WorldWideScience

Sample records for dependent variables consisted

  1. Consistency and variability in functional localisers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Keith J.; Pattamadilok, Chotiga; Knierim, Iris; Devlin, Joseph T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying the use of functional localiser scans is that the voxels identified as the functional region-of-interest (fROI) are essentially the same as those activated by the main experimental manipulation. Intra-subject variability in the location of the fROI violates this assumption, reducing the sensitivity of the analysis and biasing the results. Here we investigated consistency and variability in fROIs in a set of 45 volunteers. They performed two functional localiser scans to identify word- and object-sensitive regions of ventral and lateral occipito-temporal cortex, respectively. In the main analyses, fROIs were defined as the category-selective voxels in each region and consistency was measured as the spatial overlap between scans. Consistency was greatest when minimally selective thresholds were used to define “active” voxels (p < 0.05 uncorrected), revealing that approximately 65% of the voxels were commonly activated by both scans. In contrast, highly selective thresholds (p < 10− 4 to 10− 6) yielded the lowest consistency values with less than 25% overlap of the voxels active in both scans. In other words, intra-subject variability was surprisingly high, with between one third and three quarters of the voxels in a given fROI not corresponding to those activated in the main task. This level of variability stands in striking contrast to the consistency seen in retinotopically-defined areas and has important implications for designing robust but efficient functional localiser scans. PMID:19289173

  2. Consistent Design of Dependable Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, M.

    1996-01-01

    Design of fault handling in control systems is discussed, and a method for consistent design is presented.......Design of fault handling in control systems is discussed, and a method for consistent design is presented....

  3. Consistent Algorithm for Multi-value Constraint with Continuous Variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Mature algorithms for the Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP) of binary constraint with discrete variables have already been obtained for the application. For the instance of multi-value constraint with continuous variables, the approach will be quite different and the difficulty of settling will aggrandize a lot. This paper presents the algorithm for realizing global consistency of continuous variable. And this algorithm can be applied to multi-value constraint.

  4. Consistent histories, quantum truth functionals, and hidden variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2000-01-01

    A central principle of consistent histories quantum theory, the requirement that quantum descriptions be based upon a single framework (or family), is employed to show that there is no conflict between consistent histories and a no-hidden-variables theorem of Bell, and Kochen and Specker, contrary to a recent claim by Bassi and Ghirardi. The argument makes use of `truth functionals' defined on a Boolean algebra of classical or quantum properties.

  5. Consistent histories, quantum truth functionals, and hidden variables

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, R B

    1999-01-01

    A central principle of consistent histories quantum theory, the requirement that quantum descriptions be based upon a single framework (or family), is employed to show that there is no conflict between consistent histories and a no-hidden-variables theorem of Bell, and Kochen and Specker, contrary to a recent claim by Bassi and Ghirardi. The argument makes use of ``truth functionals'' defined on a Boolean algebra of classical or quantum properties.

  6. Integrating models that depend on variable data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, A. T.; Hill, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    -transformation. Greater consistency is obtained by imposing smaller (by up to a factor of 1/35) weights on the smaller dependent-variable values. From an error-based perspective, the small weights are consistent with large standard deviations. This work considers the consequences of these two common ways of addressing variable data.

  7. Inter-laboratory consistency and variability in the buccal micronucleus cytome assay depends on biomarker scored and laboratory experience: results from the HUMNxl international inter-laboratory scoring exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Claudia; Knasmueller, Siegfried; Nersesyan, Armen; Roggieri, Paola; Ceppi, Marcello; Bruzzone, Marco; Blaszczyk, Ewa; Mielzynska-Svach, Danuta; Milic, Mirta; Bonassi, Stefano; Benedetti, Danieli; Da Silva, Juliana; Toledo, Raphael; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero; Groot de Restrepo, Helena; Filipic, Metka; Hercog, Klara; Aktas, Ayça; Burgaz, Sema; Kundi, Michael; Grummt, Tamara; Thomas, Philip; Hor, Maryam; Escudero-Fung, Maria; Holland, Nina; Fenech, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The buccal micronucleus cytome (BMNcyt) assay in uncultured exfoliated epithelial cells from oral mucosa is widely applied in biomonitoring human exposures to genotoxic agents and is also proposed as a suitable test for prescreening and follow-up of precancerous oral lesions. The main limitation of the assay is the large variability observed in the baseline values of micronuclei (MNi) and other nuclear anomalies mainly related to different scoring criteria. The aim of this international collaborative study, involving laboratories with different level of experience, was to evaluate the inter- and intra-laboratory variations in the BMNcyt parameters, using recently implemented guidelines, in scoring cells from the same pooled samples obtained from healthy subjects (control group) and from cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (treated group). The results indicate that all laboratories correctly discriminated samples from the two groups by a significant increase of micronucleus (MN) and nuclear bud (NBUD) frequencies and differentiated binucleated (BN) cells, associated with the exposure to ionizing radiation. The experience of the laboratories was shown to play an important role in the identification of the different cell types and nuclear anomalies. MN frequency in differentiated mononucleated (MONO) and BN cells showed the greatest consistency among the laboratories and low variability was also detected in the frequencies of MONO and BN cells. A larger variability was observed in classifying the different cell types, indicating the subjectivity in the interpretation of some of the scoring criteria while reproducibility of the results between scoring sessions was very good. An inter-laboratory calibration exercise is strongly recommended before starting studies with BMNcyt assay involving multiple research centers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions

  8. Consistent seasonal snow cover depth and duration variability over the Western Himalayas (WH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dan; Juyal, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation in solid form, i.e., snow, during winter season over the Western Himalayas (WH) leads to the build-up of seasonal snow cover. Seasonal snow cover build-up (snow cover depth and duration) largely depends on atmospheric variables such as temperature, precipitation, radiation, wind, etc. Integrated (combined) influence of atmospheric variables on seasonal snow cover gets reflected in terms of spatial and temporal variability in seasonal snow cover build-up pattern. Hence spatial and temporal variability of seasonal snow cover build-up can serve as a good indicator of climate change in high altitude mountainous regions like the WH. Consistent seasonal snow cover depth and duration, delay days and early melt days of consistent seasonal snow cover at 11 stations spread across different mountain ranges over the WH were analyzed. Mean, maximum and percentiles (25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 95th) of consistent seasonal snow cover depth and duration show decline over the WH in the recent past 2-3 decades. Consistent seasonal snow cover is found to melt early and snow cover build-up pattern is found to show changes over the WH. Decline in consistent seasonal snow cover depth, duration and changing snow cover build-up pattern over the WH in recent decades indicate that WH has undergone considerable climate change and winter weather patterns are changing in the WH.

  9. Consistent seasonal snow cover depth and duration variability over the Western Himalayas (WH)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dan Singh; Vikas Juyal; Vikas Sharma

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation in solid form, i.e., snow, during winter season over theWestern Himalayas (WH) leads to the build-up of seasonal snow cover. Seasonal snow cover build-up (snow cover depth and duration) largely depends on atmospheric variables such as temperature, precipitation, radiation, wind, etc. Integrated(combined) influence of atmospheric variables on seasonal snow cover gets reflected in terms of spatial and temporal variability in seasonal snow cover build-up pattern. Hence spatial and temporal variability of seasonal snow cover build-up can serve as a good indicator of climate change in high altitude mountainousregions like the WH. Consistent seasonal snow cover depth and duration, delay days and early melt days of consistent seasonal snow cover at 11 stations spread across different mountain ranges over the WH were analyzed. Mean, maximum and percentiles (25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 95th) of consistent seasonal snow cover depth and duration show decline over the WH in the recent past 2–3 decades. Consistent seasonal snow cover is found to melt early and snow cover build-up pattern is found to show changes over the WH. Decline in consistent seasonal snow cover depth, duration and changing snow cover buildup pattern over the WH in recent decades indicate that WH has undergone considerable climate changeand winter weather patterns are changing in the WH.

  10. Energy-dependent variability from accretion flows

    OpenAIRE

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    2005-01-01

    We develop a formalism to calculate energy-dependent fractional variability (rms) in accretion flows. We consider rms spectra resulting from radial dependencies of the level of local variability (as expected from propagation of disturbances in accretion flows) assuming the constant shape of the spectrum emitted at a given radius. We consider the cases when the variability of the flow is either coherent or incoherent between different radial zones. As example local emission, we consider blackb...

  11. Limited dependent variable models for panel data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charlier, E.

    1997-01-01

    Many economic phenomena require limited variable models for an appropriate treatment. In addition, panel data models allow the inclusion of unobserved individual-specific effects. These models are combined in this thesis. Distributional assumptions in the limited dependent variable models are

  12. Evolution variable dependence of jet substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Sakaki, Yasuhito

    2015-01-01

    Studies on jet substructure have evolved significantly in recent years. Jet substructure is essentially determined by QCD radiations and non-perturbative effects. Predictions of jet substructure are usually different among Monte Carlo event generators, and are governed by the parton shower algorithm implemented. For leading logarithmic parton shower, even though one of the core variables is the evolution variable, its choice is not unique. We examine evolution variable dependence of the jet substructure by developing a parton shower generator that interpolates between different evolution variables using a parameter $\\alpha$. Jet shape variables and associated jet rates for quark and gluon jets are used to demonstrate the $\\alpha$-dependence of the jet substructure. We find angular ordered shower predicts wider jets, while relative transverse momentum ($p_{\\bot}$) ordered shower predicts narrower jets. This is qualitatively in agreement with the missing phase space of $p_{\\bot}$ ordered showers. Such differenc...

  13. Context-dependent individual behavioral consistency in Daphnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuschele, Jan; Ekvall, Mikael T.; Bianco, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    , whereas studies focusing on smaller aquatic organisms are still rare. Here, we show individual differences in the swimming behavior of Daphnia magna, a clonal freshwater invertebrate, before, during, and after being exposed to a lethal threat, ultraviolet radiation (UVR). We show consistency in swimming...

  14. Branch dependence in the "consistent histories" approach to quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, T

    2005-01-01

    In the consistent histories formalism one specifies a family of histories as an exhaustive set of pairwise exclusive descriptions of the dynamics of a quantum system. We define branching families of histories, which strike a middle ground between the two available mathematically precise definitions of families of histories, viz., product families and Isham's history projector operator formalism. The former are too narrow for applications, and the latter's generality comes at a certain cost, barring an intuitive reading of the ``histories''. Branching families retain the intuitiveness of product families, they allow for the interpretation of a history's weight as a probability, and they allow one to distinguish two kinds of coarse-graining. It is shown that for branching families, the ``consistency condition'' is not a precondition for assigning probabilities, but for a specific kind of coarse-graining.

  15. Human Action Perception is Consistent, Flexible, and Orientation Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Jeff; Pechey, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has found that observers of object-directed human action pay more attention to information regarding hand contact over information regarding spatial trajectories in action, and that processing of trajectory information is disrupted by inversion. However, observers can also flexibly modulate their attention to spatial trajectory depending on the goal or context of the actor. In Experiments 1(a) and 1b of the current research, we directly compared attention with hand and trajectory information across placing and dropping actions in order to determine whether the hand bias is always present or whether flexibility in action perception can attenuate this bias. Results demonstrated that observers attend more to hand information for placing, but attend equally to hand and trajectory information for dropping. Experiment 2 explored the role of the actor's goal in processing spatial trajectory for mimed dropping actions and non-human control stimuli, and the role of goals in the inversion effect. Results indicated that goal relevance increases processing of trajectory information, and that processing of all spatial trajectories in human action is disrupted by inversion, regardless of the actor's goal. The present findings highlight the role of prediction in action perception, and suggest that human action is processed with expertise.

  16. Energy-dependent variability from accretion flows

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, A A

    2005-01-01

    We develop a formalism to calculate energy-dependent fractional variability (rms) in accretion flows. We consider rms spectra resulting from radial dependencies of the level of local variability (as expected from propagation of disturbances in accretion flows) assuming the constant shape of the spectrum emitted at a given radius. We consider the cases when the variability of the flow is either coherent or incoherent between different radial zones. As example local emission, we consider blackbody, Wien and thermal Comptonization spectra. In addition to numerical results, we present a number of analytical formulae for the resulting rms. We also find an analytical formula for the disc Wien spectrum, which we find to be a very good approximation to the disc blackbody. We compare our results to the rms spectrum observed in an ultrasoft state of GRS 1915+105.

  17. Degenerate U- and V-statistics under weak dependence: Asymptotic theory and bootstrap consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Leucht, Anne

    2012-01-01

    We devise a general result on the consistency of model-based bootstrap methods for U- and V-statistics under easily verifiable conditions. For that purpose, we derive the limit distributions of degree-2 degenerate U- and V-statistics for weakly dependent $\\mathbb{R}^d$-valued random variables first. To this end, only some moment conditions and smoothness assumptions concerning the kernel are required. Based on this result, we verify that the bootstrap counterparts of these statistics have the same limit distributions. Finally, some applications to hypothesis testing are presented.

  18. Benford's Law and Continuous Dependent Random Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Thealexa; Miller, Steven J; Ronan, Ryan; Strauch, Frederick W

    2011-01-01

    Many systems exhibit a digit bias. For example, the first digit base 10 of the Fibonacci numbers, or of $2^n$, equals 1 not 10% or 11% of the time, as one would expect if all digits were equally likely, but about 30% of the time. This phenomenon, known as Benford's Law, has many applications, ranging from detecting tax fraud for the IRS to analyzing round-off errors in computer science. The central question is determining which data sets follow Benford's law. Inspired by natural processes such as particle decay, our work examines models for the decomposition of conserved quantities. We prove that in many instances the distribution of lengths of the resulting pieces converges to Benford behavior as the number of divisions grow. The main difficulty is that the resulting random variables are dependent, which we handle by a careful analysis of the dependencies and tools from Fourier analysis to obtain quantified convergence rates.

  19. Independent, dependent, and other variables in healthcare and chaplaincy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannelly, Laura T; Flannelly, Kevin J; Jankowski, Katherine R B

    2014-01-01

    This article begins by defining the term variable and the terms independent variable and dependent variable, providing examples of each. It then proceeds to describe and discuss synonyms for the terms independent variable and dependent variable, including treatment, intervention, predictor, and risk factor, and synonyms for dependent variable, such as response variables and outcomes. The article explains that the terms extraneous, nuisance, and confounding variables refer to any variable that can interfere with the ability to establish relationships between independent variables and dependent variables, and it describes ways to control for such confounds. It further explains that even though intervening, mediating, and moderating variables explicitly alter the relationship between independent variables and dependent variables, they help to explain the causal relationship between them. In addition, the article links terminology about variables with the concept of levels of measurement in research.

  20. A Time-Dependent Λ and G Cosmological Model Consistent with Cosmological Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kantha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevailing constant Λ-G cosmological model agrees with observational evidence including the observed red shift, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN, and the current rate of acceleration. It assumes that matter contributes 27% to the current density of the universe, with the rest (73% coming from dark energy represented by the Einstein cosmological parameter Λ in the governing Friedmann-Robertson-Walker equations, derived from Einstein’s equations of general relativity. However, the principal problem is the extremely small value of the cosmological parameter (~10−52 m2. Moreover, the dark energy density represented by Λ is presumed to have remained unchanged as the universe expanded by 26 orders of magnitude. Attempts to overcome this deficiency often invoke a variable Λ-G model. Cosmic constraints from action principles require that either both G and Λ remain time-invariant or both vary in time. Here, we propose a variable Λ-G cosmological model consistent with the latest red shift data, the current acceleration rate, and BBN, provided the split between matter and dark energy is 18% and 82%. Λ decreases (Λ~τ-2, where τ is the normalized cosmic time and G increases (G~τn with cosmic time. The model results depend only on the chosen value of Λ at present and in the far future and not directly on G.

  1. The discovery of timescale-dependent color variability of quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yu-Han; Wang, Jun-Xian; Chen, Xiao-Yang [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zheng, Zhen-Ya, E-mail: sunyh92@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.cn [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Quasars are variable on timescales from days to years in UV/optical and generally appear bluer while they brighten. The physics behind the variations in fluxes and colors remains unclear. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey g- and r-band photometric monitoring data for quasars in Stripe 82, we find that although the flux variation amplitude increases with timescale, the color variability exhibits the opposite behavior. The color variability of quasars is prominent at timescales as short as ∼10 days, but gradually reduces toward timescales up to years. In other words, the variable emission at shorter timescales is bluer than that at longer timescales. This timescale dependence is clearly and consistently detected at all redshifts from z = 0 to 3.5; thus, it cannot be due to contamination to broadband photometry from emission lines that do not respond to fast continuum variations. The discovery directly rules out the possibility that simply attributes the color variability to contamination from a non-variable redder component such as the host galaxy. It cannot be interpreted as changes in global accretion rate either. The thermal accretion disk fluctuation model is favored in the sense that fluctuations in the inner, hotter region of the disk are responsible for short-term variations, while longer-term and stronger variations are expected from the larger and cooler disk region. An interesting implication is that one can use quasar variations at different timescales to probe disk emission at different radii.

  2. The Discovery of Timescale-Dependent Color Variability of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yu-Han; Chen, Xiao-Yang; Zheng, Zhen-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Quasars are variable on timescales from days to years in UV/optical, and generally appear bluer while they brighten. The physics behind the variations in fluxes and colors remains unclear. Using SDSS g and r band photometric monitoring data of quasars in Stripe 82, we find that although the flux variation amplitude increases with timescale, the color variability exhibits opposite behavior. The color variability of quasars is prominent at timescales as short as ~ 10 days, but gradually reduces toward timescales up to years. In other words, the variable emission at shorter timescales is bluer than that at longer timescales. This timescale dependence is clearly and consistently detected at all redshifts from z = 0 to 3.5, thus can not be due to contaminations to broadband photometry from emission lines which do not respond to fast continuum variations. The discovery directly rules out the possibility that simply attributes the color variability to contamination from a non-variable redder component, such as the h...

  3. Cardinality-dependent Variability in Orthogonal Variability Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mærsk-Møller, Hans Martin; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2012-01-01

    During our work on developing and running a software product line for eco-sustainable greenhouse-production software tools, which currently have three products members we have identified a need for extending the notation of the Orthogonal Variability Model (OVM) to support what we refer to as car......During our work on developing and running a software product line for eco-sustainable greenhouse-production software tools, which currently have three products members we have identified a need for extending the notation of the Orthogonal Variability Model (OVM) to support what we refer...

  4. Consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes when catchability depends on encounters among human predators and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Together with life-history and underlying physiology, the behavioural variability among fish is one of the three main trait axes that determines the vulnerability to fishing. However, there are only a few studies that have systematically investigated the strength and direction of selection acting on behavioural traits. Using in situ fish behaviour revealed by telemetry techniques as input, we developed an individual-based model (IBM) that simulated the Lagrangian trajectory of prey (fish) moving within a confined home range (HR). Fishers exhibiting various prototypical fishing styles targeted these fish in the model. We initially hypothesised that more active and more explorative individuals would be systematically removed under all fished conditions, in turn creating negative selection differentials on low activity phenotypes and maybe on small HR. Our results partly supported these general predictions. Standardised selection differentials were, on average, more negative on HR than on activity. However, in many simulation runs, positive selection pressures on HR were also identified, which resulted from the stochastic properties of the fishes' movement and its interaction with the human predator. In contrast, there was a consistent negative selection on activity under all types of fishing styles. Therefore, in situations where catchability depends on spatial encounters between human predators and fish, we would predict a consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes and have less faith in the direction of the selection on HR size. Our study is the first theoretical investigation on the direction of fishery-induced selection of behaviour using passive fishing gears. The few empirical studies where catchability of fish was measured in relation to passive fishing techniques, such as gill-nets, traps or recreational fishing, support our predictions that fish in highly exploited situations are, on average, characterised by low swimming activity, stemming, in

  5. Consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes when catchability depends on encounters among human predators and fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Alós

    Full Text Available Together with life-history and underlying physiology, the behavioural variability among fish is one of the three main trait axes that determines the vulnerability to fishing. However, there are only a few studies that have systematically investigated the strength and direction of selection acting on behavioural traits. Using in situ fish behaviour revealed by telemetry techniques as input, we developed an individual-based model (IBM that simulated the Lagrangian trajectory of prey (fish moving within a confined home range (HR. Fishers exhibiting various prototypical fishing styles targeted these fish in the model. We initially hypothesised that more active and more explorative individuals would be systematically removed under all fished conditions, in turn creating negative selection differentials on low activity phenotypes and maybe on small HR. Our results partly supported these general predictions. Standardised selection differentials were, on average, more negative on HR than on activity. However, in many simulation runs, positive selection pressures on HR were also identified, which resulted from the stochastic properties of the fishes' movement and its interaction with the human predator. In contrast, there was a consistent negative selection on activity under all types of fishing styles. Therefore, in situations where catchability depends on spatial encounters between human predators and fish, we would predict a consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes and have less faith in the direction of the selection on HR size. Our study is the first theoretical investigation on the direction of fishery-induced selection of behaviour using passive fishing gears. The few empirical studies where catchability of fish was measured in relation to passive fishing techniques, such as gill-nets, traps or recreational fishing, support our predictions that fish in highly exploited situations are, on average, characterised by low swimming activity

  6. Are the Variability Properties of the Kepler AGN Light Curves Consistent with a Damped Random Walk?

    CERN Document Server

    Kasliwal, Vishal P; Richards, Gordon T

    2015-01-01

    We test the consistency of active galactic nuclei (AGN) optical flux variability with the \\textit{damped random walk} (DRW) model. Our sample consists of 20 multi-quarter \\textit{Kepler} AGN light curves including both Type 1 and 2 Seyferts, radio-loud and -quiet AGN, quasars, and blazars. \\textit{Kepler} observations of AGN light curves offer a unique insight into the variability properties of AGN light curves because of the very rapid ($11.6-28.6$ min) and highly uniform rest-frame sampling combined with a photometric precision of $1$ part in $10^{5}$ over a period of 3.5 yr. We categorize the light curves of all 20 objects based on visual similarities and find that the light curves fall into 5 broad categories. We measure the first order structure function of these light curves and model the observed light curve with a general broken power-law PSD characterized by a short-timescale power-law index $\\gamma$ and turnover timescale $\\tau$. We find that less than half the objects are consistent with a DRW and ...

  7. Maximal Inequalities for Dependent Random Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Jorgensen, Jorgen

    2016-01-01

    Maximal inequalities play a crucial role in many probabilistic limit theorem; for instance, the law of large numbers, the law of the iterated logarithm, the martingale limit theorem and the central limit theorem. Let X-1, X-2,... be random variables with partial sums S-k = X-1 + ... + X-k. Then a......Maximal inequalities play a crucial role in many probabilistic limit theorem; for instance, the law of large numbers, the law of the iterated logarithm, the martingale limit theorem and the central limit theorem. Let X-1, X-2,... be random variables with partial sums S-k = X-1 + ... + X...

  8. Variability dependencies in product family engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaring, M; Bosch, J; VanDerLinden, F

    2004-01-01

    In a product family context, software architects anticipate product diversification and design architectures that support variants in both space (multiple contexts) and time (changing contexts). Product diversification is based on the concept of variability: a single architecture and a set of compon

  9. Near-resonant absorption in the time-dependent self-consistent field and multiconfigurational self-consistent field approximations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Patrick; Bishop, David M.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa;

    2001-01-01

    Computationally tractable expressions for the evaluation of the linear response function in the multiconfigurational self-consistent field approximation were derived and implemented. The finite lifetime of the electronically excited states was considered and the linear response function was shown...

  10. Consistent increase in Indian monsoon rainfall and its variability across CMIP-5 models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Menon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of an impact of global warming on the Indian monsoon is of critical importance for the large population of this region. Future projections within the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 3 (CMIP-3 showed a wide range of trends with varying magnitude and sign across models. Here the Indian summer monsoon rainfall is evaluated in 20 CMIP-5 models for the period 1850 to 2100. In the new generation of climate models a consistent increase in seasonal mean rainfall during the summer monsoon periods arises. All models simulate stronger seasonal mean rainfall in the future compared to the historic period under the strongest warming scenario RCP-8.5. Increase in seasonal mean rainfall is the largest for the RCP-8.5 scenario compared to other RCPs. The interannual variability of the Indian monsoon rainfall also shows a consistent positive trend under unabated global warming. Since both the long-term increase in monsoon rainfall as well as the increase in interannual variability in the future is robust across a wide range of models, some confidence can be attributed to these projected trends.

  11. Consistency across missions of long time series of global biophysical variables: challenges and lessons learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Roselyne; Smets, Bruno; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Camacho, Fernando; Swinnen, Else; Verger, Aleixandre

    2017-04-01

    The Global component of the Copernicus Land Monitoring Service (CGLS) provides continuously a set of bio-geophysical variables describing the dynamics of vegetation, the energy budget at the continental surface, the water cycle and the cryosphere. Products are generated on a reliable and automatic basis from Earth Observation satellite data, at a frequency ranging from one hour to 10 days. They are accessible free of charge through the GCLS website (http://land.copernicus.eu/global/), associated with documentation describing the physical methodologies, the technical properties of products, and the quality of variables based on the results of validation exercises. The portfolio of the CGLS contains some Essential Climate Variables (ECV) like the Leaf Area Index (LAI), the Fraction of PAR absorbed by the vegetation (FAPAR), the surface albedo, and additional vegetation indices. These products were derived from SPOT/VEGETATION sensor data till December 2013, are currently derived from PROBA-V sensor data, and will be derived in the future from Sentinel-3 data. This talk will show how challenging is the transition between sensors to ensure the sustainability of the production while keeping the consistency of the time series. We will discuss the various sources of differences from input data, the impact of these differences on the biophysical variables and, in turn, on some final users' applications as such those based upon anomalies or assimilation of time series. We will present the mitigation measures taken to reduce as much as possible this impact. We will conclude with the lessons learnt and how this experience will be exploited to manage the transition towards Sentinel-3.

  12. Bayesian Network Models for Local Dependence among Observable Outcome Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Russell G.; Mulder, Joris; Hemat, Lisa A.; Yan, Duanli

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian network models offer a large degree of flexibility for modeling dependence among observables (item outcome variables) from the same task, which may be dependent. This article explores four design patterns for modeling locally dependent observations: (a) no context--ignores dependence among observables; (b) compensatory context--introduces…

  13. Using naturalistic driving data to identify variables associated with infrequent, occasional, and consistent seat belt use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Ian J; McClafferty, Julie A; Berlin, Sharon P; Hankey, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Seat belt use is one of the most effective countermeasures to reduce traffic fatalities and injuries. The success of efforts to increase use is measured by road side observations and self-report questionnaires. These methods have shortcomings, with the former requiring a binary point estimate and the latter being subjective. The 100-car naturalistic driving study presented a unique opportunity to study seat belt use in that seat belt status was known for every trip each driver made during a 12-month period. Drivers were grouped into infrequent, occasional, or consistent seat belt users based on the frequency of belt use. Analyses were then completed to assess if these groups differed on several measures including personality, demographics, self-reported driving style variables as well as measures from the 100-car study instrumentation suite (average trip speed, trips per day). In addition, detailed analyses of the occasional belt user group were completed to identify factors that were predictive of occasional belt users wearing their belts. The analyses indicated that consistent seat belt users took fewer trips per day, and that increased average trip speed was associated with increased belt use among occasional belt users. The results of this project may help focus messaging efforts to convert occasional and inconsistent seat belt users to consistent users.

  14. Validity of a Residualized Dependent Variable after Pretest Covariance Adjustments: Still the Same Variable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimon, Kim; Henson, Robin K.

    2015-01-01

    The authors empirically examined whether the validity of a residualized dependent variable after covariance adjustment is comparable to that of the original variable of interest. When variance of a dependent variable is removed as a result of one or more covariates, the residual variance may not reflect the same meaning. Using the pretest-posttest…

  15. Consistent projection methods for variable density incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with continuous surface forces on a rectangular collocated mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ming-Jiu

    2009-10-01

    Two consistent projection methods of second-order temporal and spatial accuracy have been developed on a rectangular collocated mesh for variable density Navier-Stokes equations with a continuous surface force. Instead of the original projection methods (denoted as algorithms I and II in this paper), in which the updated cell center velocity from the intermediate velocity and the pressure gradient is not guaranteed solenoidal, the consistent projection methods (denoted as algorithms III and IV) obtain the cell center velocity based on an interpolation from a conservative fluxes with velocity unit on surrounding cell faces. Dependent on treatment of the continuous surface force, the pressure gradient in algorithm III or the sum of the pressure gradient and the surface force in algorithm IV at a cell center is then conducted from the difference between the updated velocity and the intermediate velocity in a consistent projection method. A non-viscous 3D static drop with serials of density ratios is numerically simulated. Using the consistent projection methods, the spurious currents can be greatly reduced and the pressure jump across the interface can be accurately captured without oscillations. The developed consistent projection method are also applied for simulation of interface evolution of an initial ellipse driven by the surface tension and of an initial sphere bubble driven by the buoyancy with good accuracy and good resolution.

  16. Earthquake recurrence on the south Hayward fault is most consistent with a time dependent, renewal process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, T.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic rebound and stress renewal are important components of earthquake forecasting because if large earthquakes can be shown to be periodic, then rupture probability is time dependent. While renewal models are used in formal forecasts, it has not been possible to exclude the alternate view that repeated large earthquakes can happen in rapid succession without requiring time for stress regeneration. Here a consistency test between time dependent and time independent recurrence distributions is made using a Monte Carlo method to replicate the paleoseismic series on the south Hayward fault. Time dependent distributions with recurrence interval of 210 years and coefficient of variation of 0.6 reproduce the event series on the south Hayward 5 times more often than any exponential distribution: a highly significant difference as determined using a two-tailed Z-test for relative proportions. Therefore large Hayward fault earthquakes are quasi-periodic and are most consistent with a stress renewal process.

  17. Generalized linear models for categorical and continuous limited dependent variables

    CERN Document Server

    Smithson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and OverviewThe Nature of Limited Dependent VariablesOverview of GLMsEstimation Methods and Model EvaluationOrganization of This BookDiscrete VariablesBinary VariablesLogistic RegressionThe Binomial GLMEstimation Methods and IssuesAnalyses in R and StataExercisesNominal Polytomous VariablesMultinomial Logit ModelConditional Logit and Choice ModelsMultinomial Processing Tree ModelsEstimation Methods and Model EvaluationAnalyses in R and StataExercisesOrdinal Categorical VariablesModeling Ordinal Variables: Common Practice versus Best PracticeOrdinal Model AlternativesCumulative Mod

  18. Future-dependent Flow Policies with Prophetic Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ximeng; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2016-01-01

    future-dependent flow policies- policies that can depend on not only the current values of variables, but also their final values. The final values are referred to using what we call prophetic variables, just as the initial values can be referenced using logical variables in Hoare logic. We develop......Content-dependency often plays an important role in the information flow security of real world IT systems. Content dependency gives rise to informative policies and permissive static enforcement, and sometimes avoids the need for downgrading. We develop a static type system to soundly enforce...... and enforce a notion of future-dependent security for open systems, in the spirit of "non-deducibility on strategies". We also illustrate our approach in scenarios where future-dependency has advantages over present-dependency and avoids mixtures of upgradings and downgradings....

  19. Structural Response Analysis under Dependent Variables Based on Probability Boxes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiao, Z; Yang, G

    2015-01-01

      This paper considers structural response analysis when structural uncertainty parameters distribution cannot be specified precisely due to lack of information and there are complex dependencies in the variables...

  20. Fixed transaction costs and modelling limited dependent variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempenius, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    As an alternative to the Tobit model, for vectors of limited dependent variables, I suggest a model, which follows from explicitly using fixed costs, if appropriate of course, in the utility function of the decision-maker.

  1. Consistent patterns of spatial variability between NE Atlantic and Mediterraneanrocky shores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dal Bello, M.; Leclerc, J.-C.; Benedetti-Cecchi, L.; Hummel, H.

    2016-01-01

    Examining how variability in population abundance and distribution is allotted among different spatial scales can inform of processes that are likely to generate that variability. Results of studies dealing with scale issues in marine benthic communities suggest that variability is concentrated at s

  2. Discovery of Fourier-dependent time lags in cataclysmic variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scaringi, S.; Körding, E.; Groot, P.J.; Uttley, P.; Marsh, T.; Knigge, C.; Maccarone, T.; Dhillon, V.S.

    2013-01-01

    We report the first study of Fourier-frequency-dependent coherence and phase/time lags at optical wavelengths of cataclysmic variables (MV Lyr and LU Cam) displaying typical flickering variability in white light. Observations were performed on the William Herschel Telescope using ULTRACAM. Light

  3. Multivariate Regression with Monotone Missing Observation of the Dependent Variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raats, V.M.; van der Genugten, B.B.; Moors, J.J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate regression is discussed, where the observations of the dependent variables are (monotone) missing completely at random; the explanatory variables are assumed to be completely observed.We discuss OLS-, GLS- and a certain form of E(stimated) GLS-estimation.It turns out that

  4. Counter-rotating stellar discs around a massive black hole: self-consistent, time-dependent dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Touma, Jihad R

    2011-01-01

    We formulate the collisionless Boltzmann equation (CBE) for dense star clusters that lie within the radius of influence of a massive black hole in galactic nuclei. Our approach to these nearly Keplerian systems follows that of Sridhar and Touma (1999): Delaunay canonical variables are used to describe stellar orbits and we average over the fast Keplerian orbital phases. The stellar distribution function (DF) evolves on the longer time scale of precessional motions, whose dynamics is governed by a Hamiltonian, given by the orbit-averaged self-gravitational potential of the cluster. We specialize to razor-thin, planar discs and consider two counter-rotating ("$\\pm$") populations of stars. To describe discs of small eccentricities, we expand the $\\pm$ Hamiltonian to fourth order in the eccentricities, with coefficients that depend self-consistently on the $\\pm$ DFs. We construct approximate $\\pm$ dynamical invariants and use Jeans' theorem to construct time-dependent $\\pm$ DFs, which are completely described by ...

  5. Asymptotics for partly linear regression with dependent samples and ARCH errors: consistency with rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Partly linear regression model is useful in practice, but littleis investigated in the literature to adapt it to the real data which are dependent and conditionally heteroscedastic. In this paper, the estimators of the regression components are constructed via local polynomial fitting and the large sample properties are explored. Under certain mild regularities, the conditions are obtained to ensure that the estimators of the nonparametric component and its derivatives are consistent up to the convergence rates which are optimal in the i.i.d. case, and the estimator of the parametric component is root-n consistent with the same rate as for parametric model. The technique adopted in the proof differs from that used and corrects the errors in the reference by Hamilton and Truong under i.i.d. samples.

  6. Representation independent algorithms for molecular response calculations in time-dependent self-consistent field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretiak, Sergei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Four different numerical algorithms suitable for a linear scaling implementation of time-dependent Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham self-consistent field theories are examined. We compare the performance of modified Lanczos, Arooldi, Davidson, and Rayleigh quotient iterative procedures to solve the random-phase approximation (RPA) (non-Hermitian) and Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) (Hermitian) eigenvalue equations in the molecular orbital-free framework. Semiempirical Hamiltonian models are used to numerically benchmark algorithms for the computation of excited states of realistic molecular systems (conjugated polymers and carbon nanotubes). Convergence behavior and stability are tested with respect to a numerical noise imposed to simulate linear scaling conditions. The results single out the most suitable procedures for linear scaling large-scale time-dependent perturbation theory calculations of electronic excitations.

  7. On the density dependent hadron field theory at finite temperature and its thermodynamical consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Avancini, S S; Chiapparini, M; Peres-Menezes, D

    2004-01-01

    In this work we study in a formal way the density dependent hadron field theory at finite temperature for nuclear matter. The thermodynamical potential and related quantities, as energy density and pressure are derived in two different ways. We first obtain the thermodynamical potential from the grand partition function, where the Hamiltonian depends on the density operator and is truncated at first order. We then reobtain the thermodynamical potential by calculating explicitly the energy density in a Thomas-Fermi approximation and considering the entropy of a fermi gas. The distribution functions for particles and antiparticles are the output of the minimization of the thermodynamical potential. It is shown that in the mean field theory the thermodynamical consistency is achieved. The connection with effective chiral lagrangians with Brown-Rho scaling is discussed.

  8. Linear Scaling Solution of the Time-Dependent Self-Consistent-Field Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Challacombe

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to solving the Time-Dependent Self-Consistent-Field equations is developed based on the double quotient formulation of Tsiper 2001 (J. Phys. B. Dual channel, quasi-independent non-linear optimization of these quotients is found to yield convergence rates approaching those of the best case (single channel Tamm-Dancoff approximation. This formulation is variational with respect to matrix truncation, admitting linear scaling solution of the matrix-eigenvalue problem, which is demonstrated for bulk excitons in the polyphenylene vinylene oligomer and the (4,3 carbon nanotube segment.

  9. Ideal-perception consistency and regulation processes in young adults’ romantic relationships: The role of personal and relationship variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Martínez Arrieta

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of both personal variables and relationship variables on ideal-perception consistency and regulation in young adults’ romantic relationships were evaluated. 176 heterosexual individuals (88 men and 88 women – ages 18 to 25 years—responded to self-report questionnaires that assessed their relationship ideals with regard to three dimensions: warmth-trustworthiness, vitality-attractiveness, and status-resources. Research models were tested for each dimension using structural equations modelling. Results showed that both personal and relationship variables had significant effects on ideal-perception consistency and regulation (desire and attempts, especially for two dimensions: warmth-trustworthiness and status-resources. Sex differences in the effects of personal and relationship variables on both ideal-perception consistency and regulation were found. The implications of these results for research on romantic relationship are discussed

  10. Statistical Dependence of Pipe Breaks on Explanatory Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Gómez-Martínez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aging infrastructure is the main challenge currently faced by water suppliers. Estimation of assets lifetime requires reliable criteria to plan assets repair and renewal strategies. To do so, pipe break prediction is one of the most important inputs. This paper analyzes the statistical dependence of pipe breaks on explanatory variables, determining their optimal combination and quantifying their influence on failure prediction accuracy. A large set of registered data from Madrid water supply network, managed by Canal de Isabel II, has been filtered, classified and studied. Several statistical Bayesian models have been built and validated from the available information with a technique that combines reference periods of time as well as geographical location. Statistical models of increasing complexity are built from zero up to five explanatory variables following two approaches: a set of independent variables or a combination of two joint variables plus an additional number of independent variables. With the aim of finding the variable combination that provides the most accurate prediction, models are compared following an objective validation procedure based on the model skill to predict the number of pipe breaks in a large set of geographical locations. As expected, model performance improves as the number of explanatory variables increases. However, the rate of improvement is not constant. Performance metrics improve significantly up to three variables, but the tendency is softened for higher order models, especially in trunk mains where performance is reduced. Slight differences are found between trunk mains and distribution lines when selecting the most influent variables and models.

  11. Sampling designs dependent on sample parameters of auxiliary variables

    CERN Document Server

    Wywiał, Janusz L

    2015-01-01

    The book offers a valuable resource for students and statisticians whose work involves survey sampling. An estimation of the population parameters in finite and fixed populations assisted by auxiliary variables is considered. New sampling designs dependent on moments or quantiles of auxiliary variables are presented on the background of the classical methods. Accuracies of the estimators based on original sampling design are compared with classical estimation procedures. Specific conditional sampling designs are applied to problems of small area estimation as well as to estimation of quantiles of variables under study. .

  12. Consistency-dependent optical properties of lubricating grease studied by terahertz spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Lu; Miao Qing; Zhang Cun-Lin; Zhou Qing-Li; Zhao Kun; Shi Yu-Lei; Zhao Dong-Mei; Zhao Song-Qing; Zhao Hui; Bao Ri-Ma; Zhu Shou-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The optical properties of four kinds of lubricating greases (urea, lithium, extreme pressure lithium, molybdenum disulfide lithium greases) with different NLGL (National Lubricant Grease Institute of America) numbers were investigated using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Greases with different NLGL grades have unique spectral features in the terahertz range. Comparison of the experimental data with predictions based on Lorentz-Lorenz theory exhibited that the refractive indices of each kind of lubricating grease were dependent on the their consistency. In addition,molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as a libricant additive shows strong absorption from 0.2 to 1.4 THz, leading to higher absorption of MoS2-1ithium grease than that of lithium grease.

  13. Self-consistent RPA and the time-dependent density matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuck, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay (France); CNRS et Universite Joseph Fourier, Laboratoire de Physique et Modelisation des Milieux Condenses, Grenoble (France); Tohyama, M. [Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    The time-dependent density matrix (TDDM) or BBGKY (Bogoliubov, Born, Green, Kirkwood, Yvon) approach is decoupled and closed at the three-body level in finding a natural representation of the latter in terms of a quadratic form of two-body correlation functions. In the small amplitude limit an extended RPA coupled to an also extended second RPA is obtained. Since including two-body correlations means that the ground state cannot be a Hartree-Fock state, naturally the corresponding RPA is upgraded to Self-Consistent RPA (SCRPA) which was introduced independently earlier and which is built on a correlated ground state. SCRPA conserves all the properties of standard RPA. Applications to the exactly solvable Lipkin and the 1D Hubbard models show good performances of SCRPA and TDDM. (orig.)

  14. Consistent neutron star models with magnetic field dependent equations of state

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Debarati; Novak, Jerome; Oertel, Micaela

    2014-01-01

    We present a self-consistent model for the study of the structure of a neutron star in strong magnetic fields. Starting from a microscopic Lagrangian, this model includes the effect of the magnetic field on the equation of state, the interaction of the electromagnetic field with matter (magnetisation), and anisotropies in the energy-momentum tensor, as well as general relativistic aspects. We build numerical axisymmetric stationary models and show the applicability of the approach with one example quark matter equation of state (EoS) often employed in the recent literature for studies of strongly magnetised neutron stars. For this EoS, the effect of inclusion of magnetic field dependence or the magnetisation do not increase the maximum mass significantly in contrast to what has been claimed by previous studies.

  15. Time-dependent density functional theory using atomic orbitals and the self-consistent Sternheimer equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübener, Hannes; Giustino, Feliciano

    2014-02-01

    We present the implementation of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory based on the self-consistent Sternheimer equation and employing a basis set of numerical pseudo-atomic orbitals. We demonstrate this method by presenting test calculations on systems of increasing size ranging from benzene to chlorophyll a, and by comparing our results with those obtained within Casida's formalism and with previous calculations. We provide a detailed assessment of the accuracy of this method, both in relation to the use of local orbitals for describing electronic excitations and to the handling of the frequency response using Padé approximants. We establish a simple criterion for estimating a priori the accuracy of the basis set in the calculation of optical spectra. We show that the computational cost of this method scales quadratically with the system size.

  16. How important is self-consistency for the dDsC density dependent dispersion correction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brémond, Éric; Corminboeuf, Clémence, E-mail: clemence.corminboeuf@epfl.ch [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Golubev, Nikolay [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Steinmann, Stephan N., E-mail: sns25@duke.edu [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    The treatment of dispersion interactions is ubiquitous but computationally demanding for seamless ab initio approaches. A highly popular and simple remedy consists in correcting for the missing interactions a posteriori by adding an attractive energy term summed over all atom pairs to standard density functional approximations. These corrections were originally based on atom pairwise parameters and, hence, had a strong touch of empiricism. To overcome such limitations, we recently proposed a robust system-dependent dispersion correction, dDsC, that is computed from the electron density and that provides a balanced description of both weak inter- and intramolecular interactions. From the theoretical point of view and for the sake of increasing reliability, we here verify if the self-consistent implementation of dDsC impacts ground-state properties such as interaction energies, electron density, dipole moments, geometries, and harmonic frequencies. In addition, we investigate the suitability of the a posteriori scheme for molecular dynamics simulations, for which the analysis of the energy conservation constitutes a challenging tests. Our study demonstrates that the post-SCF approach in an excellent approximation.

  17. Testing Dependent Correlations with Nonoverlapping Variables: A Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, N. Clayton; Hittner, James B.; May, Kim

    2004-01-01

    The authors conducted a Monte Carlo simulation of 4 test statistics or comparing dependent correlations with no variables in common. Empirical Type 1 error rates and power estimates were determined for K. Pearson and L. N. G. Filon's (1898) z, O. J. Dunn and V. A. Clark's (1969) z, J. H. Steiger's (1980) original modification of Dunn and Clark's…

  18. Ideal-perception consistency and regulation processes in young adults’ romantic relationships: The role of personal and relationship variables

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Martínez Arrieta; Karen Ripoll-Núñez

    2013-01-01

    The effects of both personal variables and relationship variables on ideal-perception consistency and regulation in young adults’ romantic relationships were evaluated. 176 heterosexual individuals (88 men and 88 women) – ages 18 to 25 years—responded to self-report questionnaires that assessed their relationship ideals with regard to three dimensions: warmth-trustworthiness, vitality-attractiveness, and status-resources. Research models were tested for each dimension using structural equatio...

  19. Plasma Biomarker Profiles Differ Depending on Breast Cancer Subtype but RANTES is Consistently Increased

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, Rachel M.; Daly, Don S.; Tan, Ruimin; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-07-01

    Background: Current biomarkers for breast cancer have little potential for detection. We determined if breast cancer subtypes influence circulating protein biomarkers. Methods: A sandwich-ELISA microarray platform was used to evaluate 23 candidate biomarkers in plasma samples that were obtained from subjects with either benign breast disease or invasive breast cancer. All plasma samples were collected at the time of biopsy, after a referral due to a suspicious screen (e.g., mammography). Cancer samples were evaluated based on breast cancer subtypes, as defined by the HER2 and estrogen receptor statuses. Results: Ten proteins were statistically altered in at least one breast cancer subtype, including four epidermal growth factor receptor ligands, two matrix metalloproteases, two cytokines, and two angiogenic factors. Only one cytokine, RANTES, was significantly increased (P<0.01 for each analysis) in all four subtypes, with areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) that ranged from 0.76 to 0.82, depending on cancer subtype. The best AUC values were observed for analyses that combined data from multiple biomarkers, with values ranging from 0.70 to 0.99, depending on the cancer subtype. Although the results for RANTES are consistent with previous publications, the multi-assay results need to be validated in independent sample sets. Conclusions: Different breast cancer subtypes produce distinct biomarker profiles, and circulating protein biomarkers have potential to differentiate between true and false positive screens for breast cancer. Impact: Subtype-specific biomarker panels may be useful for detecting breast cancer or as an adjunct assay to improve the accuracy of current screening methods.

  20. Antarctic sea ice increase consistent with intrinsic variability of the Amundsen Sea Low

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, John; Hosking, J. Scott; Marshall, Gareth J.; Phillips, Tony; Bracegirdle, Thomas J.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the relationship between atmospheric circulation variability and the recent trends in Antarctic sea ice extent (SIE) using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) atmospheric data, ECMWF Interim reanalysis fields and passive microwave satellite data processed with the Bootstrap version 2 algorithm. Over 1979-2013 the annual mean total Antarctic SIE increased at a rate of 195 × 103 km2 dec-1 (1.6 % dec-1), p 4.0 % dec-1) has been in the Ross Sea sector. Off West Antarctica there is a high correlation between trends in SIE and trends in the near-surface winds. The Ross Sea SIE seasonal trends are positive throughout the year, but largest in spring. The stronger meridional flow over the Ross Sea has been driven by a deepening of the Amundsen Sea Low (ASL). Pre-industrial control and historical simulations from CMIP5 indicate that the observed deepening of the ASL and stronger southerly flow over the Ross Sea are within the bounds of modeled intrinsic variability. The spring trend would need to continue for another 11 years for it to fall outside the 2 standard deviation range seen in 90 % of the simulations.

  1. Necessary and sufficient conditions for moderate deviations of dependent random variables with heavy tails

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the moderate deviations of real-valued extended negatively dependent(END) random variables with consistently varying tails.The moderate deviations of partial sums are first given.The results are then used to establish the necessary and sufficient conditions for the moderate deviations of random sums under certain circumstances.

  2. Verifying the consistency relation for the scale-dependent bias from local primordial non-Gaussianity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagetti, Matteo; Lazeyras, Titouan; Baldauf, Tobias; Desjacques, Vincent; Schmidt, Fabian

    2017-07-01

    We measure the large-scale bias of dark matter haloes in simulations with non-Gaussian initial conditions of the local type, and compare this bias to the response of the mass function to a change in the primordial amplitude of fluctuations. The two are found to be consistent, as expected from physical arguments, for the three halo-finder algorithms which use different spherical overdensity (SO) and friends-of-friends methods. On the other hand, we find that the commonly used prediction for universal mass functions, that the scale-dependent bias is proportional to the first-order Gaussian Lagrangian bias, does not yield a good agreement with the measurements. For all halo finders, high-mass haloes show a non-Gaussian bias suppressed by 10-15 per cent relative to the universal mass function prediction. For SO haloes, this deviation changes sign at low masses, where the non-Gaussian bias becomes larger than the universal prediction.

  3. Verifying the consistency relation for the scale-dependent bias from local primordial non-Gaussianity

    CERN Document Server

    Biagetti, Matteo; Baldauf, Tobias; Desjacques, Vincent; Schmidt, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    We measure the large-scale bias of dark matter halos in simulations with non-Gaussian initial conditions of the local type, and compare this bias to the response of the mass function to a change in the primordial amplitude of fluctuations. The two are found to be consistent, as expected from physical arguments, for three halo-finder algorithms which use different Spherical Overdensity (SO) and Friends-of-Friends (FoF) methods. On the other hand, we find that the commonly used prediction for universal mass functions, that the scale-dependent bias is proportional to the first-order Gaussian Lagrangian bias, does not yield a good agreement with the measurements. For all halo finders, high-mass halos show a non-Gaussian bias suppressed by 10-15% relative to the universal mass function prediction. For SO halos, this deviation changes sign at low masses, where the non-Gaussian bias becomes larger than the universal prediction.

  4. Self-consistent modeling of terahertz waveguide and cavity with frequency-dependent conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y. J.; Chu, K. R.; Thumm, M.

    2015-01-01

    The surface resistance of metals, and hence the Ohmic dissipation per unit area, scales with the square root of the frequency of an incident electromagnetic wave. As is well recognized, this can lead to excessive wall losses at terahertz (THz) frequencies. On the other hand, high-frequency oscillatory motion of conduction electrons tends to mitigate the collisional damping. As a result, the classical theory predicts that metals behave more like a transparent medium at frequencies above the ultraviolet. Such a behavior difference is inherent in the AC conductivity, a frequency-dependent complex quantity commonly used to treat electromagnetics of metals at optical frequencies. The THz region falls in the gap between microwave and optical frequencies. However, metals are still commonly modeled by the DC conductivity in currently active vacuum electronics research aimed at the development of high-power THz sources (notably the gyrotron), although a small reduction of the DC conductivity due to surface roughness is sometimes included. In this study, we present a self-consistent modeling of the gyrotron interaction structures (a metallic waveguide or cavity) with the AC conductivity. The resulting waveguide attenuation constants and cavity quality factors are compared with those of the DC-conductivity model. The reduction in Ohmic losses under the AC-conductivity model is shown to be increasingly significant as the frequency reaches deeper into the THz region. Such effects are of considerable importance to THz gyrotrons for which the minimization of Ohmic losses constitutes a major design consideration.

  5. A Self-consistent and Spatially Dependent Model of the Multiband Emission of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang-Wu; Gao, Quan-Gui; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    A self-consistent and spatially dependent model is presented to investigate the multiband emission of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). In this model, a spherically symmetric system is assumed and the dynamical evolution of the PWN is included. The processes of convection, diffusion, adiabatic loss, radiative loss, and photon–photon pair production are taken into account in the electron’s evolution equation, and the processes of synchrotron radiation, inverse Compton scattering, synchrotron self-absorption, and pair production are included for the photon’s evolution equation. Both coupled equations are simultaneously solved. The model is applied to explain observed results of the PWN in MSH 15–52. Our results show that the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of both electrons and photons are all a function of distance. The observed photon SED of MSH 15–52 can be well reproduced in this model. With the parameters obtained by fitting the observed SED, the spatial variations of photon index and surface brightness observed in the X-ray band can also be well reproduced. Moreover, it can be derived that the present-day diffusion coefficient of MSH 15–52 at the termination shock is {κ }0=6.6× {10}24 {{cm}}2 {{{s}}}-1, the spatial average has a value of \\bar{κ }=1.4× {10}25 {{cm}}2 {{{s}}}-1, and the present-day magnetic field at the termination shock has a value of {B}0=26.6 μ {{G}} and the spatial averaged magnetic field is \\bar{B}=14.9 μ {{G}}. The spatial changes of the spectral index and surface brightness at different bands are predicted.

  6. Consistent Performance Differences between Children and Adults Despite Manipulation of Cue-Target Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie-Raye Bauer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Two behavioral experiments assessed the plasticity and short-term improvement of task switching in 215 children and adults. Specifically, we studied manipulations of cued attention to different features of a target stimulus as a way to assess the development of cognitive flexibility. Each experiment had multiple levels of difficulty via manipulation of number of cued features (2–4 and number of response options (2 or 4. Working memory demand was manipulated across the two experiments. Impact of memory demand and task level manipulations on task accuracy and response times were measured. There were three overall goals: First, these task manipulations (number of cued features, response choices, and working memory load were tested to assess the stability of group differences in performance between children ages 6–16 years and adults 18–27 years, with the goal of reducing age group differences. Second, age-related transitions to adult-level performance were examined within subgroups of the child sample. Third, short-term improvement from the beginning to the end of the study session was measured to probe whether children can improve with task experience. Attempts to use task manipulations to reduce age differences in cued task switching performance were unsuccessful: children performed consistently worse and were more susceptible to task manipulations than adults. However, across both studies, adult-like performance was observed around mid-adolescence, by ages 13-16 years. Certain task manipulations, especially increasing number of response options when working memory demand was low, produced differences from adults even in the oldest children. Interestingly, there was similar performance improvement with practice for both child and adult groups. The higher memory demand version of the task (Experiment 2 prompted greater short-term improvement in accuracy and response times than the lower memory demand version (Experiment 1. These results

  7. Quadratic time dependent Hamiltonians and separation of variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzaldo-Meneses, A.

    2017-06-01

    Time dependent quantum problems defined by quadratic Hamiltonians are solved using canonical transformations. The Green's function is obtained and a comparison with the classical Hamilton-Jacobi method leads to important geometrical insights like exterior differential systems, Monge cones and time dependent Gaussian metrics. The Wei-Norman approach is applied using unitary transformations defined in terms of generators of the associated Lie groups, here the semi-direct product of the Heisenberg group and the symplectic group. A new explicit relation for the unitary transformations is given in terms of a finite product of elementary transformations. The sequential application of adequate sets of unitary transformations leads naturally to a new separation of variables method for time dependent Hamiltonians, which is shown to be related to the Inönü-Wigner contraction of Lie groups. The new method allows also a better understanding of interacting particles or coupled modes and opens an alternative way to analyze topological phases in driven systems.

  8. Development of comprehensive accident models for two-lane rural highways using exposure, geometry, consistency and context variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafiso, Salvatore; Di Graziano, Alessandro; Di Silvestro, Giacomo; La Cava, Grazia; Persaud, Bhagwant

    2010-07-01

    In Europe, approximately 60% of road accident fatalities occur on two-lane rural roads. Thus, research to develop and enhance explanatory and predictive models for this road type continues to be of interest in mitigating these accidents. To this end, this paper describes a novel and extensive data collection and modeling effort to define accident models for two-lane road sections based on a unique combination of exposure, geometry, consistency and context variables directly related to the safety performance. The first part of the paper documents how these were identified for the segmentation of highways into homogeneous sections. Next, is a description of the extensive data collection effort that utilized differential cinematic GPS surveys to define the horizontal alignment variables, and road safety inspections (RSIs) to quantify the other road characteristics related to safety. The final part of the paper focuses on the calibration of models for estimating the expected number of accidents on homogeneous sections that can be characterized by constant values of the explanatory variables. Several candidate models were considered for calibration using the Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM) approach. After considering the statistical significance of the parameters related to exposure, geometry, consistency and context factors, and goodness of fit statistics, 19 models were ranked and three were selected as the recommended models. The first of the three is a base model, with length and traffic as the only predictor variables; since these variables are the only ones likely to be available network-wide, this base model can be used in an empirical Bayesian calculation to conduct network screening for ranking "sites with promise" of safety improvement. The other two models represent the best statistical fits with different combinations of significant variables related to exposure, geometry, consistency and context factors. These multiple variable models can be used, with

  9. Behavioral variability and consistency: Experimental bases for a psychological theory of personality (Variabilidad y Consistencia individual: Bases experimentales de la teoría de la personalidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Santacreu Mas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explain how and why individual differences emerge despite accounting for biological andsocio-cultural differences, why people behave differently in the same context, and how behavior becomes stable and consistent. We review the experimental work on variability and stereotypy. In animal research, in contrast to expectations, there is interindividual variability in behavior under extreme environmental control. In addition, intraindividual consistency (stereotypy is detected in animals whose behavior is not fully adjusted to the contingencies. The differences in what is learned (the kind of contingency relations among laboratory animals can be explained by: a the differences between effective contingencies and programmed contingencies, and b the relationship between exploration and rate of reinforcement. In experimental studies in humans, learning differences in identical environments depend, further to the above, onwhat was previously learned by the individual (experience and education and the thoroughness and internal consistency of task instructions. From these concepts, we propose a psychological theory of personality that explains: (a how we learn different relationships from the same experience; (b how behavioral individual differences emerge (variability; and (cwhy each individual’s behavior becomes stable and consistent.

