US authorities were warned that NAZI Germany had started its program for enrichment of uranium and might have confiscated all uranium and uranium mines in their sphere of influence. Within the framework of the Manhattan Projects the first electromagnetic mass separators (Calutrons) were installed and further developed for high throughput. The military aim of the Navy Department was to develop nuclear propulsion for submarines with practically unlimited range. Parallel to this the army worked on the development of the atomic bomb. Also in 1941 plutonium was discovered and the production of 239Pu was included into the atomic bomb program. 235U enrichment starting with natural uranium was performed in two steps with different techniques of mass separation in Oak Ridge. The first step was gas diffusion which was limited to low enrichment. The second step for high enrichment was performed with electromagnetic mass spectrometers (Calutrons). The theory for the much more effective enrichment with centrifugal separation was developed also during the Second World War, but technical problems e.g. development of high speed ball and needle bearings could not be solved before the end of the war. Spying accelerated the development of uranium separation in the Soviet Union, but also later in China, India, Pakistan, Iran and Iraq. In this paper, the physical and chemical procedures are outlined which lead to the success of the project. Some security aspects and Non-Proliferation measures are discussed.

  13. Testing fully depleted CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ricard; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Jorge; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The focal plane of the PAU camera is composed of eighteen 2K x 4K CCDs. These devices, plus four spares, were provided by the Japanese company Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. with type no. S10892-04(X). These detectors are 200 μm thick fully depleted and back illuminated with an n-type silicon base. They have been built with a specific coating to be sensitive in the range from 300 to 1,100 nm. Their square pixel size is 15 μm. The read-out system consists of a Monsoon controller (NOAO) and the panVIEW software package. The deafualt CCD read-out speed is 133 kpixel/s. This is the value used in the calibration process. Before installing these devices in the camera focal plane, they were characterized using the facilities of the ICE (CSIC- IEEC) and IFAE in the UAB Campus in Bellaterra (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain). The basic tests performed for all CCDs were to obtain the photon transfer curve (PTC), the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) using X-rays and the EPER method, linearity, read-out noise, dark current, persistence, cosmetics and quantum efficiency. The X-rays images were also used for the analysis of the charge diffusion for different substrate voltages (VSUB). Regarding the cosmetics, and in addition to white and dark pixels, some patterns were also found. The first one, which appears in all devices, is the presence of half circles in the external edges. The origin of this pattern can be related to the assembly process. A second one appears in the dark images, and shows bright arcs connecting corners along the vertical axis of the CCD. This feature appears in all CCDs exactly in the same position so our guess is that the pattern is due to electrical fields. Finally, and just in two devices, there is a spot with wavelength dependence whose origin could be the result of a defectous coating process.

  14. Uranium hexafluoride bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of reports written about the transportation, handling, safety, and processing of uranium hexafluoride. An on-line literature search was executed using the DOE Energy files and the Nuclear Science Abstracts file to identify pertinent reports. The DOE Energy files contain unclassified information that is processed at the Office of Scientific and Technical Information of the US Department of Energy. The reports selected from these files were published between 1974 and 1983. Nuclear Science Abstracts contains unclassified international nuclear science and technology literature published from 1948 to 1976. In addition, scientific and technical reports published by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Energy Research and Development Administration, as well as those published by other agencies, universities, and industrial and research organizations, are included in the Nuclear Science Abstracts file. An alphabetical listing of the acronyms used to denote the corporate sponsors follows the bibliography.

  15. Yalina booster subcritical assembly performance with low enriched uranium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry, E-mail: alby@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The YALINA Booster facility is a subcritical assembly located in Minsk, Belarus. The facility has special features that result in fast and thermal neutron spectra in different zones. The fast zone of the assembly uses a lead matrix and uranium fuels with different enrichments: 90% and 36%, 36%, or 21%. The thermal zone of the assembly contains 10% enriched uranium fuel in a polyethylene matrix. This study discusses the performance of the three YALINA Booster configurations with the different fuel enrichments. In order to maintain the same subcriticality level in the three configurations, the number of fuel rods in the thermal zone is increased as the uranium fuel enrichment in the fast zone is decreased. The maximum number of fuel rods that can be loaded in the thermal zone is about 1185. Consequently, the neutron multiplication of the configuration with 21% enriched uranium fuel in the fast zone is enhanced by changing the position of the boron carbide and the natural uranium absorber rods, located between the fast and the thermal zones, to form an annular rather than a square arrangement. (author)

  16. Calixarene-entrapped nanoemulsion for uranium extraction from contaminated solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnul, Aurélie; Bouvier-Capely, Céline; Phan, Guillaume; Rebière, François; Fattal, Elias

    2010-03-01

    Accidental cutaneous contamination by actinides such as uranium occurring to nuclear power plant workers can lead to their dissemination in other tissues and induce severe damages. Until now, no specific emergency treatment for such contamination has been developed. The aim of the present work was to formulate a tricarboxylic calix[6]arene molecule, known to exhibit good affinity and selectivity for complexing uranium, within a topical delivery system for the treatment of skin contamination. Since calixarene was shown to reduce oil/water interfacial tension, we have designed an oil-in-water nanoemulsion, taking advantage of the small droplet size offering a high contact surface with the contaminated aqueous medium. Characterization of the calixarene nanoemulsion was performed by determination of the oily droplet size, zeta potential and pH, measured as a function of the calixarene concentration. The obtained results have confirmed the surface localization of calixarene molecules being potentially available to extract uranyl ions from an aqueous contaminated solution. In a preliminary experiments, the calixarene nanoemulsion was used for the removal of free uranium from an aqueous contaminated solution. Results showed that the calixarene nanoemulsion extracted up to 80 +/- 5% of uranium, which demonstrates the potential interest of this delivery system for uranium skin decontamination.

  17. Pilot plant operation of the Uranium Chip Oxidation Facility at the Y-12 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Y.C.

    1987-01-16

    Due to changing environmental regulations, the current practice of depleted uranium chip (machine turning) disposal via shallow land burial has become environmentally objectionable. The chips are pyrophoric and oxidize rapidly when exposed to air; therefore, long-term storage of the uranium chips presents a major fire hazard. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Development Division was contacted to devise a disposal method that would eliminate chip burial and minimize storage space requirements. The proposed method of accomplishing this task was oxidizing the uranium chips to uranium oxide (U/sub 3/O/sub 8/) under controlled conditions. Pilot plant operation of the Uranium Chip Oxidation Facility (UCOF) was initiated on May 20, 1985, by the Y-12 Development Division. The purpose of this initial development testing was to evaluate the equipment, determine operating parameters, and provide on-the-job training for Waste Treatment Operations (WTO) personnel. Startup of the UCOF began with the check-out of the equipment using only the No. 1 oxidizer. Following the verification stage, the oxidizer was loaded with an initial charge of cold uranium oxide (U/sub 3/O/sub 8/) in preparation for test burning. Results of the test are given.

  18. The development of uranium foil farication technology utilizing twin roll method for Mo-99 irradiation target

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, C K; Park, H D

    2002-01-01

    MDS Nordion in Canada, occupying about 75% of global supply of Mo-99 isotope, has provided the irradiation target of Mo-99 using the rod-type UAl sub x alloys with HEU(High Enrichment Uranium). ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) through co-operation with BATAN in Indonesia, leading RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) program substantially for nuclear non-proliferation, has designed and fabricated the annular cylinder of uranium targets, and successfully performed irradiation test, in order to develop the fabrication technology of fission Mo-99 using LEU(Low Enrichment Uranium). As the uranium foils could be fabricated in laboratory scale, not in commercialized scale by hot rolling method due to significant problems in foil quality, productivity and economic efficiency, attention has shifted to the development of new technology. Under these circumstances, the invention of uranium foil fabrication technology utilizing twin-roll casting method in KAERI is found to be able to fabricate LEU or...

  19. Power distributions in fresh and depleted LEU and HEU cores of the MITR reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, E.H.; Horelik, N.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Newton, T.H., Jr.; Hu, L.; Stevens, J.G. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (2MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory and Nuclear Science and Engineering Department)

    2012-04-04

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Toward this goal, core geometry and power distributions are presented. Distributions of power are calculated for LEU cores depleted with MCODE using an MCNP5 Monte Carlo model. The MCNP5 HEU and LEU MITR models were previously compared to experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. This same model was used with a finer spatial depletion in order to generate power distributions for the LEU cores. The objective of this work is to generate and characterize a series of fresh and depleted core peak power distributions, and provide a thermal hydraulic evaluation of the geometry which should be considered for subsequent thermal hydraulic safety analyses.

  20. Uranium mining operations in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, J.-M.; Arnaiz, J.; Criado, M.; Lopez, A.

    1995-12-31

    The Empresa Nacional del Uranio, SA (ENUSA) was founded in 1972 to undertake and develop the industrial and procurement activities of the nuclear fuel cycle in Spain. Within the organisation of ENUSA, the Uranium Division is directly responsible for the uranium mining and production operations that have been carried out since 1973 in the area of Ciudad Rodrigo in the province of Salamanca. These activities are based on open pit mining, heap leaching and a hydrometallurgical plant (Elefante) for extracting uranium concentrates from the ore. This plant was shut down in 1993 and a new plant was started up on the same site (Quercus) with a dynamic leaching process. The nominal capacity of the new plant is 950 t U{sub 3}O{sub 8} per year. Because of the historically low uranium prices which have recently prevailed, the plant is currently running at a strategic production rate of 300 t U{sub 3}O{sub 8} per year. From 1981 to 1990, in the area of La Haba (Badajoz province), ENUSA also operated a uranium production site, based on open pit mining, and an experimental extraction plant (Lobo-G). ENUSA is currently decommissioning these installations. This paper describes innovations and improvements that ENUSA has recently introduced in the field of uranium concentrates production with a view to cutting production costs, and to improving the decommissioning and site restoration processes in those sites where production is being shut down or resources have been worked out. (author).

  1. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Benesova, Dagmar [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Environment Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Dvorakova, Marcela [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vanek, Tomas, E-mail: vanek@ueb.cas.cz [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2011-06-15

    Hydroponicaly cultivated plants were grown on medium containing uranium. The appropriate concentrations of uranium for the experiments were selected on the basis of a standard ecotoxicity test. The most sensitive plant species was determined to be Lactuca sativa with an EC{sub 50} value about 0.1 mM. Cucumis sativa represented the most resistant plant to uranium (EC{sub 50} = 0.71 mM). Therefore, we used the uranium in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 mM. Twenty different plant species were tested in hydroponic solution supplemented by 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM uranium concentration. The uranium accumulation of these plants varied from 0.16 mg/g DW to 0.011 mg/g DW. The highest uranium uptake was determined for Zea mays and the lowest for Arabidopsis thaliana. The amount of accumulated uranium was strongly influenced by uranium concentration in the cultivation medium. Autoradiography showed that uranium is mainly localized in the root system of the plants tested. Additional experiments demonstrated the possibility of influencing the uranium uptake from the cultivation medium by amendments. Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba up to 2.8 times or 1.9 times, respectively. Phosphate deficiency increased uranium uptake up to 4.5 times or 3.9 times, respectively, by Brassica oleracea and S. alba. In the case of deficiency of iron or presence of cadmium ions we did not find any increase in uranium accumulation. - Highlights: > The uranium accumulation in twenty different plant species varied from 0.160 to 0.011 mg/g DW. > Uranium is mainly localized in the root system. > Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba. > The phosphates deficiency increase the uranium uptake.

