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Sample records for dependent resonance self-shielding

  1. Continuous Energy, Multi-Dimensional Transport Calculations for Problem Dependent Resonance Self-Shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Downar

    2009-03-31

    The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system.

  2. SUBGR: A Program to Generate Subgroup Data for the Subgroup Resonance Self-Shielding Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-06

    The Subgroup Data Generation (SUBGR) program generates subgroup data, including levels and weights from the resonance self-shielded cross section table as a function of background cross section. Depending on the nuclide and the energy range, these subgroup data can be generated by (a) narrow resonance approximation, (b) pointwise flux calculations for homogeneous media; and (c) pointwise flux calculations for heterogeneous lattice cells. The latter two options are performed by the AMPX module IRFFACTOR. These subgroup data are to be used in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) neutronic simulator MPACT, for which the primary resonance self-shielding method is the subgroup method.

  3. Experimental investigation of resonance self-shielding and the Doppler effect in uranium and tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byoun, T. Y.; Block, R. C.; Semler, T. T.

    1972-01-01

    A series of average transmission and average self-indication ratio measurements were performed in order to investigate the temperature dependence of the resonance self-shielding effect in the unresolved resonance region of depleted uranium and tantalum. The measurements were carried out at 77 K, 295 K and approximately 1000 K with sample thicknesses varying from approximately 0.1 to 1.0 mean free path. The average resonance parameters as well as the temperature dependence were determined by using an analytical model which directly integrates over the resonance parameter distribution functions.

  4. Study on the Processing Method for Resonance Self-shielding Calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a new approach for resonance self-shielding calculations, based on a straightforward subgroup method, used in association with characteristics method. Subgroup method is actually the subdivision of cross section range for resonance energy range.

  5. Calculation of resonance self-shielding for {sup 235}U from 0 to 2250 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.; Derrien, H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Santos, G.R. [Cidade Univ., Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Inst. de Engenharia Nuclear

    1998-08-01

    Over the years, the evaluated {sup 235}U cross sections in the resolved energy range have been extensively revised. A major accomplishment was the first evaluation released to the ENDF/B-VI library. In that evaluation, the low energy range bound was lowered to 10{sup {minus}5} eV, and the upper limit raised to 2,250 eV. Several high-resolution measurements in conjunction with the Bayesian computer code SAMMY were used to perform the analysis of the {sup 235}U resonance parameters. SAMMY uses the Reich-Moore formalism, which is adequate for representing neutron cross sections of fissile isotopes, and a generalized least-squares (Bayes) technique for determining the energy-dependence of the neutron cross sections. Recently a re-evaluation of the {sup 235}U cross section in the resolved resonance region was completed. This evaluation has undergone integral tests in various laboratories throughout the USA and abroad. The evaluation has been accepted for inclusion in ENDF/B-VI release 5. The intent of this work is to present results of calculations of self-shielded fission rates carried out with these resonance parameters and to compare those fission rates with experimental data. Results of this comparison study provide an assessment of the resonance parameters with respect to the calculation of self-shielded group cross sections.

  6. RESONANCE SELF-SHIELDING EFFECT IN UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION OF FISSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GO CHIBA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to properly quantify fission reactor neutronics parameter uncertainties, we have to use covariance data and sensitivity profiles consistently. In the present paper, we establish two consistent methodologies for uncertainty quantification: a self-shielded cross section-based consistent methodology and an infinitely-diluted cross section-based consistent methodology. With these methodologies and the covariance data of uranium-238 nuclear data given in JENDL-3.3, we quantify uncertainties of infinite neutron multiplication factors of light water reactor and fast reactor fuel cells. While an inconsistent methodology gives results which depend on the energy group structure of neutron flux and neutron-nuclide reaction cross section representation, both the consistent methodologies give fair results with no such dependences.

  7. Sensitivity of computed uranium-238 self-shielding factors to the choice of the unresolved average resonance parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobos, J.L.; de Saussure, G.; Perez, R.B.

    1982-05-01

    The influence of different representations of the unresolved resonances of /sup 238/U on the computed self-shielding factors is examined. It is shown that the evaluated infinitely diluted average capture cross section does not provide sufficient information to determine a unique set of unresolved resonance parameters; different sets of unresolved resonance parameters equally consistent with the evaluated average capture cross section yield significantly different computed self-shielding factors. In the conclusion it is recommended that the resolved resonance description of the evaluated /sup 238/U cross sections be extended to higher energies and that thick sample transmission data and self-indication data be used to improve the evaluation of the unresolved resonance region.

  8. PAPIN: A Fortran-IV program to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko and transmission self-shielding factors for fertile isotopes in the unresolved resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobos, J.G.

    1981-08-01

    The Fortran IV code PAPIN has been developed to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors and average self-indication ratios for non-fissile isotopes, below the inelastic threshold, on the basis of the ENDF/B prescriptions for the unresolved resonance region. Monte-Carlo methods are utilized to generate ladders of resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region, from average resonance parameters and their appropriate distribution functions. The neutron cross-sections are calculated by the single level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) formalism, with s, p and d-wave contributions. The cross section probability tables are constructed by sampling the Doppler-broadened cross sections. The various self-shielded factors are computed numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross section probability tables. The program PAPIN has been validated through extensive comparisons with several deterministic codes.

  9. Uranium self-shielding in fast reactor blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadiroglu, O.K.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1976-03-01

    The effects of heterogeneity on resonance self-shielding are examined with particular emphasis on the blanket region of the fast breeder reactor and on its dominant reaction--capture in /sup 238/U. The results, however, apply equally well to scattering resonances, to other isotopes (fertile, fissile and structural species) and to other environments, so long as the underlying assumptions of narrow resonance theory apply. The heterogeneous resonance integral is first cast into a modified homogeneous form involving the ratio of coolant-to-fuel fluxes. A generalized correlation (useful in its own right in many other applications) is developed for this ratio, using both integral transport and collision probability theory to infer the form of correlation, and then relying upon Monte Carlo calculations to establish absolute values of the correlation coefficients. It is shown that a simple linear prescription can be developed for the flux ratio as a function of only fuel optical thickness and the fraction of the slowing-down source generated by the coolant. This in turn permitted derivation of a new equivalence theorem relating the heterogeneous self-shielding factor to the homogeneous self-shielding factor at a modified value of the background scattering cross section per absorber nucleus. A simple version of this relation is developed and used to show that heterogeneity has a negligible effect on the calculated blanket breeding ratio in fast reactors.

  10. Investigating spatial self-shielding and temperature effects for homogeneous and double heterogeneous pebble models with MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.; Nuenighoff; Pohl, C.; Allelein, H.J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung, Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik (IEF-6)

    2010-05-15

    The gas-cooled, high temperature reactor (HTR) represents a valuable option for the future development of nuclear technology, because of its excellent safety features. One main safety feature is the negative temperature coefficient which is due to the Doppler broadening of the (n,y) resonance absorption cross section. A second important effect is the spatial self-shielding due to the double heterogeneous geometry of a pebble bed reactor. At FZ-Juelich two reactor analysis codes have been developed: VSOP for core design and MGT for transient analysis. Currently an update of the nuclear cross section libraries to ENDF/B-VII.0 of both codes takes place. In order to take the temperature dependency as well as the spatial self-shielding into account the absorption cross sections {sigma}{sub (n,y)} for the resonance absorbers like {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U have to be provided as function of incident neutron energy, temperature and nuclide concentration. There are two reasons for choosing the Monte-Carlo approach to calculate group wise cross sections. First, the former applied ZUT-DGL code to generate the resonance cross section tables for MGT is so far not able to handle the new resonance description based on Reich-Moore instead of Single-level Breit-Wigner. Second, the rising interest in PuO{sub 2} fuel motivated an investigation on the generation of group wise cross sections describing thermal resonances of {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu. (orig.)

  11. MPACT Subgroup Self-Shielding Efficiency Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Yuxuan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, Benjamin S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-31

    Recent developments to improve the efficiency of the MOC solvers in MPACT have yielded effective kernels that loop over several energy groups at once, rather that looping over one group at a time. These kernels have produced roughly a 2x speedup on the MOC sweeping time during eigenvalue calculation. However, the self-shielding subgroup calculation had not been reevaluated to take advantage of these new kernels, which typically requires substantial solve time. The improvements covered in this report start by integrating the multigroup kernel concepts into the subgroup calculation, which are then used as the basis for further extensions. The next improvement that is covered is what is currently being termed as “Lumped Parameter MOC”. Because the subgroup calculation is a purely fixed source problem and multiple sweeps are performed only to update the boundary angular fluxes, the sweep procedure can be condensed to allow for the instantaneous propagation of the flux across a spatial domain, without the need to sweep along all segments in a ray. Once the boundary angular fluxes are considered to be converged, an additional sweep that will tally the scalar flux is completed. The last improvement that is investigated is the possible reduction of the number of azimuthal angles per octant in the shielding sweep. Typically 16 azimuthal angles per octant are used for self-shielding and eigenvalue calculations, but it is possible that the self-shielding sweeps are less sensitive to the number of angles than the full eigenvalue calculation.

  12. Assessment of the MPACT Resonance Data Generation Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Williams, Mark L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-26

    Currently, heterogeneous models are being used to generate resonance self-shielded cross-section tables as a function of background cross sections for important nuclides such as 235U and 238U by performing the CENTRM (Continuous Energy Transport Model) slowing down calculation with the MOC (Method of Characteristics) spatial discretization and ESSM (Embedded Self-Shielding Method) calculations to obtain background cross sections. And then the resonance self-shielded cross section tables are converted into subgroup data which are to be used in estimating problem-dependent self-shielded cross sections in MPACT (Michigan Parallel Characteristics Transport Code). Although this procedure has been developed and thus resonance data have been generated and validated by benchmark calculations, assessment has never been performed to review if the resonance data are properly generated by the procedure and utilized in MPACT. This study focuses on assessing the procedure and a proper use in MPACT.

  13. Self-shielding clumps in starburst clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Palouš, Jan; Ehlerová, Soňa; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Young and massive star clusters above a critical mass form thermally unstable clumps reducing locally the temperature and pressure of the hot 10$^{7}$~K cluster wind. The matter reinserted by stars, and mass loaded in interactions with pristine gas and from evaporating circumstellar disks, accumulate on clumps that are ionized with photons produced by massive stars. We discuss if they may become self-shielded when they reach the central part of the cluster, or even before it, during their free fall to the cluster center. Here we explore the importance of heating efficiency of stellar winds.

  14. Self-Shielding Treatment to Perform Cell Calculation for Seed Furl In Th/U Pwr Using Dragon Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Amin El Said Abd El Hameed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Time and precision of the results are the most important factors in any code used for nuclear calculations. Despite of the high accuracy of Monte Carlo codes, MCNP and Serpent, in many cases their relatively long computational time leads to difficulties in using any of them as the main calculation code. Usually, Monte Carlo codes are used only to benchmark the results. The deterministic codes, which are usually used in nuclear reactor’s calculations, have limited precision, due to the approximations in the methods used to solve the multi-group transport equation. Self- Shielding treatment, an algorithm that produces an average cross-section defined over the complete energy domain of the neutrons in a nuclear reactor, is responsible for the biggest error in any deterministic codes. There are mainly two resonance self-shielding models commonly applied: models based on equivalence and dilution and models based on subgroup approach. The fundamental problem with any self-shielding method is that it treats any isotope as there are no other isotopes with resonance present in the reactor. The most practical way to solve this problem is to use multi-energy groups (50-200 that are chosen in a way that allows us to use all major resonances without self-shielding. In this paper, we perform cell calculations, for a fresh seed fuel pin which is used in thorium/uranium reactors, by solving 172 energy group transport equation using the deterministic DRAGON code, for the two types of self-shielding models (equivalence and dilution models and subgroup models Using WIMS-D5 and DRAGON data libraries. The results are then tested by comparing it with the stochastic MCNP5 code.  We also tested the sensitivity of the results to a specific change in self-shielding method implemented, for example the effect of applying Livolant-Jeanpierre Normalization scheme and Rimman Integration improvement on the equivalence and dilution method, and the effect of using Ribbon

  15. Self-shielding Electron Beam Installation for Sterilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linac; Laboratory

    2002-01-01

    China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) has developed a self-shielding electron beam installationfor sterilization as handling letters with anthrax germ or spores which has the least volume and the least

  16. Self-shielding effects in neutron spectra measurements for neutron capture therapy by means of activation foils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Krzysztof; Józefowicz, Krystyna; Pytel, Beatrycze; Koziel, Alina

    2004-01-01

    The design and optimisation of a neutron beam for neutron capture therapy (NCT) is accompanied by the neutron spectra measurements at the target position. The method of activation detectors was applied for the neutron spectra measurements. Epithermal neutron energy region imposes the resonance structure of activation cross sections resulting in strong self-shielding effects. The neutron self-shielding correction factor was calculated using a simple analytical model of a single absorption event. Such a procedure has been applied to individual cross sections from pointwise ENDF/B-VI library and new corrected activation cross sections were introduced to a spectra unfolding algorithm. The method has been verified experimentally both for isotropic and for parallel neutron beams. Two sets of diluted and non-diluted activation foils covered with cadmium were irradiated in the neutron field. The comparison of activation rates of diluted and non-diluted foils has demonstrated the correctness of the applied self-shielding model.

  17. Self-Shielding Of Transmission Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, Christos [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The use of shielding to contend with noise or harmful EMI/EMR energy is not a new concept. An inevitable trade that must be made for shielding is physical space and weight. Space was often not as much of a painful design trade in older larger systems as they are in today’s smaller systems. Today we are packing in an exponentially growing number of functionality within the same or smaller volumes. As systems become smaller and space within systems become more restricted, the implementation of shielding becomes more problematic. Often, space that was used to design a more mechanically robust component must be used for shielding. As the system gets smaller and space is at more of a premium, the trades starts to result in defects, designs with inadequate margin in other performance areas, and designs that are sensitive to manufacturing variability. With these challenges in mind, it would be ideal to maximize attenuation of harmful fields as they inevitably couple onto transmission lines without the use of traditional shielding. Dr. Tom Van Doren proposed a design concept for transmission lines to a class of engineers while visiting New Mexico. This design concept works by maximizing Electric field (E) and Magnetic Field (H) field containment between operating transmission lines to achieve what he called “Self-Shielding”. By making the geometric centroid of the outgoing current coincident with the return current, maximum field containment is achieved. The reciprocal should be true as well, resulting in greater attenuation of incident fields. Figure’s 1(a)-1(b) are examples of designs where the current centroids are coincident. Coax cables are good examples of transmission lines with co-located centroids but they demonstrate excellent field attenuation for other reasons and can’t be used to test this design concept. Figure 1(b) is a flex circuit design that demonstrate the implementation of self-shielding vs a standard conductor layout.

  18. Self-shielded electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belugin, V. M.; Rozanov, N. E.; Pirozhenko, V. M.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes self-shielded high-intensity electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies. The specific property of the accelerators is that they do not apply an external magnetic field; acceleration and focusing of electron beams are performed by radio-frequency fields in the accelerating structures. The main characteristics of the accelerators are high current and beam power, but also reliable operation and a long service life. To obtain these characteristics, a number of problems have been solved, including a particular optimization of the accelerator components and the application of a variety of specific means. The paper describes features of the electron beam dynamics, accelerating structure, and radio-frequency power supply. Several compact self-shielded accelerators for radiation sterilization and x-ray cargo inspection have been created. The introduced methods made it possible to obtain a high intensity of the electron beam and good performance of the accelerators.

  19. REPOSITORY LAYOUT SUPPORTING DESIGN FEATURE #13- WASTE PACKAGE SELF SHIELDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Owen

    1999-04-09

    The objective of this analysis is to develop a repository layout, for Feature No. 13, that will accommodate self-shielding waste packages (WP) with an areal mass loading of 25 metric tons of uranium per acre (MTU/acre). The scope of this analysis includes determination of the number of emplacement drifts, amount of emplacement drift excavation required, and a preliminary layout for illustrative purposes.

  20. Photodissociation of H2 in Protogalaxies: Modeling Self-Shielding in 3D Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wolcott-Green, Jemma; Bryan, Greg L

    2011-01-01

    The ability of primordial gas to cool in proto-galactic haloes exposed to Lyman-Werner (LW) radiation is critically dependent on the self-shielding of H_2. We perform radiative transfer calculations of LW line photons, post-processing outputs from three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations of haloes with T_vir > 10^4 K at redshifts around z=10. We calculate the optically thick photodissociation rate numerically, including the effects of density, temperature, and velocity gradients in the gas, as well as line overlap and shielding of H_2 by HI, over a large number of sight-lines. In low-density regions (n10^4 K haloes by an order of magnitude; this increases the number of such haloes in which supermassive (approx. M=10^5 M_sun) black holes may have formed.

  1. Self-shielding effect of a single phase liquid xenon detector for direct dark matter search

    CERN Document Server

    Minamino, A; Ashie, Y; Hosaka, J; Ishihara, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Mitsuda, C; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakajima, Y; Namba, T; Ogawa, H; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Taki, K; Ueshima, K; Ebizuka, Y; Ota, A; Suzuki, S; Hagiwara, H; Hashimoto, Y; Kamada, S; Kikuchi, M; Kobayashi, N; Nagase, T; Nakamura, S; Tomita, K; Uchida, Y; Fukuda, Y; Sato, T; Nishijima, K; Maruyama, T; Motoki, D; Itow, Y; Kim, Y D; Lee, J I; Moon, S H; Lim, K E; Cravens, J P; Smy, M B

    2009-01-01

    Liquid xenon is a suitable material for a dark matter search. For future large scale experiments, single phase detectors are attractive due to their simple configuration and scalability. However, in order to reduce backgrounds, they need to fully rely on liquid xenon's self-shielding property. A prototype detector was developed at Kamioka Observatory to establish vertex and energy reconstruction methods and to demonstrate the self-shielding power against gamma rays from outside of the detector. Sufficient self-shielding power for future experiments was obtained.

  2. Gamma self-shielding correction factors calculation for aqueous bulk sample analysis by PGNAA technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasrabadi, M.N. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Modern Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mnnasrabadi@ast.ui.ac.ir; Mohammadi, A. [Department of Physics, Payame Noor University (PNU), Kohandej, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalali, M. [Isfahan Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRT), Reactor and Accelerators Research and Development School, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    In this paper bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) was applied to aqueous sample analysis using a relative method. For elemental analysis of an unknown bulk sample, gamma self-shielding coefficient was required. Gamma self-shielding coefficient of unknown samples was estimated by an experimental method and also by MCNP code calculation. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the gamma self-shielding within the sample volume is required.

  3. Set up of a method for the adjustment of resonance parameters on integral experiments; Mise au point d`une methode d`ajustement des parametres de resonance sur des experiences integrales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise, P.

    1996-12-18

    Resonance parameters for actinides play a significant role in the neutronic characteristics of all reactor types. All the major integral parameters strongly depend on the nuclear data of the isotopes in the resonance-energy regions.The author sets up a method for the adjustment of resonance parameters taking into account the self-shielding effects and restricting the cross section deconvolution problem to a limited energy region. (N.T.).

  4. How an improved implementation of H2 self-shielding influences the formation of massive stars and black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Tilman; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Latif, Muhammad A.; Volonteri, Marta

    2015-09-01

    High-redshift quasars at z > 6 have masses up to ˜109 M⊙. One of the pathways to their formation includes direct collapse of gas, forming a supermassive star, precursor of the black hole seed. The conditions for direct collapse are more easily achievable in metal-free haloes, where atomic hydrogen cooling operates and molecular hydrogen (H2) formation is inhibited by a strong external (ultraviolet) UV flux. Above a certain value of UV flux (Jcrit), the gas in a halo collapses isothermally at ˜104 K and provides the conditions for supermassive star formation. However, H2 can self-shield, reducing the effect of photodissociation. So far, most numerical studies used the local Jeans length to calculate the column densities for self-shielding. We implement an improved method for the determination of column densities in 3D simulations and analyse its effect on the value of Jcrit. This new method captures the gas geometry and velocity field and enables us to properly determine the direction-dependent self-shielding factor of H2 against photodissociating radiation. We find a value of Jcrit that is a factor of 2 smaller than with the Jeans approach (˜2000 J21 versus ˜4000 J21). The main reason for this difference is the strong directional dependence of the H2 column density. With this lower value of Jcrit, the number of haloes exposed to a flux > Jcrit is larger by more than an order of magnitude compared to previous studies. This may translate into a similar enhancement in the predicted number density of black hole seeds.

  5. Self-shielding phenomenon modelling in multigroup transport code Apollo-2; Modelisation du phenomene d'autoprotection dans le code de transport multigroupe Apollo 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coste-Delclaux, M

    2006-03-15

    This document describes the improvements carried out for modelling the self-shielding phenomenon in the multigroup transport code APOLLO2. They concern the space and energy treatment of the slowing-down equation, the setting up of quadrature formulas to calculate reaction rates, the setting-up of a method that treats directly a resonant mixture and the development of a sub-group method. We validate these improvements either in an elementary or in a global way. Now, we obtain, more accurate multigroup reaction rates and we are able to carry out a reference self-shielding calculation on a very fine multigroup mesh. To end, we draw a conclusion and give some prospects on the remaining work. (author)

  6. Quark-mass dependence of baryon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, M.F.M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planck Str. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany) and Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: m.lutz@gsi.de; Garcia-Recio, C. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Kolomeitsev, E.E. [Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Nieves, J. [Departamento de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2005-05-30

    We study the quark-mass dependence of JP=12- s-wave and JP=32- d-wave baryon resonances. Parameter-free results are obtained in terms of the leading order chiral Lagrangian. In the 'heavy' SU(3) limit with m{pi}=mK{approx}500 MeV the s-wave resonances turn into bound states forming two octets plus a singlet representations of the SU(3) group. Similarly the d-wave resonances turn into bound states forming an octet and a decuplet in this limit. A contrasted result is obtained in the 'light' SU(3) limit with m{pi}=mK{approx}140 MeV for which no resonances exist.

  7. GCR Transport in the Brain: Assessment of Self-Shielding, Columnar Damage, and Nuclear Reactions on Cell Inactivation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation shield design is driven by the need to limit radiation risks while optimizing risk reduction with launch mass/expense penalties. Both limitation and optimization objectives require the development of accurate and complete means for evaluating the effectiveness of various shield materials and body-self shielding. For galactic cosmic rays (GCR), biophysical response models indicate that track structure effects lead to substantially different assessments of shielding effectiveness relative to assessments based on LET-dependent quality factors. Methods for assessing risk to the central nervous system (CNS) from heavy ions are poorly understood at this time. High-energy and charge (HZE) ion can produce tissue events resulting in damage to clusters of cells in a columnar fashion, especially for stopping heavy ions. Grahn (1973) and Todd (1986) have discussed a microlesion concept or model of stochastic tissue events in analyzing damage from HZE's. Some tissues, including the CNS, maybe sensitive to microlesion's or stochastic tissue events in a manner not illuminated by either conventional dosimetry or fluence-based risk factors. HZE ions may also produce important lateral damage to adjacent cells. Fluences of high-energy proton and alpha particles in the GCR are many times higher than HZE ions. Behind spacecraft and body self-shielding the ratio of protons, alpha particles, and neutrons to HZE ions increases several-fold from free-space values. Models of GCR damage behind shielding have placed large concern on the role of target fragments produced from tissue atoms. The self-shielding of the brain reduces the number of heavy ions reaching the interior regions by a large amount and the remaining light particle environment (protons, neutrons, deuterons. and alpha particles) may be the greatest concern. Tracks of high-energy proton produce nuclear reactions in tissue, which can deposit doses of more than 1 Gv within 5 - 10 cell layers. Information on rates of

  8. Distance dependence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Swathi; K L Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    Deviations from the usual -6 dependence of the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) on the distance between the donor and the acceptor have been a common scenario in the recent times. In this paper, we present a critical analysis of the distance dependence of FRET, and try to illustrate the non--6 type behaviour of the rate for the case of transfer from a localized electronic excitation on the donor, a dye molecule to three different energy acceptors with delocalized electronic excitations namely, graphene, a two-dimensional semiconducting sheet and the case of such a semiconducting sheet rolled to obtain a nanotube. We use simple analytic models to understand the distance dependence in each case.

  9. Rotor position sensing in brushless ac motors with self-shielding magnets using linear Hall sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z. Q.; Shi, Y. F.; Howe, D.

    2006-04-01

    This paper investigates the use of low cost linear Hall sensors for rotor position sensing in brushless ac motors equipped with self-shielding magnets, addresses practical issues, such as the influence of magnetic and mechanical tolerances, temperature variations, and the armature reaction field, and describes the performance which is achieved.

  10. Radiologic assessment of a self-shield with boron-containing water for a compact medical cyclotron

    OpenAIRE

    Horitsugi, Genki; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Eto, Akihisa; Iwamoto, Yasuo; Hashimoto, Hiromi; Hamada, Seiki; Obara, Satoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The cyclotron at our hospital has a self-shield of boron-containing water. The amount of induced radioactivity in the boron-containing water shield of a compact medical cyclotron has not yet been reported. In this study, we measured the photon and neutron dose rates outside the self-shield during cyclotron operation. We estimated the induced radioactivities of the boron-containing water used for the self-shield and then measured them. We estimated the activation of concrete outside the self-s...

  11. Temperature dependence of ferromagnetic resonance measurements in nanostructured line arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raposo V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of temperature on the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR spectra of nanostructured line arrays. Different temperature dependences are observed for permalloy an nickel based samples. The qualitative features of the temperature dependence of the resonance field and linewidth can be described by the usual expression of slow relaxing linewidth mechanism and Bloch equation.

  12. Effects of CeF3 on properties of self-shielded flux cored wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Ping; Tian Zhiling; Pan Chuan; Xue Jin

    2006-01-01

    Effects of CeF3 on properties of self-shielded flux cored wire including welding process, inclusions in weld metal and mechanical properties are systematically studied. Welding smoke and spatter are reduced with the addition of CeF3. The main non-metallic inclusions in weld metal are AlN and Al2 O3. CeF3 can refine non-metallic inclusions and reduce the amount of large size inclusions, which is attributed to the inclusion floating behavior during the solidification of weld metal. The low temperature impact toughness is improved by adding suitable amount of CeF3 in the flux.

  13. Radiologic assessment of a self-shield with boron-containing water for a compact medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horitsugi, Genki; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Eto, Akihisa; Iwamoto, Yasuo; Hashimoto, Hiromi; Hamada, Seiki; Obara, Satoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-07-01

    The cyclotron at our hospital has a self-shield of boron-containing water. The amount of induced radioactivity in the boron-containing water shield of a compact medical cyclotron has not yet been reported. In this study, we measured the photon and neutron dose rates outside the self-shield during cyclotron operation. We estimated the induced radioactivities of the boron-containing water used for the self-shield and then measured them. We estimated the activation of concrete outside the self-shield in the cyclotron laboratory. The thermal neutron flux during cyclotron operation was estimated to be 4.72 × 10(2) cm(-2) s(-1), and the activation of concrete in a cyclotron laboratory was about three orders of magnitude lower than the clearance level of RS-G-1.7 (IAEA). The activity concentration of the boron-containing water did not exceed the concentration limit for radioactive isotopes in drainage in Japan and the exemption level for Basic Safety Standards. Consequently, the boron-containing water is treatable as non-radioactive waste. Neutrons were effectively shielded by the self-shield during cyclotron operation.

  14. Next generation self-shielded flux cored electrode with improved toughness for off shore oil well platform structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Daya; Soltis, Patrick; Narayanan, Badri; Quintana, Marie; Fox, Jeff [The Lincoln Electric Company (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Self-shielded flux cored arc welding electrodes (FCAW-S) are ideal for outdoor applications, particularly open fabrication yards where high winds are a possibility. Development work was carried out on a FCAW-S electrode for welding 70 and 80 ksi yield strength base materials with a required minimum average Charpy V-Notch (CVN) absorbed energy value of 35 ft-lb at -40 deg F in the weld metal. The effect of Al, Mg, Ti, and Zr on CVN toughness was evaluated by running a Design of Experiments approach to systematically vary the levels of these components in the electrode fill and, in turn, the weld metal. These electrodes were used to weld simulated pipe joints. Over the range of compositions tested, 0.05% Ti in the weld metal was found to be optimum for CVN toughness. Ti also had a beneficial effect on the usable voltage range. Simulated offshore joints were welded to evaluate the effect of base metal dilution, heat input, and welding procedure on the toughness of weld metal. CVN toughness was again measured at -40 deg F on samples taken from the root and the cap pass regions. The root pass impact toughness showed strong dependence on the base metal dilution and the heat input used to weld the root and fill passes. (author)

  15. An analytical approach to γ-ray self-shielding effects for radioactive bodies encountered nuclear decommissioning scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, K A A; Joyce, M J

    2011-10-01

    A novel analytical approach is described that accounts for self-shielding of γ radiation in decommissioning scenarios. The approach is developed with plutonium-239, cobalt-60 and caesium-137 as examples; stainless steel and concrete have been chosen as the media for cobalt-60 and caesium-137, respectively. The analytical methods have been compared MCNPX 2.6.0 simulations. A simple, linear correction factor relates the analytical results and the simulated estimates. This has the potential to greatly simplify the estimation of self-shielding effects in decommissioning activities.

  16. Magnetic Field Dependence and Q of the Josephson Plasma Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Finnegan, T. F.; Langenberg, D. N.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the magnetic field dependence of the Josephson-plasma-resonance frequency and linewidth in Pb-Pb oxide-Pb tunnel junctions are reported. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the plasma mode is found to be sensitive to an antisymmetric component...... of supercurrent density which is not observed in conventional measurements of the field-dependent critical current. The frequency and field dependence of the plasma-resonance linewidth are interpreted as evidence that the previously unobserved quasiparticle-pair-interference tunnel current predicted by Josephson...

  17. Line Overlap and Self-Shielding of Molecular Hydrogen in Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Draine, Bruce T.