  10. Epoch-dependent absorption line profile variability in lambda Cep

    CERN Document Server

    Uuh-Sonda, J M; Eenens, P; Mahy, L; Palate, M; Gosset, E; Flores, C A

    2014-01-01

    We present the analysis of a multi-epoch spectroscopic monitoring campaign of the O6Ief star lambda Cep. Previous observations reported the existence of two modes of non-radial pulsations in this star. Our data reveal a much more complex situation. The frequency content of the power spectrum considerably changes from one epoch to the other. We find no stable frequency that can unambiguously be attributed to pulsations. The epoch-dependence of the frequencies and variability patterns are similar to what is seen in the wind emission lines of this and other Oef stars, suggesting that both phenomena likely have the same, currently still unknown, origin.

  11. Methane fluxes show consistent temperature dependence across microbial to ecosystem scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Allen, Andrew P; Bastviken, David; Conrad, Ralf; Gudasz, Cristian; St-Pierre, Annick; Thanh-Duc, Nguyen; del Giorgio, Paul A

    2014-03-27

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas because it has 25 times the global warming potential of carbon dioxide (CO2) by mass over a century. Recent calculations suggest that atmospheric CH4 emissions have been responsible for approximately 20% of Earth's warming since pre-industrial times. Understanding how CH4 emissions from ecosystems will respond to expected increases in global temperature is therefore fundamental to predicting whether the carbon cycle will mitigate or accelerate climate change. Methanogenesis is the terminal step in the remineralization of organic matter and is carried out by strictly anaerobic Archaea. Like most other forms of metabolism, methanogenesis is temperature-dependent. However, it is not yet known how this physiological response combines with other biotic processes (for example, methanotrophy, substrate supply, microbial community composition) and abiotic processes (for example, water-table depth) to determine the temperature dependence of ecosystem-level CH4 emissions. It is also not known whether CH4 emissions at the ecosystem level have a fundamentally different temperature dependence than other key fluxes in the carbon cycle, such as photosynthesis and respiration. Here we use meta-analyses to show that seasonal variations in CH4 emissions from a wide range of ecosystems exhibit an average temperature dependence similar to that of CH4 production derived from pure cultures of methanogens and anaerobic microbial communities. This average temperature dependence (0.96 electron volts (eV)), which corresponds to a 57-fold increase between 0 and 30°C, is considerably higher than previously observed for respiration (approximately 0.65 eV) and photosynthesis (approximately 0.3 eV). As a result, we show that both the emission of CH4 and the ratio of CH4 to CO2 emissions increase markedly with seasonal increases in temperature. Our findings suggest that global warming may have a large impact on the relative contributions of CO2 and CH

  12. Effect of methamphetamine dependence on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brook L; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William

    2012-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an increasing popular and highly addictive stimulant associated with autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction, cardiovascular pathology and neurotoxicity. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used to assess autonomic function and predict mortality in cardiac disorders and drug intoxication, but has not been characterized in METH use. We recorded HRV in a sample of currently abstinent individuals with a history of METH dependence compared to age- and gender-matched drug-free comparison subjects. HRV was assessed using time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear entropic analyses in 17 previously METH-dependent and 21 drug-free comparison individuals during a 5 minute rest period. The METH-dependent group demonstrated significant reduction in HRV, reduced parasympathetic activity, and diminished heartbeat complexity relative to comparison participants. More recent METH use was associated with increased sympathetic tone. Chronic METH exposure may be associated with decreased HRV, impaired vagal function, and reduction in heart rate complexity as assessed by multiple methods of analysis. We discuss and review evidence that impaired HRV may be related to the cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects of prolonged METH use.

  13. Assessment of self-consistent field convergence in spin-dependent relativistic calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masahiko; Seino, Junji; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    This Letter assesses the self-consistent field (SCF) convergence behavior in the generalized Hartree-Fock (GHF) method. Four acceleration algorithms were implemented for efficient SCF convergence in the GHF method: the damping algorithm, the conventional direct inversion in the iterative subspace (DIIS), the energy-DIIS (EDIIS), and a combination of DIIS and EDIIS. Four different systems with varying complexity were used to investigate the SCF convergence using these algorithms, ranging from atomic systems to metal complexes. The numerical assessments demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of DIIS and EDIIS for GHF calculations in comparison with the other discussed algorithms.

  14. Short term memory bowing effect is consistent with presentation rate dependent decay

    OpenAIRE

    Tarnow, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    I reanalyze the free recall data of Murdock, J Exp Psychol 64(5):482–488 (1962) and Murdock and Okada, J Verbal Learn and Verbal Behav 86:263–267 (1970) which show the famous bowing effect in which initial and recent items are recalled better than intermediate items (primacy and recency effects). Recent item recall probabilities follow a logarithmic decay with time of recall consistent with the tagging/retagging theory. The slope of the decay increases with increasing presentation rate. The i...

  15. Short term memory bowing effect is consistent with presentation rate dependent decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnow, Eugen

    2010-12-01

    I reanalyze the free recall data of Murdock, J Exp Psychol 64(5):482-488 (1962) and Murdock and Okada, J Verbal Learn and Verbal Behav 86:263-267 (1970) which show the famous bowing effect in which initial and recent items are recalled better than intermediate items (primacy and recency effects). Recent item recall probabilities follow a logarithmic decay with time of recall consistent with the tagging/retagging theory. The slope of the decay increases with increasing presentation rate. The initial items, with an effectively low presentation rate, decay with the slowest logarithmic slope, explaining the primacy effect. The finding that presentation rate limits the duration of short term memory suggests a basis for memory loss in busy adults, for the importance of slow music practice, for long term memory deficiencies for people with attention deficits who may be artificially increasing the presentation rates of their surroundings. A well-defined, quantitative measure of the primacy effect is introduced.

  16. Exercise training improves heart rate variability after methamphetamine dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Brett Andrew; Chudzynski, Joy; Dickerson, Daniel; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard A; Garfinkel, Alan; Cooper, Christopher B

    2014-06-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects a healthy autonomic nervous system and is increased with physical training. Methamphetamine dependence (MD) causes autonomic dysfunction and diminished HRV. We compared recently abstinent methamphetamine-dependent participants with age-matched, drug-free controls (DF) and also investigated whether HRV can be improved with exercise training in the methamphetamine-dependent participants. In 50 participants (MD = 28; DF = 22), resting heart rate (HR; R-R intervals) was recorded over 5 min while seated using a monitor affixed to a chest strap. Previously reported time domain (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency domain (LFnu, HFnu, LF/HF) parameters of HRV were calculated with customized software. MD were randomized to thrice-weekly exercise training (ME = 14) or equal attention without training (MC = 14) over 8 wk. Groups were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Participant characteristics were matched between groups (mean ± SD): age = 33 ± 6 yr; body mass = 82.7 ± 12 kg, body mass index = 26.8 ± 4.1 kg·min. Compared with DF, the MD group had significantly higher resting HR (P increased SDNN (+14.7 ± 2.0 ms, +34%), RMSSD (+19.6 ± 4.2 ms, +63%), pNN50 (+22.6% ± 2.7%, +173%), HFnu (+14.2 ± 1.9, +60%), and decreased HR (-5.2 ± 1.1 bpm, -7%), LFnu (-9.6 ± 1.5, -16%), and LF/HF (-0.7 ± 0.3, -19%). These measures did not change from baseline in the MC group. HRV, based on several conventional indices, was diminished in recently abstinent, methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Moreover, physical training yielded a marked increase in HRV, representing increased vagal modulation or improved autonomic balance.

  17. Efficient Estimation of Mutual Information for Strongly Dependent Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shuyang; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that a popular class of nonparametric mutual information (MI) estimators based on k-nearest-neighbor graphs requires number of samples that scales exponentially with the true MI. Consequently, accurate estimation of MI between two strongly dependent variables is possible only for prohibitively large sample size. This important yet overlooked shortcoming of the existing estimators is due to their implicit reliance on local uniformity of the underlying joint distribution. We introduce a new estimator that is robust to local non-uniformity, works well with limited data, and is able to capture relationship strengths over many orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed estimator on both synthetic and real-world data.

  18. Growth variability in a tissue governed by stress dependent growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, Karen; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2012-02-01

    Cell wall mechanics lie at the heart of plant cell growth and tissue morphogenesis. Conversely, mechanical forces generated at tissue level can feedback on cellular dynamics. Differential growth of neighboring cells is one eminent origin of mechanical forces and stresses in tissues where cells adhere to each other. How can stresses arising from differential growth orchestrate large scale tissue growth? We show that cell growth coupled to the cell's main stress can reduce or increase tissue growth variability. Employing a cell-based two dimensional tissue model we investigate the dynamics of a tissue with stress depending growth dynamics. We find that the exact cell division rule strongly affects not only the tissue geometry and topology but also its growth dynamics. Our results should enable to infer underlying growth dynamics from live tissue statistics.

  19. Characterizing heart rate variability by scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Gao, Jianbo; Tung, Wen-wen

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies on heart rate variability (HRV) using chaos theory, fractal scaling analysis, and many other methods, while fruitful in many aspects, have produced much confusion in the literature. Especially the issue of whether normal HRV is chaotic or stochastic remains highly controversial. Here, we employ a new multiscale complexity measure, the scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent (SDLE), to characterize HRV. SDLE has been shown to readily characterize major models of complex time series including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, stochastic oscillations, random 1/f processes, random Levy processes, and complex time series with multiple scaling behaviors. Here we use SDLE to characterize the relative importance of nonlinear, chaotic, and stochastic dynamics in HRV of healthy, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation subjects. We show that while HRV data of all these three types are mostly stochastic, the stochasticity is different among the three groups.

  20. Asymptotics for partly linear regression with dependent samples and ARCH errors: consistency with rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Zudi

    2001-01-01

    [1]Engle, R. F., Granger, C. W. J., Rice, J. et al., Semiparametric estimates of the relation between weather and electricity sales, Journal of the American Statistical Association, 1986, 81: 310.[2]Heckman, N. E., Spline smoothing in partly linear models, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Ser. B, 1986, 48: 244.[3]Rice, J., Convergence rates for partially splined models, Statistics & Probability Letters, 1986, 4: 203.[4]Chen, H., Convergence rates for parametric components in a partly linear model, Annals of Statistics, 1988, 16: 136.[5]Robinson, P. M., Root-n-consistent semiparametric regression, Econometrica, 1988, 56: 931.[6]Speckman, P., Kernel smoothing in partial linear models, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Ser. B, 1988, 50: 413.[7]Cuzick, J., Semiparametric additive regression, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Ser. B, 1992, 54: 831.[8]Cuzick, J., Efficient estimates in semiparametric additive regression models with unknown error distribution, Annals of Statistics, 1992, 20: 1129.[9]Chen, H., Shiau, J. H., A two-stage spline smoothing method for partially linear models, Journal of Statistical Planning & Inference, 1991, 27: 187.[10]Chen, H., Shiau, J. H., Data-driven efficient estimators for a partially linear model, Annals of Statistics, 1994, 22: 211.[11]Schick, A., Root-n consistent estimation in partly linear regression models, Statistics & Probability Letters, 1996, 28: 353.[12]Hamilton, S. A., Truong, Y. K., Local linear estimation in partly linear model, Journal of Multivariate Analysis, 1997, 60: 1.[13]Mills, T. C., The Econometric Modeling of Financial Time Series, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993, 137.[14]Engle, R. F., Autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity with estimates of United Kingdom inflation, Econometrica, 1982, 50: 987.[15]Bera, A. K., Higgins, M. L., A survey of ARCH models: properties of estimation and testing, Journal of Economic

  1. Time series pCO2 at a coastal mooring: Internal consistency, seasonal cycles, and interannual variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Janet J.; Cai, Wei-Jun; Xue, Liang; Vargas, Rodrigo; Noakes, Scott; Hu, Xinping; Signorini, Sergio R.; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Feely, Richard A.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Sabine, Christopher; Musielewicz, Sylvia; Chen, Baoshan; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2017-08-01

    Marine carbonate system monitoring programs often consist of multiple observational methods that include underway cruise data, moored autonomous time series, and discrete water bottle samples. Monitored parameters include all, or some of the following: partial pressure of CO2 of the water (pCO2w) and air, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), and pH. Any combination of at least two of the aforementioned parameters can be used to calculate the others. In this study at the Gray's Reef (GR) mooring in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) we: examine the internal consistency of pCO2w from underway cruise, moored autonomous time series, and calculated from bottle samples (DIC-TA pairing); describe the seasonal to interannual pCO2w time series variability and air-sea flux (FCO2), as well as describe the potential sources of pCO2w variability; and determine the source/sink for atmospheric pCO2. Over the 8.5 years of GR mooring time series, mooring-underway and mooring-bottle calculated-pCO2w strongly correlate with r-values > 0.90. pCO2w and FCO2 time series follow seasonal thermal patterns; however, seasonal non-thermal processes, such as terrestrial export, net biological production, and air-sea exchange also influence variability. The linear slope of time series pCO2w increases by 5.2 ± 1.4 μatm y-1 with FCO2 increasing 51-70 mmol m-2 y-1. The net FCO2 sign can switch interannually with the magnitude varying greatly. Non-thermal pCO2w is also increasing over the time series, likely indicating that terrestrial export and net biological processes drive the long term pCO2w increase.

  2. Dependence of NAO variability on coupling with sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Courtenay; Magnusdottir, Gudrun

    2011-05-01

    The variance of the North Atlantic Oscillation index (denoted N) is shown to depend on its coupling with area-averaged sea ice concentration anomalies in and around the Barents Sea (index denoted B). The observed form of this coupling is a negative feedback whereby positive N tends to produce negative B, which in turn forces negative N. The effects of this feedback in the system are examined by modifying the feedback in two modeling frameworks: a statistical vector autoregressive model ( F VAR) and an atmospheric global climate model ( F CAM) customized so that sea ice anomalies on the lower boundary are stochastic with adjustable sensitivity to the model's evolving N. Experiments show that the variance of N decreases nearly linearly with the sensitivity of B to N, where the sensitivity is a measure of the negative feedback strength. Given that the sea ice concentration field has anomalies, the variance of N goes down as these anomalies become more sensitive to N. If the sea ice concentration anomalies are entirely absent, the variance of N is even smaller than the experiment with the most sensitive anomalies. Quantifying how the variance of N depends on the presence and sensitivity of sea ice anomalies to N has implications for the simulation of N in global climate models. In the physical system, projected changes in sea ice thickness or extent could alter the sensitivity of B to N, impacting the within-season variability and hence predictability of N.

  3. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    We present the time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory as a framework for the time-dependent many-electron problem. The theory generalizes the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by incorporating the restricted-active-space scheme...... well known in time-independent quantum chemistry. Optimization of the orbitals as well as the expansion coefficients at each time step makes it possible to construct the wave function accurately while using only a relatively small number of electronic configurations. In numerical calculations of high...

  4. Temporal frames of reference in three Germanic languages: Individual consistency, interindividual consensus, and cross-linguistic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe-Wulf, Annelie; Beller, Sieghard; Bender, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A task like "moving a meeting forward" reveals the ambiguity inherent in temporal references. That speakers of U.S. English do not agree on how to solve it is well established: Roughly one half moves the meeting futurewards, the other half pastwards. But the extent to which individual speakers, rather than groups of speakers, consider such phrases as ambiguous has not been scrutinized. Does the split in readings result from a lack of intraindividual consistency or from a lack of interindividual consensus? And how specific is U.S. English in this regard when compared to other closely related Germanic languages? Based on a taxonomy of spatiotemporal frames of reference (FoRs), we conducted two experiments with speakers of Swedish, U.S. English, and German to assess individual preferences for temporal FoRs, intra- and cross-linguistic variability, consistency and long-term stability of these preferences, and possible effects of priming a spatial FoR. The data reveal cross-linguistic differences, both in terms of which temporal FoRs speakers prefer (the absolute FoR in Sweden, the intrinsic FoR in German, and both of these in the US) and in terms of the extent to which these preferences are shared and stable (high consensus and consistency in Sweden and Germany, and low consensus and partial consistency in the US). Overall, no effect of spatial priming was observed; only speakers of U.S. English with a baseline preference for the absolute temporal FoR seemed to be susceptible to spatial priming. Thus, the assumption that temporal references are affected by spatial references is only weakly supported.

  5. Consistency and Variability in Talk about "Diversity": An Empirical Analysis of Discursive Scope in Swiss Large Scale Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Ostendorp

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally discussions of "diversity" in organizations either refer to an ideal "management" of a diverse workforce or to specific concerns of minorities. The term diversity, however, entails a growing number of translations. Highlighting this diversity of diversity, the concept cannot be merely conceived of as either social-normative or economic-functional. Therefore, the present study empirically scrutinizes the current scope of diversity-talk in Swiss large scale enterprises from a discursive psychological perspective. First, it provides five so-called interpretative repertoires which focus on: image, market, minorities, themes, and difference. Second, it discusses why and how persons oscillate between consistency and variability whenever they draw upon these different repertoires. Finally, it points out possibilities to combine them. This empirical approach to diversity in organizations offers new aspects to the current debate on diversity and introduces crucial concepts of a discursive psychological analysis. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs090218

  6. Human phoneme recognition depending on speech-intrinsic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Bernd T; Jürgens, Tim; Wesker, Thorsten; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger

    2010-11-01

    The influence of different sources of speech-intrinsic variation (speaking rate, effort, style and dialect or accent) on human speech perception was investigated. In listening experiments with 16 listeners, confusions of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) and vowel-consonant-vowel (VCV) sounds in speech-weighted noise were analyzed. Experiments were based on the OLLO logatome speech database, which was designed for a man-machine comparison. It contains utterances spoken by 50 speakers from five dialect/accent regions and covers several intrinsic variations. By comparing results depending on intrinsic and extrinsic variations (i.e., different levels of masking noise), the degradation induced by variabilities can be expressed in terms of the SNR. The spectral level distance between the respective speech segment and the long-term spectrum of the masking noise was found to be a good predictor for recognition rates, while phoneme confusions were influenced by the distance to spectrally close phonemes. An analysis based on transmitted information of articulatory features showed that voicing and manner of articulation are comparatively robust cues in the presence of intrinsic variations, whereas the coding of place is more degraded. The database and detailed results have been made available for comparisons between human speech recognition (HSR) and automatic speech recognizers (ASR).

  7. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for bosonic many-body systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, Camille; Bojer Madsen, Lars

    2017-04-01

    We develop an ab initio time-dependent wavefunction based theory for the description of a many-body system of cold interacting bosons. Like the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method for bosons (MCTDHB), the theory is based on a configurational interaction Ansatz for the many-body wavefunction with time-dependent self-consistent-field orbitals. The theory generalizes the MCTDHB method by incorporating restrictions on the active space of the orbital excitations. The restrictions are specified based on the physical situation at hand. The equations of motion of this time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory are derived. The similarity between the formal development of the theory for bosons and fermions is discussed. The restrictions on the active space allow the theory to be evaluated under conditions where other wavefunction based methods due to exponential scaling in the numerical effort cannot, and to clearly identify the excitations that are important for an accurate description, significantly beyond the mean-field approach. For ground state calculations we find it to be important to allow a few particles to have the freedom to move in many orbitals, an insight facilitated by the flexibility of the restricted-active-space Ansatz. Moreover, we find that a high accuracy can be obtained by including only even excitations in the many-body self-consistent-field wavefunction. Time-dependent simulations of harmonically trapped bosons subject to a quenching of their noncontact interaction, show failure of the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii approach within a fraction of a harmonic oscillation period. The TD-RASSCF theory remains accurate at much reduced computational cost compared to the MCTDHB method. Exploring the effect of changes of the restricted-active-space allows us to identify that even self-consistent-field excitations are mainly responsible for the accuracy of the method.

  8. Exercise Training Improves Heart Rate Variability after Methamphetamine Dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Brett A.; Chudzynski, Joy; Dickerson, Daniel; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard A.; Garfinkel, Alan; Cooper, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects a healthy autonomic nervous system and is increased with physical training. Methamphetamine dependence (MD) causes autonomic dysfunction and diminished HRV. We compared recently abstinent MD participants with age-matched, drug free controls (DF) and also investigated whether HRV can be improved with exercise training in the MD participants. Methods In 50 participants (MD=28; DF=22) resting heart rate (R-R intervals) was recorded over 5 min while seated using a monitor affixed to a chest strap. Previously reported time-domain (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency-domain (LFnu, HFnu, LF/HF) parameters of HRV were calculated with customized software. MD were randomized to thrice weekly exercise training (ME=14) or equal attention without training (MC=14) over 8 weeks. Groups were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results Participant characteristics were matched between groups: age 33±6 years; body mass 82.7±12 kg, BMI 26.8±4.1 kg•min−2, mean±SD. Compared with DF, the MD group had significantly higher resting heart rate (P<0.05), LFnu, and LF/HF (P<0.001) as well as lower SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50 and HFnu (all P<0.001). At randomization, HRV indices were similar between ME and MC groups. However, after training, the ME group significantly (all P<0.001) increased SDNN (+14.7±2.0 ms, +34%), RMSSD (+19.6±4.2 ms, +63%), pNN50 (+22.6±2.7%, +173%), HFnu (+14.2±1.9, +60%) and decreased HR (−5.2±1.1 beats·min−1, −7%), LFnu (−9.6±1.5, −16%) and LF/HF (−0.7±0.3, −19%). These measures did not change from baseline in the MC group. Conclusion HRV, based on several conventional indices, was diminished in recently abstinent, methamphetamine dependent individuals. Moreover, physical training yielded a marked increase of HRV representing increased vagal modulation or improved autonomic balance. PMID:24162556

  9. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2013-01-01

    We present the time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) theory as a framework for the time-dependent many-electron problem. The theory generalizes the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by incorporating the restricted-active-space scheme...... well known in time-independent quantum chemistry. Optimization of the orbitals as well as the expansion coefficients at each time step makes it possible to construct the wave function accurately while using only a relatively small number of electronic configurations. In numerical calculations of high......-order harmonic generation spectra of a one-dimensional model of atomic beryllium interacting with a strong laser pulse, the TD-RASSCF method is reasonably accurate while largely reducing the computational complexity. The TD-RASSCF method has the potential to treat large atoms and molecules beyond the capability...

  10. Variability of interconnected wind plants: correlation length and its dependence on variability time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Martin, Clara M.; Lundquist, Julie K.; Handschy, Mark A.

    2015-04-01

    The variability in wind-generated electricity complicates the integration of this electricity into the electrical grid. This challenge steepens as the percentage of renewably-generated electricity on the grid grows, but variability can be reduced by exploiting geographic diversity: correlations between wind farms decrease as the separation between wind farms increases. But how far is far enough to reduce variability? Grid management requires balancing production on various timescales, and so consideration of correlations reflective of those timescales can guide the appropriate spatial scales of geographic diversity grid integration. To answer ‘how far is far enough,’ we investigate the universal behavior of geographic diversity by exploring wind-speed correlations using three extensive datasets spanning continents, durations and time resolution. First, one year of five-minute wind power generation data from 29 wind farms span 1270 km across Southeastern Australia (Australian Energy Market Operator). Second, 45 years of hourly 10 m wind-speeds from 117 stations span 5000 km across Canada (National Climate Data Archive of Environment Canada). Finally, four years of five-minute wind-speeds from 14 meteorological towers span 350 km of the Northwestern US (Bonneville Power Administration). After removing diurnal cycles and seasonal trends from all datasets, we investigate dependence of correlation length on time scale by digitally high-pass filtering the data on 0.25-2000 h timescales and calculating correlations between sites for each high-pass filter cut-off. Correlations fall to zero with increasing station separation distance, but the characteristic correlation length varies with the high-pass filter applied: the higher the cut-off frequency, the smaller the station separation required to achieve de-correlation. Remarkable similarities between these three datasets reveal behavior that, if universal, could be particularly useful for grid management. For high

  11. Time-dependent complete-active-space self-consistent-field method for atoms: Application to high-harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Takeshi; Brezinova, Iva; Lackner, Fabian; Nagele, Stefan; Burgdorfer, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We present the numerical implementation of the time-dependent complete-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-CASSCF) method [Phys. Rev. A, 88, 023402 (2013)] for atoms driven by a strong linearly polarized laser pulse. The present implementation treats the problem in its full dimensionality and introduces a gauge-invariant frozen-core approximation, an efficient evaluation of the Coulomb mean field scaling linearly with the number of basis functions, and a split-operator method specifically designed for stable propagation of stiff spatial derivative operators. We apply this method to high-harmonic generation in helium, beryllium, and neon and explore the role of electron correlations.

  12. Age Dependent Variability in Gene Expression in Fischer 344 ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent evidence suggests older adults may be a sensitive population with regard to environmental exposure to toxic compounds. One source of this sensitivity could be an enhanced variability in response. Studies on phenotypic differences have suggested that variation in response does increase with age. However, few reports address the question of variation in gene expression as an underlying cause for increased variability of phenotypic response in the aged. In this study, we utilized global analysis to compare variation in constitutive gene expression in the retinae of young (4 mos), middle-aged (11 mos) and aged (23 mos) Fischer 344 rats. Three hundred and forty transcripts were identified in which variance in expression increased from 4 to 23 mos of age, while only twelve transcripts were found for which it decreased. Functional roles for identified genes were clustered in basic biological categories including cell communication, function, metabolism and response to stimuli. Our data suggest that population stochastically-induced variability should be considered in assessing sensitivity due to old age. Recent evidence suggests older adults may be a sensitive population with regard to environmental exposure to toxic compounds. One source of this sensitivity could be an enhanced variability in response. Studies on phenotypic differences have suggested that variation in response does increase with age. However, few reports address the question of variation in

  13. Consistent Treatment of Variables and Causation Poses a Challenge for Behavioral Research Methods: A Commentary on Nesselroade and Molenaar (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Nesselroade and Molenaar presented the ideographic filter as a proposal for analyzing lawful regularities in behavioral research. The proposal highlights an inconsistency that poses a challenge for behavioral research more generally. One can distinguish a broadly Humean approach from a broadly non-Humean approach as they relate to variables and to causation. Nesselroade and Molenaar rejected a Humean approach to latent variables that characterizes them as nothing more than summaries of their manifest indicators. By contrast, they tacitly accepted a Humean approach to causes characterized as nothing more than summaries of their manifest causal effects. A non-Humean treatment of variables coupled with a Humean treatment of causation creates a theoretical tension within their proposal. For example, one can interpret the same model elements as simultaneously representing both variables and causes. Future refinement of the ideographic filter proposal to address this tension could follow any of a number of strategies.

  14. The functional central limit theorem for strong near-epoch dependent random variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Jin; LIN Zhengyan

    2004-01-01

    The functional central limit theorem for strong near-epoch dependent sequences of random variables is proved.The conditions given improve on previous results in the literature concerning dependence and heterogeneity.

  15. On an asymptotic distribution of dependent random variables on a 3-dimensional lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Danielle J; Weng, Qian; Beckett, Laurel A

    2010-06-15

    We define conditions under which sums of dependent spatial data will be approximately normally distributed. A theorem on the asymptotic distribution of a sum of dependent random variables defined on a 3-dimensional lattice is presented. Examples are also presented.

  16. On Direction of Dependence in Latent Variable Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Eye, Alexander; Wiedermann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Approaches to determining direction of dependence in nonexperimental data are based on the relation between higher-than second-order moments on one side and correlation and regression models on the other. These approaches have experienced rapid development and are being applied in contexts such as research on partner violence, attention deficit…

  17. LARGE DEVIATIONS AND MODERATE DEVIATIONS FOR SUMS OF NEGATIVELY DEPENDENT RANDOM VARIABLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Li; Wan Chenggao; Feng Yanqin

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we obtain the large deviations and moderate deviations for negatively dependent (ND) and non-identically distributed random variables defined on (-∞, +∞). The results show that for some non-identical random variables, precise large deviations and moderate deviations remain insensitive to negative dependence structure.

  18. Phase Dependent Spectral Variability of 4U1907+09

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, M S E; Leahy, D A; Hall, T A; Finley, J P; Cominsky, L R; Srinivasan, R; Roberts, Mallory S.E.; Michelson, Peter F.; Leahy, Denis A.; Hall, Tony A.; Finley, John P.; Cominsky, Lynn R.; Srinivasen, Radhika

    2001-01-01

    We report on ASCA, RXTE, and archival observations of the high mass X-ray binary pulsar 4U1907+09. Spectral measurements of the absorption and flux were made at all phases of the X-ray pulsar orbit, including the first spectral measurements of an extended period of low flux during two of the ASCA observations. We find that a simple spherical wind model can fit the time averaged light curve as measured by the RXTE ASM, but does not fit the observed changes in the absorption column or account for the existence of the phase-locked secondary flare. An additional model component consisting of a trailing stream can account for the variations in column depth. However, these models favor a high inclination angle for the system, suggesting a companion mass more consistent with an identification as a Be-star. In this case an equatorially enhanced wind and inclined neutron star orbit may be a more appropriate interpretation of the data.

  19. [Multiple dependent variables LS-SVM regression algorithm and its application in NIR spectral quantitative analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xin; Xu, Shuo; Zhang, Lu-Da; Su, Shi-Guang

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, on the basis of LS-SVM algorithm, we built a multiple dependent variables LS-SVM (MLS-SVM) regression model whose weights can be optimized, and gave the corresponding algorithm. Furthermore, we theoretically explained the relationship between MLS-SVM and LS-SVM. Sixty four broomcorn samples were taken as experimental material, and the sample ratio of modeling set to predicting set was 51 : 13. We first selected randomly and uniformly five weight groups in the interval [0, 1], and then in the way of leave-one-out (LOO) rule determined one appropriate weight group and parameters including penalizing parameters and kernel parameters in the model according to the criterion of the minimum of average relative error. Then a multiple dependent variables quantitative analysis model was built with NIR spectrum and simultaneously analyzed three chemical constituents containing protein, lysine and starch. Finally, the average relative errors between actual values and predicted ones by the model of three components for the predicting set were 1.65%, 6.47% and 1.37%, respectively, and the correlation coefficients were 0.9940, 0.8392 and 0.8825, respectively. For comparison, LS-SVM was also utilized, for which the average relative errors were 1.68%, 6.25% and 1.47%, respectively, and the correlation coefficients were 0.9941, 0.8310 and 0.8800, respectively. It is obvious that MLS-SVM algorithm is comparable to LS-SVM algorithm in modeling analysis performance, and both of them can give satisfying results. The result shows that the model with MLS-SVM algorithm is capable of doing multi-components NIR quantitative analysis synchronously. Thus MLS-SVM algorithm offers a new multiple dependent variables quantitative analysis approach for chemometrics. In addition, the weights have certain effect on the prediction performance of the model with MLS-SVM, which is consistent with our intuition and is validated in this study. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize

  20. Time-dependent sleep stage transition model based on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Toki; Mizuno, Osamu; Tanaka, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    A new model is proposed to automatically classify sleep stages using heart rate variability (HRV). The generative model, based on the characteristics that the distribution and the transition probabilities of sleep stages depend on the elapsed time from the beginning of sleep, infers the sleep stage with a Gibbs sampler. Experiments were conducted using a public data set consisting of 45 healthy subjects and the model's classification accuracy was evaluated for three sleep stages: wake state, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM sleep. Experimental results demonstrated that the model provides more accurate sleep stage classification than conventional (naive Bayes and Support Vector Machine) models that do not take the above characteristics into account. Our study contributes to improve the quality of sleep monitoring in the daily life using easy-to-wear HRV sensors.

  1. Energy decay of a variable-coefficient wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent localized damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqiong Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the energy decay for the Cauchy problem of the wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent and space-dependent damping. The damping is localized in a bounded domain and near infinity, and the principal part of the wave equation has a variable-coefficient. We apply the multiplier method for variable-coefficient equations, and obtain an energy decay that depends on the property of the coefficient of the damping term.

  2. Self-consistent time dependent vibrational and free electron kinetics for CO2 dissociation and ionization in cold plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitelli, M.; Colonna, G.; D'Ammando, G.; Pietanza, L. D.

    2017-05-01

    A self-consistent time dependent model, based on the coupling between the Boltzmann equation for free electrons, the non equilibrium vibrational kinetics for the asymmetric mode of CO2 and simplified global models for the dissociation and ionization plasma chemistry, has been applied to conditions which can be met under pulsed microwave (MW), dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and nanosecond pulsed discharges (NPD). Under MW discharge type conditions, the selected pulse duration generates large concentration of vibrational excited states, which affects the electron energy distribution function (eedf) through the superelastic vibrational collisions. Moreover, in discharge conditions, plateaux appear in the vibrational distribution function (vdf) through the vibrational-vibrational up pumping mechanism, persisting also in the post discharge. In post discharge conditions, also the eedf is characterized by plateaux due to the superelastic collisions between cold electrons and the CO2 electronic state at 10.5 eV. The plateau in vdf increases the dissociation of pure vibrational mechanism (PVM), which can become competitive with the dissociation mechanism induced by electron molecule collisions. The PVM rates increase with the decrease of gas temperature, generating a non-Arrhenius behaviour. The situation completely changes under DBD and NPD type conditions characterized by shorter pulse duration and higher applied E/N values. Under discharge conditions, both vdf and eedf plateaux disappear, reappering in the afterglow.

  3. Progenitor-dependent Explosion Dynamics in Self-consistent, Axisymmetric Simulations of Neutrino-driven Core-collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Summa, Alexander; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias; Marek, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    We present self-consistent, axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code for 18 pre-supernova models in the range of 11-28 solar masses, including progenitors recently investigated by other groups. All models develop explosions, but depending on the progenitor structure, they can be divided into two classes. With a steep density decline at the Si/Si-O interface, the arrival of this interface at the shock front leads to a sudden drop of the mass-accretion rate, triggering a rapid approach to explosion. With a more gradually decreasing accretion rate, it takes longer for the neutrino heating to overcome the accretion ram pressure and explosions set in later. Early explosions are facilitated by high mass-accretion rates after bounce and correspondingly high neutrino luminosities combined with a pronounced drop of the accretion rate and ram pressure at the Si/Si-O interface. Because of rapidly shrinking neutron star radii and receding shock fronts after the passage th...

  4. Deferasirox demonstrates a dose-dependent reduction in liver iron concentration and consistent efficacy across subgroups of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Ali T; Porter, John B; Viprakasit, Vip; Kattamis, Antonis; Chuncharunee, Suporn; Sutcharitchan, Pranee; Siritanaratkul, Noppadol; Galanello, Renzo; Karakas, Zeynep; Lawniczek, Tomasz; Habr, Dany; Ros, Jacqueline; Zhang, Yiyun; Cappellini, M Domenica

    2013-06-01

    The 1-year THALASSA study enrolled 166 patients with various non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT) syndromes, degrees of iron burden and patient characteristics, and demonstrated the overall efficacy and safety of deferasirox in reducing liver iron concentration (LIC) in these patients. Here, reduction in LIC with deferasirox 5 and 10 mg/kg/day starting dose groups is shown to be consistent across the following patient subgroups-baseline LIC/serum ferritin, age, gender, race, splenectomy (yes/no), and underlying NTDT syndrome (β-thalassemia intermedia, HbE/β-thalassemia or α-thalassemia). These analyses also evaluated deferasirox dosing strategies for patients with NTDT. Greater reductions in LIC were achieved in patients dose-escalated at Week 24 from deferasirox 10 mg/kg/day starting dose to 20 mg/kg/day. Patients who received an average actual dose of deferasirox >12.5-≤17.5 mg/kg/day achieved a greater LIC decrease compared with the ≥7.5-≤12.5 mg/kg/day and >0-<7.5 mg/kg/day subgroups, demonstrating a dose-response efficacy. LIC reduction across patient subgroups was generally consistent with the primary efficacy analysis with a similar safety profile.

  5. Deferasirox demonstrates a dose-dependent reduction in liver iron concentration and consistent efficacy across subgroups of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Ali T; Porter, John B; Viprakasit, Vip; Kattamis, Antonis; Chuncharunee, Suporn; Sutcharitchan, Pranee; Siritanaratkul, Noppadol; Galanello, Renzo; Karakas, Zeynep; Lawniczek, Tomasz; Habr, Dany; Ros, Jacqueline; Zhang, Yiyun; Cappellini, M Domenica

    2013-01-01

    The 1-year THALASSA study enrolled 166 patients with various non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT) syndromes, degrees of iron burden and patient characteristics, and demonstrated the overall efficacy and safety of deferasirox in reducing liver iron concentration (LIC) in these patients. Here, reduction in LIC with deferasirox 5 and 10 mg/kg/day starting dose groups is shown to be consistent across the following patient subgroups—baseline LIC/serum ferritin, age, gender, race, splenectomy (yes/no), and underlying NTDT syndrome (β-thalassemia intermedia, HbE/β-thalassemia or α-thalassemia). These analyses also evaluated deferasirox dosing strategies for patients with NTDT. Greater reductions in LIC were achieved in patients dose-escalated at Week 24 from deferasirox 10 mg/kg/day starting dose to 20 mg/kg/day. Patients who received an average actual dose of deferasirox >12.5–≤17.5 mg/kg/day achieved a greater LIC decrease compared with the ≥7.5–≤12.5 mg/kg/day and >0–<7.5 mg/kg/day subgroups, demonstrating a dose–response efficacy. LIC reduction across patient subgroups was generally consistent with the primary efficacy analysis with a similar safety profile. Am. J. Hematol. 88:503–506, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23553596

  6. Progenitor-dependent Explosion Dynamics in Self-consistent, Axisymmetric Simulations of Neutrino-driven Core-collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Alexander; Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias; Marek, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    We present self-consistent, axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code for 18 pre-supernova models in the range of 11-28 M ⊙, including progenitors recently investigated by other groups. All models develop explosions, but depending on the progenitor structure, they can be divided into two classes. With a steep density decline at the Si/Si-O interface, the arrival of this interface at the shock front leads to a sudden drop of the mass-accretion rate, triggering a rapid approach to explosion. With a more gradually decreasing accretion rate, it takes longer for the neutrino heating to overcome the accretion ram pressure and explosions set in later. Early explosions are facilitated by high mass-accretion rates after bounce and correspondingly high neutrino luminosities combined with a pronounced drop of the accretion rate and ram pressure at the Si/Si-O interface. Because of rapidly shrinking neutron star radii and receding shock fronts after the passage through their maxima, our models exhibit short advection timescales, which favor the efficient growth of the standing accretion-shock instability. The latter plays a supportive role at least for the initiation of the re-expansion of the stalled shock before runaway. Taking into account the effects of turbulent pressure in the gain layer, we derive a generalized condition for the critical neutrino luminosity that captures the explosion behavior of all models very well. We validate the robustness of our findings by testing the influence of stochasticity, numerical resolution, and approximations in some aspects of the microphysics.

  7. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent eld theory: Formulation and application to laser-driven many-electron dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    We have developed a new theoretical framework for time-dependent many-electron problems named time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent field (TD-RASSCF) theory. The theory generalizes the multicongurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) theory by truncating the expansion...

  8. Complete Moment Convergence and Mean Convergence for Arrays of Rowwise Extended Negatively Dependent Random Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors first present a Rosenthal inequality for sequence of extended negatively dependent (END random variables. By means of the Rosenthal inequality, the authors obtain some complete moment convergence and mean convergence results for arrays of rowwise END random variables. The results in this paper extend and improve the corresponding theorems by Hu and Taylor (1997.

  9. A Bayesian Alternative to Mutual Information for the Hierarchical Clustering of Dependent Random Variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Marrelec

    Full Text Available The use of mutual information as a similarity measure in agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC raises an important issue: some correction needs to be applied for the dimensionality of variables. In this work, we formulate the decision of merging dependent multivariate normal variables in an AHC procedure as a Bayesian model comparison. We found that the Bayesian formulation naturally shrinks the empirical covariance matrix towards a matrix set a priori (e.g., the identity, provides an automated stopping rule, and corrects for dimensionality using a term that scales up the measure as a function of the dimensionality of the variables. Also, the resulting log Bayes factor is asymptotically proportional to the plug-in estimate of mutual information, with an additive correction for dimensionality in agreement with the Bayesian information criterion. We investigated the behavior of these Bayesian alternatives (in exact and asymptotic forms to mutual information on simulated and real data. An encouraging result was first derived on simulations: the hierarchical clustering based on the log Bayes factor outperformed off-the-shelf clustering techniques as well as raw and normalized mutual information in terms of classification accuracy. On a toy example, we found that the Bayesian approaches led to results that were similar to those of mutual information clustering techniques, with the advantage of an automated thresholding. On real functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI datasets measuring brain activity, it identified clusters consistent with the established outcome of standard procedures. On this application, normalized mutual information had a highly atypical behavior, in the sense that it systematically favored very large clusters. These initial experiments suggest that the proposed Bayesian alternatives to mutual information are a useful new tool for hierarchical clustering.

  10. A Bayesian Alternative to Mutual Information for the Hierarchical Clustering of Dependent Random Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelec, Guillaume; Messé, Arnaud; Bellec, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The use of mutual information as a similarity measure in agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC) raises an important issue: some correction needs to be applied for the dimensionality of variables. In this work, we formulate the decision of merging dependent multivariate normal variables in an AHC procedure as a Bayesian model comparison. We found that the Bayesian formulation naturally shrinks the empirical covariance matrix towards a matrix set a priori (e.g., the identity), provides an automated stopping rule, and corrects for dimensionality using a term that scales up the measure as a function of the dimensionality of the variables. Also, the resulting log Bayes factor is asymptotically proportional to the plug-in estimate of mutual information, with an additive correction for dimensionality in agreement with the Bayesian information criterion. We investigated the behavior of these Bayesian alternatives (in exact and asymptotic forms) to mutual information on simulated and real data. An encouraging result was first derived on simulations: the hierarchical clustering based on the log Bayes factor outperformed off-the-shelf clustering techniques as well as raw and normalized mutual information in terms of classification accuracy. On a toy example, we found that the Bayesian approaches led to results that were similar to those of mutual information clustering techniques, with the advantage of an automated thresholding. On real functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) datasets measuring brain activity, it identified clusters consistent with the established outcome of standard procedures. On this application, normalized mutual information had a highly atypical behavior, in the sense that it systematically favored very large clusters. These initial experiments suggest that the proposed Bayesian alternatives to mutual information are a useful new tool for hierarchical clustering.

  11. Synaptic Variability Introduces State-Dependent Modulation of Excitatory Spinal Cord Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Parker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of neuronal and synaptic variability remains unclear. Cellular and synaptic plasticity and neuromodulation are also variable. This could reflect state-dependent effects caused by the variable initial cellular or synaptic properties or direct variability in plasticity-inducing mechanisms. This study has examined state-dependent influences on synaptic plasticity at connections between excitatory interneurons (EIN and motor neurons in the lamprey spinal cord. State-dependent effects were examined by correlating initial synaptic properties with the substance P-mediated plasticity of low frequency-evoked EPSPs and the reduction of the EPSP depression over spike trains (metaplasticity. The low frequency EPSP potentiation reflected an interaction between the potentiation of NMDA responses and the release probability. The release probability introduced a variable state-dependent subtractive influence on the postsynaptic NMDA-dependent potentiation. The metaplasticity was also state-dependent: it was greater at connections with smaller available vesicle pools and high initial release probabilities. This was supported by the significant reduction in the number of connections showing metaplasticity when the release probability was reduced by high Mg2+ Ringer. Initial synaptic properties thus introduce state-dependent influences that affect the potential for plasticity. Understanding these conditions will be as important as understanding the subsequent changes.

  12. Synaptic Variability Introduces State-Dependent Modulation of Excitatory Spinal Cord Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of neuronal and synaptic variability remains unclear. Cellular and synaptic plasticity and neuromodulation are also variable. This could reflect state-dependent effects caused by the variable initial cellular or synaptic properties or direct variability in plasticity-inducing mechanisms. This study has examined state-dependent influences on synaptic plasticity at connections between excitatory interneurons (EIN) and motor neurons in the lamprey spinal cord. State-dependent effects were examined by correlating initial synaptic properties with the substance P-mediated plasticity of low frequency-evoked EPSPs and the reduction of the EPSP depression over spike trains (metaplasticity). The low frequency EPSP potentiation reflected an interaction between the potentiation of NMDA responses and the release probability. The release probability introduced a variable state-dependent subtractive influence on the postsynaptic NMDA-dependent potentiation. The metaplasticity was also state-dependent: it was greater at connections with smaller available vesicle pools and high initial release probabilities. This was supported by the significant reduction in the number of connections showing metaplasticity when the release probability was reduced by high Mg(2+) Ringer. Initial synaptic properties thus introduce state-dependent influences that affect the potential for plasticity. Understanding these conditions will be as important as understanding the subsequent changes.

  13. Statistical Portfolio Estimation under the Utility Function Depending on Exogenous Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Hamada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the estimation of portfolios, it is natural to assume that the utility function depends on exogenous variable. From this point of view, in this paper, we develop the estimation under the utility function depending on exogenous variable. To estimate the optimal portfolio, we introduce a function of moments of the return process and cumulant between the return processes and exogenous variable, where the function means a generalized version of portfolio weight function. First, assuming that exogenous variable is a random process, we derive the asymptotic distribution of the sample version of portfolio weight function. Then, an influence of exogenous variable on the return process is illuminated when exogenous variable has a shot noise in the frequency domain. Second, assuming that exogenous variable is nonstochastic, we derive the asymptotic distribution of the sample version of portfolio weight function. Then, an influence of exogenous variable on the return process is illuminated when exogenous variable has a harmonic trend. We also evaluate the influence of exogenous variable on the return process numerically.

  14. Onset Of Opportunity To Use Cannabis And Progression From Opportunity To Dependence: Are Influences Consistent Across Transitions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Lindsey A.; Morley, Katherine I.; Strang, John; Agrawal, Arpana; Nelson, Elliot C.; Statham, Dixie; Martin, Nicholas G.; Lynskey, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a developing body of research looking at cannabis use opportunity, but little research examining timing of opportunity to use cannabis. Aims Identify factors associated with 1) earlier opportunity to use cannabis and 2) faster progression from opportunity to cannabis dependence. Method Cross-sectional study of 3824 Australian twins and siblings, measuring age of onset of cannabis use opportunity and DSM-IV cannabis dependence. Survival analysis identified factors associated with faster progression to opportunity or dependence. Results Factors associated with both speed of progression to opportunity and dependence were conduct disorder (opportunity HR 5.57, 95%CI 1.52–20.47; dependence HR 2.49, 95%CI 1.91–3.25), parental drug problems (opportunity HR 7.29, 95%CI 1.74–30.62; dependence HR 3.30, 95%CI 1.63–6.69), weekly tobacco use (opportunity HR 8.57, 95%CI 3.93–18.68; dependence HR 2.76, 95% CI 2.10–3.64), and female gender (opportunity HR 0.69, 95%CI 0.64–0.75; dependence HR 0.44, 95%CI 0.34–0.55). Frequent childhood religious attendance (HR 0.74, 95%CI 0.68–0.80), parental conflict (HR 1.09, 95%CI 1.00–1.18), parental alcohol problems (HR 1.19, 95%CI 1.08–1.30) and childhood sexual abuse (HR 1.17, 95%CI 1.01–1.34) were uniquely associated with transition to opportunity. Depressive episode (HR 1.44, 95%CI 1.12–1.85), tobacco dependence (HR 1.36, 95%CI 1.04 – 1.78), alcohol dependence (HR 2.64, 95%CI 1.53–4.58), other drug use (HR 2.10, 95%CI 1.64–2.69) and other drug dependence (HR 2.75, 95%CI 1.70–4.43) were uniquely associated with progression to dependence. Conclusion The profile of factors associated with opportunity to use cannabis and dependence only partially overlaps, suggesting targeting of interventions may benefit from being tailored to the stages of drug use. PMID:26811121

  15. Onset of opportunity to use cannabis and progression from opportunity to dependence: Are influences consistent across transitions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Lindsey A; Morley, Katherine I; Strang, John; Agrawal, Arpana; Nelson, Elliot C; Statham, Dixie; Martin, Nicholas G; Lynskey, Michael T

    2016-03-01

    There is a developing body of research looking at cannabis use opportunity, but little research examining timing of opportunity to use cannabis. Identify factors associated with (1) earlier opportunity to use cannabis and (2) faster progression from opportunity to cannabis dependence. Cross-sectional study of 3824 Australian twins and siblings, measuring age of onset of cannabis use opportunity and DSM-IV cannabis dependence. Survival analysis identified factors associated with faster progression to opportunity or dependence. Factors associated with both speed of progression to opportunity and dependence were conduct disorder (opportunity HR 5.57, 95%CI 1.52-20.47; dependence HR 2.49, 95%CI 1.91-3.25), parental drug problems (opportunity HR 7.29, 95%CI 1.74-30.62; dependence HR 3.30, 95%CI 1.63-6.69), weekly tobacco use (opportunity HR 8.57, 95%CI 3.93-18.68; dependence HR 2.76, 95% CI 2.10-3.64), and female gender (opportunity HR 0.69, 95%CI 0.64-0.75; dependence HR 0.44, 95%CI 0.34-0.55). Frequent childhood religious attendance (HR 0.74, 95%CI 0.68-0.80), parental conflict (HR 1.09, 95%CI 1.00-1.18), parental alcohol problems (HR 1.19, 95%CI 1.08-1.30) and childhood sexual abuse (HR 1.17, 95%CI 1.01-1.34) were uniquely associated with transition to opportunity. Depressive episode (HR 1.44, 95%CI 1.12-1.85), tobacco dependence (HR 1.36, 95%CI 1.04-1.78), alcohol dependence (HR 2.64, 95%CI 1.53-4.58), other drug use (HR 2.10, 95%CI 1.64-2.69) and other drug dependence (HR 2.75, 95%CI 1.70-4.43) were uniquely associated with progression to dependence. The profile of factors associated with opportunity to use cannabis and dependence only partially overlaps, suggesting targeting of interventions may benefit from being tailored to the stages of drug use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. On an asymptotic distribution of dependent random variables on a 3-dimensional lattice✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Danielle J.; Weng, Qian; Beckett, Laurel A.

    2010-01-01

    We define conditions under which sums of dependent spatial data will be approximately normally distributed. A theorem on the asymptotic distribution of a sum of dependent random variables defined on a 3-dimensional lattice is presented. Examples are also presented. PMID:20436940

  17. Weak laws of large numbers for arrays of rowwise negatively dependent random variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Taylor

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Weak laws of large numbers for arrays of rowwise negatively dependent random variables are obtained in this paper. The more general hypothesis of negative dependence relaxes the usual assumption of independence. The moment conditions are similar to previous results, and the stochastic bounded condition also provides a generalization of the usual distributional assumptions.

  18. A CENTRAL LIMIT THEOREM FOR STRONG NEAR-EPOCH DEPENDENT RANDOM VARIABLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN ZHENGYAN; QIU JIN

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a central limit theorem for strong near-epoch dependent sequences of random variables introduced in [9] is showed. Under the same moments condition,the authors essentially weaken the "size" requirement mentioned in other papers about near epoch dependence.

  19. The Functional Segregation and Integration Model: Mixture Model Representations of Consistent and Variable Group-Level Connectivity in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Nathan W; Madsen, Kristoffer; Mørup, Morten

    2016-10-01

    The brain consists of specialized cortical regions that exchange information between each other, reflecting a combination of segregated (local) and integrated (distributed) processes that define brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is widely used to characterize these functional relationships, although it is an ongoing challenge to develop robust, interpretable models for high-dimensional fMRI data. Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) are a powerful tool for parcellating the brain, based on the similarity of voxel time series. However, conventional GMMs have limited parametric flexibility: they only estimate segregated structure and do not model interregional functional connectivity, nor do they account for network variability across voxels or between subjects. To address these issues, this letter develops the functional segregation and integration model (FSIM). This extension of the GMM framework simultaneously estimates spatial clustering and the most consistent group functional connectivity structure. It also explicitly models network variability, based on voxel- and subject-specific network scaling profiles. We compared the FSIM to standard GMM in a predictive cross-validation framework and examined the importance of different model parameters, using both simulated and experimental resting-state data. The reliability of parcellations is not significantly altered by flexibility of the FSIM, whereas voxel- and subject-specific network scaling profiles significantly improve the ability to predict functional connectivity in independent test data. Moreover, the FSIM provides a set of interpretable parameters to characterize both consistent and variable aspects functional connectivity structure. As an example of its utility, we use subject-specific network profiles to identify brain regions where network expression predicts subject age in the experimental data. Thus, the FSIM is effective at summarizing functional connectivity structure in group

  20. Satellite derived precipitation and freshwater flux variability and its dependence on the North Atlantic Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Axel; Bakan, Stephan; Graßl, Hartmut

    2010-08-01

    The variability of satellite retrieved precipitation and freshwater flux from the `Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data' (HOAPS) is assessed with special emphasis on the `North Atlantic Oscillation' (NAO). To cover also land areas, a novel combination of the satellite derived precipitation climatology with the rain gauge based `Full Data Reanalysis Product Version 4', of the `Global Precipitation Climatology Centre' (GPCC) is used. This yields unique high-resolution, quasi-global precipitation fields compiled from two independent data sources. Over the ocean, the response of the freshwater balance and the related parameters to the NAO is investigated for the first time by using a purely satellite based data set. A strong dependence of precipitation patterns to the state of the NAO is found. On synoptic scale this is in accordance with earlier findings by other satellite based and reanalysis products. Furthermore, the consistency of the combined HOAPS-3/GPCC data set allows also detailed regional analyses of precipitation patterns. The response of HOAPS-3 freshwater flux to the NAO is dominated by precipitation at mid and high latitudes, while for the subtropical regions the feedback of the evaporation is stronger.

  1. Method of frequency dependent correlations: investigating the variability of total solar irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelt, J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Olspert, N.

    2017-03-01

    Context. This paper contributes to the field of modeling and hindcasting of the total solar irradiance (TSI) based on different proxy data that extend further back in time than the TSI that is measured from satellites. Aims: We introduce a simple method to analyze persistent frequency-dependent correlations (FDCs) between the time series and use these correlations to hindcast missing historical TSI values. We try to avoid arbitrary choices of the free parameters of the model by computing them using an optimization procedure. The method can be regarded as a general tool for pairs of data sets, where correlating and anticorrelating components can be separated into non-overlapping regions in frequency domain. Methods: Our method is based on low-pass and band-pass filtering with a Gaussian transfer function combined with de-trending and computation of envelope curves. Results: We find a major controversy between the historical proxies and satellite-measured targets: a large variance is detected between the low-frequency parts of targets, while the low-frequency proxy behavior of different measurement series is consistent with high precision. We also show that even though the rotational signal is not strongly manifested in the targets and proxies, it becomes clearly visible in FDC spectrum. A significant part of the variability can be explained by a very simple model consisting of two components: the original proxy describing blanketing by sunspots, and the low-pass-filtered curve describing the overall activity level. The models with the full library of the different building blocks can be applied to hindcasting with a high level of confidence, Rc ≈ 0.90. The usefulness of these models is limited by the major target controversy. Conclusions: The application of the new method to solar data allows us to obtain important insights into the different TSI modeling procedures and their capabilities for hindcasting based on the directly observed time intervals.

  2. Consistent QBO-dependent effect of geomagnetic activity on the Northern Annular Mode during the 20th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliniemi, Ville; Asikainen, Timo; Mursula, Kalevi

    2016-04-01

    Several earlier studies have shown that geomagnetic activity (GA), as a proxy for energetic particle precipitation into the atmosphere, affects the winter-time Northern Annular Mode (NAM), which is the dominant circulation pattern in the northern hemisphere during winter. It has also been found that the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) modulates the relationship between GA and NAM. However, some of the earlier studies on this QBO modulation have been mutually conflicting, with some studies suggesting a stronger positive relation in the easterly phase of the QBO, while other studies suggest a stronger positive relation in the westerly phase of the QBO. Here we study the QBO-GA-NAM relationship using a QBO reconstruction covering the whole 20th century. We find that the QBO modulation of the GA-NAM relation is temporally variable, which explains the earlier, seemingly differing results. Positive GA-NAM relation is found to be valid in the easterly QBO phase at 30 hPa during the whole 20th century. We also find that the QBO at 30 hPa represents the Holton-Tan relation for the surface circulation better than QBO at 50 hPa, and that the Holton-Tan relation is only observed during early/mid winter, while an anti-Holton-Tan relation is found in the late winter for strong geomagnetic activity. These results emphasize the variable but systematic response of NAM to energetic particle precipitation during the entire 20th century, and underline the importance of considering the preconditioning of the atmosphere when studying the solar-related effects upon climate.