  2. Syk Inhibition with Fostamatinib Leads to Transitional B Lymphocyte Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Paul M.; Wei, Chungwen; Roger, James; Schaefer-Cutillo, Julia; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Jung, John; Sanz, Iñaki; Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Cell signaling initiated by the B cell receptor is critical to normal development of B lymphocytes, most notably at the transitional B cell stage. Inhibition of this signaling pathway with the syk inhibitor, fostamatinib, has produced significant efficacy in lymphoid malignancies and autoimmune conditions. Here, we demonstrate that short-term use of fostamatinib impairs B lymphocyte development at the transitional stage without affecting mature B cell populations. Additionally, IL-10 producing B cells remained relatively constant throughout the treatment period. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of action of B cell receptor inhibition in autoimmune disease. As the development of agents targeting B cell receptor signaling proceeds, monitoring for long-term consequences as well as functional evaluation of B cell subsets may further improve our understanding of this rapidly growing class of novel agents. PMID:22284392

  3. Contribution to the geochemical knowledge of the uranium-radium and thorium families in the southern Vosges. Applications of some results in the prospecting of uranium deposits; Contribution a la connaissance geochimique des familles uranium-radium et du thorium dans les Vosges meridionales. Application de certains resultats en prospection des gisements d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurain, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    This work's aim is to lead to a more accurate knowledge of the geochemistry of the Uranium-Radium and Thorium families in the Southern Vosges and to apply some of the results to the prospecting of uraniferous deposits: It has been showed: a bond between Calcium-Magnesium and Uranium-Thorium in the calco-alkaline granites. The host minerals of Uranium and Thorium are hornblende, biotite, titanite and epidote. a concentration of Uranium, at present time with secular disequilibrium in a thermal zone where the satellite mineralizations form an epithermal paragenesis. a disequilibrium of the Uranium-Radium family in the supergene minerals of the lead (phosphate and vanadate) showing the present circulations of Uranium. a bond between the radon grade of the spring waters and Uranium-Radium of the rocks. Such a relation allow to realize a prospecting method based on the determination of radioactive gases from the cold spring-waters of a common country. (author) [French] L'etude presentee ici a pour but de conduire a une connaissance plus precise de la geochimie des familles Uranium-Radium et Thorium dans les Vosges meridionales et d'appliquer certains resultats a la prospection des gites uraniferes. Il a ete mis en evidence: une liaison Calcium-Magnesium et Uranium-Thorium dans des granites calco-alcalins. Les mineraux hotes de l'Uranium et du Thorium sont: la hornblende, la biotite, le sphene, l'epidote. une concentration actuelle de l'Uranium en desequilibre seculaire dans une zone thermale ou les mineralisations satellites constituent une paragenese epithermale. un desequilibre de la famille Uranium-Radium dans des mineraux supergenes du plomb (phosphates et vanadates) prouvant les circulations actuelles de l'Uranium. une liaison entre la teneur en Radon des eaux de sources et celle en Uranium-Radium des roches. Une telle liaison permet de realiser une methode de prospection fondee sur le dosage du gaz radioactif des eaux de sources

  4. Microbial accumulation of uranium, radium, and cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; North, S.E.

    1981-05-01

    Diverse microbial species varied considerably in their ability to accumulate uranium, cesium, and radium. Mechanistic differences in uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were indicated. S. serevisiae exhibited a slow (hours) surface accumulation of uranium which was subject to environmental factors, while P. aeruginosa accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense intracellular deposits and did not appear to be affected by environmental parameters. Metabolism was not required for uranium uptake by either organism. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several species tested.

  5. "When the going gets tough, who keeps going?" Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Stefanie J; Adriaanse, Marieke A; De Vet, Emely; Fennis, Bob M; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In three studies, we assessed individual differences in depletion sensitivity, and demonstrate that depletion sensitivity moderates ego-depletion effects. The Depletion Sensitivity Scale (DSS) was employed to assess depletion sensitivity. Study 1 employs the DSS to demonstrate that individual differences in sensitivity to ego-depletion exist. Study 2 shows moderate correlations of depletion sensitivity with related self-control concepts, indicating that these scales measure conceptually distinct constructs. Study 3 demonstrates that depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect. Specifically, participants who are sensitive to depletion performed worse on a second self-control task, indicating a stronger ego-depletion effect, compared to participants less sensitive to depletion.

  6. Preliminary developments of MTR plates with uranium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, J.P.; Laudamy, P. [CERCA, Romans (France); Richter, K. [Institut fuer Transurane, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    In the opinion of CERCA, the total weight of Uranium per MTR plate (without changing the external dimensions) cannot be further increased using U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. Limits have been reached on plates with a thicker meat or loaded to 6g Ut/cm{sup 3}. The use of a denser fuel like Uranium mononitride could permit an increase in these limits. A collaboration between the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, and CERCA has been set ut. The preliminary studies at the ITU to check compatibility between aluminium and UN proved that there are no metallurgical interactions below 500{degrees}C. Feasibility of the manufacturing, on a laboratory scale at CERCA, of depleted Uranium mononitride plates loaded to 7 g Ut/cm{sup 3} has been demonstrated. The manufacturing process, however, is only one aspect of the development of a new fuel. The experience gained in the case of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} has shown that the development of a new fuel requires considerable time and financial investment. Such a development certainly represents an effort of about 10 years.

  7. First principle active neutron coincidence counting measurements of uranium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is present in most nuclear fuel cycle facilities ranging from uranium mines, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear reactors, and reprocessing plants. The isotopic, chemical, and geometric composition of uranium can vary significantly between these facilities, depending on the application and type of facility. Examples of this variation are: enrichments varying from depleted (~0.2 wt% 235U) to high enriched (>20 wt% 235U); compositions consisting of U3O8, UO2, UF6, metallic, and ceramic forms; geometries ranging from plates, cans, and rods; and masses which can range from a 500 kg fuel assembly down to a few grams fuel pellet. Since 235U is a fissile material, it is routinely safeguarded in these facilities. Current techniques for quantifying the 235U mass in a sample include neutron coincidence counting. One of the main disadvantages of this technique is that it requires a known standard of representative geometry and composition for calibration, which opens up a pathway for potential erroneous declarations by the State and reduces the effectiveness of safeguards. In order to address this weakness, the authors have developed a neutron coincidence counting technique which uses the first principle point-model developed by Boehnel instead of the "known standard" method. This technique was primarily tested through simulations of 1000 g U3O8 samples using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The results of these simulations showed good agreement between the simulated and exact 235U sample masses.

  8. Use of the reference organism Eisenia foetida to investigate bioaccumulation and biological effects following contamination of soil by uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovanetti, A.; Cozzella, M.L.; Basso, E. [ENEA, Institute of Radiation Protection, CR Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301 00060, Rome (Italy); Ninova, P. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Molecular Biology, G. Bonchev St. 21, 1130, Sofia (Bulgaria); Fesenko, S.; Sansone, U. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Agency Laboratories Seibersdorf, A -1400, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The use of reference organisms for radiological assessments on non -human species is an integral part of the current systemic approach for the management of radiation effects in the environment. The reference organisms approach allows the evaluation of radiological impact on the environment taking into account relationships among ambient radionuclide activity concentrations, dose and expected adverse biological effects. Four broad categories of biological damages are included: mortality, morbidity, DNA damage and reproductive failure. Earthworms are one of the most important biotic components in the soil, they are commonly used in studies of toxicity and they are included in the list of the reference organisms suggested by International (ICRP) and national organisations. However, up to now, no adequate results have been obtained for earthworms allowing the identification of the dose-response relationship, essentially for the contamination scenarios where radionuclide can provide both radiation and chemical impact. Uranium (U) is a naturally occurring heavy metal. Recently there has been public concern on the presence in the environment of depleted uranium (DU), a by-product of the process used to enrich natural uranium ore for use in nuclear reactors and in nuclear weapons. The presence of uranium in soil could lead to both toxic and radiation impact and it is difficult to distinguish the different impacts and their contribution to possible biological effects. European Union, OECD and FAO have selected the earthworms Eisenia for testing soil toxicity because it is an organism that can be easily cultured in the laboratory, an extensive database is available, and it feeds at the soil surface level. The prime objective of the present study was to evaluate the possible use of Eisenia foetida as a bio-marker of U environmental impact. Four groups of six sexually mature Eisenia foetida were maintained in the dark at 21 deg. C in Petri

  9. REE/trace element characteristics of sandstone-type uranium deposits in the Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Mingxing; YANG Xiaoyong; SUN Wei; MIAO Jianyu; LIU Chiyang

    2006-01-01

    The major elements, trace elements and REEs were analyzed on the samples collected from the sandstone-type uranium deposits in the Ordos Basin to constrain the mechanism of uranium enrichment. The total REE amount ranges from 36.7 to 701.8 μg/g and the REE distribution patterns of the sandstone-type uranium samples are characterized by LREE enrichment and high REE depletion. The results also indicated a high Y abundance and Eu anomalies between 0.77-1.81. High-precision ICP-MS results showed that U abundances are within the range of 0.73-150 μg/g, showing some strong correlation between U enrichment and related elements such as Ti, V, Zr, Mo, and Au. In addition, Th abundance is correlated with ΣREE.

  10. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  11. A Uranium Bioremediation Reactive Transport Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Sengor, Sevinc; Fang, Yilin

    2015-06-01

    A reactive transport benchmark problem set has been developed based on in situ uranium bio-immobilization experiments that have been performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, USA. Acetate-amended groundwater stimulates indigenous microorganisms to catalyze the reduction of U(VI) to a sparingly soluble U(IV) mineral. The interplay between the flow, acetate loading periods and rates, microbially-mediated and geochemical reactions leads to dynamic behavior in metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, pH, alkalinity, and reactive mineral surfaces. The benchmark is based on an 8.5 m long one-dimensional model domain with constant saturated flow and uniform porosity. The 159-day simulation introduces acetate and bromide through the upgradient boundary in 14-day and 85-day pulses separated by a 10 day interruption. Acetate loading is tripled during the second pulse, which is followed by a 50 day recovery period. Terminal electron accepting processes for goethite, phyllosilicate Fe(III), U(VI), and sulfate are modeled using Monod-type rate laws. Major ion geochemistry modeled includes mineral reactions, as well as aqueous and surface complexation reactions for UO2++, Fe++, and H+. In addition to the dynamics imparted by the transport of the acetate pulses, U(VI) behavior involves the interplay between bioreduction, which is dependent on acetate availability, and speciation-controlled surface complexation, which is dependent on pH, alkalinity and available surface complexation sites. The general difficulty of this benchmark is the large number of reactions (74), multiple rate law formulations, a multisite uranium surface complexation model, and the strong interdependency and sensitivity of the reaction processes. Results are presented for three simulators: HYDROGEOCHEM, PHT3D, and PHREEQC.

  12. The economics of uranium 1991. 3. ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The new Roskill report on the economics of uranium, 1991, gives essential facts and figures on five main topics; background, supply and demand; prices and uranium and nuclear activities by country and company. (author).

  13. Uranium Determination by Delayed Neutron Counting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Uranium is a very important resource in nuclear industry, especially in the exploiture of nuclear energy. Determination of uranium using delayed neutron counting (DNC) is simple, non-destructive, and

  14. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  15. Uranium 2007 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2008-01-01

    Based on official information received from 40 countries, Uranium 2007 provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1st January 2007, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2030 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. It finds that with rising demand and declining inventories, uranium prices have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, the uranium industry is undergoing a significant revival, bringing to an end a period of over 20 years of underinvestment.

  16. Characterization of uranium bearing material using x-ray fluorescence and direct gamma-rays measurement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujaini, M., E-mail: madihah@uniten.edu.my; Chankow, N. [Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University Phyathai Rd., Wang Mai, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Yusoff, M. Z.; Hamid, N. A. [College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Uranium ore can be easily detected due to various gamma-ray energies emitted from uranium daughters particularly from {sup 238}U daughters such as {sup 214}Bi, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 226}Ra. After uranium is extracted from uranium ore, only low energy gamma-rays emitted from {sup 235}U may be detected if the detector is placed in close contact to the specimen. In this research, identification and characterization of uranium bearing materials is experimentally investigated using direct measurement of gamma-rays from {sup 235}U in combination with the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. Measurement of gamma-rays can be conducted by using high purity germanium (HPGe) detector or cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector while a {sup 57}Coradioisotope-excited XRF spectrometer using CdTe detector is used for elemental analysis. The proposed technique was tested with various uranium bearing specimens containing natural, depleted and enriched uranium in both metallic and powder forms.