    2014-11-01

    The effect of line overlap in the Lyman and Werner bands, often ignored in galactic studies of the atomic-to-molecular transition, greatly enhances molecular hydrogen self-shielding in low metallicity environments and dominates over dust shielding for metallicities below about 10% solar. We implement that effect in cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with an empirical model, calibrated against the observational data, and provide fitting formulae for the molecular hydrogen fraction as a function of gas density on various spatial scales and in environments with varied dust abundance and interstellar radiation field. We find that line overlap, while important for detailed radiative transfer in the Lyman and Werner bands, has only a minor effect on star formation on galactic scales, which, to a much larger degree, is regulated by stellar feedback.

  18. Line Overlap and Self-Shielding of Molecular Hydrogen in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y

    2014-01-01

    The effect of line overlap in the Lyman and Werner bands, often ignored in galactic studies of the atomic-to-molecular transition, greatly enhances molecular hydrogen self-shielding in low metallicity environments, and dominates over dust shielding for metallicities below about 10% solar. We implement that effect in cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with an empirical model, calibrated against the observational data, and provide fitting formulae for the molecular hydrogen fraction as a function of gas density on various spatial scales and in environments with varied dust abundance and interstellar radiation field. We find that line overlap, while important for detailed radiative transfer in the Lyman and Werner bands, has only a minor effect on star formation on galactic scales, which, to a much larger degree, is regulated by stellar feedback.

  19. Formation Mechanism of Inclusion in Self-Shielded Flux Cored Arc Welds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ping; LU Xiao-sheng; PAN Chuan; XUE Jin; LI Zheng-bang

    2005-01-01

    The formation mechanism of inclusion in welds with different aluminum contents was determined based on thermodynamic equilibrium in self-shielded flux cored arc welds. Inclusions in welds were systematically studied by optical microscopy, scanning microscopy and image analyzer. The results show that the average size and the contamination rate of inclusions in low-aluminum weld are lower than those in high-aluminum weld. Highly faceted AlN inclusions with big size in the high-aluminum weld are more than those in low-aluminum weld. As a result,the low temperature impact toughness of low-aluminum weld is higher than that of high-aluminum weld. Finally,the thermodynamic analysis indicates that thermodynamic result agrees with the experimental data.

  20. Abrasive resistance of arc sprayed carbonitride alloying self-shielded coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yu; Yu, Shengfu; Xing, Shule; Huang, Linbing; Lu, Yan

    2011-10-01

    Wear-resistant coatings were prepared on the surface of the Q235 low-carbon steel plate by HVAS with the carbonitride alloying self-shielded flux-cored wire. Detection and analysis on the microstructure and properties of the coatings were carried out by using scanning electron microscope, microhardness tester and wear tester. The forming, the wear resistance and its mechanism of the coatings were studied. The results show that the coatings have good forming, homogeneous microstructure and compact structure. The coatings have good hardness, the average microhardness value reaches 520 HV 0.1, and the highest value is up to about 560 HV 0.1. As a result, the coatings have good abrasive wear performance and adhesion strength.

  1. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  2. Quark mass dependence of s-wave baryon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Recio, C.; Nieves, J. [Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna; Lutz, M.F.M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    We study the quark mass dependence of J{sup P} = 1/2{sup -} s-wave baryon resonances. Parameter free results are obtained in terms of the leading order chiral Lagrangian. In the 'heavy' SU(3) limit with m{sub {pi}} = m{sub K} {approx_equal} 500 MeV the resonances turn into bound states forming two octets plus a singlet representations of the SU(3) group. A contrasted result is obtained in the 'light' SU(3) limit with m{sub {pi}} = m{sub K} {approx_equal} 140 MeV for which no resonances exist. Using physical quark masses our analysis suggests to assign to the S = -2 resonances {xi}(1690) and {xi}(1620) the quantum numbers J{sup P} = 1/2{sup -}. (orig.)

  3. Geometry dependence of surface lattice resonances in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, R; Törmä, P

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoarrays which support collective surface lattice resonances (SLRs) have become an exciting frontier in plasmonics. Compared with the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in individual particles, these collective modes have appealing advantages such as angle-dependent dispersions and much narrower linewidths. Here, we investigate systematically how the geometry of the lattice affects the SLRs supported by metallic nanoparticles. We present a general theoretical framework from which the various SLR modes of a given geometry can be straightforwardly obtained by a simple comparison of the diffractive order (DO) vectors and orientation of the nanoparticle dipole given by the polarization of the incident field. Our experimental measurements show that while square, hexagonal, rectangular, honeycomb and Lieb lattice arrays have similar spectra near the $\\Gamma$-point ($k=0$), they have remarkably different SLR dispersions. Furthermore, their dispersions are highly dependent on the polarization. Num...

  4. CO Self-Shielding as a Mechanism to Make 16O-Enriched Solids in the Solar Nebula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Nuth, III

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Photochemical self-shielding of CO has been proposed as a mechanism to produce solids observed in the modern, 16O-depleted solar system. This is distinct from the relatively 16O-enriched composition of the solar nebula, as demonstrated by the oxygen isotopic composition of the contemporary sun. While supporting the idea that self-shielding can produce local enhancements in 16O-depleted solids, we argue that complementary enhancements of 16O-enriched solids can also be produced via C16O-based, Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT catalytic processes that could produce much of the carbonaceous feedstock incorporated into accreting planetesimals. Local enhancements could explain observed 16O enrichment in calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs, such as those from the meteorite, Isheyevo (CH/CHb, as well as in chondrules from the meteorite, Acfer 214 (CH3. CO self-shielding results in an overall increase in the 17O and 18O content of nebular solids only to the extent that there is a net loss of C16O from the solar nebula. In contrast, if C16O reacts in the nebula to produce organics and water then the net effect of the self-shielding process will be negligible for the average oxygen isotopic content of nebular solids and other mechanisms must be sought to produce the observed dichotomy between oxygen in the Sun and that in meteorites and the terrestrial planets. This illustrates that the formation and metamorphism of rocks and organics need to be considered in tandem rather than as isolated reaction networks.

  5. The new solid target system at UNAM in a self-shielded 11 MeV cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarate-Morales, A.; Gaspar-Carcamo, R. E.; Lopez-Rodriguez, V.; Flores-Moreno, A.; Trejo-Ballado, F.; Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel A. [Unidad PET, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 , D.F. Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-12-19

    A dual beam line (BL) self-shielded RDS 111 cyclotron for radionuclide production was installed at the School of Medicine of the National Autonomous University of Mexico in 2001. One of the BL's was upgraded to Eclipse HP (Siemens) in 2008 and the second BL was recently upgraded (June 2011) to the same version with the option for the irradiation of solid targets for the production of metallic radioisotopes.

  6. Temperature Dependence of Spreading Width of Giant Dipole Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Storozhenko, A N; Ventura, A; Blokhin, A I

    2002-01-01

    The Quasiparticle-Phonon Nuclear Model extended to finite temperature within the framework of Thermo Field Dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Gamma^{\\downarrow} of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for ^{120}Sn and ^{208}Pb nuclei. It is found that Gamma^{\\downarrow} increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones, existing in the literature.

  7. Contact angle dependence of the resonant properties of sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, James

    2012-02-01

    A simple optical deflection technique was used to monitor the vibrations of microlitre sessile drops of glycerol/water mixtures with glycerol compositions ranging from 0% to 75%. A photodiode was used to detect time dependent variations in the intensity of laser light reflected from the droplets. The intensity variations were Fourier transformed to obtain information about the resonant properties of the drops (frequency and width of the resonance). These experiments were performed on a range of different substrates where the contact angle formed by the droplets varied between 38±2^o and 160±4^o. The measured resonant frequency values were found to be in agreement with a recently developed theory of vibrations which considers standing wave states along the profile length of the droplet. The widths of the resonances were also compared with theories which predict the influence of substrate effects, surface contamination effects and bulk viscous effects on the damping of capillary waves at the free surface of the droplets. These experiments indicate that the dominant source of damping in sessile liquid droplet is due to bulk viscous effects but that for small contact angles damping due to the droplet/substrate interaction becomes more important.

  8. Characterization and dosimetry of a practical X-ray alternative to self-shielded gamma irradiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kishor; Parker, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The Insect Pest Control Laboratory of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture recently purchased an X-ray irradiator as part of their programme to develop the sterile insect technique (SIT). It is a self-contained type with a maximum X-ray beam energy of 150 keV using a newly developed 4 π X-ray tube to provide a very uniform dose to the product. This paper describes the results of our characterization study, which includes determination of dose rate in the centre of a canister as well as establishing absorbed dose distribution in the canister. The irradiation geometry consists of five canisters rotating around an X-ray tube—the volume of each canister being 3.5 l. The dose rate at the maximum allowed power of the tube (about 6.75 kW) in the centre of a canister filled with insects (or a simulated product) is about 14 Gy min -1. The dose uniformity ratio is about 1.3. The dose rate was measured using a Farmer type 0.18-cm 3 ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant low photon energies. Routine absorbed dose measurement and absorbed dose mapping can be performed using a Gafchromic® film dosimetry system. The radiation response of Gafchromic film is almost independent of X-ray energy in the range 100-150 keV, but is very sensitive to the surrounding material with which it is in immediate contact. It is important, therefore, to ensure that all absorbed dose measurements are performed under identical conditions to those used for the calibration of the dosimetry system. Our study indicates that this X-ray irradiator provides a practical alternative to self-shielded gamma irradiators for SIT programmes. Food and Agriculture Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency.

  9. Quantitative neutron capture resonance analysis verified with instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaauw, M. E-mail: blaauw@iri.tudelft.nl; Postma, H.; Mutti, P

    2003-06-01

    The newly developed elemental analysis technique Neutron Resonance Capture Analysis (NRCA) was verified by analyzing a prehistoric bronze arrowhead with both NRCA and Instrumental Activation Analysis (INAA). In NRCA, elements are identified through their neutron resonance capture energies as determined through detection of prompt capture gamma-rays as a function of time of flight. The quantification is obtained from the resonance peak areas. Corrections are required for neutron-energy-dependent dead time and self-shielding, the latter also depending on Doppler broadening. The analysis program REFIT, of which the intended use is the determination of the resonance parameters, was used to this end. The agreement observed between INAA and NRCA results indicates that the NRCA results obtained are accurate.

  10. Frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance in neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Daqing; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-08-01

    Biological neurons receive multiple noisy oscillatory signals, and their dynamical response to the superposition of these signals is of fundamental importance for information processing in the brain. Here we study the response of neural systems to the weak envelope modulation signal, which is superimposed by two periodic signals with different frequencies. We show that stochastic resonance occurs at the beat frequency in neural systems at the single-neuron as well as the population level. The performance of this frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance is influenced by both the beat frequency and the two forcing frequencies. Compared to a single neuron, a population of neurons is more efficient in detecting the information carried by the weak envelope modulation signal at the beat frequency. Furthermore, an appropriate fine-tuning of the excitation-inhibition balance can further optimize the response of a neural ensemble to the superimposed signal. Our results thus introduce and provide insights into the generation and modulation mechanism of the frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance in neural systems.

  11. Time-dependent resonant magneto-optical rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Dziczek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Results of a fairly straightforward experiment on resonant magneto-optical rotation by rubidium-87 atoms revealed strong time-dependence of the polarization plane of light emerging from atomic vapors following a sudden irradiation with a laser beam. The rotation of the plane appears as a not direct consequence of the influence of the magnetic field on atoms. Reported measurements conducted using a vapor cell without any buffer gas or an anti-relaxation wall coating show that transmitted light has initially the same (linear) polarization as the incident one. Rotation of the polarization plane caused by an axial magnetic field develops in time scales similar to the pace of establishing the optical pumping/relaxation equilibrium in the atomic ensemble. The traditional passive Faraday rotation picture providing working description for the resonant magneto-optical effects in steady-state conditions does not explain the observed sequence of evolution of the polarization. The picture has to be augmented with analysi...

  12. CO Self-Shielding as a Mechanism to Make O-16 Enriched Solids in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A. III; Johnson, Natasha M.; Hill, Hugh G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical self-shielding of CO has been proposed as a mechanism to produce solids observed in the modern, O-16 depleted solar system. This is distinct from the relatively O-16 enriched composition of the solar nebula, as demonstrated by the oxygen isotopic composition of the contemporary sun. While supporting the idea that self-shielding can produce local enhancements in O-16 depleted solids, we argue that complementary enhancements of O-16 enriched solids can also be produced via CO-16 based, Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) catalytic processes that could produce much of the carbonaceous feedstock incorporated into accreting planetesimals. Local enhancements could explain observed O-16 enrichment in calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs), such as those from the meteorite, Isheyevo (CH/CHb), as well as in chondrules from the meteorite, Acfer 214 (CH3). CO selfshielding results in an overall increase in the O-17 and O-18 content of nebular solids only to the extent that there is a net loss of CO-16 from the solar nebula. In contrast, if CO-16 reacts in the nebula to produce organics and water then the net effect of the self-shielding process will be negligible for the average oxygen isotopic content of nebular solids and other mechanisms must be sought to produce the observed dichotomy between oxygen in the Sun and that in meteorites and the terrestrial planets. This illustrates that the formation and metamorphism of rocks and organics need to be considered in tandem rather than as isolated reaction networks.

  13. Studies of Spuriously Time-dependent Resonances in Time-dependent Density Functional Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Kai; Maitra, Neepa T

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic approximations in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) will in general yield unphysical time-dependent shifts in the resonance positions of a system driven far from its ground-state. This spurious time-dependence is rationalized in [J. I. Fuks, K. Luo, E. D. Sandoval and N. T. Maitra, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 114}, 183002 (2015)] in terms of the violation of an exact condition by the non-equilibrium exchange-correlation kernel of TDDFT. Here we give details on the derivation and discuss reformulations of the exact condition that apply in special cases. In its most general form, the condition states that when a system is left in an arbitrary state, in the absence of time-dependent external fields nor ionic motion, the TDDFT resonance position for a given transition is independent of the state. Special cases include the invariance of TDDFT resonances computed with respect to any reference interacting stationary state of a fixed potential, and with respect to any choice of appropriate stationa...

  14. Time-dependent Corotation Resonance in Barred Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Pfenniger, Daniel; Taam, Ronald E.

    2016-10-01

    The effective potential neighboring the corotation resonance region in barred galaxies is shown to be strongly time-dependent in any rotating frame, due to the competition of nearby perturbations of similar strengths with differing rotation speeds. Contrary to the generally adopted assumption that in the bar rotating frame the corotation region should possess four stationary equilibrium points (Lagrange points), with high quality N-body simulations, we localize the instantaneous equilibrium points (EPs) and find that they circulate or oscillate broadly in azimuth with respect to the pattern speeds of the inner or outer perturbations. This implies that at the particle level the Jacobi integral is not well conserved around the corotation radius. That is, angular momentum exchanges decouple from energy exchanges, enhancing the chaotic diffusion of stars through the corotation region.

  15. Time-dependent Corotation Resonance in Barred Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Taam, Ronald E

    2016-01-01

    The effective potential neighboring the corotation resonance region in barred galaxies is shown to be strongly time-dependent in any rotating frame because of the competition of nearby perturbations of similar strengths with differing rotation speeds. Contrary to the generally adopted assumption, that in the bar rotating frame the corotation region should possess four stationary equilibrium points (Lagrange points), with high quality N-body simulations we localize the instantaneous equilibrium points and find that they circulate or oscillate broadly in azimuth with respect to the pattern speeds of the inner or outer perturbations. This implies that at the particle level the Jacobi integral is not well conserved around the corotation radius. That is, angular momentum exchanges decouple from energy exchanges, enhancing the chaotic diffusion of stars through the corotation region.

  16. How an improved implementation of H$_2$ self-shielding influences the formation of massive stars and black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hartwig, Tilman; Klessen, Ralf S; Latif, Muhammad A; Volonteri, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The highest redshift quasars at z>6 have mass estimates of about a billion M$_\\odot$. One of the pathways to their formation includes direct collapse of gas, forming a supermassive star ($\\sim 10^5\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$) precursor of the black hole seed. The conditions for direct collapse are more easily achievable in metal-free haloes, where atomic hydrogen cooling operates and molecular hydrogen (H$_2$) formation is inhibited by a strong external UV flux. Above a certain value of UV flux ($J_{\\rm crit}$), the gas in a halo collapses isothermally at $\\sim10^4$K and provides the conditions for supermassive star formation. However, H$_2$ can self-shield and the effect of photodissociation is reduced. So far, most numerical studies used the local Jeans length to calculate the column densities for self-shielding. We implement an improved method for the determination of column densities in 3D simulations and analyse its effect on the value of $J_{\\rm crit}$. This new method captures the gas geometry and velocity fie...

  17. Automatic welding technologies for long-distance pipelines by use of all-position self-shielded flux cored wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Huilin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize the automatic welding of pipes in a complex operation environment, an automatic welding system has been developed by use of all-position self-shielded flux cored wires due to their advantages, such as all-position weldability, good detachability, arc's stability, low incomplete fusion, no need for welding protective gas or protection against wind when the wind speed is < 8 m/s. This system consists of a welding carrier, a guide rail, an auto-control system, a welding source, a wire feeder, and so on. Welding experiments with this system were performed on the X-80 pipeline steel to determine proper welding parameters. The welding technique comprises root welding, filling welding and cover welding and their welding parameters were obtained from experimental analysis. On this basis, the mechanical properties tests were carried out on welded joints in this case. Results show that this system can help improve the continuity and stability of the whole welding process and the welded joints' inherent quality, appearance shape, and mechanical performance can all meet the welding criteria for X-80 pipeline steel; with no need for windbreak fences, the overall welding cost will be sharply reduced. Meanwhile, more positive proposals were presented herein for the further research and development of this self-shielded flux core wires.

  18. Radiation Dosimetry of Self-Shielding Cyclotron%自屏蔽回旋加速器辐射剂量测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包宝亮; 何玉林; 李剑波

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect the radiation dose of self-shielding cyclotron to ensure the security of radiation workers. Methods Detecting the dose of radiation released by self-shielding cyclotron in cyclotron room, radiochemical laboratory and the teardowning and reinstalling process of target body with a portable radiation measuring instrument. Results The radiation dose in cyclotron room, radiochemical laboratory and the teardowning and reinstalling process of target body is within the security scope. Conclusion The self-shielding system, hot synthesis chamber and safety shield of self-shielding cyclotron have good shielding effect for radiation.%目的:检测自屏蔽回旋加速器的辐射剂量,以保障放射工作人员的安全。方法应用手提便携式辐射测量仪检测加速器室、放化实验室以及靶的拆卸和重装过程中的辐射剂量。结果加速器室、放化实验室以及靶的拆卸和重装过程中的辐射剂量在规定的安全范围之内。结论回旋加速器自屏蔽系统、合成热室、分装防护屏等具有良好的辐射屏蔽效果。

  19. Resonance treatment using pin-based pointwise energy slowing-down method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Lee, Changho; Lee, Deokjung

    2017-02-01

    A new resonance self-shielding method using a pointwise energy solution has been developed to overcome the drawbacks of the equivalence theory. The equivalence theory uses a crude resonance scattering source approximation, and assumes a spatially constant scattering source distribution inside a fuel pellet. These two assumptions cause a significant error, in that they overestimate the multi-group effective cross sections, especially for 238U. The new resonance self-shielding method solves pointwise energy slowing-down equations with a sub-divided fuel rod. The method adopts a shadowing effect correction factor and fictitious moderator material to model a realistic pointwise energy solution. The slowing-down solution is used to generate the multi-group cross section. With various light water reactor problems, it was demonstrated that the new resonance self-shielding method significantly improved accuracy in the reactor parameter calculation with no compromise in computation time, compared to the equivalence theory.

  20. Initial state dependence of a quantum-resonance ratchet

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Jiating; Dadras, Siamak; Borunda, Mario F; Wimberger, Sandro; Summy, Gil S

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate quantum resonance ratchets created with Bose-Einstein condensates exposed to pulses of an off-resonant standing light wave. We show how some of the basic properties of the ratchets are controllable through the creation of different initial states of the system. In particular, our results prove that through an appropriate choice of initial state it is possible to reduce the extent to which the ratchet state changes with respect to time. We develop a simple theory to explain our results and indicate how ratchets might be used as part of a matter wave interferometer or quantum-random walk experiment.

  1. Initial experience with an 11 MeV self-shielded medical cyclotron on operation and radiation safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pant G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A self-shielded medical cyclotron (11 MeV was commissioned at our center, to produce positron emitters, namely, 18 F, 15 O, 13 N and 11 C for positron emission tomography (PET imaging. Presently the cyclotron has been exclusively used for the production of 18 F - for 18 F-FDG imaging. The operational parameters which influence the yield of 18 F - production were monitored. The radiation levels in the cyclotron and radiochemistry laboratory were also monitored to assess the radiation safety status in the facility. The target material, 18 O water, is bombarded with proton beam from the cyclotron to produce 18 F - ion that is used for the synthesis of 18 F-FDG. The operational parameters which influence the yield of 18 F - were observed during 292 production runs out of a total of more than 400 runs. The radiation dose levels were also measured in the facility at various locations during cyclotron production runs and in the radiochemistry laboratory during 18 F-FDG syntheses. It was observed that rinsing the target after delivery increased the number of production runs in a given target, as well as resulted in a better correlation between the duration of bombardment and the end of bombardment 18 F - activity with absolutely clean target after being rebuilt. The radiation levels in the cyclotron and radiochemistry laboratory were observed to be well within prescribed limits with safe work practice.

  2. Infrared-microwave double resonance: signal dependence on microwave radiation strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreede, J.P.M. de; Dijkerman, H.A.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of MW radiation on the magnitude of double resonance signals is studied in the case of steady-state 3-level IR-MW double resonance, using IR or MW radiation as probe field. The measurements reveal a strong signal dependence on the microwave power level. Changes in the absorption factor

  3. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F. D.; Hagel, K.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O.; Charity, R. J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R. S.; Simon, R. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    High-energy γ rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of 136Xe+48Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width Γ is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy E*. A saturation at about Γ=10 MeV is observed for E*/A>=1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  4. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F.D.; Hagel, K.; Kuehn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O. (II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet, Giessen, Giessen (Germany)); Charity, R.J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R.S.; Simon, R.S.; Wessels, J.P. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)); Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A.A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Florence, Florence (Italy))

    1992-07-13

    High-energy {gamma} rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of {sup 136}Xe+{sup 48}Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width {Gamma} is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy {ital E}{sup *}. A saturation at about {Gamma}=10 MeV is observed for {ital E}{sup *}/{ital A}{ge}1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  5. Energy dependence of resonance production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Feng-lan; Wang, Rui-qin; Zhang, Mao-sheng

    2016-01-01

    The production of hadronic resonances $K^{*}(892)$, $\\phi(1020)$, $\\Sigma^{*}(1385)$, and $\\Xi^{*}(1530)$ in central AA collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 17.3, 200, and 2760 GeV are systematically studied. The direct production of these resonances at system hadronization are described by the quark combination model and the effects of hadron multiple-scattering stage are dealt with by a ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics model (UrQMD). We study the contribution of these two production sources to final observation and compare the final spectra with the available experimental data. The $p_T$ spectra of $K^{*}(892)$ calculated directly by quark combination model are explicitly higher than the data at low $p_T \\lesssim 1.5$ GeV and taking into account the modification of rescattering effects the resulting final spectra well agree with the data at all three collision energies. The rescattering effect on $\\phi(1020)$ production is weak and including it can slightly improve our description at low $p_T$ on the...

  6. Energy dependence of resonance production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng-Lan; Song, Jun; Wang, Rui-Qin; Zhang, Mao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    The production of the hadronic resonances K*0(892), ϕ(1020), Σ*(1385), and Ξ*(1530) in central AA collisions at , 200, and 2760 GeV is systematically studied. The direct production of these resonances at system hadronization is described by the quark combination model and the effects of hadron multiple-scattering stage are dealt with by a ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamics model (UrQMD). We study the contribution of these two production sources to final observation and compare the final spectra with the available experimental data. The p T spectra of K*0(892) calculated directly by quark combination model are explicitly higher than the data at low p T ≲ 1.5 GeV, and taking into account the modification of rescattering effects, the resulting final spectra well agree with the data at all three collision energies. The rescattering effect on ϕ(1020) production is weak and including it can slightly improve our description at low p T on the basis of overall agreement with the data. We also predict the p T spectra of Σ*(1385) and Ξ*(1530), to be tested by the future experimental data. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575100, 11305076, 11505104)

  7. Calculation of thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for aqueous bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasrabadi, M.N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Kashan, Km. 6, Ravand Road, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mnnasri@kashanu.ac.ir; Jalali, M. [Isfahan Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Atomic Energy organization of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Kashan, Km. 6, Ravand Road, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    In this work thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing materials is studied using bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) with the MCNP code. The code was used to perform three dimensional simulations of a neutron source, neutron detector and sample of various material compositions. The MCNP model was validated against experimental measurements of the neutron flux performed using a BF{sub 3} detector. Simulations were performed to predict thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing solutes. In practice, the MCNP calculations are combined with experimental measurements of the relative thermal neutron flux over the sample's surface, with respect to a reference water sample, to derive the thermal neutron self-shielding within the sample. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the average thermal neutron flux within the sample volume is required.

  8. Off-resonant vibrational excitation: Orientational dependence and spatial control of photofragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machholm, Mette; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2000-01-01

    -dependent response to the IR fields is due to the anharmonicity of the potential. A subsequent ultraviolet laser pulse in resonance at the outer turning point of the vibrational motion can then dissociate the oscillating molecules, all with the same orientation, leading to spatial control of the photofragment......Off-resonant and resonant vibrational excitation with short intense infrared (IR) laser pulses creates localized oscillating wave packets, but differs by the efficiency of the excitation and surprisingly by the orientational dependence. Orientational selectivity of the vibrational excitation...... of randomly oriented heteronuclear diatomic molecules can be obtained under simultaneous irradiation by a resonant and an off-resonant intense IR laser pulse: Molecules with one initial orientation will be vibrationally excited, while those with the opposite orientation will be at rest. The orientation...

  9. Development and validation of burnup dependent computational schemes for the analysis of assemblies with advanced lattice codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Karthikeyan

    The main aim of this research is the development and validation of computational schemes for advanced lattice codes. The advanced lattice code which forms the primary part of this research is "DRAGON Version4". The code has unique features like self shielding calculation with capabilities to represent distributed and mutual resonance shielding effects, leakage models with space-dependent isotropic or anisotropic streaming effect, availability of the method of characteristics (MOC), burnup calculation with reaction-detailed energy production etc. Qualified reactor physics codes are essential for the study of all existing and envisaged designs of nuclear reactors. Any new design would require a thorough analysis of all the safety parameters and burnup dependent behaviour. Any reactor physics calculation requires the estimation of neutron fluxes in various regions of the problem domain. The calculation goes through several levels before the desired solution is obtained. Each level of the lattice calculation has its own significance and any compromise at any step will lead to poor final result. The various levels include choice of nuclear data library and energy group boundaries into which the multigroup library is cast; self shielding of nuclear data depending on the heterogeneous geometry and composition; tracking of geometry, keeping error in volume and surface to an acceptable minimum; generation of regionwise and groupwise collision probabilities or MOC-related information and their subsequent normalization thereof, solution of transport equation using the previously generated groupwise information and obtaining the fluxes and reaction rates in various regions of the lattice; depletion of fuel and of other materials based on normalization with constant power or constant flux. Of the above mentioned levels, the present research will mainly focus on two aspects, namely self shielding and depletion. The behaviour of the system is determined by composition of resonant

  10. Calculation of optical absorption and resonance Raman correlators using time-dependent recursion relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Christian; Mortensen, O. Sonnich; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1996-01-01

    Time-dependent recursion relationships are derived for optical absorption and resonance Raman correlators in the multidimensional harmonic case using a second-quantization formalism. Furthermore, a procedure is given for the calculation of correlators involving a general analytic coordinate depen...... dependence of the transition dipole moment....

  11. Resonant relaxation near a massive black hole: the dependence on eccentricity

    CERN Document Server

    Gürkan, M Atakan

    2007-01-01

    The orbits of stars close to a massive black hole are nearly Keplerian ellipses. Such orbits exert long term torques on each other, which lead to an enhanced angular momentum relaxation known as resonant relaxation. Under certain conditions, this process can modify the angular momentum distribution and affect the interaction rates of the stars with the massive black hole more efficiently than non-resonant relaxation. The torque on an orbit exerted by the cluster depends on the eccentricity of the orbit. In this paper, we calculate this dependence and determine the resonant relaxation timescale as a function of eccentricity. In particular, we show that the component of the torque that changes the magnitude of the angular momentum is linearly proportional to eccentricity, so resonant relaxation is much more efficient on eccentric orbits than on circular orbits.

  12. Vibrational resonance in adaptive small-world neuronal networks with spike-timing-dependent plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2015-10-01

    The phenomenon of vibrational resonance is investigated in adaptive Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks, where the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is modulated based on spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Numerical results demonstrate that there exists appropriate amplitude of high-frequency driving which is able to optimize the neural ensemble response to the weak low-frequency periodic signal. The effect of networked vibrational resonance can be significantly affected by spike-timing-dependent plasticity. It is shown that spike-timing-dependent plasticity with dominant depression can always improve the efficiency of vibrational resonance, and a small adjusting rate can promote the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, the network topology plays an important role in the vibrational resonance in spike-timing-dependent plasticity-induced neural systems, where the system response to the subthreshold signal is maximized by an optimal network structure. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the introduction of inhibitory synapses can considerably weaken the phenomenon of vibrational resonance in the hybrid small-world neuronal networks with spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

  13. Overcoming the concentration-dependence of responsive probes for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanger, Levi A.