  3. Tail dependence of random variables from ARCH and heavy tailed bilinear models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘家柱

    2002-01-01

    Discussed in this paper is the dependent structure in the tails of distributions of random variables from some heavy-tailed stationary nonlinear time series. One class of models discussed is the first-order autoregressive conditional heteroscedastic (ARCH) process introduced by Engle (1982). The other class is the simple first-order bilinear models driven by heavy-tailed innovations. We give some explicit formulas for the asymptotic values of conditional probabilities used for measuring the tail dependence between two random variables from these models. Our results have significant meanings in finance.

  4. On the dependence of QCD splitting functions on the choice of the evolution variable

    CERN Document Server

    Jadach, S; Placzek, W; Skrzypek, M

    2016-01-01

    We show that already at the NLO level the DGLAP evolution kernel Pqq starts to depend on the choice of the evolution variable. We give an explicit example of such a variable, namely the maximum of transverse momenta of emitted partons and we identify a class of evolution variables that leave the NLO Pqq kernel unchanged with respect to the known standard MS-bar results. The kernels are calculated using a modified Curci-Furmanski-Petronzio method which is based on a direct Feynman-graphs calculation.

  5. On the dependence of QCD splitting functions on the choice of the evolution variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadach, S.; Kusina, A.; Placzek, W.; Skrzypek, M.

    2016-08-01

    We show that already at the NLO level the DGLAP evolution kernel P qq starts to depend on the choice of the evolution variable. We give an explicit example of such a variable, namely the maximum of transverse momenta of emitted partons and we identify a class of evolution variables that leave the NLO P qq kernel unchanged with respect to the known standard overline{MS} results. The kernels are calculated using a modified Curci-Furmanski-Petronzio method which is based on a direct Feynman-graphs calculation.

  6. Multiscale Modeling Indicates That Temperature Dependent [Ca2+]i Spiking in Astrocytes Is Quantitatively Consistent with Modulated SERCA Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komin, Niko; Moein, Mahsa; Ellisman, Mark H; Skupin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) are the most predominant active signaling mechanism in astrocytes that can modulate neuronal activity and is assumed to influence neuronal plasticity. Although Ca(2+) signaling in astrocytes has been intensively studied in the past, our understanding of the signaling mechanism and its impact on tissue level is still incomplete. Here we revisit our previously published data on the strong temperature dependence of Ca(2+) signals in both cultured primary astrocytes and astrocytes in acute brain slices of mice. We apply multiscale modeling to test the hypothesis that the temperature dependent [Ca(2+)]i spiking is mainly caused by the increased activity of the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum ATPases (SERCAs) that remove Ca(2+) from the cytosol into the endoplasmic reticulum. Quantitative comparison of experimental data with multiscale simulations supports the SERCA activity hypothesis. Further analysis of multiscale modeling and traditional rate equations indicates that the experimental observations are a spatial phenomenon where increasing pump strength leads to a decoupling of Ca(2+) release sites and subsequently to vanishing [Ca(2+)]i spikes.

  7. Spatial variability and its scale dependency of observed and modeled soil moisture under different climate conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Past studies on soil moisture spatial variability have been mainly conducted in catchment scales where soil moisture is often sampled over a short time period. Because of limited climate and weather conditions, the observed soil moisture often exhibited smaller dynamic ranges which prevented the complete revelation of soil moisture spatial variability as a function of mean soil moisture. In this study, spatial statistics (mean, spatial variability and skewness of in situ soil moisture measurements (from a continuously monitored network across the US, modeled and satellite retrieved soil moisture obtained in a warm season (198 days were examined at large extent scales (>100 km over three different climate regions. The investigation on in situ measurements revealed that their spatial moments strongly depend on climates, with distinct mean, spatial variability and skewness observed in each climate zone. In addition, an upward convex shape, which was revealed in several smaller scale studies, was observed for the relationship between spatial variability of in situ soil moisture and its spatial mean across dry, intermediate, and wet climates. These climate specific features were vaguely or partially observable in modeled and satellite retrieved soil moisture estimates, which is attributed to the fact that these two data sets do not have climate specific and seasonal sensitive mean soil moisture values, in addition to lack of dynamic ranges. From the point measurements to satellite retrievals, soil moisture spatial variability decreased in each climate region. The three data sources all followed the power law in the scale dependency of spatial variability, with coarser resolution data showing stronger scale dependency than finer ones. The main findings from this study are: (1 the statistical distribution of soil moisture depends on spatial mean soil moisture values and thus need to be derived locally within any given area; (2 the boundedness of soil

  8. Self-consistent pseudopotentials in the thermodynamic limit. II. The state-dependent one-body field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, E. S.; Plastino, A.; Szybisz, L.

    1980-07-01

    We explore the concept of the pseudopotential, introduced in a previous paper, within the context of the exact boundary condition for a system of fermions interacting through a pair-wise, hard-core potential, in the thermodynamic limit. We discuss several Ansätze for the Lagrange multipliers that allow the inclusion of the boundary conditions into the variational principle. It is found that under a given Ansatz, a dynamical, microscopic interpretation of the pseudopotential can be put forward. A comparison between this situation and the coherent approximation induced by the use of the correlation function is also presented. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE Hard-core interactions, boundary condition, variational principle constrained Hartree-Fock problem; Ansatz, structure of the pseudopotential, state dependence.

  9. Motivation as an independent and a dependent variable in medical education: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusurkar, R A; Ten Cate, Th J; van Asperen, M; Croiset, G

    2011-01-01

    Motivation in learning behaviour and education is well-researched in general education, but less in medical education. To answer two research questions, 'How has the literature studied motivation as either an independent or dependent variable? How is motivation useful in predicting and understanding processes and outcomes in medical education?' in the light of the Self-determination Theory (SDT) of motivation. A literature search performed using the PubMed, PsycINFO and ERIC databases resulted in 460 articles. The inclusion criteria were empirical research, specific measurement of motivation and qualitative research studies which had well-designed methodology. Only studies related to medical students/school were included. Findings of 56 articles were included in the review. Motivation as an independent variable appears to affect learning and study behaviour, academic performance, choice of medicine and specialty within medicine and intention to continue medical study. Motivation as a dependent variable appears to be affected by age, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, personality, year of medical curriculum and teacher and peer support, all of which cannot be manipulated by medical educators. Motivation is also affected by factors that can be influenced, among which are, autonomy, competence and relatedness, which have been described as the basic psychological needs important for intrinsic motivation according to SDT. Motivation is an independent variable in medical education influencing important outcomes and is also a dependent variable influenced by autonomy, competence and relatedness. This review finds some evidence in support of the validity of SDT in medical education.

  10. Degree of cure-dependent modelling for polymer curing processes at small-strain. Part I: consistent reformulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M.; Steinmann, P.

    2014-04-01

    A physically-based small strain curing model has been developed and discussed in our previous contribution (Hossain et al. in Comput Mech 43:769-779, 2009a) which was extended later for finite strain elasticity and viscoelasticity including shrinkage in Hossain et al. (Comput Mech 44(5):621-630, 2009b) and in Hossain et al. (Comput Mech 46(3):363-375, 2010), respectively. The previously proposed constitutive models for curing processes are based on the temporal evolution of the material parameters, namely the shear modulus and the relaxation time (in the case of viscoelasticity). In the current paper, a thermodynamically consistent small strain constitutive model is formulated that is directly based on the degree of cure, a key parameter in the curing (reaction) kinetics. The new formulation is also in line with the earlier proposed hypoelastic approach. The curing process of polymers is a complex phenomenon involving a series of chemical reactions which transform a viscoelastic fluid into a viscoelastic solid during which the temperature, the chemistry and the mechanics are coupled. Part I of this work will deal with an isothermal viscoelastic formulation including shrinkage effects whereas the following Part II will give emphasis on the thermomechanical coupled approach. Some representative numerical examples conclude the paper and show the capability of the newly proposed constitutive formulation to capture major phenomena observed during the curing processes of polymers.

  11. Investigation of Dependence between Time-zero and Time-dependent Variability in High-k NMOS Transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Hassan, Mohammad Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Bias Temperature Instability (BTI) is a major reliability concern in CMOS technology, especially with High dielectric constant (High-\\k{appa}/HK) metal gate (MG) transistors. In addition, the time independent process induced variation has also increased because of the aggressive scaling down of devices. As a result, the faster devices at the lower threshold voltage distribution tail experience higher stress, leading to additional skewness in the BTI degradation. Since time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) and stress-induced leakage current (SILC) in NMOS devices are correlated to BTI, it is necessary to investigate the effect of time zero variability on all these effects simultaneously. To that effect, we propose a simulation framework to model and analyze the impact of time-zero variability (in particular, random dopant fluctuations) on different aging effects. For small area devices (~1000 nm2) in 30nm technology, we observe significant effect of Random Dopant Fluctuation (RDF) on BTI induced variabili...

  12. Rethinking the dependent variable in voting behavior: On the measurement and analysis of electoral utilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van der Cees; Brug, van der Wouter; Kroh, Martin; Franklin, Mark

    2006-01-01

    As a dependent variable, party choice did not lend itself to analysis by means of powerful multivariate methods until the coming of discrete-choice models, most notably conditional logit and multinomial logit. These methods involve estimating effects on party preferences (utilities) that are post ho

  13. Panel data models extended to spatial error autocorrelation or a spatially lagged dependent variable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elhorst, J. Paul

    2001-01-01

    This paper surveys panel data models extended to spatial error autocorrelation or a spatially lagged dependent variable. In particular, it focuses on the specification and estimation of four panel data models commonly used in applied research: the fixed effects model, the random effects model, the

  14. Comparing apples and oranges: the dependent variable problem in comparing and evaluating climate change adaptation policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupuis, J.; Biesbroek, G.R.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have compared climate change adaptation policies within and between different countries. In this paper we show that these comparative studies suffer from what is known as the ‘‘dependent variable problem’ – the indistinctness of the phenomenon that is being measured,

  15. Comparing apples and oranges: the dependent variable problem in comparing and evaluating climate change adaptation policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupuis, J.; Biesbroek, G.R.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have compared climate change adaptation policies within and between different countries. In this paper we show that these comparative studies suffer from what is known as the ‘‘dependent variable problem’ – the indistinctness of the phenomenon that is being measured,

  16. Parametric and Semiparametric Estimation in Models with Misclassified Categorical Dependent Variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dustmann, C.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    1999-01-01

    We consider both a parametric and a semiparametric method to account for classification errors on the dependent variable in an ordered response model. The methods are applied to the analysis of self-reported speaking fluency of male immigrants in Germany. We find some substantial differences in para

  17. Parametric and Semiparametric Estimation in Models with Misclassified Categorical Dependent Variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dustmann, C.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    1999-01-01

    We consider both a parametric and a semiparametric method to account for classification errors on the dependent variable in an ordered response model. The methods are applied to the analysis of self-reported speaking fluency of male immigrants in Germany. We find some substantial differences in

  18. Field Dependency, n Power and Locus of Control Variables in Alcohol Aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Query, William T.

    1983-01-01

    Compared individual differences and treatment effectiveness in male volunteer alcoholics (N=47) in a 10-day electroconditioning aversion program. Follow-up showed combination therapy was more successful. Internals and hard liquor drinkers tended to be abstinent as predicted. Field dependency was a more unstable variable for outcome. (Author/JAC)

  19. A Maximum Likelihood Method for Latent Class Regression Involving a Censored Dependent Variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedidi, Kamel; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A method is proposed to simultaneously estimate regression functions and subject membership in "k" latent classes or groups given a censored dependent variable for a cross-section of subjects. Maximum likelihood estimates are obtained using an EM algorithm. The method is illustrated through a consumer psychology application. (SLD)

  20. Dose dependency and individual variability of the lipopolysaccharide-induced bovine acute phase protein response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S.; Andersen, P.H.; Tølbøll, T.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the dose dependency and the individual variability of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute phase protein response in cattle, 8 nonlactating, nonpregnant Danish Holstein cows were challenged 3 times each by intravenous injection of increasing doses (10, 100, and 1000 ng...... for several days after each LPS injection, and their increase or decrease was significantly related to LPS dose. In addition to dose dependency, the response was also dependent on the individual, as APP concentrations differed significantly among cows. To compare APP production in 2 consecutive challenges...

  1. Time-dependent multiconfiguration self-consistent-field method based on occupation restricted multiple active space model for multielectron dynamics in intense laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The time-dependent multiconfiguration self-consistent-field method based on the occupation-restricted multiple active space model is proposed (TD-ORMAS) for multielectron dynamics in intense laser fields. Extending the previously proposed time-dependent complete-active-space self-consistent-field method [TD-CASSCF; Phys. Rev. A, {\\bf 88}, 023402 (2013)], which divides the occupied orbitals into core and active orbitals, the TD-ORMAS method {\\it further} subdivides the active orbitals into an arbitrary number of subgroups, and poses the {\\it occupation restriction} by giving the minimum and maximum number of electrons distributed in each subgroup. This enables highly flexible construction of the configuration interaction (CI) space, allowing a large-active-space simulation of dynamics, e.g., the core excitation or ionization. The equations of motion both for CI coefficients and spatial orbitals are derived based on the time-dependent variational principle, and an efficient algorithm is proposed to solve for th...

  2. Asymptotic Results for Tail Probabilities of Sums of Dependent and Heavy-Tailed Random Variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kam Chuen YUEN; Chuancun YIN

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Let X1,X2,...be a sequence of dependent and heavy-tailed random variables with distributions F1,F2,…. on (-∞,∞),and let т be a nonnegative integer-valued random variable independent of the sequence {Xk,k≥ 1}.In this framework,the asymptotic behavior of the tail probabilities of the quantities Sn =n∑k=1 Xk and S(n) =max1≤k≤n Sk for n > 1,and their randomized versions Sт and S(т) are studied.Some applications to the risk theory are presented.

  3. Anatomy of a population cycle: the role of density dependence and demographic variability on numerical instability and periodicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Jeffrey R; Wilson, Paul J; Murray, Dennis L

    2014-07-01

    Determining the causes of cyclic fluctuations in population size is a central tenet in population ecology and provides insights into population regulatory mechanisms. We have a firm understanding of how direct and delayed density dependence affects population stability and cyclic dynamics, but there remains considerable uncertainty in the specific processes contributing to demographic variability and consequent change in cyclic propensity. Spatiotemporal variability in cyclic propensity, including recent attenuation or loss of cyclicity among several temperate populations and the implications of habitat fragmentation and climate change on this pattern, highlights the heightened need to understand processes underlying cyclic variation. Because these stressors can differentially impact survival and productivity and thereby impose variable time delays in density dependence, there is a specific need to elucidate how demographic vital rates interact with the type and action of density dependence to contribute to population stability and cyclic variation. Here, we address this knowledge gap by comparing the stability of time series derived from general and species-specific (Canada lynx: Lynx canadensis; small rodents: Microtus, Lemmus and Clethrionomys spp.) matrix population models, which vary in their demographic rates and the direct action of density dependence. Our results reveal that density dependence acting exclusively on survival as opposed to productivity is destabilizing, suggesting that a shift in the action of population regulation toward reproductive output may decrease cyclic propensity and cycle amplitude. This result was the same whether delayed density dependence was pulsatile and acted on a single time period (e.g. t-1, t-2 or t-3) vs. more constant by affecting a successive range of years (e.g. t-1,…, t-3). Consistent with our general models, reductions in reproductive potential in both the lynx and small rodent systems led to notably large drops in

  4. On a Camassa-Holm type equation with two dependent variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falqui, Gregorio [SISSA, Via Beirut 2/4, I-34014 Trieste (Italy)

    2006-01-13

    We consider a generalization of the Camassa-Holm (CH) equation with two dependent variables, called CH2, introduced in a paper by Liu and Zhang (Liu S-Q and Zhang Y 2005 J. Geom. Phys. 54 427-53). We briefly provide an alternative derivation of it based on the theory of Hamiltonian structures on (the dual of) a Lie algebra. The Lie algebra involved here is the same algebra as underlies the NLS hierarchy. We study the structural properties of the hierarchy defined by the CH2 equation within the bi-Hamiltonian theory of integrable PDEs, and provide its Lax representation. Then we explicitly discuss how to construct classes of solutions, both of peakon and of algebro-geometrical type. Finally we sketch the construction of a class of singular solutions, defined by setting to zero one of the two dependent variables.

  5. Stochasticity and Determinism: How Density-Independent and Density-Dependent Processes Affect Population Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Ohlberger; Rogers, Lauren A.; Nils Chr. Stenseth

    2014-01-01

    A persistent debate in population ecology concerns the relative importance of environmental stochasticity and density dependence in determining variability in adult year-class strength, which contributes to future reproduction as well as potential yield in exploited populations. Apart from the strength of the processes, the timing of density regulation may affect how stochastic variation, for instance through climate, translates into changes in adult abundance. In this study, we develop a lif...

  6. An edgeworth expansion for a sum of M-Dependent random variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Soo Rhee

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Given a sequence X1,X2,…,Xn of m-dependent random variables with moments of order 3+α (0<α≦1, we give an Edgeworth expansion of the distribution of Sσ−1(S=X1+X2+…+Xn, σ2=ES2 under the assumption that E[exp(it Sσ1] is small away from the origin. The result is of the best possible order.

  7. A Generic Algorithm to Estimate LAI, FAPAR and FCOVER Variables from SPOT4_HRVIR and Landsat Sensors: Evaluation of the Consistency and Comparison with Ground Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The leaf area index (LAI and the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by green vegetation (FAPAR are essential climatic variables in surface process models. FCOVER is also important to separate vegetation and soil for energy balance processes. Currently, several LAI, FAPAR and FCOVER satellite products are derived moderate to coarse spatial resolution. The launch of Sentinel-2 in 2015 will provide data at decametric resolution with a high revisit frequency to allow quantifying the canopy functioning at the local to regional scales. The aim of this study is thus to evaluate the performances of a neural network based algorithm to derive LAI, FAPAR and FCOVER products at decametric spatial resolution and high temporal sampling. The algorithm is generic, i.e., it is applied without any knowledge of the landcover. A time series of high spatial resolution SPOT4_HRVIR (16 scenes and Landsat 8 (18 scenes images acquired in 2013 over the France southwestern site were used to generate the LAI, FAPAR and FCOVER products. For each sensor and each biophysical variable, a neural network was first trained over PROSPECT+SAIL radiative transfer model simulations of top of canopy reflectance data for green, red, near-infra red and short wave infra-red bands. Our results show a good spatial and temporal consistency between the variables derived from both sensors: almost half the pixels show an absolute difference between SPOT and LANDSAT estimates of lower that 0.5 unit for LAI, and 0.05 unit for FAPAR and FCOVER. Finally, downward-looking digital hemispherical cameras were completed over the main land cover types to validate the accuracy of the products. Results show that the derived products are strongly correlated with the field measurements (R2 > 0.79, corresponding to a RMSE = 0.49 for LAI, RMSE = 0.10 (RMSE = 0.12 for black-sky (white sky FAPAR and RMSE = 0.15 for FCOVER. It is concluded that the proposed generic algorithm provides a good

  8. Bayesian Techniques for Comparing Time-dependent GRMHD Simulations to Variable Event Horizon Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhan; Marrone, Daniel P.; Chan, Chi-Kwan; Medeiros, Lia; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a millimeter-wavelength, very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment that is capable of observing black holes with horizon-scale resolution. Early observations have revealed variable horizon-scale emission in the Galactic Center black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). Comparing such observations to time-dependent general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations requires statistical tools that explicitly consider the variability in both the data and the models. We develop here a Bayesian method to compare time-resolved simulation images to variable VLBI data, in order to infer model parameters and perform model comparisons. We use mock EHT data based on GRMHD simulations to explore the robustness of this Bayesian method and contrast it to approaches that do not consider the effects of variability. We find that time-independent models lead to offset values of the inferred parameters with artificially reduced uncertainties. Moreover, neglecting the variability in the data and the models often leads to erroneous model selections. We finally apply our method to the early EHT data on Sgr A*.

  9. Modelling the statistical dependence of rainfall event variables by a trivariate copula function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Balistrocchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In many hydrological models, such as those derived by analytical probabilistic methods, the precipitation stochastic process is represented by means of individual storm random variables which are supposed to be independent of each other. However, several proposals were advanced to develop joint probability distributions able to account for the observed statistical dependence. The traditional technique of the multivariate statistics is nevertheless affected by several drawbacks, whose most evident issue is the unavoidable subordination of the dependence structure assessment to the marginal distribution fitting. Conversely, the copula approach can overcome this limitation, by splitting the problem in two distinct items. Furthermore, goodness-of-fit tests were recently made available and a significant improvement in the function selection reliability has been achieved. Herein a trivariate probability distribution of the rainfall event volume, the wet weather duration and the interevent time is proposed and verified by test statistics with regard to three long time series recorded in different Italian climates. The function was developed by applying a mixing technique to bivariate copulas, which were formerly obtained by analyzing the random variables in pairs. A unique probabilistic model seems to be suitable for representing the dependence structure, despite the sensitivity shown by the dependence parameters towards the threshold utilized in the procedure for extracting the independent events. The joint probability function was finally developed by adopting a Weibull model for the marginal distributions.

  10. The test of variables of attention (TOVA): Internal consistency (Q1 vs. Q2 and Q3 vs. Q4) in children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The internal consistency of the Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA) was examined in a cohort of 6- to 12-year-old children (N = 63) strictly diagnosed with ADHD. The internal consistency of errors of omission (OMM), errors of commission (COM), response time (RT), and response time variability (RTV...

  11. Bayesian Network Models for Local Dependence among Observable Outcome Variables. Research Report. ETS RR-06-36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Russell G.; Mulder, Joris; Hemat, Lisa A.; Yan, Duanli

    2006-01-01

    Bayesian network models offer a large degree of flexibility for modeling dependence among observables (item outcome variables) from the same task that may be dependent. This paper explores four design patterns for modeling locally dependent observations from the same task: (1) No context--Ignore dependence among observables; (2) Compensatory…

  12. Distance and Azimuthal Dependence of Ground‐Motion Variability for Unilateral Strike‐Slip Ruptures

    KAUST Repository

    Vyas, Jagdish Chandra

    2016-06-21

    We investigate near‐field ground‐motion variability by computing the seismic wavefield for five kinematic unilateral‐rupture models of the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers earthquake, eight simplified unilateral‐rupture models based on the Landers event, and a large Mw 7.8 ShakeOut scenario. We include the geometrical fault complexity and consider different 1D velocity–density profiles for the Landers simulations and a 3D heterogeneous Earth structure for the ShakeOut scenario. For the Landers earthquake, the computed waveforms are validated using strong‐motion recordings. We analyze the simulated ground‐motion data set in terms of distance and azimuth dependence of peak ground velocity (PGV). Our simulations reveal that intraevent ground‐motion variability Graphic is higher in close distances to the fault (<20  km) and decreases with increasing distance following a power law. This finding is in stark contrast to constant sigma‐values used in empirical ground‐motion prediction equations. The physical explanation of a large near‐field Graphic is the presence of strong directivity and rupture complexity. High values of Graphic occur in the rupture‐propagation direction, but small values occur in the direction perpendicular to it. We observe that the power‐law decay of Graphic is primarily controlled by slip heterogeneity. In addition, Graphic, as function of azimuth, is sensitive to variations in both rupture speed and slip heterogeneity. The azimuth dependence of the ground‐motion mean μln(PGV) is well described by a Cauchy–Lorentz function that provides a novel empirical quantification to model the spatial dependency of ground motion. Online Material: Figures of slip distributions, residuals to ground‐motion prediction equations (GMPEs), distance and azimuthal dependence, and directivity predictor of ground‐motion variability for different source models.

  13. Variation among Species in the Temperature Dependence of the Reappearance of Variable Fluorescence following Illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J J

    1990-06-01

    The relationship between the thermal dependence of the reappearance of chlorophyll variable fluorescence following illumination and temperature dependence of the apparent Michaelis constant (K(m)) of NADH hydroxypyruvate reductase for NADH was investigated in cool and warm season plant species. Brancker SF-20 and SF-30 fluorometers were used to evaluate induced fluorescence transients from detached leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv TAM-101), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Paymaster 145), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv Del Oro), bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv California Wonder), and petunia (Petunia hybrida cv. Red Sail). Following an illumination period at 25 degrees C, the reappearance of variable fluorescence during a dark incubation was determined at 5 degrees C intervals from 15 degrees C to 45 degrees C. Variable fluorescence recovery was normally distributed with the maximum recovery observed at 20 degrees C in wheat, 30 degrees C in cotton, 20 degrees C to 25 degrees C in tomato, 30 to 35 degrees C in bell pepper and 25 degrees C in petunia. Comparison of the thermal response of fluorescence recovery with the temperature sensitivity of the apparent K(m) of hydroxypyruvate reductase for NADH showed that the range of temperatures providing fluorescence recovery corresponded with those temperatures providing the minimum apparent K(m) values (viz. the thermal kinetic window).

  14. Contact-dependent performance variability of monolayer MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Gyuchull; Yoon, Youngki, E-mail: youngki.yoon@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2014-11-24

    Using self-consistent quantum transport simulations, we investigate the performance variability of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors (FETs) with various contact properties. Varying the Schottky barrier in MoS{sub 2} FETs affects the output characteristics more significantly than the transfer characteristics. If doped contacts are realized, the performance variation due to non-ideal contacts becomes negligible; otherwise, channel doping can effectively suppress the performance variability in metal-contact devices. Our scaling study also reveals that for sub-10-nm channels, doped-contact devices can be more robust in terms of switching, while metal-contact MoS{sub 2} FETs can undergo the smaller penalty in output conductance.

  15. Degree of multicollinearity and variables involved in linear dependence in additive-dominant models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Petrini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the degree of multicollinearity and to identify the variables involved in linear dependence relations in additive-dominant models. Data of birth weight (n=141,567, yearling weight (n=58,124, and scrotal circumference (n=20,371 of Montana Tropical composite cattle were used. Diagnosis of multicollinearity was based on the variance inflation factor (VIF and on the evaluation of the condition indexes and eigenvalues from the correlation matrix among explanatory variables. The first model studied (RM included the fixed effect of dam age class at calving and the covariates associated to the direct and maternal additive and non-additive effects. The second model (R included all the effects of the RM model except the maternal additive effects. Multicollinearity was detected in both models for all traits considered, with VIF values of 1.03 - 70.20 for RM and 1.03 - 60.70 for R. Collinearity increased with the increase of variables in the model and the decrease in the number of observations, and it was classified as weak, with condition index values between 10.00 and 26.77. In general, the variables associated with additive and non-additive effects were involved in multicollinearity, partially due to the natural connection between these covariables as fractions of the biological types in breed composition.

  16. Stochasticity and determinism: how density-independent and density-dependent processes affect population variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlberger, Jan; Rogers, Lauren A; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2014-01-01

    A persistent debate in population ecology concerns the relative importance of environmental stochasticity and density dependence in determining variability in adult year-class strength, which contributes to future reproduction as well as potential yield in exploited populations. Apart from the strength of the processes, the timing of density regulation may affect how stochastic variation, for instance through climate, translates into changes in adult abundance. In this study, we develop a life-cycle model for the population dynamics of a large marine fish population, Northeast Arctic cod, to disentangle the effects of density-independent and density-dependent processes on early life-stages, and to quantify the strength of compensatory density dependence in the population. The model incorporates information from scientific surveys and commercial harvest, and dynamically links multiple effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on all life-stages, from eggs to spawners. Using a state-space approach we account for observation error and stochasticity in the population dynamics. Our findings highlight the importance of density-dependent survival in juveniles, indicating that this period of the life cycle largely determines the compensatory capacity of the population. Density regulation at the juvenile life-stage dampens the impact of stochastic processes operating earlier in life such as environmental impacts on the production of eggs and climate-dependent survival of larvae. The timing of stochastic versus regulatory processes thus plays a crucial role in determining variability in adult abundance. Quantifying the contribution of environmental stochasticity and compensatory mechanisms in determining population abundance is essential for assessing population responses to climate change and exploitation by humans.

  17. The dependence of J/ψ-nucleon inelastic cross section on the Feynman variable

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Chun-Gui; LIU Na; MIAO Wen-Dan

    2011-01-01

    By means of two typical sets of nuclear parton distribution functions,meanwhile taking account of the energy loss of the beam proton and the nuclear absorption of the charmonium states traversing the nuclear matter in the uniform framework of the Glauber model,a leading order phenomenological analysis is given in the color evaporation model of the E866 experimental data on J/Ψ production differential cross section ratios RFe/Be(xF).It is shown that the energy loss effect of beam proton on RFe/Be(xF)is more important than the nuclear effects on parton distribution functions in the high Feynman variable xF region.It is found that the J/Ψ-nucleon inelastic cross section depends on the Feynman variable XF and increases linearly with XF in the region xF > 0.2.

  18. Independent Sampling vs Interitem Dependencies in Whole Report Processing: Contributions of Processing Architecture and Variable Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busey, Thomas A.; Townsend, James T.

    2001-04-01

    All current models of visual whole report processing assume perceptual independence among the displayed items in which the perceptual processing of individual items is not affected by other items in the display. However, models proposed by Townsend (1981, Acta Psychologica 47, 149-173), Shibuya and Bundesen (1988, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 14, 591-600), and Bundesen (1990, Psychological Review 97, 523-547) contain postperceptual buffers that must predict negative dependencies. The perceptual-independence assumption forms what we term the modal model class. A recent example of a model that assumes perceptual independence is the Independent Sampling Model of Loftus, Busey, and Senders (1993, Perception and Psychophysics 54, 535-554). The fundamental independence assumption has only been directly tested once before, where tests revealed no dependencies except those produced by guessing. The present study tests the independence assumption using several different statistics and, contrary to most extant models of whole report, finds significant positive dependence. Poisson models do predict a positive dependence and we develop a succinctly parameterized version, the Weighted Path Poisson Model, which allows the finishing order to be a weighted probabilistic mechanism. However, it does not predict the data quite as well as a new model, the Variable Attention Model, which allows independence within trials (unlike the Poisson models). This model assumes that attention (or, potentially, other aspects such as signal quality) varies widely across trials, thus predicting an overall positive dependence. Intuitions for and against the competing models are discussed. In addition, we show, through mimicking formulae, that models which contain the proper qualitative type of dependence structure can be cast in either serial or parallel form. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Timing and Variability of Galactose Metabolic Gene Activation Depend on the Rate of Environmental Change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong D Nguyen-Huu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of gene network activity allows cells to respond to changes in environmental conditions. For example, the galactose utilization network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by the presence of galactose but repressed by glucose. If both sugars are present, the yeast will first metabolize glucose, depleting it from the extracellular environment. Upon depletion of glucose, the genes encoding galactose metabolic proteins will activate. Here, we show that the rate at which glucose levels are depleted determines the timing and variability of galactose gene activation. Paradoxically, we find that Gal1p, an enzyme needed for galactose metabolism, accumulates more quickly if glucose is depleted slowly rather than taken away quickly. Furthermore, the variability of induction times in individual cells depends non-monotonically on the rate of glucose depletion and exhibits a minimum at intermediate depletion rates. Our mathematical modeling suggests that the dynamics of the metabolic transition from glucose to galactose are responsible for the variability in galactose gene activation. These findings demonstrate that environmental dynamics can determine the phenotypic outcome at both the single-cell and population levels.

  20. Precipitation variability on global pasturelands may affect food security in livestock-dependent regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloat, L.; Gerber, J. S.; Samberg, L. H.; Smith, W. K.; West, P. C.; Herrero, M.; Brendan, P.; Cecile, G.; Katharina, W.; Smith, W. K.

    2016-12-01

    The need to feed an increasing number of people while maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services is one of the key challenges currently facing humanity. Livestock systems are likely to be a crucial piece of this puzzle, as urbanization and changing diets in much of the world lead to increases in global meat consumption. This predicted increase in global demand for livestock products will challenge the ability of pastures and rangelands to maintain or increase their productivity. The majority of people that depend on animal production for food security do so through grazing and herding on natural rangelands, and these systems make a significant contribution to global production of meat and milk. The vegetation dynamics of natural forage are highly dependent on climate, and subject to disruption with changes in climate and climate variability. Precipitation heterogeneity has been linked to the ecosystem dynamics of grazing lands through impacts on livestock carrying capacity and grassland degradation potential. Additionally, changes in precipitation variability are linked to the increased incidence of extreme events (e.g. droughts, floods) that negatively impact food production and food security. Here, we use the inter-annual coefficient of variation (CV) of precipitation as a metric to assess climate risk on global pastures. Comparisons of global satellite measures of vegetation greenness to climate reveal that the CV of precipitation is negatively related to mean annual NDVI, such that areas with low year-to-year precipitation variability have the highest measures of vegetation greenness, and vice versa. Furthermore, areas with high CV of precipitation support lower livestock densities and produce less meat. A sliding window analysis of changes in CV of precipitation over the last century shows that, overall, precipitation variability is increasing in global pasture areas, although global maps reveal a patchwork of both positive and negative changes. We use

  1. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  2. The Timescale-dependent Color Variability of Quasars Viewed with /GALEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fei-Fan; Wang, Jun-Xian; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Sun, Yu-Han

    2016-11-01

    In a recent work by Sun et al., the color variation of quasars, namely the bluer-when-brighter trend, was found to be timescale dependent using the SDSS g/r band light curves in Stripe 82. Such timescale dependence, i.e., bluer variation at shorter timescales, supports the thermal fluctuation origin of the UV/optical variation in quasars, and can be modeled well with the inhomogeneous accretion disk model. In this paper, we extend the study to much shorter wavelengths in the rest frame (down to extreme UV) using GALaxy Evolution eXplorer (GALEX) photometric data of quasars collected in two ultraviolet bands (near-UV and far-UV). We develop Monte Carlo simulations to correct for possible biases due to the considerably larger photometric uncertainties in the GALEX light curves (particularly in the far-UV, compared with the SDSS g/r bands), which otherwise could produce artificial results. We securely confirm the previously discovered timescale dependence of the color variability with independent data sets and at shorter wavelengths. We further find that the slope of the correlation between the amplitude of the color variation and timescale appears even steeper than predicted by the inhomogeneous disk model, which assumes that disk fluctuations follow a damped random walk (DRW) process. The much flatter structure function observed in the far-UV compared with that at longer wavelengths implies deviation from the DRW process in the inner disk, where rest-frame extreme UV radiation is produced.

  3. The Timescale-Dependent Color Variability of Quasars Viewed with GALEX

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Fei-Fan; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Sun, Yu-Han

    2016-01-01

    In recent work done by Sun et. al., the color variation of quasars, namely the bluer-when-brighter trend, was found to be timescale-dependent using SDSS $g/r$ band light curves in the Stripe 82. Such timescale dependence, i.e., bluer variation at shorter timescales, supports the thermal fluctuation origin of the UV/optical variation in quasars, and can be well modeled with the inhomogeneous accretion disk model. In this paper, we extend the study to much shorter wavelengths in the rest frame (down to extreme UV), using GALaxy Evolution eXplorer (GALEX) photometric data of quasars collected in two ultraviolet bands (near-UV and far-UV). We develop Monte-Carlo simulations to correct possible biases due to the considerably larger photometric uncertainties in GALEX light curves (particularly in far-UV, comparing with SDSS $g/r$ bands), which otherwise could produce artificial results. We securely confirm the previously discovered timescale dependence of the color variability with independent datasets and at short...

  4. Solid consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Lorenzo; Creminelli, Paolo; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Noreña, Jorge

    2017-03-01

    We argue that isotropic scalar fluctuations in solid inflation are adiabatic in the super-horizon limit. During the solid phase this adiabatic mode has peculiar features: constant energy-density slices and comoving slices do not coincide, and their curvatures, parameterized respectively by ζ and Script R, both evolve in time. The existence of this adiabatic mode implies that Maldacena's squeezed limit consistency relation holds after angular average over the long mode. The correlation functions of a long-wavelength spherical scalar mode with several short scalar or tensor modes is fixed by the scaling behavior of the correlators of short modes, independently of the solid inflation action or dynamics of reheating.

  5. Cast microstructure of Inconel 713C and its dependence on solidification variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhambri, A.K.; Kattamis, T.Z.; Morral, J.E.

    1975-03-01

    The dependence of cast microstructure of Inconel 713C on solidification variables was investigated over a wide range of local cooling rates, epsilon, and thermal gradients in the liquid at the solid-liquid interface, G. The shape of MC carbide particles was found to depend greatly on: 1) the G/R ratio at the solid-liquid interface, where R is growth rate, through the effect of this ratio on the solid phase, ..gamma../sub g/, growth morphology. Under planar front growth conditions the carbide particles were octahedral, under cellular growth conditions they were plate-like, elongated along the cellular growth direction, and under dendritic growth conditions they were irregularly shaped; 2) the local cooling rate, epsilon, when ..gamma.. was dendritic, with a transition from octahedral to dendritic with increasing epsilon. The size of MC carbide particles was found to be controlled by coarsening and to become finer with increasing epsilon. In this alloy the composition of the MC carbide was established as (Nb/sub 0/./sub 63/Ti/sub 0/./sub 31/M0/sub 0/./sub 06/)C and was practically independent of local cooling rate. Other observations were that the precipitation of ..gamma.., d the formation of nonequilibrium eutectics, such as MC-..gamma.., ..gamma..-..gamma..' or MC-..gamma..-..gamma..' were suppressed at splat-cooling rates. Also, microsegregation of all alloying elements with the exception of aluminum was normal, with concentration increasing from the dendrite center-line to the dendrite arm boundary. Aluminum behaved in the opposite manner. Within the cooling rate range used herein, this variable had only a slight effect on microsegregation.

  6. Time-dependent complete-active-space self-consistent-field method for atoms: Application to high-order harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Kenichi L.; Březinová, Iva; Lackner, Fabian; Nagele, Stefan; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    We present a numerical implementation of the time-dependent complete-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-CASSCF) method [Phys. Rev. A 88, 023402 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.023402] for atoms driven by a strong linearly polarized laser pulse. The present implementation treats the problem in its full dimensionality and introduces a gauge-invariant frozen-core approximation, an efficient evaluation of the Coulomb mean field scaling linearly with the number of basis functions, and a split-operator method specifically designed for stable propagation of stiff spatial derivative operators. We apply this method to high-harmonic generation in helium, beryllium, and neon and explore the role of electron correlations.

  7. A duality approach to the worst case value at risk for a sum of dependent random variables with known covariances

    OpenAIRE

    Brice Franke; Michael Stolz

    2009-01-01

    We propose an approach to the aggregation of risks which is based on estimation of simple quantities (such as covariances) associated to a vector of dependent random variables, and which avoids the use of parametric families of copulae. Our main result demonstrates that the method leads to bounds on the worst case Value at Risk for a sum of dependent random variables. Its proof applies duality theory for infinite dimensional linear programs.

  8. Time-dependent reliability of corrosion-affected RC beams. Part 3: Effect of corrosion initiation time and its variability on time-dependent failure probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, Kapilesh, E-mail: kapil_66@barc.gov.i [Architecture and Civil Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mori, Yasuhiro [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ghosh, A.K. [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-05-15

    This paper forms the third part of a study which addresses time-dependent reliability analyses of reinforced concrete (RC) beams affected by reinforcement corrosion. Parts 1 and 2 of the reliability study are presented in companion papers. Part 1 of the reliability study presents evaluation of probabilistic descriptions for time-dependent strengths of a typical simply supported corrosion-affected RC beam. These probabilistic descriptions, i.e., mean and coefficient of variation (c.o.v.) for the time-dependent strengths are presented for two limit states: (a) flexural failure; and (b) shear failure. Part 2 of the reliability study presents evaluation of time-dependent failure probability for the considered RC beam by utilizing the information on probabilistic descriptions for time-dependent strengths available in Part 1. Evaluation of time-dependent failure probability considering the variability in time-dependent strengths and/or time-dependent degradation functions is also presented. This paper investigates the effects of time to corrosion initiation and its variability on failure probability of the same RC beam presented in companion papers. By considering variability in the identified variables that could affect the expected time of first corrosion, simple estimations are presented for mean time to corrosion initiation and variability associated with time to corrosion initiation. Evaluation of time-dependent failure probability for the beam is presented by considering estimated probabilistic descriptions, i.e., mean and c.o.v. for time to corrosion initiation. Parametric analyses show that failure probability for the beam is sensitive to the mode of strength degradation and time to corrosion initiation.

  9. Functional Entropy Variables: A New Methodology for Deriving Thermodynamically Consistent Algorithms for Complex Fluids, with Particular Reference to the Isothermal Navier-Stokes-Korteweg Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    analyzing the stability of nonlinear problems. The study of entropy-stable schemes for gas dynamics can be traced back to early work on symmetrization of... back from entropy variables to conservation variables is non-local and involves the solution operator of the Laplace problem. To avoid the difficulties... corrector algorithm given by (157)-(178). Remark 20. We adopt the preconditioned GMRES algorithm [53] from PETSc [2] to solve the linear system given by (175

  10. Progress in many-body theory with the equation of motion method: Time-dependent density matrix meets self-consistent RPA and applications to solvable models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Peter; Tohyama, Mitsuru

    2016-04-01

    The Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon or time-dependent density matrix (TDDM) hierarchy of equations for higher density matrices is truncated at the three-body level in approximating the three-body correlation function by a quadratic form of two-body ones, closing the equations in this way. The procedure is discussed in detail and it is shown in nontrivial model cases that the approximate inclusion of three-body correlation functions is very important to obtain precise results. A small amplitude approximation of this time-dependent nonlinear equation for the two-body correlation function is performed (STDDM*-b) and it is shown that the one-body sector of this generalized nonlinear second random phase approximation (RPA) equation is equivalent to the self-consistent RPA (SCRPA) approach which had been derived previously by different techniques. It is discussed in which way SCRPA also contains the three-body correlations. TDDM and SCRPA are tested versus exactly solvable model cases.

  11. Ionic strength-dependent changes in tentacular ion exchangers with variable ligand density. II. Functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhambure, Rahul; Angelo, James M; Gillespie, Christopher M; Phillips, Michael; Graalfs, Heiner; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2017-07-14

    The effect of ligand density was studied on protein adsorption and transport behavior in tentacular cation-exchange sorbents at different ionic strengths. Results were obtained for lysozyme, lactoferrin and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) in order to examine the effects of protein size and charge. The combination of ligand density and ionic strength results in extensive variability of the static and dynamic binding capacities, transport rate and binding affinity of the proteins. Uptake and elution experiments were performed to quantify the transport behavior of selected proteins, specifically to estimate intraparticle protein diffusivities. The observed trend of decreasing uptake diffusivities with an increase in ligand density was correlated to structural properties of the ligand-density variants, particularly the accessible porosity. Increasing the ionic strength of the equilibration buffer led to enhanced mass transfer during uptake, independent of the transport model used, and specifically for larger proteins like lactoferrin and mAb, the most significant effects were evident in the sorbent of the highest ligand density. For lysozyme, higher ligand density leads to higher static and dynamic binding capacities whereas for lactoferrin and the mAb, the binding capacity is a complex function of accessible porosity due to ionic strength-dependent changes. Ligand density has a less pronounced effect on the elution rate, presumably due to ionic strength-dependent changes in the pore architecture of the sorbents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Next generation of the self-consistent and environment-dependent Hamiltonian: Applications to various boron allotropes from zero- to three-dimensional structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandy, P; Yu, Ming; Leahy, C; Jayanthi, C S; Wu, S Y

    2015-03-28

    An upgrade of the previous self-consistent and environment-dependent linear combination of atomic orbitals Hamiltonian (referred as SCED-LCAO) has been developed. This improved version of the semi-empirical SCED-LCAO Hamiltonian, in addition to the inclusion of self-consistent determination of charge redistribution, multi-center interactions, and modeling of electron-electron correlation, has taken into account the effect excited on the orbitals due to the atomic aggregation. This important upgrade has been subjected to a stringent test, the construction of the SCED-LCAO Hamiltonian for boron. It was shown that the Hamiltonian for boron has successfully characterized the electron deficiency of boron and captured the complex chemical bonding in various boron allotropes, including the planar and quasi-planar, the convex, the ring, the icosahedral, and the fullerene-like clusters, the two-dimensional monolayer sheets, and the bulk alpha boron, demonstrating its transferability, robustness, reliability, and predictive power. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme based on the Hamiltonian has been applied to explore the existence and the energetics of ∼230 compact boron clusters BN with N in the range from ∼100 to 768, including the random, the rhombohedral, and the spherical icosahedral structures. It was found that, energetically, clusters containing whole icosahedral B12 units are more stable for boron clusters of larger size (N > 200). The ease with which the simulations both at 0 K and finite temperatures were completed is a demonstration of the efficiency of the SCED-LCAO Hamiltonian.

  13. Nanostructures study of CNT nanofluids transport with temperature-dependent variable viscosity in a muscular tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Abid, Syed Ali; Tripathi, Dharmendra; Mir, Nazir Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    The transport of single-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) nanofluids with temperature-dependent variable viscosity is analyzed by peristaltically driven flow. The main flow problem has been modeled using cylindrical coordinates and flow equations are simplified to ordinary differential equations using long wavelength and low Reynolds' number approximation. Analytical solutions have been obtained for axial velocity, pressure gradient and temperature. Results acquired are discussed graphically for better understanding. It is observed that with an increment in the Grashof number the velocity of the governing fluids starts to decrease significantly and the pressure gradient is higher for pure water as compared to single-walled carbon nanotubes due to low density. As the specific heat is very high for pure water as compared to the multi-wall carbon nanotubes, it raises temperature of the muscles, in the case of pure water, as compared to the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, it is noticed that the trapped bolus starts decreasing in size as the buoyancy forces are dominant as compared to viscous forces. This model may be applicable in biomedical engineering and nanotechnology to design the biomedical devices.

  14. Metallurgical coke quality depending on the variability of properties of coking coal mixes components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Kaloc; S. Bartusek; S. Czudek [VSB-TU Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2005-07-01

    The main sources for this report are the experiences acquired by the long lasting practice of the coking coal mixes preparing and tuning them in accordance with the variable qualitative properties of the coals mined in the coalfields of the OKD Company Ostrava. The systematic database, made by summarizing the values of measured indexes, became a very useful instrument for the coal mixes composing with regard on the two today very important points of view, namely: Contemporary presence and the long lasting availability of the definite coal type from any local source. Price basis influencing strongly the economics of the coke production. The method of prognostic estimating of the metallurgical coke quality dependence on the coking mixes composition, developed some time ago by authors of presented paper, was published in the Cokemaking International Vol. 13, 2/2001 (Czudek S. and al.: Simulation of Carbonization Process under Laboratory Conditions). The original procedure was newly accomplished by implementing a special method of the multi criteria evaluation of the definite coal components. New method is based on special processing of the technologic significant qualitative properties of the mined coal brands enabling deeply estimate the impacts of their application in metallurgical coke production. The importance of this evaluating system exceeds largely the well known method that is incorporated in the international coal classification. The main advantage of the new method is the fully respecting of the specialties marking the geographic different coalfields. (Abstract only)

  15. A classification of substance-dependent men on temperament and severity variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Melinda J; Galen, Luke W

    2003-06-01

    This study examined the validity of classifying substance abusers based on temperament and dependence severity, and expanded the scope of typology differences to proximal determinants of use (e.g., expectancies, motives). Patients were interviewed about substance use, depression, and family history of alcohol and drug abuse. Self-report instruments measuring temperament, expectancies, and motives were completed. Participants were 147 male veterans admitted to inpatient substance abuse treatment at a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical center. Cluster analysis identified four types of users with two high substance problem severity and two low substance problem severity groups. Two, high problem severity, early onset groups differed only on the cluster variable of negative affectivity (NA), but showed differences on antisocial personality characteristics, hypochondriasis, and coping motives for alcohol. The two low problem severity groups were distinguished by age of onset and positive affectivity (PA). The late onset, low PA group had a higher incidence of depression, a greater tendency to use substances in solitary contexts, and lower enhancement motives for alcohol compared to the early onset, high PA cluster. The four-cluster solution yielded more distinctions on external criteria than the two-cluster solution. Such temperament variation within both high and low severity substance abusers may be important for treatment planning.

  16. The Functional Segregation and Integration Model: Mixture Model Representations of Consistent and Variable Group-Level Connectivity in fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Churchill, Nathan William; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Mørup, Morten

    2016-01-01

    The brain consists of specialized cortical regions that exchange information between each other, reflecting a combination of segregated (local) and integrated (distributed) processes that define brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is widely used to characterize these func...

  17. Radial dependence of line profile variability in seven O9--B0.5 stars

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, F; Hillier, D J; Donati, J -F; Bouret, J -C

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars show a variety of spectral variability: presence of discrete absorption components in UV P-Cygni profiles, optical line profile variability, X-ray variability, radial velocity modulations. Our goal is to study the spectral variability of single OB stars to better understand the relation between photospheric and wind variability. For that, we rely on high spectral resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra collected with the spectrograph NARVAL on the Telescope Bernard Lyot at Pic du Midi. We investigate the variability of twelve spectral lines by means of the Temporal Variance Spectrum (TVS). The selected lines probe the radial structure of the atmosphere, from the photosphere to the outer wind. We also perform a spectroscopic analysis with atmosphere models to derive the stellar and wind properties, and to constrain the formation region of the selected lines. We show that variability is observed in the wind lines of all bright giants and supergiants, on a daily timescale. Lines form...

  18. Alaskan soil carbon stocks: spatial variability and dependence on environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Mishra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The direction and magnitude of soil organic carbon (SOC changes in response to climate change depend on the spatial and vertical distributions of SOC. We estimated spatially resolved SOC stocks from surface to C horizon, distinguishing active-layer and permafrost-layer stocks, based on geospatial analysis of 472 soil profiles and spatially referenced environmental variables for Alaska. Total Alaska state-wide SOC stock was estimated to be 77 Pg, with 61% in the active-layer, 27% in permafrost, and 12% in non-permafrost soils. Prediction accuracy was highest for the active-layer as demonstrated by highest ratio of performance to deviation (1.5. Large spatial variability was predicted, with whole-profile, active-layer, and permafrost-layer stocks ranging from 1–296 kg C m−2, 2–166 kg m−2, and 0–232 kg m−2, respectively. Temperature and soil wetness were found to be primary controllers of whole-profile, active-layer, and permafrost-layer SOC stocks. Secondary controllers, in order of importance, were found to be land cover type, topographic attributes, and bedrock geology. The observed importance of soil wetness rather than precipitation on SOC stocks implies that the poor representation of high-latitude soil wetness in Earth system models may lead to large uncertainty in predicted SOC stocks under future climate change scenarios. Under strict caveats described in the text and assuming temperature changes from the A1B Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions scenario, our geospatial model indicates that the equilibrium average 2100 Alaska active-layer depth could deepen by 11 cm, resulting in a thawing of 13 Pg C currently in permafrost. The equilibrium SOC loss associated with this warming would be highest under continuous permafrost (31%, followed by discontinuous (28%, isolated (24.3%, and sporadic (23.6% permafrost areas. Our high-resolution mapping of soil carbon stock reveals the

  19. Category learning in Alzheimer's disease and normal cognitive aging depends on initial experience of feature variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jeffrey S; McMillan, Corey T; Smith, Edward E; Grossman, Murray

    2017-04-01

    Semantic category learning is dependent upon several factors, including the nature of the learning task, as well as individual differences in the quality and heterogeneity of exemplars that an individual encounters during learning. We trained healthy older adults (n=39) and individuals with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or Mild Cognitive Impairment (n=44) to recognize instances of a fictitious animal, a "crutter". Each stimulus item contained 10 visual features (e.g., color, tail shape) which took one of two values for each feature (e.g., yellow/red, curly/straight tails). Participants were presented with a series of items (learning phase) and were either told the items belonged to a semantic category (explicit condition) or were told to think about the appearance of the items (implicit condition). Half of participants saw learning items with higher similarity to an unseen prototype (high typicality learning set), and thus lower between-item variability in their constituent features; the other half learned from items with lower typicality (low typicality learning set) and higher between-item feature variability. After the learning phase, participants were presented with test items one at a time that varied in the number of typical features from 0 (antitype) to 10 (prototype). We examined between-subjects factors of learning set (lower or higher typicality), instruction type (explicit or implicit), and group (patients vs. elderly control). Learning in controls was aided by higher learning set typicality: while controls in both learning set groups demonstrated significant learning, those exposed to a high-typicality learning set appeared to develop a prototype that helped guide their category membership judgments. Overall, patients demonstrated more difficulty with category learning than elderly controls. Patients exposed to the higher-typicality learning set were sensitive to the typical features of the category and discriminated between the most and least

  20. Alaskan soil carbon stocks: spatial variability and dependence on environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Mishra

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The direction and magnitude of soil organic carbon (SOC changes in response to climate change depend on the spatial and vertical distributions of SOC. We estimated spatially-resolved SOC stocks from surface to C horizon, distinguishing active-layer and permafrost-layer stocks, based on geospatial analysis of 472 soil profiles and spatially referenced environmental variables for Alaska. Total Alaska state-wide SOC stock was estimated to be 77 Pg, with 61% in the active-layer, 27% in permafrost, and 12% in non-permafrost soils. Prediction accuracy was highest for the active-layer as demonstrated by highest ratio of performance to deviation (1.5. Large spatial variability was predicted, with whole-profile, active-layer, and permafrost-layer stocks ranging from 1–296 kg C m−2, 2–166 kg m−2, and 0–232 kg m−2, respectively. Temperature and soil wetness were found to be primary controllers of whole-profile, active-layer, and permafrost-layer SOC stocks. Secondary controllers, in order of importance, were: land cover type, topographic attributes, and bedrock geology. The observed importance of soil wetness rather than precipitation on SOC stocks implies that the poor representation of high-latitude soil wetness in Earth System Models may lead to large uncertainty in predicted SOC stocks under future climate change scenarios. Under strict caveats described in the text and assuming temperature changes from the A1B Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions scenario, our geospatial model indicates that the equilibrium average 2100 Alaska active-layer depth could deepen by 11 cm, resulting in a thawing of 13 Pg C currently in permafrost. The equilibrium SOC loss associated with this warming would be highest under continuous permafrost (31%, followed by discontinuous (28%, isolated (24.3%, and sporadic (23.6% permafrost areas. Our high resolution mapping of soil carbon stock reveals the potential

  1. The derivative-dependent functional variable separation for the evolution equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shun-Li; Lou Sen-Yue; Qu Chang-Zheng

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies variable separation of the evolution equations via the generalized conditional symmetry. To illustrate, we classify the extended nonlinear wave equation utt = A(u,ux)uxx+B(u,ux,ut) which admits the derivativedependent functional separable solutions (DDFSSs). We also extend the concept of the DDFSS to cover other variable separation approaches.

  2. Seismic hazard from induced seismicity: effect of time-dependent hazard variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertito, V.; Sharma, N.; Maercklin, N.; Emolo, A.; Zollo, A.