  17. Variations in the uranium isotopic compositions of uranium ores from different types of uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvarova, Yulia A.; Kyser, T. Kurt; Geagea, Majdi Lahd; Chipley, Don

    2014-12-01

    Variations in 238U/235U and 234U/238U ratios were measured in uranium minerals from a spectrum of uranium deposit types, as well as diagenetic phosphates in uranium-rich basins and peraluminous rhyolites and associated autunite mineralisation from Macusani Meseta, Peru. Mean δ238U values of uranium minerals relative to NBL CRM 112-A are 0.02‰ for metasomatic deposits, 0.16‰ for intrusive, 0.18‰ for calcrete, 0.18‰ for volcanic, 0.29‰ for quartz-pebble conglomerate, 0.29‰ for sandstone-hosted, 0.44‰ for unconformity-type, and 0.56‰ for vein, with a total range in δ238U values from -0.30‰ to 1.52‰. Uranium mineralisation associated with igneous systems, including low-temperature calcretes that are sourced from U-rich minerals in igneous systems, have low δ238U values of ca. 0.1‰, near those of their igneous sources, whereas uranium minerals in basin-hosted deposits have higher and more variable values. High-grade unconformity-related deposits have δ238U values around 0.2‰, whereas lower grade unconformity-type deposits in the Athabasca, Kombolgie and Otish basins have higher δ238U values. The δ234U values for most samples are around 0‰, in secular equilibrium, but some samples have δ234U values much lower or higher than 0‰ associated with addition or removal of 234U during the past 2.5 Ma. These δ238U and δ234U values suggest that there are at least two different mechanisms responsible for 238U/235U and 234U/238U variations. The 234U/238U disequilibria ratios indicate recent fluid interaction with the uranium minerals and preferential migration of 234U. Fractionation between 235U and 238U is a result of nuclear-field effects with enrichment of 238U in the reduced insoluble species (mostly UO2) and 235U in oxidised mobile species as uranyl ion, UO22+, and its complexes. Therefore, isotopic fractionation effects should be reflected in 238U/235U ratios in uranium ore minerals formed either by reduction of uranium to UO2 or chemical

  18. Uranium Enrichment Reduction in the PGSFR Core Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chihyung; Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Yonghee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Korea is currently developing the so-called Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR) to investigate and demonstrate the capability of TRU transmutation. However, since fuel recycling technology is still at early development in Korea and also due to lack of experience in burning TRU in a fast reactor, the initial core of PGSFR is loaded with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Several test assemblies containing TRU fuels are supposed to be irradiated and tested for future TRU fuel developments. The uranium enrichment in the LEU PGSFR core is high, about 19.20%, due to large neutron leakage and low conversion ratio. In this paper, the required uranium enrichment is reduced by replacing the reflector material and modifying the reflector geometry in order to decrease the fuel cost of the LEU PGSFR core. PbO is chosen as the reflector material to replace the current HT9 and an inverted reflector assembly is also investigated in this study. It is shown that longer cycle length, higher fuel burnup and flattening power distribution can be achieved with PbO reflector and enhanced neutron leakage can be handled by the optimization of shielding material or core geometry. PbO reflector with inverted geometry is suggest in this research and by using inverted PbO reflector, core performance can be improved while leakage is negligibly enhanced than conventional pin type reflector assembly. Research about reducing the uranium enrichment more by increasing the uranium content in the uranium fuel which is U-10Zr now or increasing the smeared density which is currently 75% can be considered as a future work. Detailed analysis about multi-batch fuel management should be carried out since currently it is done approximately by using linear reactivity theory. Also, analysis for PGSFR with various reflector materials like LME, liquid lead will be carried out and the chemical reaction of those materials including PbO with sodium should be carefully investigated.

  19. Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium by starfish and Pseudomonas putida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jaeyoung [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jchoi@kist.re.kr; Lee, Ju Young; Yang, Jung-Seok [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium from contaminated wastewaters may represent an innovative purification process. This study investigates the removal ability of unit mass of Pseudomonas putida and starfish for lead, cadmium, and uranium by quantifying the adsorption capacity. The adsorption of heavy metals and uranium by the samples was influenced by pH, and increased with increasing Pb, Cd, and U concentrations. Dead cells adsorbed the largest quantity of all heavy metals than live cells and starfish. The adsorption capacity followed the order: U(VI) > Pb > Cd. The results also suggest that bacterial membrane cells can be used successfully in the treatment of high strength metal-contaminated wastewaters.

  20. Metallogenesis of Devonian—Carboniferous Strata—bound Carbonate—type Uranium Deposits in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞玉蕙

    1990-01-01

    This paper deais with the geological conditions.mineralization characteristics,genetic types and space-time distribution of the Devonian-Carboniferous strata-bound carbonate-type uranium deposits in South China.These ore deposits are genetically classified as the leaching type and the leaching-hydrothermal superimposed type,These ore deposits are confined mainly to the strata (D2-3,C1)of platform-lagoon carbonate facies.Unique tectonic settings are a vital factor leading to the formation of these uranium deposits.A metallogenetic model for these uranium deposits has been proposed.

  1. Uranium briquettes for irradiation target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Martins, Ilson Carlos; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: saliba@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Direct irradiation on targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc radioisotopes. Nevertheless, since the imposed limits to use LEU uranium to prevent nuclear armament production, the amount of uranium loaded in target meats has physically increased and new processes have been proposed for production. Routes using metallic uranium thin film and UAl{sub x} dispersion have been used for this purpose. Both routes have their own issues, either by bringing difficulties to disassemble the aluminum case inside hot cells or by generating great amount of alkaline radioactive liquid rejects. A potential route might be the dispersion of powders of LEU metallic uranium and nickel, which are pressed as a blend inside a die and followed by pulse electroplating of nickel. The electroplating provides more strength to the briquettes and creates a barrier for gas evolution during neutronic disintegration of {sup 235}U. A target briquette platted with nickel encapsulated in an aluminum case to be irradiated may be an alternative possibility to replace other proposed targets. This work uses pulse Ni-electroplating over iron powder briquette to simulate the covering of uranium by nickel. The following parameters were applied 10 times for each sample: 900Hz, -0.84A/square centimeters with duty cycle of 0.1 in Watts Bath. It also presented the optical microscopy analysis of plated microstructure section. (author)

  2. Manhattan Project Technical Series The Chemistry of Uranium (I) Chapters 1-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitch, E. I. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Katz, J. J. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1946-09-30

    This constitutes Chapters 1 through 10. inclusive, of The Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Nuclear Properties of Uranium; Properties of the Uranium Atom; Uranium in Nature; Extraction of Uranium from Ores and Preparation of Uranium Metal; Physical Properties of Uranium Metal; Chemical Properties of Uranium Metal; Intermetallic Compounds and Alloy systems of Uranium; the Uranium-Hydrogen System; Uranium Borides, Carbides, and Silicides; Uranium Nitrides, Phosphides, Arsenides, and Antimonides.

  3. The Optimal Depletion of Exhaustible Resource under Different Commitment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Wei; Wu Kangping

    2012-01-01

    There are few papers in the literature focusing on the issue of the optimal depletion of exhaustible resources in the framework of variable time preference. This paper attempts to analyze the pure consumption of exhaustible resource under hy- perbolic time preference, and to discuss the optimal depletion rate and the effect of the protection of the exhaustible resource under different commitment abilities. The results of model show that the case of the hyperbolic discount with the full commitment of the govemment is equivalent to the case of constant discount of the social planner problem. In that case, the optimal depletion rate and the initial consumption of exhaustible resource are the slowest. On the contrary, they are the highest and the myopic behaviors lead to excessive consumption of exhaustible resources inevitably without commitment. Otherwise, in the case of partial commit- ment, the results are between the cases of full commitment and of no commitment. Therefore, with the hyperbolic time preference, the optimal depletion rate of resource depends on the commitment ability. Higher commitment ability leads to lower effective rate of time preference, and consequently, lower depletion rate and lower initial depletion value. The improvement of commitment ability can decrease the impatience and myopia behaviors, and contribute to the protection of the exhaustible resources.

  4. Uranium 2003 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2004-01-01

    Uranium 2003: Resources, Production and Demand paints a detailed statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe and North America and for the first time, a report for Turkmenistan. Also included are international expert analyses and projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2020.

  5. Statistical data of the uranium industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    Data are presented on US uranium reserves, potential resources, exploration, mining, drilling, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1980. The compendium reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Office. Statistics are based primarily on information provided by the uranium exploration, mining, and milling companies. Data on commercial U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ sales and purchases are included. Data on non-US uranium production and resources are presented in the appendix. (DMC)

  6. Surface Water-Groundwater Interactions as a Critical Component of Uranium Plume Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K. H.; Christensen, J. N.; Hobson, C.

    2015-12-01

    Residual contamination of soils, sediments and groundwater by uranium milling operations presents a lingering problem at former mill sites throughout the upper Colorado River Basin in the western USA. Remedial strategies predicated upon natural flushing by low uranium recharge waters have frequently failed to achieve target concentrations set by national and state regulators. Flushing times of tens of years have often yielded negligible decreases in groundwater uranium concentrations, with extrapolated trends suggesting multiple decades or longer may be required to achieve regulatory goals. The U.S. Department of Energy's Rifle, Colorado field site serves as a natural laboratory for investigating the underlying causes for uranium plume persistence, with recent studies there highlighting the important role that surface water-groundwater interactions play in sustaining uranium delivery to the aquifer. Annual snowmelt-driven increases in Colorado River discharge induce 1-2 m excursions in groundwater elevation at the Rifle site, which enables residual tailings-contaminated materials (so-called Supplemental Standards) to become hydrologically connected to the aquifer for short periods of time during peak discharge. The episodic contact between shallow groundwater and residual contamination leads to abrupt 20-fold increases in groundwater uranium concentration, which serve to seasonally replenish the plume given the location of the Supplemental Standards along the upgradient edge of the aquifer. Uranium isotope composition changes abruptly as uranium concentrations increase reflecting the contribution of a temporally distinct contaminant reservoir. The release of uranium serves to potentially replenish organic matter rich sediments located within the alluvial aquifer at downstream locations, which have been postulated to serve as a parallel contributor to plume persistence following the uptake, immobilization, and slow re-oxidation of uranium.

  7. The uranium in the environment; L'uranium dans l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The uranium is a natural element omnipresent in the environment, with a complex chemistry more and more understood. Many studies are always today devoted to this element to better improve the uranium behavior in the environment. To illustrate this knowledge and for the public information the CEA published this paper. It gathers in four chapters: historical aspects and properties of the uranium, the uranium in the environment and the impacts, the metrology of the uranium and its migration. (A.L.B.)

  8. Fuel depletion calculation in MTR-LEU NUR reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeggar Foudil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present the results of a few energy groups calculations for the NUR reactor fuel depletion analysis up to 45 000 MWd/tU taken as the maximum fuel burn up. The WIMSD-4 cell code has been employed as a calculation tool. In this study, we are interested in actinides such as the uranium and plutonium isotopes, as well as fission products Xe-135, Sm-149, Sm-151, Eu-155, and Gd-157. Calculation results regarding the five energy groups are in a good agreement with those obtained with only two energy groups which can, therefore, be used in all subsequent calculations. Calculation results presented in this article can be used as a microscopic data base for estimating the amount of radioactive sources randomly dispersed in the environment. They can also be used to monitor the fuel assemblies inventory at the core level.

  9. Investigation of breached depleted UF sub 6 cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

    1991-09-01

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

  10. Investigation of breached depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, E.J.; Butler, T.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Googin, J.M.; Taylor, M.S.; Dyer, R.H.; Russell, J.R.

    1991-09-01

    In June 1990, during a three-site inspection of cylinders being used for long-term storage of solid depleted UF{sub 6}, two 14-ton steel cylinders at Portsmouth, Ohio, were discovered with holes in the barrel section of the cylinders. Both holes, concealed by UF{sub 4} reaction products identical in color to the cylinder coating, were similarly located near the front stiffening ring. The UF{sub 4} appeared to have self-sealed the holes, thus containing nearly all of the uranium contents. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Vice President K.W. Sommerfeld immediately formed an investigation team to: (1) identify the most likely cause of failure for the two breached cylinders, (2) determine the impact of these incidents on the three-site inventory, and (3) provide recommendations and preventive measures. This document discusses the results of this investigation.

  11. Rotational Mixing and Lithium Depletion

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsonneault, M H

    2010-01-01

    I review basic observational features in Population I stars which strongly implicate rotation as a mixing agent; these include dispersion at fixed temperature in coeval populations and main sequence lithium depletion for a range of masses at a rate which decays with time. New developments related to the possible suppression of mixing at late ages, close binary mergers and their lithium signature, and an alternate origin for dispersion in young cool stars tied to radius anomalies observed in active young stars are discussed. I highlight uncertainties in models of Population II lithium depletion and dispersion related to the treatment of angular momentum loss. Finally, the origins of rotation are tied to conditions in the pre-main sequence, and there is thus some evidence that enviroment and planet formation could impact stellar rotational properties. This may be related to recent observational evidence for cluster to cluster variations in lithium depletion and a connection between the presence of planets and s...

  12. 77 FR 14837 - Bioassay at Uranium Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... COMMISSION Bioassay at Uranium Mills AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide... for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-8051, ``Bioassay at Uranium Mills.'' This guide describes a bioassay program acceptable to the NRC staff for uranium mills and applicable portions...