    2015-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging, contrast agents are molecules that increase the contrast-to-noise ratio of non-invasively acquired images. The information gained from magnetic resonance imaging can be increased using responsive contrast agents that undergo chemical changes, and consequently changes to contrast enhancement, for example in response to specific biomarkers that are indicative of diseases. A major limitation with modern responsive contrast agents is concentration-dependence that requires the concentration of contrast agent to be known: an extremely challenging task in vivo. Here, we review advances in several strategies aimed at overcoming the concentration-dependent nature of responsive contrast agents. PMID:25579206

  14. Will Organic Synthesis Within Icy Grains or on Dust Surfaces in the Primitive Solar Nebula Completely Erase the Effects of Photochemical Self Shielding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    There are at least 3 separate photochemical self-shielding models with different degrees of commonality. All of these models rely on the selective absorption of (12))C(16)O dissociative photons as the radiation source penetrates through the gas allowing the production of reactive O-17 and O-18 atoms within a specific volume. Each model also assumes that the undissociated C(16)O is stable and does not participate in the chemistry of nebular dust grains. In what follows we will argue that this last, very important assumption is simply not true despite the very high energy of the CO molecular bond.

  15. Correlation length and universality in the BCS-BEC crossover for energy-dependent resonance superfluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, S.; Chiofalo, M.-L.

    2017-07-01

    We consider the BCS-BEC crossover of a quantum Fermi gas at T = 0 in the presence of an energy-dependent Fano-Feshbach resonance, driving the system from broad to narrow limits. We choose a minimal microscopic potential reproducing the two-particle resonance physics in terms of the scattering length a and the effective range R∗ representing the resonance width, and solve the BCS mean-field equations varying a, R∗ and the density. We show that the condensate fraction manifests a universal behavior when the correlation length, measuring the pair size, is used as the crossover parameter. Generally, a negative effective range has the effect of stretching the crossover region between the two extreme regimes, as evidenced by the behavior of the chemical potential. These results can be useful in view of the more recent perspectives of realizing narrow resonances also by optical means and amenable as a base quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. Temperature dependence of the cosphi conductance in Josephson tunnel junctions determined from plasma resonance experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.; Mygind, Jesper

    1978-01-01

    The microwave response at 9 GHz of Sn-O-Sn tunnel-junction current biased at zero dc voltage has been measured just below the critical temperature Tc of the Sn films. The temperature dependence of the cosφ conductance is determined from the resonant response at the junction plasma frequency fp...... of the experiment....

  17. Tailoring Rydberg interactions via F\\"orster resonances: state combinations, hopping and angular dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Paris-Mandoki, Asaf; Tresp, Christoph; Mirgorodskiy, Ivan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    F\\"orster resonances provide a highly flexible tool to tune both the strength and the angular shape of interactions between two Rydberg atoms. We give a detailed explanation about how F\\"orster resonances can be found by searching through a large range of possible quantum number combinations. We apply our search method to $SS$, $SD$ and $DD$ pair states of $^{87}$Rb with principal quantum numbers from 30 to 100, taking into account the fine structure splitting of the Rydberg states. We find various strong resonances between atoms with a large difference in principal quantum numbers. We quantify the strength of these resonances by introducing a figure of merit $\\tilde C_3$ which is independent of the magnetic quantum number and geometry to classify the resonances by interaction strength. We further predict to what extent interaction exchange is possible on different resonances and point out limitations of the coherent hopping process. Finally, we discuss the angular dependence of the dipole-dipole interaction ...

  18. Morphology-Dependent Resonances and Their Applications to Sensing in Aerospace Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, G.; Otugen, M.V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in Morphology-Dependent Resonance (MDR)-based sensors for aerospace applications. The sensor concept is based on the detection of small shifts of optical resonances (also called the whispering gallery modes or WGM) of dielectric spheres caused by external effects. Recent developments in MRD-based micro-optical sensors for temperature, force, pressure, and concentration are discussed. In addition to the experimental configurations used in each type of prototype sensor, a brief overview is also given for analytical approaches to describe the sensor principle.

  19. Anisotropy modeling of terahertz metamaterials: polarization dependent resonance manipulation by meta-atom cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyunseung; In, Chihun; Choi, Hyunyong; Lee, Hojin

    2014-06-09

    Recently metamaterials have inspired worldwide researches due to their exotic properties in transmitting, reflecting, absorbing or refracting specific electromagnetic waves. Most metamaterials are known to have anisotropic properties, but existing anisotropy models are applicable only to a single meta-atom and its properties. Here we propose an anisotropy model for asymmetrical meta-atom clusters and their polarization dependency. The proposed anisotropic meta-atom clusters show a unique resonance property in which their frequencies can be altered for parallel polarization, but fixed to a single resonance frequency for perpendicular polarization. The proposed anisotropic metamaterials are expected to pave the way for novel optical systems.

  20. The Influence of Crystal Annealing on Orientation Dependence of Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance in InSe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.O. Khandozhko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the spectrum intensity on the orientation of crystallographic axes of anisotropic crystal with respect to the magnetic component vector of high-frequency field was studied using NQR method. The existence of residual intensity of the resonance spectrum while Н1c indicates the presence of defects in single crystal – blocks with small angle boundaries or other violations of atomic layers. Crystal annealing at the temperature of 550C is accompanied by improvment of quality of NQR resonance spectra and diffraction maxima at topograms.

  1. Carrier concentration dependence of the tunability of the dipole resonance peak in optically excited metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzakis, Ioannis; Luo, Liang; Wang, Jigang; Shen, Nian Hai; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas

    2011-03-01

    Currently, there is strong interest to explore the dynamic control of the electromagnetic properties of metamaterials, which have important implications on their optoelectronic applications. While the design, fabrication and photo-doping of metamaterial/semiconductor structures have been actively pursued, some fundamental issues related to highly photo-excited states, their dynamic tuning and temporal evolution remain open. Using optical-pump terahertz probe spectroscopy, we report on the pump fluence dependence of the electric dipole resonance tunability in metamaterials. We find a previously undiscovered large non-monotonic variation on the strength of the dipole resonance peak with the photo-injected carrier concentration.

  2. Angular dependent study on ferromagnetic resonance and spin excitations by spin rectification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yichao; Fan, Xiaolong, E-mail: fanxiaolong@lzu.edu.cn; Zhao, Xiaobing; Rao, Jinwei; Zhou, Hengan; Guo, Dangwei; Xue, Desheng [The Key Lab for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2015-01-14

    We report angular dependent spin rectification spectra which are applied to studying spin excitations in single permalloy stripe. Based on planar Hall effect, those spin excitations generate special resonant dc Hall voltages, which have been characterized as functions of the amplitude and direction of applied magnetic field. Through high angular resolution 2D mappings, the evolutions of different spin excitation can be directly presented, and the dynamic magnetic parameters such as the gyromagnetic ratio, effective exchange field, as well as the quantized numbers of standing spin waves can be accurately determined through fitting the angular evolution of each resonance.

  3. On The $Q^2$ Dependence of The Spin Structure Function In The Resonance Region

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Li, Zhenping; Li, Zhujun

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we show what we can learn from the CEBAF experiments on spin-structure functions, and the transition from the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule in the real photon limit to the spin dependent sum rules in the deep inelastic scattering, and how the asymmetry $A_1(x,Q^2)$ approaches the scaling limit in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region alone can not determine the spin-dependent sum rule due to the kinematic restriction of the resonance region. The integral $\\int_0^1 \\frac {A_1(x,Q^2)F_2(x,Q^2)}{2x(1+R(x,Q^2))}dx$ is estimated from $Q^2=0$ to $2.5$ GeV$^2$. The result shows that there is a region where both contributions from the baryon resonances and the deep inelastic scattering are important, thus provides important information on the high twist effects on the spin dependent sum rule.

  4. Verification of effectiveness of borated water shield for a cyclotron type self-shielded; Verificacao da eficacia da blindagem de agua borada construida para um acelerador ciclotron do tipo autoblindado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videira, Heber S.; Burkhardt, Guilherme M.; Santos, Ronielly S., E-mail: heber@cyclopet.com.br [Cyclopet Radiofarmacos Ltda., Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Passaro, Bruno M.; Gonzalez, Julia A.; Santos, Josefina; Guimaraes, Maria I.C.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Lenzi, Marcelo K. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitina (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica

    2013-04-15

    The technological advances in positron emission tomography (PET) in conventional clinic imaging have led to a steady increase in the number of cyclotrons worldwide. Most of these cyclotrons are being used to produce {sup 18}F-FDG, either for themselves as for the distribution to other centers that have PET. For there to be safety in radiological facilities, the cyclotron intended for medical purposes can be classified in category I and category II, ie, self-shielded or non-shielded (bunker). Therefore, the aim of this work is to verify the effectiveness of borated water shield built for a cyclotron accelerator-type Self-shielded PETtrace 860. Mixtures of water borated occurred in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, as well as the results of the radiometric survey in the vicinity of the self-shielding of the cyclotron in the conditions established by the manufacturer showed that radiation levels were below the limits. (author)

  5. UV resonance Raman investigation of the aqueous solvation dependence of primary amide vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punihaole, David; Jakubek, Ryan S; Dahlburg, Elizabeth M; Hong, Zhenmin; Myshakina, Nataliya S; Geib, Steven; Asher, Sanford A

    2015-03-12

    We investigated the normal mode composition and the aqueous solvation dependence of the primary amide vibrations of propanamide. Infrared, normal Raman, and UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy were applied in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) to assign the vibrations of crystalline propanamide. We examined the aqueous solvation dependence of the primary amide UVRR bands by measuring spectra in different acetonitrile/water mixtures. As previously observed in the UVRR spectra of N-methylacetamide, all of the resonance enhanced primary amide bands, except for the Amide I (AmI), show increased UVRR cross sections as the solvent becomes water-rich. These spectral trends are rationalized by a model wherein the hydrogen bonding and the high dielectric constant of water stabilizes the ground state dipolar (-)O-C═NH2(+) resonance structure over the neutral O═C-NH2 resonance structure. Thus, vibrations with large C-N stretching show increased UVRR cross sections because the C-N displacement between the electronic ground and excited state increases along the C-N bond. In contrast, vibrations dominated by C═O stretching, such as the AmI, show a decreased displacement between the electronic ground and excited state, which result in a decreased UVRR cross section upon aqueous solvation. The UVRR primary amide vibrations can be used as sensitive spectroscopic markers to study the local dielectric constant and hydrogen bonding environments of the primary amide side chains of glutamine (Gln) and asparagine (Asn).

  6. Magnetic field dependence of the neutron spin resonance in CeB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnichenko, P. Y.; Demishev, S. V.; Semeno, A. V.; Ohta, H.; Cameron, A. S.; Surmach, M. A.; Jang, H.; Friemel, G.; Dukhnenko, A. V.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.; Filipov, V. B.; Schneidewind, A.; Ollivier, J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Inosov, D. S.

    2016-07-01

    In zero magnetic field, the famous neutron spin resonance in the f -electron superconductor CeCoIn5 is similar to the recently discovered exciton peak in the nonsuperconducting CeB6. A magnetic field splits the resonance in CeCoIn5 into two components, indicating that it is a doublet. Here we employ inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to scrutinize the field dependence of spin fluctuations in CeB6. The exciton shows a markedly different behavior without any field splitting. Instead, we observe a second field-induced magnon whose energy increases with field. At the ferromagnetic zone center, however, we find only a single mode with a nonmonotonic field dependence. At low fields, it is initially suppressed to zero together with the antiferromagnetic order parameter, but then reappears at higher fields inside the hidden-order phase, following the energy of an electron spin resonance (ESR). This is a unique example of a ferromagnetic resonance in a heavy-fermion metal seen by both ESR and INS consistently over a broad range of magnetic fields.

  7. A Polarization-Dependent Normal Incident Quantum Cascade Detector Enhanced Via Metamaterial Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Wang, Feng-Jiao; Liu, Jun-Qi; Liu, Shu-Man; Zhuo, Ning; Zhang, Chuan-Jin; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2016-12-01

    The design, fabrication, and characterization of a polarization-dependent normal incident quantum cascade detector coupled via complementary split-ring metamaterial resonators in the infrared regime are presented. The metamaterial structure is designed through three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method and fabricated on the top metal contact, which forms a double-metal waveguide together with the metallic ground plane. With normal incidence, significant enhancements of photocurrent response are obtained at the metamaterial resonances compared with the 45° polished edge coupling device. The photocurrent response enhancements exhibit clearly polarization dependence, and the largest response enhancement factor of 165% is gained for the incident light polarized parallel to the split-ring gap.

  8. Orientational dependence of optically detected magnetic resonance signals in laser-driven atomic magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Simone; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Scholtes, Theo; Grujić, Zoran D.; Lebedev, Victor; Weis, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of lock-in-demodulated M_x-magnetometer signals on the orientation of the static magnetic field B0 of interest. Magnetic resonance spectra for 2400 discrete orientations of B0 covering a 4π solid angle have been recorded by a PC-controlled steering and data acquisition system. Off-line fits by previously derived lineshape functions allow us to extract the relevant resonance parameters (shape, amplitude, width, and phase) and to represent their dependence on the orientation of B0 with respect to the laser beam propagation direction. We have performed this study for two distinct M_x-magnetometer configurations, in which the rf-field is either parallel or perpendicular to the light propagation direction. The results confirm well the algebraic theoretical model functions. We suggest that small discrepancies are related to hitherto uninvestigated atomic alignment contributions.

  9. Temperature dependence of a spreading width of giant dipole resonance in neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin, A.I.; Storozhenko, A.N

    2003-07-14

    A temperature dependence of the spreading width of a giant dipole resonance is studied in the framework of the Quasiparticle-Phonon Model extended to finite temperature using a formalism of the Thermo Field Dynamics. Numerical calculations are performed for {sup 120}Sn and the neutron-rich double-magic isotope {sup 132}Sn It is found that the dispersion of the E1 strength function {sigma} increases with temperature.

  10. Age-dependent heterogeneity of familiar hypertrophic cardiomyopathy phenotype: a role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaveckaitė, Sigita; Rudys, Alfredas; Mikštienė, Violeta; Valevičienė, Nomeda; Palionis, Darius; Laucevičius, Aleksandras

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, we present familiar hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with age-dependent heterogeneity of the disease phenotype among the members of one family who carry the same mutation of the myosin-binding protein C gene. Phenotypic heterogeneity is common in patients with familial forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, both in clinical expression and outcome. Compared with other noninvasive cardiac imaging modalities, cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides an opportunity to more accurately characterize the varying phenotypic presentations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  11. M-ary suprathreshold stochastic resonance in multilevel threshold systems with signal-dependent noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chaojun; Zhou, Bingchang; Gao, Xiao; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate multilevel threshold systems with signal-dependent noise that transmit a common random input signal. We demonstrate the occurrence of M-ary suprathreshold stochastic resonance caused by the signal-dependent noise, and quantify the information enhancement that results relative to the absence of noise. We also find that in the case of M-ary threshold systems, the values of mutual information and signal-to-quantization-noise ratio are larger than the corresponding values in the case of binary threshold systems. These results are potentially useful for understanding the encoding mechanism of inner-ear hair cells and other biological sensory systems.

  12. EFFECT OF Fe2O3 ON WELDING TECHNOLOGY AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WELD METAL DEPOSITED BY SELF-SHIELDED FLUX CORED WIRE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Ping; Pan Chuan; Xue Jin; Li Zhengbang

    2005-01-01

    Five experimental self-shielded flux cored wires are fabricated with different amount of Fe2O3 in the flux. The effect of Fe2O3 on welding technology and mechanical properties of weld metals deposited by these wires are studied. The results show that with the increase of Fe2O3 in the mix, the melting point of the pretreated mix is increased. LiBaF3 and BaFe12O19, which are very low in inherent moisture, are formed after the pretreatment. The mechanical properties are evaluated to the weld metals. The low temperature notch toughness of the weld metals is increased linearly with the Fe2O3 content in the flux due to the balance between Fe2O3 and residual Al in the weld metal. The optimum Fe2O3 content in flux is 2.5%~3.5 %.

  13. Polarization dependence of transition intensities in double resonance experiments: unresolved spin doublets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Vladimir S; Field, Robert W

    2008-01-07

    The polarization dependence of transition intensities in multiple resonance spectroscopic experiments can provide information useful for making rotational assignments. A formalism to describe the polarization dependence of transition intensities in multiple resonance experiments, particularly for cases when two rotational/fine structure quantum numbers are needed to specify the state of the system, is presented. The formalism is presented in a form usable both when the transitions between the underlying fine structure components are experimentally resolved, as well as when they are unresolved, to form composite lines. This sort of treatment is necessary for cases when the two quantum numbers that specify the fine structure differ significantly, such as is the case at low N, when the difference between J and N becomes comparable to the value of J. Ratios of transition intensities in different experimentally convenient polarization arrangements are evaluated for the case of composite N transitions formed by combining the spin components of a doublet system. The formalism is expressed in a form easily extendable to accommodate experimental cases of more than two excitation steps, or a combination of excitation steps and an external static electric field. This polarization diagnostic has been experimentally applied to assign spectral features in double resonance Rydberg spectra of CaF.

  14. Resonant Spin-Flavor Conversion of Supernova Neutrinos: Dependence on Electron Mole Fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, T; Kimura, K; Yokomakura, H; Kawagoe, S; Kajino, T

    2009-01-01

    Detailed dependence of resonant spin-flavor (RSF) conversion of supernova neutrinos on electron mole fraction Ye is investigated. Supernova explosion forms a hot-bubble and neutrino-driven wind region of which electron mole fraction exceeds 0.5 in several seconds after the core collapse. When a higher resonance of the RSF conversion is located in the innermost region, flavor change of the neutrinos strongly depends on the sign of 1-2Ye. At an adiabatic high RSF resonance the flavor conversion of bar{nu}_e -> nu_{mu,tau} occurs in Ye 0.5 and inverted mass hierarchy. In other cases of Ye values and mass hierarchies, the conversion of nu_e -> bar{nu}_{mu,tau} occurs. The final bar{nu}_e spectrum is evaluated in the cases of Ye 0.5 taking account of the RSF conversion. Based on the obtained result, time variation of the event number ratios of low bar{nu}_e energy to high bar{nu}_e energy is discussed. In normal mass hierarchy, an enhancement of the event ratio should be seen in the period when the electron frac...

  15. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...... theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall perspective...

  16. Time Dependent Coupled Cluster Approach to Resonance Raman Excitation Profiles from General Anharmonic Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Durga Prasad

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A time dependent coupled cluster approach to the calculation of Resonance Raman excitation profiles on general anharmonic surfaces is presented. The vibrational wave functions on the ground electronic surface are obtained by the coupled cluster method (CCM. It is shown that the propagation of the vibrational ground state on the upper surface is equivalent to propagation of the vacuum state by an effective hamiltonian generated by the similarity transformation of the vibrational hamiltonian of that surface by the CCM wave operator of the lower surface up to a normalization constant. This time propagation is carried out by the time-dependent coupled cluster method in a time dependent frame. Numerical studies are presented to asses the validity of the approach.

  17. Temperature dependence of the Kondo resonance and its satellites in CeCu_2Si_2

    OpenAIRE

    Reinert, F.; Ehm, D.; Schmidt, S; Nicolay, G.; H"ufner, S.; Kroha, J.; Trovarelli, O.; Geibel, C.

    2001-01-01

    We present high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy studies on the Kondo resonance of the strongly-correlated Ce system CeCu$_2$Si$_2$. Exploiting the thermal broadening of the Fermi edge we analyze position, spectral weight, and temperature dependence of the low-energy 4f spectral features, whose major weight lies above the Fermi level $E_F$. We also present theoretical predictions based on the single-impurity Anderson model using an extended non-crossing approximation (NCA), including all...

  18. Resonant Charge Current in a Rashba Ring Induced by Spin-Dependent Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhan-Feng; LI Hong

    2008-01-01

    A one-dimensional ring subject to Rashba spin-orbit coupling is investigated. When it is attached to a lead with spin-dependent chemical potential, there will be charge current in the ring. The charge current response is resonantly maximized when the Fermi energy of the lead is equal to any energy level of the 1D ring. And if two probes are attached to the ring, the electric voltage between them creates sawtooth-like wave, which indicates the direction of the charge current. A ferromagnetic lead can also induce persistent charge current, which can be detected by magnetization intensity measurement.

  19. Position-dependent coupling between a channel waveguide and a distorted microsphere resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Murugan, Ganapathy; Panitchob, Yuwapat; Tull, Elizabeth J.; Bartlett, Philip N.; Hewak, Daniel W.; Zervas, Michalis N.; Wilkinson, James S.

    2010-03-01

    Glass microsphere resonators have the potential to add significant functionality to planar lightwave circuits when coupled to waveguides where they can provide wavelength filtering, delay and low-power switching, and laser functions. Design of such photonic circuits requires precise coupling between spheres and waveguides to allow control of Q-factor and hence of stored energy and resonator bandwidth. In this paper an erbium-doped silicate glass microsphere is coupled to an ion-exchanged glass waveguide, and excitation spectra for the sphere whispering-gallery modes are determined as a function of spatial separation. Modal assignment allows extraction of the physical parameters of the microsphere and the dependence of Q-factor with separation is compared with theory. All practical microspheres exhibit a small degree of ellipticity and the effects of this upon whispering-gallery mode excitation and wavelength splitting are explored. It has been shown that appropriate displacement and orientation of slightly deformed microspheres with respect to the waveguide can be used to control the effective Q-factor and optimize the spectral shape of the optical devices. This can result in either single high-Q peaks or substantially broadened and spectrally flattened resonances.

  20. Vibrationally dependent electron-electron interactions in resonant electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpenbeck, A.; Härtle, R.; Bockstedte, M.; Thoss, M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the role of electronic-vibrational coupling in resonant electron transport through single-molecule junctions, taking into account that the corresponding coupling strengths may depend on the charge and excitation state of the molecular bridge. Within an effective-model Hamiltonian approach for a molecule with multiple electronic states, this requires to extend the commonly used model and include vibrationally dependent electron-electron interaction. We use Born-Markov master equation methods and consider selected models to exemplify the effect of the additional interaction on the transport characteristics of a single-molecule junction. In particular, we show that it has a significant influence on local cooling and heating mechanisms, it may result in negative differential resistance, and it may cause pronounced asymmetries in the conductance map of a single-molecule junction.

  1. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  2. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-05-27

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  3. Spin-dependent electrical conduction in a pentacene Schottky diode explored by electrically detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Kunito; Asakawa, Naoki

    2017-02-01

    Reported is the observation of dark spin-dependent electrical conduction in a Schottky barrier diode with pentacene (PSBD) using electrically detected magnetic resonance at room temperature. It is suggested that spin-dependent conduction exists in pentacene thin films, which is explored by examining the anisotropic linewidth of the EDMR signal and current density-voltage (J-V) measurements. The EDMR spectrum can be decomposed to Gaussian and Lorentzian components. The dependency of the two signals on the applied voltage was consistent with the current density-voltage (J-V) of the PSBD rather than that of the electron-only device of Al/pentacene/Al, indicating that the spin-dependent conduction is due to bipolaron formation associated with hole polaronic hopping processes. The applied-voltage dependence of the ratio of intensity of the Gaussian line to the Lorentzian may infer that increasing current density should make conducting paths more dispersive, thereby resulting in an increased fraction of the Gaussian line due to the higher dispersive g-factor.

  4. Investigating the phase-dependent photochemical reaction dynamics of chlorine dioxide using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sophia C.; Wallace, Paul M.; Bolinger, Josh C.; Reid, Philip J.

    Recent progress in understanding the phase-dependent reactivity demonstrated by halooxides is outlined. Specifically, resonance Raman intensity analysis (RRIA) and time-resolved resonance Raman (TRRR) studies of chlorine dioxide (OClO) photochemistry in solution are presented. Using RRIA, it has been determined that the excited-state structural evolution that occurs along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate in the gas phase is restricted in solution. The absence of evolution along this coordinate results in the preservation of groundstate symmetry in the excited state. The role of symmetry in defining the reaction coordinate and the solvent-solute interactions responsible for modification of the excited-state potential energy surface are discussed. TRRR studies are presented which demonstrate that geminate recombination of the primary photoproducts resulting in the reformation of ground-state OClO is a central feature of OClO photochemistry in solution. These studies also demonstrate that a fraction of photoexcited OClO undergoes photoisomerization to form ClOO, with the ground-state thermal decomposition of this species resulting in Cl production on the subnanosecond timescale. Finally, time-resolved anti-Stokes experiments are presented which demonstrate that the OClO vibrational-relaxation dynamics are solvent dependent. The current picture of OClO photochemistry derived from these studies is discussed, and future directions for study are outlined.

  5. Brain Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging of Sleep Homeostasis and Restoration in Drug Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George H. Trksak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous reports have documented a high occurrence of sleep difficulties in drug-dependent populations, prompting researchers to characterize sleep profiles and physiology in drug abusing populations. This mini-review examines studies indicating that drug-dependent populations exhibit alterations in sleep homeostatic and restoration processes in response to sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation is a principal sleep research tool that results in marked physiological challenge, which provides a means to examine sleep homeostatic processes in response to extended wakefulness. A report from our laboratory demonstrated that following recovery sleep from sleep deprivation, brain high-energy phosphates particularly beta–nucleoside triphosphate (beta-NTP are markedly increased as measured with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. A more recent study examined the effects of sleep deprivation in opiate-dependent methadone-maintained (MM subjects. The study demonstrated increases in brain beta-NTP following recovery sleep. Interestingly, these increases were of a markedly greater magnitude in MM subjects compared to control subjects. A similar study examined sleep deprivation in cocaine-dependent subjects demonstrating that cocaine-dependent subjects exhibit greater increases in brain beta-NTP following recovery sleep when compared to control subjects. The studies suggest that sleep deprivation in both MM subjects and cocaine-dependent subjects is characterized by greater changes in brain ATP levels than control subjects. Greater enhancements in brain ATP following recovery sleep may reflect a greater disruption to or impact of sleep deprivation in drug dependent subjects, whereby sleep restoration processes may be unable to properly regulate brain ATP and maintain brain high-energy equilibrium. These studies support the notion of a greater susceptibility to sleep loss in drug dependent populations. Additional sleep studies in drug abusing

  6. Resonant Damping of Propagating Kink Waves in Time-Dependent Magnetic Flux Tube. I. Zero Plasma-pmb{\\upbeta}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-11-01

    We explore the notion of resonant absorption in a dynamic time-dependent magnetised plasma background. Very many works have investigated resonance in the Alfvén and slow MHD continua under both ideal and dissipative MHD regimes. Jump conditions in static and steady systems have been found in previous works, connecting solutions at both sides of the resonant layer. Here, we derive the jump conditions in a temporally dependent, magnetised, inhomogeneous plasma background to leading order in the Wentzel-Kramers-Billouin (WKB) approximation. Next, we exploit the results found in Williamson and Erdélyi ( Solar Phys. 289, 899, 2014) to describe the evolution of the jump condition in the dynamic model considered. The jump across the resonant point is shown to increase exponentially in time. We determined the damping as a result of the resonance over the same time period and investigated the temporal evolution of the damping itself. We found that the damping coefficient, as a result of the evolution of the resonance, decreases as the density gradient across the transitional layer decreases. This has the consequence that in such time-dependent systems resonant absorption may not be as efficient as time progresses.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomics to identify novel biomarkers of alcohol-dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Mostafa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol misuse is a ravaging public health and social problem. Its harm can affect the drinkers and the whole society. Alcohol-dependence is a phase of alcohol misuse in which the drinker consumes excessive amounts of alcohol and has a continuous urge to consume alcohol. Current methods of alcohol dependence diagnoses are questionnaires and some biomarkers. However, both methods lack specificity and sensitivity. Metabolomics is a scientific field which deals with the identification and the quantification of the metabolites present in the metabolome using spectroscopic techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. Metabolomics helps to indicate the perturbation in the levels of metabolites in cells and tissues due to diseases or ingestion of any substances. NMR is one of the most widely used spectroscopic techniques in metabolomics because of its reproducibility and speed. Some recent metabolomics studies were conducted on alcohol consumption and alcohol misuse in animals and humans. However, few focused on identifying alcohol dependence novel biomarkers. A sensitive and specific technique such as NMR based metabolomics applied to find novel biomarkers in plasma and urine can be useful to diagnose alcohol-dependence.

  8. Temperature and baric dependence of nuclear quadruple resonance spectra in indium and gallium monoselenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandozhko, Victor; Raranskii, Nikolai; Balazjuk, Vitaly; Samila, Andriy; Kovalyuk, Zahar

    2013-12-01

    Pulsed radiospectroscopy method has been used to study nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR) spectra of 69Ga and 115In isotopes in the layered semiconductors GaSe and InSe. It has been found that in GaSe and InSe there is a considerable temperature dependence of NQR frequency which in the temperature range of 250 to 390 K is practically linear with conversion slope 1.54 kHz/degree for 69Ga and 2.35 kHz/degree for 115In. In the same crystals the effect of uniaxial pressure on NQR spectra applied along the optical axis с up to the values of 500 kg/сm2 has been studied. A strong attenuation of NQR spectra intensity with increase in pressure on layered crystal package has been established. The unvaried multiplicity of resonance spectra indicates the absence of structural transformations in these layered crystals over the investigated range of temperatures and pressures.

  9. Plasmon resonance enhanced temperature-dependent photoluminescence of Si-V centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shaoheng [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Song, Jie; Wang, Qiliang; Liu, Junsong; Li, Hongdong, E-mail: hdli@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Baolin [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-11-23

    Temperature dependent optical property of diamond has been considered as a very important factor for realizing high performance diamond-based optoelectronic devices. The photoluminescence feature of the zero phonon line of silicon-vacancy (Si-V) centers in Si-doped chemical vapor deposited single crystal diamond (SCD) with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) induced by gold nanoparticles has been studied at temperatures ranging from liquid nitrogen temperature to 473 K, as compared with that of the SCD counterpart in absence of the LSPR. It is found that with LSPR the emission intensities of Si-V centers are significantly enhanced by factors of tens and the magnitudes of the redshift (width) of the emissions become smaller (narrower), in comparison with those of normal emissions without plasmon resonance. More interestingly, these strong Si-V emissions appear remarkably at temperatures up to 473 K, while the spectral feature was not reported in previous studies on the intrinsic Si-doped diamonds when temperatures are higher than room temperature. These findings would lead to reaching high performance diamond-based devices, such as single photon emitter, quantum cryptography, biomarker, and so forth, working under high temperature conditions.