    2012-12-01

    Geothermal systems are drawing large attention worldwide as an alternative source of energy. Although geothermal energy is beneficial, field operations can produce induced seismicity whose effects can range from light and unfelt to severe damaging. In a recent paper by Convertito et al. (2012), we have investigated the effect of time-dependent seismicity parameters on seismic hazard from induced seismicity. The analysis considered the time-variation of the b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter relationship and the seismicity rate, and assumed a non-homogeneous Poisson model to solve the hazard integral. The procedure was tested in The Geysers geothermal area in Northern California where commercial exploitation has started in the 1960s. The analyzed dataset consists of earthquakes recorded during the period 2007 trough 2010 by the LBNL Geysers/Calpine network. To test the reliability of the analysis, we applied a simple forecasting procedure which compares the estimated hazard values in terms of ground-motion values having fixed probability of exceedance and the observed ground-motion values. The procedure is feasible for monitoring purposes and for calibrating the production/extraction rate to avoid adverse consequences. However, one of the main assumptions we made concern the fact that both median predictions and standard deviation of the ground-motion prediction equation (GMPE) are stationary. Particularly for geothermal areas where the number of recorded earthquakes can rapidly change with time, we want to investigate how a variation of the coefficients of the used GMPE and of the standard deviation influences the hazard estimates. Basically, we hypothesize that the physical-mechanical properties of a highly fractured medium which is continuously perturbed by field operations can produce variations of both source and medium properties that cannot be captured by a stationary GMPE. We assume a standard GMPE which accounts for the main effects which modify the scaling

  3. Time-dependent reliability of corrosion-affected RC beams-Part 1: Estimation of time-dependent strengths and associated variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, Kapilesh, E-mail: kapilesh_66@yahoo.co.u [Architecture and Civil Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mori, Yasuhiro [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ghosh, A.K. [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: Predictive models for corrosion-induced damages in RC structures. Formulations for time-dependent flexural and shear strengths of corroded RC beams. Methodology for mean and c.o.v. for time-dependent strengths of corroded RC beams. Simple estimation of mean and c.o.v. for flexural strength with loss of bond. - Abstract: The structural deterioration of reinforced concrete (RC) structures due to reinforcement corrosion is a major worldwide problem. Damages to RC structures due to reinforcement corrosion manifest in the form of expansion, cracking and eventual spalling of the cover concrete; thereby resulting in serviceability and durability degradation of such structures. In addition to loss of cover, RC structure may suffer structural damages due to loss of reinforcement cross-sectional area, and loss of bond between corroded reinforcement and surrounding cracked concrete, sometimes to the extent that the structural failure becomes inevitable. This paper forms the first part of a study which addresses time-dependent reliability analyses of RC beams affected by reinforcement corrosion. In this paper initially the predictive models are presented for the quantitative assessment of time-dependent damages in RC beams, recognized as loss of mass and cross-sectional area of reinforcing bar, loss of concrete section owing to the peeling of cover concrete, and loss of bond between corroded reinforcement and surrounding cracked concrete. Then these models have been used to present analytical formulations for evaluating time-dependent flexural and shear strengths of corroded RC beams, based on the standard composite mechanics expressions for RC sections. Further by considering variability in the identified basic variables that could affect the time-dependent strengths of corrosion-affected RC beams, the estimation of statistical descriptions for the time-dependent strengths is presented for a typical simply supported RC beam. The statistical descriptions

  4. Heart rate variability biofeedback in patients with alcohol dependence: a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penzlin AI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ana Isabel Penzlin,1 Timo Siepmann,2 Ben Min-Woo Illigens,3 Kerstin Weidner,4 Martin Siepmann4 1Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, 2Department of Neurology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Saxony, Germany; 3Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 4Department of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Medicine, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Saxony, Germany Background and objective: In patients with alcohol dependence, ethyl-toxic damage of vasomotor and cardiac autonomic nerve fibers leads to autonomic imbalance with neurovascular and cardiac dysfunction, the latter resulting in reduced heart rate variability (HRV. Autonomic imbalance is linked to increased craving and cardiovascular mortality. In this study, we sought to assess the effects of HRV biofeedback training on HRV, vasomotor function, craving, and anxiety. Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled study in 48 patients (14 females, ages 25–59 years undergoing inpatient rehabilitation treatment. In the treatment group, patients (n=24 attended six sessions of HRV biofeedback over 2 weeks in addition to standard rehabilitative care, whereas, in the control group, subjects received standard care only. Psychometric testing for craving (Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale, anxiety (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised, HRV assessment using coefficient of variation of R-R intervals (CVNN analysis, and vasomotor function assessment using laser Doppler flowmetry were performed at baseline, immediately after completion of treatment or control period, and 3 and 6 weeks afterward (follow-ups 1 and 2. Results: Psychometric testing showed decreased craving in the biofeedback group immediately postintervention (OCDS scores: 8.6±7.9 post-biofeedback versus 13.7±11.0 baseline [mean ± standard deviation], P<0.05, whereas craving was unchanged at

  5. Consistent sets contradict

    CERN Document Server

    Kent, A

    1996-01-01

    In the consistent histories formulation of quantum theory, the probabilistic predictions and retrodictions made from observed data depend on the choice of a consistent set. We show that this freedom allows the formalism to retrodict several contradictory propositions which correspond to orthogonal commuting projections and which all have probability one. We also show that the formalism makes contradictory probability one predictions when applied to generalised time-symmetric quantum mechanics.

  6. The relative dependence of Spanish landscape pattern on environmental and geographical variables over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortega, M.; Bunce, R.G.H.; Barrio, del J.M.G.; Elena-Rossello, R.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of the dependence of landscape patterns on environment was carried out in order to investigate the landscape structure evolution of Spain. The underlying concept was that the dependence between landscape spatial structure and environmental factors could be gradually decreasing over

  7. Patterns of variability in early-life traits of fishes depend on spatial scale of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Antonio; Guidetti, Paolo

    2011-06-23

    Estimates of early-life traits of fishes (e.g. pelagic larval duration (PLD) and spawning date) are essential for investigating and assessing patterns of population connectivity. Such estimates are available for a large number of both tropical and temperate fish species, but few studies have assessed their variability in space, especially across multiple scales. The present study, where a Mediterranean fish (i.e. the white seabream Diplodus sargus sargus) was used as a model, shows that spawning date and PLD are spatially more variable at a scale of kilometres than at a scale of tens to hundreds of kilometres. This study indicates the importance of considering spatial variability of early-life traits of fishes in order to properly delineate connectivity patterns at larval stages (e.g. by means of Lagrangian simulations), thus providing strategically useful information on connectivity and relevant management goals (e.g. the creation of networks of marine reserves).

  8. Time-dependent excitation and ionization modelling of absorption-line variability due to GRB080310

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vreeswijk, P.M.; De Cia, A.; Jakobsson, P.

    2013-01-01

    We model the time-variable absorption of Feii, Feiii, Siii, Cii and Crii detected in Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectra of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 080310, with the afterglow radiation exciting and ionizing the interstellar medium in the host galaxy at a redshift of z = 2.427...

  9. Architecting product diversification - Formalizing variability dependencies in software product family engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaring, M; Bosch, J; Ehrich, HD; Schewe, KD

    2004-01-01

    In a software product family context, software architects design architectures that support product diversification in both space (multiple contexts) and time (changing contexts). Product diversification is based on the concept of variability: a single architecture and a set of components support a

  10. A characterization of marginal distributions of (possibly dependent) lifetime variables which right censor each other

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bedford, T.; Meilijson, I.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the joint distribution of a pair of lifetime variables $X_1$ and $X_2$ which right censor each other cannot be specified in terms of the subsurvival functions $$P(X_2 > X_1 > x), \\quad P(X_1 > X_2 > x)$ \\quad \\text{and} \\quad $P(X_1 = X_2 > x)$$ without additional assumptions s

  11. Age Dependent Variability in Gene Expression in Fischer 344 Rat Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent evidence suggests older adults may be a sensitive population with regard to environmental exposure to toxic compounds. One source of this sensitivity could be an enhanced variability in response. Studies on phenotypic differences have suggested that variation in response d...

  12. Saddlepoint expansions for sums of Markov dependent variables on a continuous state space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    here very similar to the classical results for i.i.d. variables. In particular we establish also conditions under which the expansions hold uniformly over the range of the saddlepoint. Expansions are also derived for sums of the form f(X1, X0)+f(X2, X1)+...+f(Xn, Xn-1) although the uniformity result...

  13. Weighted sums of subexponential random variables and asymptotic dependence between returns on reinsurance equities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L. Geluk (Jaap); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAsymptotic tail probabilities for bivariate linear combinations of subexponential random variables are given. These results are applied to explain the joint movements of the stocks of reinsurers. Portfolio investment and retrocession practices in the reinsurance industry, for reasons of

  14. Accurate approximate solution to nonlinear oscillators in which the restoring force is inversely proportional to the dependent variable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belendez, A; Gimeno, E; Mendez, D I; Alvarez, M L [Departamento de Fisica, IngenierIa de Sistemas y TeorIa de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Fernandez, E [Departamento de Optica, FarmacologIa y AnatomIa, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: a.belendez@ua.es

    2008-06-15

    A modified generalized, rational harmonic balance method is used to construct approximate frequency-amplitude relations for a conservative nonlinear singular oscillator in which the restoring force is inversely proportional to the dependent variable. The procedure is used to solve the nonlinear differential equation approximately. The approximate frequency obtained using this procedure is more accurate than those obtained using other approximate methods and the discrepancy between the approximate frequency and the exact one is lower than 0.40%.

  15. Near-infrared thermal emission from near-Earth asteroids: Aspect-dependent variability

    CERN Document Server

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A; DeMeo, Francesca E; Binzel, Richard P; Endicott, Thomas; Yang, Bin; Howell, Ellen S; Vervack, Ronald J; Fernandez, Yanga R

    2016-01-01

    Here we explore a technique for constraining physical properties of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) based on variability in thermal emission as a function of viewing aspect. We present case studies of the low albedo, near-Earth asteroids (285263) 1998 QE2 and (175706) 1996 FG3. The Near-Earth Asteroid Thermal Model (NEATM) is used to fit signatures of thermal emission in near-infrared (0.8 - 2.5 micron) spectral data. This analysis represents a systematic study of thermal variability in the near-IR as a function of phase angle. The observations of QE2 imply that carefully timed observations from multiple viewing geometries can be used to constrain physical properties like retrograde versus prograde pole orientation and thermal inertia. The FG3 results are more ambiguous with detected thermal variability possibly due to systematic issues with NEATM, an unexpected prograde rotation state, or a surface that is spectrally and thermally heterogenous. This study highlights the potential diagnostic importance of high ph...

  16. Variable Viscosity Effects on Time Dependent Magnetic Nanofluid Flow past a Stretchable Rotating Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Paras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to describe the effects of geothermal viscosity with viscous dissipation on the three dimensional time dependent boundary layer flow of magnetic nanofluids due to a stretchable rotating plate in the presence of a porous medium. The modelled governing time dependent equations are transformed a from boundary value problem to an initial value problem, and thereafter solved by a fourth order Runge-Kutta method in MATLAB with a shooting technique for the initial guess. The influences of mixed temperature, depth dependent viscosity, and the rotation strength parameter on the flow field and temperature field generated on the plate surface are investigated. The derived results show direct impact in the problems of heat transfer in high speed computer disks (Herrero et al. [1] and turbine rotor systems (Owen and Rogers [2].

  17. The Relationships between Cognitive Style of Field Dependence and Learner Variables in E-Learning Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozcu, Omer Faruk

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between cognitive styles of field dependent learners with their attitudes towards e-learning (distance education) and instructional behavior in e-learning instruction. The Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) and the attitude survey (for students' preferences) towards e-learning instruction as distance education…

  18. Near-infrared thermal emission from near-Earth asteroids: Aspect-dependent variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Polishook, David; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Binzel, Richard P.; Endicott, Thomas; Yang, Bin; Howell, Ellen S.; Vervack, , Ronald J.; Fernández, Yanga R.

    2017-03-01

    Here we explore a technique for constraining physical properties of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) based on variability in thermal emission as a function of viewing aspect. We present case studies of the low albedo, near-Earth asteroids (285263) 1998 QE2 and (175706) 1996 FG3. The Near-Earth Asteroid Thermal Model (NEATM) is used to fit signatures of thermal emission in near-infrared (0.8 - 2.5 μm) spectral data. This analysis represents a systematic study of thermal variability in the near-IR as a function of phase angle. The observations of QE2 imply that carefully timed observations from multiple viewing geometries can be used to constrain physical properties like retrograde versus prograde pole orientation and thermal inertia. The FG3 results are more ambiguous with detected thermal variability possibly due to systematic issues with NEATM, an unexpected prograde rotation state, or a surface that is spectrally and thermally heterogenous. This study highlights the potential diagnostic importance of high phase angle thermal measurements on both sides of opposition. We find that the NEATM thermal beaming parameters derived from our near-IR data tend to be of order10's of percent higher than parameters from ensemble analyses of longer wavelength data sets. However, a systematic comparison of NEATM applied to data in different wavelength regimes is needed to understand whether this offset is simply a reflection of small number statistics or an intrinsic limitation of NEATM when applied to near-IR data. With the small sample presented here, it remains unclear whether NEATM modeling at near-IR wavelengths can robustly determine physical properties like pole orientation and thermal inertia.

  19. THE DIFFERENCES IN MORAL, GROUP IDENTITY AND THE PERCON’S VARIABILITY DEPENDING ON THE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Aleksandrobna Kolinichenko

    2017-06-01

    Results. The results of the study have revealed the dominance of all specified assessment parameters in the group of test subjects with incomplete higher education: higher level of moral development in all dilemmas (the opposition of life values (compassion and following the law, self-interest – the interests of the city (law, business (benefit and law, personal interests (career and the freedom of another person, except for the dilemma of the opposition between the interests of a majority and a single person. The differences have also been revealed between the two groups of test subjects according to the group identity, group variability, the desirability of the common categories of identity.

  20. Modeling the Effects of a Normal-Stress-Dependent State Variable, Within the Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Framework, at Stepovers and Dip-Slip Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kenny J.; Oglesby, David D.

    2017-03-01

    The development of the rate- and state-dependent friction framework (Dieterich Appl Geophys 116:790-806, 1978; J Geophys Res 84, 2161-2168, 1979; Ruina Friction laws and instabilities: a quasistatic analysis of some dry friction behavior, Ph.D. Thesis, Brown Univ., Providence, R.I., 1980; J Geophys Res 88:10359-10370, 1983) includes the dependence of friction coefficient on normal stress (Linker and Dieterich J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992); however, a direct dependence of the friction law on time-varying normal stress in dynamic stepover and dip-slip fault models has not yet been extensively explored. Using rate- and state-dependent friction laws and a 2-D dynamic finite element code (Barall J Int 178, 845-859, 2009), we investigate the effect of the Linker-Dieterich dependence of state variable on normal stress at stepovers and dip-slip faults, where normal stress should not be constant with time (e.g., Harris and Day J Geophys Res 98:4461-4472, 1993; Nielsen Geophys Res Lett 25:125-128, 1998). Specifically, we use the relation d ψ/d t = -( α/ σ)(d σ/d t) from Linker and Dieterich (J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992), in which a change in normal stress leads to a change in state variable of the opposite sign. We investigate a range of values for alpha, which scales the impact of the normal stress change on state, from 0 to 0.5 (laboratory values range from 0.2 to 0.56). For stepovers, we find that adding normal-stress dependence to the state variable delays or stops re-nucleation on the secondary fault segment when compared to normal-stress-independent state evolution. This inhibition of jumping rupture is due to the fact that re-nucleation along the secondary segment occurs in areas of decreased normal stress in both compressional and dilational stepovers. However, the magnitude of such an effect differs between dilational and compressional systems. Additionally, it is well known that the asymmetric geometry of reverse and normal faults can lead to greater

  1. A functional limit theorem for partial sums of dependent random variables with infinite variance

    CERN Document Server

    Basrak, Bojan; Segers, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Under an appropriate regular variation condition, the affinely normalized partial sums of a sequence of independent and identically distributed random variables converges weakly to a non-Gaussian stable random variable. A functional version of this is known to be true as well, the limit process being a stable L\\'evy process. The main result in the paper is that for a stationary, regularly varying sequence for which clusters of high-threshold excesses can be broken down into asymptotically independent blocks, the properly centered partial sum process still converges to a stable L\\'evy process. Due to clustering, the L\\'evy triple of the limit process can be different from the one in the independent case. The convergence takes place in the space of c\\`adl\\`ag functions endowed with Skorohod's $M_1$ topology, the more usual $J_1$ topology being inappropriate as the partial sum processes may exhibit rapid successions of jumps within temporal clusters of large values, collapsing in the limit to a single jump. The ...

  2. Exploring connections between statistical mechanics and Green's functions for realistic systems. Temperature dependent entropy and internal energy from a self-consistent second-order Green's function

    CERN Document Server

    Welden, Alicia Rae; Zgid, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Including finite-temperature effects into electronic structure calculations of semiconductors and metals is frequently necessary, but can become cumbersome using zero-temperature methods, which require an explicit evaluation of excited states to extend the approach to finite-temperature. Using a Matsubara Green's function formalism, it is easy to include the effects of temperature and to connect dynamic quantities such as the self-energy with static thermodynamic quantities such as the Helmholtz energy, entropy, and internal energy. We evaluate the thermodynamic quantities with a self-consistent Green's function where the self-energy is approximated to second-order (GF2). To validate our method, we benchmark it against finite temperature full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations for a hydrogen fluoride (HF) molecule and find excellent agreement at high temperatures and very good agreement at low temperatures. Then, we proceed to evaluate thermodynamic quantities for a one-dimension hydrogen solid at v...

  3. Exploring connections between statistical mechanics and Green's functions for realistic systems: Temperature dependent electronic entropy and internal energy from a self-consistent second-order Green's function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welden, Alicia Rae; Rusakov, Alexander A; Zgid, Dominika

    2016-11-28

    Including finite-temperature effects from the electronic degrees of freedom in electronic structure calculations of semiconductors and metals is desired; however, in practice it remains exceedingly difficult when using zero-temperature methods, since these methods require an explicit evaluation of multiple excited states in order to account for any finite-temperature effects. Using a Matsubara Green's function formalism remains a viable alternative, since in this formalism it is easier to include thermal effects and to connect the dynamic quantities such as the self-energy with static thermodynamic quantities such as the Helmholtz energy, entropy, and internal energy. However, despite the promising properties of this formalism, little is known about the multiple solutions of the non-linear equations present in the self-consistent Matsubara formalism and only a few cases involving a full Coulomb Hamiltonian were investigated in the past. Here, to shed some light onto the iterative nature of the Green's function solutions, we self-consistently evaluate the thermodynamic quantities for a one-dimensional (1D) hydrogen solid at various interatomic separations and temperatures using the self-energy approximated to second-order (GF2). At many points in the phase diagram of this system, multiple phases such as a metal and an insulator exist, and we are able to determine the most stable phase from the analysis of Helmholtz energies. Additionally, we show the evolution of the spectrum of 1D boron nitride to demonstrate that GF2 is capable of qualitatively describing the temperature effects influencing the size of the band gap.

  4. Exploring connections between statistical mechanics and Green's functions for realistic systems: Temperature dependent electronic entropy and internal energy from a self-consistent second-order Green's function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welden, Alicia Rae; Rusakov, Alexander A.; Zgid, Dominika

    2016-11-01

    Including finite-temperature effects from the electronic degrees of freedom in electronic structure calculations of semiconductors and metals is desired; however, in practice it remains exceedingly difficult when using zero-temperature methods, since these methods require an explicit evaluation of multiple excited states in order to account for any finite-temperature effects. Using a Matsubara Green's function formalism remains a viable alternative, since in this formalism it is easier to include thermal effects and to connect the dynamic quantities such as the self-energy with static thermodynamic quantities such as the Helmholtz energy, entropy, and internal energy. However, despite the promising properties of this formalism, little is known about the multiple solutions of the non-linear equations present in the self-consistent Matsubara formalism and only a few cases involving a full Coulomb Hamiltonian were investigated in the past. Here, to shed some light onto the iterative nature of the Green's function solutions, we self-consistently evaluate the thermodynamic quantities for a one-dimensional (1D) hydrogen solid at various interatomic separations and temperatures using the self-energy approximated to second-order (GF2). At many points in the phase diagram of this system, multiple phases such as a metal and an insulator exist, and we are able to determine the most stable phase from the analysis of Helmholtz energies. Additionally, we show the evolution of the spectrum of 1D boron nitride to demonstrate that GF2 is capable of qualitatively describing the temperature effects influencing the size of the band gap.

  5. The greek infinitive in variable deliberative, principally dependent questions: an interpretation in terms of naturalness theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Kavčič

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper I investigate the use of the infinitive in dependent delibera­ tive clauses in Greek, a phenomenon occurring in several (modern languages, cf. Slovene Nisem vedel, kaj storiti. 'I didn't know what to do?', English I didn't know what to do., German Was tun? 'What to do?'l. In the first part I present the development of deliberative infinitive clauses in Post-Classical Greek with a special emphasis on the use of this form in two Early Byzantine prose writings (in Pratum Spirituale and in Vita Theodori Syceotae, both belonging to the 6th;7th century AD, where some peculiarities are observed. In the second part an attempt is made to interpret the basic characteristics of the Greek infinitive in dependent deliberative clauses from the perspective of Naturalness Theory.

  6. Frequency-dependent sexual selection with respect to offspring fitness returns is consistent with predictions from rock-paper-scissors dynamics in the European common lizard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S. Fitze

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphism can be maintained over time by negative frequency-dependent (FD selection induced by Rock-paper-scissors (RPS social systems. RPS games produce cyclic dynamics, and have been suggested to exist in lizards, insects, isopods, plants, and bacteria. Sexual selection is predicted to accentuate the survival of the future progeny during negative FD survival selection. More specifically, females are predicted to select mates that produce progeny genotypes that exhibit highest survival during survival selection imposed by adult males. However, no empirical evidence demonstrates the existence of FD sexual selection with respect to fitness payoffs of genetic polymorphisms. Here we tested this prediction using the common lizard Zootoca vivipara, a species with three male color morphs (orange, white, yellow that exhibit morph frequency cycles. In a first step we tested the congruence of the morph frequency change with the predicted change in three independent populations, differing in male color morph frequency and state of the FD morph cycle. Thereafter we ran standardized sexual selection assays in which we excluded alternative mechanisms that potentially induce negative FD selection, and we quantified inter-sexual behavior. The patterns of sexual selection and the observed behavior were in line with context-dependent female mate choice and male behavior played a minor role. Moreover, the strength of the sexual selection was within the magnitude of selection required to produce the observed 3-4-year and 6-8 year morph frequency cycles at low and high altitudes, respectively. In summary, the study provides the first experimental evidence that underpins the crucial assumption of the RPS games suggested to exist in lizards, insects, isopods, and plants; namely, that sexual selection produces negative-FD selection. This indicates that sexual selection, in our study exert by females, might be a crucial driver of the maintenance of genetic

  7. Variability in projected elevation dependent warming in boreal midlatitude winter in CMIP5 climate models and its potential drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangwala, Imtiaz; Sinsky, Eric; Miller, James R.

    2016-04-01

    The future rate of climate change in mountains has many potential human impacts, including those related to water resources, ecosystem services, and recreation. Analysis of the ensemble mean response of CMIP5 global climate models (GCMs) shows amplified warming in high elevation regions during the cold season in boreal midlatitudes. We examine how the twenty-first century elevation-dependent response in the daily minimum surface air temperature [d(ΔTmin)/dz] varies among 27 different GCMs during winter for the RCP 8.5 emissions scenario. The focus is on regions within the northern hemisphere mid-latitude band between 27.5°N and 40°N, which includes both the Rocky Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau/Himalayas. We find significant variability in d(ΔTmin)/dz among the individual models ranging from 0.16 °C/km (10th percentile) to 0.97 °C/km (90th percentile), although nearly all of the GCMs (24 out of 27) show a significant positive value for d(ΔTmin)/dz. To identify some of the important drivers associated with the variability in d(ΔTmin)/dz during winter, we evaluate the co-variance between d(ΔTmin)/dz and the differential response of elevation-based anomalies in different climate variables as well as the GCMs' spatial resolution, their global climate sensitivity, and their elevation-dependent free air temperature response. We find that d(ΔTmin)/dz has the strongest correlation with elevation-dependent increases in surface water vapor, followed by elevation-dependent decreases in surface albedo, and a weak positive correlation with the GCMs' free air temperature response.

  8. Re-examining the ontogeny of the context preexposure facilitation effect in the rat through multiple dependent variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, M V; Ferreras, S; Krapacher, F A; Paglini, G; Arias, C

    2012-07-15

    The capability to acquire context conditioning does not emerge until weaning, at least when the defining features of the context lack explicit and salient olfactory cues. Contextual learning deficits in preweanling rats have been associated with functional immaturity of the dorsal hippocampus. According to recent studies, the so-called context preexposure facilitation effect (CPFE) - a hippocampus-dependent effect - is not observed until postnatal day 23 (PD23). In these studies the footshock intensity employed was higher (1.5 mA) than in adult studies, and context conditioning was inferred from a single behavioral measure (percentage of freezing). The present study examined the CPFE on PD17 and PD23 by analyzing multiple dependent variables, including fecal boli and an ethogram covering the complete behavioral repertoire of the rat. A non-shocked control group was included in the design and two footshock intensities were employed (0.5 and 1.5 mA). Results showed clear evidence of contextual fear conditioning in preweanling and weanling rats, as well as evidence of conditioned fear in non-preexposed rats from both age groups. In some cases, some dependent variables, such as grooming or vertical exploration, were more sensitive than freezing for detecting evidence of memory. Strong fear responses were detected in weanling (but not preweanling) rats, when rats were evaluated in a different context from the one employed at conditioning. These results indicate that preweanling rats are capable of acquiring contextual conditioning, even in a context lacking explicit odor cues, and highlight the importance of multiple dependent variables for analyzing the ontogeny of memory.

  9. Altered blood oxygen level-dependent signal variability in chronic post-traumatic stress disorder during symptom provocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jun Ke,1,* Li Zhang,2,* Rongfeng Qi,1,* Qiang Xu,1 Weihui Li,2 Cailan Hou,3 Yuan Zhong,1 Zhiqiang Zhang,1 Zhong He,4 Lingjiang Li,2,5 Guangming Lu11Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, 2Mental Health Institute, the Second Xiangya Hospital, National Technology Institute of Psychiatry, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Changsha, 3Guangdong Academy of Medical Science, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Mental Health Center, Guangzhou, 4Department of Radiology of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 5Shenzhen Kangning Hospital of Guangdong Province, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Recent research suggests that variability in brain signal provides important information about brain function in health and disease. However, it is unknown whether blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal variability is altered in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. We aimed to identify the BOLD signal variability changes of PTSD patients during symptom provocation and compare the brain patterns of BOLD signal variability with those of brain activation.Methods: Twelve PTSD patients and 14 age-matched controls, who all experienced a mining accident, underwent clinical assessment as well as fMRI scanning while viewing trauma-related and neutral pictures. BOLD signal variability and brain activation were respectively examined with standard deviation (SD and general linear model analysis, and compared between the PTSD and control groups. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to explore the association between PTSD symptom severity and these two brain measures across all subjects as well as in the PTSD group.Results: PTSD patients showed increased activation in the middle occipital gyrus compared with controls, and an inverse correlation was found between PTSD

  10. Light-dependent and -independent behavioral effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields in a land snail are consistent with a parametric resonance mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato, F.S.; Thomas, A.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)]|[St. Joseph`s Health Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Kavaliers, M. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Cullen, A.P. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). School of Optometry

    1997-05-01

    Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has been shown to attenuate endogenous opioid peptide mediated antinociception or analgesia in the terrestrial pulmonate snail, Cepaea nemoralis. Here the authors examine the roles of light in determining this effect and address the mechanisms associated with mediating the effects of the ELF magnetic fields in both the presence and absence of light. Specifically, they consider whether the magnetic field effects involve an indirect induced electric current mechanism or a direct effect such as a parametric resonance mechanism (PRM). They exposed snails in both the presence and absence of light at three different frequencies (30, 60, and 120 Hz) with static field values (B{sub DC}) and ELF magnetic field amplitude (peak) and direction (B{sub AC}) set according to the predictions of the PRM for Ca{sup 2+}. Analgesia was induced in snails by injecting them with an enkephalinase inhibitor, which augments endogenous opioid (enkephalin) activity. They found that the magnetic field exposure reduced this opioid-induced analgesia significantly more if the exposure occurred in the presence rather than the absence of light. However, the percentage reduction in analgesia in both the presence and absence of light was not dependent on the ELF frequency. This finding suggests that in both the presence and the absence of light the effect of the ELF magnetic field was mediated by a direct magnetic field detection mechanism such as the PRM rather than an induced current mechanism.

  11. The GALEX Time Domain Survey. II. Wavelength-Dependent Variability of Active Galactic Nuclei in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, T; Jones, D O; Kirshner, R P; Chornock, R; Berger, E; Rest, A; Huber, M; Narayan, G; Scolnic, D; Waters, C; Wainscoat, R; Martin, D C; Forster, K; Neill, J D

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the wavelength-dependent variability of a sample of spectroscopically confirmed active galactic nuclei (AGN) selected from near-UV ($NUV$) variable sources in the GALEX Time Domain Survey that have a large amplitude of optical variability (difference-flux S/N $>$ 3) in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1 MDS). By matching GALEX and PS1 epochs in 5 bands ($NUV$, $g_{P1}$, $r_{P1}$, $i_{P1}$, $z_{P1}$) in time, and taking their flux difference, we create co-temporal difference-flux spectral energy distributions ($\\Delta f$SEDs) using two chosen epochs for each of the 23 objects in our sample on timescales of about a year. We confirm the "bluer-when-brighter" trend reported in previous studies, and measure a median spectral index of the $\\Delta f$SEDs of $\\alpha_{\\lambda}$ = 2.1 that is consistent with an accretion disk spectrum. We further fit the $\\Delta f$SEDs of each source with a standard accretion disk model in which the accretion rate changes from one epoch to the other. In our sample, 17 o...

  12. Time-dependence in Relativistic Collisionless Shocks: Theory of the Variable "Wisps" in the Crab Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Spitkovsky, A; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Arons, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    We describe results from time-dependent numerical modeling of the collisionless reverse shock terminating the pulsar wind in the Crab Nebula. We treat the upstream relativistic wind as composed of ions and electron-positron plasma embedded in a toroidal magnetic field, flowing radially outward from the pulsar in a sector around the rotational equator. The relativistic cyclotron instability of the ion gyrational orbit downstream of the leading shock in the electron-positron pairs launches outward propagating magnetosonic waves. Because of the fresh supply of ions crossing the shock, this time-dependent process achieves a limit-cycle, in which the waves are launched with periodicity on the order of the ion Larmor time. Compressions in the magnetic field and pair density associated with these waves, as well as their propagation speed, semi-quantitatively reproduce the behavior of the wisp and ring features described in recent observations obtained using the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-Ray Observator...

  13. Solvent dependence of Stokes shift for organic solute-solvent systems: A comparative study by spectroscopy and reference interaction-site model-self-consistent-field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsura; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Norio; Hirata, Fumio

    2013-09-01

    The Stokes shift magnitudes for coumarin 153 (C153) in 13 organic solvents with various polarities have been determined by means of steady-state spectroscopy and reference interaction-site model-self-consistent-field (RISM-SCF) theory. RISM-SCF calculations have reproduced experimental results fairly well, including individual solvent characteristics. It is empirically known that in some solvents, larger Stokes shift magnitudes are detected than anticipated on the basis of the solvent relative permittivity, ɛr. In practice, 1,4-dioxane (ɛr = 2.21) provides almost identical Stokes shift magnitudes to that of tetrahydrofuran (THF, ɛr = 7.58), for C153 and other typical organic solutes. In this work, RISM-SCF theory has been used to estimate the energetics of C153-solvent systems involved in the absorption and fluorescence processes. The Stokes shift magnitudes estimated by RISM-SCF theory are ∼5 kJ mol(-1) (400 cm(-1)) less than those determined by spectroscopy; however, the results obtained are still adequate for dipole moment comparisons, in a qualitative sense. We have also calculated the solute-solvent site-site radial distributions by this theory. It is shown that solvation structures with respect to the C-O-C framework, which is common to dioxane and THF, in the near vicinity (∼0.4 nm) of specific solute sites can largely account for their similar Stokes shift magnitudes. In previous works, such solute-solvent short-range interactions have been explained in terms of the higher-order multipole moments of the solvents. Our present study shows that along with the short-range interactions that contribute most significantly to the energetics, long-range electrostatic interactions are also important. Such long-range interactions are effective up to 2 nm from the solute site, as in the case of a typical polar solvent, acetonitrile.

  14. Variability of photovoltaic panels efficiency depending on the value of the angle of their inclination relative to the horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majdak Marek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to determine the relationship between the efficiency of photovoltaic panels and the value of the angle of their inclination relative to the horizon. For the purpose of experimental research have been done tests on the photovoltaic modules made of monocrystalline, polycrystalline and amorphous silicon. The experiment consisted of measurement of the voltage and current generated by photovoltaic panels at a known value of solar radiation and a specified resistance value determined by using resistor with variable value of resistance and known value of the angle of their inclination relative to the horizon.

  15. Dependency of the Cusp Density Anomaly on the Variability of Forcing Inside and Outside the Cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, D. G.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Clemmons, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's magnetospheric cusp provides direct access of energetic particles to the thermosphere. These particles produce ionization and kinetic (particle) heating of the atmosphere. The increased ionization coupled with enhanced electric fields in the cusp produces increased Joule heating and ion drag forcing. These energy inputs largely determine the neutral density structure in the cusp region. Measurements by the CHAMP satellite (460-390- km altitude) have shown a region of strong enhanced density attributed to the combination of cusp particle and Joule heating. The Streak mission (325-123 km), on the other hand, observed a relative depletion in density in the cusp. While particle precipitation in the cusp is comparatively well constrained, the characteristics of the steady and fluctuating components of the electric field in the cusp are poorly constrained. Also, the significance of harder particle precipitation in areas adjacent to the cusp in particular at lower altitudes has not been addressed as it relates to the cusp density anomaly. We address the response of the cusp region to a range electrodynamical forcing with our high resolution two-dimensional time-dependent nonhydrostatic nonlinear dynamical model. We take advantage of our model's high resolution and focus on a more typical cusp width of 2 degrees in latitude. Earlier simulations have also shown a significant contribution from soft particle precipitation. We simulate the atmospheric response to a range of realizable magnitudes of the fluctuating and steady components of the electric field to examine the dependence of the magnitude of the cusp density anomaly on a large range of observed characteristics of the electrodynamical forcing and examine, in particular, the importance of particle heating relative to Joule heating. In addition we investigate the role of harder particle precipitation in areas adjacent to the cusp in determining the lower altitude cusp density and wind structure. We compare

  16. Functional limit theorem for moving average processes generated by dependent random variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Let {Xt,t≥1} be a moving average process defined byXt = ∞∑j=0bjξt-j , where {bj,j≥0} is a sequence of real numbers and { ξt, ∞< t <∞ } is a doubly infinite sequence of strictly stationary φ- mixing random variables. Under conditions on { bj, j ≥0 }which entail that { Xt, t ≥ 1 } is either a long memory process or a linear process, we study asymptotics of Sn ( s ) = [ns]∑t=1 Xt (properly normalized). When { Xt, t≥1 } is a long memory process, we establish a functional limit theorem. When { Xt, t≥1 } is a linear process, we not only obtain the multi-dimensional weak convergence for { Xt, t≥1 }, but also weaken the moment condition on { ξt, - ∞< t <∞ } and the restriction on { bj,j≥0}. Finally, we give some applications of our results.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic dissipative flow across the slendering stretching sheet with temperature dependent variable viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandra Babu, M.; Sandeep, N.; Ali, M. E.; Nuhait, Abdullah O.

    The boundary layer flow across a slendering stretching sheet has gotten awesome consideration due to its inexhaustible pragmatic applications in nuclear reactor technology, acoustical components, chemical and manufacturing procedures, for example, polymer extrusion, and machine design. By keeping this in view, we analyzed the two-dimensional MHD flow across a slendering stretching sheet within the sight of variable viscosity and viscous dissipation. The sheet is thought to be convectively warmed. Convective boundary conditions through heat and mass are employed. Similarity transformations used to change over the administering nonlinear partial differential equations as a group of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Runge-Kutta based shooting technique is utilized to solve the converted equations. Numerical estimations of the physical parameters involved in the problem are calculated for the friction factor, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. Viscosity variation parameter and chemical reaction parameter shows the opposite impact to each other on the concentration profile. Heat and mass transfer Biot numbers are helpful to enhance the temperature and concentration respectively.

  18. Time-dependent excitation and ionization modelling of absorption-line variability due to GRB 080310

    CERN Document Server

    Vreeswijk, P M; Raassen, A J J; Smette, A; De Cia, A; Woźniak, P R; Fox, A J; Vestrand, W T; Jakobsson, P

    2012-01-01

    We model the time-variable absorption of FeII, FeIII, SiII, CII and CrII detected in UVES spectra of GRB 080310, with the afterglow radiation exciting and ionizing the interstellar medium in the host galaxy at a redshift of z=2.42743. To estimate the rest-frame afterglow brightness as a function of time, we use a combination of the optical VRI photometry obtained by the RAPTOR-T telescope array -- which are presented in this paper -- and Swift's X-Ray Telescope observations. Excitation alone, which has been successfully applied for a handful of other GRBs, fails to describe the observed column-density evolution in the case of GRB 080310. Inclusion of ionization is required to explain the column-density decrease of all observed FeII levels (including the ground state 6D9/2) and increase of the FeIII 7S3 level. The large population of ions in this latter level (up to 10% of all FeIII) can only be explained through ionization of FeII, whereby a large fraction of the ionized FeII ions -- we calculate 31% using th...

  19. Spatio-temporal dependencies between hospital beds, physicians and health expenditure using visual variables and data classification in statistical table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medyńska-Gulij Beata

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the use of table visual variables of statistical data of hospital beds as an important tool for revealing spatio-temporal dependencies. It is argued that some of conclusions from the data about public health and public expenditure on health have a spatio-temporal reference. Different from previous studies, this article adopts combination of cartographic pragmatics and spatial visualization with previous conclusions made in public health literature. While the significant conclusions about health care and economic factors has been highlighted in research papers, this article is the first to apply visual analysis to statistical table together with maps which is called previsualisation.

  20. Studies of Hot Photoluminescence in Plasmonically Coupled Silicon via Variable Energy Excitation and Temperature-Dependent Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    By integrating silicon nanowires (∼150 nm diameter, 20 μm length) with an Ω-shaped plasmonic nanocavity, we are able to generate broadband visible luminescence, which is induced by high order hybrid nanocavity-surface plasmon modes. The nature of this super bandgap emission is explored via photoluminescence spectroscopy studies performed with variable laser excitation energies (1.959 to 2.708 eV) and finite difference time domain simulations. Furthermore, temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy shows that the observed emission corresponds to radiative recombination of unthermalized (hot) carriers as opposed to a resonant Raman process. PMID:25120156

  1. Spatio-temporal dependencies between hospital beds, physicians and health expenditure using visual variables and data classification in statistical table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medyńska-Gulij, Beata; Cybulski, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyses the use of table visual variables of statistical data of hospital beds as an important tool for revealing spatio-temporal dependencies. It is argued that some of conclusions from the data about public health and public expenditure on health have a spatio-temporal reference. Different from previous studies, this article adopts combination of cartographic pragmatics and spatial visualization with previous conclusions made in public health literature. While the significant conclusions about health care and economic factors has been highlighted in research papers, this article is the first to apply visual analysis to statistical table together with maps which is called previsualisation.

  2. Testing in a Random Effects Panel Data Model with Spatially Correlated Error Components and Spatially Lagged Dependent Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming He

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a random effects panel data model with both spatially correlated error components and spatially lagged dependent variables. We focus on diagnostic testing procedures and derive Lagrange multiplier (LM test statistics for a variety of hypotheses within this model. We first construct the joint LM test for both the individual random effects and the two spatial effects (spatial error correlation and spatial lag dependence. We then provide LM tests for the individual random effects and for the two spatial effects separately. In addition, in order to guard against local model misspecification, we derive locally adjusted (robust LM tests based on the Bera and Yoon principle (Bera and Yoon, 1993. We conduct a small Monte Carlo simulation to show the good finite sample performances of these LM test statistics and revisit the cigarette demand example in Baltagi and Levin (1992 to illustrate our testing procedures.

  3. A new method for obtaining sharp compound Poisson approximation error estimates for sums of locally dependent random variables

    CERN Document Server

    Boutsikas, Michael V; 10.3150/09-BEJ201

    2010-01-01

    Let $X_1,X_2,...,X_n$ be a sequence of independent or locally dependent random variables taking values in $\\mathbb{Z}_+$. In this paper, we derive sharp bounds, via a new probabilistic method, for the total variation distance between the distribution of the sum $\\sum_{i=1}^nX_i$ and an appropriate Poisson or compound Poisson distribution. These bounds include a factor which depends on the smoothness of the approximating Poisson or compound Poisson distribution. This "smoothness factor" is of order $\\mathrm{O}(\\sigma ^{-2})$, according to a heuristic argument, where $\\sigma ^2$ denotes the variance of the approximating distribution. In this way, we offer sharp error estimates for a large range of values of the parameters. Finally, specific examples concerning appearances of rare runs in sequences of Bernoulli trials are presented by way of illustration.

  4. Investigation of spatial resolution dependent variability in transcutaneous oxygen saturation using point spectroscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philimon, Sheena P.; Huong, Audrey K. C.; Ngu, Xavier T. I.

    2017-08-01

    This paper aims to investigate the variation in one’s percent mean transcutaneous oxygen saturation (StO2) with differences in spatial resolution of data. This work required the knowledge of extinction coefficient of hemoglobin derivatives in the wavelength range of 520 - 600 nm to solve for the StO2 value via an iterative fitting procedure. A pilot study was conducted on three healthy subjects with spectroscopic data collected from their right index finger at different arbitrarily selected distances. The StO2 value estimated by Extended Modified Lambert Beer (EMLB) model revealed a higher mean StO2 of 91.1 ± 1.3% at a proximity distance of 30 mm compared to 60.83 ± 2.8% at 200 mm. The results showed a high correlation between data spatial resolution and StO2 value, and revealed a decrease in StO2 value as the sampling distance increased. The preliminary findings from this study contribute to the knowledge of the appropriate distance range for consistent and high repeatability measurement of skin oxygenation.

  5. Modeling Time-Dependent Behavior of Concrete Affected by Alkali Silica Reaction in Variable Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaggar, Mohammed; Di Luzio, Giovanni; Cusatis, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Alkali Silica Reaction (ASR) is known to be a serious problem for concrete worldwide, especially in high humidity and high temperature regions. ASR is a slow process that develops over years to decades and it is influenced by changes in environmental and loading conditions of the structure. The problem becomes even more complicated if one recognizes that other phenomena like creep and shrinkage are coupled with ASR. This results in synergistic mechanisms that can not be easily understood without a comprehensive computational model. In this paper, coupling between creep, shrinkage and ASR is modeled within the Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM) framework. In order to achieve this, a multi-physics formulation is used to compute the evolution of temperature, humidity, cement hydration, and ASR in both space and time, which is then used within physics-based formulations of cracking, creep and shrinkage. The overall model is calibrated and validated on the basis of experimental data available in the literature. Results show that even during free expansions (zero macroscopic stress), a significant degree of coupling exists because ASR induced expansions are relaxed by meso-scale creep driven by self-equilibriated stresses at the meso-scale. This explains and highlights the importance of considering ASR and other time dependent aging and deterioration phenomena at an appropriate length scale in coupled modeling approaches. PMID:28772829

  6. Dark focus of accommodation as dependent and independent variables in visual display technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sherrie; Kennedy, Robert; Harm, Deborah

    1992-01-01

    When independent stimuli are available for accommodation, as in the dark or under low contrast conditions, the lens seeks its resting position. Individual differences in resting positions are reliable, under autonomic control, and can change with visual task demands. We hypothesized that motion sickness in a flight simulator might result in dark focus changes. Method: Subjects received training flights in three different Navy flight simulators. Two were helicopter simulators entailed CRT presentation using infinity optics, one involved a dome presentation of a computer graphic visual projection system. Results: In all three experiments there were significant differences between dark focus activity before and after simulator exposure when comparisons were made between sick and not-sick pilot subjects. In two of these experiments, the average shift in dark focus for the sick subjects was toward increased myopia when each subject was compared to his own baseline. In the third experiment, the group showed an average shift outward of small amount and the subjects who were sick showed significantly less outward movement than those who were symptom free. Conclusions: Although the relationship is not a simple one, dark focus changes in simulator sickness imply parasympathetic activity. Because changes can occur in relation to endogenous and exogenous events, such measurement may have useful applications as dependent measures in studies of visually coupled systems, virtual reality systems, and space adaptation syndrome.

  7. High interindividual variability in dose-dependent reduction in speed of movement after exposing C. elegans to shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstman, Nicholas B; Kiessling, Maren C; Frank, Hans-Georg; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (br-mTBI) little is known about the connections between initial trauma and expression of individual clinical symptoms. Partly due to limitations of current in vitro and in vivo models of br-mTBI, reliable prediction of individual short- and long-term symptoms based on known blast input has not yet been possible. Here we demonstrate a dose-dependent effect of shock wave exposure on C. elegans using shock waves that share physical characteristics with those hypothesized to induce br-mTBI in humans. Increased exposure to shock waves resulted in decreased mean speed of movement while increasing the proportion of worms rendered paralyzed. Recovery of these two behavioral symptoms was observed during increasing post-traumatic waiting periods. Although effects were observed on a population-wide basis, large interindividual variability was present between organisms exposed to the same highly controlled conditions. Reduction of cavitation by exposing worms to shock waves in polyvinyl alcohol resulted in reduced effect, implicating primary blast effects as damaging components in shock wave induced trauma. Growing worms on NGM agar plates led to the same general results in initial shock wave effect in a standard medium, namely dose-dependence and high interindividual variability, as raising worms in liquid cultures. Taken together, these data indicate that reliable prediction of individual clinical symptoms based on known blast input as well as drawing conclusions on blast input from individual clinical symptoms is not feasible in br-mTBI.

  8. Do drug treatment variables predict cognitive performance in multidrug-treated opioid-dependent patients? A regression analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapeli Pekka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive deficits and multiple psychoactive drug regimens are both common in patients treated for opioid-dependence. Therefore, we examined whether the cognitive performance of patients in opioid-substitution treatment (OST is associated with their drug treatment variables. Methods Opioid-dependent patients (N = 104 who were treated either with buprenorphine or methadone (n = 52 in both groups were given attention, working memory, verbal, and visual memory tests after they had been a minimum of six months in treatment. Group-wise results were analysed by analysis of variance. Predictors of cognitive performance were examined by hierarchical regression analysis. Results Buprenorphine-treated patients performed statistically significantly better in a simple reaction time test than methadone-treated ones. No other significant differences between groups in cognitive performance were found. In each OST drug group, approximately 10% of the attention performance could be predicted by drug treatment variables. Use of benzodiazepine medication predicted about 10% of performance variance in working memory. Treatment with more than one other psychoactive drug (than opioid or BZD and frequent substance abuse during the past month predicted about 20% of verbal memory performance. Conclusions Although this study does not prove a causal relationship between multiple prescription drug use and poor cognitive functioning, the results are relevant for psychosocial recovery, vocational rehabilitation, and psychological treatment of OST patients. Especially for patients with BZD treatment, other treatment options should be actively sought.

  9. Chemical variability and biological activities of Brassica rapa var. rapifera parts essential oils depending on geographic variation and extraction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Boualem; Djouahri, Abderrahmane; Djerrad, Zineb; Souhila, Terfi; Aberrane, Sihem; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Baaliouamer, Aoumeur; Boudarene, Lynda

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, the Brassica rapa var. rapifera parts essential oils and their antioxidant and antimicrobial activities were investigated for the first time depending on geographic origin and extraction technique. GC and GC-MS analyses showed several constituents, including alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ketones, norisoprenoids, terpenic, nitrogen and sulphur compounds, totalizing 38 and 41 compounds in leaves and root essential oils, respectively. Nitrogen compounds were the main volatiles in leaves essential oils and sulphur compounds were the main volatiles in root essential oils. Qualitative and quantitative differences were found among B. rapa var. rapifera parts essential oils collected from different locations and extracted by hydrodistillation (HD) and microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MAHD) techniques. Furthermore, our findings showed a high variability for both antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. The highlighted variability reflects the high impact of plant part, geographic variation and extraction technique on chemical composition and biological activities, which led to conclude that we should select essential oils to be investigated carefully depending on these factors, in order to isolate the bioactive components or to have the best quality of essential oil in terms of biological activities and preventive effects in food. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Time dependent simulations of multiwavelength variability of the blazar Mrk 421 with a Monte Carlo multi-zone code

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuhui; Liang, Edison; Boettcher, Markus

    2011-01-01

    (abridged) We present a new time-dependent multi-zone radiative transfer code and its application to study the SSC emission of Mrk 421. The code couples Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo methods, in a 2D geometry. For the first time all the light travel time effects (LCTE) are fully considered, along with a proper treatment of Compton cooling, which depends on them. We study a set of simple scenarios where the variability is produced by injection of relativistic electrons as a `shock front' crosses the emission region. We consider emission from two components, with the second one either being pre-existing and co-spatial and participating in the evolution of the active region, or spatially separated and independent, only diluting the observed variability. Temporal and spectral results of the simulation are compared to the multiwavelength observations of Mrk 421 in March 2001. We find parameters that can adequately fit the observed SEDs and multiwavelength light curves and correlations. There remain however a few o...

  11. Breeder and batch-dependent variability in the acquisition and performance of a motor skill in adult Long-Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryant, Amber J; Allred, Rachel P; Maldonado, Monica A; Cormack, Lawrence K; Jones, Theresa A

    2011-10-10

    Reaching tasks are popular tools for investigating the neural mechanisms of motor skill learning and recovery from brain damage in rodents, but there is considerable unexplained variability across studies using these tasks. We investigated whether breeder, batch effects, experimenter, time of year, weight and other factors contribute to differences in the acquisition and performance of a skilled reaching task, the single pellet retrieval task, in adult male Long-Evans hooded rats. First, we retrospectively analyzed task acquisition and performance in rats from different breeding colonies that were used in several studies spanning a 3 year period in our laboratory. Second, we compared reaching variables in age-matched rats from different breeders that were trained together as a batch by the same experimenters. All rats had received daily training on the reaching task until they reached a criterion of successful reaches per attempt. We found significant breeder-dependent differences in learning rate and final performance level. This was found even when age-matched rats from different breeders were trained together by the same experimenters. There was also significant batch-to-batch variability within rats from the same breeder trained by the same experimenter. Other factors, including weight, paw preference and the experimenter, were not as strong or consistent in their contributions to differences across studies. The breeder and batch effects found within the same rat strain may reflect genetic and environmental influences on the neural substrates of motor skill learning. This is an important consideration when comparing baseline performance across studies and for controlling variability within studies.

  12. Temperature and field-dependent transport measurements in continuously tunable tantalum oxide memristors expose the dominant state variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Catherine E.; Dávila, Noraica; Merced-Grafals, Emmanuelle J.; Lam, Si-Ty; Strachan, John Paul; Williams, R. Stanley

    2017-03-01

    Applications of memristor devices are quickly moving beyond computer memory to areas of analog and neuromorphic computation. These applications require the design of devices with different characteristics from binary memory, such as a large tunable range of conductance. A complete understanding of the conduction mechanisms and their corresponding state variable(s) is crucial for optimizing performance and designs in these applications. Here we present measurements of low bias I-V characteristics of 6 states in a Ta/ tantalum-oxide (TaOx)/Pt memristor spanning over 2 orders of magnitude in conductance and temperatures from 100 K to 500 K. Our measurements show that the 300 K device conduction is dominated by a temperature-insensitive current that varies with non-volatile memristor state, with an additional leakage contribution from a thermally-activated current channel that is nearly independent of the memristor state. We interpret these results with a parallel conduction model of Mott hopping and Schottky emission channels, fitting the voltage and temperature dependent experimental data for all memristor states with only two free parameters. The memristor conductance is linearly correlated with N, the density of electrons near EF participating in the Mott hopping conduction, revealing N to be the dominant state variable for low bias conduction in this system. Finally, we show that the Mott hopping sites can be ascribed to oxygen vacancies, where the local oxygen vacancy density responsible for critical hopping pathways controls the memristor conductance.

  13. Insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in dairy cows with variable fat mobilization around calving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C; Schäff, C T; Kautzsch, U; Börner, S; Erdmann, S; Görs, S; Röntgen, M; Sauerwein, H; Bruckmaier, R M; Metges, C C; Kuhla, B; Hammon, H M

    2016-08-01

    clamps, pp nonesterified fatty acid concentrations did not reach the ap levels. The study demonstrated a minor influence of different degrees of body fat mobilization on insulin metabolism in cows during the transition period. The distinct decrease in the glucose-dependent release of insulin pp is the most striking finding that explains the impaired insulin action after calving, but does not explain differences in body fat mobilization between HLFC and LLFC cows.

  14. Dependence of P-wave dispersion on mean arterial pressure as an independent hemodynamic variable in school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elibet Chávez González

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The relationship between diastolic dysfunction and P-wave dispersion (PWD in the electrocardiogram has been studied for some time. In this regard, echocardiography is emerging as a diagnostic tool to improve risk stratification for mild hypertension.Objective:To determine the dependence of PWD on the electrocardiogram and on echocardiographic variables in a pediatric population.Methods: Five hundred and fifteen children from three elementary schools were studiedfrom a total of 565 children. Those whose parents did not want them to take part in the study, as well as those with known congenital diseases, were excluded. Tests including 12-lead surface ECGs and 4 blood pressure (BP measurements were performed. Maximum and minimum P-values were measured, and the PWD on the electrocardiogram was calculated. Echocardiography for structural measurements and the pulsed Doppler of mitral flow were also performed.Results: A significant correlation in statistical variables was found between PWD and mean BP for pre-hypertensive and hypertensive children, i.e., r= 0.32, p <0.01 and r= 0.33, p <0.01, respectively. There was a significant correlation found between PWD and the left atrial area (r= 0.45 and p <0.01.Conclusions: We highlight the dependency between PWD, the electrocardiogram and  mean  blood pressure. We also draw attention to the dependence of PWD on the left atrial area.  This result provides an explanation for earlier changes in atrial electrophysiological and hemodynamic characteristics in pediatric patients.

  15. Demographic models reveal the shape of density dependence for a specialist insect herbivore on variable host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tom E X

    2007-07-01

    1. It is widely accepted that density-dependent processes play an important role in most natural populations. However, persistent challenges in our understanding of density-dependent population dynamics include evaluating the shape of the relationship between density and demographic rates (linear, concave, convex), and identifying extrinsic factors that can mediate this relationship. 2. I studied the population dynamics of the cactus bug Narnia pallidicornis on host plants (Opuntia imbricata) that varied naturally in relative reproductive effort (RRE, the proportion of meristems allocated to reproduction), an important plant quality trait. I manipulated per-plant cactus bug densities, quantified subsequent dynamics, and fit stage-structured models to the experimental data to ask if and how density influences demographic parameters. 3. In the field experiment, I found that populations with variable starting densities quickly converged upon similar growth trajectories. In the model-fitting analyses, the data strongly supported a model that defined the juvenile cactus bug retention parameter (joint probability of surviving and not dispersing) as a nonlinear decreasing function of density. The estimated shape of this relationship shifted from concave to convex with increasing host-plant RRE. 4. The results demonstrate that host-plant traits are critical sources of variation in the strength and shape of density dependence in insects, and highlight the utility of integrated experimental-theoretical approaches for identifying processes underlying patterns of change in natural populations.

  16. Consistency of Random Survival Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishwaran, Hemant; Kogalur, Udaya B

    2010-07-01

    We prove uniform consistency of Random Survival Forests (RSF), a newly introduced forest ensemble learner for analysis of right-censored survival data. Consistency is proven under general splitting rules, bootstrapping, and random selection of variables-that is, under true implementation of the methodology. Under this setting we show that the forest ensemble survival function converges uniformly to the true population survival function. To prove this result we make one key assumption regarding the feature space: we assume that all variables are factors. Doing so ensures that the feature space has finite cardinality and enables us to exploit counting process theory and the uniform consistency of the Kaplan-Meier survival function.

  17. Using rain-on-snow events to evaluate the quality of bias correction to represent complex inter-variable dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Ole; Bosshard, Thomas; Weingartner, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    A key issue for adaptation planning is the information of projections about changes of extremes. Climate projections of meteorological extremes and their downscaling are a challenge on their own. Yet - at least in hydrology - meteorological extremes are not necessarily hydrological extremes. These can also result from a sequence of days with only moderate meteorological conditions, too. This sequences are called "storylines". In climate change impact assess studies it is relevant to know, whether these meteorological storylines are represented in regional climate models, and how well can bias correction preserve or improve the representation. One storyline leading to hydrological extremes are rain-on-snow events, and more specifically rain-on-snowfall events. These events challenge the regional climate model and the bias correction in terms of representing absolute values and inter-variable dependences. This study makes use of the rain-on-snow-storylines to evaluate the performance of regional climate models and a bias correction method in reproducing complex inter-variable dependencies. At first, we applied a hydrological model to a mesoscale catchment in Switzerland that is known to be effected by rain-on-snow events. At second, the ERA-Interim driven regional climate model RCA4.5 - developed at SMHI - with a spatial resolution of 0.11 * 0.11 degree was used to drive the hydrological model. At third, bias-correction of the RCM was done applying the distribution based scaling (DBS) bias-correction method (Yang et al., 2010) developed at the SMHI. The bias-corrected data then also served as driving input data to the hydrological model. Based on the simulated runoff, as well as simulated precipitation, temperature, and snow pack data, an algorithm to detect rain-on-snow events was applied. Finally, the presence or absents of rain-on-snow events for the three different climate input data, ERA.RCA4.5, DBS corrected ERA.RC4 and observed climate, are evaluated within

  18. Low-Frequency Variability in the Northern Hemisphere Winter: Geographical Distribution, Structure and Time-Scale Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Yochanan; Wallace, John M.