  13. Calculations of ADS with deep subcritical uranium active cores - comparison with experiments and predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivkov, P.; Furman, W.; Stoyanov, Ch

    2014-09-01

    The main characteristics of the neutron field formed within the massive (512 kg) natural uranium target assembly (TA) QUINTA irradiated by deuteron beam of JINR Nuclotron with energies 1,2,4, and 8 GeV as well as the spatial distributions and the integral numbers of (n,f), (n,γ) and (n,xn)- reactions were calculated and compared with experimental data [1] . The MCNPX 27e code with ISABEL/ABLA/FLUKA and INCL4/ABLA models of intra-nuclear cascade (INC) and experimental cross-sections of the corresponding reactions were used. Special attention was paid to the elucidation of the role of charged particles (protons and pions) in the fission of natural uranium of TA QUINTA. Extensive calculations have been done for quasi-infinite (with very small neutron leakage) depleted uranium TA BURAN having mass about 20 t which are intended to be used in experiments at Nuclotron in 2014-2016. As in the case of TA QUINTA which really models the central zone of TA BURAN the total numbers of fissions, produced 239Pu nuclei and total neutron multiplicities are predicted to be proportional to proton or deuteron energy up to 12 GeV. But obtained values of beam power gain are practically constant in studied incident energy range and are approximately four. These values are in contradiction with the experimental result [2] obtained for the depleted uranium core weighting three tons at incident proton energy 0.66 GeV.

  14. Comparison of the radiological hazard of thorium and uranium spent fuels from VVER-1000 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frybort, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Thorium fuel is considered as a viable alternative to the uranium fuel used in the current generation of nuclear power plants. Switch from uranium to thorium means a complete change of composition of the spent nuclear fuel produced as a result of the fuel depletion during operation of a reactor. If the Th-U fuel cycle is implemented, production of minor actinides in the spent fuel is negligible. This is favourable for the spent fuel disposal. On the other hand, thorium fuel utilisation is connected with production of 232U, which decays via several alpha decays into a strong gamma emitter 208Tl. Presence of this nuclide might complicate manipulations with the irradiated thorium fuel. Monte-Carlo computation code MCNPX can be used to simulate thorium fuel depletion in a VVER-1000 reactor. The calculated actinide composition will be analysed and dose rate from produced gamma radiation will be calculated. The results will be compared to the reference uranium fuel. Dependence of the dose rate on time of decay after the end of irradiation in the reactor will be analysed. This study will compare the radiological hazard of the spent thorium and uranium fuel handling.

  15. Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

    1999-08-05

    Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

  16. Electroformation of uranium hemispherical shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, S.L.; Redey, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Vissers, D.R.

    1989-11-01

    This effort was directed at developing an electrochemical process for forming uniform and dendrite-free deposits of uranium from molten salts. This process is to be used for the electroformation of free-standing hemispherical shells of uranium for nuclear applications. Electrodeposition of uranium onto a substrate was accomplished with a fused chloride mixture containing 42 wt% UCl{sub 3} and a fused chloride-fluoride mixture containing 4 wt % UF{sub 4}. Under pulsed potential control at 504{degree}C, the chloride-fluoride mixture yielded the widest range of plating conditions for which dendrites could be avoided. Bipolar current pulse plating with both electrolytes gave good results, and successful application of this technique to a large tubular cathode has been demonstrated. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Transfer of uranium throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract of the rat: In vivo and in vitro approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dublineau, I.; Grison, S.; Dudoignon, N.; Baudelin, C.; Aigueperse, J.

    2004-07-01

    The presence of uranium in environment either natural or due to civil and military use, may lead to contamination of the public throughout the entire life mainly by chronic ingestion. The mechanisms of uranium transfer from alimentary bolus to blood are still not well known. In particular, few information are available on the different absorption sites along the gastrointestinal tract, the different cellular pathways (para-or trans-cellular), and the transporters implicated in the uranium absorption. In addition, the specific role of Peyer's patches, the aggregated structure of Gut-Associated Lymphoid tissue, in the intestinal transfer of uranium has never been determined. In fact, the transport of uranium through these structures specialized in antigen uptake from intestinal lumen may lead to major dysfunctions in mucosal immunity. Thus, different approaches have to be developed to determine the role of the different gastrointestinal structures and to apprehend the biological consequences of daily passage of uranium through these structures. These experiments include in vivo measurement of uranium in blood after in situ deposit of uranium (233U) in the different segments of the alimentary tract (buccal cavity, stomach, small intestine, colon) and ex vivo experiments in Using chambers to compare uranium passage from luminal to serosal side through intestinal epithelium and Peyer's patches. In vitro studies are also necessary to determine the nature of the cells as well as the transporters implicated in the gastrointestinal passage of uranium. Autoradiography experiments were performed to determine if uranium absorption was only restricted to villi which contained absorptive cells or if uranium absorption was also due to crypt cells. In addition, the transporter implicated in the uranium passage is dependent of the physico-chemical form of uranium present at the different gastrointestinal sites. When complexed to phosphate, uranium is transported by the

  18. Uranium in spring water and bryophytes at basin creek in central idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacklette, H.T.; Erdman, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Arkosic sandstones and conglomerates of Tertiary age beneath the Challis Volcanics of Eocene age at Basin Creek, 10 km northeast of Stanley, Idaho, contain uranium-bearing vitrainized carbon fragments. The economic potential of these sandstones and conglomerates is currently being assessed. Springs abound at the contacts of rock units, and water from these springs supports abundant growths of bryophytes (mosses and liverworts). Water from 22 springs and associated bryophytes were sampled; two springs were found to contain apparently anomalous concentrations (normalized) of uranium - as much as 6.5 ??g/L (ppb) in water and 1800 ??g/g (ppm) in ash of mosses. Moss samples from both springs also contained anomalous concentrations of arsenic, and one contained highly anomalous amounts of beryllium. Water from a third spring contained slightly anomalous amounts of uranium, and two species of mosses at the spring contained anomalous uranium (400 and 700 ??g/g) and high levels of both cadmium and lead. Water from a fourth spring was normal for uranium (0.18 ??g/L), but the moss from the water contained a moderate uranium level and highly anomalous concentrations of lead, germanium, and thallium. These results suggest that, in the Basin Creek area, moss sampling at springs may give a more reliable indication of uranium occurrence than would water sampling. The reason for this may be the ability of mosses to concentrate uranium and its associated pathfinder elements and to integrate uranium fluctuations that occur in the spring water over any period of time. ?? 1982.

  19. Radon Exposure, IL-6 Promoter Variants, and Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Former Uranium Miners

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: High radon exposure is a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma, a major lung cancer histology observed in former uranium miners. Radon exposure can cause oxidative stress, leading to pulmonary inflammation. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pro-carcinogenic inflammatory cytokine that plays a pivotal role in lung cancer development. Objectives: We assessed whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL6 promoter are associated with lung cancer in former uranium miners with high...

  20. Uranium induces apoptosis in lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Sadanandan, Bindu; Thomas, Renard; Wilson, Bobby L. [Texas Southern University, Environmental Toxicology Program, Department of Chemistry, Houston, TX (United States); Ravichandran, Prabakaran; Sharma, Chidananda S.; Ramesh, Vani; Hall, Joseph C.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T. [Norfolk State University, Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sciences, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radioactive material present everywhere in the environment. It is toxic because of its chemical or radioactive properties. Uranium enters environment mainly from mines and industry and cause threat to human health by accumulating in lungs as a result of inhalation. In our previous study, we have shown the effectiveness of antioxidant system response to the oxidative stress induced by uranyl acetate (UA) in rat lung epithelial (LE) cells. As part of our continuing studies; here, we investigated the mechanism underlying when LE cells are exposed to different concentration of UA. Oxidative stress may lead to apoptotic signaling pathways. LE cells treated with 0.25, 0.5 and 1 mM of UA results in dose and time-dependent increase in activity of both caspases-3 and -8. Increase in the concentration of cytochrome-c oxidase in cytosol was seen in LE cells treated with 1 mM UA as a result of mitochondria membrane permeability. The cytochrome-c leakage may trigger the apoptotic pathway. TUNEL assay performed in LE cells treated with 1 mM of UA showed significant incorporation of dNTPs in the nucleus after 24 h. In the presence of the caspase inhibitors, we observed the significant decrease in the activity of caspases-8 and -3 in 0.5 and 1 mM UA-treated LE cells. (orig.)

  1. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-01-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  2. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM TUNGSTEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnam, K.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the rccovery of uranium which has adhered to tungsten parts in electromagnetic isotope separation apparatus. Such a tungsten article is dissolved electrolytically in 20% NaOH by using the tungsten article as the anode. The resulting solution, containing soluble sodium lungstate and an insoluble slime, is then filtered. The slime residue is ignited successively with sodium nitrate and sodium pyrosulfate and leashed, and the resulting filtrates are combined with the original filtrate. Uranium is then recovered from the combined flltrates by diuranate precipitation.

  3. Release behavior of uranium in uranium mill tailings under environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Peng, Tongjiang; Sun, Hongjuan; Yue, Huanjuan

    2017-05-01

    Uranium contamination is observed in sedimentary geochemical environments, but the geochemical and mineralogical processes that control uranium release from sediment are not fully appreciated. Identification of how sediments and water influence the release and migration of uranium is critical to improve the prevention of uranium contamination in soil and groundwater. To understand the process of uranium release and migration from uranium mill tailings under water chemistry conditions, uranium mill tailing samples from northwest China were investigated with batch leaching experiments. Results showed that water played an important role in uranium release from the tailing minerals. The uranium release was clearly influenced by contact time, liquid-solid ratio, particle size, and pH under water chemistry conditions. Longer contact time, higher liquid content, and extreme pH were all not conducive to the stabilization of uranium and accelerated the uranium release from the tailing mineral to the solution. The values of pH were found to significantly influence the extent and mechanisms of uranium release from minerals to water. Uranium release was monitored by a number of interactive processes, including dissolution of uranium-bearing minerals, uranium desorption from mineral surfaces, and formation of aqueous uranium complexes. Considering the impact of contact time, liquid-solid ratio, particle size, and pH on uranium release from uranium mill tailings, reducing the water content, decreasing the porosity of tailing dumps and controlling the pH of tailings were the key factors for prevention and management of environmental pollution in areas near uranium mines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ozone depletion following future volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Klobas, J.; Wilmouth, David M.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Anderson, James G.; Salawitch, Ross J.

    2017-07-01

    While explosive volcanic eruptions cause ozone loss in the current atmosphere due to an enhancement in the availability of reactive chlorine following the stratospheric injection of sulfur, future eruptions are expected to increase total column ozone as halogen loading approaches preindustrial levels. The timing of this shift in the impact of major volcanic eruptions on the thickness of the ozone layer is poorly known. Modeling four possible climate futures, we show that scenarios with the smallest increase in greenhouse gas concentrations lead to the greatest risk to ozone from heterogeneous chemical processing following future eruptions. We also show that the presence in the stratosphere of bromine from natural, very short-lived biogenic compounds is critically important for determining whether future eruptions will lead to ozone depletion. If volcanic eruptions inject hydrogen halides into the stratosphere, an effect not considered in current ozone assessments, potentially profound reductions in column ozone would result.

  5. Nuclear, uranium, reserves, sustainability, independence; Nucleaire, Uranium, reserves, durabilite, independance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acket, C

    2007-06-15

    In order to evaluate the energy independence concerning the nuclear energy, the author takes the state of the art about the uranium. He details the fuel needs, the reserves on the base of the today available techniques, the reserves on the base of the future techniques and concludes positively on the energy independence for the nuclear. (A.L.B.)

  6. Development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin-guang, E-mail: wangxg@upc.edu.cn [School of Geosciences, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580 (China); Engineering Research Center of Nuclear Technology Application (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Liu, Dan [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Zhang, Feng [School of Geosciences, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580 (China)

    2015-03-15

    This article introduces a development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument. By analyzing the temporal distribution of epithermal neutrons generated from the thermal fission of {sup 235}U, we propose a new method with a uranium-bearing index to calculate the uranium content in the formation. An instrument employing a D-T neutron generator and two epithermal neutron detectors has been developed. The logging response is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and experiments in calibration wells. The simulation and experimental results show that the uranium-bearing index is linearly correlated with the uranium content, and the porosity and thermal neutron lifetime of the formation can be acquired simultaneously.

  7. Impact of mineral resource depletion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brent, AC

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In a letter to the editor, the authors comment on BA Steen's article on "Abiotic Resource Depletion: different perceptions of the problem with mineral deposits" published in the special issue of the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment...