  10. Temperature dependence of the Kondo resonance and its satellites in CeCu2Si2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, F; Ehm, D; Schmidt, S; Nicolay, G; Hüfner, S; Kroha, J; Trovarelli, O; Geibel, C

    2001-09-03

    We present high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy studies on the Kondo resonance of the strongly correlated Ce system CeCu2Si2. By exploiting the thermal broadening of the Fermi edge we analyze position, spectral weight, and temperature dependence of the low-energy 4f spectral features, whose major weight lies above the Fermi level E(F). We also present theoretical predictions based on the single-impurity Anderson model using an extended noncrossing approximation, including all spin-orbit and crystal field splittings of the 4f states. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment provides strong evidence that the spectral properties of CeCu2Si2 can be described by single-impurity Kondo physics down to T approximately 5 K.

  11. Temperature dependence of power handling capability of HTS filter with double-strip resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, N.; Fujihara, K.

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of power handling capability of a high temperature superconducting filter with a double-strip resonator (DSR). The DSR structure consists of two coupled strips and the center pins of the SMA connector as feed line. We designed a four-pole DSR filter with the center frequency of 5 GHz and band width of 50 MHz. The filter was fabricated using two YBa2Cu3Oy thin films on CeO2-buffered r-Al2O3 substrates. The measured frequency responses of the filters were in reasonable agreement with the simulated ones. The measured power handling capability of the DSR filter at 35 K was 3.2 times higher than that of the filter at 70 K.

  12. Measuring evaporation rates of laser-trapped droplets by use of fluorescent morphology-dependent resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, R; Struthers, A

    2001-05-20

    Morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) are used to measure accurately the evaporation rates of laser-trapped 1- to 2-mum droplets of ethylene glycol. Droplets containing 3 x 10(-5) M Rhodamine-590 laser dye are optically trapped in a 20-mum hollow fiber by two counterpropagating 150-mW, 800-nm laser beams. A weaker 532-nm laser excites the dye, and fluorescence emission is observed near 560 nm as the droplet evaporates. A complete series of first-order TE and TM MDRs dominates the fluorescent output. MDR mode identification sizes the droplets and provides accurate evaporation rates. We verify the automated MDR mode identification by counting fringes in a videotape of the experiment. The longitudinal spring constant of the trap, measured by analysis of the videotaped motion of droplets perturbed from the trap center, provides independent verification of the laser's intensity within the trap.

  13. Spin-dependent transport and recombination in solar cells studied by pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrends, Jan

    2009-11-11

    This thesis deals with spin-dependent transport and recombination of charge carriers in solar cells. A systematic study on the influence of localized paramagnetic states which act as trapping and recombination centres for photogenerated charge carriers, is presented for three different types of solar cells. The central technique used in this thesis is electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). The capabilities of pulsed (p) EDMR were extended with regard to the detection sensitivity. These improvements allowed pEDMR measurements on fully processed devices from cryogenic to room temperature. The instrumental upgrades also set the stage for pEDMR measurements at different resonance frequencies. In high-efficiency solar cells based on the heterojunction between hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon (c-Si), recombination via performancelimiting interface states could directly be measured electrically for the first time. The identification of these defects could be achieved by exploiting their orientation with regard to the surface. In thin-film solar cells based on hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon ({mu}-Si:H) the situation is more complex due to the heterogeneous and disordered structure of the material itself. In addition, these cells are multilayer-systems comprising three different silicon layers with different doping levels and microstructures. By combining a systematic alteration of the sample structure with the information extracted from deconvoluting spectrally overlapping signals in the time domain, it was possible to assign the spin-dependent signals to defects in the individual layers of the solar cells. Benefiting from the instrumental improvements, recombination via dangling bond states in silicon-based solar cells could be investigated by pEDMR at room temperature for the first time. In organic bulk heterojunction solar cells based on MEH-PPV and PCBM two different spin-dependent mechanisms coexist. Both processes

  14. Electric dipole spin resonance in systems with a valley-dependent g factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rančić, Marko J.; Burkard, Guido

    2016-05-01

    In this theoretical study we qualitatively and quantitatively investigate the electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR) in a single Si/SiGe quantum dot in the presence of a magnetic field gradient, e.g., produced by a ferromagnet. We model a situation in which the control of electron spin states is achieved by applying an oscillatory electric field, inducing real-space oscillations of the electron inside the quantum dot. One of the goals of our study is to present a microscopic theory of valley-dependent g factors in Si/SiGe quantum dots and investigate how valley relaxation combined with a valley-dependent g factor leads to a novel electron spin dephasing mechanism. Furthermore, we discuss the interplay of spin and valley relaxations in Si/SiGe quantum dots. Our findings suggest that the electron spin dephases due to valley relaxation, and are in agreement with recent experimental studies [Nat. Nanotechnol. 9, 666 (2014), 10.1038/nnano.2014.153].

  15. Magnetic field dependence of piezoelectric resonance frequency in CoFe2O4-BaTiO3 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagomiya, Isao; Hayashi, Yusuke; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi

    2012-08-01

    The particulate and the multilayer CoFe2O4(CFO)-BaTiO3(BT) composites were prepared by the conventional solid state reaction method and the tape casting method, respectively. Both the prepared composites were simultaneously ferroelectric and ferromagnetic at room temperature. For the multilayer composite sample, a piezoelectric resonance frequency remarkably depended on the applied DC magnetic field, while no remarkable magnetic field dependence was observed for the particulate composite samples. An uniform magnetostriction of the CFO phase in the multilayer composite contributes to piezoelectric effect of the BT phases, resulting in the modulation of the piezoelectric resonance frequency.

  16. Temperature dependence of the giant dipole resonance width in 152Gd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, C.; Mishra, G.; Rhine Kumar, A. K.; Dokania, N.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Kumar, Suresh; Rout, P. C.; Joshi, Sandeep; Arumugam, P.

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the dependence of giant dipole resonance (GDR) width on temperature (T ) and angular momentum (J ), high energy γ -ray spectra were measured in the reaction 28Si+124Sn at E28Si=135 MeV. The J information was deduced from multiplicity of low-energy γ rays. The GDR parameters, namely, the centroid energy and width are extracted using statistical model analysis. The observed variation of the GDR width for T ˜1.2 -1.37 MeV and J ˜20 ℏ -40 ℏ is consistent with the universal scaling given by Kusnezov et al., which is applicable in the liquid-drop regime. The GDR input cross sections extracted from the statistical model best fits are compared with thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) calculations and are found to be in good agreement. The TSFM calculations predominantly favor the noncollective oblate shape, while the statistical model fit with both prolate and oblate shapes describes the data. The present data together with earlier measurements indicate a very slow variation of the GDR width for T ˜1.2 to 1.5 MeV. The observed trend is well explained by the TSFM calculations, although the calculated values are ˜4 %-13% higher than the data.

  17. Enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance dependence of silver nanoparticles on the stoichiometric ratio of citrate stabilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClary, Felicia A.; Gaye-Campbell, Shauna; Hai Ting, Andy Yuen; Mitchell, James W.

    2013-02-01

    A stoichiometric approach to the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with appreciable enhancements in the localized surface plasmon resonance is presented. Microwave irradiation afforded AgNPs, optimized to a thermodynamic equilibrium by varying the silver to trisodium citrate (Ag0/citrate3-) stoichiometric ratio from 1:1 to 1:10, and ranging in size from 32 to 65 nm (±1-9 nm, hydrodynamic diameter). The concentration-dependent plasmonic enhancements were monitored by UV-Vis absorption spectrophotometry, showing absorption maxima typical of AgNPs, at 440-450 nm. A linear accession in plasmon absorbance intensity, approaching 1:5 (Ag0/citrate3-), followed by a linear depletion, at larger stoichiometries (1:6-1:10), was observed. Size distribution measurements, using dynamic light scattering, showed the highest polydispersity index, 0.547, for 1:10 suspensions and the lowest, 0.305, for the thermodynamic maximum, determined to occur at 1:5. Surface charge measurements approaching 0 mV confirm the destabilizing effect of high concentrations of citrate, leading to greater instances of aggregation and large hydrodynamic diameters. Reaction kinetics data suggests an increased preference for Ag n + -citrate, metal/ligand complexation, at 1:10, diminishing nanoparticle production.

  18. Polarization-Dependent Interference of Coherent Scattering from Orthogonal Dipole Moments of a Resonantly Excited Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Disheng; Lander, Gary R.; Solomon, Glenn S.; Flagg, Edward B.

    2017-01-01

    Resonant photoluminescence excitation (RPLE) spectra of a neutral InGaAs quantum dot show unconventional line shapes that depend on the detection polarization. We characterize this phenomenon by performing polarization-dependent RPLE measurements and simulating the measured spectra with a three-level quantum model. The spectra are explained by interference between fields coherently scattered from the two fine structure split exciton states, and the measurements enable extraction of the steady-state coherence between the two exciton states.

  19. Effects of spike-time-dependent plasticity on the stochastic resonance of small-world neuronal networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang, E-mail: jiangwang@tju.edu.cn; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks is investigated when the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is adaptively adjusted by spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is shown that irrespective of the synaptic connectivity is fixed or adaptive, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The efficiency of network stochastic resonance can be largely enhanced by STDP in the coupling process. Particularly, the resonance for adaptive coupling can reach a much larger value than that for fixed one when the noise intensity is small or intermediate. STDP with dominant depression and small temporal window ratio is more efficient for the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, we demonstrate that the effect of stochastic resonance can be further improved via fine-tuning of the average coupling strength of the adaptive network. Furthermore, the small-world topology can significantly affect stochastic resonance of excitable neuronal networks. It is found that there exists an optimal probability of adding links by which the noise-induced transmission of weak periodic signal peaks.

  20. Periodic coupling strength-dependent multiple coherence resonance by time delay in Newman-Watts neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanan; Gong, Yubing; Xu, Bo

    2013-12-01

    Recently, multiple coherence resonance induced by time delay has been observed in neuronal networks with constant coupling strength. In this paper, by employing Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuron networks with time-periodic coupling strength, we study how the temporal coherence of spiking behavior and coherence resonance by time delay change when the frequency of periodic coupling strength is varied. It is found that delay induced coherence resonance is dependent on periodic coupling strength and increases when the frequency of periodic coupling strength increases. Periodic coupling strength can also induce multiple coherence resonance, and the coherence resonance occurs when the frequency of periodic coupling strength is approximately multiple of the spiking frequency. These results show that for periodic coupling strength time delay can more frequently optimize the temporal coherence of spiking activity, and periodic coupling strength can repetitively optimize the temporal coherence of spiking activity as well. Frequency locking may be the mechanism for multiple coherence resonance induced by periodic coupling strength. These findings imply that periodic coupling strength is more efficient for enhancing the temporal coherence of spiking activity of neuronal networks, and thus it could play a more important role in improving the time precision of information processing and transmission in neural networks.

  1. Effects of spike-time-dependent plasticity on the stochastic resonance of small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks is investigated when the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is adaptively adjusted by spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is shown that irrespective of the synaptic connectivity is fixed or adaptive, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The efficiency of network stochastic resonance can be largely enhanced by STDP in the coupling process. Particularly, the resonance for adaptive coupling can reach a much larger value than that for fixed one when the noise intensity is small or intermediate. STDP with dominant depression and small temporal window ratio is more efficient for the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, we demonstrate that the effect of stochastic resonance can be further improved via fine-tuning of the average coupling strength of the adaptive network. Furthermore, the small-world topology can significantly affect stochastic resonance of excitable neuronal networks. It is found that there exists an optimal probability of adding links by which the noise-induced transmission of weak periodic signal peaks.

  2. Spin-dependent Breit-Wigner and Fano resonances in photon-assisted electron transport through a semiconductor heterostructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Li-Yun; Zhou Bin

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the electron transmission through a seven-layer semiconductor heterostructure with the Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling under two applied oscillating fields. Numerical results show that both of the spindependent symmetric Breit-Wigner and the asymmetric Fano resonances appear and that the properties of these two types of resonance peaks are dependent on the amplitude and the relative phases of the two applied oscillating fields.The modulation of the spin-polarization efficiency of transmitted electrons by the relative phase is also discussed.

  3. Hamiltonian Dynamics and Adiabatic Invariants for Time-Dependent Superconducting Qubit-Oscillators and Resonators in Quantum Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Ryeol Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adiabatic invariant, which is a conserved quantity, is useful for studying quantum and classical properties of dynamical systems. Adiabatic invariants for time-dependent superconducting qubit-oscillator systems and resonators are investigated using the Liouville-von Neumann equation. At first, we derive an invariant for a simple superconducting qubit-oscillator through the introduction of its reduced Hamiltonian. Afterwards, an adiabatic invariant for a nanomechanical resonator linearly interfaced with a superconducting circuit, via a coupling with a time-dependent strength, is evaluated using the technique of unitary transformation. The accuracy of conservation for such invariant quantities is represented in detail. Based on the results of our developments in this paper, perturbation theory is applicable to the research of quantum characteristics of more complicated qubit systems that are described by a time-dependent Hamiltonian involving nonlinear terms.

  4. Spin and valley dependent line-type resonant peaks in electrically and magnetically modulated silicene quantum structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanshan; Guo, Yong

    2017-02-01

    A barrier with a tunable spin-valley dependent energy gap in silicene could be used as a spin and valley filter. Meanwhile, special resonant modes in unique quantum structure can act as energy filters. Hence we investigate valley and spin transport properties in the potential silicene quantum structures, i.e., single ferromagnetic barrier, single electromagnetic barrier and double electric barriers. Our quantum transport calculation indicates that quantum devices of high accuracy and efficiency (100% polarization), based on modulated silicene quantum structures, can be designed for valley, spin and energy filtering. These intriguing features are revealed by the spin, valley dependent line-type resonant peaks. In addition, line-type peaks in different structure depend on spin and valley diversely. The filter we proposed is controllable by electric gating.

  5. Discrimination between spin-dependent charge transport and spin-dependent recombination in π-conjugated polymers by correlated current and electroluminescence-detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavand, Marzieh; Baird, Douglas; van Schooten, Kipp; Malissa, Hans; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Spin-dependent processes play a crucial role in organic electronic devices. Spin coherence can give rise to spin mixing due to a number of processes such as hyperfine coupling, and leads to a range of magnetic field effects. However, it is not straightforward to differentiate between pure single-carrier spin-dependent transport processes which control the current and therefore the electroluminescence, and spin-dependent electron-hole recombination which determines the electroluminescence yield and in turn modulates the current. We therefore investigate the correlation between the dynamics of spin-dependent electric current and spin-dependent electroluminescence in two derivatives of the conjugated polymer poly(phenylene-vinylene) using simultaneously measured pulsed electrically detected (pEDMR) and optically detected (pODMR) magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This experimental approach requires careful analysis of the transient response functions under optical and electrical detection. At room temperature and under bipolar charge-carrier injection conditions, a correlation of the pEDMR and the pODMR signals is observed, consistent with the hypothesis that the recombination currents involve spin-dependent electronic transitions. This observation is inconsistent with the hypothesis that these signals are caused by spin-dependent charge-carrier transport. These results therefore provide no evidence that supports earlier claims that spin-dependent transport plays a role for room-temperature magnetoresistance effects. At low temperatures, however, the correlation between pEDMR and pODMR is weakened, demonstrating that more than one spin-dependent process influences the optoelectronic materials' properties. This conclusion is consistent with prior studies of half-field resonances that were attributed to spin-dependent triplet exciton recombination, which becomes significant at low temperatures when the triplet lifetime increases.

  6. Ultrafast fluorescence resonance energy transfer in a bile salt aggregate: Excitation wavelength dependence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ujjwal Mandal; Subhadip Ghosh; Dibyendu Kumar Das; Aniruddha Adhikari; Shantanu Dey; Kankan Bhattacharyya

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Coumarin 153 (C153) to Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in a secondary aggregate of a bile salt (sodium deoxycholate, NaDC) is studied by femtosecond up-conversion. The emission spectrum of C153 in NaDC is analysed in terms of two spectra-one with emission maximum at 480 nm which corresponds to a non-polar and hydrophobic site and another with maximum at ∼ 530 nm which arises from a polar hydrophilic site. The time constants of FRET were obtained from the rise time of the emission of the acceptor (R6G). In the NaDC aggregate, FRET occurs in multiple time scales -4 ps and 3700 ps. The 4 ps component is assigned to FRET from a donor (D) to an acceptor (A) held at a close distance (DA ∼ 17 Å) inside the bile salt aggregate. The 3700 ps component corresponds to a donor-acceptor distance ∼ 48 Å. The long (3700 ps) component may involve diffusion of the donor. With increase in the excitation wavelength (ex) from 375 to 435 nm, the relative contribution of the ultrafast component of FRET (∼ 4 ps) increases from 3 to 40% with a concomitant decrease in the contribution of the ultraslow component (∼3700 ps) from 97 to 60%. The ex dependence is attributed to the presence of donors at different locations. At a long ex (435 nm) donors in the highly polar peripheral region are excited. A short ex (375 nm) `selects’ donor at a hydrophobic location.

  7. Polarization-dependent characteristics of a racetrack waveguide resonator fabricated by ion exchange in K9 glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuyou Han; Feng Liu; Fufei Pang; Fenghong Chu; Haiwen Cai; Ronghui Qu; Zujie Fang

    2006-01-01

    @@ A racetrack waveguide resonator filter was fabricated by ion exchange technology in K9 optical glass.The filter responses of the waveguide resonator were measured with two polarized input lightwaves. The polarization-dependent characteristics of the waveguide resonator were analyzed, and the results of effective indices of Nte = 1.5721 and Ntm = 1.5548, coupling ratios of Rte = 0.731 and Rtm = 0.761, and losses of Αte = 4.35 Db/cm and Αtm = 6.05 Db/cm were obtained for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes, respectively. The causes of large loss and effective index differences between TE and TM modes were discussed.

  8. Parametric and Internal Resonances of an Axially Moving Beam with Time-Dependent Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamadev Sahoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear vibration of a travelling beam subjected to principal parametric resonance in presence of internal resonance is investigated. The beam velocity is assumed to be comprised of a constant mean value along with a harmonically varying component. The stretching of neutral axis introduces geometric cubic nonlinearity in the equation of motion of the beam. The natural frequency of second mode is approximately three times that of first mode; a three-to-one internal resonance is possible. The method of multiple scales (MMS is directly applied to the governing nonlinear equations and the associated boundary conditions. The nonlinear steady state response along with the stability and bifurcation of the beam is investigated. The system exhibits pitchfork, Hopf, and saddle node bifurcations under different control parameters. The dynamic solutions in the periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic forms are captured with the help of time history, phase portraits, and Poincare maps showing the influence of internal resonance.

  9. Temperature dependence of electron magnetic resonance spectra of iron oxide nanoparticles mineralized in Listeria innocua protein cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J; Russek, Stephen E; Klem, Michael T; Allen, Mark A; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark; Idzerda, Yves U; Singel, David J

    2012-10-15

    Electron magnetic resonance (EMR) spectroscopy was used to determine the magnetic properties of maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles formed within size-constraining Listeria innocua (LDps)-(DNA-binding protein from starved cells) protein cages that have an inner diameter of 5 nm. Variable-temperature X-band EMR spectra exhibited broad asymmetric resonances with a superimposed narrow peak at a gyromagnetic factor of g ≈ 2. The resonance structure, which depends on both superparamagnetic fluctuations and inhomogeneous broadening, changes dramatically as a function of temperature, and the overall linewidth becomes narrower with increasing temperature. Here, we compare two different models to simulate temperature-dependent lineshape trends. The temperature dependence for both models is derived from a Langevin behavior of the linewidth resulting from "anisotropy melting." The first uses either a truncated log-normal distribution of particle sizes or a bi-modal distribution and then a Landau-Liftshitz lineshape to describe the nanoparticle resonances. The essential feature of this model is that small particles have narrow linewidths and account for the g ≈ 2 feature with a constant resonance field, whereas larger particles have broad linewidths and undergo a shift in resonance field. The second model assumes uniform particles with a diameter around 4 nm and a random distribution of uniaxial anisotropy axes. This model uses a more precise calculation of the linewidth due to superparamagnetic fluctuations and a random distribution of anisotropies. Sharp features in the spectrum near g ≈ 2 are qualitatively predicted at high temperatures. Both models can account for many features of the observed spectra, although each has deficiencies. The first model leads to a nonphysical increase in magnetic moment as the temperature is increased if a log normal distribution of particles sizes is used. Introducing a bi-modal distribution of particle sizes resolves

  10. Temperature dependence of electron magnetic resonance spectra of iron oxide nanoparticles mineralized in Listeria innocua protein cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Russek, Stephen E.; Klem, Michael T.; Allen, Mark A.; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark; Idzerda, Yves U.; Singel, David J.

    2012-10-01

    Electron magnetic resonance (EMR) spectroscopy was used to determine the magnetic properties of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles formed within size-constraining Listeria innocua (LDps)-(DNA-binding protein from starved cells) protein cages that have an inner diameter of 5 nm. Variable-temperature X-band EMR spectra exhibited broad asymmetric resonances with a superimposed narrow peak at a gyromagnetic factor of g ≈ 2. The resonance structure, which depends on both superparamagnetic fluctuations and inhomogeneous broadening, changes dramatically as a function of temperature, and the overall linewidth becomes narrower with increasing temperature. Here, we compare two different models to simulate temperature-dependent lineshape trends. The temperature dependence for both models is derived from a Langevin behavior of the linewidth resulting from "anisotropy melting." The first uses either a truncated log-normal distribution of particle sizes or a bi-modal distribution and then a Landau-Liftshitz lineshape to describe the nanoparticle resonances. The essential feature of this model is that small particles have narrow linewidths and account for the g ≈ 2 feature with a constant resonance field, whereas larger particles have broad linewidths and undergo a shift in resonance field. The second model assumes uniform particles with a diameter around 4 nm and a random distribution of uniaxial anisotropy axes. This model uses a more precise calculation of the linewidth due to superparamagnetic fluctuations and a random distribution of anisotropies. Sharp features in the spectrum near g ≈ 2 are qualitatively predicted at high temperatures. Both models can account for many features of the observed spectra, although each has deficiencies. The first model leads to a nonphysical increase in magnetic moment as the temperature is increased if a log normal distribution of particles sizes is used. Introducing a bi-modal distribution of particle sizes resolves the unphysical

  11. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Scale Dependent Transport Phenomena and Bioactivity in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, J. D.; Codd, S. L.; Romanenko, K. V.; Hornemann, J. A.; Brosten, T. R.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) provides the ability to obtain data on the pore scale via imaging and the sample scale by bulk measurement, allowing for connection between microscale dynamics and macroscale transport phenomena. This has led to MRM techniques becoming a preeminent method for characterization of dynamics in porous media. A significant question in modeling transport in porous media is definition of the porous media structure as homogeneous (ordered) or heterogeneous (disordered)[1]. One means of defining the 'complexity' of a porous media is based on the dynamics of the system[2]. The ability of MRM to measure the time dependent statistics of the dynamics [3,4,5] provides quantification of the pre-asymptotic dynamics. The transition from preasymptotic to Gaussian transport consistent with models of homogeneous porous media is clearly visualized. Biological activity in porous media, such as microbial growth, typically manifests itself as biofilms or colonies of microbes that adhere to surfaces and are surrounded by a hydrogel of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). The biofilm growth introduces complexity into the system structure in generation of physical pore blocking, trapping within the EPS gel, elastic interfaces due to the EPS and generation of channels in which faster flow occur. The hierarchy of length and time scales and multiple physical processes which are introduced by the biofilm growth impacts the porous media transport as reflected in the change in dynamics [6]. The transition can be modeled using statistical mechanical approaches based on continuous time random walk (CTRW) processes that generate fractional differential equations[7]. The bioactivity alters the structure of the porous media from homogeneous to heterogeneous resulting in the transition from a Gaussian to a non Gaussian subdiffusive dispersion process. References 1. M. Quintard and S. Whitaker, Transport in ordered and disordered porous media: Volume averaged

  12. Uncertainty of Doppler reactivity worth due to uncertainties of JENDL-3.2 resonance parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zukeran, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan). Power and Industrial System R and D Div.; Hanaki, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Tuneo; Shibata, Keiichi; Ishikawa, Makoto

    1998-03-01

    Analytical formula of Resonance Self-shielding Factor (f-factor) is derived from the resonance integral (J-function) based on NR approximation and the analytical expression for Doppler reactivity worth ({rho}) is also obtained by using the result. Uncertainties of the f-factor and Doppler reactivity worth are evaluated on the basis of sensitivity coefficients to the resonance parameters. The uncertainty of the Doppler reactivity worth at 487{sup 0}K is about 4 % for the PNC Large Fast Breeder Reactor. (author)

  13. Unusual dimensional dependence of resonance frequencies of Au nanocantilevers fabricated with self-organized microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Banerjee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanocantilevers of gold are fabricated from self-supporting polycrystalline thin film (100 nm by focused ion beam assisted milling and ion induced manipulation processes. The surfactant assisted growth of the thin film leads to self-organized dendrite like morphology. This self-organized dendrite like morphology of the gold film imposes a new characteristic length scale corresponding to the mean size of gold grains present within the branches of the dendrite pattern in the film. The resonance characteristic investigated on cantilevers having different widths shows a significant drop in energy dissipation and hence an enhancement in the resonance amplitude at a characteristic width. At this width the resonance frequency of a vibrating cantilever approaches the theoretically expected value anticipated from an ideal cantilever treated like an elastic continuum.

  14. Molding of plasmonic resonances in metallic nanostructures: Dependence of the non-linear electric permittivity on system size and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Alabastri, A.

    2013-10-25

    In this paper, we review the principal theoretical models through which the dielectric function of metals can be described. Starting from the Drude assumptions for intraband transitions, we show how this model can be improved by including interband absorption and temperature effect in the damping coefficients. Electronic scattering processes are described and included in the dielectric function, showing their role in determining plasmon lifetime at resonance. Relationships among permittivity, electric conductivity and refractive index are examined. Finally, a temperature dependent permittivity model is presented and is employed to predict temperature and non-linear field intensity dependence on commonly used plasmonic geometries, such as nanospheres. 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  15. Functional multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the kidneys using blood oxygen level dependent and diffusion-weighted sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannarini, Gianluca; Kessler, Thomas M; Roth, Beat; Vermathen, Peter; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2014-08-01

    Little data are available on noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging based assessment of renal function during upper urinary tract obstruction. We determined whether functional multiparametric kidney magnetic resonance imaging could monitor the treatment response in cases of acute unilateral upper urinary tract obstruction. Between January 2008 and January 2010, 18 patients with acute unilateral upper urinary tract obstruction due to calculi were prospectively enrolled to undergo kidney magnetic resonance imaging with conventional, blood oxygen level dependent and diffusion-weighted sequences upon emergency hospital admission and after release of obstruction. We assessed functional imaging parameters of obstructed and contralateral unobstructed kidneys derived from blood oxygen level dependent (apparent spin relaxation rate) and diffusion-weighted (total apparent diffusion coefficient, pure diffusion coefficient and perfusion fraction) sequences during acute upper urinary tract obstruction and after its release. During acute obstruction the apparent spin relaxation rate and perfusion fraction were lower in the cortex (p=0.020 and 0.031) and medulla (p=0.012 and 0.190, respectively) of obstructed kidneys compared to contralateral unobstructed kidneys. After obstruction release the apparent spin relaxation rate and perfusion fraction increased in the cortex (p=0.016 and 0.004) and medulla (p=0.071 and 0.044, respectively) of formerly obstructed kidneys to values similar to those in contralateral kidneys. Total apparent diffusion coefficient and pure diffusion coefficient values did not significantly differ between obstructed and contralateral unobstructed kidneys during or after obstruction. In our patients with acute unilateral upper urinary tract obstruction due to calculi functional kidney magnetic resonance imaging using blood oxygen level dependent and diffusion-weighted sequences enabled us to monitor pathophysiological changes in obstructed kidneys during

  16. Temperature dependent electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of SrZrO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Santosh K., E-mail: santufrnd@gmail.com [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Pathak, Nimai [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Ghosh, P.S. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Rajeshwari, B. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Natarajan, V. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kadam, R.M. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2015-10-01

    SrZrO{sub 3} (SZO), a distorted perovskite was synthesized using gel-combustion route employing citric acid as a fuel and ammonium nitrate as oxidizer followed by characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Purity of the sample is confirmed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis. Broadening and shift of the resonance field position in EPR spectrum to the lower field was observed as the temperature is lowered; which is the characteristic of ferromagnetic resonance spectra. The value of Curie–Weiss temperature obtained for SZO particles is 8.7 K. The positive sign of the Curie–Weiss temperature indicates that some of the spins are ferromagnetically coupled in this sample. Theoretical investigation using density functional theory (DFT) calculation revealed that Vacancy at zirconium site contribute maximum to the magnetic moment. - Highlights: • Gel-combustion synthesis of SrZrO{sub 3} perovskite at relatively low temperature. • EPR evidence for ferromagnetic resonance. • Positive sign of the Curie–Weiss temperature ~8.7 K. • Defect induced magnetism- Zirconium vacancy induces maximum magnetic moment.

  17. Intermediate state dependence of the photoelectron circular dichroism of fenchone observed via femtosecond resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Alexander; Ring, Tom; Krüger, Bastian C.; Park, G. Barratt; Schäfer, Tim; Senftleben, Arne; Baumert, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    The intermediate state dependence of photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) in resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization of fenchone in the gas phase is experimentally studied. By scanning the excitation wavelength from 359 to 431 nm, we simultaneously excite up to three electronically distinct resonances. In the PECD experiment performed with a broadband femtosecond laser, their respective contributions to the photoelectron spectrum can be resolved. High-resolution spectroscopy allows us to identify two of the resonances as belonging to the B- and C-bands, which involve excitation to states with 3s and 3p Rydberg character, respectively. We observe a sign change in the PECD signal, depending on which electronic state is used as an intermediate, and are able to identify two differently behaving contributions within the C-band. Scanning the laser wavelength reveals a decrease of PECD magnitude with increasing photoelectron energy for the 3s state. Combining the results of high-resolution spectroscopy and femtosecond experiment, the adiabatic ionization potential of fenchone is determined to be I PaF e n =(8.49 ±0.06 ) eV.