    1989-10-01

    Low-frequency variability in wintertime 500 mb height is examined, with emphasis on its structure, geographical distribution, and frequency dependence. A 39-year record of 500 mb geopotential height fields from the NMC analyses is time filtered to partition the fluctuations into frequency bands corresponding to periods of 10-60 days, 60-180 days and > 180 days. Winter is defined as the six month period November through April. Variance, teleconnectivity, and anisotropy fields, and selected loading vectors derived from orthogonal and oblique rotations of the eigenvectors of the temporal correlation matrix for each band are shown and discussed.The variability in all frequency bands exhibits substantial anistropy, with meridionally elongated features arranged as zonally oriented wave trains prevailing over the continents and zonally elongated features organized in the form of north-south oriented dipole patterns prevailing over the oceanic sectors of the hemisphere. The wave trains are most pronounced in the 10-60 day variability, while the dipoles are most pronounced at lower frequencies. Eastward energy dispersion is apparent in the wave trains, but there is no evidence of phase propagation.Most of the `teleconnection patterns' identified in previous studies appear among the more prominent loading vectors. However, in most cases the loading vectors occur in pairs, in which the two patterns are in spatial quadrature with one another and account for comparable fractions of the hemispherically integrated variance. It is argued that such patterns should be interpreted as basis functions that can be linearly combined to form a continuum of anisotropic structures. Evidence of the existence of discrete `modal structures' is found only in the interannual (> 180-day period) variability, where two patterns stand out clearly above the background continuum: the Pacific-North American (PNA) pattern and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). These patterns leave clear imprints upon

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of Arctic summer sea-ice albedo and its dependence on meltwater hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicken, H.; Perovich, D. K.; Grenfell, T. C.; Richter-Menge, J. A.; Frey, K.

    2001-12-01

    Next to ice extent and thickness, the area-averaged albedo of the summer sea-ice cover is a key parameter in determining the large-scale heat exchange over the Arctic Ocean. Various remote sensing applications have yielded a substantial data base for the former two parameters, not least due to the efforts of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) over the past 25 years. In contrast, the spatial and temporal variability of Arctic summer sea-ice albedo is much less well described. Despite its importance (incl. for ice-albedo feedback processes), few if any large-scale sea-ice and global circulation models actually predict summer ice based on the underlying physical processes. Most models employ simple parameterization schemes instead. Remote sensing of surface ice albedo also faces substantial challenges, some of which still need to be addressed in more detail. Here, we report on albedo measurements completed over first- and multi-year sea ice in the summers of 1998, 2000 and 2001 in the North American at the SHEBA drifting ice camp and in fast ice near Barrow, Alaska. As has been established in a number of studies, spatial and temporal variability in summer sea-ice albedo is mostly determined by the areal extent of meltwater ponding at the ice surface. Given the importance of this process, a comprehensive ice hydrological program (meltwater distribution, surface topography, meltwater flow and discharge, ice permeability) has been carried out in conjunction with the optical measurements. Measurements demonstrate that Arctic summer sea-ice albedo is critically dependent on the hydrology of surface melt ponds, as controlled by meltwater production rate, ice permeability and topography. Both, remarkable short-term variability (a reduction of albedo by 43% within two days) as well as the seasonal evolution of the pond fraction and hence area-averaged albedo are forced by changes in pond water level on the order of a few centimeters. While some of these forcing

  20. VARIABLE STEP-SIZE IMPLICIT-EXPLICIT LINEAR MULTISTEP METHODS FOR TIME-DEPENDENT PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Wang; Steven J. Ruuth

    2008-01-01

    Implicit-explicit (IMEX) linear multistep methods are popular techniques for solving partial differential equations (PDEs) with terms of different types. While fixed time-step versions of such schemes have been developed and studied, implicit-explicit schemes also naturally arise in general situations where the temporal smoothness of the solution changes. In this paper we consider easily implementable variable step-size implicit-explicit (VSIMEX) linear multistep methods for time-dependent PDEs. Families of order-p, p-step VSIMEX schemes are constructed and analyzed, where p ranges from 1 to 4. The corresponding schemes are simple to implement and have the property that they reduce to the classical IMEX schemes whenever constant time step-sizes are imposed. The methods are validated on the Burgers' equation. These results demonstrate that by varying the time step-size, VSIMEX methods can outperform their fixed time step counterparts while still maintaining good numerical behavior.

  1. A numerical study of comparison of two one-state-variable, rate- and state-dependent friction evolution laws

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeen-Hwa Wang

    2009-01-01

    The two one-state-variable, rate- and state-dependent friction laws, i.e., the slip and slowness laws, are compared on the basis of dynamical behavior of a one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider model through numerical simulations. Results show that two (normalized) model parameters, i.e., △(the normalized characteristic slip distance) and β-α (the difference in two normalized parameters of friction laws), control the solutions. From given values of △, β, and α, for the slowness laws, the solution exists and the unique non-zero fixed point is stable when △>(β-α), yet not when △<β-α). For the slip law, the solution exists for large ranges of model parameters and the number and stability of the non-zero fixed points change from one case to another. Results suggest that the slip law is more appropriate for controlling earthquake dynamics than the slowness law.

  2. Short-time Variability of Blazars via Non-linear, Time-dependent Synchrotron-Self Compton Radiative Losses

    CERN Document Server

    Röken, Christian; Schöneberg, Sebastian; Schuppan, Florian

    2016-01-01

    A leptonic one-zone model accounting for the radiation emission of blazars is presented. This model describes multiple successive injections of mono-energetic, ultra-relativistic, interacting electron populations, which are subjected to synchrotron and synchrotron-self Compton radiative losses. The electron number density is computed analytically by solving a time-dependent, relativistic transport equation. Moreover, the synchrotron and synchrotron-self Compton intensities as well as the corresponding total fluences are explicitly calculated. The lightcurves and fluences are plotted for realistic parameter values, showing that the model can simultaneously explain both the specific short-time variability in the flaring of blazars and the characteristic broad-band fluence behavior.

  3. High interindividual variability in dose-dependent reduction in speed of movement after exposing C. elegans to shock waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Baker Angstman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (br-mTBI little is known about the connections between initial trauma and expression of individual clinical symptoms. Partly due to limitations of current in vitro and in vivo models of br-mTBI, reliable prediction of individual short- and long-term symptoms based on known blast input has not yet been possible. Here we demonstrate a dose-dependent effect of shock wave exposure on C. elegans using shock waves that share physical characteristics with those hypothesized to induce br-mTBI in humans. Increased exposure to shock waves resulted in decreased mean speed of movement while increasing the proportion of worms rendered paralyzed. Recovery of these two behavioral symptoms was observed during increasing post-traumatic waiting periods. Although effects were observed on a population-wide basis, large interindividual variability was present between organisms exposed to the same highly controlled conditions. Reduction of cavitation by exposing worms to shock waves in polyvinyl alcohol resulted in reduced effect, implicating primary blast effects as damaging components in shock wave induced trauma. Growing worms on NGM agar plates led to the same general results in initial shock wave effect in a standard medium, namely dose-dependence and high interindividual variability, as raising worms in liquid cultures. Taken together, these data indicate that reliable prediction of individual clinical symptoms based on known blast input as well as drawing conclusions on blast input from individual clinical symptoms is not feasible in br-mTBI.

  4. Effects of Shear Dependent Viscosity and Variable Thermal Conductivity on the Flow and Heat Transfer in a Slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Miao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the effects of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on the heat transfer in the pressure-driven fully developed flow of a slurry (suspension between two horizontal flat plates. The fluid is assumed to be described by a constitutive relation for a generalized second grade fluid where the shear viscosity is a function of the shear rate, temperature and concentration. The heat flux vector for the slurry is assumed to follow a generalized form of the Fourier’s equation where the thermal conductivity k depends on the temperature as well as the shear rate. We numerically solve the governing equations of motion in the non-dimensional form and perform a parametric study to see the effects of various dimensionless numbers on the velocity, volume fraction and temperature profiles. The different cases of shear thinning and thickening, and the effect of the exponent in the Reynolds viscosity model, for the temperature variation in viscosity, are also considered. The results indicate that the variable thermal conductivity can play an important role in controlling the temperature variation in the flow.

  5. State-dependent variability of dynamic functional connectivity between frontoparietal and default networks relates to cognitive flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douw, Linda; Wakeman, Daniel G; Tanaka, Naoaki; Liu, Hesheng; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2016-12-17

    The brain is a dynamic, flexible network that continuously reconfigures. However, the neural underpinnings of how state-dependent variability of dynamic functional connectivity (vdFC) relates to cognitive flexibility are unclear. We therefore investigated flexible functional connectivity during resting-state and task-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI and t-fMRI, resp.) and performed separate, out-of-scanner neuropsychological testing. We hypothesize that state-dependent vdFC between the frontoparietal network (FPN) and the default mode network (DMN) relates to cognitive flexibility. Seventeen healthy subjects performed the Stroop color word test and underwent t-fMRI (Stroop computerized version) and rs-fMRI. Time series were extracted from a cortical atlas, and a sliding window approach was used to obtain a number of correlation matrices per subject. vdFC was defined as the standard deviation of connectivity strengths over these windows. Higher task-state FPN-DMN vdFC was associated with greater out-of-scanner cognitive flexibility, while the opposite relationship was present for resting-state FPN-DMN vdFC. Moreover, greater contrast between task-state and resting-state vdFC related to better cognitive performance. In conclusion, our results suggest that not only the dynamics of connectivity between these networks is seminal for optimal functioning, but also that the contrast between dynamics across states reflects cognitive performance.

  6. Time-dependent simulations of emission from FSRQ PKS1510-089: multiwavelength variability of external Compton and SSC models

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuhui; Liang, Edison; Boettcher, Markus

    2012-01-01

    [abridged] We present results of modeling the SED and multiwavelength variability of the bright FSRQ PKS1510-089 with our time-dependent multizone Monte Carlo/Fokker-Planck code (Chen et al. 2001). As primary source of seed photons for inverse Compton scattering, we consider radiation from the broad line region (BLR), from the molecular torus, and the local synchrotron radiation (SSC). Different scenarios are assessed by comparing simulated light curves and SEDs with one of the best flares by PKS1510-089, in March 2009. The time-dependence of our code and its correct handling of light travel time effects allow us to fully take into account the effect of the finite size of the active region, and in turn to fully exploit the information carried by time resolved observed SEDs, increasingly available since the launch of Fermi. We confirm that the spectrum adopted for the external radiation has an important impact on the modeling of the SED, in particular for the lower energy end of the Compton component, observed...

  7. Consistent Stochastic Modelling of Meteocean Design Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Sterndorff, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Consistent stochastic models of metocean design parameters and their directional dependencies are essential for reliability assessment of offshore structures. In this paper a stochastic model for the annual maximum values of the significant wave height, and the associated wind velocity, current...... velocity, and water level is presented. The stochastic model includes statistical uncertainty and dependency between the four stochastic variables. Further, a new stochastic model for annual maximum directional significant wave heights is presented. The model includes dependency between the maximum wave...... height from neighboring directional sectors. Numerical examples are presented where the models are calibrated using the Maximum Likelihood method to data from the central part of the North Sea. The calibration of the directional distributions is made such that the stochastic model for the omnidirectional...

  8. Modelling the interannual variability of extreme wave climate combining a time-dependent GEV model and Self-Organizing Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izaguirre, Cristina; Mendez, Fernando J.; Camus, Paula; Minguez, Roberto; Menendez, Melisa; Losada, Iñigo J.

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that the seasonal-to-interannual variability of extreme wave climate is linked to the anomalies of the atmosphere circulation. In this work, we analyze the relationships between extreme significant wave height at a particular site and the synoptic-scale weather type. We combine a time-dependent Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) model for monthly maxima and self-organizing maps (SOM) applied to monthly mean sea level pressure field (SLP) anomalies. These time-varying SLP anomalies are encoded using principal component analysis, obtaining the corresponding spatial patterns (Empirical Orthogonal Functions, EOFs) and the temporal modes (PC, principal components). The location, scale and shape parameters of the GEV distribution are parameterized in terms of harmonic functions (seasonality) and linear covariates for the PCs (interannual variability) and the model is fitted using standard likelihood theory and an automatic parameter selection procedure, which avoids overparameterization. Thus, the resulting anomalies of the location and scale parameters with respect to the seasonality are projected to the SOM lattice obtaining the influence of every weather type on the extreme wave height probability distribution (and subsequently, return-level quantiles). The use of Self-organizing maps allows an easy visualization of the results. The application of the method to different areas in the North Atlantic Ocean helps us to quantify the importance of the North Atlantic Oscillation and the East Atlantic pattern in the location and scale parameters of the GEV probability distribution. Additionally, this work opens new forecasting possibilities for the probabilities of extreme events based on synoptic-scale patterns.

  9. A Cautionary Tale on the Inclusion of Variable Posttranslational Modifications in Database-Dependent Searches of Mass Spectrometry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svozil, J; Baerenfaller, K

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics allows in principle the identification of unknown target proteins of posttranslational modifications and the sites of attachment. Including a variety of posttranslational modifications in database-dependent searches of high-throughput mass spectrometry data holds the promise to gain spectrum assignments to modified peptides, thereby increasing the number of assigned spectra, and to identify potentially interesting modification events. However, these potential benefits come for the price of an increased search space, which can lead to reduced scores, increased score thresholds, and erroneous peptide spectrum matches. We have assessed here the advantages and disadvantages of including the variable posttranslational modifications methionine oxidation, protein N-terminal acetylation, cysteine carbamidomethylation, transformation of N-terminal glutamine to pyroglutamic acid (Gln→pyro-Glu), and deamidation of asparagine and glutamine. Based on calculations of local false discovery rates and comparisons to known features of the respective modifications, we recommend for searches of samples that were not enriched for specific posttranslational modifications to only include methionine oxidation, protein N-terminal acetylation, and peptide N-terminal Gln→pyro-Glu as variable modifications. The principle of the validation strategy adopted here can also be applied for assessing the inclusion of posttranslational modifications for differently prepared samples, or for additional modifications. In addition, we have reassessed the special properties of the ubiquitin footprint, which is the remainder of ubiquitin moieties attached to lysines after tryptic digest. We show here that the ubiquitin footprint often breaks off as neutral loss and that it can be distinguished from dicarbamidomethylation events.

  10. Earthquake cycles on rate-state faults: how does recurrence interval and its variability depend on fault length?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattania, C.; Segall, P.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of earthquake cycles is often invoked when discussing seismic risk. However, large faults exhibit more complex behavior than periodic stick-slip cycles. Some events, such as the 2004 Parkfield earthquake, are delayed relative to the mean recurrence interval; in other cases, ruptures are larger or smaller than expected. In contrast, small earthquakes can be very predictable: locked patches surrounded by aseismic creep can rupture periodically in events with similar waveforms. We use numerical tools and ideas from fracture mechanics to study the factors determining recurrence interval (T), rupture size and their variability at different scales. T has been estimated by assuming a constant stress drop and stressing rate inversely proportional to fault length (D). However, Werner & Rubin (2013) found that an energy criterion better explains the scaling of T vs. D in numerical models: on faults loaded from below, full ruptures occur when the elastic energy release rate at the top of the fault reaches the fracture energy. We run simulations of seismic cycles on rate state faults including dynamic weakening from thermal pressurization. A fault composed of a velocity weakening part over a velocity strengthening one is loaded from below at constant slip rate. We find that T increases with thermal pressurization, and verify that the energy argument, modified to account for the fracture energy from thermal pressurization, provides a good estimate of T and its scaling with D. We suggest that the recurrence interval is determined by two timescales: the time required to accumulate sufficient elastic energy for full rupture (tf), and the nucleation time, controlled by the propagation of a creep front into the velocity weakening region (tn). Both timescales depend on fault length: tf increases with D, and tn decreases. The latter is due to faster afterslip in the velocity strengthening region on larger faults. If tn < tf, partial ruptures occur; for large faults, tn

  11. Climate-dependent sediment production: numerical modeling and field observations of variable grain size distributions from heterogeneous hillslope weathering of fractured basalt flows, Kohala Peninsula, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B. P.; Johnson, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    in the length scale for the reduction in chemical weathering below the surface, or the flushing depth. The flushing depth is assumed to scale linearly with MAP, but decreases exponentially with increasing soil depth, as soil capillarity will imbibe infiltration. Modeling six MAP regimes between 500 and 3000 mm produces a non-linear increase in soil depths from 0.59 m soil to 5.15 m, which is broadly consistent with field observations from Kohala Peninsula. The median corestone grain size (D50) was calculated at model completion for the 20 blocks below the soil-rock interface. In the driest regime the D50 was 98% of that for the initial column, while the D50 for the wettest regime was 56% of the initial. This sediment preparation model predicts soil depths and tracks particle size reduction with variable climate-dependent weathering rates. Incorporating this type of model into sediment-transport dependent landscape evolution models may be the key to understanding the systematic differences in topography across spatially variable climate gradients, such as Kohala Peninsula.

  12. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) coupled with reference interaction site model self-consistent field explicitly including spatial electron density distribution (RISM-SCF-SEDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokogawa, D.

    2016-09-01

    Theoretical approach to design bright bio-imaging molecules is one of the most progressing ones. However, because of the system size and computational accuracy, the number of theoretical studies is limited to our knowledge. To overcome the difficulties, we developed a new method based on reference interaction site model self-consistent field explicitly including spatial electron density distribution and time-dependent density functional theory. We applied it to the calculation of indole and 5-cyanoindole at ground and excited states in gas and solution phases. The changes in the optimized geometries were clearly explained with resonance structures and the Stokes shift was correctly reproduced.

  13. Three Ingredients for Improved Global Aftershock Forecasts: Tectonic Region, Time-Dependent Catalog Incompleteness, and Inter-Sequence Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M. T.; Hardebeck, J.; Felzer, K. R.; Michael, A. J.; van der Elst, N.

    2015-12-01

    Following a large earthquake, seismic hazard can be orders of magnitude higher than the long-term average as a result of aftershock triggering. Due to this heightened hazard, there is a demand from emergency managers and the public for rapid, authoritative, and reliable aftershock forecasts. In the past, USGS aftershock forecasts following large, global earthquakes have been released on an ad-hoc basis with inconsistent methods, and in some cases, aftershock parameters adapted from California. To remedy this, we are currently developing an automated aftershock product that will generate more accurate forecasts based on the Reasenberg and Jones (Science, 1989) method. To better capture spatial variations in aftershock productivity and decay, we estimate regional aftershock parameters for sequences within the Garcia et al. (BSSA, 2012) tectonic regions. We find that regional variations for mean aftershock productivity exceed a factor of 10. The Reasenberg and Jones method combines modified-Omori aftershock decay, Utsu productivity scaling, and the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution. We additionally account for a time-dependent magnitude of completeness following large events in the catalog. We generalize the Helmstetter et al. (2005) equation for short-term aftershock incompleteness and solve for incompleteness levels in the global NEIC catalog following large mainshocks. In addition to estimating average sequence parameters within regions, we quantify the inter-sequence parameter variability. This allows for a more complete quantification of the forecast uncertainties and Bayesian updating of the forecast as sequence-specific information becomes available.

  14. A numerical model for density-and-viscosity-dependent flows in two-dimensional variably saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufadel, Michel C.; Suidan, Makram T.; Venosa, Albert D.

    1999-04-01

    We present a formulation for water flow and solute transport in two-dimensional variably saturated media that accounts for the effects of the solute on water density and viscosity. The governing equations are cast in a dimensionless form that depends on six dimensionless groups of parameters. These equations are discretized in space using the Galerkin finite element formulation and integrated in time using the backward Euler scheme with mass lumping. The modified Picard method is used to linearize the water flow equation. The resulting numerical model, the MARUN model, is verified by comparison to published numerical results. It is then used to investigate beach hydraulics at seawater concentration (about 30 g l -1) in the context of nutrients delivery for bioremediation of oil spills on beaches. Numerical simulations that we conducted in a rectangular section of a hypothetical beach revealed that buoyancy in the unsaturated zone is significant in soils that are fine textured, with low anisotropy ratio, and/or exhibiting low physical dispersion. In such situations, application of dissolved nutrients to a contaminated beach in a freshwater solution is superior to their application in a seawater solution. Concentration-engendered viscosity effects were negligible with respect to concentration-engendered density effects for the cases that we considered.

  15. Using XMM-Newton to study the energy dependent variability of H 1743-322 during its 2014 outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Stiele, H

    2016-01-01

    Black hole transients during bright outbursts show distinct changes of their spectral and variability properties as they evolve during an outburst, that are interpreted as evidence for changes in the accretion flow and X-ray emitting regions. We obtained an anticipated XMM-Newton ToO observation of H 1743-322 during its outburst in September 2014. Based on data of eight outbursts observed in the last 10 years we expected to catch the start of the hard-to-soft state transition. The fact that neither the general shape of the observed power density spectrum nor the characteristic frequency show an energy dependence implies that the source still stays in the low-hard state at the time of our observation near outburst peak. The spectral properties agree with the source being in the low-hard state and a Swift/XRT monitoring of the outburst reveals that H 1743-322 stays in the low-hard state during the entire outburst (a. k. a. 'failed outburst'). We derive the averaged QPO waveform and obtain phase-resolved spectra...

  16. Blade-order-dependent radiocarbon variability in brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) reflected a cold Oyashio water intrusion event in an embayment of the Sanriku coast, northeastern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, N.; Fukuda, H.; Miyairi, Y.; Yokoyama, Y.; Nagata, T.

    2015-12-01

    Radiocarbon in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater varies greatly, both geographically and with depth. This "reservoir effect" is thought to be reflected in the radiocarbon content (∆14C) of marine organisms, via DIC fixation by primary producers and subsequent trophic transfer. The ∆14C of marine organismal soft tissues might thus provide unique information about their habitats, diets, migration and other environmental histories. However, the effectiveness of this approach has yet to be extensively explored, with data on ∆14C variability in soft tissues of marine organisms being markedly limited. Here we examined whether ∆14C values of individual pinnate blades (leaf-like structures) of brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) reflect the ∆14C of DIC in the water current prevailing at the time of blade formation. The study was conducted in Otsuchi Bay located in the Sanriku coastal region, northeastern Japan, where 14C-depleted cold Oyashio current and warm Tsugaru current (high ∆14C) converge, affecting the physiology and growth of marine organisms growing there. U. pinnatifida individuals cultured in the bay (length of saprophytes, 140-215 cm) were harvested in April 2014 and ∆14C of blades were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry. Younger blades formed after the Oyashio water intrusion had significantly lower ∆14C values compared to older blades formed before the event. The ∆14C values of younger and older blades were generally consistent with the ∆14C of DIC in Oyashio (-60.5 ‰) and Tsugaru (24.9 ‰) waters, respectively. Thus, despite possible turnover of organic carbon in seaweed soft tissues, blade-order-dependent ∆14C variability appeared to strongly reflect the Oyashio intrusion event (radiocarbon shift) in the bay.

  17. Reader- and instrument-dependent variability in the electrocardiographic assessment of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rahul; Tandri, Harikrishna; Daly, Amy; Tichnell, Crystal; James, Cynthia; Abraham, Theodore; Judge, Daniel P; Calkins, Hugh; Dalal, Darshan

    2011-05-01

    Despite the use of standardized definitions, widely varying prevalence estimates of electrocardiographic (ECG) features related to arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) have been reported in different cohorts. This study was aimed at examining the variability in the ECG interpretation resulting from the same reader, different readers, and using different ECG-resolutions. Blinded to other clinical data, 2 readers examined quantitative and qualitative ECG features of 20 (10 ARVD/C) randomly selected individuals. ECGs were recorded at standard-speed (SS) and double-speed-double-amplitude (DS) settings. The SS ECGs were scanned, magnified 4×, and evaluated using electronic calipers (EL). One reader repeated all measurements. For both readers, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the measurement of QRS duration was good between conventional and electronic evaluation [DS vs EL: Reader 1--0.64 (0.52-0.73); Reader 2--0.67 (0.55-0.76)][SS vs EL: Reader 1--0.60 (0.47-0.70); Reader 2--0.60 (0.47-0.70)]. Using the same resolution, the intrareader ICC was good for SS [0.70 (0.59-0.78)], DS [0.85 (0.80-0.90)], and EL [0.70 (0.69-0.83)] resolutions, but deteriorated for interreader comparisons [0.50 (0.36-0.62), 0.75 (0.66-0.82), and 0.75 (0.66-0.82), respectively]. For qualitative parameters, the intra- and interreader agreement was inconsistent for all but 2 parameters. Both readers were in perfect agreement while interpreting right precordial T-wave inversion [κ= 1] and right bundle branch block morphology (RBBB) [κ= 0.83 (0.5-1.0)] even when using SS resolution. Right precordial t-wave inversion and RBBB are the only ECG parameters that can be detected consistently even using the conventionally used ECG-resolution. The substantial variability in evaluation of other parameters is not improved even with the use of higher resolutions. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Heart Rate Variability for Early Detection of Cardiac Iron Deposition in Patients with Transfusion-Dependent Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvilairat, Suchaya; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Saekho, Suwit; Tantiworawit, Adisak; Phrommintikul, Arintaya; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron overload cardiomyopathy remains the major cause of death in patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Cardiac T2* magnetic resonance imaging is costly yet effective in detecting cardiac iron accumulation in the heart. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used to evaluate cardiac autonomic function and is depressed in cases of thalassemia. We evaluated whether HRV could be used as an indicator for early identification of cardiac iron deposition. Methods One hundred and one patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia were enrolled in this study. The correlation between recorded HRV and hemoglobin, non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI), serum ferritin and cardiac T2* were evaluated. Results The median age was 18 years (range 8–59 years). The patient group with a 5-year mean serum ferritin >5,000 ng/mL included significantly more homozygous β-thalassemia and splenectomized patients, had lower hemoglobin levels, and had more cardiac iron deposit than all other groups. Anemia strongly influenced all domains of HRV. After adjusting for anemia, neither serum ferritin nor NTBI impacted the HRV. However cardiac T2* was an independent predictor of HRV, even after adjusting for anemia. For receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of cardiac T2* ≤20 ms, only mean ferritin in the last 12 months and the average of the standard deviation of all R-R intervals for all five-minute segments in the 24-hour recording were predictors for cardiac T2* ≤20 ms, with area under the ROC curve of 0.961 (p<0.0001) and 0.701 (p = 0.05), respectively. Conclusions Hemoglobin and cardiac T2* as significant predictors for HRV indicate that anemia and cardiac iron deposition result in cardiac autonomic imbalance. The mean ferritin in the last 12 months could be useful as the best indicator for further evaluation of cardiac risk. The ability of serum ferritin to predict cardiac risk is stronger than observed in other thalassemia cohorts. HRV might be a

  19. Influence of hypoxia and hypercapnia on sleep state-dependent heart rate variability behavior in newborn lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchée, Alain; Hernández, Alfredo I; Duvareille, Charles; Daniel, David; Samson, Nathalie; Pladys, Patrick; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2012-11-01

    Although hypercapnia and/or hypoxia are frequently present during chronic lung disease of infancy and have also been implicated in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), their effect on cardiac autonomic regulation remains unclear. The authors' goal is to test that hypercapnia and hypoxia alter sleep-wake cycle-dependent heart rate variability (HRV) in the neonatal period. Experimental study measuring HRV during sleep states in lambs randomly exposed to hypercapnia, hypoxia, or air. University center for perinatal research in ovines (Sherbrooke, Canada). INSERM-university research unit for signal processing (Rennes, France). Six nonsedated, full-term lambs. Each lamb underwent polysomnographic recordings while in a chamber flowed with either air or 21% O(2) + 5% CO(2) (hypercapnia) or 10% O(2) + 0% CO(2) (hypoxia) on day 3, 4, and 5 of postnatal age. Hypercapnia increased the time spent in wakefulness and hypoxia the time spent in quiet sleep (QS). The state of alertness was the major determinant of HRV characterized with linear or nonlinear methods. Compared with QS, active sleep (AS) was associated with an overall increase in HRV magnitude and short-term self-similarity and a decrease in entropy of cardiac cycle length in air. This AS-related HRV pattern persisted in hypercapnia and was even more pronounced in hypoxia. Enhancement of AS-related sympathovagal coactivation in hypoxia, together with increased heart rate regularity, may be evidence that AS + hypoxia represent a particularly vulnerable state in early life. This should be kept in mind when deciding the optimal arterial oxygenation target in newborns and when investigating the potential involvement of hypoxia in SIDS pathogenesis.

  20. Chip Multithreaded Consistency Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zu-Song Li; Dan-Dan Huan; Wei-Wu Hu; Zhi-Min Tang

    2008-01-01

    Multithreaded technique is the developing trend of high performance processor. Memory consistency model is essential to the correctness, performance and complexity of multithreaded processor. The chip multithreaded consistency model adapting to multithreaded processor is proposed in this paper. The restriction imposed on memory event ordering by chip multithreaded consistency is presented and formalized. With the idea of critical cycle built by Wei-Wu Hu, we prove that the proposed chip multithreaded consistency model satisfies the criterion of correct execution of sequential consistency model. Chip multithreaded consistency model provides a way of achieving high performance compared with sequential consistency model and ensures the compatibility of software that the execution result in multithreaded processor is the same as the execution result in uniprocessor. The implementation strategy of chip multithreaded consistency model in Godson-2 SMT processor is also proposed. Godson-2 SMT processor supports chip multithreaded consistency model correctly by exception scheme based on the sequential memory access queue of each thread.

  1. An Analysis of Some Variables Affecting the Internet Dependency Level of Turkish Adolescents by Using Decision Tree Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayri, Murat; Gunuc, Selim

    2010-01-01

    Internet dependency is going to expand into social life in wide area whereas it has been accepted as a pathological and psychological disease. Knowing the basic effects of internet dependency is an inevitable approach to use the internet technology healthy. In this study, internet dependency levels of 754 students were examined with the Internet…

  2. Can weighting compensate for nonresponse bias in a dependent variable? An evaluation of weighting methods to correct for substantive bias in a mail survey among Dutch municipalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H; Stuiver, B

    1998-01-01

    Due to a lack of pertinent data, little is known about nonresponse in substantive, generally "dependent" variables and its consequences. However, in a study on policy performance of Dutch municipalities, we were fortunately able to gather performance data fur respondents and nonrespondents from

  3. Convergence Analysis of Semi-Implicit Euler Methods for Solving Stochastic Age-Dependent Capital System with Variable Delays and Random Jump Magnitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghui Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider semi-implicit Euler methods for stochastic age-dependent capital system with variable delays and random jump magnitudes, and investigate the convergence of the numerical approximation. It is proved that the numerical approximate solutions converge to the analytical solutions in the mean-square sense under given conditions.

  4. Consistency and stability of recombinant fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, M E; Builder, S E

    1994-01-01

    Production of proteins of consistent quality in heterologous, genetically-engineered expression systems is dependent upon identifying the manufacturing process parameters which have an impact on product structure, function, or purity, validating acceptable ranges for these variables, and performing the manufacturing process as specified. One of the factors which may affect product consistency is genetic instability of the primary product sequence, as well as instability of genes which code for proteins responsible for post-translational modification of the product. Approaches have been developed for mammalian expression systems to assure that product quality is not changing through mechanisms of genetic instability. Sensitive protein analytical methods, particularly peptide mapping, are used to evaluate product structure directly, and are more sensitive in detecting genetic instability than is direct genetic analysis by nucleotide sequencing of the recombinant gene or mRNA. These methods are being employed to demonstrate that the manufacturing process consistently yields a product of defined structure from cells cultured through the range of cell ages used in the manufacturing process and well beyond the maximum cell age defined for the process. The combination of well designed validation studies which demonstrate consistent product quality as a function of cell age, and rigorous quality control of every product lot by sensitive protein analytical methods provide the necessary assurance that product structure is not being altered through mechanisms of mutation and selection.

  5. Consistent model driven architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  6. Flows of Carreau fluid with pressure dependent viscosity in a variable porous medium: Application of polymer melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y. Malik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work concerns the pressure dependent viscosity in Carreau fluid through porous medium. Four different combinations of pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porous medium parameters are considered for two types of flow situations namely (i Poiseuille flow and (ii Couette flow. The solutions of non-linear equations have been evaluated numerically by Shooting method along with Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method. The physical features of pertinent parameters have been discussed through graphs.

  7. No consistent bimetric gravity?

    CERN Document Server

    Deser, S; Waldron, A

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for a consistent, nonlinear, partially massless (PM), gauge symmetry of bimetric gravity (BMG). Just as for single metric massive gravity, ultimate consistency of both BMG and the putative PM BMG theory relies crucially on this gauge symmetry. We argue, however, that it does not exist.

  8. Using a latent variable approach to inform gender and racial/ethnic differences in cocaine dependence: a National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Pan, Jeng-Jong; Blazer, Dan G; Tai, Betty; Stitzer, Maxine L; Woody, George E

    2010-06-01

    This study applies a latent variable approach to examine gender and racial/ethnic differences in cocaine dependence, to determine the presence of differential item functioning (DIF) or item-response bias to diagnostic questions of cocaine dependence, and to explore the effects of DIF on the predictor analysis of cocaine dependence. The analysis sample included 682 cocaine users enrolled in two national multisite studies of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN). Participants were recruited from 14 community-based substance abuse treatment programs associated with the CTN, including 6 methadone and 8 outpatient nonmethadone programs. Factor and multiple indicators-multiple causes (MIMIC) procedures evaluated the latent continuum of cocaine dependence and its correlates. MIMIC analysis showed that men exhibited lower odds of cocaine dependence than women (regression coefficient, beta = -0.34), controlling for the effects of DIF, years of cocaine use, addiction treatment history, comorbid drug dependence diagnoses, and treatment setting. There were no racial/ethnic differences in cocaine dependence; however, DIF by race/ethnicity was noted. Within the context of multiple community-based addiction treatment settings, women were more likely than men to exhibit cocaine dependence. Addiction treatment research needs to further evaluate gender-related differences in drug dependence in treatment entry and to investigate how these differences may affect study participation, retention, and treatment response to better serve this population.

  9. Prizes for consistency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiscock, S.

    1986-07-01

    The importance of consistency in coal quality has become of increasing significance recently, with the current trend towards using coal from a range of sources. A significant development has been the swing in responsibilities for coal quality. The increasing demand for consistency in quality has led to a re-examination of where in the trade and transport chain the quality should be assessed and where further upgrading of inspection and preparation facilities are required. Changes are in progress throughout the whole coal transport chain which will improve consistency of delivered coal quality. These include installation of beneficiation plant at coal mines, export terminals, and on the premises of end users. It is suggested that one of the keys to success for the coal industry will be the ability to provide coal of a consistent quality.

  10. Planting strategies of maize farmers in Kenya: a simultaneous equations analysis in the presence of discrete dependent variables

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hassan, RM

    1996-11-01

    Full Text Available - rectly through its influence on cropping intensity (Yl). Female farmers may have preferences for cer- tain varietal traits, that may be different from those of male farmers. Again, experience and knowledge (age, education... of family size and available farm land. 4. The sex, education, and age of the farmer. Whereas the age variable is measured on a continuous scale, dichotomous indices are used to code sex (male, female) and education (none...

  11. Network Consistent Data Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Das, Abir; Roy-Chowdhury, Amit K

    2016-09-01

    Existing data association techniques mostly focus on matching pairs of data-point sets and then repeating this process along space-time to achieve long term correspondences. However, in many problems such as person re-identification, a set of data-points may be observed at multiple spatio-temporal locations and/or by multiple agents in a network and simply combining the local pairwise association results between sets of data-points often leads to inconsistencies over the global space-time horizons. In this paper, we propose a Novel Network Consistent Data Association (NCDA) framework formulated as an optimization problem that not only maintains consistency in association results across the network, but also improves the pairwise data association accuracies. The proposed NCDA can be solved as a binary integer program leading to a globally optimal solution and is capable of handling the challenging data-association scenario where the number of data-points varies across different sets of instances in the network. We also present an online implementation of NCDA method that can dynamically associate new observations to already observed data-points in an iterative fashion, while maintaining network consistency. We have tested both the batch and the online NCDA in two application areas-person re-identification and spatio-temporal cell tracking and observed consistent and highly accurate data association results in all the cases.

  12. [Dependence of effects of weak combined low-frequency variable and constant magnetic fields on the intensity of asexual reproduction of planarians Dugesia tigrina on the magnitude of the variable field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V V; Sheĭman, I M; Lisitsyn, A S; Kliubin, A V; Fesenko, E E

    2002-01-01

    It was shown that the stimulating effect of weak combined magnetic fields (constant component 42 microT, frequency of the variable component 3.7 Hz) on the division of planarians depends on the amplitude of the variable component of the field. The effect is particularly pronounced at 40 (the main maximum), 120, 160, and 640 nT. Narrow ranges of effective amplitudes alternate in some cases with equally narrow ranges in which the system does not respond to he treatment. In the range of super weak amplitudes of the variable field (0.1 and 1 nT), the stimulating effect is poorly pronounced. The data obtained indicate the presence of narrow amplitude windows in the response of the biological systems to weak and super weak magnetic fields. In a special series of experiments, it was shown that the effect of fields on planarians is partially mediated via aqueous medium preliminarily treated with weak magnetic fields. It is noteworthy that in experiments with water treated with weak magnetic fields, there were no pronounced maxima and minima in the magnitude of the effect in the range of amplitude of the variable magnetic field from 40 to 320 nT.

  13. Including long-range dependence in integrate-and-fire models of the high interspike-interval variability of cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, B Scott

    2004-10-01

    Many different types of integrate-and-fire models have been designed in order to explain how it is possible for a cortical neuron to integrate over many independent inputs while still producing highly variable spike trains. Within this context, the variability of spike trains has been almost exclusively measured using the coefficient of variation of interspike intervals. However, another important statistical property that has been found in cortical spike trains and is closely associated with their high firing variability is long-range dependence. We investigate the conditions, if any, under which such models produce output spike trains with both interspike-interval variability and long-range dependence similar to those that have previously been measured from actual cortical neurons. We first show analytically that a large class of high-variability integrate-and-fire models is incapable of producing such outputs based on the fact that their output spike trains are always mathematically equivalent to renewal processes. This class of models subsumes a majority of previously published models, including those that use excitation-inhibition balance, correlated inputs, partial reset, or nonlinear leakage to produce outputs with high variability. Next, we study integrate-and-fire models that have (nonPoissonian) renewal point process inputs instead of the Poisson point process inputs used in the preceding class of models. The confluence of our analytical and simulation results implies that the renewal-input model is capable of producing high variability and long-range dependence comparable to that seen in spike trains recorded from cortical neurons, but only if the interspike intervals of the inputs have infinite variance, a physiologically unrealistic condition. Finally, we suggest a new integrate-and-fire model that does not suffer any of the previously mentioned shortcomings. By analyzing simulation results for this model, we show that it is capable of producing output

  14. Reporting consistently on CSR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christa; Nielsen, Anne Ellerup

    2006-01-01

    of a case study showing that companies use different and not necessarily consistent strategies for reporting on CSR. Finally, the implications for managerial practice are discussed. The chapter concludes by highlighting the value and awareness of the discourse and the discourse types adopted......This chapter first outlines theory and literature on CSR and Stakeholder Relations focusing on the different perspectives and the contextual and dynamic character of the CSR concept. CSR reporting challenges are discussed and a model of analysis is proposed. Next, our paper presents the results...... in the reporting material. By implementing consistent discourse strategies that interact according to a well-defined pattern or order, it is possible to communicate a strong social commitment on the one hand, and to take into consideration the expectations of the shareholders and the other stakeholders...

  15. A Magnetic Consistency Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2012-01-01

    If cosmic magnetic fields are indeed produced during inflation, they are likely to be correlated with the scalar metric perturbations that are responsible for the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies and Large Scale Structure. Within an archetypical model of inflationary magnetogenesis, we show that there exists a new simple consistency relation for the non-Gaussian cross correlation function of the scalar metric perturbation with two powers of the magnetic field in the squeezed limit where the momentum of the metric perturbation vanishes. We emphasize that such a consistency relation turns out to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields.

  16. Consistency in Distributed Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kemme, Bettina; Ramalingam, Ganesan; Schiper, André; Shapiro, Marc; Vaswani, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    International audience; In distributed systems, there exists a fundamental trade-off between data consistency, availability, and the ability to tolerate failures. This trade-off has significant implications on the design of the entire distributed computing infrastructure such as storage systems, compilers and runtimes, application development frameworks and programming languages. Unfortunately, it also has significant, and poorly understood, implications for the designers and developers of en...

  17. Geometrically Consistent Mesh Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new paradigm of adaptivity is to execute refinement, coarsening, and smoothing of meshes on manifolds with incomplete information about their geometry and yet preserve position and curvature accuracy. We refer to this collectively as geometrically consistent (GC) mesh modification. We discuss the concept of discrete GC, show the failure of naive approaches, and propose and analyze a simple algorithm that is GC and accuracy preserving. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  18. A new approach to hull consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolev Lubomir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hull consistency is a known technique to improve the efficiency of iterative interval methods for solving nonlinear systems describing steady-states in various circuits. Presently, hull consistency is checked in a scalar manner, i.e. successively for each equation of the nonlinear system with respect to a single variable. In the present poster, a new more general approach to implementing hull consistency is suggested which consists in treating simultaneously several equations with respect to the same number of variables.

  19. Consistent wind Facilitates Vection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ogawa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined whether a consistent haptic cue suggesting forward self-motion facilitated vection. We used a fan with no blades (Dyson, AM01 providing a wind of constant strength and direction (wind speed was 6.37 m/s to the subjects' faces with the visual stimuli visible through the fan. We used an optic flow of expansion or contraction created by positioning 16,000 dots at random inside a simulated cube (length 20 m, and moving the observer's viewpoint to simulate forward or backward self-motion of 16 m/s. we tested three conditions for fan operation, which were normal operation, normal operation with the fan reversed (ie, no wind, and no operation (no wind and no sound. Vection was facilitated by the wind (shorter latency, longer duration and larger magnitude values with the expansion stimuli. The fan noise did not facilitate vection. The wind neither facilitated nor inhibited vection with the contraction stimuli, perhaps because a headwind is not consistent with backward self-motion. We speculate that the consistency between multi modalities is a key factor in facilitating vection.

  20. Statistical Frequency-Dependent Analysis of Trial-to-Trial Variability in Single Time Series by Recurrence Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tošić, Tamara; Sellers, Kristin K; Fröhlich, Flavio; Fedotenkova, Mariia; Beim Graben, Peter; Hutt, Axel

    2015-01-01

    For decades, research in neuroscience has supported the hypothesis that brain dynamics exhibits recurrent metastable states connected by transients, which together encode fundamental neural information processing. To understand the system's dynamics it is important to detect such recurrence domains, but it is challenging to extract them from experimental neuroscience datasets due to the large trial-to-trial variability. The proposed methodology extracts recurrent metastable states in univariate time series by transforming datasets into their time-frequency representations and computing recurrence plots based on instantaneous spectral power values in various frequency bands. Additionally, a new statistical inference analysis compares different trial recurrence plots with corresponding surrogates to obtain statistically significant recurrent structures. This combination of methods is validated by applying it to two artificial datasets. In a final study of visually-evoked Local Field Potentials in partially anesthetized ferrets, the methodology is able to reveal recurrence structures of neural responses with trial-to-trial variability. Focusing on different frequency bands, the δ-band activity is much less recurrent than α-band activity. Moreover, α-activity is susceptible to pre-stimuli, while δ-activity is much less sensitive to pre-stimuli. This difference in recurrence structures in different frequency bands indicates diverse underlying information processing steps in the brain.

  1. The impact of clinical and demographic variables on cognitive performance in methamphetamine-dependent individuals in rural South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kimber L; DeSantis, Stacia M; Simpson, Annie N; Tolliver, Bryan K; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Saladin, Michael E; Baker, Nathaniel L; Wagner, Mark T; Brady, Kathleen T

    2011-01-01

    Inconsistencies in reports on methamphetamine (METH) associated cognitive dysfunction may be attributed, at least in part, to the diversity of study sample features (eg, clinical and demographic characteristics). The current study assessed cognitive function in a METH-dependent population from rural South Carolina, and the impact of demographic and clinical characteristics on performance. Seventy-one male (28.2%) and female (71.8%) METH-dependent subjects were administered a battery of neurocognitive tests including the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM), Shipley Institute of Living Scale, Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT), Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), Grooved Pegboard Test, California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Demographic and clinical characteristics (eg, gender, frequency of METH use) were examined as predictors of performance. Subjects scored significantly lower than expected on one test of attention and one of fine motor function, but performed adequately on all other tests. There were no predictors of performance on attention; however, more frequent METH use was associated with better performance for males and worse for females on fine motor skills. The METH-dependent individuals in this population exhibit very limited cognitive impairment. The marked differences in education, Intellectual Quotient (IQ), and gender in our sample when compared to the published literature may contribute to these findings. Characterization of the impact of clinical and/or demographic features on cognitive deficits could be important in guiding the development of treatment interventions. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  2. Impact of ENSO variability on the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) sources: A modeling approach depending on the horizontal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babonneix, A.; Gourdeau, L.; Durand, F.; Menkes, C. E.; Djath, N.

    2012-04-01

    As the most powerful source of climatic variability in the Pacific Ocean, the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) deeply impacts the equatorial oceanic currents. The Pacific Equatorial UnderCurrent (EUC) is a powerful jet flowing eastward and shoaling with the thermocline in the eastern Pacific, bringing cold waters in surface that retroact with the atmosphere. Its transport has thus been found to follow significant variations at ENSO timescale, with an increased (decreased) transport in La Niña (El Niño) phases. However, the EUC mean properties also vary more slowly due to extratropical forcing. This process is able to modify the heat and mass transports of the subducted waters that feed the EUC. By changing the mean equatorial oceanic conditions, this is suspected to modulate in return the ENSO signal. The EUC sources have very different origins: contributions come from both hemispheres, in part from the Low-Latitude Western Boundary Currents (LLWBCs) and the remaining from the interior ocean. Each source follows different pathways and is characterized by particular properties which differently influences the properties of the downstream equatorial undercurrent and the cold tongue upwelling. The question of the location of the different EUC sources is thus of crucial importance. In this poster, we investigate the links between the ENSO variability and the partitioning of the EUC sources. For this purpose, we use a set of five simulations made available by the DRAKKAR project ranging from a 2° laminar resolution to a turbulent 1/12° partly resolving the meso-scale processes. Increasing models horizontal resolution is largely thought to improve the quality of the resulting simulated currents, in terms of dynamics as of variability. Results show that if some distinct elements appear in terms of mean transit times, little variations are found in terms of partitioning within the different simulations. However, we show that the partitioning between the EUC sources

  3. Method-dependent variability in determination of prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in Canadian retail poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Catherine D; Plante, Daniel; Iugovaz, Irène; Kenwell, Robyn; Bélanger, Ghislaine; Boucher, Francine; Poulin, Nathalie; Trottier, Yvon-Louis

    2014-10-01

    Campylobacter is the most frequent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in Canada, and the illness is commonly associated with poultry consumption. Whereas Canadian retail poultry is often contaminated with campylobacters, studies on the prevalence of this organism are inconsistent due to variability in sampling and microbiological methodology. To determine the current microbiological status of Canadian poultry, and to evaluate two commonly used microbiological methods, 348 raw poultry samples were collected at retail across Canada over a period of 3 years (2007 to 2010) and were analyzed for the presence of thermophilic Campylobacter species. The overall prevalence of Campylobacter spp. was found to be 42.8% by a combination of the two testing methods, with 33.9% of the samples positive for C. jejuni, 3.7% of the samples positive for C. coli, and 5.2% of the samples positive for both. Variability in Campylobacter spp. prevalence was observed in samples obtained from different regions across Canada and from poultry with or without skin, but this was not statistically significant. In co-contaminated samples, C. jejuni was preferentially recovered from Preston agar compared with mCCDA and Campy-Cefex agar, with an increase in recovery of C. coli on all selective media after 48 h of enrichment. A subset of 214 of the poultry rinses were analyzed by both Health Canada's standard method, MFLP-46 (enrichment in Park and Sanders broth), and a second method requiring enrichment in Bolton broth. Significantly more positive samples were obtained with the MFLP-46 method (40.6%) than with the alternate method (35.0%). This improved recovery with MFLP-46 may be due to the omission of cycloheximide from this method. These results demonstrate that determination of prevalence of Campylobacter spp. on poultry products may be significantly impacted by the choice of microbiological methods used. Canadian poultry continues to be a source of exposure to Campylobacter spp.

  4. Infanticide and moral consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Jeff

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this essay is to show that there are no easy options for those who are disturbed by the suggestion that infanticide may on occasion be morally permissible. The belief that infanticide is always wrong is doubtfully compatible with a range of widely shared moral beliefs that underlie various commonly accepted practices. Any set of beliefs about the morality of abortion, infanticide and the killing of animals that is internally consistent and even minimally credible will therefore unavoidably contain some beliefs that are counterintuitive.

  5. The Rucio Consistency Service

    CERN Document Server

    Serfon, Cedric; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenge with Large scale data management system is to ensure the consistency between the global file catalog and what is physically on all storage elements. To tackle this issue, the Rucio software which is used by the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system has been extended to automatically handle lost or unregistered files (aka Dark Data). This system automatically detects these inconsistencies and take actions like recovery or deletion of unneeded files in a central manner. In this talk, we will present this system, explain the internals and give some results.

  6. When is holography consistent?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInnes, Brett, E-mail: matmcinn@nus.edu.sg [National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ong, Yen Chin, E-mail: yenchin.ong@nordita.org [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    Holographic duality relates two radically different kinds of theory: one with gravity, one without. The very existence of such an equivalence imposes strong consistency conditions which are, in the nature of the case, hard to satisfy. Recently a particularly deep condition of this kind, relating the minimum of a probe brane action to a gravitational bulk action (in a Euclidean formulation), has been recognized; and the question arises as to the circumstances under which it, and its Lorentzian counterpart, is satisfied. We discuss the fact that there are physically interesting situations in which one or both versions might, in principle, not be satisfied. These arise in two distinct circumstances: first, when the bulk is not an Einstein manifold and, second, in the presence of angular momentum. Focusing on the application of holography to the quark–gluon plasma (of the various forms arising in the early Universe and in heavy-ion collisions), we find that these potential violations never actually occur. This suggests that the consistency condition is a “law of physics” expressing a particular aspect of holography.

  7. Consistent quantum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2015-11-01

    In response to recent criticisms by Okon and Sudarsky, various aspects of the consistent histories (CH) resolution of the quantum measurement problem(s) are discussed using a simple Stern-Gerlach device, and compared with the alternative approaches to the measurement problem provided by spontaneous localization (GRW), Bohmian mechanics, many worlds, and standard (textbook) quantum mechanics. Among these CH is unique in solving the second measurement problem: inferring from the measurement outcome a property of the measured system at a time before the measurement took place, as is done routinely by experimental physicists. The main respect in which CH differs from other quantum interpretations is in allowing multiple stochastic descriptions of a given measurement situation, from which one (or more) can be selected on the basis of its utility. This requires abandoning a principle (termed unicity), central to classical physics, that at any instant of time there is only a single correct description of the world.

  8. Intraspecies Variability Affects Heterotypic Biofilms of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia: Evidences of Strain-Dependence Biofilm Modulation by Physical Contact and by Released Soluble Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Graziela Murta; Colombo, Andrea Vieira; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that strain and virulence diversity exist within the population structure of Porphyromonas gingivalis. In the present study we investigate intra- and inter-species variability in biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and partners Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. All strains tested showed similar hydrophobicity, except for P. gingivalis W83 which has roughly half of the hydrophobicity of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. An intraspecies variability in coaggregation of P. gingivalis with P. intermedia was also found. The association P. gingivalis W83/P. intermedia 17 produced the thickest biofilm and strain 17 was prevalent. In a two-compartment system P. gingivalis W83 stimulates an increase in biomass of strain 17 and the latter did not stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis W83. In addition, P. gingivalis W83 also stimulates the growth of P. intermedia ATCC25611 although strain W83 was prevalent in the association with P. intermedia ATCC25611. P. gingivalis ATCC33277 was prevalent in both associations with P. intermedia and both strains of P. intermedia stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. FISH images also showed variability in biofilm structure. Thus, the outcome of the association P. gingivalis/P. intermedia seems to be strain-dependent, and both soluble factors and physical contact are relevant. The association P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens ATCC33563 produced larger biomass than each monotypic biofilm, and P. gingivalis was favored in consortia, while no differences were found in the two-compartment system. Therefore, in consortia P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens physical contact seems to favor P. gingivalis growth. The intraspecies variability found in our study suggests strain-dependence in ability of microorganisms to recognize molecules in other bacteria which may further elucidate the dysbiosis event during periodontitis development giving additional explanation for periodontal bacteria, such as P. gingivalis and P

  9. Modelling diameter distribution of Tetraclinis articulata in Tunisia using normal and Weibull distributions with parameters depending on stand variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sghaier T

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of both Normal and two-parameter Weibull distributions in describing diameter distribution of Tetraclinis articulata stands in north-east Tunisia. The parameters of the Weibull function were estimated using the moments method and maximum likelihood approaches. The data used in this study came from temporary plots. The three diameter distribution models were compared firstly by estimating the parameters of the distribution directly from individual tree measurements taken in each plot (parameter estimation method, and secondly by predicting the same parameters from stand variables (parameter prediction method. The comparison was based on bias, mean absolute error, mean square error and the Reynolds’ index error (as a percentage. On the basis of the parameter estimation method, the Normal distribution gave slightly better results, whereas the Weibull distribution with the maximum likelihood approach gave the best results for the parameter prediction method. Hence, in the latter case, the Weibull distribution with the maximum likelihood approach appears to be the most suitable to estimate the parameters for reducing the different comparison criteria for the distribution of trees by diameter class in Tetraclinis articulata forests in Tunisia.

  10. Power Smoothing of a Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Generator in Association With the Rotor-Speed-Dependent Gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeonhee; Kang, Moses; Muljadi, Eduard; Park, Jung-Wook; Kang, Yong Cheol

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a power-smoothing scheme for a variable-speed wind turbine generator (WTG) that can smooth out the WTG's fluctuating power caused by varying wind speeds, and thereby keep the system frequency within a narrow range. The proposed scheme employs an additional loop based on the system frequency deviation that operates in conjunction with the maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control loop. Unlike the conventional, fixed-gain scheme, its control gain is modified with the rotor speed. In the proposed scheme, the control gain is determined by considering the ratio of the output of the additional loop to that of the MPPT loop. To improve the contribution of the scheme toward maintaining the frequency while ensuring the stable operation of WTGs, in the low rotor speed region, the ratio is set to be proportional to the rotor speed; in the high rotor speed region, the ratio remains constant. The performance of the proposed scheme is investigated under varying wind conditions for the IEEE 14-bus system. The simulation results demonstrate that the scheme successfully operates regardless of the output power fluctuation of a WTG by adjusting the gain with the rotor speed, and thereby improves the frequency-regulating capability of a WTG.

  11. Student Effort, Consistency, and Online Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patron, Hilde; Lopez, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines how student effort, consistency, motivation, and marginal learning, influence student grades in an online course. We use data from eleven Microeconomics courses taught online for a total of 212 students. Our findings show that consistency, or less time variation, is a statistically significant explanatory variable, whereas…

  12. When Is Holography Consistent?

    CERN Document Server

    McInnes, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Holographic duality relates two radically different kinds of theory: one with gravity, one without. The very existence of such an equivalence imposes strong consistency conditions which are, in the nature of the case, hard to satisfy. Recently a particularly deep condition of this kind, relating the minimum of a probe brane action to a gravitational bulk action (in a Euclidean formulation), has been recognised; and the question arises as to the circumstances under which it, and its Lorentzian counterpart, are satisfied. We discuss the fact that there are physically interesting situations in which one or both versions might, in principle, \\emph{not} be satisfied. These arise in two distinct circumstances: first, when the bulk is not an Einstein manifold, and, second, in the presence of angular momentum. Focusing on the application of holography to the quark-gluon plasma (of the various forms arising in the early Universe and in heavy-ion collisions), we find that these potential violations never actually occur...