  8. Global depletion of groundwater resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wada, Y.; Beek, L.P.H. van; van Kempen, C.M.; Reckman, J.W.T.M.; Vasak, S.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    In regions with frequent water stress and large aquifer systems groundwater is often used as an additional water source. If groundwater abstraction exceeds the natural groundwater recharge for extensive areas and long times, overexploitation or persistent groundwater depletion occurs. Here we provid

  9. Corrosion of Uranium in Desert Soil, with Application to GCD Source Term M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON, HOWARD L.; BACA, JULIANNE; KRUMHANSL, JAMES L.; STOCKMAN, HARLAN W.; THOMPSON, MOLLIE E.

    1999-09-01

    Uranium fragments from the Sandia Sled Track were studied as analogues for weapons components and depleted uranium buried at the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) site in Nevada. The Sled Track uranium fragments originated as weapons mockups and counterweights impacted on concrete and soil barriers, and experienced heating and fragmentation similar to processes thought to affect the Nuclear Weapons Accident Residues (NWAR) at GCD. Furthermore, the Sandia uranium was buried in unsaturated desert soils for 10 to 40 years, and has undergone weathering processes expected to affect the GCD wastes. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analyses of the fragments show rapid alteration from metals to dominantly VI-valent oxy-hydroxides. Leaching studies of the samples give results consistent with published U-oxide dissolution rates, and suggest longer experimental periods (ca. 1 year) would be required to reach equilibrium solution concentrations. Thermochemical modeling with the EQ3/6 code indicates that the uranium concentrations in solutions saturated with becquerelite could increase as the pore waters evaporate, due to changes in carbonate equilibria and increased ionic strength.

  10. ToF-SIMS study of polycrystalline uranium after exposure to deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrall, P; Price, D; Nelson, A; Siekhaus, W; Nelson, E; Wu, K J; Stratman, M; McLean, B

    2006-01-19

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is employed to examine specific features observed on a polycrystalline depleted uranium sample after exposure to high purity D{sub 2} gas. The ToF-SIMS investigation, being the first of its kind on uranium, investigates a site where the deuterated form of uranium hydride (UD{sub 3}) is clearly observed to have broken through the thin, air-formed oxide. Density functional theory calculations have been performed, which confirm the stability of, and also assign structural geometries to, the various uranium containing fragments observed with SIMS. An inclusion site was also investigated using ToF-SIMS, and these data suggest that the edges of such inclusions exhibit increased D ion, and hence H ion, diffusion when compared to the surrounding surface oxide. These results offer support to the previously published hypotheses that inclusion sites on uranium surfaces exhibit an increased probability to form hydride sites under H{sub 2} exposure.

  11. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  12. THE EXPLOITATION OF THE TULGHEŞ-GRINŢIEŞ URANIUM DEPOSIT. BETWEEN BENEFITS AND CONTROVERSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. TOFAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Exploitation of the Tulgheș-Grințieș Uranium Deposit. Between Benefits and Controversy. Romania is one of the few European states (alongside the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Ukraine and one of the few in the world with uranium deposits (Canada, Australia, Niger, Namibia are others, mainly used in the energy sector. According to recent studies, the only currently exploited deposit (Crucea-Botușana, Suceava County is nearly depleted (by 2019 and will be eventually shut down. For this reason, there are plans to open a new uranium mining facility in the Tulgheș-Grințieș area, where geological surveys have proven that the area holds the largest uranium deposit in the country. It will provide the necessary fuel for Cernavodă Nuclear Power Plant, for the two functional reactors, which have a total capacity of 706 MW each (producing roughly 18% of the country's electricity needs, as well as for units 3 and 4, not operational yet. The study at hand intends to emphasize several aspects regarding the exploitation possibilities for the uranium deposit from the two mineralized structures located in the fracture areas of the central Carpathian line, through which the crystalline overflows the Cretaceous Flysch. Furthermore, the environmental impact analysis as well as the long term safety and security of the population inhabiting the area will be of utmost importance.

  13. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W.; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  14. Investigations on uranium sorption on bentonite and montmorillonite, respectively, and uranium in environmental samples; Untersuchungen zur Uransorption an Bentonit bzw. Montmorillonit sowie von Uran in Umweltproben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeroual, Mohamed

    2010-09-22

    The geotechnical barrier is an important component of a geological repository and consists of compacted bentonite surrounding radioactive waste containers. Its most important functions are, to retard the radionuclide migration into the biosphere and to prevent groundwater contact with containers. lt is therefore of central importance to investigate the bentonite material on its capacity to sorb radionuclides under near-natural chemical and physical conditions. The purpose of this work was to study the adsorption of uranium(VI) on bentonit and on montmorillonite-standards at high uranium concentrations. Thereby, a special account was given to the calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation, which leads to the formation of very stable and mobile uncharged Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} complex. Results of batch experiments showed that the dicalcium-uranyl-tricarbonate complexation lowers the uranium(VI) sorption on natural clay (bentonite) by a factor of up to 3. After 21 days of contact time, about 40 % and 20 % of the initial uranium(VI)concentration were sorbed on Na-bentonite and ea-bentonite, respectively, from a solution with Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} dominating the uranium(VI) speciation. On the contrary, about 55 % of the initial uranium(VI)-concentration were sorbed on thes clays from the solution, in which (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(OH){sub 3}{sup -} complex dominated the uranium(VI) speciation. Thus uranium(VI) sorption is more strongly influenced by the solution composition than by bentonite type. Na-bentonite should be used instead of ea-bentonite as a geotechnical barrier, since calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation may be a realistic scenario. Further SEM-EDX and HREM-EDX studies showed that uranium(VI) sorption occurred predominantly on montmorillonite, which is the main component of bentonite. Uranium(VI) sorption on bentonite's accessory Minerals (pyrite, calcite, mica, and feldspar) was not observed. Investigation of uranium

  15. Deployable nuclear fleet based on available quantities of uranium and reactor types – the case of fast reactors started up with enriched uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baschwitz Anne

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available International organizations regularly produce global energy demand scenarios. To account for the increasing population and GDP trends, as well as to encompass evolving energy uses while satisfying constraints on greenhouse gas emissions, long-term installed nuclear power capacity scenarios tend to be more ambitious, even after the Fukushima accident. Thus, the amounts of uranium or plutonium needed to deploy such capacities could be limiting factors. This study first considers light-water reactors (LWR, GEN III using enriched uranium, like most of the current reactor technologies. It then examines the contribution of future fast reactors (FR, GEN IV operating with an initial fissile load and then using depleted uranium and recycling their own plutonium. However, as plutonium is only available in limited quantity since it is only produced in nuclear reactors, the possibility of starting up these Generation IV reactors with a fissile load of enriched uranium is also explored. In one of our previous studies, the uranium consumption of a third-generation reactor like an EPR™ was compared with that of a fast reactor started up with enriched uranium (U5-FR. For a reactor lifespan of 60 years, the U5-FR consumes three times less uranium than the EPR and represents a 60% reduction in terms of separative work units (SWU, though its requirements are concentrated over the first few years of operation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relevance of U5-FRs in a nuclear fleet deployment configuration. Considering several power demand scenarios and assuming different finite quantities of available natural uranium, this paper examines what types of reactors must be deployed to meet the demand. The deployment of light-water reactors only is not sustainable in the long run. Generation IV reactors are therefore essential. Yet when started up with plutonium, the number of reactors that can be deployed is also limited. In a fleet deployment

  16. Geochemical evidence for contribution of ore-forming materials from peraluminous granite basement-- Taking Fucheng pluton and No. 6722 uranium deposit in southern Jiangxi Province as examples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Bangtong(章邦桐); CHEN; Peirong(陈培荣); YANG; Dongsheng(杨东生); KONG; Xinggong(孔兴功)

    2003-01-01

    Using the induced fission-track method, mobile uranium leaching and lead isotope analysis, this work obtianed geochemical features of the peraluminous Fucheng granite basement and the host rock (shoshonite) of the No. 6722 uranium deposit in southern Jiangxi Province. (i) Uranium contents of the leucocratic rock-forming minerals (0.18 ?g/g for quartz, 0.36 ?g/g for feldspar) are lower than the uranium content of the whole rock (4.6 ?g/g). Biotite and some accessory mineral inclusions (zircon, monazite and uraninite) are the main uranium carriers of the Fucheng granite pluton. The fissure uranium in altered minerals (hydromica and chlorite) increased evidently. (ii) Leachable rate of mobile uranium in the biotite granite is 10.4%, while that in the altered granite increased to 31%. (iii) Caculation based on lead isotopes shows that during alteration the Fucheng granite lost uranium (?U = ?37% - ?65%), whereas the Caotaobei shoshonite gained uranium (?U = +37%- +58%). These features suggest that the ore-forming material of the No. 6722 uranium deposit was mainly derived from the altered peraluminous granite basement of Fucheng pluton.

  17. Uranium Isotope Ratios in Modern and Precambrian Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCorte, B.; Planavsky, N.; Wang, X.; Auerbach, D. J.; Knudsen, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Uranium isotopes (δ238U values) are an emerging paleoredox proxy that can help to better understand the redox evolution of Earth's surface environment. Recently, uranium isotopes have been used to reconstruct ocean and atmospheric redox conditions (Montoya-Pino et al., 2010; Brennecka et al., 2011; Kendall et al., 2013; Dahl et al., 2014). However, to date, there have not been studies on paleosols, despite that paleosols are, arguably better suited to directly tracking the redox conditions of the atmosphere. Sedimentary δ238U variability requires the formation of the soluble, oxidized form of U, U(VI). The formation of U(VI) is generally thought to require oxygen levels orders of magnitude higher than prebiotic levels. Without significant U mobility, it would have been impossible to develop isotopically distinct pools of uranium in ancient Earth environments. Conversely, an active U redox cycle leads to significant variability in δ238U values. Here we present a temporally and geographically expansive uranium isotope record from paleosols and modern soils to better constrain atmospheric oxygen levels during the Precambrian. Preliminary U isotope measurements of paleosols are unfractionated (relative to igneous rocks), possibly because of limited fractionation during oxidation (e.g., {Wang, 2015 #478}) or insufficient atmospheric oxygen levels to oxidize U(IV)-bearing minerals in the bedrock. Further U isotope measurements of paleosols with comparison to modern soils will resolve this issue.

  18. Uranium 2011 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, questions are being raised about the future of the uranium market, including as regards the number of reactors expected to be built in the coming years, the amount of uranium required to meet forward demand, the adequacy of identified uranium resources to meet that demand and the ability of the sector to meet reactor requirements in a challenging investment climate. This 24th edition of the “Red Book”, a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, provides analyses and information from 42 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. It offers a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It also provides substantive new information on established uranium production centres around the world and in countri...

  19. Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2014-01-01

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

  20. Uranium 2005 Resources, Production and Demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris. Nuclear Energy Agency

    2006-01-01

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. This 21st edition presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand as of 1st January 2005 and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2025 are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major c...

  1. Nuclear energy in Europe: uranium flow modeling and fuel cycle scenario trade-offs from a sustainability perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendall, Danielle M; Binder, Claudia R

    2011-03-15

    The European nuclear fuel cycle (covering the EU-27, Switzerland and Ukraine) was modeled using material flow analysis (MFA).The analysis was based on publicly available data from nuclear energy agencies and industries, national trade offices, and nongovernmental organizations. Military uranium was not considered due to lack of accessible data. Nuclear fuel cycle scenarios varying spent fuel reprocessing, depleted uranium re-enrichment, enrichment assays, and use of fast neutron reactors, were established. They were then assessed according to environmental, economic and social criteria such as resource depletion, waste production, chemical and radiation emissions, costs, and proliferation risks. The most preferable scenario in the short term is a combination of reduced tails assay and enrichment grade, allowing a 17.9% reduction of uranium demand without significantly increasing environmental, economic, or social risks. In the long term, fast reactors could theoretically achieve a 99.4% decrease in uranium demand and nuclear waste production. However, this involves important costs and proliferation risks. Increasing material efficiency is not systematically correlated with the reduction of other risks. This suggests that an overall optimization of the nuclear fuel cycle is difficult to obtain. Therefore, criteria must be weighted according to stakeholder interests in order to determine the most sustainable solution. This paper models the flows of uranium and associated materials in Europe, and provides a decision support tool for identifying the trade-offs of the alternative nuclear fuel cycles considered.