  18. Understanding double-resonant Raman scattering in chiral carbon nanotubes: Diameter and energy dependence of the D mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herziger, Felix; Vierck, Asmus; Laudenbach, Jan; Maultzsch, Janina

    2015-12-01

    We present a theoretical model to describe the double-resonant scattering process in arbitrary carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We use this approach to investigate the defect-induced D mode in CNTs and unravel the dependence of the D -mode frequency on the CNT diameter and on the energy of the resonant optical transition. Our approach is based on the symmetry of the hexagonal lattice and geometric considerations; hence the method is independent of the exact model that is chosen to describe the electronic band structure or the phonon dispersion. We finally clarify the diameter dependence of this Raman mode that has been under discussion in the past and demonstrate that, depending on the experimental conditions, in general two different dependencies can be measured. We also prove that CNTs with an arbitrary chiral index can exhibit a D mode in their Raman spectrum, in contrast to previous symmetry-based arguments. Furthermore, we give a direct quantification of the curvature-induced phonon frequency corrections of the D mode in CNTs with respect to graphite.

  19. A polyene chain of canthaxanthin investigated by temperature-dependent resonance Raman spectra and density functional theory (DFT) calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yuan-Zheng; Li Shuo; Zhou Mi; Li Zuo-Wei; Sun Cheng-Lin

    2013-01-01

    We report on a temperature-dependent resonance Raman spectral characterization of the polyene chain of canthaxanthin.It is observed that all vibrational intensities of the polyene chain are inversely proportional to temperature,which is analyzed by the resonance Raman effect and the coherent weakly damped electron/lattice vibrations.The increase in intensity of the CC overtone/combination relative to the fundamental with temperature decreasing is detected and discussed in terms of electron/phonon coupling and the activation energy Uop.Moreover,the polyene chain studies using the density functional theory B3LYP/6-31G* level reveal a prominent peak at 1525 cm-1 consisting of two closely spaced modes that are both dominated by C=C stretching coordinates of the polyene chain.

  20. A time-dependent density functional theory investigation of plasmon resonances of linear Au atomic chains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dan-Dan; Zhang Hong

    2011-01-01

    We report theoretical studies on the plasmon resonances in linear Au atomic chains by using ab initio timedependent density functional theory. The dipole responses are investigated each as a function of chain length. They converge into a single resonance in the longitudinal mode but split into two transverse modes. As the chain length increases,the longitudinal plasmon mode is redshifted in energy while the transverse modes shift in the opposite direction (blueshifts). In addition,the energy gap between the two transverse modes reduces with chain length increasing. We find that there are unique characteristics,different from those of other metallic chains. These characteristics are crucial to atomic-scale engineering of single-molecule sensing,optical spectroscopy,and so on.

  1. Spin-dependent electron transport through a magnetic resonant tunneling diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havu, P.; Tuomisto, N.; Väänänen, R.; Puska, M. J.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2005-06-01

    Electron-transport properties in nanostructures can be modeled, for example, by using the semiclassical Wigner formalism or the quantum-mechanical Green’s function formalism. We compare the performance and the results of these methods in the case of magnetic resonant-tunneling diodes. We have implemented the two methods within the self-consistent spin-density-functional theory. Our numerical implementation of the Wigner formalism is based on the finite-difference scheme whereas for the Green’s function formalism the finite-element method is used. As a specific application, we consider the device studied by Slobodskyy [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 246601 (2003)] and analyze their experimental results. The Wigner and Green’s function formalisms give similar electron densities and potentials but, surprisingly, the former method requires much more computer resources in order to obtain numerically accurate results for currents. Both of the formalisms can be used to model magnetic resonant tunneling diode structures.

  2. Dependence of fluorescence intensity on the spectral overlap between fluorophores and plasmon resonant single silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yeechi; Munechika, Keiko; Ginger, David S

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the fluorescence from dyes coupled to individual DNA-functionalized metal nanoparticles. We use single-particle darkfield scattering and fluorescence microscopy to correlate the fluorescence intensity of the dyes with the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectra of the individual metal nanoparticles to which they are attached. For each of three different dyes, we observe a strong correlation between the fluorescence intensity of the dye and the degree of spectral overlap with the plasmon resonance of the nanoparticle. On average, we observe the brightest fluorescence from dyes attached to metal nanoparticles that have a LSPR scattering peak approximately 40-120 meV higher in energy than the emission peak of the fluorophore. These results should prove useful for understanding and optimizing metal-enhanced fluorescence.

  3. You'll never crawl alone: neurophysiological evidence for experience-dependent motor resonance in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elk, M; van Schie, H T; Hunnius, S; Vesper, C; Bekkering, H

    2008-12-01

    Lately, neuroscience is showing a great interest in examining the functional and neural mechanisms which support action observation and understanding. Recent studies have suggested that our motor skills crucially affect the way in which we perceive the actions generated by others, by showing stronger motor resonance for observation of actions that are established in one's motor repertoire. In the present study we extend previous findings that were based on expert motor skills in adults to the natural development of actions in infants. To investigate the effect of natural motor experience on motor resonance during action observation, 14- to 16-month-old infants' EEG was recorded during observation of action videos. Stronger mu- and beta-desynchronizations were found for observation of crawling compared to walking videos and the size of the effect was strongly related to the infant's own crawling experience. This suggests that already early in life one's own action experience is closely related to how actions of others are perceived.

  4. THE ANGULAR-MOMENTUM DEPENDENCE OF THE GIANT-DIPOLE RESONANCE IN DY-154

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NOORMAN, RF; BACELAR, JC; HARAKEH, MN; HESSELINK, WHA; HOFMANN, HJ; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, Nasser; VANSCHAGEN, JPS; STOLK, A; SUJKOWSKI, Z; DEVOIGT, MJA; VANDERWOUDE, A

    1994-01-01

    The statistical gamma-ray decay of the compound nucleus 154Dy* formed at an excitation energy of 69 MeV is studied in three angular-momentum windows [J] = 31,42 and 50h. The GDR strength function extracted from the data indicates a constant centroid energy for the resonance E(GDR) = 15.2 +/- 0.5 MeV

  5. Sensitivity Dependence of Surface Plasmon Resonance Based Sensors on Prism Refractive Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that refractive index of the prism used toload metal film has significant influence on sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance based sensors. Theprism with lower refractive index gives the sensors a higher sensitivity in detecting refractive index varia-tions of a sample. We attribute this effect to the fact that a prism with low refractive index will increasecoupling distance between surface plasmons and the medium under investigation.

  6. Polarization dependence of the metamagnetic resonance of cut-wire-pair structure by using plasmon hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dung, Nguyen Van; Yoo, Young Joon; Lee, Young Pak [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Tung, Nguyen Thanh [KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Tung, Bui Son; Lam, Vu Dinh [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-07-15

    The influence of lattice constants on the electromagnetic behavior of a cut-wire-pair (CWP) structure has been elucidated. In this report, we performed both simulations and experiments to determine the influence of polarization on the metamagnetic resonance of the CWP structure. The key finding is the result of an investigation on the plasmon hybridization between the two CWs, which showed that the polarization of the incident wave was affected. Good agreement between numerical simulation and measurement is achieved.

  7. Resonance effects in thickness-dependent ultrafast carrier and phonon dynamics of topological insulator Bi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung; Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Ju Hwan; Jang, Chan Wook; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun; Choi, Suk-Ho; Kim, Seung Hyun; Yee, Ki-Ju; Bansal, Namrata; Oh, Seongshik

    2016-01-01

    Resonance effects in the thickness-dependent ultrafast carrier and phonon dynamics of topological insulator Bi2Se3 are found irrespective of the kind of substrate by measuring thickness-dependent abrupt changes of pump-probe differential-reflectivity signals (ΔR/R) from Bi2Se3 thin films on four different substrates of poly- and single-crystalline (sc-) ZnO, sc-GaN and SiO2. The absolute peak intensity of the ΔR/R is maximized at ∼t C (6 ∼ 9 quintuple layers), which is not directly related to but is very close to the critical thickness below which the energy gap opens. The intensities of the two phonon modes deduced from the oscillatory behaviors superimposed on the ΔR/R profiles are also peaked at ∼t C for the four kinds of substrates, consistent with the thickness-dependent Raman-scattering behaviors. These resonant effects and others are discussed based on possible physical mechanisms including the effects of three-dimensional carrier depletion and intersurface coupling.

  8. Resonance frequency dependence on out-of-plane forces for square silicon membranes: applications to a MEMS gradiometer

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas del Pozo, Irene; Michelena, M D; de Manuel, V; Duch, M; Esteve, J; Plaza, J A

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic properties of membranes have been object of many researches since they can be used as sensor heads in different devices. Some methods have been proposed to solve the problem of determining the resonance frequencies and their dependence on the stress caused by forces applied on the membrane surface. The problem of the vibrating rectangular membrane under a stress caused by a uniform in-plane force is well known. However, the resonance frequency behaviour when the force is out-of-plane instead of in-plane, is not so well understood and documented. A gradiometer which uses a silicon square membrane with a magnet fixed on it as a sensor head has been developed in a previous work. This device reports a quadratic dependence of the frequency on the out-of-plane magnetic force. In this work, simulations to obtain the dependence of the frequency of the fundamental flexural mode on the stress have been performed. It has been studied the influence of in-plane and out-of-plane forces applied to the membrane. ...

  9. Correlation between single-trial visual evoked potentials and the blood oxygenation level dependent response in simultaneously recorded electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan; Pedersen, Henrik; Rostrup, Egill

    2012-01-01

    To compare different electroencephalography (EEG)-based regressors and their ability to predict the simultaneously recorded blood oxygenation level dependent response during blocked visual stimulation, simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging in 10 healthy volunteers was performed...

  10. Magnetic field dependence of piezoelectric resonance frequency in CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-BaTiO{sub 3} composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagomiya, Isao, E-mail: kagomiya@nitech.ac.jp [Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Hayashi, Yusuke; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi [Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi [Nakanojo Plant, Taiyo Yuden Co., Ltd., Gunma 377-0424 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    The particulate and the multilayer CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}(CFO)-BaTiO{sub 3}(BT) composites were prepared by the conventional solid state reaction method and the tape casting method, respectively. Both the prepared composites were simultaneously ferroelectric and ferromagnetic at room temperature. For the multilayer composite sample, a piezoelectric resonance frequency remarkably depended on the applied DC magnetic field, while no remarkable magnetic field dependence was observed for the particulate composite samples. An uniform magnetostriction of the CFO phase in the multilayer composite contributes to piezoelectric effect of the BT phases, resulting in the modulation of the piezoelectric resonance frequency. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focused on the magnetic field dependence of a piezoelectric resonance in CFO-BT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the multilayer CFO-BT, a piezoelectric resonance depended on the magnetic field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The uniform magnetostriction contributes to piezoelectric effect for the multilayer.

  11. Thickness dependence of spin torque ferromagnetic resonance in Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25}/Pt bilayer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, A.; Barman, A., E-mail: abarman@bose.res.in [Thematic Unit of Excellence on Nanodevice Technology, Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sec III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India); Kondou, K., E-mail: kkondou@riken.jp [RIKEN-CEMS, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sukegawa, H.; Mitani, S. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Kasai, S. [RIKEN-CEMS, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Niimi, Y. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Otani, Y. [RIKEN-CEMS, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2014-02-17

    The spin Hall angle of Pt in Co{sub 75}Fe{sub 25}/Pt bilayer films was experimentally investigated by means of the spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance and the modulation of damping measurements. By comparing the present results with the Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}/Pt system, we found that the ferromagnetic layer underneath the Pt one greatly affects the estimation of the spin Hall angle. We also discuss the spin diffusion length of Pt and the ferromagnetic thickness dependence of the Gilbert damping coefficient.

  12. Scheme for on-resonance generation of entanglement in time-dependent asymmetric two-qubit-cavity systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaya-Castro, Alexandra; Johnson, Neil F.; Quiroga, Luis

    2004-08-01

    We present an efficient scheme for the controlled generation of pure two-qubit states possessing any desired degree of entanglement and a prescribed symmetry. This is achieved in two-qubit-cavity QED systems (e.g., cold-trapped ions and flying atoms) via on-resonance ion- or atom-cavity couplings, which are time dependent and asymmetric, yielding a trapping vacuum state condition which does not arise for identical couplings. A duality in the role of the coupling ratio yields states with a given concurrence but opposing symmetries. Both the trapping state condition and the resulting entanglement power are robust against decoherence channels.

  13. Morphology-Dependent Resonances of Spherical Droplets with Numerous Microscopic Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    We use the recently extended superposition T-matrix method to study the behavior of a sharp Lorenz-Mie resonance upon filling a spherical micrometer-sized droplet with tens and hundreds of randomly positioned microscopic inclusions. We show that as the number of inclusions increases, the extinction cross-section peak and the sharp asymmetry-parameter minimum become suppressed, widen, and move toward smaller droplet size parameters, while ratios of diagonal elements of the scattering matrix exhibit sharp angular features indicative of a distinctly nonspherical particle. Our results highlight the limitedness of the concept of an effective refractive index of an inhomogeneous spherical particle.

  14. Shear dependent nonlinear vibration in a high quality factor single crystal silicon micromechanical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H.; Shan, G. C.; Shek, C. H.; Lee, J. E.-Y.

    2012-07-01

    The frequency response of a single crystal silicon resonator under nonlinear vibration is investigated and related to the shear property of the material. The shear stress-strain relation of bulk silicon is studied using a first-principles approach. By incorporating the calculated shear property into a device-level model, our simulation closely predicts the frequency response of the device obtained by experiments and further captures the nonlinear features. These results indicate that the observed nonlinearity stems from the material's mechanical property. Given the high quality factor (Q) of the device reported here (˜2 × 106), this makes it highly susceptible to such mechanical nonlinear effects.

  15. Time-dependent transport in interacting and noninteracting resonant-tunneling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Wingreen, Ned S.; Meir, Yigal

    1994-01-01

    We consider a mesoscopic region coupled to two leads under the influence of external time-dependent voltages. The time dependence is coupled to source and drain contacts, the gates controlling the tunnel-barrier heights, or to the gates that define the mesoscopic region. We derive, with the Keldy...

  16. A perspective on nonresonant and resonant electronic response theory for time-dependent molecular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Patrick

    2011-12-14

    The development of electronic response theory in quantum chemistry has been reviewed, starting from the early 1970's and reaching the current state-of-the-art. The general theory has been applied to the calculation of a large number of spectroscopic parameters over the years, and it has been implemented for the majority of standard electronic structure methods. Two formulations of response theory, the Ehrenfest expectation value and the quasi-energy derivative formulation, have turned into leading alternatives for the derivation of computationally tractable expressions of response functions, and they are here reviewed with an attempt to, as far as possible, leave out technical details. A set of four steps are identified as common in derivations of response functions, and the two formulations are compared along this series of steps. Particular emphasis is given to the situation when the oscillation of the weak external electromagnetic field is in resonance with a transition frequency of the system. The formation of physically sound response functions in resonance regions of the spectrum is discussed in light of the causality condition and the Kramers-Kronig relations, and it is achieved in wave function theory by means of the introduction of relaxation parameters in a manner that mimics what one sees in density matrix theory. As a working example, equations are illustrated by their application to a two-state model for para-nitroaniline including the ground and the lowest charge-transfer state in the electric dipole approximation.

  17. The sensitivity enhancement of tilted fibre Bragg grating sensors with polarization dependent resonant nano-scale coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Bialiayeu, Aliaksandr

    2015-01-01

    Fibre Bragg grating sensors have emerged as a simple, inexpensive, accurate, sensitive and reliable platform, a viable alternative to the traditional bulkier optical sensor platforms. In this work we present an extensive theoretical analysis of the tilted fibre Bragg grating sensor (TFBG) with a particular focus on its polarization-dependent properties. We have developed a highly efficient computer model capable of providing the full characterization of the TFBG device in less then $3$~minutes for a given state of incident light polarization. As a result, the polarization-dependent spectral response, the field distribution at the sensor surface as well as the fine structure of particular resonances have become accessible for theoretical analysis. As a part of this computer model we have developed a blazingly fast full-vector complex mode solver, capable of handling cylindrical waveguides of an arbitrary complex refractive index profile. Along with the theoretical study we have investigated optical properties ...

  18. Calculation of curvature dependent surface plasmon resonance in gold nanospheroid and nanoshell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Jian, E-mail: jianzhusummer@163.co [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Institute of Modern Physics, School of Science (China)

    2009-05-15

    In this paper, theoretical calculations based on dipole-limit are performed to investigate the effects of curvature on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) properties of nanometer size gold spheroid and shell. By comparing the aspect ratio with the shell thickness, we demonstrated that the curvature radius is a common better factor that can be used to predict the SPR wavelength and shift fashion. For nanospheroid, increasing the ratio of curvature radius corresponding to the climaxes leads to an increase in the ratio of SPR wavelength, whereas increasing the ratio of curvature radius of outer and inner surface in nanoshell leads to an decrease in the ratio of SPR wavelength. As a morphologic factor, curvature radius plays an important role in affecting the distribution of electron density, and consequently controlling the SPR frequency.

  19. Temperature dependence of Q-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of nitrosyl heme proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, Marco; Wajnberg, Eliane; Bemski, George

    1997-11-01

    The Q-band (35 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of nitrosyl hemoglobin (Hb N O) and nitrosyl myoglobin (Mb NO) were studied as a function of temperature between 19 K and 200 K. The spectra of both heme proteins show classes of variations as a function of temperature. The first one has previously been associated with the existence of two paramagnetic species, one with rhombic and the other with axial symmetry. The second one manifests itself in changes in the g-factors and linewidths of each species. These changes are correlated with the conformational substates model and associate the variations of g-values with changes in the angle of the N(his)-Fe-N (NO) bond in the rhombic species and with changes in the distance between Fe and N of the proximal (F8) histidine in the axial species. (author) 24 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Time-dependent scar enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging of the postoperative lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickstein, M.F.; Sussman, S.K. (Hartford Hospital, CT (USA). Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a principal modality in the evaluation of the postoperative lumbar spine. Gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) can often facilitate differentiation of scar from recurrent disc herniation according to established criteria. Scar has been believed to enhance predictably. We reviewed the contrast-enhanced MR scans of 44 patients who were examined for recurrent back pain following disc surgery and attempted to assess the enhancement characteristics of scar as a function of the time interval between initial surgery and the imaging study. In 44 patients, scar was believed to be present at 32 of 49 disc levels. In patients examined long after surgery, scar enhancement may be less intense than in those examined shortly after surgery, or even nonexistent. This temporal factor should be considered when using contrast material to differentiate scar from recurrent disc herniation in postoperative examinations of the lumbar spine. (orig./GDG).

  1. Antimicrobial dependence of silver nanoparticles on surface plasmon resonance bands against Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlalila, Nichrous G; Swai, Hulda Shaidi; Hilonga, Askwar; Kadam, Dattatreya M

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a simple and trouble-free method for determining the antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands. AgNPs were prepared by chemical reduction method using silver nitrates as a metallic precursor and formaldehyde (HCHO) as a reducing agent and capped by polyethylene glycol. Effects of several processing variables on the size and shape of AgNPs were monitored using an ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometer based on their SPR bands. The formed particles showing various particle shapes and full width at half maximum (FWHM) were tested against Escherichia coli by surface spreading using agar plates containing equal amounts of selected AgNPs samples. The NPs exhibited higher antimicrobial properties; however, monodispersed spherical NPs with narrow FWHM were more effective against E. coli growth. The NPs prepared are promising candidates in diverse applications such as antimicrobial agents in the food and biomedical industries. PMID:28053512

  2. Calculation of vibrational excitation cross-sections in resonant electron-molecule scattering using the time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) approach with application to the 2 CO- shape resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman Kumar Singh; Manabendra Sarma; Ankit Jain; Satrajit Adhikari; Manoj K Mishra

    2007-09-01

    Results from application of a new implementation of the time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) approach to the calculation of vibrational excitation cross-sections in resonant e-CO scattering are presented to examine its applicability in the treatment of e-molecule resonances. The results show that the SCF level local complex potential (LCP) in conjunction with the TDWP approach can reproduce experimental features quite satisfactorily.

  3. Size-Dependent Shifts of Plasmon Resonance in Silver Nanoparticle Films Using Controlled Dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kneipp, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    A study of the size dependent blue- and red-shift of the plasmon band of silver nanoparticle films in aqueous solution is reported. A detection scheme, where the particle size is continuously decreased by means of controlled dissolution, while measuring the plasmon band position by UV–vis...... absorption spectroscopy is used. Both blue- and red-shifts of the peak position are observed, depending on the presence of electron donors and/or acceptors in the solution, respectively. A great increase in plasmon shifts for smaller particle sizes (R 10 nm) is demonstrated, which we ascribe...

  4. How pain empathy depends on ingroup/outgroup decisions: A functional magnet resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckmann, Judith; Bodden, Maren; Jansen, Andreas; Kircher, Tilo; Dodel, Richard; Rief, Winfried

    2015-10-30

    Showing empathy is crucial for social functioning and empathy is related to group membership. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of experimentally generated groups on empathy for pain in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. Thirty healthy participants underwent a minimal group paradigm to create two groups. While BOLD contrast was measured using fMRI, subjects were instructed to empathize with ingroup and outgroup members, who were depicted in a picture paradigm of painful and neutral situations. Behavioral measure of state empathy was measured using a visual analog scale. Furthermore, self-reported trait empathy measures were obtained. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were conducted for fMRI and behavioral data. In addition to a main effect of pain in pain-related areas, a main effect of group in areas belonging to the visual cortex was found. Although there was no ingroup bias for empathy ratings, subjects showed altered neural activation in regions of the right fusiform gyrus, the cerebellum, the hippocampal and amygdala region during the pain×group interaction. Activation in the preceding structures, revealed by the interaction of pain by group, suggests that activation in the pallidum might reflect specific empathy for pain-related regulation processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antimicrobial dependence of silver nanoparticles on surface plasmon resonance bands against Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlalila NG

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nichrous G Mlalila,1,2 Hulda Shaidi Swai,1 Askwar Hilonga,3 Dattatreya M Kadam2 1School of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, Arusha, Tanzania; 2ICAR-Central Institute of Post-Harvest Engineering and Technology (ICAR-CIPHET, Ludhiana, Punjab, India; 3Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology, Arusha, Tanzania Abstract: This study presents a simple and trouble-free method for determining the antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR bands. AgNPs were prepared by chemical reduction method using silver nitrates as a metallic precursor and formaldehyde (HCHO as a reducing agent and capped by polyethylene glycol. Effects of several processing variables on the size and shape of AgNPs were monitored using an ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometer based on their SPR bands. The formed particles showing various particle shapes and full width at half maximum (FWHM were tested against Escherichia coli by surface spreading using agar plates containing equal amounts of selected AgNPs samples. The NPs exhibited higher antimicrobial properties; however, monodispersed spherical NPs with narrow FWHM were more effective against E. coli growth. The NPs prepared are promising candidates in diverse applications such as antimicrobial agents in the food and biomedical industries. Keywords: antimicrobial agent, bandwidth, full width at half maximum, nanoparticles, particle size

  6. Fluorescent material concentration dependency: Förster resonance energy transfer in quasi-solid state DSSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Woo; Jo, Hyun-Jun; Thogiti, Suresh; Yang, Weon Ki; Cheruku, Rajesh; Kim, Jae Hong

    2017-03-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is critical for wide spectral absorption, an increased dye loading, and photocurrent generation of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). This process consists of organic fluorescent materials (as an energy donor), and an organic dye (as an energy acceptor on TiO2 surfaces) with quasi-solid electrolyte. The judicious choice of the energy donor and acceptor facilitates a strong spectral overlap between the emission and absorption regions of the fluorescent materials and dye. This FRET process enhances the light-harvesting characteristics of quasi-solid state DSSCs. In this study, DSSCs containing different concentrations (0, 1, and 1.5 wt%) of a fluorescent material (FM) as the energy donor are investigated using FRET. The power conversion efficiency of DSSCs containing FMs in a quasi-solid electrolyte increased by 33% over a pristine cell. The optimized cell fabricated with the quasi-solid state DSSC containing 1.0 wt% FM shows a maximum efficiency of 3.38%, with a short-circuit current density (J SC ) of 4.32 mA/cm-2, and an open-circuit voltage (V OC ) of 0.68 V under illumination of simulated solar light (AM 1.5G, 100 mW/cm-2). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Characterization of Full Set Material Constants and Their Temperature Dependence for Piezoelectric Materials Using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2016-04-27

    During the operation of high power electromechanical devices, a temperature rise is unavoidable due to mechanical and electrical losses, causing the degradation of device performance. In order to evaluate such degradations using computer simulations, full matrix material properties at elevated temperatures are needed as inputs. It is extremely difficult to measure such data for ferroelectric materials due to their strong anisotropic nature and property variation among samples of different geometries. Because the degree of depolarization is boundary condition dependent, data obtained by the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) impedance resonance technique, which requires several samples with drastically different geometries, usually lack self-consistency. The resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) technique allows the full set material constants to be measured using only one sample, which can eliminate errors caused by sample to sample variation. A detailed RUS procedure is demonstrated here using a lead zirconate titanate (PZT-4) piezoceramic sample. In the example, the complete set of material constants was measured from room temperature to 120 °C. Measured free dielectric constants and  were compared with calculated ones based on the measured full set data, and piezoelectric constants d15 and d33 were also calculated using different formulas. Excellent agreement was found in the entire range of temperatures, which confirmed the self-consistency of the data set obtained by the RUS.

  8. Dependence of gain and phase-shift on crystal parameters and pump intensity in unidirectional photorefractive ring resonators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Maurya; T K Yadav; R A Yadav

    2009-04-01

    The steady-state amplification of light beam during two-wave mixing in photorefractive materials has been analysed in the strong nonlinear regime. The oscillation conditions for unidirectional ring resonator have been studied. The signal beam can be amplified in the presence of material absorption, provided the gain due to the beam coupling is large enough to overcome the cavity losses. Such amplification is responsible for the oscillations. The gain bandwidth is only a few Hz. In spite of such an extremely narrow bandwidth, unidirectional oscillation can be observed easily at any cavity length in ring resonators by using photorefractive crystals as the medium and this can be explained in terms of the photorefractive phase-shift. The presence of such a phase-shift allows the possibility of the non-reciprocal steady-state transfer of energy between the two light beams. Dependence of gain bandwidth on coupling constant, absorption coefficient of the material's cavity length (crystal length) and modulation ratio have also been studied.

  9. Size dependence of multipolar plasmon resonance frequencies and damping rates in simple metal spherical nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Derkachova, A

    2008-01-01

    Multipolar plasmon oscillation frequencies and corresponding damping rates for nanospheres formed of the simplest free-electron metals are studied. The possibility of controlling plasmon features by choosing the size and dielectric properties of the sphere surroundings is discussed. Optical properties of the studied metals are described within the Drude-Sommerfeld model of the dielectric function with effective parameters acounting for the contribution of conduction electrons and of interband transitions. No approximation is made in respect of the size of a particle; plasmon size characteristics are described rigorously. The results of our experiment on sodium nanodroplets [1] are compared with the oscillation frequency size dependence of dipole and quadrupole plasmon.

  10. Prevention of Cardiomyopathy in Transfusion-Dependent Homozygous Thalassaemia Today and the Role of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanassios Aessopos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion and iron chelation therapy revolutionised survival and reduced morbidity in patients with transfusion-dependent beta thalassaemia major. Despite these improvements, cardiac disease remained the most common cause of death in those patients. Recently the ability to determine the degree of cardiac iron overload, through cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR has allowed more logical approaches to iron removal, particularly from the heart. The availability of two oral chelators, deferiprone and deferasirox has reduced the need for the injectable chelator deferrioxamine and an additional benefit has been that deferiprone has been shown to be more cardioprotective than deferrioxamine. This review on the prevention of cardiac disease makes recommendations on the chelation regime that would be desirable for patients according to their cardiac iron status as determined by CMR determined by CMR. It also discusses approaches to chelation management should CMR not be available.

  11. Demonstrating the angular, wavelength and polarization dependence of surface plasmon resonance on thin gold films—An undergraduate experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Peter W. R.; Kaplan, Andrey

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the design of a simple and compact optical system capable of examining fundamental properties of light coupling to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on a thin gold film. The setup, involving a rotatable Attenuated Total Reflection device, from which the reflected light is focused by means of a parabolic mirror, allows for the investigation of the dependence of the reflected intensity on the angle of incidence without moving the detector. It additionally makes provision for a convenient exchange of light sources or the possibility to incorporate a broadband source suitable to investigate SPR at different wavelengths. Theoretical simulation of the experimental data is provided, as well as straightforward calculations for exploring the physics of light excited waves propagating on a surface.

  12. Temperature Dependence of the Kondo Resonance and Its Satellites in CeCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinert, F.; Ehm, D.; Schmidt, S.; Nicolay, G.; Huefner, S.; Kroha, J.; Trovarelli, O.; Geibel, C.

    2001-09-03

    We present high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy studies on the Kondo resonance of the strongly correlated Ce system CeCu{sub 2}Si {sub 2} . By exploiting the thermal broadening of the Fermi edge we analyze position, spectral weight, and temperature dependence of the low-energy 4f spectral features, whose major weight lies above the Fermi level E{sub F} . We also present theoretical predictions based on the single-impurity Anderson model using an extended noncrossing approximation, including all spin-orbit and crystal field splittings of the 4f states. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment provides strong evidence that the spectral properties of CeCu{sub 2}Si {sub 2} can be described by single-impurity Kondo physics down to T{approx}5 K .