  13. Variability in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal in patients with stroke-induced and primary progressive aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bonakdarpour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although fMRI is increasingly used to assess language-related brain activation in patients with aphasia, few studies have examined the hemodynamic response function (HRF in perilesional, and contralesional areas of the brain. In addition, the relationship between HRF abnormalities and other variables such as lesion size and severity of aphasia has not been explored. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in HRF signal during language-related neural activation in patients with stroke-induced aphasia (SA. We also examined the status of the HRF in patients with aphasia due to nonvascular etiology, namely, primary progressive aphasia (PPA. Five right handed SA patients, three PPA patients, and five healthy individuals participated in the study. Structural damage was quantified with T1-weighted MR images. Functional MR imaging was performed with long trial event-related design and an overt naming task to measure BOLD signal time to peak (TTP and percent signal change (ΔS. In SA patients, the average HRF TTP was significantly delayed in the left hemisphere regions involved in naming compared to healthy participants and PPA patients. However, ΔS was not different in SA patients compared to the other two groups. Delay in HRF TTP in the left hemisphere naming network of SA patients was correlated with lesion size and showed a negative correlation with global language function. There were no significant differences in the HRF TTP and ΔS in the right hemisphere homologues of the naming network or in the left and the right occipital control regions across the three groups. In PPA patients, HRF had a normal pattern. Our results indicate that abnormal task-related HRF is primarily found in the left hemisphere language network of SA patients and raise the possibility that abnormal physiology superimposed on structural damage may contribute to the clinical deficit. Follow-up investigations in a larger sample of age-matched healthy individuals

  14. Measures of Heart Rate Variability in 24-h ECGs Depend on Age but Not Gender of Healthy Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Bobkowski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many methods computing heart rate variability (HRV have been applied in studies in children. Not all of these methods have a comprehensive physiological interpretation, and not all of studies are in agreement with the Task Force Standards on HRV from 1996, and the New Joint Position Statement on the advances of HRV from 2015. The study aim was to analyse HRV in the 24-h ECGs of healthy children by the Poincare plots and Lomb-Scargle periodograms, and to follow proper HRV recommendations. Additionally, we investigated the associations between age, children's sex and measured HRV indices. One hundred healthy children, aged 3–18 underwent 24-h ECG Holter monitoring. HRV was analyzed by the Poincaré plots and spectral by Lomb-Scargle periodograms of RR intervals. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare sex differences in HRV, the van Elteren's test was used to correct for the age-gender interaction, and non-parametric Spearman correlation was applied to analyse the association between age and HRV indices. None of the HRV measures differed significantly between boys and girls. None of the HRV indices was modified by the age-gender interaction. There were statistically significant associations of age with measures of ultra-low (rho = 0.42; p < 0.0001, very low (rho = 0.35; p = 00004 and low (rho = 0.30; p = 0.0028 frequency powers, the ratio of the low to high frequency power (rho = 0.38; p = 0.0001, indices of long-term (SD2; rho = 0.37; p = 0.0002 and total (SDNN; rho = 0.33; p = 0.0008 HRV, and the contribution of the long-term HRV to total HRV (CL; rho = 0.32; p = 0.0012. In general, HRV parameters derived from the analyses of Poincaré plots and Lomb-Scargle periodograms appear not to be affected by gender, however, most of them increase with age in the 24-h ECG recordings in healthy children.

  15. Time- and state-dependent analysis of autonomic control in narcolepsy: higher heart rate with normal heart rate variability independent of sleep fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meijden, Wisse P; Fronczek, Rolf; Reijntjes, Robert H A M; Corssmit, Eleonora P M; Biermasz, Nienke R; Lammers, Gert Jan; van Dijk, J Gert; Thijs, Roland D

    2015-04-01

    Narcolepsy with hypocretin deficiency is known to alter cardiovascular control during sleep, but its aetiology is disputed. As cardiovascular control differs between sleep states, and narcolepsy affects sleep architecture, controlling for both duration and transitions of sleep states is necessary. This study therefore aimed to assess heart rate and its variability in narcolepsy during sleep taking these factors into account. The study included 12 medication-naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy and hypocretin deficiency (11 male, 16-53 years old), and 12 sex- and age-matched healthy controls (11 male, 19-55 years). All subjects underwent 1-night ambulatory polysomnography recording. Cardiovascular parameters were calculated for each 30-s epoch. Heart rate was significantly higher in patients with narcolepsy than in controls in all sleep states and during wakefulness prior to sleep. Groups did not differ in heart rate variability measures. The effects of sleep state duration on heart rate and its variability were similar between patients and controls. In conclusion, heart rate was consistently higher in patients with narcolepsy than controls, independent of sleep stage and sleep fragmentation. A direct effect of hypocretin deficiency therefore seems probable.

  16. Influence of some formulation variables on the optimization of pH-dependent, colon-targeted, sustained-release mesalamine microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bary, Ahmed Abd; Aboelwafa, Ahmed A; Al Sharabi, Ibrahim M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this work was to understand the influence of different formulation variables on the optimization of pH-dependent, colon-targeted, sustained-release mesalamine microspheres prepared by O/O emulsion solvent evaporation method, employing pH-dependent Eudragit S and hydrophobic pH-independent ethylcellulose polymers. Formulation variables studied included concentration of Eudragit S in the internal phase and the ratios between; internal to external phase, drug to Eudragit S and Eudragit S to ethylcellulose to mesalamine. Prepared microspheres were evaluated by carrying out in vitro release studies and determination of particle size, production yield, and encapsulation efficiency. In addition, morphology of microspheres was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Emulsion solvent evaporation method was found to be sensitive to the studied formulation variables. Particle size and encapsulation efficiency increased by increasing Eudragit S concentration in the internal phase, ratio of internal to external phase, and ratio of Eudragit S to the drug. Employing Eudragit S alone in preparation of the microspheres is only successful in forming acid-resistant microspheres with pulsatile release pattern at high pH. Eudragit S and ethylcellulose blend microspheres were able to control release under acidic condition and to extend drug release at high pH. The stability studies carried out at 40°C/75% RH for 6 months proved the stability of the optimized formulation. From the results of this investigation, microencapsulation of mesalamine in microspheres using blend of Eudragit S and ethylcellulose could constitute a promising approach for site-specific and controlled delivery of drug in colon.

  17. An inventory model of two-warehouse system with variable demand dependent on instantaneous displayed stock and marketing decisions via hybrid RCGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Bhunia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a single item deterministic inventory model with two separate warehouses called owned warehouse/show-room (OW and rented warehouse (RW is developed. The proposed model of this paper also considers a realistic assumption regarding the storage capacity of the rented warehouse. Demand is a function of selling price, advertisement of an item and displayed inventory level in OW. The stocks of RW are shipped to OW under bulk release pattern where shortages are not allowed. We discuss different scenarios of the proposed model to address relative size of stock dependency parameters and the capacity of owned warehouse. For each scenario, the corresponding problem is formulated as a constrained mixed integer nonlinear programming problem with three integer and two non-integer variables and a real coded genetic algorithm (RCGA is developed to solve the resulted problem. The proposed model of the paper is also examined using some numerical examples and sensitivity analysis is performed.

  18. Intra- and inter-individual variability of Aspergillus fumigatus reactive T-cell frequencies in healthy volunteers in dependency of mould exposure in residential and working environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Sebastian; Weis, Philipp; Page, Lukas; Helm, Johanna; Lazariotou, Maria; Einsele, Hermann; Ullmann, Andrew J

    2017-10-01

    Invasive aspergillosis remains a deadly disease in immunocompromised patients, whereas the combination of an exaggerated immune response and continuous exposure lead to various hyperinflammatory diseases. This pilot study aimed to gain an overview of the intra- and inter-individual variability in Aspergillus fumigatus reactive T-helper cells in healthy adults and the correlation with environmental mould exposure. In this flow cytometric study, the frequencies of CD154(+) A. fumigatus reactive T cells were evaluated in 70 healthy volunteers. All subjects completed a standardised questionnaire addressing their mould exposure. Subjects with intensive mould exposure in their professional or residential surrounding demonstrated considerably higher mean frequencies of A. fumigatus reactive T-helper and T-memory cells. Comparative evaluation of multiple measurements over time demonstrated relatively conserved reactive T-cell frequencies in the absence of major changes to the exposure profile, whereas those frequently exposed in professional environment or with changes to their risk score demonstrated a marked dependency of antigen reactive T-cell frequencies on recent mould exposure. This pilot study was the first to provide data on the intra-individual variability in A. fumigatus reactive T-cell frequencies and its linkage to mould encounter. Fungus reactive T cells are to be considered a valued tool for the assessment of environmental mould exposure. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Assessment of charge-transfer excitations with time-dependent, range-separated density functional theory based on long-range MP2 and multiconfigurational self- consistent field wave functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegård, Erik D.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Knecht, Stefan;

    2013-01-01

    formulation of multi-determinantal TD-DFT schemes where excitation classes, which are absent in conventional TD-DFT spectra (like for example double excitations), can be addressed. This paper investigates the combination of both the long-range Multi-Configuration Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) and Second Order...... TD-MC-srDFT and performs slightly better against the reference data for this small subset. Beyond the proof-of-principle calculations comprising the first part of this contribution, we additionally studied the low-lying singlet excited states (S1 and S2) of the retinal chromophore. The chromophore...... displays multireference character in the ground state and both excited states exhibit considerable double excitation character, which in turn cannot be described within standard TD-DFT, due to the adiabatic approximation. However, a TD-MC-srDFT approach can account for the multireference character...

  20. Density dependence and climate effects in Rocky Mountain elk: an application of regression with instrumental variables for population time series with sampling error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, Scott; Creel, Michael

    2009-11-01

    1. Sampling error in annual estimates of population size creates two widely recognized problems for the analysis of population growth. First, if sampling error is mistakenly treated as process error, one obtains inflated estimates of the variation in true population trajectories (Staples, Taper & Dennis 2004). Second, treating sampling error as process error is thought to overestimate the importance of density dependence in population growth (Viljugrein et al. 2005; Dennis et al. 2006). 2. In ecology, state-space models are used to account for sampling error when estimating the effects of density and other variables on population growth (Staples et al. 2004; Dennis et al. 2006). In econometrics, regression with instrumental variables is a well-established method that addresses the problem of correlation between regressors and the error term, but requires fewer assumptions than state-space models (Davidson & MacKinnon 1993; Cameron & Trivedi 2005). 3. We used instrumental variables to account for sampling error and fit a generalized linear model to 472 annual observations of population size for 35 Elk Management Units in Montana, from 1928 to 2004. We compared this model with state-space models fit with the likelihood function of Dennis et al. (2006). We discuss the general advantages and disadvantages of each method. Briefly, regression with instrumental variables is valid with fewer distributional assumptions, but state-space models are more efficient when their distributional assumptions are met. 4. Both methods found that population growth was negatively related to population density and winter snow accumulation. Summer rainfall and wolf (Canis lupus) presence had much weaker effects on elk (Cervus elaphus) dynamics [though limitation by wolves is strong in some elk populations with well-established wolf populations (Creel et al. 2007; Creel & Christianson 2008)]. 5. Coupled with predictions for Montana from global and regional climate models, our results

  1. Threshold-dependent variability of coronary artery calcification measurements - implications for contrast-enhanced multi-detector row-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moselewski, Fabian [Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ferencik, Maros [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Achenbach, Stephan [Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Internal Medicine II (Cardiology), University of Erlangen (Germany); Abbara, Suhny [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Cury, Ricardo C. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Booth, Sarah L. [Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, 711 Washington St., Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Jang, Ik-Kyung [Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Brady, Thomas J. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: uhoffman@partners.org

    2006-03-15

    Introduction: The present study investigated the threshold-dependent variability of coronary artery calcification (CAC) measurements and the potential to quantify CAC in contrast-enhanced multi-detector row-computed tomography (MDCT). Methods: We compared the mean CT attenuation of CAC to luminal contrast enhancement of the coronary arteries in 30 patients (n = 30) undergoing standard coronary contrast-enhanced spiral MDCT. The modified Agatston score [AS], calcified plaque volume [CV], and mineral mass [MM] at four different thresholds (130, 200, 300, and 400 HU) were measured in 50 patients who underwent non-contrast-enhanced MDCT. Results: Mean CT attenuation of CAC was similar to the attenuation of the contrast-enhanced coronary lumen (CAC 297.1 {+-} 68.7 HU versus 295 {+-} 65 HU (p < 0.0001), respectively). Above a threshold of 300 HU CAC measurements significantly varied to standard measurements obtained at a threshold of 130 HU (p < 0.0001). The threshold-dependent variation of MM measurements was significantly smaller than for AS and CV (130 HU versus 400 HU: 63, 75, and 81, respectively; p < 0.001). These differences resulted in a change of age and gender based percentile category for AS in 78% of subjects. Discussion: We demonstrated that CAC measurements are threshold dependent with MM measurements having significantly less variation than AS or CV. Due to the similarity of mean CT attenuation of CAC and the contrast-enhanced coronary lumen accurate quantification of CAC may be difficult in standard coronary contrast-enhanced spiral MDCT.

  2. A Core Language for Separate Variability Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iosif-Lazăr, Alexandru Florin; Wasowski, Andrzej; Schaefer, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Separate variability modeling adds variability to a modeling language without requiring modifications of the language or the supporting tools. We define a core language for separate variability modeling using a single kind of variation point to define transformations of software artifacts in object...... hierarchical dependencies between variation points via copying and flattening. Thus, we reduce a model with intricate dependencies to a flat executable model transformation consisting of simple unconditional local variation points. The core semantics is extremely concise: it boils down to two operational rules...

  3. Azimuthal Dependence of the Ground Motion Variability from Scenario Modeling of the 2014 Mw6.0 South Napa, California, Earthquake Using an Advanced Kinematic Source Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallovič, F.

    2016-11-01

    Strong ground motion simulations require physically plausible earthquake source model. Here, I present the application of such a kinematic model introduced originally by Ruiz et al. (Geophys J Int 186:226-244, 2011). The model is constructed to inherently provide synthetics with the desired omega-squared spectral decay in the full frequency range. The source is composed of randomly distributed overlapping subsources with fractal number-size distribution. The position of the subsources can be constrained by prior knowledge of major asperities (stemming, e.g., from slip inversions), or can be completely random. From earthquake physics point of view, the model includes positive correlation between slip and rise time as found in dynamic source simulations. Rupture velocity and rise time follows local S-wave velocity profile, so that the rupture slows down and rise times increase close to the surface, avoiding unrealistically strong ground motions. Rupture velocity can also have random variations, which result in irregular rupture front while satisfying the causality principle. This advanced kinematic broadband source model is freely available and can be easily incorporated into any numerical wave propagation code, as the source is described by spatially distributed slip rate functions, not requiring any stochastic Green's functions. The source model has been previously validated against the observed data due to the very shallow unilateral 2014 Mw6 South Napa, California, earthquake; the model reproduces well the observed data including the near-fault directivity (Seism Res Lett 87:2-14, 2016). The performance of the source model is shown here on the scenario simulations for the same event. In particular, synthetics are compared with existing ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), emphasizing the azimuthal dependence of the between-event ground motion variability. I propose a simple model reproducing the azimuthal variations of the between-event ground motion

  4. Degree of multicollinearity and variables involved in linear dependence in additive-dominant models Grau de multicolinearidade e variáveis envolvidas na dependência linear em modelos aditivo-dominantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Petrini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the degree of multicollinearity and to identify the variables involved in linear dependence relations in additive-dominant models. Data of birth weight (n=141,567, yearling weight (n=58,124, and scrotal circumference (n=20,371 of Montana Tropical composite cattle were used. Diagnosis of multicollinearity was based on the variance inflation factor (VIF and on the evaluation of the condition indexes and eigenvalues from the correlation matrix among explanatory variables. The first model studied (RM included the fixed effect of dam age class at calving and the covariates associated to the direct and maternal additive and non-additive effects. The second model (R included all the effects of the RM model except the maternal additive effects. Multicollinearity was detected in both models for all traits considered, with VIF values of 1.03 - 70.20 for RM and 1.03 - 60.70 for R. Collinearity increased with the increase of variables in the model and the decrease in the number of observations, and it was classified as weak, with condition index values between 10.00 and 26.77. In general, the variables associated with additive and non-additive effects were involved in multicollinearity, partially due to the natural connection between these covariables as fractions of the biological types in breed composition.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o grau de multicolinearidade e identificar as variáveis envolvidas na dependência linear em modelos aditivo-dominantes. Foram utilizados dados de peso ao nascimento (n=141.567, peso ao ano (n=58.124 e perímetro escrotal (n=20.371 de bovinos de corte compostos Montana Tropical. O diagnóstico de multicolinearidade foi baseado no fator de inflação de variância (VIF e no exame dos índices de condição e dos autovalores da matriz de correlações entre as variáveis explanatórias. O primeiro modelo estudado (RM incluiu o efeito fixo de classe de idade da mãe ao parto e

  5. Identifying long-term variations in vegetation and climatic variables and their scale-dependent relationships: A case study in Southwest Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyong; Menzel, Lucas

    2016-12-01

    Geographic time series are usually non-stationary and contain different frequency components (e.g., seasonal variations, long-term and short-term fluctuations) which may significantly affect the overall variance structure in the original data. Based upon the monthly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), precipitation and temperature data for six different vegetation types in two precipitation regimes (low and high precipitation regimes) of Rhineland-Palatinate (Southwest Germany), this study aims to examine the temporal trends in the original time series of these variables and their relationships. In addition, the further objectives are to evaluate which time-scale is dominantly responsible for the trend production found in the original data and find out the certain time-scales that represent the strongest correlation between NDVI and climatic variables (i.e., precipitation and temperature). A combined approach using the discrete wavelet transform (DWT), Mann-Kendall (MK) trend test and correlation analysis was implemented to achieve these goals. The trend assessment for the original data shows that the monthly NDVI time series for all vegetation types in both precipitation regimes have upward trends, most of which are significant. The precipitation and temperature data for six vegetation types in two precipitation regimes present weak downward trends and significant increasing trends, respectively. The most important time-scales contributing the trend production in the original NDVI data are the 2-month and 8-month events. For precipitation, the most influential ones are 2-month and 4-month scales. The 4-month periodic mode predominantly affects the trends in the original temperature time series. Based on the original time series, the change in temperature is found to be the primary driver influencing the variability in vegetation greenness over this study area, while there is a negative correlation between NDVI and precipitation for all vegetation types

  6. Variability in State-Dependent Plasticity of Intrinsic Properties during Cell-Autonomous Self-Regulation of Calcium Homeostasis in Hippocampal Model Neurons1,2,3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Sunandha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract How do neurons reconcile the maintenance of calcium homeostasis with perpetual switches in patterns of afferent activity? Here, we assessed state-dependent evolution of calcium homeostasis in a population of hippocampal pyramidal neuron models, through an adaptation of a recent study on stomatogastric ganglion neurons. Calcium homeostasis was set to emerge through cell-autonomous updates to 12 ionic conductances, responding to different types of synaptically driven afferent activity. We first assessed the impact of theta-frequency inputs on the evolution of ionic conductances toward maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Although calcium homeostasis emerged efficaciously across all models in the population, disparate changes in ionic conductances that mediated this emergence resulted in variable plasticity to several intrinsic properties, also manifesting as significant differences in firing responses across models. Assessing the sensitivity of this form of plasticity, we noted that intrinsic neuronal properties and the firing response were sensitive to the target calcium concentration and to the strength and frequency of afferent activity. Next, we studied the evolution of calcium homeostasis when afferent activity was switched, in different temporal sequences, between two behaviorally distinct types of activity: theta-frequency inputs and sharp-wave ripples riding on largely silent periods. We found that the conductance values, intrinsic properties, and firing response of neurons exhibited differential robustness to an intervening switch in the type of afferent activity. These results unveil critical dissociations between different forms of homeostasis, and call for a systematic evaluation of the impact of state-dependent switches in afferent activity on neuronal intrinsic properties during neural coding and homeostasis. PMID:26464994

  7. Filtration Consistent Nonlinear Expectations and Evaluations of Contingent Claims

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shige Peng

    2004-01-01

    We will study the following problem. Let Xt, t ∈ [0, T], be an Rd–valued process de.ned on atime interval t ∈ [0, T]. Let Y be a random value depending on the trajectory of X. Assume that, at each .xedtime t ≤ T, the information available to an agent (an individual, a .rm, or even a market) is the trajectory ofX before t. Thus at time T , the random value of Y (ω) will become known to this agent. The question is: howwill this agent evaluate Y at the time t?We will introduce an evaluation operator εt[Y] to deffine the value of Y given by this agent at time t. This operator εt[Y ]. Assigns an (Xs)0≤s≤T-dependent andom variable Y to an (Xs)0≤s≤T-dependent random variableεt[Y ]. We will mainly treat the situation in which the process X is a solution of a SDE (see equation (3.1)) withthe drift coe.cient b and di.usion coe.cient σ containing an unknown parameter θ = θt. We then consider theso called super evaluation when the agent is a seller of the asset Y . We will prove that such super evaluation is a.ltration consistent nonlinear expectation. In some typical situations, we will prove that a .ltration consistentnonlinear Markovian situation.

  8. A Pareto-Based Adaptive Variable Neighborhood Search for Biobjective Hybrid Flow Shop Scheduling Problem with Sequence-Dependent Setup Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixin Tian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different from most researches focused on the single objective hybrid flowshop scheduling (HFS problem, this paper investigates a biobjective HFS problem with sequence dependent setup time. The two objectives are the minimization of total weighted tardiness and the total setup time. To efficiently solve this problem, a Pareto-based adaptive biobjective variable neighborhood search (PABOVNS is developed. In the proposed PABOVNS, a solution is denoted as a sequence of all jobs and a decoding procedure is presented to obtain the corresponding complete schedule. In addition, the proposed PABOVNS has three major features that can guarantee a good balance of exploration and exploitation. First, an adaptive selection strategy of neighborhoods is proposed to automatically select the most promising neighborhood instead of the sequential selection strategy of canonical VNS. Second, a two phase multiobjective local search based on neighborhood search and path relinking is designed for each selected neighborhood. Third, an external archive with diversity maintenance is adopted to store the nondominated solutions and at the same time provide initial solutions for the local search. Computational results based on randomly generated instances show that the PABOVNS is efficient and even superior to some other powerful multiobjective algorithms in the literature.

  9. Intra-individual Neurocognitive Variability Confers Risk of Dependence in Activities of Daily Living among HIV-Seropositive Individuals without HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Erin E.; Woods, Steven Paul; Grant, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Although HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are the strong predictors of everyday functioning difficulties, approximately half of all functionally impaired individuals are labeled “neurocognitively normal” according to the standard neuropsychological measures, suggesting that novel predictors of functional problems in this prevalent subgroup are needed. The present study hypothesized that increased neurocognitive intra-individual variability as indexed by dispersion would be associated with poor daily functioning among 82 persons with HIV infection who did not meet research criteria for HAND. An intra-individual standard deviation was calculated across the demographically adjusted T-scores of 13 standard neuropsychological tests to represent dispersion, and functional outcomes included self-reported declines in basic and instrumental activities of daily functioning (basic activity of daily living [BADL] and instrumental activity of daily living [IADL], respectively) and medication management. Dispersion was a significant predictor of medication adherence and dependence in both BADL and IADL, even when other known predictors of functional status (i.e., age, affective distress, and indices of disease severity) were included in the models. As a significant and unique predictor of a performance on the range of daily functioning activities, neurocognitive dispersion may be indicative of deficient cognitive control expressed as inefficient regulation of neurocognitive resources in the context of competing functional demands. As such, dispersion may have clinical utility in detecting risk for functional problems among HIV-infected individuals without HAND. PMID:22337933

  10. Can a soda-lime glass be used to demonstrate how patterns of strength dependence are influenced by pre-cementation and resin-cementation variables?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To determine how the variability in biaxial flexure strength of a soda-lime glass analogue for a PLV and DBC material was influenced by precementation operative variables and following resin-cement coating.

  11. Self-consistent structure of metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1977-01-01

    A calculation is presented of the total energy of metallic hydrogen for a family of face-centered tetragonal lattices carried out within the self-consistent phonon approximation. The energy of proton motion is large and proper inclusion of proton dynamics alters the structural dependence of the total energy, causing isotropic lattices to become favored. For the dynamic lattice the structural dependence of terms of third and higher order in the electron-proton interaction is greatly reduced from static lattice equivalents.

  12. Optical Monitoring of Quasars; 1, Variability

    CERN Document Server

    García, A; Jablonski, F J; Terlevich, R J

    1999-01-01

    We present an analysis of quasar variability from data collected during a photometric monitoring of 50 objects carried out at CNPq/Laboratorio Nacional de Astrofisica, Brazil, between March 1993 and July 1996. A distinctive feature of this survey is its photometric accuracy, ~ 0.02 V mag, achieved through differential photometry with CCD detectors, what allows the detection of faint levels of variability. We find that the relative variability, delta = sigma / L, observed in the V band is anti-correlated with both luminosity and redshift, although we have no means of discovering the dominant relation, given the strong coupling between luminosity and redshift for the objects in our sample.We introduce a model for the dependence of quasar variability on frequency that is consistent with multi-wavelength observations of the nuclear variability of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. We show that correcting the observed variability for this effect slightly increases the significance of the trends of variability with lumin...

  13. Student Effort, Consistency and Online Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde Patron

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how student effort, consistency, motivation, and marginal learning, influence student grades in an online course. We use data from eleven Microeconomics courses taught online for a total of 212 students. Our findings show that consistency, or less time variation, is a statistically significant explanatory variable, whereas effort, or total minutes spent online, is not. Other independent variables include GPA and the difference between a pre-test and a post-test. The GPA is used as a measure of motivation, and the difference between a post-test and pre-test as marginal learning. As expected, the level of motivation is found statistically significant at a 99% confidence level, and marginal learning is also significant at a 95% level.

  14. Tensile properties of the hip joint ligaments are largely variable and age-dependent - An in-vitro analysis in an age range of 14-93 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Prietzel, Torsten; Hädrich, Carsten; Möbius, Robert; Sichting, Freddy; Hammer, Niels

    2016-10-03

    Hip joint stability is maintained by the surrounding ligaments, muscles, and the atmospheric pressure exerted via these structures. It is unclear whether the ligaments are capable of preventing dislocation solely due to their tensile properties, and to what extent they undergo age-related changes. This study aimed to obtain stress-strain data of the hip ligaments over a large age range. Stress-strain data of the iliofemoral (IL), ischiofemoral (IS) and pubofemoral ligament (PF) were obtained from cadavers ranging between 14 and 93 years using a highly standardized setting. Maximum strains were compared to the distances required for dislocation. Elastic modulus was 24.4 (IL), 22.4 (IS) and 24.9N/mm(2) (PF) respectively. Maximum strain was 84.5%, 86.1%, 72.4% and ultimate stress 10.0, 7.7 and 6.5N/mm(2) for the IL, IS and PF respectively. None of these values varied significantly between ligaments or sides. The IS' elastic modulus was higher and maximum strain lower in males. Lower elastic moduli of the PF and higher maximum strains for the IS and PF were revealed in the ≥55 compared to the <55 population. Maximum strain exceeded the dislocation distance of the IS without external hip joint rotation in females, and of the IS and cranial IL under external rotation in both genders. Tensile and failure load properties of the hip joint ligaments are largely variable. The IS and PF change age-dependently. Though the hip ligaments contribute to hip stability, the IS and cranial IL may not prevent dislocation due to their elasticity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Consistency of trace norm minimization

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Regularization by the sum of singular values, also referred to as the trace norm, is a popular technique for estimating low rank rectangular matrices. In this paper, we extend some of the consistency results of the Lasso to provide necessary and sufficient conditions for rank consistency of trace norm minimization with the square loss. We also provide an adaptive version that is rank consistent even when the necessary condition for the non adaptive version is not fulfilled.

  16. High SNR Consistent Compressive Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Kallummil, Sreejith; Kalyani, Sheetal

    2017-01-01

    High signal to noise ratio (SNR) consistency of model selection criteria in linear regression models has attracted a lot of attention recently. However, most of the existing literature on high SNR consistency deals with model order selection. Further, the limited literature available on the high SNR consistency of subset selection procedures (SSPs) is applicable to linear regression with full rank measurement matrices only. Hence, the performance of SSPs used in underdetermined linear models ...

  17. Consistency argued students of fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viyanti; Cari; Suparmi; Winarti; Slamet Budiarti, Indah; Handika, Jeffry; Widyastuti, Fatma

    2017-01-01

    Problem solving for physics concepts through consistency arguments can improve thinking skills of students and it is an important thing in science. The study aims to assess the consistency of the material Fluid student argmentation. The population of this study are College students PGRI Madiun, UIN Sunan Kalijaga Yogyakarta and Lampung University. Samples using cluster random sampling, 145 samples obtained by the number of students. The study used a descriptive survey method. Data obtained through multiple-choice test and interview reasoned. Problem fluid modified from [9] and [1]. The results of the study gained an average consistency argmentation for the right consistency, consistency is wrong, and inconsistent respectively 4.85%; 29.93%; and 65.23%. Data from the study have an impact on the lack of understanding of the fluid material which is ideally in full consistency argued affect the expansion of understanding of the concept. The results of the study as a reference in making improvements in future studies is to obtain a positive change in the consistency of argumentations.

  18. Coordinating user interfaces for consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Jakob

    2001-01-01

    In the years since Jakob Nielsen's classic collection on interface consistency first appeared, much has changed, and much has stayed the same. On the one hand, there's been exponential growth in the opportunities for following or disregarding the principles of interface consistency-more computers, more applications, more users, and of course the vast expanse of the Web. On the other, there are the principles themselves, as persistent and as valuable as ever. In these contributed chapters, you'll find details on many methods for seeking and enforcing consistency, along with bottom-line analys

  19. Process Fairness and Dynamic Consistency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.T. Trautmann (Stefan); P.P. Wakker (Peter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: When process fairness deviates from outcome fairness, dynamic inconsistencies can arise as in nonexpected utility. Resolute choice (Machina) can restore dynamic consistency under nonexpected utility without using Strotz's precommitment. It can similarly justify dynamically

  20. Gravitation, Causality, and Quantum Consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Hertzberg, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    We examine the role of consistency with causality and quantum mechanics in determining the properties of gravitation. We begin by constructing two different classes of interacting theories of massless spin 2 particles -- gravitons. One involves coupling the graviton with the lowest number of derivatives to matter, the other involves coupling the graviton with higher derivatives to matter, making use of the linearized Riemann tensor. The first class requires an infinite tower of terms for consistency, which is known to lead uniquely to general relativity. The second class only requires a finite number of terms for consistency, which appears as a new class of theories of massless spin 2. We recap the causal consistency of general relativity and show how this fails in the second class for the special case of coupling to photons, exploiting related calculations in the literature. In an upcoming publication [1] this result is generalized to a much broader set of theories. Then, as a causal modification of general ...

  1. Tests and applications of self-consistent cranking in the interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Kuyucak, S; Kuyucak, Serdar; Sugita, Michiaki

    1999-01-01

    The self-consistent cranking method is tested by comparing the cranking calculations in the interacting boson model with the exact results obtained from the SU(3) and O(6) dynamical symmetries and from numerical diagonalization. The method is used to study the spin dependence of shape variables in the $sd$ and $sdg$ boson models. When realistic sets of parameters are used, both models lead to similar results: axial shape is retained with increasing cranking frequency while fluctuations in the shape variable $\\gamma$ are slightly reduced.

  2. Time-consistent and market-consistent evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelsser, A.; Stadje, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    We consider evaluation methods for payoffs with an inherent financial risk as encountered for instance for portfolios held by pension funds and insurance companies. Pricing such payoffs in a way consistent to market prices typically involves combining actuarial techniques with methods from mathemati

  3. VARIABILITY IN LEVELS OF LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS CHOLESTEROL IN PATIENTS WITH FAMILIAL HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA DEPENDING ON AGE AND SEX AND ITS IMPORTANCE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF THIS DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. А. Korneva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the ranges of low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol depending on the age and gender of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FHC by an example of a sample of patients living in the Republic of Karelia.Material and methods. Parameters of lipid spectrum of 219 patients (aged 52.5±1.7 years; males 38.3% with heterozygous FHC were studied before the start of statin therapy. Definite FHC was diagnosed in 102 patients. Lipid profile was estimated by enzymatic calorimetric method. The diagnosis of FHC was established according to the criteria of The Dutch Lipid Clinic Network.  Genetic analysis was performed in 102 patients (46.6%; pathogenic mutation in the LDL receptor was identified in 21 patients. The control group consisted of 539 people with the excluded diagnosis of FHC (aged 46.8±0.8 years; males 53.8%.Results. We determined the level of LDL cholesterol (LDLC associated with increased frequency of mutations of the LDL receptor in patients with definite FHC; mutation frequency was 3 times higher when LDLC level was more than 6.5 mmol/L. We revealed the following characteristic intervals of the LDLC levels in patients with a definite FHC: up to 20 years old – 4.8-6.2 mmol/l; in patients of 20-29 years old – 5.9-8.2 mmol/l; in the age range of 30-39 years the upper value of the LDLC levels reached 9.6 mmol/l; in individuals of 40-49 years old a stabilization, "plateau", was observed – LDLC level did not differ significantly compared to the previous decade, and was 5.4-9.0 mmol/l. In the age range  of 50-59 years the upper LDLC level was up to 11.4 mmol/l. Similar indicators were identified in patients aged 60-69 years. Patients older than 70 years with a definite FHC an upper level of LDLC was higher and reached 12.5 mmol/l. Tendency to increase in the characteristic values of LDLC with age was observed both in men and in women. Specific age-related trends  for men (an increase from a plateau by the age of 50

  4. Market-consistent actuarial valuation

    CERN Document Server

    Wüthrich, Mario V

    2016-01-01

    This is the third edition of this well-received textbook, presenting powerful methods for measuring insurance liabilities and assets in a consistent way, with detailed mathematical frameworks that lead to market-consistent values for liabilities. Topics covered are stochastic discounting with deflators, valuation portfolio in life and non-life insurance, probability distortions, asset and liability management, financial risks, insurance technical risks, and solvency. Including updates on recent developments and regulatory changes under Solvency II, this new edition of Market-Consistent Actuarial Valuation also elaborates on different risk measures, providing a revised definition of solvency based on industry practice, and presents an adapted valuation framework which takes a dynamic view of non-life insurance reserving risk.

  5. Consistent Histories in Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, David A; 10.1007/s10701-010-9422-6

    2010-01-01

    We illustrate the crucial role played by decoherence (consistency of quantum histories) in extracting consistent quantum probabilities for alternative histories in quantum cosmology. Specifically, within a Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model sourced with a free massless scalar field, we calculate the probability that the univese is singular in the sense that it assumes zero volume. Classical solutions of this model are a disjoint set of expanding and contracting singular branches. A naive assessment of the behavior of quantum states which are superpositions of expanding and contracting universes may suggest that a "quantum bounce" is possible i.e. that the wave function of the universe may remain peaked on a non-singular classical solution throughout its history. However, a more careful consistent histories analysis shows that for arbitrary states in the physical Hilbert space the probability of this Wheeler-DeWitt quantum universe encountering the big bang/crun...

  6. Consistent ranking of volatility models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2006-01-01

    result in an inferior model being chosen as "best" with a probability that converges to one as the sample size increases. We document the practical relevance of this problem in an empirical application and by simulation experiments. Our results provide an additional argument for using the realized...... variance in out-of-sample evaluations rather than the squared return. We derive the theoretical results in a general framework that is not specific to the comparison of volatility models. Similar problems can arise in comparisons of forecasting models whenever the predicted variable is a latent variable.......We show that the empirical ranking of volatility models can be inconsistent for the true ranking if the evaluation is based on a proxy for the population measure of volatility. For example, the substitution of a squared return for the conditional variance in the evaluation of ARCH-type models can...

  7. Consistency of EEG source localization and connectivity estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoory, Keyvan; Nikulin, Vadim V; Botrel, Loïc; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus; Fato, Marco M; Haufe, Stefan

    2017-05-15

    As the EEG inverse problem does not have a unique solution, the sources reconstructed from EEG and their connectivity properties depend on forward and inverse modeling parameters such as the choice of an anatomical template and electrical model, prior assumptions on the sources, and further implementational details. In order to use source connectivity analysis as a reliable research tool, there is a need for stability across a wider range of standard estimation routines. Using resting state EEG recordings of N=65 participants acquired within two studies, we present the first comprehensive assessment of the consistency of EEG source localization and functional/effective connectivity metrics across two anatomical templates (ICBM152 and Colin27), three electrical models (BEM, FEM and spherical harmonics expansions), three inverse methods (WMNE, eLORETA and LCMV), and three software implementations (Brainstorm, Fieldtrip and our own toolbox). Source localizations were found to be more stable across reconstruction pipelines than subsequent estimations of functional connectivity, while effective connectivity estimates where the least consistent. All results were relatively unaffected by the choice of the electrical head model, while the choice of the inverse method and source imaging package induced a considerable variability. In particular, a relatively strong difference was found between LCMV beamformer solutions on one hand and eLORETA/WMNE distributed inverse solutions on the other hand. We also observed a gradual decrease of consistency when results are compared between studies, within individual participants, and between individual participants. In order to provide reliable findings in the face of the observed variability, additional simulations involving interacting brain sources are required. Meanwhile, we encourage verification of the obtained results using more than one source imaging procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Importance of being consistent

    CERN Document Server

    Wasserman, Adam; Jiang, Kaili; Kim, Min-Cheol; Sim, Eunji; Burke, Kieron

    2016-01-01

    We review the role of self-consistency in density functional theory. We apply a recent analysis to both Kohn-Sham and orbital-free DFT, as well as to Partition-DFT, which generalizes all aspects of standard DFT. In each case, the analysis distinguishes between errors in approximate functionals versus errors in the self-consistent density. This yields insights into the origins of many errors in DFT calculations, especially those often attributed to self-interaction or delocalization error. In many classes of problems, errors can be substantially reduced by using `better' densities. We review the history of these approaches, many of their applications, and give simple pedagogical examples.

  9. Consistent supersymmetric decoupling in cosmology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa Sánchez, Kepa

    2012-01-01

    The present work discusses several problems related to the stability of ground states with broken supersymmetry in supergravity, and to the existence and stability of cosmic strings in various supersymmetric models. In particular we study the necessary conditions to truncate consistently a sector o

  10. Dynamical Opacity-Sampling Models of Mira Variables. II: Time-Dependent Atmospheric Structure and Observable Properties of 4 M-Type Model Series

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, Michael J; Wood, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    We present 4 model series of the CODEX dynamical opacity-sampling models of Mira variables with solar abundances, designed to have parameters similar to $o$ Cet, R Leo and R Cas. We demonstrate that the CODEX models provide a clear physical basis for the molecular shell scenario used to explain interferometric observations of Mira variables. We show that these models generally provide a good match to photometry and interferometry at wavelengths between the near-infrared and the radio, and make the model outputs publicly available. These model also demonstrate that, in order to match visible and infrared observations, the Fe-poor silicate grains that form within 3 continuum radii must have small grain radii and therefore can not drive the winds from O-rich Mira variables.

  11. Foundations of consistent couple stress theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjesfandiari, Ali R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the recently developed skew-symmetric couple stress theory and demonstrate its inner consistency, natural simplicity and fundamental connection to classical mechanics. This hopefully will help the scientific community to overcome any ambiguity and skepticism about this theory, especially the validity of the skew-symmetric character of the couple-stress tensor. We demonstrate that in a consistent continuum mechanics, the response of infinitesimal elements of matter at each point decomposes naturally into a rigid body portion, plus the relative translation and rotation of these elements at adjacent points of the continuum. This relative translation and rotation captures the deformation in terms of stretches and curvatures, respectively. As a result, the continuous displacement field and its corresponding rotation field are the primary variables, which remarkably is in complete alignment with rigid body mechanics, thus providing a unifying basis. For further clarification, we also exami...

  12. Consistence of Network Filtering Rules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHE Kun; WU Yuancheng; HUANG Juncai; ZHOU Mingtian

    2004-01-01

    The inconsistence of firewall/VPN(Virtual Private Network) rule makes a huge maintainable cost.With development of Multinational Company,SOHO office,E-government the number of firewalls/VPN will increase rapidly.Rule table in stand-alone or network will be increased in geometric series accordingly.Checking the consistence of rule table manually is inadequate.A formal approach can define semantic consistence,make a theoretic foundation of intelligent management about rule tables.In this paper,a kind of formalization of host rules and network ones for auto rule-validation based on SET theory were proporsed and a rule validation scheme was defined.The analysis results show the superior performance of the methods and demonstrate its potential for the intelligent management based on rule tables.

  13. Self-consistent triaxial models

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Jason L

    2015-01-01

    We present self-consistent triaxial stellar systems that have analytic distribution functions (DFs) expressed in terms of the actions. These provide triaxial density profiles with cores or cusps at the centre. They are the first self-consistent triaxial models with analytic DFs suitable for modelling giant ellipticals and dark haloes. Specifically, we study triaxial models that reproduce the Hernquist profile from Williams & Evans (2015), as well as flattened isochrones of the form proposed by Binney (2014). We explore the kinematics and orbital structure of these models in some detail. The models typically become more radially anisotropic on moving outwards, have velocity ellipsoids aligned in Cartesian coordinates in the centre and aligned in spherical polar coordinates in the outer parts. In projection, the ellipticity of the isophotes and the position angle of the major axis of our models generally changes with radius. So, a natural application is to elliptical galaxies that exhibit isophote twisting....

  14. On Modal Refinement and Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyman, Ulrik; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    Almost 20 years after the original conception, we revisit several fundamental question about modal transition systems. First, we demonstrate the incompleteness of the standard modal refinement using a counterexample due to Hüttel. Deciding any refinement, complete with respect to the standard...... notions of implementation, is shown to be computationally hard (co-NP hard). Second, we consider four forms of consistency (existence of implementations) for modal specifications. We characterize each operationally, giving algorithms for deciding, and for synthesizing implementations, together...

  15. Tri-Sasakian consistent reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Cassani, Davide

    2011-01-01

    We establish a universal consistent Kaluza-Klein truncation of M-theory based on seven-dimensional tri-Sasakian structure. The four-dimensional truncated theory is an N=4 gauged supergravity with three vector multiplets and a non-abelian gauge group, containing the compact factor SO(3). Consistency follows from the fact that our truncation takes exactly the same form as a left-invariant reduction on a specific coset manifold, and we show that the same holds for the various universal consistent truncations recently put forward in the literature. We describe how the global symmetry group SL(2,R) x SO(6,3) is embedded in the symmetry group E7(7) of maximally supersymmetric reductions, and make the connection with the approach of Exceptional Generalized Geometry. Vacuum AdS4 solutions spontaneously break the amount of supersymmetry from N=4 to N=3,1 or 0, and the spectrum contains massive modes. We find a subtruncation to minimal N=3 gauged supergravity as well as an N=1 subtruncation to the SO(3)-invariant secto...

  16. Consistent implementation of decisions in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A R Marshall

    Full Text Available Despite the complexity and variability of decision processes, motor responses are generally stereotypical and independent of decision difficulty. How is this consistency achieved? Through an engineering analogy we consider how and why a system should be designed to realise not only flexible decision-making, but also consistent decision implementation. We specifically consider neurobiologically-plausible accumulator models of decision-making, in which decisions are made when a decision threshold is reached. To trade-off between the speed and accuracy of the decision in these models, one can either adjust the thresholds themselves or, equivalently, fix the thresholds and adjust baseline activation. Here we review how this equivalence can be implemented in such models. We then argue that manipulating baseline activation is preferable as it realises consistent decision implementation by ensuring consistency of motor inputs, summarise empirical evidence in support of this hypothesis, and suggest that it could be a general principle of decision making and implementation. Our goal is therefore to review how neurobiologically-plausible models of decision-making can manipulate speed-accuracy trade-offs using different mechanisms, to consider which of these mechanisms has more desirable decision-implementation properties, and then review the relevant neuroscientific data on which mechanism brains actually use.

  17. The "Life Potential": a new complex algorithm to assess "Heart Rate Variability" from Holter records for cognitive and diagnostic aims. Preliminary experimental results showing its dependence on age, gender and health conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Barra, Orazio A

    2013-01-01

    Although HRV (Heart Rate Variability) analyses have been carried out for several decades, several limiting factors still make these analyses useless from a clinical point of view. The present paper aims at overcoming some of these limits by introducing the "Life Potential" (BMP), a new mathematical algorithm which seems to exhibit surprising cognitive and predictive capabilities. BMP is defined as a linear combination of five HRV Non-Linear Variables, in turn derived from the thermodynamic formalism of chaotic dynamic systems. The paper presents experimental measurements of BMP (Average Values and Standard Deviations) derived from 1048 Holter tests, matched in age and gender, including a control group of 356 healthy subjects. The main results are: (a) BMP always decreases when the age increases, and its dependence on age and gender is well established; (b) the shape of the age dependence within "healthy people" is different from that found in the general group: this behavior provides evidence of possible illn...

  18. On the consistency of MPS

    CERN Document Server

    Souto-Iglesias, Antonio; González, Leo M; Cercos-Pita, Jose L

    2013-01-01

    The consistency of Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method in reproducing the gradient, divergence and Laplacian differential operators is discussed in the present paper. Its relation to the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method is rigorously established. The application of the MPS method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations using a fractional step approach is treated, unveiling inconsistency problems when solving the Poisson equation for the pressure. A new corrected MPS method incorporating boundary terms is proposed. Applications to one dimensional boundary value Dirichlet and mixed Neumann-Dirichlet problems and to two-dimensional free-surface flows are presented.

  19. Measuring process and knowledge consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Jensen, Klaes Ladeby; Haug, Anders

    2007-01-01

    with a 5 point Liker scale and a corresponding scoring system. Process consistency is measured by using a first-person drawing tool with the respondent in the centre. Respondents sketch the sequence of steps and people they contact when configuring a product. The methodology is tested in one company...... for granted; rather the contrary, and attempting to implement a configuration system may easily ignite a political battle. This is because stakes are high in the sense that the rules and processes chosen may only reflect one part of the practice, ignoring a majority of the employees. To avoid this situation...

  20. VERTICAL ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURE IN A VARIABLE BROWN DWARF: PRESSURE-DEPENDENT PHASE SHIFTS IN SIMULTANEOUS HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE-SPITZER LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buenzli, Esther; Apai, Daniel; Flateau, Davin [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Morley, Caroline V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (United States); Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Reid, I. Neill, E-mail: ebuenzli@email.arizona.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Heterogeneous clouds or temperature perturbations in rotating brown dwarfs produce variability in the observed flux. We report time-resolved simultaneous observations of the variable T6.5 brown dwarf 2MASS J22282889-431026 over the wavelength ranges 1.1-1.7 {mu}m and broadband 4.5 {mu}m. Spectroscopic observations were taken with Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope and photometry with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The object shows sinusoidal infrared variability with a period of 1.4 hr at most wavelengths with peak-to-peak amplitudes between 1.45% and 5.3% of the mean flux. While the light curve shapes are similar at all wavelengths, their phases differ from wavelength to wavelength with a maximum difference of more than half of a rotational period. We compare the spectra with atmospheric models of different cloud prescriptions, from which we determine the pressure levels probed at different wavelengths. We find that the phase lag increases with decreasing pressure level, or higher altitude. We discuss a number of plausible scenarios that could cause this trend of light curve phase with probed pressure level. These observations are the first to probe heterogeneity in an ultracool atmosphere in both horizontal and vertical directions, and thus are an ideal test case for realistic three-dimensional simulations of the atmospheric structure with clouds in brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets.

  1. A VL-linker-VH Orientation Dependent Single Chain Variable Antibody Fragment Against Rabies Virus G Protein with Enhanced Neutralizing Potency in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yue; Li, Zhuang; Xi, Hualong; Gu, Tiejun; Yuan, Ruosen; Chen, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2016-01-01

    Lethal rabies can be prevented effectively by post-exposure prophylactic (PEP) with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). Single-chain variable fragment (scFv), which is composed of a variable heavy chain (VH) and variable light chain (VL) connected by a peptide linker, may be developed as alternative to RIG for neutralizing rabies virus (RV). However, our previously constructed scFv (FV57S) with the (NH2) VH-linker-VL (COOH) orientation showed a lower neutralizing potency than its parent RIG. This orientation may inhibit FV57S from refolding into an intact and correct conformation. Therefore, the RFV57S protein with a VL-linker-VH orientation was constructed based on FV57S. A HIS tag was incorporated to aid in purification and detection of RFV57S and FV57S. However, abilities of RFV57S and FV57S to bind with the anti-HIS tag mAb were different. Therefore, a novel direct ELISA was established by utilizing a biotin-labeled truncated glycoprotein of RV. Although with similar stability and in vitro neutralizing potency as FV57S, RFV57S showed enhanced binding ability, affinity and in vivo protective efficacy against lethal dose of RV. Our studies support the feasibility of developing a scFv with reversed orientation and provide a novel method for evaluating the binding ability, stability and affinity of engineered antibodies recognizing linear epitope.

  2. Evaluating Temporal Consistency in Marine Biodiversity Hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacenza, Susan E; Thurman, Lindsey L; Barner, Allison K; Benkwitt, Cassandra E; Boersma, Kate S; Cerny-Chipman, Elizabeth B; Ingeman, Kurt E; Kindinger, Tye L; Lindsley, Amy J; Nelson, Jake; Reimer, Jessica N; Rowe, Jennifer C; Shen, Chenchen; Thompson, Kevin A; Heppell, Selina S

    2015-01-01

    With the ongoing crisis of biodiversity loss and limited resources for conservation, the concept of biodiversity hotspots has been useful in determining conservation priority areas. However, there has been limited research into how temporal variability in biodiversity may influence conservation area prioritization. To address this information gap, we present an approach to evaluate the temporal consistency of biodiversity hotspots in large marine ecosystems. Using a large scale, public monitoring dataset collected over an eight year period off the US Pacific Coast, we developed a methodological approach for avoiding biases associated with hotspot delineation. We aggregated benthic fish species data from research trawls and calculated mean hotspot thresholds for fish species richness and Shannon's diversity indices over the eight year dataset. We used a spatial frequency distribution method to assign hotspot designations to the grid cells annually. We found no areas containing consistently high biodiversity through the entire study period based on the mean thresholds, and no grid cell was designated as a hotspot for greater than 50% of the time-series. To test if our approach was sensitive to sampling effort and the geographic extent of the survey, we followed a similar routine for the northern region of the survey area. Our finding of low consistency in benthic fish biodiversity hotspots over time was upheld, regardless of biodiversity metric used, whether thresholds were calculated per year or across all years, or the spatial extent for which we calculated thresholds and identified hotspots. Our results suggest that static measures of benthic fish biodiversity off the US West Coast are insufficient for identification of hotspots and that long-term data are required to appropriately identify patterns of high temporal variability in biodiversity for these highly mobile taxa. Given that ecological communities are responding to a changing climate and other

  3. Non-Numeric Intrajudge Consistency Feedback in an Angoff Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, George M.

    2015-01-01

    The credibility of standard-setting cut scores depends in part on two sources of consistency evidence: intrajudge and interjudge consistency. Although intrajudge consistency feedback has often been provided to Angoff judges in practice, more evidence is needed to determine whether it achieves its intended effect. In this randomized experiment with…

  4. Maintaining consistency in distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1991-01-01

    In systems designed as assemblies of independently developed components, concurrent access to data or data structures normally arises within individual programs, and is controlled using mutual exclusion constructs, such as semaphores and monitors. Where data is persistent and/or sets of operation are related to one another, transactions or linearizability may be more appropriate. Systems that incorporate cooperative styles of distributed execution often replicate or distribute data within groups of components. In these cases, group oriented consistency properties must be maintained, and tools based on the virtual synchrony execution model greatly simplify the task confronting an application developer. All three styles of distributed computing are likely to be seen in future systems - often, within the same application. This leads us to propose an integrated approach that permits applications that use virtual synchrony with concurrent objects that respect a linearizability constraint, and vice versa. Transactional subsystems are treated as a special case of linearizability.

  5. Applying the Transactional Stress and Coping Model to Sickle Cell Disorder and Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus: Identifying Psychosocial Variables Related to Adjustment and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Matthew C.; Lochman, John E.

    2005-01-01

    This review paper examines the literature on psychosocial factors associated with adjustment to sickle cell disease and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in children through the framework of the transactional stress and coping (TSC) model. The transactional stress and coping model views adaptation to a childhood chronic illness as mediated by…

  6. Nonferromagnetic linear variable differential transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, James F.; Walstrom, Peter L.

    1977-06-14

    A nonferromagnetic linear variable differential transformer for accurately measuring mechanical displacements in the presence of high magnetic fields is provided. The device utilizes a movable primary coil inside a fixed secondary coil that consists of two series-opposed windings. Operation is such that the secondary output voltage is maintained in phase (depending on polarity) with the primary voltage. The transducer is well-suited to long cable runs and is useful for measuring small displacements in the presence of high or alternating magnetic fields.

  7. Consistency Relations for the Conformal Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Creminelli, Paolo; Khoury, Justin; Simonović, Marko

    2012-01-01

    We systematically derive the consistency relations associated to the non-linearly realized symmetries of theories with spontaneously broken conformal symmetry but with a linearly-realized de Sitter subalgebra. These identities relate (N+1)-point correlation functions with a soft external Goldstone to N-point functions. These relations have direct implications for the recently proposed conformal mechanism for generating density perturbations in the early universe. We study the observational consequences, in particular a novel one-loop contribution to the four-point function, relevant for the stochastic scale-dependent bias and CMB mu-distortion.

  8. Consistency relations for the conformal mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creminelli, Paolo [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, 34151, Trieste (Italy); Joyce, Austin; Khoury, Justin [Center for Particle Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Simonović, Marko, E-mail: creminel@ictp.it, E-mail: joyceau@sas.upenn.edu, E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu, E-mail: marko.simonovic@sissa.it [SISSA, via Bonomea 265, 34136, Trieste (Italy)

    2013-04-01

    We systematically derive the consistency relations associated to the non-linearly realized symmetries of theories with spontaneously broken conformal symmetry but with a linearly-realized de Sitter subalgebra. These identities relate (N+1)-point correlation functions with a soft external Goldstone to N-point functions. These relations have direct implications for the recently proposed conformal mechanism for generating density perturbations in the early universe. We study the observational consequences, in particular a novel one-loop contribution to the four-point function, relevant for the stochastic scale-dependent bias and CMB μ-distortion.

  9. Logical consistency and sum-constrained linear models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Perlo -ten Kleij, Frederieke; Steerneman, A.G.M.; Koning, Ruud H.

    2006-01-01

    A topic that has received quite some attention in the seventies and eighties is logical consistency of sum-constrained linear models. Loosely defined, a sum-constrained model is logically consistent if the restrictions on the parameters and explanatory variables are such that the sum constraint is a

  10. The dependence on atmospheric resolution of ENSO and related East Asian-western North Pacific summer climate variability in a coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Zhao, Guijie; Huang, Gang; Wang, Pengfei; Yan, Bangliang

    2017-08-01

    The authors present results for El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and East Asian-western North Pacific climate variability simulated in a new version high-resolution coupled model (ICM.V2) developed at the Center for Monsoon System Research of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (CMSR, IAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. The analyses are based on the last 100-year output of a 1000-year simulation. Results are compared to an earlier version of the same coupled model (ICM.V1), reanalysis, and observations. The two versions of ICM have similar physics but different atmospheric resolution. The simulated climatological mean states show marked improvement over many regions, especially the tropics in ICM.V2 compared to those in ICM.V1. The common bias in the cold tongue has reduced, and the warm biases along the ocean boundaries have improved as well. With improved simulation of ENSO, including its period and strength, the ENSO-related western North Pacific summer climate variability becomes more realistic compared to the observations. The simulated East Asian summer monsoon anomalies in the El Niño decaying summer are substantially more realistic in ICM.V2, which might be related to a better simulation of the Indo-Pacific Ocean capacitor (IPOC) effect and Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO).

  11. Decentralized Consistent Updates in SDN

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, Thanh Dang

    2017-04-10

    We present ez-Segway, a decentralized mechanism to consistently and quickly update the network state while preventing forwarding anomalies (loops and blackholes) and avoiding link congestion. In our design, the centralized SDN controller only pre-computes information needed by the switches during the update execution. This information is distributed to the switches, which use partial knowledge and direct message passing to efficiently realize the update. This separation of concerns has the key benefit of improving update performance as the communication and computation bottlenecks at the controller are removed. Our evaluations via network emulations and large-scale simulations demonstrate the efficiency of ez-Segway, which compared to a centralized approach, improves network update times by up to 45% and 57% at the median and the 99th percentile, respectively. A deployment of a system prototype in a real OpenFlow switch and an implementation in P4 demonstrate the feasibility and low overhead of implementing simple network update functionality within switches.