  2. Synthesis of uranium fluorides from uranium dioxide with ammonium bifluoride and ammonolysis of uranium fluorides to uranium nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeamans, Charles Burnett

    This work presents the chemical conversion of uranium oxides to uranium fluorides, and their subsequent conversion to uranium nitrides. Uranium dioxide reacts with ammonium bifluoride at 20°C to form compound in the ammonium-uranium fluoride chemical system. This reaction occurs between solid uranium dioxide at the surface of the particles and ammonium fluoride vapor. A shrinking-sphere model demonstrated surface reaction kinetics, not mass transport by diffusion through the product layer, limit the reaction rate when the starting material consists of 100 mum uranium dioxide particles. Powder x-ray diffraction showed the reaction to be complete within 8 hours, with (NH4) 4UF8 the reaction product. High-resolution electron microcopy revealed the product is largely amorphous on a micrometer-scale, but contains well-formed crystal domains on the order of 10x10 nm. X-ray diffraction showed the reaction progresses though beta-NH4UF5, delta-(NH 4)2UF6, and gamma-(NH4)2UF6 intermediate phases before finally forming (NH4)4UF 8. Modeling the system as a series of first-order reaction suggested a fourth intermediate, possibly UF4, is likely to occur. The reaction of (NH4)4UF8 with ammonia gas at 800°C forms alpha-U2N3/UN2 solid solution products with a composition of UN1.83. The x-ray powder diffraction pattern of this product is the fcc pattern commonly referenced as that of UN2 and the lattice parameter was 0.53050 nm. Surface area increased by a factor of ten during ammonolysis, consistent with the action of a hydriding agent. The alpha-U2N 3/UN2 solid solution system formed contained 1 wt% UO 2 as an impurity. Upon subsequent heating to 1150°C for 4.5 hours under argon, the nitride sample formed UN with a UO2 impurity of 9 wt%. Based on the HRTEM images, oxidation in the UN product appears to be limited to within 20 nm of particle surfaces and grain boundaries.

  3. Time delay and profit accumulation effect on a mine-based uranium market clearing model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auzans, Aris [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ostwaldi 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia); Teder, Allan [School of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu, Narva mnt 4, EE-51009 Tartu (Estonia); Tkaczyk, Alan H., E-mail: alan@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ostwaldi 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Improved version of a mine-based uranium market clearing model for the front-end uranium market and enrichment industries is proposed. • A profit accumulation algorithm and time delay function provides more realistic uranium mine decision making process. • Operational decision delay increased uranium market price volatility. - Abstract: The mining industry faces a number of challenges such as market volatility, investment safety, issues surrounding employment and productivity. Therefore, computer simulations are highly relevant in order to reduce financial risks associated with these challenges. In the mining industry, each firm must compete with other mines and the basic target is profit maximization. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the world uranium (U) supply by simulating financial management challenges faced by an individual U mine that are caused by a variety of regulation issues. In this paper front-end nuclear fuel cycle tool is used to simulate market conditions and the effects they have on the stability of U supply. An individual U mine’s exit or entry in the market might cause changes in the U supply side which can increase or decrease the market price. In this paper we offer a more advanced version of a mine-based U market clearing model. The existing U market model incorporates the market of primary U from uranium mines with secondary uranium (depleted uranium DU), enriched uranium (HEU) and enrichment services. In the model each uranium mine acts as an independent agent that is able to make operational decisions based on the market price. This paper introduces a more realistic decision making algorithm of individual U mine that adds constraints to production decisions. The authors added an accumulated profit model, which allows for the profits accumulated to cover any possible future economic losses and the time-delay algorithm to simulate delayed process of reopening a U mine. The U market simulation covers time period 2010

  4. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    In wetlands, which are a major feature at the groundwater-surface water interface, plants deliver oxygen to the subsurface to keep root tissue aerobic. Some of this oxygen leaches into the rhizosphere where it will oxidize iron that typically precipitates on or near roots. Furthermore, plans provide carbon via root exudates and turnover, which in the presence of the iron oxides drives the activity of heterotrophic iron reducers in wetland soils. Oxidized iron is an important electron acceptor for many microbially-driven transformations, which can affect the fate and transport of several pollutants. It has been shown that heterotrophic iron reducing organisms, such as Geobacter sp., can reduce water soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). The goal of this study was to determine if and how iron cycling in the wetland rhizosphere affects uranium dynamics. For this purpose, we operated a series of small-scale wetland mesocosms in a greenhouse to simulate the discharge of uranium-contaminated groundwater to surface waters. The mesocosms were operated with two different Fe(II) loading rates, two plant types, and unplanted controls. The mesocosms contained zones of root exclusion to differentiate between the direct presence and absence of roots in the planted mesocosms. The mesocosms were operated for several month to get fully established, after which a U(VI) solution was fed for 80 days. The mesocosms were then sacrificed and analyzed for solid-associated chemical species, microbiological characterization, micro-X-ray florescence (µ-XRF) mapping of Fe and U on the root surface, and U speciation via X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Results showed that bacterial numbers including Geobacter sp., Fe(III), as well as total uranium, were highest on roots, followed by sediments near roots, and lowest in zones without much root influence. Results from the µ-XRF mapping on root surfaces indicated a strong spatial correlation between Fe and U. This correlation was

  5. Reactive transport modeling at uranium in situ recovery sites: uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Tutu, Hlanganani; Brown, Adrian; Figueroa, Linda; Wolkersdorfer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical changes that can occur down gradient from uranium in situ recovery (ISR) sites are important for various stakeholders to understand when evaluating potential effects on surrounding groundwater quality. If down gradient solid-phase material consists of sandstone with iron hydroxide coatings (no pyrite or organic carbon), sorption of uranium on iron hydroxides can control uranium mobility. Using one-dimensional reactive transport models with PHREEQC, two different geochemical databases, and various geochemical parameters, the uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides are evaluated, because these oxidized zones create a greater risk for future uranium transport than fully reduced zones where uranium generally precipitates.

  6. Lead abundance in the uranium star CS 31082-001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plez, B.; Hill, V.; Cayrel, R.

    2004-01-01

    stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data......stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data...

  7. Ecological condition around the uranium tailing pits in Tajikistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsaidov, I.; Mirsaidov, U.; Khakimov, N.; Nazarov, Kh. [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Agency under the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tajikistan, 33 Rudaki avenue, Dushanbe 734025 (Tajikistan)

    2010-07-01

    One of the basic sectors of the economy in Tajikistan is the mining industry. Its development in the past led to an accumulation of large amounts of waste mainly associated with the uranium milling facilities. These wastes contain radionuclides in high concentrations (basically uranium- thorium series) and other hazardous substances. These facilities are often located in residential areas and in the upper side of the main watersheds of the region, such as Amu-Daria and Syr-Daria. Tajikistan has a number of uranium ore deposits and mining and milling facilities, which operated in the past. This country's own ores and imported raw materials were processed mainly at the former Leninabad Geochemical Combine facility (currently State Enterprise (SE) 'Vostokredmet') and also at other hydro-metallurgical plants located in the vicinity of uranium ore extraction sites (Adrasman, Taboshar, Isphara etc.). Presently the only operating enterprise in the Republic of Tajikistan, which still has the potential to process Uranium ores, using an acid leach extraction process, is the SE 'Vostokredmet'. It is interesting is to note that the mine wastes at the Adrasman site were recently successfully reprocessed to produce a lead concentrate. Otherwise, all underground and open pit mines and old radium and uranium facilities have been decommissioned, but most of them are still not remediated. Due to the recent significant increase in the price of uranium, the uranium mining residues have become a focus of interest for various different investors and commercial companies who are considering reprocessing the waste rock piles and mill tailings of Northern Tajikistan. Based on estimates from SE 'Vostokredmet', the total amount of residual uranium in the tailings and waste rock piles in the Republic of Tajikistan is about 55 million tons. The total activity of these wastes is estimated to be approximately 240-285 10{sup 12} Bq. The total volume of waste

  8. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  9. Uranium deposits in the Republic of Niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-03-01

    Niger is located at the southern edge of the Sahara desert in north-central Africa. The country covers a territory of 1,267,000 square kilometers (489,191 square miles), or about three times the size of California, with a population exceeding 7.5 million people. In 1989, Niger abandoned 16 years of military rule and is now on the way to a democratic system; the first multiparty elections are schedules for 1992. Mining industries are the primary base for Niger`s economy. Uranium is the leading export commodity, with revenues accounting for about one-third of Niger`s export earnings. Other mineral products include coal, tin, and small amounts of gold.

  10. The Neutron Spectrum in a Uranium Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, E.; Jonsson, E.; Lindberg, M.; Mednis, J.

    1963-10-15

    A series of experimental and theoretical investigations on neutron spectra in lattice cells has been started at the reactor R1. This report gives the results from the first one of these cells - one with a tube of natural -uranium surrounded by heavy water. In the measurements the cell was placed in the central, vertical channel of the reactor. The neutron spectrum from a lead scatterer in the uranium tube - outer diameter 49.2 mm, inner diameter 28.3 mm - was measured with a fast chopper in the energy region 0.01 to 100 eV. Subsidiary measurements indicated that the spectrum in the beam from the lead piece corresponds to the spectrum of the angular flux integrated over all angles. This correspondence is important for the interpretation of the experimental data. The thermal part of the spectrum was found to deviate significantly from a Maxwellian. However, the deviation is not very large, and one could use a Maxwellian, at least to give a rough idea of the hardness of the spectrum. For the present tube the temperature of this Maxwellian was estimated as 90 to 100 deg C above the moderator temperature (33 deg C). In the joining region the rise of the spectrum towards the thermal part is slower than for the cell boundary spectrum, measured earlier. In the epithermal region the limited resolution of the chopper has affected the measurements at the energies of the uranium resonances. However, the shape of the spectrum on the flanks of the first resonance in {sup 238}U (6.68 eV) has been obtained accurately. In the theoretical treatment the THERMOS code with a free gas scattering model has been used. The energy region was 3.06 - 0.00025 eV. The agreement with the measurements is good for the thermal part - possibly the theoretical spectrum is a little softer than the experimental one. In the joining region the results from THERMOS are comparatively high - probably due to the scattering model used.

  11. Extracellular reduction of uranium via Geobacter conductive pili as a protective cellular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologgi, Dena L; Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Speers, Allison M; Kelly, Shelly D; Reguera, Gemma

    2011-09-13

    The in situ stimulation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by Geobacter bacteria leads to the concomitant precipitation of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater. Despite its promise for the bioremediation of uranium contaminants, the biological mechanism behind this reaction remains elusive. Because Fe(III) oxide reduction requires the expression of Geobacter's conductive pili, we evaluated their contribution to uranium reduction in Geobacter sulfurreducens grown under pili-inducing or noninducing conditions. A pilin-deficient mutant and a genetically complemented strain with reduced outer membrane c-cytochrome content were used as controls. Pili expression significantly enhanced the rate and extent of uranium immobilization per cell and prevented periplasmic mineralization. As a result, pili expression also preserved the vital respiratory activities of the cell envelope and the cell's viability. Uranium preferentially precipitated along the pili and, to a lesser extent, on outer membrane redox-active foci. In contrast, the pilus-defective strains had different degrees of periplasmic mineralization matching well with their outer membrane c-cytochrome content. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses demonstrated the extracellular reduction of U(VI) by the pili to mononuclear tetravalent uranium U(IV) complexed by carbon-containing ligands, consistent with a biological reduction. In contrast, the U(IV) in the pilin-deficient mutant cells also required an additional phosphorous ligand, in agreement with the predominantly periplasmic mineralization of uranium observed in this strain. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for Geobacter conductive pili in the extracellular reduction of uranium, and highlight its essential function as a catalytic and protective cellular mechanism that is of interest for the bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater.

  12. Self-regulatory depletion increases emotional reactivity in the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Dylan D; Heatherton, Todd F

    2013-04-01

    The ability to self-regulate can become impaired when people are required to engage in successive acts of effortful self-control, even when self-control occurs in different domains. Here, we used functional neuroimaging to test whether engaging in effortful inhibition in the cognitive domain would lead to putative dysfunction in the emotional domain. Forty-eight participants viewed images of emotional scenes during functional magnetic resonance imaging in two sessions that were separated by a challenging attention control task that required effortful inhibition (depletion group) or not (control group). Compared to the control group, depleted participants showed increased activity in the left amygdala to negative but not to positive or neutral scenes. Moreover, whereas the control group showed reduced amygdala activity to all scene types (i.e. habituation), the depletion group showed increased amygdala activity relative to their pre-depletion baseline; however this was only significant for negative scenes. Finally, depleted participants showed reduced functional connectivity between the left amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex during negative scene processing. These findings demonstrate that consuming self-regulatory resources leads to an exaggerated neural response to emotional material that appears specific to negatively valenced stimuli and further suggests a failure to recruit top-down prefrontal regions involved in emotion regulation.