  13. Stability and anomalous compressibility of Bose gases near resonance: The scale-dependent interactions and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shao-Jian; Zhou, Fei

    2015-07-01

    The stability of Bose gases near resonance has been a puzzling problem in recent years. In this article, we demonstrate that in addition to generating thermal pressure, thermal atoms enhance the repulsiveness of the scale-dependent interactions between condensed atoms due to a renormalization effect and further stabilize the Bose gases. Consequently, we find that, as a precursor of instability, the compressibility develops an anomalous structure as a function of scattering length and is drastically reduced compared with the mean-field value. Furthermore, the density profile of a Bose gas in a harmonic trap is found to develop a flat top near the center. This is due to the anomalous behavior of compressibility and can be a potential smoking gun for probing such an effect.

  14. Effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity on coherence resonance and synchronization transitions by time delay in adaptive neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huijuan; Gong, Yubing; Wang, Qi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we numerically study how time delay induces multiple coherence resonance (MCR) and synchronization transitions (ST) in adaptive Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). It is found that MCR induced by time delay STDP can be either enhanced or suppressed as the adjusting rate Ap of STDP changes, and ST by time delay varies with the increase of Ap, and there is optimal Ap by which the ST becomes strongest. It is also found that there are optimal network randomness and network size by which ST by time delay becomes strongest, and when Ap increases, the optimal network randomness and optimal network size increase and related ST is enhanced. These results show that STDP can either enhance or suppress MCR and optimal STDP can enhance ST induced by time delay in the adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into STDP's role for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  15. Simulation of the modulation transfer function dependent on the partial Fourier fraction in dynamic contrast enhancement magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Ueyama, Tsuyoshi; Miyati, Tosiaki; Yamamura, Kenichirou

    2016-12-01

    The image characteristics in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) depend on the partial Fourier fraction and contrast medium concentration. These characteristics were assessed and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated by computer simulation. A digital phantom was created from signal intensity data acquired at different contrast medium concentrations on a breast model. The frequency images [created by fast Fourier transform (FFT)] were divided into 512 parts and rearranged to form a new image. The inverse FFT of this image yielded the MTF. From the reference data, three linear models (low, medium, and high) and three exponential models (slow, medium, and rapid) of the signal intensity were created. Smaller partial Fourier fractions, and higher gradients in the linear models, corresponded to faster MTF decline. The MTF more gradually decreased in the exponential models than in the linear models. The MTF, which reflects the image characteristics in DCE-MRI, was more degraded as the partial Fourier fraction decreased.

  16. Helicity dependence of the γ {sup 3}He → πX reactions in the Δ(1232) resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costanza, S.; Rigamonti, F. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Universita di Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica, Pavia (Italy); Mushkarenkov, A.; Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Romaniuk, M.; Mandaglio, G. [INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Universita di Messina, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Messina (Italy); Aguar Bartolome, P.; Ahrens, J.; Arends, H.J.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Kashevarov, V.L.; Ostrick, M.; Ortega, H.; Otte, P.B.; Oussena, B.; Schumann, S.; Thomas, A.; Unverzagt, M. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Annand, J.R.M.; Hamilton, D.; Howdle, D.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Mancell, J.; McGeorge, J.C.; Rosner, G. [University of Glasgow, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Beck, R. [University of Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Bekrenev, V.; Kruglov, S.; Kulbardis, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Berghaeuser, H.; Drexler, P.; Metag, V.; Thiel, M. [University of Giessen, II Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Briscoe, W.J.; Downie, E.J. [The George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Cherepnya, S.N.; Fil' kov, L.V.; Lisin, V.; Polonski, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Collicott, C. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Saint Mary' s University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Fix, A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Glazier, D.I. [University of Glasgow, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); University of Edinburgh, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Heil, W.; Krimmer, J. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik, Mainz (Germany); Hornidge, D.; Middleton, D.G. [Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB (Canada); Jaegle, I.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Oberle, M.; Pheron, F.; Rostomyan, T.; Werthmueller, D. [University of Basel, Institut fuer Physik, Basel (Switzerland); Huber, G.M. [University of Regina, Regina, SK (Canada); Jude, T.; Watts, D.P. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kondratiev, R. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Korolija, M.; Supek, I. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Manley, D.M. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio (United States); Nefkens, B.M.K.; Starostin, A. [University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Nikolaev, A. [Universita di Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica, Pavia (Italy); Prakhov, S. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); The George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sarty, A.J. [Saint Mary' s University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Collaboration: A2 Collaboration

    2014-11-15

    The helicity dependences of the differential cross sections for the semi-inclusive γ {sup 3}He → π{sup 0} X and γ {sup 3}He → π{sup ±} X reactions have been measured for the first time in the energy region 200 < E{sub γ} 450 MeV. The experiment was performed at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI accelerator in Mainz using a longitudinally polarised high-pressure {sup 3}He gas target. Hadronic products were measured with the large-acceptance Crystal Ball detector complemented with additional devices for charged-particle tracking and identification. Unpolarised differential cross sections and their helicity dependence are compared with theoretical calculations using the Fix-Arenhoevel model. The effect of the intermediate excitation of the Δ(1232) resonance can be clearly seen from this comparison, especially for the polarised case, where nuclear effects are relatively small. The model provides a better theoretical description of the unpolarised charged pion photoproduction data than the neutral pion channel. It does significantly better in describing the helicity-dependent data in both channels. These comparisons provide new information on the mechanisms involved in pion photoproduction on {sup 3}He and suggest that a polarised {sup 3}He target can provide valuable information on the corresponding polarised quasi-free neutron reactions. (orig.)

  17. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in chemistry and biology: Non-Förster distance dependence of the FRET rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sangeeta Saini; Harjinder Singh; Biman Bagchi

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a popular tool to study equilibrium and dynamical properties of polymers and biopolymers in condensed phases and is now widely used in conjunction with single molecule spectroscopy. In the data analysis, one usually employs the Förster expression which predicts (1/6) distance dependence of the energy transfer rate. However, critical analysis shows that this expression can be of rather limited validity in many cases. We demonstrate this by explicitly considering a donor-acceptor system, polyfluorene (PF6)-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), where the size of both donor and acceptor is comparable to the distance separating them. In such cases, one may expect much weaker distance (as 1/2 or even weaker) dependence. We have also considered the case of energy transfer from a dye to a nanoparticle. Here we find 1/4 distance dependence at large separations, completely different from Förster. We also discuss recent application of FRET to study polymer conformational dynamics.

  18. Frequency-dependent conductivity contrast for tissue characterization using a dual-frequency range conductivity mapping magnetic resonance method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chauhan, Munish; Kim, Min-Oh; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyung Joong; Sersa, Igor; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-02-01

    Electrical conductivities of biological tissues show frequency-dependent behaviors, and these values at different frequencies may provide clinically useful diagnostic information. MR-based tissue property mapping techniques such as magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) and magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT) are widely used and provide unique conductivity contrast information over different frequency ranges. Recently, a new method for data acquisition and reconstruction for low- and high-frequency conductivity images from a single MR scan was proposed. In this study, we applied this simultaneous dual-frequency range conductivity mapping MR method to evaluate its utility in a designed phantom and two in vivo animal disease models. Magnetic flux density and B(1)(+) phase map for dual-frequency conductivity images were acquired using a modified spin-echo pulse sequence. Low-frequency conductivity was reconstructed from MREIT data by the projected current density method, while high-frequency conductivity was reconstructed from MREPT data by B(1)(+) mapping. Two different conductivity phantoms comprising varying ion concentrations separated by insulating films with or without holes were used to study the contrast mechanism of the frequency-dependent conductivities related to ion concentration and mobility. Canine brain abscess and ischemia were used as in vivo models to evaluate the capability of the proposed method to identify new electrical properties-based contrast at two different frequencies. The simultaneous dual-frequency range conductivity mapping MR method provides unique contrast information related to the concentration and mobility of ions inside tissues. This method has potential to monitor dynamic changes of the state of disease.

  19. Cerebral misery perfusion diagnosed using hypercapnic blood-oxygenation-level-dependent contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Souza Olympio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cerebral misery perfusion represents a failure of cerebral autoregulation. It is an important differential diagnosis in post-stroke patients presenting with collapses in the presence of haemodynamically significant cerebrovascular stenosis. This is particularly the case when cortical or internal watershed infarcts are present. When this condition occurs, further investigation should be done immediately. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian man presented with a stroke secondary to complete occlusion of his left internal carotid artery. He went on to suffer recurrent seizures. Neuroimaging demonstrated numerous new watershed-territory cerebral infarcts. No source of arterial thromboembolism was demonstrable. Hypercapnic blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure his cerebrovascular reserve capacity. The findings were suggestive of cerebral misery perfusion. Conclusions Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging allows the inference of cerebral misery perfusion. This procedure is cheaper and more readily available than positron emission tomography imaging, which is the current gold standard diagnostic test. The most evaluated treatment for cerebral misery perfusion is extracranial-intracranial bypass. Although previous trials of this have been unfavourable, the results of new studies involving extracranial-intracranial bypass in high-risk patients identified during cerebral perfusion imaging are awaited. Cerebral misery perfusion is an important and under-recognized condition in which emerging imaging and treatment modalities present the possibility of practical and evidence-based management in the near future. Physicians should thus be aware of this disorder and of recent developments in diagnostic tests that allow its detection.

  20. Frequency dependence of the microwave surface resistance of MgB{sub 2} by coaxial cavity resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agliolo Gallitto, A., E-mail: aurelio.agliologallitto@unipa.it [CNISM and Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Camarda, P.; Li Vigni, M. [CNISM and Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Figini Albisetti, A. [EDISON SpA Research and Development Division, Foro Buonaparte 31, 20121 Milano (Italy); Giunchi, G. [Freelance Consultant, via Teodosio 8, 20131 Milano (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We investigate the microwave properties of a bulk MgB{sub 2} rod 94.3 mm long. • The MgB{sub 2} rod is used as inner conductor of a coaxial cavity. • The mw surface resistance vs. frequency is studied in the range 1–9 GHz. • R{sub s} vs. f curves follow a f{sup n} law, with n decreasing with the temperature. • Deviations from the quadratic law are highlighted at relatively low temperatures. - Abstract: We report on the microwave (mw) properties of a cylindrical MgB{sub 2} rod prepared by the reactive liquid Mg infiltration technology. The MgB{sub 2} rod, 94.3 mm long, is used as inner conductor of a coaxial cavity having a Cu tube as external conductor. By analyzing the resonance curves of the cavity in the different resonant modes and at different temperatures, we have determined the temperature dependence of the mw surface resistance, R{sub s}, of the MgB{sub 2} material, at fixed frequencies, and the frequency dependence of R{sub s}, at fixed temperatures. Our results show that the R{sub s}(f) curves follow a f{sup n} law, where n decreases on increasing the temperature, starting from n≈2, at T=4.2K, down to n≈0.7 at T⩾T{sub c}. The double-gap nature of MgB{sub 2} manifests itself in the presence of a wide low-T tail in the R{sub s}(T) curves, which can be ascribed to the quasiparticles thermally excited through the π gap even at relatively low temperatures.

  1. Alignment dependence in above-threshold ionization of H2+: role of intermediate resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández, Jorge Fernández; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2009-01-01

    sσg) ground and the 2Σ+u(2pσu) first excited electronic states, in laser pulses of seven optical cycles (19 fs) with a wavelength of 800 nm and for different intensities. The numerical procedure combines two different techniques, a grid-based split-step method to propagate the wave packet during......We report a 3D ab initio investigation of the dependence of above-threshold ionization of the H2+ molecule on the orientation of a linearly polarized intense femtosecond laser pulse with respect to the molecular axis. The calculations were performed in the frozen nuclei approximation for the 2Σ+g(1...... the pulse, and a bound and scattering states B-spline basis set calculation to extract the information from the former. We show that the orientation dependence of the above-threshold ionization spectra is very sensitive to the intensity of the field and to the final electron energy. For some intensities...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder: dependence on the level of training of the performing radiologist for diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodoropoulos, John S. [University of Toronto, Division of Orthopaedics, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Andreisek, Gustav [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); University Hospital Zuerich, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Harvey, Edward J. [McGill University, Division of Orthopaedics, MUHC - Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wolin, Preston [Center for Athletic Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Discrepancies were identified between magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical findings in patients who had MR imaging examinations evaluated by community-based general radiologists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of MR imaging examinations of the shoulder with regard to the training level of the performing radiologist. A review of patient charts identified 238 patients (male/female, 175/63; mean age, 40.4 years) in whom 250 arthroscopies were performed and who underwent MR imaging or direct MR arthrography in either a community-based or hospital-based institution prior to surgery. All MR imaging and surgical reports were reviewed and the diagnostic performance for the detection of labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions was determined. Kappa and Student's t test analyses were performed in a subset of cases in which initial community-based MR images were re-evaluated by hospital-based musculoskeletal radiologists, to determine the interobserver agreement and any differences in image interpretation. The diagnostic performance of community-based general radiologists was lower than that of hospital-based sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists. A sub-analysis of re-evaluated cases showed that musculoskeletal radiologists performed better. {kappa} values were 0.208, 0.396, 0.376, and 0.788 for labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions (t test statistics: p =<0.001, 0.004, 0.019, and 0.235). Our results indicate that the diagnostic performance of MR imaging and MR arthrography of the shoulder depends on the training level of the performing radiologist, with sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists having a better diagnostic performance than general radiologists. (orig.)

  3. Quantifying the size-dependent effect of the residual surface stress on the resonant frequencies of silicon nanowires if finite deformation kinematics are considered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Harold S

    2009-03-18

    There are two major objectives to the present work. The first objective is to demonstrate that, in contrast to predictions from linear surface elastic theory, when nonlinear, finite deformation kinematics are considered, the residual surface stress does impact the resonant frequencies of silicon nanowires. The second objective of this work is to delineate, as a function of nanowire size, the relative contributions of both the residual (strain-independent) and the surface elastic (strain-dependent) parts of the surface stress to the nanowire resonant frequencies. Both goals are accomplished by using the recently developed surface Cauchy-Born model, which accounts for nanoscale surface stresses through a nonlinear, finite deformation continuum mechanics model that leads to the solution of a standard finite element eigenvalue problem for the nanowire resonant frequencies. In addition to demonstrating that the residual surface stress does impact the resonant frequencies of silicon nanowires, we further show that there is a strong size dependence to its effect; in particular, we find that consideration of the residual surface stress alone leads to significant errors in predictions of the nanowire resonant frequency, with an increase in error with decreasing nanowire size. Correspondingly, the strain-dependent part of the surface stress is found to have an increasingly important effect on the resonant frequencies of the nanowires with decreasing nanowire size.

  4. Resonance dependence of gravitropicreactionof cress roots in weak combined magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatina, N. I.; Sheykina, N. V.; Kordyum, E. L.

    The gravitropic reaction of cress was studied in combined magnetic fields, that is the static magnetic field of the order of Earth's one and parallel to it alternating magnetic field. The frequency region for alternating magnetic field was varied in wide diapason ( from 1 Hz up to 45 Hz). The magnitude of alternating magnetic field was equal to 6 microT. The magnetic field conditions were well reproducible. For this purpose the external magnetic field was shielded in the work volume and artificial magnetic field was created in the volume. Both ferromagnetic metal shield and superconductive one with warm volume for work were used. The magnetic noises inside both of ferromagnetic metal and superconductive shields were measured to provide the well reproducible characteristics of artificial field created in the work volume. The objects of investigation were the roots of cress after 2-3-days germination. They were located in the closed humid room, that was located inside the shield in the artificially created magnetic field. All roots were in the darkness. For control we used the analogous roots located in the analogous volume but only in the static magnetic field of the Earth. We measured the divergence angle of the root from its primary direction of growing. We obtained the following results. The curve of dependence of measured angles on the frequency of alternating component of magnetic field had series of sharp peaks. These peaks were well reproducible and their location depended on the magnitude of the static component of magnetic field. The frequency of peak location is in direct proportion with its magnitude. The analysis showed that the location of peaks coincided very well with the cyclotron frequencies of the following ions: Ca+2, Cu+1 , K+1: Fe+3: Ag+1: and with the cyclotron frequencies of ions of phytohormons such as ions of indolile-acetic acid, abscise acid and gibberellins. Some quantitive analogies between the gravitropic process and the effect of

  5. Collagene order of articular cartilage by clinical magnetic resonance images and its age dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, P.; Gruender, W. [Inst. of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The present papers describes a novel method to obtain information on the degree of order of the collagen network of the knee meniscal cartilage by means of a single clinical MRI. Images were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers aged between 6 and 76 years as well as from one patient with clinically-diagnosed arthrosis at the age of 32 and 37 years. A siemens vision (1.5 T) MRT with TR = 750 ms, TE = 50 ms, FoV = 160 mm, and Matrix 512 x 512 was used for this purpose. The MR signal intensities of the cartilage were read out along slices with constant height above the subchondral bone and plotted versus the actual angle to the external magnetic field. The obtained intensity curves were fitted by a model distribution, and the degree of order of the collagen fibers was calculated. For the knee meniscal cartilage, there was an age-dependency of the degree of order and a significant deviation of the volunteer with arthrosis from the normal curve. The results are discussed in view of the arcade model and of a possible use of non-invasive clinical MRT for the detection of early arthrotic changes of cartilage. (orig.)

  6. Myocardial feature tracking reduces observer-dependence in low-dose dobutamine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schuster

    Full Text Available To determine whether quantitative wall motion assessment by CMR myocardial feature tracking (CMR-FT would reduce the impact of observer experience as compared to visual analysis in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM.15 consecutive patients with ICM referred for assessment of hibernating myocardium were studied at 3 Tesla using SSFP cine images at rest and during low dose dobutamine stress (5 and 10 μg/kg/min of dobutamine. Conventional visual, qualitative analysis was performed independently and blinded by an experienced and an inexperienced reader, followed by post-processing of the same images by CMR-FT to quantify subendocardial and subepicardial circumferential (Eccendo and Eccepi and radial (Err strain. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC were assessed for each strain parameter and operator to detect the presence of inotropic reserve as visually defined by the experienced observer.141 segments with wall motion abnormalities at rest were eligible for the analysis. Visual scoring of wall motion at rest and during dobutamine was significantly different between the experienced and the inexperienced observer (p0.05. Eccendo was the most accurate (AUC of 0.76, 10 μg/kg/min of dobutamine parameter. Diagnostic accuracy was worse for resting strain with differences between operators for Eccendo and Eccepi (p0.05.Whilst visual analysis remains highly dependent on operator experience, quantitative CMR-FT analysis of myocardial wall mechanics during DS-CMR provides diagnostic accuracy for the detection of inotropic reserve regardless of operator experience and hence may improve diagnostic robustness of low-dose DS-CMR in clinical practice.

  7. Directly Characterizing the Relative Strength and Momentum Dependence of Electron-Phonon Coupling Using Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereaux, T. P.; Shvaika, A. M.; Wu, K.; Wohlfeld, K.; Jia, C. J.; Wang, Y.; Moritz, B.; Chaix, L.; Lee, W.-S.; Shen, Z.-X.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Braicovich, L.

    2016-10-01

    The coupling between lattice and charge degrees of freedom in condensed matter materials is ubiquitous and can often result in interesting properties and ordered phases, including conventional superconductivity, charge-density wave order, and metal-insulator transitions. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering serve as effective probes for determining the behavior of appropriate, individual degrees of freedom—the electronic structure and lattice excitation, or phonon dispersion, respectively. However, each provides less direct information about the mutual coupling between the degrees of freedom, usually through self-energy effects, which tend to renormalize and broaden spectral features precisely where the coupling is strong, impacting one's ability to quantitatively characterize the coupling. Here, we demonstrate that resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, or RIXS, can be an effective tool to directly determine the relative strength and momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling in condensed matter systems. Using a diagrammatic approach for an eight-band model of copper oxides, we study the contributions from the lowest-order diagrams to the full RIXS intensity for a realistic scattering geometry, accounting for matrix element effects in the scattering cross section, as well as the momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling vertex. A detailed examination of these maps offers a unique perspective into the characteristics of electron-phonon coupling, which complements both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering, as well as Raman and infrared conductivity.

  8. Directly Characterizing the Relative Strength and Momentum Dependence of Electron-Phonon Coupling Using Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devereaux, T.P.; Shvaika, A.M.; Wu, K.; Wohlfeld, K.; Jia, C.J.; Wang, Y.; Moritz, B.; Chaix, L.; Lee, W.-S.; Shen, Z.-X.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Braicovich, L.

    2016-10-25

    The coupling between lattice and charge degrees of freedom in condensed matter materials is ubiquitous and can often result in interesting properties and ordered phases, including conventional superconductivity, charge-density wave order, and metal-insulator transitions. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering serve as effective probes for determining the behavior of appropriate, individual degrees of freedom—the electronic structure and lattice excitation, or phonon dispersion, respectively. However, each provides less direct information about the mutual coupling between the degrees of freedom, usually through self-energy effects, which tend to renormalize and broaden spectral features precisely where the coupling is strong, impacting one’s ability to quantitatively characterize the coupling. Here, we demonstrate that resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, or RIXS, can be an effective tool to directly determine the relative strength and momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling in condensed matter systems. Using a diagrammatic approach for an eight-band model of copper oxides, we study the contributions from the lowest-order diagrams to the full RIXS intensity for a realistic scattering geometry, accounting for matrix element effects in the scattering cross section, as well as the momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling vertex. A detailed examination of these maps offers a unique perspective into the characteristics of electron-phonon coupling, which complements both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering, as well as Raman and infrared conductivity.

  9. Angular dependence of the cross section asymmetry of the. gamma. p. -->. p. pi. /sup 0/ reaction in resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, R.O.; Bagdasaryan, A.S.; Vartapetyan, G.A.; Oganesyan, A.A.; Petrosyan, Zh.V. (Erevanskij Fizicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-10-01

    Angular dependences of cross section asymmetry of ..pi../sup 0/-meson photoproduction in the ..gamma..p ..-->.. p..pi../sup 0/ reaction on energy of primary ..gamma..-quanta in the Esub(..gamma..)=(0.7+-1.3) GeV range are analyzed. Recent data on cross section asymmetry for angles of ..pi../sup 0/-meson production in c. m. s. THETAsub(..pi..)=65 deg - 80 deg are presented. The measurements have been conducted on a quasimonochromatic polarized photon beam of the Yerevan synchrotron by means of a two-arm installation intended for recoil proton detection from ..gamma..p ..-->.. p..pi../sup 0/ reaction in coincidence with one ..gamma..-quantum from ..pi../sup 0/-meson decay. Data are compared with different theoretical analyses. None of the present analyses describes of the measured energy and angular dependences of polarization parameters ..sigma.., Psub(y), Psub(xz) for ..gamma..p ..-->.. p..pi../sup 0/ reaction in the range of 2-3-resonances where ..sigma..-asymmetry of the reaction cross section, Psub(y), Psub(xz) - constituent of polarization vector lying in the plane of the reaction and perpendicular.

  10. Computational Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based on Time-Dependent Bloch NMR Flow Equation and Bessel Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awojoyogbe, Bamidele O; Dada, Michael O; Onwu, Samuel O; Ige, Taofeeq A; Akinwande, Ninuola I

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field along with radio waves and a computer to produce highly detailed "slice-by-slice" pictures of virtually all internal structures of matter. The results enable physicians to examine parts of the body in minute detail and identify diseases in ways that are not possible with other techniques. For example, MRI is one of the few imaging tools that can see through bones, making it an excellent tool for examining the brain and other soft tissues. Pulsed-field gradient experiments provide a straightforward means of obtaining information on the translational motion of nuclear spins. However, the interpretation of the data is complicated by the effects of restricting geometries as in the case of most cancerous tissues and the mathematical concept required to account for this becomes very difficult. Most diffusion magnetic resonance techniques are based on the Stejskal-Tanner formulation usually derived from the Bloch-Torrey partial differential equation by including additional terms to accommodate the diffusion effect. Despite the early success of this technique, it has been shown that it has important limitations, the most of which occurs when there is orientation heterogeneity of the fibers in the voxel of interest (VOI). Overcoming this difficulty requires the specification of diffusion coefficients as function of spatial coordinate(s) and such a phenomenon is an indication of non-uniform compartmental conditions which can be analyzed accurately by solving the time-dependent Bloch NMR flow equation analytically. In this study, a mathematical formulation of magnetic resonance flow sequence in restricted geometry is developed based on a general second order partial differential equation derived directly from the fundamental Bloch NMR flow equations. The NMR signal is obtained completely in terms of NMR experimental parameters. The process is described based on Bessel functions and properties that can make it

  11. Fano resonance in the nonadiabatically pumped shot noise of a time-dependent quantum well in a two-dimensional electron gas and graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Rui, E-mail: rzhu@scut.edu.cn; Dai, Jiao-Hua [Department of Physics, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Guo, Yong [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2015-04-28

    Interference between different quantum paths can generate Fano resonance. One of the examples is transport through a quasibound state driven by a time-dependent scattering potential. Previously it is found that Fano resonance occurs as a result of energy matching in one-dimensional systems. In this work, we demonstrate that when transverse motion is present, Fano resonance occurs precisely at the wavevector matching situation. Using the Floquet scattering theory, we considered the transport properties of a nonadiabatic time-dependent well both in a two-dimensional electron gas and monolayer graphene structure. Dispersion of the quasibound state of a static quantum well is obtained with transverse motion present. We found that Fano resonance occurs when the wavevector in the transport direction of one of the Floquet sidebands is exactly identical to that of the quasibound state in the well at equilibrium and follows the dispersion pattern of the latter. To observe the Fano resonance phenomenon in the transmission spectrum, we also considered the pumped shot noise properties when time and spatial symmetry secures vanishing current in the considered configuration. Prominent Fano resonance is found in the differential pumped shot noise with respect to the reservoir Fermi energy.

  12. Time dependent density functional theory investigation of the resonance Raman properties of the julolidinemalononitrile push-pull chromophore in various solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthmuller, Julien; Champagne, Benoît

    2007-10-28

    The absorption and resonance Raman spectra have been investigated for the first excited state of the julolidinemalononitrile push-pull chromophore in cyclohexane, dichloromethane, and acetonitrile by means of time dependent density functional theory calculations. The effect of nonlocal exchange has been considered by using three different hybrid exchange-correlation functionals containing 20%, 35%, and 50% of exact Hartree-Fock exchange. The interactions with the solvent have been described by the polarizable continuum model. The short-time approximation expression has been used to evaluate the resonance Raman intensities, while the vibronic theory of resonance Raman spectroscopy has been employed to determine both the intensities and the excitation profiles. It is shown that a consistent description of the vibronic structure of the excited state and resonance Raman spectra can be obtained provided that an adequate amount, close to 35%, of exact exchange is included in the exchange-correlation functional. The effect of increasing the polarity of the solvent is well represented by the polarizable continuum model, both for the absorption spectra and resonance Raman intensities. In particular, these simulations can reproduce the observed variations of the 1560 cm(-1) band intensity and attribute them to elongations of a CC double bond upon electronic excitation. Moreover, the short-time approximation has been found sufficient to reproduce most of the results of the more evolved vibronic theory of resonance Raman spectroscopy, which includes summations over vibrational excited states, for both the spectral signatures and their solvent dependencies.

  13. 自保护药芯焊丝弧桥并存过渡试验分析%Experimental analysis of bridging transfer without arc interruption of self-shielded flux cored wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志明; 刘海云; 王勇; 张英乔

    2011-01-01

    采用高速摄影、汉诺威弧焊质量分析仪和体式显微镜对自保护药芯焊丝弧桥并存过渡特征和过渡机理进行了试验研究,结果表明:弧桥并存过渡是一种液桥持续存在的同时电弧不熄灭的熔滴过渡模式,是自保护药芯焊丝主要熔滴过渡模式之一;电弧电压和焊接电流波形没有短路过渡特征,表现为一定范围内小幅波动,与弧桥并存过渡特征相对应;电压概率密度分布曲线和电流概率密度曲线都没有短路过渡的特征;弧桥并存过渡的液桥是由熔融渣包裹液态金属混合形成的;自保护药芯焊丝孤桥并存过渡主要是在表面张力和电磁收缩力的共同作用下完成.%By using the high speed photography,Hanover analyzer and macro-microscope,the tranfer characteristic and the tranfer mechanisim of metal transfer of self-shielded flux cored wire have been studied.The results reaveal that bridging transfer without arc interruption transfer is a kind of transfer which the bridge exists lastingly while the arc isn't extinguished,and it is one of the metal transfer models of self-shielded flux cored wire.Without the characteristic of short-circuit transfer,the wave pattern of arc voltage and welding current represent the slight waving within a certain scope,corresponding to the characteristic of bridging transfer without arc interruption,the U-PDD & I-PDD doesn't show the characteristic of short circuit transfer.The bridge of bridging transfer without arc interruption is formed of mixture of the slag's covering the liquid metal.The accomplishment of bridging transfer without arc interruption is mainly conducted by joint work of surface tension and electromagnetic force.

  14. Angular dependence of the asymmetry of the cross section for the reaction. gamma. p. -->. p. pi. /sup 0/ in the resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, R.O.; Bagdasaryan, A.S.; Vartapetyan, G.A.; Oganesyan, A.A.; Petrosyan, Z.V.

    1984-10-01

    We report measurements of the angular dependence of the asymmetry of the cross section for the reaction ..gamma..p..-->..p..pi../sup 0/ for ..pi../sup 0/-meson production angles theta(0 = 65--80/sup 0/ in the resonance region. The data are compared with various theoretical analyses.

  15. Preoperative 3T high field blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging for glioma involving sensory cortical areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shao-wu; WANG Jiang-fei; JIANG Tao; LI Shou-wei; ZHANG Wen-bo; LI Zi-xiao; ZHANG Zhong; DAI Jian-ping; WANG Zhong-cheng

    2010-01-01

    Background Localization of sensory cortical areas during the operation is essential to preserve the sensory function.Intraoperative direct electrostimulation under awake anesthesia is the golden standard but time-consuming. We applied 3T high field blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify the relationship between glioma and cortical sensory areas preoperatively and to guide intraoperative direct electrostimulation for quick and precise localization.Methods Five glioma patients with sensory cortex involvement by or next to the lesion had preoperative BOLD fMRI to determine the spatial relationship of cortical sensory areas to the tumours. Bilateral hand opposite movement was performed by these patients for fMRI. Precentral and postcentral gyri were identified by electrical stimulation during the operation. Karnofsky Performance Status scores of the patients' pre- and postoperative and the role of BOLD fMRI were evaluated.Results The cortical sensory areas were all activated in five glioma patients involving postcentral gyrus areas by BOLDf MRI with bilateral hand opposite movement. The detected activation areas corresponded with the results from cortical electrical stimulation.Conclusions The relationship between cortical sensory areas and tumour can be accurately shown by BOLD fMRI before operation. And the information used to make the tumour resection could obtain good clinical results.