  12. The Consistent Vehicle Routing Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groer, Christopher S [ORNL; Golden, Bruce [University of Maryland; Edward, Wasil [American University

    2009-01-01

    In the small package shipping industry (as in other industries), companies try to differentiate themselves by providing high levels of customer service. This can be accomplished in several ways, including online tracking of packages, ensuring on-time delivery, and offering residential pickups. Some companies want their drivers to develop relationships with customers on a route and have the same drivers visit the same customers at roughly the same time on each day that the customers need service. These service requirements, together with traditional constraints on vehicle capacity and route length, define a variant of the classical capacitated vehicle routing problem, which we call the consistent VRP (ConVRP). In this paper, we formulate the problem as a mixed-integer program and develop an algorithm to solve the ConVRP that is based on the record-to-record travel algorithm. We compare the performance of our algorithm to the optimal mixed-integer program solutions for a set of small problems and then apply our algorithm to five simulated data sets with 1,000 customers and a real-world data set with more than 3,700 customers. We provide a technique for generating ConVRP benchmark problems from vehicle routing problem instances given in the literature and provide our solutions to these instances. The solutions produced by our algorithm on all problems do a very good job of meeting customer service objectives with routes that have a low total travel time.

  13. Meteorological variables affect fertility rate after intrauterine artificial insemination in sheep in a seasonal-dependent manner: a 7-year study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, C.; Abecia, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    A total number of 48,088 artificial inseminations (AIs) have been controlled during seven consecutive years in 79 dairy sheep Spanish farms (41° N). Mean, maximum and minimum ambient temperatures ( Ts), temperature amplitude (TA), mean relative humidity (RH), mean solar radiation (SR) and total rainfall of each insemination day and 15 days later were recorded. Temperature-humidity index (THI) and effective temperature (ET) have been calculated. A binary logistic regression model to estimate the risk of not getting pregnant compared to getting pregnant, through the odds ratio (OR), was performed. Successful winter inseminations were carried out under higher SR ( P 1 (maximum T, ET and rainfall on AI day, and ET and rainfall on day 15), and two variables presented OR reverse their effects in the hot or cold seasons. A forecast of the meteorological conditions could be a useful tool when AI dates are being scheduled.

  14. Reliability and Consistency of Surface Contamination Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouppert, F.; Rivoallan, A.; Largeron, C.

    2002-02-26

    Surface contamination evaluation is a tough problem since it is difficult to isolate the radiations emitted by the surface, especially in a highly irradiating atmosphere. In that case the only possibility is to evaluate smearable (removeable) contamination since ex-situ countings are possible. Unfortunately, according to our experience at CEA, these values are not consistent and thus non relevant. In this study, we show, using in-situ Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry on contaminated metal samples, that fixed contamination seems to be chemisorbed and removeable contamination seems to be physisorbed. The distribution between fixed and removeable contamination appears to be variable. Chemical equilibria and reversible ion exchange mechanisms are involved and are closely linked to environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature. Measurements of smearable contamination only give an indication of the state of these equilibria between fixed and removeable contamination at the time and in the environmental conditions the measurements were made.

  15. Operant variability when reinforcement is delayed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Katie; Neuringer, Allen

    2006-05-01

    Operant responses are often weakened when delays are imposed between the responses and reinforcers. We examined what happens when delayed reinforcers were contingent upon operant response variability. Three groups of rats were rewardedfor varying their response sequences, with onegroup rewarded for high variability, another for middle, and the third for low levels. Consistent with many reports in the literature, responding slowed significantly in all groups as delays were lengthened. Consistent with other reports, large differences in variability were maintained across the three groups despite the delays. Reinforced variability appears to be relatively immune to disruption by such things as delays, response slowing, prefeeding, and noncontingent reinforcement. Furthermore, the small effects on variability depended on baseline levels: As delays lengthened, variability increased in the low group, was statistically unchanged in the middle group, and decreased in the high group, an interaction similar to that reported previously when reinforcement frequencies were lowered. Thus, variable operant responding is controlled by reinforcement contingencies, but sometimes differently than more commonly studied repetitive responding.

  16. Menstrual Cycle Dependent Variability for Serum Tumor Markers CEA, AFP, CA 19-9, CA 125 and CA 15-3 in Healthy Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Binnur Erbağci

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on menstrual cycle dependent variation of tumor markers in healthy women is a subject of diagnostic efficiency and has an impact in elucidating the normal function of these markers. In this study midfollicular and midluteal concentrations of serum CEA, AFP, CA 19-9, CA 125, CA 15-3 and their relations with LH, FSH, prolactin, estradiol and progesterone were evaluated during ovulatory cycles in a group of 23 healthy female individuals. Samples were collected on the 7th and 21st day of the same menstrual cycle. Tumor marker and hormone concentrations were determined with chemiluminescence or electrochemiluminescence EIA methods. A significant phase-dependent difference was observed for CA 15-3, midluteal concentrations (mean ± SEM; 26.33 ± 1.56 U/ml higher than the midfollicular (mean ± SEM; 19.27 ± 1.49 U/ml concentrations (p < 0.001. But an obvious difference for other tumor markers investigated did not exist. Significant correlations of follicular and luteal CA 125 levels with body mass index of the subjects were observed (r:0.52, p < 0.05 and r:0.57, p < 0.005, respectively.

  17. Superorbital variability of X-ray and radio emission of Cyg X-1 - II. Dependence of the orbital modulation on the superorbital phase

    CERN Document Server

    Poutanen, Juri; Ibragimov, Askar

    2008-01-01

    We discover a pronounced dependence of the strength of the soft X-ray orbital modulation in Cyg X-1 in the hard state on its superorbital phase. We find our results can be well modelled as orbital-phase dependent X-ray absorption in an accretion bulge, located at the accretion disc edge close to the companion but displaced from the line connecting the stars by about 25^o and in the case when the disc is precessing (which appears to cause the superorbital flux modulation). Our finding are supported by the distribution of the X-ray dips showing concentration towards zero superorbital phase, which corresponds to the bulge passing through the line of sight. We Fourier analyse our model, and find it explains the previous finding of asymmetric beat (between the orbital and superorbital modulations) frequencies in the observed power spectrum, provided the disc precession is prograde. On the other hand, we find no statistically significant changes of the orbital modulation with the superorbital phase in the 15-GHz ra...

  18. Fast Selection of Spectral Variables with B-Spline Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Fabrice; Wertz, Vincent; Meurens, Marc; Verleysen, Michel

    2007-01-01

    The large number of spectral variables in most data sets encountered in spectral chemometrics often renders the prediction of a dependent variable uneasy. The number of variables hopefully can be reduced, by using either projection techniques or selection methods; the latter allow for the interpretation of the selected variables. Since the optimal approach of testing all possible subsets of variables with the prediction model is intractable, an incremental selection approach using a nonparametric statistics is a good option, as it avoids the computationally intensive use of the model itself. It has two drawbacks however: the number of groups of variables to test is still huge, and colinearities can make the results unstable. To overcome these limitations, this paper presents a method to select groups of spectral variables. It consists in a forward-backward procedure applied to the coefficients of a B-Spline representation of the spectra. The criterion used in the forward-backward procedure is the mutual infor...

  19. Time-variable transit time distributions and transport: Theory and application to storage-dependent transport of chloride in a watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Ciaran J.

    2015-01-01

    Transport processes and pathways through many hydrodynamic systems vary over time, often driven by variations in total water storage. This paper develops a very general approach to modeling unsteady transport through an arbitrary control volume (such as a watershed) that accounts for temporal variability in the underlying transport dynamics. Controls on the selection of discharge from stored water are encapsulated in probability distributions ΩQ>(ST,t>) of age-ranked storage ST (the volume of water in storage ranked from youngest to oldest). This framework is applied to a long-term record of rainfall and streamflow chloride in a small, humid watershed at Plynlimon, UK. While a time-invariant gamma distribution for ΩQ produced a good fit to data, the fit was significantly improved when the distribution was allowed to vary with catchment storage. However, the variation was inverse to that of a "well-mixed" system where storage has a pure dilution effect. Discharge at high storage was predicted to contain a larger fraction of recent event water than at low storage. The effective volume of storage involved in transport was 3411 mm at mean catchment wetness, but declined by 71 mm per 1 mm of additional catchment storage, while the fraction of event water in discharge increased by 1.4%. This "inverse storage effect" is sufficient to reproduce the observed long-memory 1/f fractal spectral structure of stream chloride. Metrics quantifying the strength and direction of storage effects are proposed as useful signatures, and point toward a unified framework for observing and modeling coupled watershed flow and transport.

  20. Surface consistent finite frequency phase corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimman, W. P.

    2016-07-01

    Static time-delay corrections are frequency independent and ignore velocity variations away from the assumed vertical ray path through the subsurface. There is therefore a clear potential for improvement if the finite frequency nature of wave propagation can be properly accounted for. Such a method is presented here based on the Born approximation, the assumption of surface consistency and the misfit of instantaneous phase. The concept of instantaneous phase lends itself very well for sweep-like signals, hence these are the focus of this study. Analytical sensitivity kernels are derived that accurately predict frequency-dependent phase shifts due to P-wave anomalies in the near surface. They are quick to compute and robust near the source and receivers. An additional correction is presented that re-introduces the nonlinear relation between model perturbation and phase delay, which becomes relevant for stronger velocity anomalies. The phase shift as function of frequency is a slowly varying signal, its computation therefore does not require fine sampling even for broad-band sweeps. The kernels reveal interesting features of the sensitivity of seismic arrivals to the near surface: small anomalies can have a relative large impact resulting from the medium field term that is dominant near the source and receivers. Furthermore, even simple velocity anomalies can produce a distinct frequency-dependent phase behaviour. Unlike statics, the predicted phase corrections are smooth in space. Verification with spectral element simulations shows an excellent match for the predicted phase shifts over the entire seismic frequency band. Applying the phase shift to the reference sweep corrects for wavelet distortion, making the technique akin to surface consistent deconvolution, even though no division in the spectral domain is involved. As long as multiple scattering is mild, surface consistent finite frequency phase corrections outperform traditional statics for moderately large

  1. Bolasso: model consistent Lasso estimation through the bootstrap

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Francis

    2008-01-01

    We consider the least-square linear regression problem with regularization by the l1-norm, a problem usually referred to as the Lasso. In this paper, we present a detailed asymptotic analysis of model consistency of the Lasso. For various decays of the regularization parameter, we compute asymptotic equivalents of the probability of correct model selection (i.e., variable selection). For a specific rate decay, we show that the Lasso selects all the variables that should enter the model with probability tending to one exponentially fast, while it selects all other variables with strictly positive probability. We show that this property implies that if we run the Lasso for several bootstrapped replications of a given sample, then intersecting the supports of the Lasso bootstrap estimates leads to consistent model selection. This novel variable selection algorithm, referred to as the Bolasso, is compared favorably to other linear regression methods on synthetic data and datasets from the UCI machine learning rep...

  2. Model-Consistent Sparse Estimation through the Bootstrap

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Francis

    2009-01-01

    We consider the least-square linear regression problem with regularization by the $\\ell^1$-norm, a problem usually referred to as the Lasso. In this paper, we first present a detailed asymptotic analysis of model consistency of the Lasso in low-dimensional settings. For various decays of the regularization parameter, we compute asymptotic equivalents of the probability of correct model selection. For a specific rate decay, we show that the Lasso selects all the variables that should enter the model with probability tending to one exponentially fast, while it selects all other variables with strictly positive probability. We show that this property implies that if we run the Lasso for several bootstrapped replications of a given sample, then intersecting the supports of the Lasso bootstrap estimates leads to consistent model selection. This novel variable selection procedure, referred to as the Bolasso, is extended to high-dimensional settings by a provably consistent two-step procedure.

  3. StralSV: assessment of sequence variability within similar 3D structures and application to polio RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemla, A; Lang, D; Kostova, T; Andino, R; Zhou, C

    2010-11-29

    Most of the currently used methods for protein function prediction rely on sequence-based comparisons between a query protein and those for which a functional annotation is provided. A serious limitation of sequence similarity-based approaches for identifying residue conservation among proteins is the low confidence in assigning residue-residue correspondences among proteins when the level of sequence identity between the compared proteins is poor. Multiple sequence alignment methods are more satisfactory - still, they cannot provide reliable results at low levels of sequence identity. Our goal in the current work was to develop an algorithm that could overcome these difficulties and facilitate the identification of structurally (and possibly functionally) relevant residue-residue correspondences between compared protein structures. Here we present StralSV, a new algorithm for detecting closely related structure fragments and quantifying residue frequency from tight local structure alignments. We apply StralSV in a study of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of poliovirus and demonstrate that the algorithm can be used to determine regions of the protein that are relatively unique or that shared structural similarity with structures that are distantly related. By quantifying residue frequencies among many residue-residue pairs extracted from local alignments, one can infer potential structural or functional importance of specific residues that are determined to be highly conserved or that deviate from a consensus. We further demonstrate that considerable detailed structural and phylogenetic information can be derived from StralSV analyses. StralSV is a new structure-based algorithm for identifying and aligning structure fragments that have similarity to a reference protein. StralSV analysis can be used to quantify residue-residue correspondences and identify residues that may be of particular structural or functional importance, as well as unusual or unexpected

  4. Genetic homogeneity but IgG subclass-dependent clinical variability of alloimmune membranous nephropathy with anti-neutral endopeptidase antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivarelli, Marina; Emma, Francesco; Pellé, Thimothée; Gerken, Christopher; Pedicelli, Stefania; Diomedi-Camassei, Francesca; Klaus, Günter; Waldegger, Siegfried; Ronco, Pierre; Debiec, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Alloimmune antenatal membranous nephropathy (MN) during pregnancy results from antibodies produced by a neutral endopeptidase (NEP)-deficient mother. Here we report two recent cases that provide clues to the severity of renal disease. Mothers of the two children had circulating antibodies against NEP showing the characteristic species-dependent pattern by immunofluorescence on kidney slices. A German mother produced predominantly anti-NEP IgG4 accompanied by a low amount of IgG1. Her child recovered renal function within a few weeks. In sharp contrast, an Italian mother mainly produced complement-fixing anti-NEP IgG1, which also inhibits NEP enzymatic activity, whereas anti-NEP IgG4 has a weak inhibitory potency. Her child was dialyzed for several weeks. A kidney biopsy performed at 12 days of age showed MN, ischemic glomeruli, and arteriolar and tubular lesions. A second biopsy performed at 12 weeks of age showed aggravation with an increased number of collapsed capillary tufts. Both mothers were homozygous for the truncating deletion mutation 466delC and were thus NEP deficient. The 466delC mutation, identified in three previously described families, suggests a founder effect. Because of the potential severity of alloimmune antenatal MN, it is essential to identify families at risk by the detection of anti-NEP antibodies and NEP antigen in urine. On the basis of the five families identified to date, we propose an algorithm for the diagnosis of the disease and the prevention of complications.

  5. The nebular variables

    CERN Document Server

    Glasby, John S

    1974-01-01

    The Nebular Variables focuses on the nebular variables and their characteristics. Discussions are organized by type of nebular variable, namely, RW Aurigae stars, T Orionis stars, T Tauri stars, and peculiar nebular objects. Topics range from light variations of the stars to their spectroscopic and physical characteristics, spatial distribution, interaction with nebulosity, and evolutionary features. This volume is divided into four sections and consists of 25 chapters, the first of which provides general information on nebular variables, including their stellar associations and their classifi

  6. Assessing atmospheric bias correction for dynamical consistency using potential vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheta, Eytan; Evans, Jason P.; Sharma, Ashish

    2014-12-01

    Correcting biases in atmospheric variables prior to impact studies or dynamical downscaling can lead to new biases as dynamical consistency between the ‘corrected’ fields is not maintained. Use of these bias corrected fields for subsequent impact studies and dynamical downscaling provides input conditions that do not appropriately represent intervariable relationships in atmospheric fields. Here we investigate the consequences of the lack of dynamical consistency in bias correction using a measure of model consistency—the potential vorticity (PV). This paper presents an assessment of the biases present in PV using two alternative correction techniques—an approach where bias correction is performed individually on each atmospheric variable, thereby ignoring the physical relationships that exists between the multiple variables that are corrected, and a second approach where bias correction is performed directly on the PV field, thereby keeping the system dynamically coherent throughout the correction process. In this paper we show that bias correcting variables independently results in increased errors above the tropopause in the mean and standard deviation of the PV field, which are improved when using the alternative proposed. Furthermore, patterns of spatial variability are improved over nearly all vertical levels when applying the alternative approach. Results point to a need for a dynamically consistent atmospheric bias correction technique which results in fields that can be used as dynamically consistent lateral boundaries in follow-up downscaling applications.

  7. Sludge characterization: the role of physical consistency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinosa, Ludovico; Wichmann, Knut

    2003-07-01

    The physical consistency is an important parameter in sewage sludge characterization as it strongly affects almost all treatment, utilization and disposal operations. In addition, in many european Directives a reference to the physical consistency is reported as a characteristic to be evaluated for fulfilling the regulations requirements. Further, in many analytical methods for sludge different procedures are indicated depending on whether a sample is liquid or not, is solid or not. Three physical behaviours (liquid, paste-like and solid) can be observed with sludges, so the development of analytical procedures to define the boundary limit between liquid and paste-like behaviours (flowability) and that between solid and paste-like ones (solidity) is of growing interest. Several devices can be used for evaluating the flowability and solidity properties, but often they are costly and difficult to be operated in the field. Tests have been carried out to evaluate the possibility to adopt a simple extrusion procedure for flowability measurements, and a Vicat needle for solidity ones. (author)

  8. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: Depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Daniel J; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E; Lacombe, Pierre J

    2014-12-15

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  9. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Daniel J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Lacombe, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55 years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  10. Modeling Shared Variables in VHDL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan; Brage, Jens P.

    1994-01-01

    A set of concurrent processes communicating through shared variables is an often used model for hardware systems. This paper presents three modeling techniques for representing such shared variables in VHDL, depending on the acceptable constraints on accesses to the variables. Also a set of guide......A set of concurrent processes communicating through shared variables is an often used model for hardware systems. This paper presents three modeling techniques for representing such shared variables in VHDL, depending on the acceptable constraints on accesses to the variables. Also a set...

  11. Consistent quadrupole-octupole collective model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, A.; Mazurek, K.; Góźdź, A.

    2016-11-01

    Within this work we present a consistent approach to quadrupole-octupole collective vibrations coupled with the rotational motion. A realistic collective Hamiltonian with variable mass-parameter tensor and potential obtained through the macroscopic-microscopic Strutinsky-like method with particle-number-projected BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) approach in full vibrational and rotational, nine-dimensional collective space is diagonalized in the basis of projected harmonic oscillator eigensolutions. This orthogonal basis of zero-, one-, two-, and three-phonon oscillator-like functions in vibrational part, coupled with the corresponding Wigner function is, in addition, symmetrized with respect to the so-called symmetrization group, appropriate to the collective space of the model. In the present model it is D4 group acting in the body-fixed frame. This symmetrization procedure is applied in order to provide the uniqueness of the Hamiltonian eigensolutions with respect to the laboratory coordinate system. The symmetrization is obtained using the projection onto the irreducible representation technique. The model generates the quadrupole ground-state spectrum as well as the lowest negative-parity spectrum in 156Gd nucleus. The interband and intraband B (E 1 ) and B (E 2 ) reduced transition probabilities are also calculated within those bands and compared with the recent experimental results for this nucleus. Such a collective approach is helpful in searching for the fingerprints of the possible high-rank symmetries (e.g., octahedral and tetrahedral) in nuclear collective bands.

  12. Combining Speed and Accuracy in Cognitive Psychology: Is the Inverse Efficiency Score (IES a Better Dependent Variable than the Mean Reaction Time (RT and the Percentage Of Errors (PE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Bruyer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments in cognitive psychology usually return two dependent variables: the percentage of errors and the reaction time of the correct responses. Townsend and Ashby (1978, 1983 proposed the inverse efficiency score (IES as a way to combine both measures and, hence, to provide a better summary of the findings. In this article we examine the usefulness of IES by applying it to existing datasets. Although IES does give a better summary of the findings in some cases, mostly the variance of the measure is increased to such an extent that it becomes less interesting. Against our initial hopes, we have to conclude that it is not a good idea to limit the statistical analyses to IES without further checking the data.

  13. Strong near-epoch dependence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhengyan

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new class of dependent sequences of random variables, which is a subclass of near-epoch dependent sequences, but can also be approximated by mixing sequences. For this kind of sequences of random variables, we call them strong nearepoch dependent sequences, a p-order, p > 2, (maximum) moment inequality is established under weaker dependence sizes.

  14. Evaluating the hydrological consistency of evaporation products

    KAUST Repository

    López, Oliver

    2017-01-18

    . Interestingly, after imposing a simple lag in GRACE data to account for delayed surface runoff or baseflow components, an improved match in terms of degree correlation was observed in the Niger River basin. Significant improvements to the degree correlations (from  ∼  0 to about 0.6) were also found in the Colorado River basin for both the CSIRO-PML and GLEAM products, while MOD16 showed only half of that improvement. In other basins, the variability in the temporal pattern of degree correlations remained considerable and hindered any clear differentiation between the evaporation products. Even so, it was found that a constant lag of 2 months provided a better fit compared to other alternatives, including a zero lag. From a product assessment perspective, no significant or persistent advantage could be discerned across any of the three evaporation products in terms of a sustained hydrological consistency with precipitation and water storage anomaly data. As a result, our analysis has implications in terms of the confidence that can be placed in independent retrievals of the hydrological cycle, raises questions on inter-product quality, and highlights the need for additional techniques to evaluate large-scale products.

  15. Asymptotic behavior of ratio-dependent chemostat model with variable yield%具有变消耗率的比率确定型chemostat模型渐近行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙树林; 陈兰荪

    2007-01-01

    To make the theoretical analysis of the microbial continuous culture more close to the experimental results, a ratio-dependent chemostat model with variable yield is formulated. The model develops the classical Monod model and assumes that the yield is a linear function of the nutrient concentration and the microbial growth rate is a ratio-dependent type function. Qualitative analysis is implemented on this model. It is shown that the system is permanent if and only if it has a positive equilibrium. The sufficient conditions of existence of limit cycles and globally asymptotic stability of the positive equilibrium for the model are given.%为了使微生物培养的理论研究更接近于实验,建立了一个具有变消耗率的比率确定型chemostat模型.这个模型推广了经典的Monod模型,而且假定了消耗率是一个营养基的线性函数,微生物增长率是比率确定型函数.对该模型作了定性分析,证明了只要正平衡点存在系统就是持续生存的.同时也给出了系统极限环存在和正平衡点全局渐近稳定的充分条件.

  16. The stoichiometry and biophysical properties of the Kv4 potassium channel complex with K+ channel-interacting protein (KChIP) subunits are variable, depending on the relative expression level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2014-06-20

    Kv4 is a voltage-gated K(+) channel, which underlies somatodendritic subthreshold A-type current (ISA) and cardiac transient outward K(+) (Ito) current. Various ion channel properties of Kv4 are known to be modulated by its auxiliary subunits, such as K(+) channel-interacting protein (KChIP) or dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein. KChIP is a cytoplasmic protein and increases the current amplitude, decelerates the inactivation, and accelerates the recovery from inactivation of Kv4. Crystal structure analysis demonstrated that Kv4 and KChIP form an octameric complex with four Kv4 subunits and four KChIP subunits. However, it remains unknown whether the Kv4·KChIP complex can have a different stoichiometry other than 4:4. In this study, we expressed Kv4.2 and KChIP4 with various ratios in Xenopus oocytes and observed that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 gradually changed with the increase in co-expressed KChIP4. The tandem repeat constructs of Kv4.2 and KChIP4 revealed that the 4:4 (Kv4.2/KChIP4) channel shows faster recovery than the 4:2 channel, suggesting that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 change, depending on the number of bound KChIP4s. Subunit counting by single-molecule imaging revealed that the bound number of KChIP4 in each Kv4.2·KChIP4 complex was dependent on the expression level of KChIP4. Taken together, we conclude that the stoichiometry of Kv4·KChIP complex is variable, and the biophysical properties of Kv4 change depending on the number of bound KChIP subunits.

  17. The Stoichiometry and Biophysical Properties of the Kv4 Potassium Channel Complex with K+ Channel-interacting Protein (KChIP) Subunits Are Variable, Depending on the Relative Expression Level*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Kv4 is a voltage-gated K+ channel, which underlies somatodendritic subthreshold A-type current (ISA) and cardiac transient outward K+ (Ito) current. Various ion channel properties of Kv4 are known to be modulated by its auxiliary subunits, such as K+ channel-interacting protein (KChIP) or dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein. KChIP is a cytoplasmic protein and increases the current amplitude, decelerates the inactivation, and accelerates the recovery from inactivation of Kv4. Crystal structure analysis demonstrated that Kv4 and KChIP form an octameric complex with four Kv4 subunits and four KChIP subunits. However, it remains unknown whether the Kv4·KChIP complex can have a different stoichiometry other than 4:4. In this study, we expressed Kv4.2 and KChIP4 with various ratios in Xenopus oocytes and observed that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 gradually changed with the increase in co-expressed KChIP4. The tandem repeat constructs of Kv4.2 and KChIP4 revealed that the 4:4 (Kv4.2/KChIP4) channel shows faster recovery than the 4:2 channel, suggesting that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 change, depending on the number of bound KChIP4s. Subunit counting by single-molecule imaging revealed that the bound number of KChIP4 in each Kv4.2·KChIP4 complex was dependent on the expression level of KChIP4. Taken together, we conclude that the stoichiometry of Kv4·KChIP complex is variable, and the biophysical properties of Kv4 change depending on the number of bound KChIP subunits. PMID:24811166

  18. Ashtekar variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    2015-05-01

    In the spirit of Scholarpedia, this invited article is addressed to students and younger researchers. It provides the motivation and background material, a summary of the main physical ideas, mathematical structures and results, and an outline of applications of the connection variables for general relativity. These variables underlie both the canonical/Hamiltonian and the spinfoam/path integral approaches in loop quantum gravity.

  19. A correlation consistency based multivariate alarm thresholds optimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huihui; Liu, Feifei; Zhu, Qunxiong

    2016-11-01

    Different alarm thresholds could generate different alarm data, resulting in different correlations. A new multivariate alarm thresholds optimization methodology based on the correlation consistency between process data and alarm data is proposed in this paper. The interpretative structural modeling is adopted to select the key variables. For the key variables, the correlation coefficients of process data are calculated by the Pearson correlation analysis, while the correlation coefficients of alarm data are calculated by kernel density estimation. To ensure the correlation consistency, the objective function is established as the sum of the absolute differences between these two types of correlations. The optimal thresholds are obtained using particle swarm optimization algorithm. Case study of Tennessee Eastman process is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed method.

  20. Noncommuting Electric Fields and Algebraic Consistency in Noncommutative Gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, R

    2003-01-01

    We show that noncommuting electric fields occur naturally in noncommutative gauge theories. Using this noncommutativity, which is field dependent, and a hamiltonian generalisation of the Seiberg-Witten Map, the algebraic consistency in the lagrangian and hamiltonian formulations of these theories, is established. The stability of the Poisson algebra, under this generalised map, is studied.

  1. MDCC: Multi-Data Center Consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Kraska, Tim; Franklin, Michael J; Madden, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Replicating data across multiple data centers not only allows moving the data closer to the user and, thus, reduces latency for applications, but also increases the availability in the event of a data center failure. Therefore, it is not surprising that companies like Google, Yahoo, and Netflix already replicate user data across geographically different regions. However, replication across data centers is expensive. Inter-data center network delays are in the hundreds of milliseconds and vary significantly. Synchronous wide-area replication is therefore considered to be unfeasible with strong consistency and current solutions either settle for asynchronous replication which implies the risk of losing data in the event of failures, restrict consistency to small partitions, or give up consistency entirely. With MDCC (Multi-Data Center Consistency), we describe the first optimistic commit protocol, that does not require a master or partitioning, and is strongly consistent at a cost similar to eventually consiste...

  2. Non-autonomous discrete Boussinesq equation: Solutions and consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nong, Li-Juan; Zhang, Da-Juan

    2014-07-01

    A non-autonomous 3-component discrete Boussinesq equation is discussed. Its spacing parameters pn and qm are related to independent variables n and m, respectively. We derive bilinear form and solutions in Casoratian form. The plain wave factor is defined through the cubic roots of unity. The plain wave factor also leads to extended non-autonomous discrete Boussinesq equation which contains a parameter δ. Tree-dimendional consistency and Lax pair of the obtained equation are discussed.

  3. A dual-consistency cache coherence protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Ros, Alberto; Jimborean, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Weak memory consistency models can maximize system performance by enabling hardware and compiler optimizations, but increase programming complexity since they do not match programmers’ intuition. The design of an efficient system with an intuitive memory model is an open challenge. This paper proposes SPEL, a dual-consistency cache coherence protocol which simultaneously guarantees the strongest memory consistency model provided by the hardware and yields improvements in both performance and ...

  4. Personality and Situation Predictors of Consistent Eating Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uku Vainik

    Full Text Available A consistent eating style might be beneficial to avoid overeating in a food-rich environment. Eating consistency entails maintaining a similar dietary pattern across different eating situations. This construct is relatively under-studied, but the available evidence suggests that eating consistency supports successful weight maintenance and decreases risk for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Yet, personality and situation predictors of consistency have not been studied.A community-based sample of 164 women completed various personality tests, and 139 of them also reported their eating behaviour 6 times/day over 10 observational days. We focused on observations with meals (breakfast, lunch, or dinner. The participants indicated if their momentary eating patterns were consistent with their own baseline eating patterns in terms of healthiness or size of the meal. Further, participants described various characteristics of each eating situation.Eating consistency was positively predicted by trait self-control. Eating consistency was undermined by eating in the evening, eating with others, eating away from home, having consumed alcohol and having undertaken physical exercise. Interactions emerged between personality traits and situations, including punishment sensitivity, restraint, physical activity and alcohol consumption.Trait self-control and several eating situation variables were related to eating consistency. These findings provide a starting point for targeting interventions to improve consistency, suggesting that a focus on self-control skills, together with addressing contextual factors such as social situations and time of day, may be most promising. This work is a first step to provide people with the tools they need to maintain a consistently healthy lifestyle in a food-rich environment.

  5. Personality and Situation Predictors of Consistent Eating Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainik, Uku; Dubé, Laurette; Lu, Ji; Fellows, Lesley K

    2015-01-01

    A consistent eating style might be beneficial to avoid overeating in a food-rich environment. Eating consistency entails maintaining a similar dietary pattern across different eating situations. This construct is relatively under-studied, but the available evidence suggests that eating consistency supports successful weight maintenance and decreases risk for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Yet, personality and situation predictors of consistency have not been studied. A community-based sample of 164 women completed various personality tests, and 139 of them also reported their eating behaviour 6 times/day over 10 observational days. We focused on observations with meals (breakfast, lunch, or dinner). The participants indicated if their momentary eating patterns were consistent with their own baseline eating patterns in terms of healthiness or size of the meal. Further, participants described various characteristics of each eating situation. Eating consistency was positively predicted by trait self-control. Eating consistency was undermined by eating in the evening, eating with others, eating away from home, having consumed alcohol and having undertaken physical exercise. Interactions emerged between personality traits and situations, including punishment sensitivity, restraint, physical activity and alcohol consumption. Trait self-control and several eating situation variables were related to eating consistency. These findings provide a starting point for targeting interventions to improve consistency, suggesting that a focus on self-control skills, together with addressing contextual factors such as social situations and time of day, may be most promising. This work is a first step to provide people with the tools they need to maintain a consistently healthy lifestyle in a food-rich environment.

  6. Conditional acceptability of random variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasos C Christofides

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acceptable random variables introduced by Giuliano Antonini et al. (J. Math. Anal. Appl. 338:1188-1203, 2008 form a class of dependent random variables that contains negatively dependent random variables as a particular case. The concept of acceptability has been studied by authors under various versions of the definition, such as extended acceptability or wide acceptability. In this paper, we combine the concept of acceptability with the concept of conditioning, which has been the subject of current research activity. For conditionally acceptable random variables, we provide a number of probability inequalities that can be used to obtain asymptotic results.

  7. 依据迭代系数状态因子分段的变步长NLMS算法%Segmental Variable Step-Size Normalized LMS Algorithm Dependent on the State Parameter of Iteration Coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹纯烨; 张剑云; 黄中瑞

    2015-01-01

    针对固定步长的归一化LMS算法(NLMS)存在不能同时兼顾收敛速度与稳态误差的问题,本文提出一种依据迭代系数状态因子进行分段的变步长NLMS算法。该变步长NLMS算法采用迭代系数状态因子作为表征迭代系数与实际系数的逼近状态的指标。当迭代系数状态因子值大于1,则说明迭代系数有偏离真实系数的趋势,此时采用步长因子较大的变步长方案;反之,说明迭代系数有逼近真实系数的趋势,应该采样步长因子较小的变步长方案。这样的自适应选择措施使得算法具有较强的收敛能力。理论分析和实验表明:在同样实验条件下,本文算法能够获得比其他文献更快的收敛速度和更小的稳态误差。%Fixed step size Normalized LMS algorithm can’t step out the dilemma of fast convergence rate and low excess mean-square error.To solve this problem,this paper proposed a Segmental Variable Step-Size Normalized LMS algorithm Dependent on the state parameter of iteration coefficient.This Normalized LMS algorithm employs the state parameter of it-eration coefficient to express the approximation degree between iteration coefficient and real coefficient.When the value of state parameter of iteration coefficient is larger than 1 ,which indicates that iteration coefficient tends to deviate from the re-al coefficient,at this time,variable step-size scheme that can provide larger step-size parameter is needed.However when the value of state parameter of iteration coefficient is smaller than 1 ,which indicates that iteration coefficient tends to ap-proach the real coefficient,at this time,variable step-size scheme that can provide smaller step-size parameter is needed. This adaptive selection of variable step-size scheme enables the proposed NLMS algorithm to have better convergence per-formance.Analysis and experiment results show that:under the same experimental condition,the proposed algorithm can

  8. Consistent estimators in random censorship semiparametric models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王启华

    1996-01-01

    For the fixed design regression modelwhen Y, are randomly censored on the right, the estimators of unknown parameter and regression function g from censored observations are defined in the two cases .where the censored distribution is known and unknown, respectively. Moreover, the sufficient conditions under which these estimators are strongly consistent and pth (p>2) mean consistent are also established.

  9. Consistent truncations with massive modes and holography

    CERN Document Server

    Cassani, Davide; Faedo, Anton F

    2011-01-01

    We review the basic features of some recently found consistent Kaluza-Klein truncations including massive modes. We emphasize the general ideas underlying the reduction procedure, then we focus on type IIB supergravity on 5-dimensional manifolds admitting a Sasaki-Einstein structure, which leads to half-maximal gauged supergravity in five dimensions. Finally, we comment on the holographic picture of consistency.

  10. CONSISTENT AGGREGATION IN FOOD DEMAND SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Levedahl, J. William; Reed, Albert J.; Clark, J. Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Two aggregation schemes for food demand systems are tested for consistency with the Generalized Composite Commodity Theorem (GCCT). One scheme is based on the standard CES classification of food expenditures. The second scheme is based on the Food Guide Pyramid. Evidence is found that both schemes are consistent with the GCCT.

  11. A Framework of Memory Consistency Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡伟武; 施巍松; 等

    1998-01-01

    Previous descriptions of memory consistency models in shared-memory multiprocessor systems are mainly expressed as constraints on the memory access event ordering and hence are hardware-centric.This paper presents a framework of memory consistency models which describes the memory consistency model on the behavior level.Based on the understanding that the behavior of an execution is determined by the execution order of conflicting accesses,a memory consistency model is defined as an interprocessor synchronization mechanism which orders the execution of operations from different processors.Synchronization order of an execution under certain consistency model is also defined.The synchronization order,together with the program order determines the behavior of an execution.This paper also presents criteria for correct program and correct implementation of consistency models.Regarding an implementation of a consistency model as certain memory event ordering constraints,this paper provides a method to prove the correctness of consistency model implementations,and the correctness of the lock-based cache coherence protocol is proved with this method.

  12. Sticky continuous processes have consistent price systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Christian; Pakkanen, Mikko; Sayit, Hasanjan

    Under proportional transaction costs, a price process is said to have a consistent price system, if there is a semimartingale with an equivalent martingale measure that evolves within the bid-ask spread. We show that a continuous, multi-asset price process has a consistent price system, under arb...

  13. Testing the visual consistency of web sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, van der Thea; Loorbach, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Consistency in the visual appearance of Web pages is often checked by experts, such as designers or reviewers. This article reports a card sort study conducted to determine whether users rather than experts could distinguish visual (in-)consistency in Web elements and pages. The users proved to agre

  14. Putting Consistent Theories Together in Institutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应明生

    1995-01-01

    The problem of putting consistent theories together in institutions is discussed.A general necessary condition for consistency of the resulting theory is carried out,and some sufficient conditions are given for diagrams of theories in which shapes are tree bundles or directed graphs.Moreover,some transformations from complicated cases to simple ones are established.

  15. Modeling and Testing Legacy Data Consistency Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nytun, J. P.; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of data sources are available on the Internet, many of which offer semantically overlapping data, but based on different schemas, or models. While it is often of interest to integrate such data sources, the lack of consistency among them makes this integration difficult....... This paper addresses the need for new techniques that enable the modeling and consistency checking for legacy data sources. Specifically, the paper contributes to the development of a framework that enables consistency testing of data coming from different types of data sources. The vehicle is UML and its...... accompanying XMI. The paper presents techniques for modeling consistency requirements using OCL and other UML modeling elements: it studies how models that describe the required consistencies among instances of legacy models can be designed in standard UML tools that support XMI. The paper also considers...

  16. A Study on the Consistency of Discretization Equation in Unsteady Heat Transfer Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The previous studies on the consistency of discretization equation mainly focused on the finite difference method, but the issue of consistency still remains with several problems far from totally solved in the actual numerical computation. For instance, the consistency problem is involved in the numerical case where the boundary variables are solved explicitly while the variables away from the boundary are solved implicitly. And when the coefficient of discretization equation of nonlinear numerical case is the function of variables, calculating the coefficient explicitly and the variables implicitly might also give rise to consistency problem. Thus the present paper mainly researches the consistency problems involved in the explicit treatment of the second and third boundary conditions and that of thermal conductivity which is the function of temperature. The numerical results indicate that the consistency problem should be paid more attention and not be neglected in the practical computation.

  17. Predicting Group-Level Outcome Variables from Variables Measured at the Individual Level: A Latent Variable Multilevel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croon, Marcel A.; van Veldhoven, Marc J. P. M.

    2007-01-01

    In multilevel modeling, one often distinguishes between macro-micro and micro-macro situations. In a macro-micro multilevel situation, a dependent variable measured at the lower level is predicted or explained by variables measured at that lower or a higher level. In a micro-macro multilevel situation, a dependent variable defined at the higher…

  18. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  19. A new insight into the consistency of smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Klapp, Jaime; Vargas, Carlos A; Campos, Kilver

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the problem of consistency of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is solved. A novel error analysis is developed in $n$-dimensional space using the Poisson summation formula, which enables the treatment of the kernel and particle approximation errors in combined fashion. New consistency integral relations are derived for the particle approximation which correspond to the cosine Fourier transform of the classically known consistency conditions for the kernel approximation. The functional dependence of the error bounds on the SPH interpolation parameters, namely the smoothing length $h$ and the number of particles within the kernel support ${\\cal{N}}$ is demonstrated explicitly from which consistency conditions are seen to follow naturally. As ${\\cal{N}}\\to\\infty$, the particle approximation converges to the kernel approximation independently of $h$ provided that the particle mass scales with $h$ as $m\\propto h^{\\beta}$, with $\\beta >n$. This implies that as $h\\to 0$, the joint limit $m\\to 0$, $...

  20. Consistency in experiments on multistable driven delay systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Neus; Larger, Laurent; Fischer, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the consistency properties in the responses of a nonlinear delay optoelectronic intensity oscillator subject to different drives, in particular, harmonic and self-generated waveforms. This system, an implementation of the Ikeda oscillator, is operating in a closed-loop configuration, exhibiting its autonomous dynamics while the drive signals are additionally introduced. Applying the same drive multiple times, we compare the dynamical responses of the optoelectronic oscillator and quantify the degree of consistency among them via their correlation. Our results show that consistency is not restricted to conditions close to the first Hopf bifurcation but can be found in a broad range of dynamical regimes, even in the presence of multistability. Finally, we discuss the dependence of consistency on the nature of the drive signal.

  1. Consistent group selection in high-dimensional linear regression

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Fengrong; 10.3150/10-BEJ252

    2010-01-01

    In regression problems where covariates can be naturally grouped, the group Lasso is an attractive method for variable selection since it respects the grouping structure in the data. We study the selection and estimation properties of the group Lasso in high-dimensional settings when the number of groups exceeds the sample size. We provide sufficient conditions under which the group Lasso selects a model whose dimension is comparable with the underlying model with high probability and is estimation consistent. However, the group Lasso is, in general, not selection consistent and also tends to select groups that are not important in the model. To improve the selection results, we propose an adaptive group Lasso method which is a generalization of the adaptive Lasso and requires an initial estimator. We show that the adaptive group Lasso is consistent in group selection under certain conditions if the group Lasso is used as the initial estimator.

  2. Consistency of the group Lasso and multiple kernel learning

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Francis

    2007-01-01

    We consider the least-square regression problem with regularization by a block 1-norm, i.e., a sum of Euclidean norms over spaces of dimensions larger than one. This problem, referred to as the group Lasso, extends the usual regularization by the 1-norm where all spaces have dimension one, where it is commonly referred to as the Lasso. In this paper, we study the asymptotic model consistency of the group Lasso. We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the consistency of group Lasso under practical assumptions, such as model misspecification. When the linear predictors and Euclidean norms are replaced by functions and reproducing kernel Hilbert norms, the problem is usually referred to as multiple kernel learning and is commonly used for learning from heterogeneous data sources and for non linear variable selection. Using tools from functional analysis, and in particular covariance operators, we extend the consistency results to this infinite dimensional case and also propose an adaptive scheme to obt...

  3. Consistência do padrão de agrupamento de cultivares de milho Clustering pattern consistency of corn cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cargnelutti Filho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a consistência do padrão de agrupamento obtido a partir da combinação de duas medidas de dissimilaridade e quatro métodos de agrupamento, em cenários formados por combinações de número de cultivares e número de variáveis, com dados reais de cultivares de milho (Zea mays L. e com dados simulados. Foram usados os dados reais de cinco variáveis mensuradas em 69 experimentos de competição de cultivares de milho, cujo número de cultivares avaliadas oscilou entre 9 e 40. A fim de investigar os resultados com maior número de cultivares e de variáveis, foram simulados, sob distribuição normal padrão, 1.000 experimentos para cada um dos 54 cenários formados pela combinação entre o número de cultivares (20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 e 100 e o número de variáveis (5, 6, 7, 8, 9 e 10. Foram realizadas análises de correlação, de diagnóstico de multicolinearidade e de agrupamento. A consistência do padrão de agrupamento foi avaliada por meio do coeficiente de correlação cofenética. Há decréscimo da consistência do padrão de agrupamento com o acréscimo do número de cultivares e de variáveis. A distância euclidiana proporciona maior consistência no padrão de agrupamento em relação à distância de Manhattan. A consistência do padrão de agrupamento entre os métodos aumenta na seguinte ordem: Ward, ligação completa, ligação simples e ligação média entre grupo.The objective of this research was to evaluate the clustering pattern consistency obtained from the combination of the two dissimilarity measures and four clustering methods, in scenarios consist of combinations number of cultivars and number of variables, with real data in corn cultivars (Zea mays L. and simulated data. We used real data from five variables measured in 69 trials involving corn cultivars, the number of cultivars ranged between 9 and 40. In order to investigate the results with more cultivars and

  4. On the Initial State and Consistency Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhiani, Lasha

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of the initial state on the consistency conditions for adiabatic perturbations. In order to be consistent with the constraints of General Relativity, the initial state must be diffeomorphism invariant. As a result, we show that initial wavefunctional/density matrix has to satisfy a Slavnov-Taylor identity similar to that of the action. We then investigate the precise ways in which modified initial states can lead to violations of the consistency relations. We find two independent sources of violations: i) the state can include initial non-Gaussianities; ii) even if the initial state is Gaussian, such as a Bogoliubov state, the modified 2-point function can modify the q->0 analyticity properties of the vertex functional and result in violations of the consistency relations.

  5. On the initial state and consistency relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin, E-mail: lashaber@sas.upenn.edu, E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu [Center for Particle Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the initial state on the consistency conditions for adiabatic perturbations. In order to be consistent with the constraints of General Relativity, the initial state must be diffeomorphism invariant. As a result, we show that initial wavefunctional/density matrix has to satisfy a Slavnov-Taylor identity similar to that of the action. We then investigate the precise ways in which modified initial states can lead to violations of the consistency relations. We find two independent sources of violations: i) the state can include initial non-Gaussianities; ii) even if the initial state is Gaussian, such as a Bogoliubov state, the modified 2-point function can modify the q-vector → 0 analyticity properties of the vertex functional and result in violations of the consistency relations.

  6. Self-Consistent Asset Pricing Models

    CERN Document Server

    Malevergne, Y

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the foundations of factor or regression models in the light of the self-consistency condition that the market portfolio (and more generally the risk factors) is (are) constituted of the assets whose returns it is (they are) supposed to explain. As already reported in several articles, self-consistency implies correlations between the return disturbances. As a consequence, the alpha's and beta's of the factor model are unobservable. Self-consistency leads to renormalized beta's with zero effective alpha's, which are observable with standard OLS regressions. Analytical derivations and numerical simulations show that, for arbitrary choices of the proxy which are different from the true market portfolio, a modified linear regression holds with a non-zero value $\\alpha_i$ at the origin between an asset $i$'s return and the proxy's return. Self-consistency also introduces ``orthogonality'' and ``normality'' conditions linking the beta's, alpha's (as well as the residuals) and the weights of the proxy por...

  7. Quasiparticle self-consistent GW theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schilfgaarde, M; Kotani, Takao; Faleev, S

    2006-06-09

    In past decades the scientific community has been looking for a reliable first-principles method to predict the electronic structure of solids with high accuracy. Here we present an approach which we call the quasiparticle self-consistent approximation. It is based on a kind of self-consistent perturbation theory, where the self-consistency is constructed to minimize the perturbation. We apply it to selections from different classes of materials, including alkali metals, semiconductors, wide band gap insulators, transition metals, transition metal oxides, magnetic insulators, and rare earth compounds. Apart from some mild exceptions, the properties are very well described, particularly in weakly correlated cases. Self-consistency dramatically improves agreement with experiment, and is sometimes essential. Discrepancies with experiment are systematic, and can be explained in terms of approximations made.

  8. Consistency in the World Wide Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Grauenkjær

    Tim Berners-Lee envisioned that computers will behave as agents of humans on the World Wide Web, where they will retrieve, extract, and interact with information from the World Wide Web. A step towards this vision is to make computers capable of extracting this information in a reliable...... and consistent way. In this dissertation we study steps towards this vision by showing techniques for the specication, the verication and the evaluation of the consistency of information in the World Wide Web. We show how to detect certain classes of errors in a specication of information, and we show how...... the World Wide Web, in order to help perform consistent evaluations of web extraction techniques. These contributions are steps towards having computers reliable and consistently extract information from the World Wide Web, which in turn are steps towards achieving Tim Berners-Lee's vision. ii...

  9. Consistency Relations for Large Field Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Chiba, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Consistency relations for chaotic inflation with a monomial potential and natural inflation and hilltop inflation are given which involve the scalar spectral index $n_s$, the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ and the running of the spectral index $\\alpha$. The measurement of $\\alpha$ with $O(10^{-3})$ and the improvement in the measurement of $n_s$ could discriminate monomial model from natural/hilltop inflation models. A consistency region for general large field models is also presented.

  10. Self-consistent generalized Langevin equation for colloidal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Rojo, Marco Antonio; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2005-09-01

    A self-consistent theory of collective and tracer diffusion in colloidal mixtures is presented. This theory is based on exact results for the partial intermediate scattering functions derived within the framework of the generalized Langevin equation formalism, plus a number of conceptually simple and sensible approximations. The first of these consists of a Vineyard-like approximation between collective and tracer diffusion, which writes the collective dynamics in terms of the memory function related to tracer diffusion. The second consists of interpolating this only unknown memory function between its two exact limits at small and large wave vectors; for this, a phenomenologically determined, but not arbitrary, interpolating function is introduced: a Lorentzian with its inflection point located at the first minimum of the partial static structure factor. The small wave-vector exact limit involves a time-dependent friction function, for which we take a general approximate result, previously derived within the generalized Langevin equation formalism. This general result expresses the time-dependent friction function in terms of the partial intermediate scattering functions, thus closing the system of equations into a fully self-consistent scheme. This extends to mixtures a recently proposed self-consistent theory developed for monodisperse suspensions [Yeomans-Reyna and Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 64, 066114 (2001)]. As an illustration of its quantitative accuracy, its application to a simple model of a binary dispersion in the absence of hydrodynamic interactions is reported.

  11. A Van Atta reflector consisting of half-wave dipoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1966-01-01

    The reradiation pattern of a passive Van Atta reflector consisting of half-wave dipoles is investigated. The character of the reradiation pattern first is deduced by qualitative and physical considerations. Various types of array elements are considered and several geometrical configurations...... of these elements are outlined. Following this, an analysis is made of the reradiation pattern of a linear Van Atta array consisting of four equispaced half-wave dipoles. The general form of the reradiation pattern is studied analytically. The influence of scattering and coupling is determined and the dependence...

  12. The cluster bootstrap consistency in generalized estimating equations

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Guang

    2013-03-01

    The cluster bootstrap resamples clusters or subjects instead of individual observations in order to preserve the dependence within each cluster or subject. In this paper, we provide a theoretical justification of using the cluster bootstrap for the inferences of the generalized estimating equations (GEE) for clustered/longitudinal data. Under the general exchangeable bootstrap weights, we show that the cluster bootstrap yields a consistent approximation of the distribution of the regression estimate, and a consistent approximation of the confidence sets. We also show that a computationally more efficient one-step version of the cluster bootstrap provides asymptotically equivalent inference. © 2012.

  13. Completeness and consistency of renormalisation group flows

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F; Litim, Daniel F.; Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2002-01-01

    We study different renormalisation group flows for scale dependent effective actions, including exact and proper-time renormalisation group flows. These flows have a simple one loop structure. They differ in their dependence on the full field-dependent propagator, which is linear for exact flows. We investigate the inherent approximations of flows with a non-linear dependence on the propagator. We check explicitly that standard perturbation theory is not reproduced. We explain the origin of the discrepancy by providing links to exact flows both in closed expressions and in given approximations. We show that proper-time flows are approximations to Callan-Symanzik flows. Within a background field formalism, we provide a generalised proper-time flow, which is exact. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. A Mn₁₅ single-molecule magnet consisting of a supertetrahedron incorporated in a loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moushi, Eleni E; Masello, Antonio; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Nastopoulos, Vassilios; Christou, George; Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J

    2010-05-28

    Two new Mn(15) clusters consisting of a supertetrahedron which is incorporated in a loop are reported. The reactions of [Mn(O(2)CEt)(2)]·2H(2)O with the diols 1,3-propanediol (H(2)pd) or 2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (H(2)mpd) in the presence of KX (X = CN(-), Cl(-), Br(-), NO(3)(-), ClO(4)(-), OCN(-), SCN(-)) afforded compounds [Mn(15)K(mu(4)-O)(4)(O(2)CEt)(11)(pd)(12)(py)(2)] (1) and [Mn(15)K(mu(4)-O)(4)(O(2)CEt)(11)(mpd)(12)(py)(2)] (2). The structural core of 1 and 2 consists of a Mn(11) loop and a Mn(9)K supertetrahedron sharing a Mn(5) triangle. To the best of our knowledge, the structural motif of a supertetrahedron incorporated in a loop appears for the first time in metal cluster chemistry. Variable-temperature, solid-state direct current (dc) magnetic susceptibility studies in the 300-5 K range showed that the chi(M)T value increases with decreasing T suggesting the existence of predominant ferromagnetic exchange interactions and a relatively large ground state spin. This was confirmed by field-variable temperature magnetization measurements which were fitted using a matrix diagonalization method to give S approximately 23/2, g = 1.92(1) and D = -0.071(2) cm(-1). In addition, compound 1 displays frequency-dependent alternating current (ac) signals suggesting single-molecule magnetism (SMM) behaviour. This was proven by magnetization vs. dc field sweeps on single-crystals of 1·0.7py·1.3MeCN, which displayed sweep rate- and temperature-dependent hysteresis loops.

  15. Self consistent modeling of accretion columns in accretion powered pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Sebastian; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Wolff, Michael Thomas; Becker, Peter A.; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    We combine three physical models to self-consistently derive the observed flux and pulse profiles of neutron stars' accretion columns. From the thermal and bulk Comptonization model by Becker & Wolff (2006) we obtain seed photon continua produced in the dense inner regions of the accretion column. In a thin outer layer these seed continua are imprinted with cyclotron resonant scattering features calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. The observed phase and energy dependent flux corresponding to these emission profiles is then calculated, taking relativistic light bending into account. We present simulated pulse profiles and the predicted dependency of the observable X-ray spectrum as a function of pulse phase.

  16. Self-consistency in Bicultural Persons: Dialectical Self-beliefs Mediate the Relation between Identity Integration and Self-consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Noels, Kimberly A.; Lalonde, Richard N.; Salas, S. J.

    2017-01-01

    Prior research differentiates dialectical (e.g., East Asian) from non-dialectical cultures (e.g., North American and Latino) and attributes cultural differences in self-concept consistency to naïve dialecticism. In this research, we explored the effects of managing two cultural identities on consistency within the bicultural self-concept via the role of dialectical beliefs. Because the challenge of integrating more than one culture within the self is common to biculturals of various heritage backgrounds, the effects of bicultural identity integration should not depend on whether the heritage culture is dialectical or not. In four studies across diverse groups of bicultural Canadians, we showed that having an integrated bicultural identity was associated with being more consistent across roles (Studies 1–3) and making less ambiguous self-evaluations (Study 4). Furthermore, dialectical self-beliefs mediated the effect of bicultural identity integration on self-consistency (Studies 2–4). Finally, Latino biculturals reported being more consistent across roles than did East Asian biculturals (Study 2), revealing the ethnic heritage difference between the two groups. We conclude that both the content of heritage culture and the process of integrating cultural identities influence the extent of self-consistency among biculturals. Thus, consistency within the bicultural self-concept can be understood, in part, to be a unique psychological product of bicultural experience. PMID:28326052

  17. Entropy-based consistent model driven architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    A description of software architecture is a plan of the IT system construction, therefore any architecture gaps affect the overall success of an entire project. The definitions mostly describe software architecture as a set of views which are mutually unrelated, hence potentially inconsistent. Software architecture completeness is also often described in an ambiguous way. As a result most methods of IT systems building comprise many gaps and ambiguities, thus presenting obstacles for software building automation. In this article the consistency and completeness of software architecture are mathematically defined based on calculation of entropy of the architecture description. Following this approach, in this paper we also propose our method of automatic verification of consistency and completeness of the software architecture development method presented in our previous article as Consistent Model Driven Architecture (CMDA). The proposed FBS (Functionality-Behaviour-Structure) entropy-based metric applied in our CMDA approach enables IT architects to decide whether the modelling process is complete and consistent. With this metric, software architects could assess the readiness of undergoing modelling work for the start of IT system building. It even allows them to assess objectively whether the designed software architecture of the IT system could be implemented at all. The overall benefit of such an approach is that it facilitates the preparation of complete and consistent software architecture more effectively as well as it enables assessing and monitoring of the ongoing modelling development status. We demonstrate this with a few industry examples of IT system designs.