  13. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  14. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, N; Jackman, C H; Cannizzo, J K; Mattson, B J; Chen, W; Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan

    2003-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time, improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma-ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma-rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion roughly to double the ``biologically active'' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova mu...

  15. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  16. Ozone depletion, paradigms, and politics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iman, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    The destruction of the Earth`s protective ozone layer is a prime environmental concern. Industry has responded to this environmental problem by: implementing conservation techniques to reduce the emission of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs); using alternative cleaning solvents that have lower ozone depletion potentials (ODPs); developing new, non-ozone-depleting solvents, such as terpenes; and developing low-residue soldering processes. This paper presents an overview of a joint testing program at Sandia and Motorola to evaluate a low-residue (no-clean) soldering process for printed wiring boards (PWBs). Such processes are in widespread use in commercial applications because they eliminate the cleaning operation. The goal of this testing program was to develop a data base that could be used to support changes in the mil-specs. In addition, a joint task force involving industry and the military has been formed to conduct a follow-up evaluation of low-residue processes that encompass the concerns of the tri-services. The goal of the task force is to gain final approval of the low-residue technology for use in military applications.

  17. A MATLAB-Linked Solver to Find Fuel Depletion in a PWR, a Suggested VVER-1000 Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Faghihi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Coupled first-order IVPs are frequently used in many parts of engineering and sciences. We present a “solver” including three computer programs which were joint with the MATLAB software to solve and plot solutions of the first-order coupled stiff or nonstiff IVPs. Some applications related to IVPs are given here using our MATLAB-linked solver. Muon catalyzed fusion in a D-T mixture is considered as a first dynamical example of the coupled IVPs. Then, we have focused on the fuel depletion in a suggested PWR including poisons burnups (xenon-135 and samarium-149, plutonium isotopes production, and uranium depletion.

  18. Halocarbon ozone depletion and global warming potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Richard A.; Wuebbles, D.; Atkinson, R.; Connell, Peter S.; Dorn, H. P.; Derudder, A.; Derwent, Richard G.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Fisher, D.; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Concern over the global environmental consequences of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has created a need to determine the potential impacts of other halogenated organic compounds on stratospheric ozone and climate. The CFCs, which do not contain an H atom, are not oxidized or photolyzed in the troposphere. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere where they decompose and can lead to chlorine catalyzed ozone depletion. The hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs or HFCs), in particular those proposed as substitutes for CFCs, contain at least one hydrogen atom in the molecule, which confers on these compounds a much greater sensitivity toward oxidation by hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere, resulting in much shorter atmospheric lifetimes than CFCs, and consequently lower potential for depleting ozone. The available information is reviewed which relates to the lifetime of these compounds (HCFCs and HFCs) in the troposphere, and up-to-date assessments are reported of the potential relative effects of CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, and halons on stratospheric ozone and global climate (through 'greenhouse' global warming).

  19. Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction (FAI/00-39)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PLYS, M.G.

    2000-10-10

    The purpose of this report is to provide a topical reference on the phenomena and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project with specific applications to SNF Project processes and situations. Spent metallic uranium nuclear fuel is currently stored underwater at the K basins in the Hanford 100 area, and planned processing steps include: (1) At the basins, cleaning and placing fuel elements and scrap into stainless steel multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) holding about 6 MT of fuel apiece; (2) At nearby cold vacuum drying (CVD) stations, draining, vacuum drying, and mechanically sealing the MCOs; (3) Shipping the MCOs to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) on the 200 Area plateau; and (4) Welding shut and placing the MCOs for interim (40 year) dry storage in closed CSB storage tubes cooled by natural air circulation through the surrounding vault. Damaged fuel elements have exposed and corroded fuel surfaces, which can exothermically react with water vapor and oxygen during normal process steps and in off-normal situations, A key process safety concern is the rate of reaction of damaged fuel and the potential for self-sustaining or runaway reactions, also known as uranium fires or fuel ignition. Uranium metal and one of its corrosion products, uranium hydride, are potentially pyrophoric materials. Dangers of pyrophoricity of uranium and its hydride have long been known in the U.S. Department of Energy (Atomic Energy Commission/DOE) complex and will be discussed more below; it is sufficient here to note that there are numerous documented instances of uranium fires during normal operations. The motivation for this work is to place the safety of the present process in proper perspective given past operational experience. Steps in development of such a perspective are: (1) Description of underlying physical causes for runaway reactions, (2) Modeling physical processes to explain runaway reactions, (3) Validation of the method

  20. Reports on investigations of uranium anomalies. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodknight, C.S.; Burger, J.A. (comps.)

    1982-10-01

    During the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program, conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC), radiometric and geochemical surveys and geologic investigations detected anomalies indicative of possible uranium enrichment. Data from the Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Survey (ARMS) and the Hydrogeochemical and Stream-Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR), both of which were conducted on a national scale, yielded numerous anomalies that may signal areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Results from geologic evaluations of individual 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangles for the NURE program also yielded anomalies, which could not be adequately checked during scheduled field work. Included in this volume are individual reports of field investigations for the following six areas which were shown on the basis of ARMS, HSSR, and (or) geologic data to be anomalous: (1) Hylas zone and northern Richmond basin, Virginia; (2) Sischu Creek area, Alaska; (3) Goodman-Dunbar area, Wisconsin; (4) McCaslin syncline, Wisconsin; (5) Mt. Withington Cauldron, Socorro County, New Mexico; (6) Lake Tecopa, Inyo County, California. Field checks were conducted in each case to verify an indicated anomalous condition and to determine the nature of materials causing the anomaly. The ultimate objective of work is to determine whether favorable conditions exist for the occurrence of uranium deposits in areas that either had not been previously evaluated or were evaluated before data from recent surveys were available. Most field checks were of short duration (2 to 5 days). The work was done by various investigators using different procedures, which accounts for variations in format in their reports. All papers have been abstracted and indexed.

  1. Containment and storage of uranium hexafluoride at US Department of Energy uranium enrichment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, C.R.; Alderson, J.H.; Blue, S.C.; Boelens, R.A.; Conkel, M.E.; Dorning, R.E.; Ecklund, C.D.; Halicks, W.G.; Henson, H.M.; Newman, V.S.; Philpot, H.E.; Taylor, M.S.; Vournazos, J.P. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States). UEO Enrichment Technical Operations Div.; Russell, J.R. [USDOE Oak Ridge Field Office, TN (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ziehlke, K.T. [MJB Technical Associates (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Isotopically depleted UF{sub 6} (uranium hexafluoride) accumulates at a rate five to ten times greater than the enriched product and is stored in steel vessels at the enrichment plant sites. There are approximately 55,000 large cylinders now in storage at Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Most of them contain a nominal 14 tons of depleted UF{sub 6}. Some of these cylinders have been in the unprotected outdoor storage environment for periods approaching 40 years. Storage experience, supplemented by limited corrosion data, suggests a service life of about 70 years under optimum conditions for the 48-in. diameter, 5/16-in.-wall pressure vessels (100 psi working pressure), using a conservative industry-established 1/4-in.-wall thickness as the service limit. In the past few years, however, factors other than atmospheric corrosion have become apparent that adversely affect the serviceability of small numbers of the storage containers and that indicate the need for a managed program to ensure maintenance ofcontainment integrity for all the cylinders in storage. The program includes periodic visual inspections of cylinders and storage yards with documentation for comparison with other inspections, a group of corrosion test programs to permit cylinder life forecasts, and identification of (and scheduling for remedial action) situations in which defects, due to handling damage or accelerated corrosion, can seriously shorten the storage life or compromise the containment integrity of individual cylinders. The program also includes rupture testing to assess the effects of certain classes of damage on overall cylinder strength, aswell as ongoing reviews of specifications, procedures, practices, and inspection results to effect improvements in handling safety, containment integrity, and storage life.

  2. Cellular localization of uranium in the renal proximal tubules during acute renal uranium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma-Takeda, Shino; Kitahara, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kyoko; Blyth, Benjamin J; Suya, Noriyoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Terada, Yasuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2015-12-01

    Renal toxicity is a hallmark of uranium exposure, with uranium accumulating specifically in the S3 segment of the proximal tubules causing tubular damage. As the distribution, concentration and dynamics of accumulated uranium at the cellular level is not well understood, here, we report on high-resolution quantitative in situ measurements by high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis in renal sections from a rat model of uranium-induced acute renal toxicity. One day after subcutaneous administration of uranium acetate to male Wistar rats at a dose of 0.5 mg uranium kg(-1) body weight, uranium concentration in the S3 segment of the proximal tubules was 64.9 ± 18.2 µg g(-1) , sevenfold higher than the mean renal uranium concentration (9.7 ± 2.4 µg g(-1) ). Uranium distributed into the epithelium of the S3 segment of the proximal tubules and highly concentrated uranium (50-fold above mean renal concentration) in micro-regions was found near the nuclei. These uranium levels were maintained up to 8 days post-administration, despite more rapid reductions in mean renal concentration. Two weeks after uranium administration, damaged areas were filled with regenerating tubules and morphological signs of tissue recovery, but areas of high uranium concentration (100-fold above mean renal concentration) were still found in the epithelium of regenerating tubules. These data indicate that site-specific accumulation of uranium in micro-regions of the S3 segment of the proximal tubules and retention of uranium in concentrated areas during recovery are characteristics of uranium behavior in the kidney.

  3. Maximum permissible concentrations of uranium in air

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, N

    1973-01-01

    The retention of uranium by bone and kidney has been re-evaluated taking account of recently published data for a man who had been occupationally exposed to natural uranium aerosols and for adults who had ingested uranium at the normal dietary levels. For life-time occupational exposure to uranium aerosols the new retention functions yield a greater retention in bone and a smaller retention in kidney than the earlier ones, which were based on acute intakes of uranium by terminal patients. Hence bone replaces kidney as the critical organ. The (MPC) sub a for uranium 238 on radiological considerations using the current (1959) ICRP lung model for the new retention functions is slightly smaller than for earlier functions but the (MPC) sub a determined by chemical toxicity remains the most restrictive.

  4. Uranium in cassiterites of tin deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagruzina, I.A.; Pinskij, Eh.M.; Savinova, I.B.

    1986-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidation of physico-chemical features of uranium and tin behaviour in ore deposition zones uranium determinations (1000 determ) in cassiterite grains from 55 tin-ore deposits of different formation types of several separate regions are carried out by means of fission radiography. It is shown that uranium content in cassiterites is a genetic sign. Peculiarities of uranium concentration and migration in tin deposits permit to use them as prognostic radiogeochemical criteria. Radiogeochemical prognostic-search signs confirm the antagonism between uranium and tin deposits of cassiterite-silicate and cassiterite-sulfide formations and paragenetic of certain types of uranium hydrothermal deposits with tin deposits of cassiterite-quartz formation.

  5. Deposit model for volcanogenic uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, George N.; Hall, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanism is a major contributor to the formation of important uranium deposits both close to centers of eruption and more distal as a result of deposition of ash with leachable uranium. Hydrothermal fluids that are driven by magmatic heat proximal to some volcanic centers directly form some deposits. These fluids leach uranium from U-bearing silicic volcanic rocks and concentrate it at sites of deposition within veins, stockworks, breccias, volcaniclastic rocks, and lacustrine caldera sediments. The volcanogenic uranium deposit model presented here summarizes attributes of those deposits and follows the focus of the International Atomic Energy Agency caldera-hosted uranium deposit model. Although inferred by some to have a volcanic component to their origin, iron oxide-copper-gold deposits with economically recoverable uranium contents are not considered in this model.

  6. Uranium Metal Analysis via Selective Dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2008-09-10

    Uranium metal, which is present in sludge held in the Hanford Site K West Basin, can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during sludge handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage operations by its oxidation/corrosion in water. A thorough knowledge of the uranium metal concentration in sludge therefore is essential to successful sludge management and waste process design. The goal of this work was to establish a rapid routine analytical method to determine uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of up to 1000-fold higher total uranium concentrations (i.e., up to 30 wt% and more uranium) for samples to be taken during the upcoming sludge characterization campaign and in future analyses for sludge handling and processing. This report describes the experiments and results obtained in developing the selective dissolution technique to determine uranium metal concentration in K Basin sludge.