  16. Magnetic field and in situ stress dependence of elastic behavior in EuTiO3 from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiemer, Jason; Spalek, Leszek J.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Panagopoulos, Christos; Katsufuji, Takuro; Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Köhler, Jürgen; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetoelectric coupling phenomena in EuTiO3 are of considerable fundamental interest and are also understood to be key to reported multiferroic behavior in strained films, which exhibit distinctly different properties to the bulk. Here, the magnetoelastic coupling of EuTiO3 is investigated by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy with in situ applied magnetic field and stress as a function of temperature ranging from temperatures above the structural transition temperature T s to below the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature T n. One single crystal and two polycrystalline samples are investigated and compared to each other. Both paramagnetic and diamagnetic transducer carriers are used, allowing an examination of the effect of both stress and magnetic field on the behavior of the sample. The properties are reported in constant field/variable temperature and in constant temperature/variable field mode where substantial differences between both data sets are observed. In addition, elastic and magnetic poling at high fields and stresses at low temperature has been performed in order to trace the history dependence of the elastic constants. Four different temperature regions are identified, characterized by unusual elastic responses. The low-temperature phase diagram has been explored and found to exhibit rich complexity. The data evidence a considerable relaxation of elastic constants at high temperatures, but with little effect from magnetic field alone above 20 K, in addition to the known low-temperature coupling.

  17. Theoretical and experimental studies of distance dependent response of micro-ring resonator-based ultrasonic detectors for photoacoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Dong, Biqin; Li, Hao; Zhou, Fan; Zhang, Hao F; Sun, Cheng

    2014-10-14

    We present in this paper a systematic study of the distance dependent detection characteristics of the newly developed micro-ring resonator (MRR)-based ultrasonic detector for photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). A simple analytic model was first developed to study the steady-state response to the continuous ultrasonic waves. While placing the MRR detector at the acoustic far-field provides longer working distance and broader field of view, the detection at acoustic near-field offers the improved sensitivity and broader bandwidth but at the cost of reduction in the field of view. Furthermore, a numerical model was developed to analyze the transient response to the photoacoustic-induced impulsive waves. Notably, far-field detection exhibits a flat wavefront of its response pattern in the time domain while large distortions are clearly visible in the case of near-field detection. Finally, both analytic and numerical models are validated by experimental studies. This work establishes a theoretical framework for quantitatively analyzing the trade-offs between near-field and far-field detection using MRR detector, creating a guideline for optimizing the PAM for various applications in biomedical imaging and diagnostics.

  18. Angular dependence of ferromagnetic resonance in Tb-doped Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Chen [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Zhang, Dong [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); School of Physics Science and Information Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Wang, Yukun [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Huang, Haibo [College of Material Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Zhai, Ya, E-mail: yazhai@seu.edu.cn [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Zhai, Hongru [National Laboratory of Solid Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Highlights: • The soft magnetic properties of Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} films with Tb dopants up to 8.4% are kept. • The different mechanisms of FMR linewidth are separated and studied. • Magnetic anisotropy constants, Lande g factor, etc. are discussed quantitatively. • The Gilbert damping is increased by more than 50 times with 8.4% of Tb dopants. - Abstract: The mechanisms of angular dependence of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth of dilute Tb doping in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} thin films are investigated by experimental approach and the theoretical fitting by considering the contributions from intrinsic spin–orbit coupling, two-magnon scattering and inhomogeneous broadening. It is shown that the damping coefficient α, by intrinsic contribution extracted from FMR linewidth, is increased by more than 50 times as the Tb concentration increases to 8.4%, indicating that the spin–orbit coupling of this system increases with the introduction of Tb impurities. The magnetic anisotropy constants K{sub 1} and K{sub 2} are obtained and show an increasing trend from negative to positive, which implies that the Tb dopants could enhance the perpendicular anisotropy.

  19. Improved algorithms for the calculation of resolved resonance cross sections with applications to the structural Doppler effect in fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, R N; Toppel, B J; Henryson, H II

    1980-10-01

    Motivated by a need for an economical yet rigorous tool which can address the computation of the structural material Doppler effect, an extremely efficient improved RABANL capability has been developed utilizing the fact that the Doppler broadened line shape functions become essentially identical to the natural line shape functions or Lorentzian limits beyond about 100 Doppler widths from the resonance energy, or when the natural width exceeds about 200 Doppler widths. The computational efficiency has been further enhanced by preprocessing or screening a significant number of selected resonances during library preparation into composition and temperature independent smooth background cross sections. The resonances which are suitable for such pre-processing are those which are either very broad or those which are very weak. The former contribute very little to the Doppler effect and their self-shielding effect can readily be averaged into slowly varying background cross section data, while the latter contribute very little to either the Doppler or to self-shielding effects. To illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the improved RABANL algorithms and resonance screening techniques, calculations have been performed for two systems, the first with a composition typical of the STF converter region and the second typical of an LMFBR core composition. Excellent agreement has been found for RABANL compared to the reference Monte Carlo solution obtained using the code VIM, and improved results have also been obtained for the narrow resonance approximation in the ultra-fine-group option of MC/sup 2/-2.

  20. Temperature and Angular Dependence of Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR Signal of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO Thin Film Using FMR Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Inkoom

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This research study was aimed at determining the temperature dependence of Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR, the recorded signal versus angle and the magnetic property of the 15 uc thick La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO thin film sample on a single crystalline SrTiO3 (STO substrate at 150 K and 9.75 GHz using ferromagnetic resonance technique. We observed from the Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR spectra at various temperatures (150, 200 and 250 K, respectively that as the temperature increases, the FMR spectra shifts to higher fields and this might be as a result of transition into the ferromagnetic state. The recorded signal versus the angle showed an unusual phenomenon at all temperatures (150, 200 and 250 K, respectively and this might be due to shape effects and other contributing factors such as misfit strain and crystal misfit in the LSMO thin film. The plot of resonance field versus the in-plane angle showed a spectrum which was sinusoidal-like in nature with maximum and minimum curvatures. The resonance position and the Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM of the 15 uc thick LSMO thin film were 718.15 and 561.45 Oe, respectively. The 15 uc thick LSMO thin film displayed ferromagnetic resonance at 150, 200 and 250 K, respectively and this has been confirmed using the surface plot.

  1. Fermi resonance and solvent dependence of the vC=O frequency shifts of Raman spectra: cyclohexanone and 2-cyclohexene-1-one

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, S I; Lee, M S; Jung, Y M

    2001-01-01

    The carbonyl stretching vibration, vC=O of 2-cyclohexene-1-one , is in Fermi resonance with a combination tone. The amount of Fermi resonance interaction between these two modes is dependent upon the amount of solute/solvent interaction due to hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl oxygen and the solvent proton. The corrected vC=O frequency of 2-cyclohexene-1-one occurs at a lower frequency than the observed vC=O mode of cyclohexanone, possibly caused by expanded conjugation effects. The carbonyl stretching modes of cyclic ketones were also affected by interaction with the ROH/CCl sub 4 mixed solvent system.

  2. Screening sensitive nanosensors via the investigation of shape-dependent localized surface plasmon resonance of single Ag nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of differently shaped plasmonic nanoparticles benefits screening and designing highly sensitive single nanoparticle sensors. Herein, in the present work, we systematically investigated the shape-dependent scattering light colours and refractive index (RI) sensitivity of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) at the single nanoparticle level using conventional dark-field light scattering microscopy and spectroscopy. AgNPs in various shapes and scattering colourful light were synthesized, and the shape effect on the scattering light colour was determined by the colocalization of the same nanoparticles with dark-field microscopy (DFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the AgNPs that scattered blue, cyan, yellow, and red light are spheres, cubes, triangular bipyramids, and rods, respectively, which enable us to directly recognize the shape of AgNPs through dark-field microscopy instead of electron microscopy. Further studies on investigation of the scattering spectral responses of single AgNPs to their surrounding solvents show that the RI sensitivity of AgNPs of different shapes followed the order of rods > cubes > triangular bipyramids > spheres. Among the commonly studied AgNPs, Ag nanorods have the highest RI sensitivity, which increases as the aspect ratio increases. Then, AgNPs of various shapes were used as single nanoparticle sensors for probing the adsorption of small molecules.Understanding the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of differently shaped plasmonic nanoparticles benefits screening and designing highly sensitive single nanoparticle sensors. Herein, in the present work, we systematically investigated the shape-dependent scattering light colours and refractive index (RI) sensitivity of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) at the single nanoparticle level using conventional dark-field light scattering microscopy and spectroscopy. AgNPs in various shapes and scattering colourful

  3. Sequence dependent structure and thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides and polynucleotides: uv melting and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboul-ela, F.M.

    1987-12-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for double strand formation have been measured for the twenty-five DNA double helices made by mixing deoxyoligonucleotides of the sequence dCA/sub 3/XA/sub 3/G with the complement dCT/sub 3/YT/sub 3/G. Each of the bases A, C, G, T, and I (I = hypoxanthine) have been substituted at the positions labeled X and Y. The results are analyzed in terms of nearest neighbors. At higher temperatures the sequences containing a G)centerreverse arrowdot)C base pair become more stable than those containing only A)centerreverse arrowdot)T. All molecules containing mismatcher are destabilized with respect to those with only Watson-Crick pairing, but there is a wide range of destabilization. Large neighboring base effects upon stability were observed. For example, when (X, Y) = (I, A), the duplex is eightfold more stable than when (X, Y) = (A, I). Independent of sequence effects the order of stabilities is: I)centerreverse arrowdot)C )succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot) A)succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot)T approx. I)centerreverse arrowdot)G. All of these results are discussed within the context of models for sequence dependent DNA secondary structure, replication fidelity and mechanisms of mismatch repair, and implications for probe design. The duplex deoxyoligonucleotide d(GGATGGGAG))centerreverse arrowdot)d(CTCCCATCC) is a portion of the gene recognition sequence of the protein transcription factor IIIA. The crystal structure of this oligonucleotide was shown to be A-form The present study employs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, optical, chemical and enzymatic techniques to investigate the solution structure of this DNA 9-mer. (157 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Concentration dependence of the wings of a dipole-broadened magnetic resonance line in magnetically diluted lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobov, V. E., E-mail: rsa@iph.krasn.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kirenskii Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Kucherov, M. M. [Siberian Federal University, Institute of Space and Information Technologies (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The singularities of the time autocorrelation functions (ACFs) of magnetically diluted spin systems with dipole–dipole interaction (DDI), which determine the high-frequency asymptotics of autocorrelation functions and the wings of a magnetic resonance line, are studied. Using the self-consistent fluctuating local field approximation, nonlinear equations are derived for autocorrelation functions averaged over the independent random arrangement of spins (magnetic atoms) in a diamagnetic lattice with different spin concentrations. The equations take into account the specificity of the dipole–dipole interaction. First, due to its axial symmetry in a strong static magnetic field, the autocorrelation functions of longitudinal and transverse spin components are described by different equations. Second, the long-range type of the dipole–dipole interaction is taken into account by separating contributions into the local field from distant and near spins. The recurrent equations are obtained for the expansion coefficients of autocorrelation functions in power series in time. From them, the numerical value of the coordinate of the nearest singularity of the autocorrelation function is found on the imaginary time axis, which is equal to the radius of convergence of these expansions. It is shown that in the strong dilution case, the logarithmic concentration dependence of the coordinate of the singularity is observed, which is caused by the presence of a cluster of near spins whose fraction is small but contribution to the modulation frequency is large. As an example a silicon crystal with different {sup 29}Si concentrations in magnetic fields directed along three crystallographic axes is considered.

  5. Sequence dependent structure and thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides and polynucleotides: uv melting and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboul-ela, F.M.

    1987-12-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for double strand formation have been measured for the twenty-five DNA double helices made by mixing deoxyoligonucleotides of the sequence dCA/sub 3/XA/sub 3/G with the complement dCT/sub 3/YT/sub 3/G. Each of the bases A, C, G, T, and I (I = hypoxanthine) have been substituted at the positions labeled X and Y. The results are analyzed in terms of nearest neighbors. At higher temperatures the sequences containing a G)centerreverse arrowdot)C base pair become more stable than those containing only A)centerreverse arrowdot)T. All molecules containing mismatcher are destabilized with respect to those with only Watson-Crick pairing, but there is a wide range of destabilization. Large neighboring base effects upon stability were observed. For example, when (X, Y) = (I, A), the duplex is eightfold more stable than when (X, Y) = (A, I). Independent of sequence effects the order of stabilities is: I)centerreverse arrowdot)C )succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot) A)succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot)T approx. I)centerreverse arrowdot)G. All of these results are discussed within the context of models for sequence dependent DNA secondary structure, replication fidelity and mechanisms of mismatch repair, and implications for probe design. The duplex deoxyoligonucleotide d(GGATGGGAG))centerreverse arrowdot)d(CTCCCATCC) is a portion of the gene recognition sequence of the protein transcription factor IIIA. The crystal structure of this oligonucleotide was shown to be A-form The present study employs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, optical, chemical and enzymatic techniques to investigate the solution structure of this DNA 9-mer. (157 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. First observation of angle-dependent Stark cyclotron resonance in bulk crystals: High-electric-field interlayer magnetotransport in a layered organic conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, A.; Konoike, T.; Uchida, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Osada, T., E-mail: osada@issp.u-tokyo.ac.j [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    We report a novel angle-dependent magnetotransport phenomenon in layered conductors under strong interlayer electric fields. Interlayer conduction shows the Stark cyclotron resonance (SCR) when electron orbital motion becomes periodic in k-space. The SCR amplitude oscillates depending on magnetic field orientations. The conventional angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillation (AMRO) switches to the angle-dependent SCR in high electric fields. We predict angle-dependent SCR due to electron orbital motion in layered conductors with coherent interlayer coupling. In addition, we demonstrate the expected switching from conventional AMRO to angle-dependent SCR in high electric fields using an organic conductor {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}NH{sub 4}Hg(SCN){sub 4}. This is the first observation of the SCR with orbital origin in bulk crystals.

  7. Solar Wind Activity Dependence of the Occurrence of Field-Line Resonance at low Latitudes (L~1.3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, S.; Kawano, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.; Seto, M.; Iijima, M.; Yumoto, K.

    2002-12-01

    It is known that the field line resonance (FLR below) is caused by hydromagnetic waves in the magnetosphere. The fundamental field line eigenfrequency can be expressed by the magnetic field line length, the magnetic field intensity, and the plasma density at the magnetic field line. We can measure the fundamental field line eigenfrequency by ground-based observation. The field line length and the magnetic field intensity can be calculated from some magnetic field model (such as the IGRF model) of the magnetosphere. Then, it is possible that the plasma density at the magnetic field line is determined by these factors. The final aim of this study is to monitor and study time-dependent changes in the plasmaspheric plasma distributions by using ground magnetic field observations. For this purpose, we are working in the following three research phases. The first phase is to confirm the possibility of identifying FLR at low-latitudes (L~1.3). The second phase is to examine the correlation between FLR and solar wind parameters. The third phase is to estimate the plasma density from the FLR data, and monitor the density in a continuous manner. We are now in the third phase, and we report here the results of the first two phase. In the first phase, in order to investigate features of FLR close to the Earth, we installed three magnetometers in Japan at L~1.3 (at Kawatabi, Zaou, and Iitate), and started observing ULF geomagnetic pulsations. Each adjacent stations are separated in latitude by 50 to 100 km. The magnetic field data from these stations and Kakioka geomagnetic observatory, Japan, were analyzed by using the amplitude-ratio method and the cross-phase method. As a result, we identified FLR events whose frequency decreased with decreasing geomagnetic latitude; we infer that this feature was caused by heavy ion mass loading to low-L field lines. In the second phase, we studied the dependence of the occurrence probability of the above-identified FLR events on solar wind

  8. Nonlinearity in Intensity versus Concentration Dependence for the Deep UV Resonance Raman Spectra of Toluene and Heptane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.

    2013-01-01

    by absorption and Resonance Raman effects. Raman spectra of toluene and heptane mixtures - with progressively increasing concentrations of heptane - were measured by use of 229 nm excitation. The results show that the characteristic band intensities are not directly proportional to the relative concentrations...... of the compounds and deviate due to absorption resonance effects. An approximated mathematical model is developed to demonstrate that the intensities of the normal Raman scattering bands are suppressed. An inhibition coefficient Ki is introduced to describe the situation and determine the penetration depth. Most......The relation between Raman scattering, resonance Raman scattering and absorption is reviewed to see to what extent quantitative analysis can be applied in Resonance Raman spectroscopy. In addition to this it is demonstrated experimentally that normal Raman spectra can be dramatically inhibited...

  9. 1H-NMR study of diamagnetic cytochrome P450cam: assignment of heme resonances and substrate dependance of one cysteinate beta proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouro, C; Bondon, A; Simonneaux, G; Jung, C

    1997-09-08

    The 1H-NMR study of diamagnetic cytochrome P450cam FeII-CO has been performed for the first time. Chemical shifts of the cysteinate fifth ligand protons and of several heme protons have been assigned through 1- and 2-dimensional spectra at 500 MHz. A substrate dependance has been observed for the resonance of the cysteinate proton detected in the high-field region.

  10. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the periplasmic signalling domain of HasR, a TonB-dependent outer membrane heme transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Idir; Cardoso de Amorim, Gisele; Simenel, Catherine; Prochnicka-Chalufour, Ada; Delepierre, Muriel; Izadi-Pruneyre, Nadia

    2013-04-01

    TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) are bacterial outer membrane proteins that internalize nutrients such as vitamin B12, metal complexes, heme, some carbohydrates, etc. In addition to their transport activity, several TBDTs are also involved in a signalling cascade from the cell surface into the cytoplasm, via their periplasmic signalling domain. Here we report the backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the signalling domain of HasR, a TonB-dependent outer membrane heme transporter from Serratia marcescens as a first step towards its structural study.

  11. Observation of momentum-dependent charge excitations in hole-doped cuprates using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the oxygen K edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenji; Tohyama, Takami; Asano, Shun; Sato, Kentaro; Fujita, Masaki; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Tustsui, Kenji; Sota, Shigetoshi; Miyawaki, Jun; Niwa, Hideharu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Pelliciari, Jonathan; Huang, Yaobo; Schmitt, Thorsten; Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2017-09-01

    We investigate electronic excitations in La2 -x(Br,Sr ) xCuO4 using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the oxygen K edge. RIXS spectra of the hole-doped cuprates show clear momentum dependence below 1 eV. The broad spectral weight exhibits positive dispersion and shifts to higher energy with increasing hole concentration. Theoretical calculation of the dynamical charge structure factor on oxygen orbitals in a three-band Hubbard model is consistent with the experimental observation of the momentum and doping dependence, and therefore the momentum-dependent spectral weight is ascribed to intraband charge excitations which have been observed in electron-doped cuprates. Our results confirm that the momentum-dependent charge excitations exist on the order of the transfer energy (t ), and the broad spectral line shape indicates damped and incoherent character of the charge excitations at the energy range in the doped Mott insulators.

  12. Determination of the Fermi velocity by angle-dependent periodic orbit resonance measurements in the organic conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, A. E.; Hill, S.; Qualls, J. S.

    2002-10-01

    We report on detailed angle-dependent studies of the microwave (ν=50-90 GHz) interlayer magnetoelectrodynamics of a single crystal sample of the organic charge-density-wave (CDW) conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4. Recently developed instrumentation enables both magnetic-field (B) sweeps for a fixed sample orientation and angle sweeps at fixed ν/B. We observe series' of resonant absorptions, which we attribute to periodic orbit resonances (POR)-a phenomenon closely related to cyclotron resonance. The angle dependence of the POR indicates that they are associated with the low-temperature quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) Fermi surface (FS) of the title compound; indeed, all of the resonance peaks collapse onto a single set of ν/B versus angle curves, generated using a semiclassical magnetotransport theory for a single Q1D FS. We show that Q1D POR measurements provide one of the most direct methods for determining the Fermi velocity, without any detailed assumptions concerning the band structure; our analysis yields an average value of vF=6.5×104 m/s. Quantitative analysis of the POR harmonic content indicates that the Q1D FS is strongly corrugated. This is consistent with the assumption that the low-temperature FS derives from a reconstruction of the high-temperature quasi-two-dimensional FS, caused by the CDW instability. Detailed analysis of the angle dependence of the POR yields parameters associated with the CDW superstructure, which are consistent with published results. Finally, we address the issue as to whether or not the interlayer electrodynamics are coherent in the title compound. We obtain a relaxation time from the POR linewidths, which is considerably longer than the interlayer hopping time, indicating that the transport in this direction is coherent.

  13. 钢轨自保护药芯焊丝自动窄间隙电弧焊工艺及装备研究%Technology and equipment development of self-shielded flux cored narrow gap arc rail welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋宏图; 李力; 丁韦; 季关钰

    2011-01-01

    无缝线路建设的大范围展开迫切需要性能、质量、生产效率相匹配的原位焊接方法,目前使用最多的为铝热焊和电弧焊.介绍了窄间陈电弧焊在钢轨焊接中的应用,并重点对电弧位置实时检测技术和自保护药芯焊丝自动钢轨窄间隙电弧焊工艺及装备进行了说明.进行接头性能试验,结果表明:采用钢轨自保护药芯焊丝自动窄间隙电弧焊焊接的接头性能良好,完全超过另外一种原位焊接方法铝热焊的接头性能,能够通过铝热焊不能通过的落锤试验,拉伸性能也强于铝热焊,冲击性能大幅度优于目前使用的闪光焊、气压焊和铝热焊.%Higher joint quality and performance good production efficiency in situ rail welding method should be developed for jointless railway wide construction. Nowadays most ways in used are thermit welding and arc welding. In this paper,narrow gap are welding used in rail welding is introduced,especially on our study of automatic narrow gap are rail welding using self-shielded flux cored wire and based on are position vision detection.Joint properties is overall better than another method thermit welding of in situ welding joint performance,can pass through the drop hammer test,tensile properties is also stronger than thermit welding,the impact performance significantly better than the currently used flash welding, gas pressure welding and thermit welding.

  14. Monitoring the temperature-dependent elastic and anelastic properties in isotropic polycrystalline ice using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Matthew J.; van Wijk, Kasper; Prior, David J.; Hamish Bowman, M.

    2016-11-01

    The elastic and anelastic properties of ice are of interest in the study of the dynamics of sea ice, glaciers, and ice sheets. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy allows quantitative estimates of these properties and aids calibration of active and passive seismic data gathered in the field. The elastic properties and anelastic quality factor Q in laboratory-manufactured polycrystalline isotropic ice cores decrease (reversibly) with increasing temperature, but compressional-wave speed and attenuation prove most sensitive to temperature, indicative of pre-melting of the ice. This method of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy can be deployed in the field, for those situations where shipping samples is difficult (e.g. remote locations), or where the properties of ice change rapidly after extraction (e.g. in the case of sea ice).

  15. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  16. Correlation between single-trial visual evoked potentials and the blood oxygenation level dependent response in simultaneously recorded electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan; Pedersen, Henrik; Rostrup, Egill;

    2012-01-01

    To compare different electroencephalography (EEG)-based regressors and their ability to predict the simultaneously recorded blood oxygenation level dependent response during blocked visual stimulation, simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging in 10 healthy volunteers was performed...... in different occipital and extraoccipital cortical areas not explained by the boxcar regressor. The results suggest that the P1-N2 regressor is the best EEG-based regressor to model the visual paradigm, but when looking for additional effects like habituation or attention modulation that cannot be modeled...

  17. Temperature and field dependent magnetization in a sub-μm patterned Co/FeRh film studied by resonant x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounis, Lounès; Spezzani, Carlo; Delaunay, Renaud; Fortuna, Franck; Obstbaum, Martin; Günther, Stefan; Back, Christian H.; Popescu, Horia; Vidal, Franck; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    We studied the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization in a Co/FeRh/MgO(0 0 1) film patterned into a matrix of sub-μm sized rectangles, using element selective resonant scattering of polarized soft x-rays. We show that it is possible to reverse partially the magnetization of the Co layer in a thermal cycle that crosses the FeRh antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition. Our results support interest in patterned Co/FeRh films and their potential for achieving temperature induced magnetization switching.

  18. Time-dependent theoretical approach to the influence of laser fields on the resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization of SH radical

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Da-Guang; Zheng Xiao-Yun; Liu Hao; Wang Chun-Xing; Meng Qing-Tian

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports that the(2+1)resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization spectra of SH radical in external fields are simulated using the split-operator scheme of time-dependent wave-packet method.Two ionic states.i.e.α1△ and b1∑+,are involved in the simulation.It gives the simulated photoelectron spectra,the population in each electronic state,as well as the projection of the wave-packet in each electronic state on different vibrational states.These results show that the so-called four-state model can represent the experimental results well.

  19. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2. These results may be used to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Heavy Element Chemistry program.

  20. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  1. Resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy of atoms and simple molecules: Satellite features and dependence on energy detuning and photon polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žitnik, M., E-mail: matjaz.zitnik@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Jadranska 21, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kavčič, M.; Bohinc, R.; Bučar, K.; Mihelič, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Cao, W. [Research Centre for Molecular Materials, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Guillemin, R.; Journel, L.; Marchenko, T.; Carniato, S.; Kawerk, E. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Piancastelli, M.N. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Simon, M. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-10-15

    We summarize recent results dealing with high resolution (resonant) X-ray spectroscopy of atomic and molecular targets in the tender X-ray energy region. We comment on advantages, new possibilities and problems related to RIXS spectroscopy with respect to the standard photoabsorption technique, where scanning the probe energy is the only option. In particular, three research areas are covered: X-ray emission mediated by energy dependent photoabsorption to multi-electron excited states, the Cl K core-hole clock studies exemplified by systematic study of chloro(fluoro)-hydrocarbon targets and the polarization dependent X-ray emission studies. Due to its spectral selectivity and simultaneous detection capability, high resolution wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has the capability to resolve structural and dynamical properties of matter within new instrumentation frontiers.

  2. Angioplasty and stenting for severe vertebral artery oriifce stenosis:effects on cerebellar function remodeling veriifed by blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Liu; Zhiwei Li; Peng Xie

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral artery oriifce stenting may improve blood supply of the posterior circulation of the brain to regions such as the cerebellum and brainstem. However, previous studies have mainly focused on recovery of cerebral blood lfow and perfusion in the posterior circulation after inter-ventional therapy. This study examined the effects of functional recovery of local brain tissue on cerebellar function remodeling using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic reso-nance imaging before and after interventional therapy. A total of 40 Chinese patients with severe unilateral vertebral artery oriifce stenosis were enrolled in this study. Patients were equally and randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The control group received drug treat-ment only. The intervention group received vertebral artery oriifce angioplasty and stenting+identical drug treatment to the control group. At 13 days after treatment, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory score was compared between the intervention and control groups. Cerebellar function remodeling was observed between the two groups using blood oxygen level-dependent function-al magnetic resonance imaging. The improvement in dizziness handicap and cerebellar function was more obvious in the intervention group than in the control group. Interventional therapy for severe vertebral artery oriifce stenosis may effectively promote cerebellar function remodeling and exert neuroprotective effects.

  3. Orexin Receptor Activation Generates Gamma Band Input to Cholinergic and Serotonergic Arousal System Neurons and Drives an Intrinsic Ca2+-Dependent Resonance in LDT and PPT Cholinergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Gumenchuk, Iryna; Kang, Bryan; Steger, Catherine; Lynn, Elizabeth; Molina, Nancy E.; Eisenberg, Leonard M.; Leonard, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30–60 Hz) – a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT) and pedunculopontine (PPT) tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR) neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin) neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4–14 Hz) and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep, and intracortical gamma. PMID

  4. Orexin Receptor Activation Generates Gamma Band Input to Cholinergic and Serotonergic Arousal System Neurons and Drives an Intrinsic Ca(2+)-Dependent Resonance in LDT and PPT Cholinergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Gumenchuk, Iryna; Kang, Bryan; Steger, Catherine; Lynn, Elizabeth; Molina, Nancy E; Eisenberg, Leonard M; Leonard, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30-60 Hz) - a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT) and pedunculopontine (PPT) tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR) neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca(2+)-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin) neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca(2+)-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca(2+)-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4-14 Hz) and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca(2+) dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep, and intracortical gamma.

  5. Orexin receptor activation generates gamma band input to cholinergic and serotonergic arousal system neurons and drives an intrinsic Ca2+-dependent resonance in LDT and PPT cholinergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eIshibashi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30-60 Hz - a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculopontine (PPT tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4 - 14 Hz and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep and intracortical

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinical Trial of a Dual-Processing Treatment Protocol for Substance-Dependent Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Holly C.; Hadjiyane, Maria C.; Kost, Michelle; Marshall, Jennifer; Wiley, Joseph; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica; Khatiwada, Manish; VanMeter, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Empirical evidence suggests substance dependence creates stress system dysregulation which, in turn, may limit the efficacy of verbal-based treatment interventions, as the recovering brain may not be functionally capable of executive level processing. Treatment models that target implicit functioning are necessary. Methods: An RCT was…

  7. Flavor-dependent eigenvolume interactions in hadron resonance gas and its implications for hadron yields at LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Alba, P; Gorenstein, M I; Stoecker, H

    2016-01-01

    We study the eigenvolume effects in the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model on hadron yields at zero chemical potential. Using different mass-volume relations for strange and nonstrange hadrons we observe a remarkable improvement in the quality of the fit of the mean hadron multiplicities measured by the ALICE Collaboration in the central Pb+Pb collisions at the collision energy $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 2.76$~TeV. The fit within the point-particle HRG yields $\\chi^2 / N_{\\rm dof} \\simeq 27.1 / 8$ while the corresponding calculation within the eigevolume HRG with smaller radii for heavier strange hadrons yields a remarkably small $\\chi^2 / N_{\\rm dof} \\simeq 0.42 / 6$. This effect appears to be rather insensitive to the details in the implementation of the HRG model, including the variations in the hadron list, as well the variations in the excluded-volume mechanism. Our result shows that there are no anomalies in the description of the heavy-ion hadron yield data at LHC within the HRG model, as long as physical exte...