  18. THE CONSISTENCY OF STATISTICAL ESTIMATES OF THURSTONE-MOSTELLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Bugaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional method of analysis procedures of collective choice involves three different approaches: investigation operator voting against the characteristic conditions, investigation the properties of the function of choice, analysis on the possibility of manipulating (verification the stability of the voting process under the influence of negative impacts from voters or organizer. Research team of the department ITMU VSUET proposed and implemented a fourth approach, which is to research the probabilistic characteristics the results of the procedures (value of the displacement valuation of estimate the usefulness of specific alternative to its true value, the standard deviation of evaluating of estimate the usefulness of alternative from its true value, the probability of correct ranking of alternatives at the output the procedure of choice, etc.. This article is dedicated to the analysis of the consistency of estimates the usefulness to compare alternatives, obtained at the output of the traditional procedure Thurstone-Mosteller and its generalizations, created by the authors of. In the general, the term of consistency of estimator of statistical estimation assumes tending to zero error of estimation by increasing the sample size. However, depending on the interpretation of "calculation errors" in science are the following main types of consistency: the weak consistency of statistical estimation, based on the notion of convergence in probability of the random quantity; the strong consistency, based on the concept of convergence with probability to one; the consistency of statistical estimation in the mean square. The variance of this assessment tends to zero. This article provides a proof of the theorem, according to which the assumptions rather general nature of estimates the usefulness being ranked alternatives obtained using the procedure Thurstone-Mosteller satisfied the consistency of statistical estimation in the mean square. In this

  19. Glycoengineered Monoclonal Antibodies with Homogeneous Glycan (M3, G0, G2, and A2 Using a Chemoenzymatic Approach Have Different Affinities for FcγRIIIa and Variable Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kurogochi

    Full Text Available Many therapeutic antibodies have been developed, and IgG antibodies have been extensively generated in various cell expression systems. IgG antibodies contain N-glycans at the constant region of the heavy chain (Fc domain, and their N-glycosylation patterns differ during various processes or among cell expression systems. The Fc N-glycan can modulate the effector functions of IgG antibodies, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC. To control Fc N-glycans, we performed a rearrangement of Fc N-glycans from a heterogeneous N-glycosylation pattern to homogeneous N-glycans using chemoenzymatic approaches with two types of endo-β-N-acetyl glucosaminidases (ENG'ases, one that works as a hydrolase to cleave all heterogeneous N-glycans, another that is used as a glycosynthase to generate homogeneous N-glycans. As starting materials, we used an anti-Her2 antibody produced in transgenic silkworm cocoon, which consists of non-fucosylated pauci-mannose type (Man2-3GlcNAc2, high-mannose type (Man4-9GlcNAc2, and complex type (Man3GlcNAc3-4 N-glycans. As a result of the cleavage of several ENG'ases (endoS, endoM, endoD, endoH, and endoLL, the heterogeneous glycans on antibodies were fully transformed into homogeneous-GlcNAc by a combination of endoS, endoD, and endoLL. Next, the desired N-glycans (M3; Man3GlcNAc1, G0; GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, G2; Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, A2; NeuAc2Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1 were transferred from the corresponding oxazolines to the GlcNAc residue on the intact anti-Her2 antibody with an ENG'ase mutant (endoS-D233Q, and the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody was obtained. The binding assay of anti-Her2 antibody with homogenous N-glycans with FcγRIIIa-V158 showed that the glycoform influenced the affinity for FcγRIIIa-V158. In addition, the ADCC assay for the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody (mAb-M3, mAb-G0, mAb-G2, and mAb-A2 was performed using SKBR-3 and BT-474 as target

  20. Consistency and Derangements in Brane Tilings

    CERN Document Server

    Hanany, Amihay; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    Brane tilings describe Lagrangians (vector multiplets, chiral multiplets, and the superpotential) of four dimensional $\\mathcal{N}=1$ supersymmetric gauge theories. These theories, written in terms of a bipartite graph on a torus, correspond to worldvolume theories on $N$ D$3$-branes probing a toric Calabi-Yau threefold singularity. A pair of permutations compactly encapsulates the data necessary to specify a brane tiling. We show that geometric consistency for brane tilings, which ensures that the corresponding quantum field theories are well behaved, imposes constraints on the pair of permutations, restricting certain products constructed from the pair to have no one-cycles. Permutations without one-cycles are known as derangements. We illustrate this formulation of consistency with known brane tilings. Counting formulas for consistent brane tilings with an arbitrary number of chiral bifundamental fields are written down in terms of delta functions over symmetric groups.

  1. Quantifying the consistency of scientific databases

    CERN Document Server

    Šubelj, Lovro; Boshkoska, Biljana Mileva; Kastrin, Andrej; Levnajić, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Science is a social process with far-reaching impact on our modern society. In the recent years, for the first time we are able to scientifically study the science itself. This is enabled by massive amounts of data on scientific publications that is increasingly becoming available. The data is contained in several databases such as Web of Science or PubMed, maintained by various public and private entities. Unfortunately, these databases are not always consistent, which considerably hinders this study. Relying on the powerful framework of complex networks, we conduct a systematic analysis of the consistency among six major scientific databases. We found that identifying a single "best" database is far from easy. Nevertheless, our results indicate appreciable differences in mutual consistency of different databases, which we interpret as recipes for future bibliometric studies.

  2. Self-consistent Green's function approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Barbieri, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    We present the fundamental techniques and working equations of many-body Green's function theory for calculating ground state properties and the spectral strength. Green's function methods closely relate to other polynomial scaling approaches discussed in chapters~8 and ~10. However, here we aim directly at a global view of the many-fermion structure. We derive the working equations for calculating many-body propagators, using both the Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction technique and the self-consistent formalism at finite temperature. Their implementation is discussed, as well as the the inclusion of three-nucleon interactions. The self-consistency feature is essential to guarantee thermodynamic consistency. The paring and neutron matter models introduced in previous chapters are solved and compared with the other methods in this book.

  3. Personalized recommendation based on unbiased consistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuzhen; Tian, Hui; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Zheng; Zhou, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Recently, in physical dynamics, mass-diffusion-based recommendation algorithms on bipartite network provide an efficient solution by automatically pushing possible relevant items to users according to their past preferences. However, traditional mass-diffusion-based algorithms just focus on unidirectional mass diffusion from objects having been collected to those which should be recommended, resulting in a biased causal similarity estimation and not-so-good performance. In this letter, we argue that in many cases, a user's interests are stable, and thus bidirectional mass diffusion abilities, no matter originated from objects having been collected or from those which should be recommended, should be consistently powerful, showing unbiased consistence. We further propose a consistence-based mass diffusion algorithm via bidirectional diffusion against biased causality, outperforming the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in disparate real data sets, including Netflix, MovieLens, Amazon and Rate Your Music.

  4. A Revisit to Probability - Possibility Consistency Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamoni Dhar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, our main intention is to highlight the fact that the probable links between probability and possibility which were established by different authors at different point of time on the basis of some well known consistency principles cannot provide the desired result. That is why the paper discussed some prominent works for transformations between probability and possibility and finally aimed to suggest a new principle because none of the existing principles because none of them found the unique transformation. The new consistency principle which is suggested hereby would in turn replace all others that exist in the literature references by providing a reliable estimate of consistency between the two.Furthermore some properties of entropy of fuzzy numbers are also presented in this article.

  5. Improving Interprofessional Consistency in Electronic Fetal Heart Rate Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindappagari, Shravya; Zaghi, Sahar; Zannat, Ferdous; Reimers, Laura; Goffman, Dena; Kassel, Irene; Bernstein, Peter S

    2016-07-01

    Objective To determine if mandatory online training in electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) improved agreement in documentation between obstetric care providers and nurses on labor and delivery. Methods Health care professionals working in obstetrics at our institution were required to complete a course on EFM interpretation. We performed a retrospective chart review of 701 charts including patients delivered before and after the introduction of the course to evaluate agreement among providers in their documentation of their interpretations of the EFM tracings. Results Agreement between provider and nurse documentation at the time of admission improved for variability and accelerations (variability: 91.1 vs. 98.3%, p < 0.001; and accelerations: 75.2 vs. 87.7%, p < 0.001). Similarly, agreement improved at the time of the last note prior to delivery for documentation of variability and accelerations (variability: 82.1 vs. 90.6%, p = 0.001; and accelerations: 56.7 vs. 68.6%, p = 0.0012). Agreement in interpretation of decelerations both at the time of admission and at the time of delivery increased (86.3 vs. 90.6%, p = 0.0787, and 56.7 vs. 61.1%, p = 0.2314, respectively) but was not significant. Conclusion An online EFM course can significantly improve consistency in multidisciplinary documentation of fetal heart rate tracing interpretation.

  6. Consistent matter couplings for Plebanski gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Tennie, Felix

    2010-01-01

    We develop a scheme for the minimal coupling of all standard types of tensor and spinor field matter to Plebanski gravity. This theory is a geometric reformulation of vacuum general relativity in terms of two-form frames and connection one-forms, and provides a covariant basis for various quantization approaches. Using the spinor formalism we prove the consistency of the newly proposed matter coupling by demonstrating the full equivalence of Plebanski gravity plus matter to Einstein--Cartan gravity. As a byproduct we also show the consistency of some previous suggestions for matter actions.

  7. Consistent matter couplings for Plebanski gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennie, Felix; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.

    2010-11-01

    We develop a scheme for the minimal coupling of all standard types of tensor and spinor field matter to Plebanski gravity. This theory is a geometric reformulation of vacuum general relativity in terms of two-form frames and connection one-forms, and provides a covariant basis for various quantization approaches. Using the spinor formalism we prove the consistency of the newly proposed matter coupling by demonstrating the full equivalence of Plebanski gravity plus matter to Einstein-Cartan gravity. As a by-product we also show the consistency of some previous suggestions for matter actions.

  8. Noncommuting electric fields and algebraic consistency in noncommutative gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rabin

    2003-05-01

    We show that noncommuting electric fields occur naturally in θ-expanded noncommutative gauge theories. Using this noncommutativity, which is field dependent, and a Hamiltonian generalization of the Seiberg-Witten map, the algebraic consistency in the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of these theories is established. A comparison of results in different descriptions shows that this generalized map acts as a canonical transformation in the physical subspace only. Finally, we apply the Hamiltonian formulation to derive the gauge symmetries of the action.

  9. Spectrally Consistent Satellite Image Fusion with Improved Image Priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Aanæs, Henrik; Jensen, Thomas B.S.;

    2006-01-01

    Here an improvement to our previous framework for satellite image fusion is presented. A framework purely based on the sensor physics and on prior assumptions on the fused image. The contributions of this paper are two fold. Firstly, a method for ensuring 100% spectrally consistency is proposed......, even when more sophisticated image priors are applied. Secondly, a better image prior is introduced, via data-dependent image smoothing....

  10. GW method with the self-consistent Sternheimer equation

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to quasiparticle GW calculations which does not require the computation of unoccupied electronic states. In our approach the screened Coulomb interaction is evaluated by solving self-consistent linear-response Sternheimer equations, and the noninteracting Green's function is evaluated by solving inhomogeneous linear systems. The frequency-dependence of the screened Coulomb interaction is explicitly taken into account. In order to avoid the singularities of the scre...

  11. Concomitant variables in finite mixture models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedel, M

    The standard mixture model, the concomitant variable mixture model, the mixture regression model and the concomitant variable mixture regression model all enable simultaneous identification and description of groups of observations. This study reviews the different ways in which dependencies among

  12. Modelling plasticity of unsaturated soils in a thermodynamically consistent framework

    CERN Document Server

    Coussy, O

    2010-01-01

    Constitutive equations of unsaturated soils are often derived in a thermodynamically consistent framework through the use a unique 'effective' interstitial pressure. This later is naturally chosen as the space averaged interstitial pressure. However, experimental observations have revealed that two stress state variables were needed to describe the stress-strain-strength behaviour of unsaturated soils. The thermodynamics analysis presented here shows that the most general approach to the behaviour of unsaturated soils actually requires three stress state variables: the suction, which is required to describe the retention properties of the soil and two effective stresses, which are required to describe the soil deformation at water saturation held constant. Actually, it is shown that a simple assumption related to internal deformation leads to the need of a unique effective stress to formulate the stress-strain constitutive equation describing the soil deformation. An elastoplastic framework is then presented ...

  13. Inter-laboratory consistency of gait analysis measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, M G; Merlo, A; Leardini, A

    2013-09-01

    The dissemination of gait analysis as a clinical assessment tool requires the results to be consistent, irrespective of the laboratory. In this work a baseline assessment of between site consistency of one healthy subject examined at 7 different laboratories is presented. Anthropometric and spatio-temporal parameters, pelvis and lower limb joint rotations, joint sagittal moments and powers, and ground reaction forces were compared. The consistency between laboratories for single parameters was assessed by the median absolute deviation and maximum difference, for curves by linear regression. Twenty-one lab-to-lab comparisons were performed and averaged. Large differences were found between the characteristics of the laboratories (i.e. motion capture systems and protocols). Different values for the anthropometric parameters were found, with the largest variability for a pelvis measurement. The spatio-temporal parameters were in general consistent. Segment and joint kinematics consistency was in general high (R2>0.90), except for hip and knee joint rotations. The main difference among curves was a vertical shift associated to the corresponding value in the static position. The consistency between joint sagittal moments ranged form R2=0.90 at the ankle to R2=0.66 at the hip, the latter was increasing when comparing separately laboratories using the same protocol. Pattern similarity was good for ankle power but not satisfactory for knee and hip power. The force was found the most consistent, as expected. The differences found were in general lower than the established minimum detectable changes for gait kinematics and kinetics for healthy adults.

  14. Consistency in multi-viewpoint architectural design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, R.M.; Dijkman, Remco Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a framework that aids in preserving consistency in multi-viewpoint designs. In a multi-viewpoint design each stakeholder constructs his own design part. We call each stakeholder’s design part the view of that stakeholder. To construct his view, a stakeholder has a viewpoint.

  15. Developing consistent time series landsat data products

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Landsat series satellite has provided earth observation data record continuously since early 1970s. There are increasing demands on having a consistent time series of Landsat data products. In this presentation, I will summarize the work supported by the USGS Landsat Science Team project from 20...

  16. Developing consistent pronunciation models for phonemic variants

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Davel, M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available from a lexicon containing variants. In this paper we (the authors) address both these issues by creating ‘pseudo-phonemes’ associated with sets of ‘generation restriction rules’ to model those pronunciations that are consistently realised as two or more...

  17. On Consistency Maintenance In Service Discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundramoorthy, V.; Hartel, Pieter H.; Scholten, Johan

    2005-01-01

    Communication and node failures degrade the ability of a service discovery protocol to ensure Users receive the correct service information when the service changes. We propose that service discovery protocols employ a set of recovery techniques to recover from failures and regain consistency. We

  18. On Consistency Maintenance In Service Discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundramoorthy, V.; Hartel, Pieter H.; Scholten, Johan

    Communication and node failures degrade the ability of a service discovery protocol to ensure Users receive the correct service information when the service changes. We propose that service discovery protocols employ a set of recovery techniques to recover from failures and regain consistency. We

  19. Consistent feeding positions of great tit parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lessells, C.M.; Poelman, E.H.; Mateman, A.C.; Cassey, P.

    2006-01-01

    When parent birds arrive at the nest to provision their young, their position on the nest rim may influence which chick or chicks are fed. As a result, the consistency of feeding positions of the individual parents, and the difference in position between the parents, may affect how equitably food is

  20. Computing Rooted and Unrooted Maximum Consistent Supertrees

    CERN Document Server

    van Iersel, Leo

    2009-01-01

    A chief problem in phylogenetics and database theory is the computation of a maximum consistent tree from a set of rooted or unrooted trees. A standard input are triplets, rooted binary trees on three leaves, or quartets, unrooted binary trees on four leaves. We give exact algorithms constructing rooted and unrooted maximum consistent supertrees in time O(2^n n^5 m^2 log(m)) for a set of m triplets (quartets), each one distinctly leaf-labeled by some subset of n labels. The algorithms extend to weighted triplets (quartets). We further present fast exact algorithms for constructing rooted and unrooted maximum consistent trees in polynomial space. Finally, for a set T of m rooted or unrooted trees with maximum degree D and distinctly leaf-labeled by some subset of a set L of n labels, we compute, in O(2^{mD} n^m m^5 n^6 log(m)) time, a tree distinctly leaf-labeled by a maximum-size subset X of L that all trees in T, when restricted to X, are consistent with.

  1. Addendum to "On the consistency of MPS"

    CERN Document Server

    Souto-Iglesias, Antonio; González, Leo M; Cercos-Pita, Jose L

    2013-01-01

    The analogies between the Moving Particle Semi-implicit method (MPS) and Incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method (ISPH) are established in this note, as an extension of the MPS consistency analysis conducted in "Souto-Iglesias et al., Computer Physics Communications, 184(3), 2013."

  2. Proteolysis and consistency of Meshanger cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de L.

    1978-01-01

    Proteolysis in Meshanger cheese, estimated by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is discussed. The conversion of α s1 -casein was proportional to rennet concentration in the cheese. Changes in consistency, after a maximum, were correlated to breakdown of

  3. On the existence of consistent price systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayraktar, Erhan; Pakkanen, Mikko S.; Sayit, Hasanjan

    2014-01-01

    We formulate a sufficient condition for the existence of a consistent price system (CPS), which is weaker than the conditional full support condition (CFS). We use the new condition to show the existence of CPSs for certain processes that fail to have the CFS property. In particular this condition...

  4. A self-consistent Maltsev pulse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buneman, O.

    1985-04-01

    A self-consistent model for an electron pulse propagating through a plasma is presented. In this model, the charge imbalance between plasma ions, plasma electrons and pulse electrons creates the travelling potential well in which the pulse electrons are trapped.

  5. Consistency in multi-viewpoint architectural design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, Remco Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a framework that aids in preserving consistency in multi-viewpoint designs. In a multi-viewpoint design each stakeholder constructs his own design part. We call each stakeholder¿s design part the view of that stakeholder. To construct his view, a stakeholder has a viewpoint. Thi

  6. Properties and Update Semantics of Consistent Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    8217 PR.OPERTIES AND UPDATE SEMANTICS OF CONSISTENT VIEWS G. Gottlob Institute for Applied Mathematics C.N.H.., G<•nova, Italy Compnt.<•r Sden... Gottlob G., Paolini P., Zicari R., "Proving Properties of Programs ou Database Views", Dipartiuwnto di Elcttronica, Politecnko di Milano (in

  7. Consistency Analysis of Network Traffic Repositories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lastdrager, Elmer; Pras, Aiko

    2009-01-01

    Traffic repositories with TCP/IP header information are very important for network analysis. Researchers often assume that such repositories reliably represent all traffic that has been flowing over the network; little thoughts are made regarding the consistency of these repositories. Still, for var

  8. Consistency of Network Traffic Repositories: An Overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lastdrager, E.; Pras, A.

    2009-01-01

    Traffc repositories with TCP/IP header information are very important for network analysis. Researchers often assume that such repositories reliably represent all traffc that has been flowing over the network; little thoughts are made regarding the consistency of these repositories. Still, for vario

  9. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Joseph L

    2011-01-01

    The text covers a broad spectrum between basic and advanced complex variables on the one hand and between theoretical and applied or computational material on the other hand. With careful selection of the emphasis put on the various sections, examples, and exercises, the book can be used in a one- or two-semester course for undergraduate mathematics majors, a one-semester course for engineering or physics majors, or a one-semester course for first-year mathematics graduate students. It has been tested in all three settings at the University of Utah. The exposition is clear, concise, and lively

  10. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Flanigan, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: ""A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation."" Not so here-Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion

  11. Nicotine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine dependence Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Nicotine dependence ― also called tobacco dependence ― is an addiction to tobacco products caused by the drug nicotine. Nicotine dependence means you can't stop using the substance, ...

  12. Teaching hands-on science activities: Variables that moderate attitude-behavior consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.

    The relationship between prospective elementary teachers' attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions to teach science using hands-on activities at least twice a week during their first year of employment was investigated. The findings suggest that measuring prospective teachers' attitudes toward science cannot adequately predict nor provide a satisfactory explanation of their science teaching behaviors. The findings also provide clear support for two hypotheses derived from Fishbein and Ajzen's theory of reasoned action regarding the predictability of prospective teachers' intentions to teach science from their attitudes and subjective norms.Received: 25 October 1985

  13. Self-consistency in Capital Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbrahim, Hamid

    2013-03-01

    Capital Markets are considered, at least in theory, information engines whereby traders contribute to price formation with their diverse perspectives. Regardless whether one believes in efficient market theory on not, actions by individual traders influence prices of securities, which in turn influence actions by other traders. This influence is exerted through a number of mechanisms including portfolio balancing, margin maintenance, trend following, and sentiment. As a result market behaviors emerge from a number of mechanisms ranging from self-consistency due to wisdom of the crowds and self-fulfilling prophecies, to more chaotic behavior resulting from dynamics similar to the three body system, namely the interplay between equities, options, and futures. This talk will address questions and findings regarding the search for self-consistency in capital markets.

  14. Consistence beats causality in recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xuzhen; Hu, Zheng; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The explosive growth of information challenges people's capability in finding out items fitting to their own interests. Recommender systems provide an efficient solution by automatically push possibly relevant items to users according to their past preferences. Recommendation algorithms usually embody the causality from what having been collected to what should be recommended. In this article, we argue that in many cases, a user's interests are stable, and thus the previous and future preferences are highly consistent. The temporal order of collections then does not necessarily imply a causality relationship. We further propose a consistence-based algorithm that outperforms the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in disparate real data sets, including \\textit{Netflix}, \\textit{MovieLens}, \\textit{Amazon} and \\textit{Rate Your Music}.

  15. A supersymmetric consistent truncation for conifold solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cassani, Davide

    2010-01-01

    We establish a supersymmetric consistent truncation of type IIB supergravity on the T^{1,1} coset space, based on extending the Papadopoulos-Tseytlin ansatz to the full set of SU(2)xSU(2) invariant Kaluza-Klein modes. The five-dimensional model is a gauged N=4 supergravity with three vector multiplets, which incorporates various conifold solutions and is suitable for the study of their dynamics. By analysing the scalar potential we find a family of new non-supersymmetric AdS_5 extrema interpolating between a solution obtained long ago by Romans and a solution employing an Einstein metric on T^{1,1} different from the standard one. Finally, we discuss some simple consistent subtruncations preserving N=2 supersymmetry. One of them is compatible with the inclusion of smeared D7-branes.

  16. Temporally consistent segmentation of point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jason L.; Osteen, Philip R.; Daniilidis, Kostas

    2014-06-01

    We consider the problem of generating temporally consistent point cloud segmentations from streaming RGB-D data, where every incoming frame extends existing labels to new points or contributes new labels while maintaining the labels for pre-existing segments. Our approach generates an over-segmentation based on voxel cloud connectivity, where a modified k-means algorithm selects supervoxel seeds and associates similar neighboring voxels to form segments. Given the data stream from a potentially mobile sensor, we solve for the camera transformation between consecutive frames using a joint optimization over point correspondences and image appearance. The aligned point cloud may then be integrated into a consistent model coordinate frame. Previously labeled points are used to mask incoming points from the new frame, while new and previous boundary points extend the existing segmentation. We evaluate the algorithm on newly-generated RGB-D datasets.

  17. Consistent Linearized Gravity in Brane Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Aref'eva, I Ya; Mück, W; Viswanathan, K S; Volovich, I V

    2000-01-01

    A globally consistent treatment of linearized gravity in the Randall-Sundrum background with matter on the brane is formulated. Using a novel gauge, in which the transverse components of the metric are non-vanishing, the brane is kept straight. We analyze the gauge symmetries and identify the physical degrees of freedom of gravity. Our results underline the necessity for non-gravitational confinement of matter to the brane.

  18. Self-consistent model of fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Yershov, V N

    2002-01-01

    We discuss a composite model of fermions based on three-flavoured preons. We show that the opposite character of the Coulomb and strong interactions between these preons lead to formation of complex structures reproducing three generations of quarks and leptons with all their quantum numbers and masses. The model is self-consistent (it doesn't use input parameters). Nevertheless, the masses of the generated structures match the experimental values.

  19. Consistent formulation of the spacelike axial gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnel, A.; Van der Rest-Jaspers, M.

    1983-12-15

    The usual formulation of the spacelike axial gauge is afflicted with the difficulty that the metric is indefinite while no ghost is involved. We solve this difficulty by introducing a ghost whose elimination is such that the metric becomes positive for physical states. The technique consists in the replacement of the gauge condition nxA = 0 by the weaker one partial/sub 0/nxAroughly-equal0.

  20. Security Policy: Consistency, Adjustments and Restraining Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang; Jiemian

    2004-01-01

    In the 2004 U.S. presidential election, despite well-divided domestic opinions and Kerry's appealing slogan of "Reversing the Trend," a slight majority still voted for George W. Bush in the end. It is obvious that, based on the author's analysis, security agenda such as counter-terrorism and Iraqi issue has contributed greatly to the reelection of Mr. Bush. This also indicates that the security policy of Bush's second term will basically be consistent.……

  1. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, L.; Y. Han; Jin, X.; Y. Chen; D. A. Tremblay

    2015-01-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark datasets for both inter-calibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly com...

  2. The internal consistency of perfect competition

    OpenAIRE

    Jakob Kapeller; Stephan Pühringer

    2010-01-01

    This article surveys some arguments brought forward in defense of the theory of perfect competition. While some critics propose that the theory of perfect competition, and thus also the theory of the firm, are logically flawed, (mainstream) economists defend their most popular textbook model by a series of apparently different arguments. Here it is examined whether these arguments are comparable, consistent and convincing from the point of view of philosophy of science.

  3. Cloud Standardization: Consistent Business Processes and Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan Daniel ZOTA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing represents one of the latest emerging trends in distributed computing that enables the existence of hardware infrastructure and software applications as services. The present paper offers a general approach to the cloud computing standardization as a mean of improving the speed of adoption for the cloud technologies. Moreover, this study tries to show out how organizations may achieve more consistent business processes while operating with cloud computing technologies.

  4. Dynamic consistency for Stochastic Optimal Control problems

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentier, Pierre; Cohen, Guy; De Lara, Michel; Girardeau, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    For a sequence of dynamic optimization problems, we aim at discussing a notion of consistency over time. This notion can be informally introduced as follows. At the very first time step $t_0$, the decision maker formulates an optimization problem that yields optimal decision rules for all the forthcoming time step $t_0, t_1, ..., T$; at the next time step $t_1$, he is able to formulate a new optimization problem starting at time $t_1$ that yields a new sequence of optimal decision rules. This process can be continued until final time $T$ is reached. A family of optimization problems formulated in this way is said to be time consistent if the optimal strategies obtained when solving the original problem remain optimal for all subsequent problems. The notion of time consistency, well-known in the field of Economics, has been recently introduced in the context of risk measures, notably by Artzner et al. (2007) and studied in the Stochastic Programming framework by Shapiro (2009) and for Markov Decision Processes...

  5. CMB lens sample covariance and consistency relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motloch, Pavel; Hu, Wayne; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien

    2017-02-01

    Gravitational lensing information from the two and higher point statistics of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization fields are intrinsically correlated because they are lensed by the same realization of structure between last scattering and observation. Using an analytic model for lens sample covariance, we show that there is one mode, separately measurable in the lensed CMB power spectra and lensing reconstruction, that carries most of this correlation. Once these measurements become lens sample variance dominated, this mode should provide a useful consistency check between the observables that is largely free of sampling and cosmological parameter errors. Violations of consistency could indicate systematic errors in the data and lens reconstruction or new physics at last scattering, any of which could bias cosmological inferences and delensing for gravitational waves. A second mode provides a weaker consistency check for a spatially flat universe. Our analysis isolates the additional information supplied by lensing in a model-independent manner but is also useful for understanding and forecasting CMB cosmological parameter errors in the extended Λ cold dark matter parameter space of dark energy, curvature, and massive neutrinos. We introduce and test a simple but accurate forecasting technique for this purpose that neither double counts lensing information nor neglects lensing in the observables.

  6. Hippocampography Guides Consistent Mesial Resections in Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus C. Ng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The optimal surgery in lesional neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy is unknown. Hippocampal electrocorticography maximizes seizure freedom by identifying normal-appearing epileptogenic tissue for resection and minimizes neuropsychological deficit by limiting resection to demonstrably epileptogenic tissue. We examined whether standardized hippocampal electrocorticography (hippocampography guides resection for more consistent hippocampectomy than unguided resection in conventional electrocorticography focused on the lesion. Methods. Retrospective chart reviews any kind of electrocorticography (including hippocampography as part of combined lesionectomy, anterolateral temporal lobectomy, and hippocampectomy over 8 years . Patients were divided into mesial (i.e., hippocampography and lateral electrocorticography groups. Primary outcome was deviation from mean hippocampectomy length. Results. Of 26 patients, fourteen underwent hippocampography-guided mesial temporal resection. Hippocampography was associated with 2.6 times more consistent resection. The range of hippocampal resection was 0.7 cm in the mesial group and 1.8 cm in the lateral group (p=0.01. 86% of mesial group versus 42% of lateral group patients achieved seizure freedom (p=0.02. Conclusions. By rationally tailoring excision to demonstrably epileptogenic tissue, hippocampography significantly reduces resection variability for more consistent hippocampectomy than unguided resection in conventional electrocorticography. More consistent hippocampal resection may avoid overresection, which poses greater neuropsychological risk, and underresection, which jeopardizes postoperative seizure freedom.

  7. An algebraic method for constructing stable and consistent autoregressive filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlim, John, E-mail: jharlim@psu.edu [Department of Mathematics, the Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Meteorology, the Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hong, Hoon, E-mail: hong@ncsu.edu [Department of Mathematics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Robbins, Jacob L., E-mail: jlrobbi3@ncsu.edu [Department of Mathematics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we introduce an algebraic method to construct stable and consistent univariate autoregressive (AR) models of low order for filtering and predicting nonlinear turbulent signals with memory depth. By stable, we refer to the classical stability condition for the AR model. By consistent, we refer to the classical consistency constraints of Adams–Bashforth methods of order-two. One attractive feature of this algebraic method is that the model parameters can be obtained without directly knowing any training data set as opposed to many standard, regression-based parameterization methods. It takes only long-time average statistics as inputs. The proposed method provides a discretization time step interval which guarantees the existence of stable and consistent AR model and simultaneously produces the parameters for the AR models. In our numerical examples with two chaotic time series with different characteristics of decaying time scales, we find that the proposed AR models produce significantly more accurate short-term predictive skill and comparable filtering skill relative to the linear regression-based AR models. These encouraging results are robust across wide ranges of discretization times, observation times, and observation noise variances. Finally, we also find that the proposed model produces an improved short-time prediction relative to the linear regression-based AR-models in forecasting a data set that characterizes the variability of the Madden–Julian Oscillation, a dominant tropical atmospheric wave pattern.

  8. Developing a CD-CBM Anticipatory Approach for Cavitation - Defining a Model-Based Descriptor Consistent Across Processes, Phase 1 Final Report Context-Dependent Prognostics and Health Assessment: A New Paradigm for Condition-based Maintenance SBIR Topic No. N98-114

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this research, and subsequent testing, was to identify specific features of cavitation that could be used as a model-based descriptor in a context-dependent condition-based maintenance (CD-CBM) anticipatory prognostic and health assessment model. This descriptor is based on the physics of the phenomena, capturing the salient features of the process dynamics. The test methodology and approach were developed to make the cavitation features the dominant effect in the process and collected signatures. This would allow the accurate characterization of the salient cavitation features at different operational states. By developing such an abstraction, these attributes can be used as a general diagnostic for a system or any of its components. In this study, the particular focus will be pumps. As many as 90% of pump failures are catastrophic. They seem to be operating normally and fail abruptly without warning. This is true whether the failure is sudden hardware damage requiring repair, such as a gasket failure, or a transition into an undesired operating mode, such as cavitation. This means that conventional diagnostic methods fail to predict 90% of incipient failures and that in addressing this problem, model-based methods can add value where it is actually needed.

  9. Consistent energy barrier distributions in magnetic particle chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laslett, O., E-mail: O.Laslett@soton.ac.uk [Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO16 7QF (United Kingdom); Ruta, S.; Chantrell, R.W. [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Barker, J. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Friedman, G. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hovorka, O. [Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO16 7QF (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-01

    We investigate long-time thermal activation behaviour in magnetic particle chains of variable length. Chains are modelled as Stoner–Wohlfarth particles coupled by dipolar interactions. Thermal activation is described as a hopping process over a multidimensional energy landscape using the discrete orientation model limit of the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert dynamics. The underlying master equation is solved by diagonalising the associated transition matrix, which allows the evaluation of distributions of time scales of intrinsic thermal activation modes and their energy representation. It is shown that as a result of the interaction dependence of these distributions, increasing the particle chain length can lead to acceleration or deceleration of the overall relaxation process depending on the initialisation procedure.

  10. Consistency of Scalar Potentials from Quantum de Sitter Space

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa, José R; Trépanier, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    We derive constraints on the scalar potential of a quantum field theory in de Sitter space. The constraints, which we argue should be understood as consistency conditions for quantum field theories in dS space, originate from a consistent interpretation of quantum de Sitter space through its Coleman-De Luccia tunneling rate. Indeed, consistency of de Sitter space as a quantum theory of gravity with a finite number of degrees of freedom suggests the tunneling rates to vacua with negative cosmological constants be interpreted as Poincar\\'e recurrences. Demanding the tunneling rate to be a Poincar\\'e recurrence imposes two constraints, or consistency conditions, on the scalar potential. Although the exact consistency conditions depend on the shape of the scalar potential, generically they correspond to: the distance in field space between the de Sitter vacuum and any other vacuum with negative cosmological constant must be of the order of the reduced Planck mass or larger; and the fourth root of the vacuum energ...

  11. Is soft breaking of BRST symmetry consistent?

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, Peter; Reshetnyak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A definition of soft breaking of BRST symmetry in the field-antifield formalism is proposed, valid for general gauge theories and arbitrary gauge fixing. The Ward identities for the generating functionals of Green's functions are derived, and their gauge dependence is investigated. We present a generalization of the Gribov-Zwanziger action to a one-parameter linear gauge. It is argued that gauge theories with a soft breaking of BRST symmetry are inconsistent.

  12. The Morphology of the Galactic Dark Matter Synchrotron Emission with Self-Consistent Cosmic Ray Diffusion Models

    CERN Document Server

    Linden, Tim; Anderson, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    A generic prediction in the paradigm of weakly interacting dark matter is the production of relativistic particles from dark matter pair-annihilation in regions of high dark matter density. Ultra-relativistic electrons and positrons produced in the center of the Galaxy by dark matter annihilation should produce a diffuse synchrotron emission. While the spectral shape of the synchrotron dark matter haze depends on the particle model (and secondarily on the galactic magnetic fields), the morphology of the haze depends primarily on (1) the dark matter density distribution, (2) the galactic magnetic field morphology, and (3) the diffusion model for high-energy cosmic-ray leptons. Interestingly, an unidentified excess of microwave radiation with characteristics similar to those predicted by dark matter models has been claimed to exist near the galactic center region in the data reported by the WMAP satellite, and dubbed the "WMAP haze". In this study, we carry out a self-consistent treatment of the variables enume...

  13. Improving analytical tomographic reconstructions through consistency conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Arcadu, Filippo; Stampanoni, Marco; Marone, Federica

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces and characterizes a fast parameterless filter based on the Helgason-Ludwig consistency conditions, used to improve the accuracy of analytical reconstructions of tomographic undersampled datasets. The filter, acting in the Radon domain, extrapolates intermediate projections between those existing. The resulting sinogram, doubled in views, is then reconstructed by a standard analytical method. Experiments with simulated data prove that the peak-signal-to-noise ratio of the results computed by filtered backprojection is improved up to 5-6 dB, if the filter is used prior to reconstruction.

  14. Consistency of non-minimal renormalisation schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Jack, I

    2016-01-01

    Non-minimal renormalisation schemes such as the momentum subtraction scheme (MOM) have frequently been used for physical computations. The consistency of such a scheme relies on the existence of a coupling redefinition linking it to MSbar. We discuss the implementation of this procedure in detail for a general theory and show how to construct the relevant redefinition up to three-loop order, for the case of a general theory of fermions and scalars in four dimensions and a general scalar theory in six dimensions.

  15. Gentzen's centenary the quest for consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Rathjen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Gerhard Gentzen has been described as logic’s lost genius, whom Gödel called a better logician than himself. This work comprises articles by leading proof theorists, attesting to Gentzen’s enduring legacy to mathematical logic and beyond. The contributions range from philosophical reflections and re-evaluations of Gentzen’s original consistency proofs to the most recent developments in proof theory. Gentzen founded modern proof theory. His sequent calculus and natural deduction system beautifully explain the deep symmetries of logic. They underlie modern developments in computer science such as automated theorem proving and type theory.

  16. Consistent Predictions of Future Forest Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, N. G.

    2014-12-01

    We examined empirical and model based estimates of current and future forest mortality of conifers in the northern hemisphere. Consistent water potential thresholds were found that resulted in mortality of our case study species, pinon pine and one-seed juniper. Extending these results with IPCC climate scenarios suggests that most existing trees in this region (SW USA) will be dead by 2050. Further, independent estimates of future mortality for the entire coniferous biome suggest widespread mortality by 2100. The validity and assumptions and implications of these results are discussed.

  17. Are there consistent models giving observable NSI ?

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Enrique Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    While the existing direct bounds on neutrino NSI are rather weak, order 10(−)(1) for propagation and 10(−)(2) for production and detection, the close connection between these interactions and new NSI affecting the better-constrained charged letpon sector through gauge invariance make these bounds hard to saturate in realistic models. Indeed, Standard Model extensions leading to neutrino NSI typically imply constraints at the 10(−)(3) level. The question of whether consistent models leading to observable neutrino NSI naturally arises and was discussed in a dedicated session at NUFACT 11. Here we summarize that discussion.

  18. Consistent thermodynamic properties of lipids systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunico, Larissa; Ceriani, Roberta; Sarup, Bent

    Physical and thermodynamic properties of pure components and their mixtures are the basic requirement for process design, simulation, and optimization. In the case of lipids, our previous works[1-3] have indicated a lack of experimental data for pure components and also for their mixtures...... different pressures, with azeotrope behavior observed. Available thermodynamic consistency tests for TPx data were applied before performing parameter regressions for Wilson, NRTL, UNIQUAC and original UNIFAC models. The relevance of enlarging experimental databank of lipids systems data in order to improve...

  19. Consistency Checking of Web Service Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cambronero, M. Emilia; Okika, Joseph C.; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2008-01-01

    Behavioural properties are analyzed for web service contracts formulated in Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) and Choreography Description Language (CDL). The key result reported is an automated technique to check consistency between protocol aspects of the contracts. The contracts...... are abstracted to (timed) automata and from there a simulation is set up, which is checked using automated tools for analyzing networks of finite state processes. Here we use the Concurrency Work Bench. The proposed techniques are illustrated with a case study that include otherwise difficult to analyze fault...

  20. Probability-consistent spectrum and code spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈建文; 石树中

    2004-01-01

    In the seismic safety evaluation (SSE) for key projects, the probability-consistent spectrum (PCS), usually obtained from probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), is not consistent with the design response spectrum given by Code for Seismic Design of Buildings (GB50011-2001). Sometimes, there may be a remarkable difference between them. If the PCS is lower than the corresponding code design response spectrum (CDS), the seismic fortification criterion for the key projects would be lower than that for the general industry and civil buildings. In the paper, the relation between PCS and CDS is discussed by using the ideal simple potential seismic source. The results show that in the most areas influenced mainly by the potential sources of the epicentral earthquakes and the regional earthquakes, PCS is generally lower than CDS in the long periods. We point out that the long-period response spectra of the code should be further studied and combined with the probability method of seismic zoning as much as possible. Because of the uncertainties in SSE, it should be prudent to use the long-period response spectra given by SSE for key projects when they are lower than CDS.

  1. Consistent mutational paths predict eukaryotic thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Noort Vera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomes of thermophilic prokaryotes have been instrumental in structural biology and successfully exploited in biotechnology, however many proteins required for eukaryotic cell function are absent from bacteria or archaea. With Chaetomium thermophilum, Thielavia terrestris and Thielavia heterothallica three genome sequences of thermophilic eukaryotes have been published. Results Studying the genomes and proteomes of these thermophilic fungi, we found common strategies of thermal adaptation across the different kingdoms of Life, including amino acid biases and a reduced genome size. A phylogenetics-guided comparison of thermophilic proteomes with those of other, mesophilic Sordariomycetes revealed consistent amino acid substitutions associated to thermophily that were also present in an independent lineage of thermophilic fungi. The most consistent pattern is the substitution of lysine by arginine, which we could find in almost all lineages but has not been extensively used in protein stability engineering. By exploiting mutational paths towards the thermophiles, we could predict particular amino acid residues in individual proteins that contribute to thermostability and validated some of them experimentally. By determining the three-dimensional structure of an exemplar protein from C. thermophilum (Arx1, we could also characterise the molecular consequences of some of these mutations. Conclusions The comparative analysis of these three genomes not only enhances our understanding of the evolution of thermophily, but also provides new ways to engineer protein stability.

  2. Viewpoint Consistency: An Eye Movement Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Cristino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Eye movements have been widely studied, using images and videos in laboratories or portable eye trackers in the real world. Although a good understanding of the saccadic system and extensive models of gaze have been developed over the years, only a few studies have focused on the consistency of eye movements across viewpoints. We have developed a new technique to compute and map the depth of collected eye movements on stimuli rendered from 3D mesh objects using a traditional corneal reflection eye tracker (SR Eyelink 1000. Having eye movements mapped into 3D space (and not on an image space allowed us to compare fixations across viewpoints. Fixation sequences (scanpaths were also studied across viewpoints using the ScanMatch method (Cristino et al 2010, Behavioural and Research Methods 42, 692–700, extended to work with 3D eye movements. In a set of experiments where participants were asked to perform a recognition task on either a set of objects or faces, we recorded their gaze while performing the task. Participants either viewed the stimuli in 2D or using anaglyph glasses. The stimuli were shown from different viewpoints during the learning and testing phases. A high degree of gaze consistency was found across the different viewpoints, particularly between learning and testing phases. Scanpaths were also similar across viewpoints, suggesting not only that the gazed spatial locations are alike, but also their temporal order.

  3. Subgame consistent cooperation a comprehensive treatise

    CERN Document Server

    Yeung, David W K

    2016-01-01

    Strategic behavior in the human and social world has been increasingly recognized in theory and practice. It is well known that non-cooperative behavior could lead to suboptimal or even highly undesirable outcomes. Cooperation suggests the possibility of obtaining socially optimal solutions and the calls for cooperation are prevalent in real-life problems. Dynamic cooperation cannot be sustainable if there is no guarantee that the agreed upon optimality principle at the beginning is maintained throughout the cooperation duration. It is due to the lack of this kind of guarantees that cooperative schemes fail to last till its end or even fail to get started. The property of subgame consistency in cooperative dynamic games and the corresponding solution mechanism resolve this “classic” problem in game theory. This book is a comprehensive treatise on subgame consistent dynamic cooperation covering the up-to-date state of the art analyses in this important topic. It sets out to provide the theory, solution tec...

  4. Self-consistent conversion of a viscous fluid to particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Denes; Wolff, Zack

    2017-02-01

    Comparison of hydrodynamic and "hybrid" hydrodynamics+transport calculations with heavy-ion data inevitably requires the conversion of the fluid to particles. For dissipative fluids the conversion is ambiguous without additional theory input complementing hydrodynamics. We obtain self-consistent shear viscous phase-space corrections from linearized Boltzmann transport theory for a gas of hadrons. These corrections depend on the particle species, and incorporating them in Cooper-Frye freeze-out affects identified particle observables. For example, with additive quark model cross sections, proton elliptic flow is larger than pion elliptic flow at moderately high pT in Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. This is in contrast to Cooper-Frye freeze-out with the commonly used "democratic Grad" ansatz that assumes no species dependence. Various analytic and numerical results are also presented for massless and massive two-component mixtures to better elucidate how species dependence arises. For convenient inclusion in pure hydrodynamic and hybrid calculations, Appendix G contains self-consistent viscous corrections for each species both in tabulated and parametrized form.

  5. Stochastic modelling of spatially and temporally consistent daily precipitation time-series over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, D. E.; Fischer, A. M.; Frei, C.; Liniger, M. A.; Appenzeller, C.; Knutti, R.

    2014-07-01

    Many climate impact assessments over topographically complex terrain require high-resolution precipitation time-series that have a spatio-temporal correlation structure consistent with observations. This consistency is essential for spatially distributed modelling of processes with non-linear responses to precipitation input (e.g. soil water and river runoff modelling). In this regard, weather generators (WGs) designed and calibrated for multiple sites are an appealing technique to stochastically simulate time-series that approximate the observed temporal and spatial dependencies. In this study, we present a stochastic multi-site precipitation generator and validate it over the hydrological catchment Thur in the Swiss Alps. The model consists of several Richardson-type WGs that are run with correlated random number streams reflecting the observed correlation structure among all possible station pairs. A first-order two-state Markov process simulates intermittence of daily precipitation, while precipitation amounts are simulated from a mixture model of two exponential distributions. The model is calibrated separately for each month over the time-period 1961-2011. The WG is skilful at individual sites in representing the annual cycle of the precipitation statistics, such as mean wet day frequency and intensity as well as monthly precipitation sums. It reproduces realistically the multi-day statistics such as the frequencies of dry and wet spell lengths and precipitation sums over consecutive wet days. Substantial added value is demonstrated in simulating daily areal precipitation sums in comparison to multiple WGs that lack the spatial dependency in the stochastic process: the multi-site WG is capable to capture about 95% of the observed variability in daily area sums, while the summed time-series from multiple single-site WGs only explains about 13%. Limitation of the WG have been detected in reproducing observed variability from year to year, a component that has

  6. Effect of stress on field dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, V; Heineken, E; Peters, H

    1976-08-01

    60 subjects were tested in the rod-and-frame test under flicker conditions (stress). As compared to scores in a control situation (no flicker), the rod-and-frame scores were large under stress and increased monotonically during the session. Futhermore, both intra- and interindividual variability of rod-and-frame performance changed under stress conditions in a consistent manner. The general results, which clearly point to a reliable influence of stress on field dependency, are discussed within the methodological framework of Witkin's theory of perception and personality.

  7. Consistent evolution in a pedestrian flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Junbiao; Wang, Kaihua

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, pedestrian evacuation considering different human behaviors is studied by using a cellular automaton (CA) model combined with the snowdrift game theory. The evacuees are divided into two types, i.e. cooperators and defectors, and two different human behaviors, herding behavior and independent behavior, are investigated. It is found from a large amount of numerical simulations that the ratios of the corresponding evacuee clusters are evolved to consistent states despite 11 typically different initial conditions, which may largely owe to self-organization effect. Moreover, an appropriate proportion of initial defectors who are of herding behavior, coupled with an appropriate proportion of initial defectors who are of rationally independent thinking, are two necessary factors for short evacuation time.

  8. Consistency of warm k-inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Zhi-Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Min; Zhu, Jian-Yang

    2016-01-01

    We extend the k-inflation which is a type of kinetically driven inflationary model under the standard inflationary scenario to a possible warm inflationary scenario. The dynamical equations of this warm k-inflation model are obtained. We rewrite the slow-roll parameters which are different from the usual potential driven inflationary models and perform a linear stability analysis to give the proper slow-roll conditions in the warm k-inflation. Two cases, a power-law kinetic function and an exponential kinetic function, are studied, when the dissipative coefficient $\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0$ and $\\Gamma=\\Gamma(\\phi)$, respectively. A proper number of e-folds is obtained in both concrete cases of warm k-inflation. We find a constant dissipative coefficient ($\\Gamma=\\Gamma_0$) is not a workable choice for these two cases while the two cases with $\\Gamma=\\Gamma(\\phi)$ are self-consistent warm inflationary models.

  9. Compact difference approximation with consistent boundary condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Dexun; MA Yanwen; LI Xinliang; LIU Mingyu

    2003-01-01

    For simulating multi-scale complex flow fields it should be noted that all the physical quantities we are interested in must be simulated well. With limitation of the computer resources it is preferred to use high order accurate difference schemes. Because of their high accuracy and small stencil of grid points computational fluid dynamics (CFD) workers pay more attention to compact schemes recently. For simulating the complex flow fields the treatment of boundary conditions at the far field boundary points and near far field boundary points is very important. According to authors' experience and published results some aspects of boundary condition treatment for far field boundary are presented, and the emphasis is on treatment of boundary conditions for the upwind compact schemes. The consistent treatment of boundary conditions at the near boundary points is also discussed. At the end of the paper are given some numerical examples. The computed results with presented method are satisfactory.

  10. Consistency of canonical formulation of Horava gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soo, Chopin, E-mail: cpsoo@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-22

    Both the non-projectable and projectable version of Horava gravity face serious challenges. In the non-projectable version, the constraint algebra is seemingly inconsistent. The projectable version lacks a local Hamiltonian constraint, thus allowing for an extra graviton mode which can be problematic. A new formulation (based on arXiv:1007.1563) of Horava gravity which is naturally realized as a representation of the master constraint algebra (instead of the Dirac algebra) studied by loop quantum gravity researchers is presented. This formulation yields a consistent canonical theory with first class constraints; and captures the essence of Horava gravity in retaining only spatial diffeomorphisms as the physically relevant non-trivial gauge symmetry. At the same time the local Hamiltonian constraint is equivalently enforced by the master constraint.

  11. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-07-29

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits.

  12. On the consistent use of Constructed Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Trott, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We define "constructed observables" as relating experimental measurements to terms in a Lagrangian while simultaneously making assumptions about possible deviations from the Standard Model (SM), in other Lagrangian terms. Ensuring that the SM effective field theory (EFT) is constrained correctly when using constructed observables requires that their defining conditions are imposed on the EFT in a manner that is consistent with the equations of motion. Failing to do so can result in a "functionally redundant" operator basis and the wrong expectation as to how experimental quantities are related in the EFT. We illustrate the issues involved considering the $\\rm S$ parameter and the off shell triple gauge coupling (TGC) verticies. We show that the relationships between $h \\rightarrow V \\bar{f} \\, f$ decay and the off shell TGC verticies are subject to these subtleties, and how the connections between these observables vanish in the limit of strong bounds due to LEP. The challenge of using constructed observables...

  13. Consistently weighted measures for complex network topologies

    CERN Document Server

    Heitzig, Jobst; Zou, Yong; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    When network and graph theory are used in the study of complex systems, a typically finite set of nodes of the network under consideration is frequently either explicitly or implicitly considered representative of a much larger finite or infinite set of objects of interest. The selection procedure, e.g., formation of a subset or some kind of discretization or aggregation, typically results in individual nodes of the studied network representing quite differently sized parts of the domain of interest. This heterogeneity may induce substantial bias and artifacts in derived network statistics. To avoid this bias, we propose an axiomatic scheme based on the idea of {\\em node splitting invariance} to derive consistently weighted variants of various commonly used statistical network measures. The practical relevance and applicability of our approach is demonstrated for a number of example networks from different fields of research, and is shown to be of fundamental importance in particular in the study of climate n...

  14. Consistent 4-form fluxes for maximal supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Godazgar, Hadi; Krueger, Olaf; Nicolai, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    We derive new ansaetze for the 4-form field strength of D=11 supergravity corresponding to uplifts of four-dimensional maximal gauged supergravity. In particular, the ansaetze directly yield the components of the 4-form field strength in terms of the scalars and vectors of the four-dimensional maximal gauged supergravity---in this way they provide an explicit uplift of all four-dimensional consistent truncations of D=11 supergravity. The new ansaetze provide a substantially simpler method for uplifting d=4 flows compared to the previously available method using the 3-form and 6-form potential ansaetze. The ansatz for the Freund-Rubin term allows us to conjecture a `master formula' for the latter in terms of the scalar potential of d=4 gauged supergravity and its first derivative. We also resolve a long-standing puzzle concerning the antisymmetry of the flux obtained from uplift ansaetze.

  15. Quantum cosmological consistency condition for inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Gianluca [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, calle Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Kiefer, Claus [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Strasse 77, 50937 Köln (Germany); Steinwachs, Christian F., E-mail: calcagni@iem.cfmac.csic.es, E-mail: kiefer@thp.uni-koeln.de, E-mail: christian.steinwachs@physik.uni-freiburg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the quantum cosmological tunneling scenario for inflationary models. Within a path-integral approach, we derive the corresponding tunneling probability distribution. A sharp peak in this distribution can be interpreted as the initial condition for inflation and therefore as a quantum cosmological prediction for its energy scale. This energy scale is also a genuine prediction of any inflationary model by itself, as the primordial gravitons generated during inflation leave their imprint in the B-polarization of the cosmic microwave background. In this way, one can derive a consistency condition for inflationary models that guarantees compatibility with a tunneling origin and can lead to a testable quantum cosmological prediction. The general method is demonstrated explicitly for the model of natural inflation.

  16. Internal Branding and Employee Brand Consistent Behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzei, Alessandra; Ravazzani, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Employee behaviours conveying brand values, named brand consistent behaviours, affect the overall brand evaluation. Internal branding literature highlights a knowledge gap in terms of communication practices intended to sustain such behaviours. This study contributes to the development of a non......-normative and constitutive approach to internal branding by proposing an enablement-oriented communication approach. The conceptual background presents a holistic model of the inside-out process of brand building. This model adopts a theoretical approach to internal branding as a nonnormative practice that facilitates...... constitutive processes. In particular, the paper places emphasis on the role and kinds of communication practices as a central part of the nonnormative and constitutive internal branding process. The paper also discusses an empirical study based on interviews with 32 Italian and American communication managers...

  17. Quantum cosmological consistency condition for inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Steinwachs, Christian F

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the quantum cosmological tunneling scenario for inflationary models. Within a path-integral approach, we derive the corresponding tunneling probability distribution. A sharp peak in this distribution can be interpreted as the initial condition for inflation and therefore as a quantum cosmological prediction for its energy scale. This energy scale is also a genuine prediction of any inflationary model by itself, as the primordial gravitons generated during inflation leave their imprint in the B-polarization of the cosmic microwave background. In this way, one can derive a consistency condition for inflationary models that guarantees compatibility with a tunneling origin and can lead to a testable quantum cosmological prediction. The general method is demonstrated explicitly for the model of natural inflation.

  18. Thermodynamically consistent model calibration in chemical kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamics of biochemical reaction systems are constrained by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, which impose well-defined relationships among the reaction rate constants characterizing these systems. Constructing biochemical reaction systems from experimental observations often leads to parameter values that do not satisfy the necessary thermodynamic constraints. This can result in models that are not physically realizable and may lead to inaccurate, or even erroneous, descriptions of cellular function. Results We introduce a thermodynamically consistent model calibration (TCMC method that can be effectively used to provide thermodynamically feasible values for the parameters of an open biochemical reaction system. The proposed method formulates the model calibration problem as a constrained optimization problem that takes thermodynamic constraints (and, if desired, additional non-thermodynamic constraints into account. By calculating thermodynamically feasible values for the kinetic parameters of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling cascade, we demonstrate the qualitative and quantitative significance of imposing thermodynamic constraints on these parameters and the effectiveness of our method for accomplishing this important task. MATLAB software, using the Systems Biology Toolbox 2.1, can be accessed from http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS lab/software.html. An SBML file containing the thermodynamically feasible EGF/ERK signaling cascade model can be found in the BioModels database. Conclusions TCMC is a simple and flexible method for obtaining physically plausible values for the kinetic parameters of open biochemical reaction systems. It can be effectively used to recalculate a thermodynamically consistent set of parameter values for existing thermodynamically infeasible biochemical reaction models of cellular function as well as to estimate thermodynamically feasible values for the parameters of new

  19. Multiconfigurational self-consistent reaction field theory for nonequilibrium solvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Cesar, Amary; Ågren, Hans

    1995-01-01

    We present multiconfigurational self-consistent reaction field theory and implementation for solvent effects on a solute molecular system that is not in equilibrium with the outer solvent. The approach incorporates two different polarization vectors for studying the influence of the solvent...... states influenced by the two types of polarization vectors. The general treatment of the correlation problem through the use of complete and restricted active space methodologies makes the present multiconfigurational self-consistent reaction field approach general in that it can handle any type of state......, open-shell, excited, and transition states. We demonstrate the theory by computing solvatochromatic shifts in optical/UV spectra of some small molecules and electron ionization and electron detachment energies of the benzene molecule. It is shown that the dependency of the solvent induced affinity...

  20. Improving consistency in student evaluation at affiliated family practice centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, H K

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Family Medicine at Jefferson Medical College has since 1974 been successful in administering a required third-year family medicine clerkship, providing students with a structured, didactic, and experiential curriculum in six affiliated family practice centers. Prior analysis (1976-1981) had indicated, however, that variation existed in evaluating similar students, depending on the clerkship training site, i.e., three sites graded students in a significantly different fashion than the three other sites. Utilizing these data to focus on the evaluation process, a comprehensive and specific six-point plan was developed to improve consistency in evaluations at the different training sites. This plan consisted of a yearly meeting of affiliate faculty, assigning predoctoral training administrative responsibility to one faculty member at each training site, increased telephone communication, affiliate-faculty attendance at the university site evaluation session, faculty rotation to spend time at other training sites, and financial reimbursement to the affiliate training sites. After intervention, analysis (1981-1983) indicated that five of the six clerkship sites now grade students in a consistent fashion, with only one affiliate using different grading standards. The intervention was therefore judged to be successful for five of the six training sites, allowing for better communication and more critical and consistent evaluation of medical students.