  7. Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2010-01-01

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

  8. Micro-distribution of uranium in bone after contamination: new insight into its mechanism of accumulation into bone tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, Damien [ICSM, LHYS, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Burt-Pichat, Brigitte [INSERM, UMR 1033 Lyon (France); Lyon Univ. (France); Le Goff, Xavier [ICSM, L2ME, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2015-09-15

    After internal contamination, uranium rapidly distributes in the body; up to 20 % of the initial dose is retained in the skeleton, where it remains for years. Several studies suggest that uranium has a deleterious effect on the bone cell system, but little is known regarding the mechanisms leading to accumulation of uranium in bone tissue. We have performed synchrotron radiation-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR μ-XRF) studies to assess the initial distribution of uranium within cortical and trabecular bones in contaminated rats' femurs at the micrometer scale. This sensitive technique with high spatial resolution is the only method available that can be successfully applied, given the small amount of uranium in bone tissue. Uranium was found preferentially located in calcifying zones in exposed rats and rapidly accumulates in the endosteal and periosteal area of femoral metaphyses, in calcifying cartilage and in recently formed bone tissue along trabecular bone. Furthermore, specific localized areas with high accumulation of uranium were observed in regions identified as micro-vessels and on bone trabeculae. These observations are of high importance in the study of the accumulation of uranium in bone tissue, as the generally proposed passive chemical sorption on the surface of the inorganic part (apatite) of bone tissue cannot account for these results. Our study opens original perspectives in the field of exogenous metal bio-mineralization.

  9. Investigations on uranium sorption on bentonite and montmorillonite, respectively, and uranium in environmental samples; Untersuchungen zur Uransorption an Bentonit bzw. Montmorillonit sowie von Uran in Umweltproben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeroual, Mohamed

    2010-09-22

    The geotechnical barrier is an important component of a geological repository and consists of compacted bentonite surrounding radioactive waste containers. Its most important functions are, to retard the radionuclide migration into the biosphere and to prevent groundwater contact with containers. lt is therefore of central importance to investigate the bentonite material on its capacity to sorb radionuclides under near-natural chemical and physical conditions. The purpose of this work was to study the adsorption of uranium(VI) on bentonit and on montmorillonite-standards at high uranium concentrations. Thereby, a special account was given to the calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation, which leads to the formation of very stable and mobile uncharged Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} complex. Results of batch experiments showed that the dicalcium-uranyl-tricarbonate complexation lowers the uranium(VI) sorption on natural clay (bentonite) by a factor of up to 3. After 21 days of contact time, about 40 % and 20 % of the initial uranium(VI)concentration were sorbed on Na-bentonite and ea-bentonite, respectively, from a solution with Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} dominating the uranium(VI) speciation. On the contrary, about 55 % of the initial uranium(VI)-concentration were sorbed on thes clays from the solution, in which (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(OH){sub 3}{sup -} complex dominated the uranium(VI) speciation. Thus uranium(VI) sorption is more strongly influenced by the solution composition than by bentonite type. Na-bentonite should be used instead of ea-bentonite as a geotechnical barrier, since calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation may be a realistic scenario. Further SEM-EDX and HREM-EDX studies showed that uranium(VI) sorption occurred predominantly on montmorillonite, which is the main component of bentonite. Uranium(VI) sorption on bentonite's accessory Minerals (pyrite, calcite, mica, and feldspar) was not observed. Investigation of uranium

  10. Rate phenomena in uranium extraction by amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C. F.; McDowell, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetics studies and other rate measurements are reviewed in the amine extraction of uranium and of some other related and associated metal ions. Equilibration is relatively fast in the uranium sulfate systems most important to uranium hydrometallurgy. Significantly slow equilibration has been encountered in some other systems. Most of the recorded rate information, both qualitative and quantitative, has come from exploratory and process-development work, while some kinetics studies have been directed specifically toward elucidation of extraction mechanisms. 71 references.

  11. METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM METAL BY ELECTROLYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, R.D.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for making uranium metal from oxidic material by electrolytic deposition on the cathode. The oxidic material admixed with two moles of carbon per one mole of uranium dioxide forms the anode, and the electrolyte is a mixture of from 40 to 75% of calcium fluoride or barium fluoride, 15 to 45% of uranium tetrafluoride, and from 10 to 20% of lithium fluoride or magnesium fluoride; the temperature of the electrolyte is between 1150 and 1175 deg C. (AEC)

  12. Design of Uranium Solution Critical Experimental Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI; Da-yong; GUO; Zhi-jia; YAO; Cheng-zhi; SHI; Chen-lei

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2012, Department of reactor engineering design completes the design and mechanical analysis of Uranium solution critical experimental device. According to user’s requirements and nuclear safety regulations, design and analysis mainly involves two sets of core structure, uranium solution loop, water loop and experimental bench, etc. The core which includes a core vessel, reactor core support, safety rods, control rods, and so on, is used for containing uranium solution and fuel element and fulfilling the

  13. ELECTROLYTIC CLADDING OF ZIRCONIUM ON URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, J.J.

    1959-09-22

    A method is presented for coating uranium with zircoalum by rendering the uranium surface smooth and oxidefree, immersing it in a molten electrolytic bath in NaCI, K/sub 2/ZrF/sub 6/, KF, and ZrO/sub 2/, and before the article reaches temperature equilibrium with the bath, applying an electrolyzing current of 60 amperes per square dectmeter at approximately 3 volts to form a layer of zirconium metal on the uranium.

  14. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium; Recuperacao de uranio em escorias de uranio metalico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CNEN/IPEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Combustiveis Nucleares], e-mail: ffornar@ipen.br

    2006-07-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U{sub 3} Si{sub 2}) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF{sub 6}) with enrichment 20% in weight of {sup 235}U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U{sub 3}O{sub 8} is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  15. Lead (Pb) Isotope Baselines for Studies of Ancient Human Migration and Trade in the Maya Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharpe, Ashley E; Kamenov, George D; Gilli, Adrian; Hodell, David A; Emery, Kitty F; Brenner, Mark; Krigbaum, John

    2016-01-01

    .... We analyzed 60 rock samples for lead isotope ratios and a representative subset of samples for lead, uranium, and thorium concentrations across the Maya region, including the Northern Lowlands...

  16. Ego Depletion and the Strength Model of Self-Control: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagger, Martin S.; Wood, Chantelle; Stiff, Chris; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L. D.

    2010-01-01

    According to the strength model, self-control is a finite resource that determines capacity for effortful control over dominant responses and, once expended, leads to impaired self-control task performance, known as "ego depletion". A meta-analysis of 83 studies tested the effect of ego depletion on task performance and related outcomes,…

  17. Ego Depletion and the Strength Model of Self-Control: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagger, Martin S.; Wood, Chantelle; Stiff, Chris; Chatzisarantis, Nikos L. D.

    2010-01-01

    According to the strength model, self-control is a finite resource that determines capacity for effortful control over dominant responses and, once expended, leads to impaired self-control task performance, known as "ego depletion". A meta-analysis of 83 studies tested the effect of ego depletion on task performance and related outcomes,…

  18. Uranium market issues and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julian, L.C. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga (USA))

    1989-09-01

    The market for uranium has become increasingly international in scope. This trend is expected to continue, with additional sources of competitive supply entering the market. The decrease in constant-dollar uranium prices over the past 11-12 years has realigned competitive supply sources. Implementation of the US-Canada Free Trade Agreement in 1989 is a significant event in its implications for future trade patterns. Namibian independence from South Africa would open additional markets for Rossing production. Decisions by the government of Australia concerning the three mine policy and the floor price for contracts are crucial in the development of supply in that country. Uranium from China and the USSR may become increasingly available and acceptable to some worldwide buyers. Over the long run, the competitive status of the US with respect to certain foreign producers will probably depend more on the success of US producers in minimizing costs or using unconventional mining techniques, such as in-situ leach where feasible, than on legislative measures. Investment in promising areas outside of the US is a potential avenue to be explored for profitable ventures. Price formation is dependent on a number of interacting supply-and-demand factors. Future price movement will be the major factor determining which production centers will be competitive.

  19. Oxidation of uranium nanoparticles produced via pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trelenberg, T W; Glade, S C; Tobin, J G; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V

    2005-12-07

    An experimental apparatus designed for the synthesis, via pulsed laser deposition, and analysis of metallic nanoparticles and thin films of plutonium and other actinides was tested on depleted uranium samples. Five nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser produced films of {approx}1600 {angstrom} thickness that were deposited showing an angular distribution typical thermal ablation. The films remained contiguous for many months in vacuum but blistered due to induced tensile stresses several days after exposure to air. The films were allowed to oxidize from the residual water vapor within the chamber (2 x 10{sup -10} Torr base pressure). The oxidation was monitored by in-situ analysis techniques including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and followed Langmuir kinetics.

  20. Oxidation and crystal field effects in uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Booth, C. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shuh, D. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); van der Laan, G. [Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom); Sokaras, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Weng, T. -C. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Yu, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bagus, P. S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Tyliszczak, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nordlund, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-07-06

    An extensive investigation of oxidation in uranium has been pursued. This includes the utilization of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, hard x-ray absorption near-edge structure, resonant (hard) x-ray emission spectroscopy, cluster calculations, and a branching ratio analysis founded on atomic theory. The samples utilized were uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium trioxide (UO3), and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4). As a result, a discussion of the role of non-spherical perturbations, i.e., crystal or ligand field effects, will be presented.

  1. The Leyden uranium prospect, Jefferson County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, Garland B.

    1950-01-01

    The Leyden uranium prospect is in sec. 28, T, 2 S., R. 70 W, Jefferson County, Cplo, Examination of the property was made in February 1950. Uranium was first reported in this locality in 1875 by Captain E. L. Berthoud, who noted uranium minerals associated with the main coal bed. The Old Leyden coal mine workings have long been abandoned and caved, but specimens of the uranium-bearing rock can be seen on the old dump 700 feet to the south. The mineralized coal bed is 10 to 12 feet thick and occurs near the base of the Laramie formation of Upper Cretaceous age. Uranium minerals are present in the form of yellow incrustations and inclusions in fractured and partly silicified coal. Petrographic studies indicate that the silica and uranium minerals were deposited after deposition and carbonization of the coal. Secondary uranium minerals also were found by C. R. Butler along the outcrop of the sandstones in the Laramie formation. No uranium minerals were found in place by the writer, but four samples from the dump contained 0.001, 0,005, 0.17 and 0.69 percent uranium.

  2. Mitigating uranium in groundwater: prospects and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noubactep, C; Meinrath, G; Dietrich, P; Merkel, B

    2003-09-15

    Removal of uranium(VI) by zerovalent iron has been suggested as a feasible pathway to control uranium contaminations in seepage waters. Available information in the literature however presents discrepant evidence on the process responsible for the mitigation effect. On basis of an EH-pH diagram of uranium and iron, it is outlined that these discrepancies may be explained by the aqueous chemistry of uranium and iron. Additional effects contributing to the complexity of the system are given. Solubilization experiments using scrap iron together with water works sludge, MnO2, and pyrite indicate that U(VI) is immobilized by iron corrosion products after about 50 days.

  3. In Vivo Nanodetoxication for Acute Uranium Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guzmán

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accidental exposure to uranium is a matter of concern, as U(VI is nephrotoxic in both human and animal models, and its toxicity is associated to chemical toxicity instead of radioactivity. We synthesized different PAMAM G4 and G5 derivatives in order to prove their interaction with uranium and their effect on the viability of red blood cells in vitro. Furthermore, we prove the effectiveness of the selected dendrimers in an animal model of acute uranium intoxication. The dendrimer PAMAM G4-Lys-Fmoc-Cbz demonstrated the ability to chelate the uranyl ion in vivo, improving the biochemical and histopathologic features caused by acute intoxication with uranium.

  4. Colorimetric detection of uranium in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVol, Timothy A [Clemson, SC; Hixon, Amy E [Piedmont, SC; DiPrete, David P [Evans, GA

    2012-03-13

    Disclosed are methods, materials and systems that can be used to determine qualitatively or quantitatively the level of uranium contamination in water samples. Beneficially, disclosed systems are relatively simple and cost-effective. For example, disclosed systems can be utilized by consumers having little or no training in chemical analysis techniques. Methods generally include a concentration step and a complexation step. Uranium concentration can be carried out according to an extraction chromatographic process and complexation can chemically bind uranium with a detectable substance such that the formed substance is visually detectable. Methods can detect uranium contamination down to levels even below the MCL as established by the EPA.

  5. Statistical data of the uranium industry