  8. Planetesimal clearing and size-dependent asteroid retention by secular resonance sweeping during the depletion of the solar nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Xiaochen; Kouwenhoven, M B N

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of heavy elements is anomalously low in the asteroid main belt region compared with elsewhere in the solar system. Observational surveys also indicate a deficit in the number of small ($ \\le 50$~km size) asteroids that is two orders of magnitude lower than what is expected from the single power-law distribution that results from a collisional coagulation and fragmentation equilibrium. Here, we consider the possibility that a major fraction of the original asteroid population may have been cleared out by Jupiter's secular resonance, as it swept through the main asteroid belt during the depletion of the solar nebula. This effect leads to the excitation of the asteroids' orbital eccentricities. Concurrently, hydrodynamic drag and planet-disk tidal interaction effectively damp the eccentricities of sub-100 km-size and of super-lunar-size planetesimals, respectively. These combined effects lead to the asteroids' orbital decay and clearing from the present-day main belt region ($\\sim 2.1-3.3$~AU). ...

  9. Multi-Group Formulation of the Temperature-Dependent Resonance Scattering Model and its Impact on Reactor Core Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghrayeb, Shadi Z. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering; Ougouag, Abderrafi M. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ouisloumen, Mohamed [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin N. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering

    2014-01-01

    A multi-group formulation for the exact neutron elastic scattering kernel is developed. It incorporates the neutron up-scattering effects, stemming from lattice atoms thermal motion and accounts for it within the resulting effective nuclear cross-section data. The effects pertain essentially to resonant scattering off of heavy nuclei. The formulation, implemented into a standalone code, produces effective nuclear scattering data that are then supplied directly into the DRAGON lattice physics code where the effects on Doppler Reactivity and neutron flux are demonstrated. The correct accounting for the crystal lattice effects influences the estimated values for the probability of neutron absorption and scattering, which in turn affect the estimation of core reactivity and burnup characteristics. The results show an increase in values of Doppler temperature feedback coefficients up to -10% for UOX and MOX LWR fuels compared to the corresponding values derived using the traditional asymptotic elastic scattering kernel. This paper also summarizes the results done on this topic to date.

  10. Comparison of echocardiographic (US volumetry with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR imaging in transfusion dependent thalassemia major (TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotsis Efstathios

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite advances in survival in patients with thalassemia major (TM the most common cause of death is cardiac disease. Regular cardiac follow-up is imperative in order to identify and reverse pathology. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR and Echocardiography (US are applied in parallel to TM patients for cardiac evaluation and ongoing monitoring. A comparison between mutual features would be useful in order to assess the accuracy and reliability of the two methods, with a particular focus on routine US application. TM's special attributes offer an excellent opportunity for cardiac imaging research that has universal general purpose applications. Methods 135 TM patients underwent US (Teichholz's M-mode formula – rapidly accessible means of measuring volumes and ejection fraction and CMR volumetry. Paired-samples t-test, Passing & Badlock regression and Bland & Altman plot were used while comparing the common parameters between the CMR and the US. Results We found that the US volumes were underestimated, especially the end-diastolic volume (p Conclusion In cases where cardiac wall movement abnormalities are absent, the US Teichholz's M-mode formula for volume measurements, though less sophisticated in comparison to the high resolution CMR technique, offers an adequate ejection fraction estimation for routine use, especially when monitoring gross alterations in cardiac function over time, and is easy to perform.

  11. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Value Is Not Dependent on Magnetic Resonance Systems and Field Strength Under Fixed Imaging Parameters in Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Akio; Tamura, Takayuki; Ozaki, Masanori; Doi, Tsukasa; Fujimoto, Koji; Miyati, Tosiaki; Ito, Yukiko; Maeda, Fumie; Tarewaki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the causes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement errors and to determine the optimal scanning parameters that are independent of the field strength and vendors of the magnetic resonance (MR) system. Brain MR images of 10 healthy volunteers were scanned using 6 MR scanners of different field strengths and vendors in 2 different institutions. Ethical review board approvals were obtained for this study, and all volunteers gave their informed consents. Coefficient of variation (CV) of ADC values were compared for their differences in various MR scanners and in the scanned subjects. The CV of ADC values for 6 different scanners of 6 brains was 3.32%. The CV for repeated measurements in 1 day (10 scans per day) and in 10 days (scan per day for 10 days) for 1 subject was 1.72% and 2.96%, respectively (n = 5, P variance for the same subject but were lower than the intersubject variance for the same scanner. The variance in the ADC values for different MR scanners is reasonably small if appropriate scanning parameters (repetition time, >3000 ms; echo time, minimum; and high enough signal-to-noise ratio of high-b diffusion-weighted image) are used.

  12. Planetesimal Clearing and Size-dependent Asteroid Retention by Secular Resonance Sweeping during the Depletion of the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaochen; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.

    2017-02-01

    The distribution of heavy elements is anomalously low in the asteroid main belt region compared with elsewhere in the solar system. Observational surveys also indicate a deficit in the number of small (≲50 km size) asteroids, which is two orders of magnitude lower than what is expected from the single power-law distribution that results from a collisional coagulation and fragmentation equilibrium. Here, we consider the possibility that a major fraction of the original asteroid population may have been cleared out by Jupiter’s secular resonance, as it swept through the main asteroid belt during the depletion of the solar nebula. This effect leads to the excitation of the asteroids’ orbital eccentricities. Concurrently, hydrodynamic drag and planet–disk tidal interaction effectively damp the eccentricities of sub-100 km-size and of super-lunar-size planetesimals, respectively. These combined effects lead to the asteroids’ orbital decay and clearing from the present-day main belt region (∼2.1–3.3 au). Eccentricity damping for the intermediate-size (50 to several hundreds of kilometers) planetesimals is less efficient than for small or large planetesimals. These objects therefore preferentially remain as main belt asteroids near their birthplaces, with modest asymptotic eccentricities. The smaller asteroids are the fragments of subsequent disruptive collisions at later times as suggested by the present-day asteroid families. This scenario provides a natural explanation for both the observed low surface density and the size distribution of asteroids in the main belt, without the need to invoke special planetesimal formation mechanisms. It also offers an explanation for the confined spatial extent of the terrestrial planet building blocks without the requirement of extensive migration of Jupiter, which is required in the grand-tack scenario.

  13. Determination of Temperature-Dependent Stress State in Thin AlGaN Layer of AlGaN/GaN HEMT Heterostructures by Near-Resonant Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-dependent stress state in the AlGaN barrier layer of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure grown on sapphire substrate was investigated by ultraviolet (UV near-resonant Raman scattering. Strong scattering peak resulting from the A1(LO phonon mode of AlGaN is observed under near-resonance condition, which allows for the accurate measurement of Raman shifts with temperature. The temperature-dependent stress in the AlGaN layer determined by the resonance Raman spectra is consistent with the theoretical calculation result, taking lattice mismatch and thermal mismatch into account together. This good agreement indicates that the UV near-resonant Raman scattering can be a direct and effective method to characterize the stress state in thin AlGaN barrier layer of AlGaN/GaN HEMT heterostructures.

  14. Irreversible magnetic-field dependence of ferromagnetic resonance and inverse spin Hall effect voltage in CoFeB/Pt bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Choi, Yeon Suk; Park, Seung-Young

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic field (H) sweeping direction dependences of the mixed voltage Vmix induced by the inverse-spin Hall effect(ISHE) and spin-rectified effect (SRE) in a CoFeB (5 nm)/Pt (10 nm) bilayer structure are investigated using the ferromagnetic resonance in the TE mode cavities and coplanar waveguide methods. Conventionally, the magnitude of ISHE voltage VISH (symmetric) excluding the SRE (antisymmetric component) was unavoidably separated from the fitting curve of Vmix (a sum of a symmetric and an antisymmetric part) for one direction of H-source. By studying the ratio of the two voltage parts with the bi-directional H sweeping, the optimized VISH (no SRE condition) value which also include a well-defined spin Hall angle can be obtained via the linear response relation of ISHE and SRE components.

  15. Comparison of Energy Dependence of PAGAT Polymer Gel Dosimeter with Electron and Photon Beams using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Azadbakht

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate dependence of PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter 1/T2 on different electron and photon energies for a standard clinically used 60Co therapy unit and an electa linear accelerator.Using MRI, the formulation to give the maximum change in the transverse relaxation rate R2(1/T2 was determined to be 4.5% N,N'-methylen-bis-acrylamide(bis, 4.5% acrylamid(AA, 5% gelatine, 5 mM tetrakis (hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (THPC, 0.01 mM hydroquinone (HQ and 86% HPLC(Water. When the preparation of final polymer gel solution is completed, it is transferred into phantoms and allowed to set by storage in a refrigerator at about 4°C. The optimal post-manufacture irradiation and post imaging times were both determined to be 24 h. The sensitivity of PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter with irradiation of photon and electron beams was represented by the slope of calibration curve in the linear region measured for each modality. The response of PAGAT gel with photon and electron beams is very similar in the lower dose region. The R2-dose response was linear up to 30 Gy and the R2-dose response of the PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter is linear between 10 to 30 Gy. In electron beams the R2-dose response for doses less than 3 Gy is not exact, but in photon beams the R2-dose response for doses less than 2Gy is not exact. Dosimeter energy dependence was studied for electron energies of 4, 12 and 18MeV and photon energies of 1.25, 4, 6 and 18 MV. Evaluation of dosimeters were performed on Siemens Symphony, Germany 1.5T Scanner in the head coil. In this study no trend in polymer-gel dosimeter 1/T2 dependence was found on mean energy for electron and photon beams.

  16. Determination of elastic constants of a single-crystal topaz and their temperature dependence via sphere resonance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sema, Fumie; Watanabe, Tohru

    2017-10-01

    Water and halogens in ocean floor sediments transported by a descending slab might play important roles in geodynamic processes. Imaging subducted sediments through seismological observations requires a thorough understanding of elastic properties of sediment origin hydrous minerals. Topaz is a sediment origin hydrous mineral, which is formed at the depth of 250-350 km on a cold subducting slab. We determined elastic constants and their temperature derivatives of a natural single-crystal of topaz (Al1.97SiO4(F1.56, OH0.42)) at the temperature from 271.5 to 312.7 °K by using the sphere-resonance method. Elastic constants at an ambient temperature (T = 291.9 °K) are C11 = 281.21(1) GPa, C22 = 346.23(9) GPa, C33 = 294.99(9) GPa, C44 = 108.49(1) GPa, C55 = 132.47(1) GPa, C66 = 130.32(1) GPa, C12 = 121.48(3) GPa, C13 = 80.94(3) GPa and C23 = 81.77(2) GPa. Since our sample [Al2SiO4(F1.56,OH0.42)] was relatively rich in fluorine, only small differences in elastic constants can be seen between our sample and fluorine end member. Elastic constants of OH-rich topaz should be experimentally investigated to understand the influence of F-OH substitution on elasticity of topaz. All the elastic constants decrease linearly with increasing temperature. The temperature derivatives are dC11/dT = -0.014(3) GPa/°K, dC22/dT = -0.010(7) GPa/°K, dC33/dT = -0.021(5) GPa/°K, dC44/dT = -0.011(1) GPa/°K, dC55/dT = -0.016(2) GPa/°K, dC66/dT = -0.0101(2) GPa/°K, dC12/dT = -0.0041(6) GPa/°K, dC13/dT = -0.001(2) GPa/°K and dC23/dT = -0.002(1) GPa/°K. The isotropic seismic velocities in topaz are distinctly higher than those in olivine at 10 GPa and 300-1400 °K. There should be a strong velocity contrast between the overlying mantle and the thin sediment-origin layer at the depth around 300 km. A seismological technique like the receiver function technique should be applied to detect a thin layer of topaz in a cold subduction zone.

  17. Phase and ellipticity dependence of the photoelectron angular distribution in non-resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faye, M; Wane, S T, E-mail: mamadou.faye@ucad.edu.sn [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Universite Cheikh Anta Diop, Boulevard Martin Luther King, (Corniche Ouest) BP 5005-Dakar Fann (Senegal)

    2011-03-14

    We study the ellipticity and the dependence on the phase lag (lead) (between the semimajor and the semiminor axes of the field components) of the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) in the non-resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. We establish exact analytical expressions for azimuthal PAD for 3s, 3p and 3d excited initial states, marked by the occurrence of an asymmetric term. This term gives rise to elliptic dichroism (ED), which can be obtained in two ways: either with the left (versus right) ellipticity, or with the phase lag (versus lead); for 3s and 3p initial states, it is shown that the quantum phase of continua is directly related to the phase lag, one-photon below-threshold ionization, and indirectly one photon above. Another important result is that the magnetic sublevels, m = 0, for 3p and m = {+-}1, for 3d, do not contribute to the azimuthal PAD. Our numerical results show, for 3s and 3d, and near-threshold ionization, that the PAD has maxima either along the semimajor or the semiminor axis, while for above-threshold ionization, they are always shifted from these axes. However, the maxima of the corresponding ED coincide with the PAD maxima, while for 3p, they are shifted from the PAD minima. A strong dependence of the ED sign is noted, regardless of the state or the process. However, strong ED signals are obtained for the 3s initial state and below-threshold ionization.

  18. Observation of a Change in Twist of an RNA Kissing Complex Using the Angular Dependence of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Milas, Peker; Parrot, Louis; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of a change in the bend angle of an RNA kissing complex upon Rop binding using single-molecular-pair FRET. The angular relationship between the dyes, rather than the distance between them, is shown to be responsible for the observed change in energy transfer. It has long been thought that Rop increases the bend angle of the R1inv-R2inv complex upon binding, but this has never been directly observed. In contrast, we find an increase in FRET upon the addition of Rop that is shown via modeling to be consistent with a decrease in the bend angle of the complex of $-15^{\\circ}\\pm7^{\\circ}$. The model predicts FRET from dye trajectories generated using molecular dynamics simulations of Cy3 and Cy5 attached to $5'$ terminal cytosine or guanosine on RNA. While FRET is commonly used to observe global changes in molecular structure attributed to changes in the distance between dyes, it is rarely, if ever, used to elucidate angular changes. Subtle global changes in molecular structure upon binding are generally difficult to discern using NMR or crystallography, but FRET is well suited to observe these changes because of its sensitivity at interdye distance around the F\\"orster radius, $R_F\\approx5$ nm. While FRET is often referred to and used as a "molecular ruler" for distances around $R_F$, for dye pairs that have minimal rotational freedom, FRET can also be used to observe changes in structure for which there is no significant change in distance between the dyes. This is the case for the R1inv-R2inv kissing complex studied here. This complex is derived from the RNA I - RNA II complex in E. coli. RNA II is a primer for replication of the ColE1 plasmid, its function is modulated by interaction with RNA II. Rop is known to stabilize the complex, and it is also known to bind kissing complexes in a structure, but not sequence, dependent fashion.

  19. Pointwise cross-section-based on-the-fly resonance interference treatment with intermediate resonance approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacha, Meer; Joo, Han Gyu [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The effective cross sections (XSs) in the direct whole core calculation code nTRACER are evaluated by the equivalence theory-based resonance-integral-table method using the WIMS-based library as an alternative to the subgroup method. The background XSs, as well as the Dancoff correction factors, were evaluated by the enhanced neutron-current method. A method, with pointwise microscopic XSs on a union-lethargy grid, was used for the generation of resonance-interference factors (RIFs) for mixed resonant absorbers. This method was modified by the intermediate-resonance approximation by replacing the potential XSs for the non-absorbing moderator nuclides with the background XSs and neglecting the resonance-elastic scattering. The resonance-escape probability was implemented to incorporate the energy self-shielding effect in the spectrum. The XSs were improved using the proposed method as compared to the narrow resonance infinite mass-based method. The RIFs were improved by 1% in {sup 235}U, 7% in {sup 239}Pu, and >2% in {sup 240}Pu. To account for thermal feedback, a new feature was incorporated with the interpolation of pre-generated RIFs at the multigroup level and the results compared with the conventional resonance-interference model. This method provided adequate results in terms of XSs and k-eff. The results were verified first by the comparison of RIFs with the exact RIFs, and then comparing the XSs with the McCARD calculations for the homogeneous configurations, with burned fuel containing a mixture of resonant nuclides at different burnups and temperatures. The RIFs and XSs for the mixture showed good agreement, which verified the accuracy of the RIF evaluation using the proposed method. The method was then verified by comparing the XSs for the virtual environment for reactor application-benchmark pin-cell problem, as well as the heterogeneous pin cell containing burned fuel with McCARD. The method works well for homogeneous, as well as heterogeneous

  20. Combination of blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potential recordings for abnormal visual cortex in two types of amblyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinmei; Cui, Dongmei; Zheng, Ling; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the different neuromechanisms of subjects with strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia compared with normal vision subjects using blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) and pattern-reversal visual evoked potential (PR-VEP). Methods Fifty-three subjects, age range seven to 12 years, diagnosed with strabismic amblyopia (17 cases), anisometropic amblyopia (20 cases), and normal vision (16 cases), were examined using the BOLD-fMRI and PR-VEP of UTAS-E3000 techniques. Cortical activation by binocular viewing of reversal checkerboard patterns was examined in terms of the calcarine region of interest (ROI)-based and spatial frequency–dependent analysis. The correlation of cortical activation in fMRI and the P100 amplitude in VEP were analyzed using the SPSS 12.0 software package. Results In the BOLD-fMRI procedure, reduced areas and decreased activation levels were found in Brodmann area (BA) 17 and other extrastriate areas in subjects with amblyopia compared with the normal vision group. In general, the reduced areas mainly resided in the striate visual cortex in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia. In subjects with strabismic amblyopia, a more significant cortical impairment was found in bilateral BA 18 and BA 19 than that in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia. The activation by high-spatial-frequency stimuli was reduced in bilateral BA 18 and 19 as well as BA 17 in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia, whereas the activation was mainly reduced in BA 18 and BA 19 in subjects with strabismic amblyopia. These findings were further confirmed by the ROI-based analysis of BA 17. During spatial frequency–dependent VEP detection, subjects with anisometropic amblyopia had reduced sensitivity for high spatial frequency compared to subjects with strabismic amblyopia. The cortical activation in fMRI with the calcarine ROI-based analysis of BA 17 was significantly correlated with the P100 amplitude in VEP

  1. Evidence of cortical reorganization of language networks after stroke with subacute Broca's aphasia: a blood oxygenation level dependent-functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei-Hong; Wu, Hui-Xiang; Yang, Qing-Lu; Kang, Zhuang; Chen, Zhao-Cong; Li, Kui; Qiu, Guo-Rong; Xie, Chun-Qing; Wan, Gui-Fang; Chen, Shao-Qiong

    2017-01-01

    Aphasia is an acquired language disorder that is a common consequence of stroke. The pathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood, and as a result, current treatment options are not satisfactory. Here, we used blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate the activation of bilateral cortices in patients with Broca's aphasia 1 to 3 months after stroke. Our results showed that language expression was associated with multiple brain regions in which the right hemisphere participated in the generation of language. The activation areas in the left hemisphere of aphasia patients were significantly smaller compared with those in healthy adults. The activation frequency, volumes, and intensity in the regions related to language, such as the left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area), the left superior temporal gyrus, and the right inferior frontal gyrus (the mirror region of Broca's area), were lower in patients compared with healthy adults. In contrast, activation in the right superior temporal gyrus, the bilateral superior parietal lobule, and the left inferior temporal gyrus was stronger in patients compared with healthy controls. These results suggest that the right inferior frontal gyrus plays a role in the recovery of language function in the subacute stage of stroke-related aphasia by increasing the engagement of related brain areas.

  2. Light-dependent and -independent behavioral effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields in a land snail are consistent with a parametric resonance mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prato, F.S.; Thomas, A.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)]|[St. Joseph`s Health Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Kavaliers, M. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Cullen, A.P. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). School of Optometry

    1997-05-01

    Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has been shown to attenuate endogenous opioid peptide mediated antinociception or analgesia in the terrestrial pulmonate snail, Cepaea nemoralis. Here the authors examine the roles of light in determining this effect and address the mechanisms associated with mediating the effects of the ELF magnetic fields in both the presence and absence of light. Specifically, they consider whether the magnetic field effects involve an indirect induced electric current mechanism or a direct effect such as a parametric resonance mechanism (PRM). They exposed snails in both the presence and absence of light at three different frequencies (30, 60, and 120 Hz) with static field values (B{sub DC}) and ELF magnetic field amplitude (peak) and direction (B{sub AC}) set according to the predictions of the PRM for Ca{sup 2+}. Analgesia was induced in snails by injecting them with an enkephalinase inhibitor, which augments endogenous opioid (enkephalin) activity. They found that the magnetic field exposure reduced this opioid-induced analgesia significantly more if the exposure occurred in the presence rather than the absence of light. However, the percentage reduction in analgesia in both the presence and absence of light was not dependent on the ELF frequency. This finding suggests that in both the presence and the absence of light the effect of the ELF magnetic field was mediated by a direct magnetic field detection mechanism such as the PRM rather than an induced current mechanism.

  3. Evidence of cortical reorganization of language networks after stroke with subacute Broca's aphasia: a blood oxygenation level dependent-functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei-hong; Wu, Hui-xiang; Yang, Qing-lu; Kang, Zhuang; Chen, Zhao-cong; Li, Kui; Qiu, Guo-rong; Xie, Chun-qing; Wan, Gui-fang; Chen, Shao-qiong

    2017-01-01

    Aphasia is an acquired language disorder that is a common consequence of stroke. The pathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood, and as a result, current treatment options are not satisfactory. Here, we used blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate the activation of bilateral cortices in patients with Broca's aphasia 1 to 3 months after stroke. Our results showed that language expression was associated with multiple brain regions in which the right hemisphere participated in the generation of language. The activation areas in the left hemisphere of aphasia patients were significantly smaller compared with those in healthy adults. The activation frequency, volumes, and intensity in the regions related to language, such as the left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area), the left superior temporal gyrus, and the right inferior frontal gyrus (the mirror region of Broca's area), were lower in patients compared with healthy adults. In contrast, activation in the right superior temporal gyrus, the bilateral superior parietal lobule, and the left inferior temporal gyrus was stronger in patients compared with healthy controls. These results suggest that the right inferior frontal gyrus plays a role in the recovery of language function in the subacute stage of stroke-related aphasia by increasing the engagement of related brain areas. PMID:28250756

  4. Effect of Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity on Intrinsic Coherence Resonance in Newman-Watts Stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huijuan; Gong, Yubing; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we numerically study the effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) on coherence resonance (CR) induced by channel noise in adaptive Newman-Watts stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron networks. It is found that STDP can either enhance or suppress the intrinsic CR when the adjusting rate of STDP decreases or increases. STDP can alter the effects of network randomness and network size on the intrinsic CR. Under STDP, for electrical coupling there are optimal network randomness and network size by which the intrinsic CR becomes strongest, however, for chemical coupling the intrinsic CR is always enhanced as network randomness or network size increases, which are different from the results for fixed coupling. These results show that the intrinsic CR of the neuronal networks can be either enhanced or suppressed by STDP, and there are optimal network randomness and network size by which the intrinsic CR becomes strongest. These findings could provide a new insight into the role of STDP for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  5. Structure-dependent localized surface plasmon resonance characteristics and surface enhanced Raman scattering performances of quasi-periodic nanoarrays: Measurements and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dong; Zhou, Jun, E-mail: zhoujun@nbu.edu.cn [Institute of Photonics, Faculty of Science, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Rippa, Massimo; Petti, Lucia [Institute of Applied Sciences and Intelligent Systems “E. Caianiello” of CNR, Via Campi Flegrei 34, 80072 Pozzuoli (Italy)

    2015-10-28

    A set of periodic and quasi-periodic Au nanoarrays with different morphologies have been fabricated by using electron beam lithography technique, and their optical properties have been examined experimentally and analyzed theoretically by scanning near-field optical microscope and finite element method, respectively. Results present that the localized surface plasmon resonance of the as-prepared Au nanoarrays exhibit the structure-depended characteristics. Comparing with the periodic nanoarrays, the quasi-periodic ones demonstrate stronger electric field enhancement, especially for Thue-Morse nanoarray. Meanwhile, the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid molecular labeled nanoarrays show that the quasi-periodic nanoarrays exhibit distinct SERS enhancement, for example, a higher enhancement factor of ∼10{sup 7} is obtained for the Thue-Morse nanoarray consisted of square pillars of 100 nm size. Therefore, it is significant to optimally design and fabricate the chip-scale quasi-periodic nanoarrays with high localized electric field enhancement for SERS applications in biosensing field.

  6. Assessment of mode-mixing and Herzberg-Teller effects on two-photon absorption and resonance hyper-Raman spectra from a time-dependent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, HuiLi; Zhao, Yi; Liang, WanZhen

    2014-03-07

    A time-dependent approach is presented to simulate the two-photon absorption (TPA) and resonance hyper-Raman scattering (RHRS) spectra including Duschinsky rotation (mode-mixing) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic coupling effects. The computational obstacles for the excited-state geometries, vibrational frequencies, and nuclear derivatives of transition dipole moments, which enter the expressions of TPA and RHRS cross sections, are further overcome by the recently developed analytical excited-state energy derivative approaches in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. The excited-state potential curvatures are evaluated at different levels of approximation to inspect the effects of frequency differences, mode-mixing and HT on TPA and RHRS spectra. Two types of molecules, one with high symmetry (formaldehyde, p-difluorobenzene, and benzotrifluoride) and the other with non-centrosymmetry (cis-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone in the deprotonated anion state (HDBI(-))), are used as test systems. The calculated results reveal that it is crucial to adopt the exact excited-state potential curvatures in the calculations of TPA and RHRS spectra even for the high-symmetric molecules, and that the vertical gradient approximation leads to a large deviation. Furthermore, it is found that the HT contribution is evident in the TPA and RHRS spectra of HDBI(-) although its one- and two-photon transitions are strongly allowed, and its effect results in an obvious blueshift of the TPA maximum with respect to the one-photon absorption maximum. With the HT and solvent effects getting involved, the simulated blueshift of 1291 cm(-1) agrees well with the experimental measurement.

  7. Assessment of mode-mixing and Herzberg-Teller effects on two-photon absorption and resonance hyper-Raman spectra from a time-dependent approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, HuiLi [State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, and Institute of Fujian Provincial Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhao, Yi; Liang, WanZhen, E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, and Institute of Fujian Provincial Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2014-03-07

    A time-dependent approach is presented to simulate the two-photon absorption (TPA) and resonance hyper-Raman scattering (RHRS) spectra including Duschinsky rotation (mode-mixing) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic coupling effects. The computational obstacles for the excited-state geometries, vibrational frequencies, and nuclear derivatives of transition dipole moments, which enter the expressions of TPA and RHRS cross sections, are further overcome by the recently developed analytical excited-state energy derivative approaches in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. The excited-state potential curvatures are evaluated at different levels of approximation to inspect the effects of frequency differences, mode-mixing and HT on TPA and RHRS spectra. Two types of molecules, one with high symmetry (formaldehyde, p-difluorobenzene, and benzotrifluoride) and the other with non-centrosymmetry (cis-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone in the deprotonated anion state (HDBI{sup −})), are used as test systems. The calculated results reveal that it is crucial to adopt the exact excited-state potential curvatures in the calculations of TPA and RHRS spectra even for the high-symmetric molecules, and that the vertical gradient approximation leads to a large deviation. Furthermore, it is found that the HT contribution is evident in the TPA and RHRS spectra of HDBI{sup −} although its one- and two-photon transitions are strongly allowed, and its effect results in an obvious blueshift of the TPA maximum with respect to the one-photon absorption maximum. With the HT and solvent effects getting involved, the simulated blueshift of 1291 cm{sup −1} agrees well with the experimental measurement.

  8. Redox-dependent interactions between reduced/oxidized cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase evaluated by in-situ electrochemical surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yuting; An, Jianhong; Deng, Chunyan; Chen, Shu; Xiang, Juan

    2016-07-01

    The interactions between the redox couple of cytochrome c (Cyt c) and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) were investigated at a mimic redox-modulated interface by using an electrochemical surface plasmon resonance (EC-SPR) system. Although early studies of the binding between COX and Cyt c have been conducted using several techniques in homogeneous solutions, a problem still inherent is that ferro-cytochrome c (Cyt c red), the reduced form of Cyt c, can be easily oxidized into ferri-cytochrome c (Cyt c ox) and adversely impact the accuracy and reproducibility of the binding measurements. In order to realize reliable redox-dependent binding tests, here the Cyt c red is quantitatively electro-generated from Cyt c ox by in situ cathodic polarization in a flow cell. Then the kinetic and dissociation constants of the bindings between COX and Cyt c red/Cyt c ox can be evaluated accurately. In this study, the values of association/dissociation rate constants (k a, k d) for both COX/Cyt c red and COX/Cyt c ox were obtained. The dissociation constants, K D, were finally calculated as 3.33 × 10(-8) mol · L(-1) for COX/Cyt c red and 4.25 × 10(-5) mol · L(-1) for COX/Cyt c ox, respectively. In-situ EC-SPR is promising for better mimicking the in vivo condition that COX is embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane and Cyt c acts as an electron shuttle in the mobile phase. It is an effective method for the investigation of redox-dependent biomolecular interactions. Graphical Abstract Schematic representation of the experimental designs using EC-SPR system. (a) the Au-Cys-COX SPR chip with SAM layers. (b) redox-modulated Cyt c and its binding onto pre-immobilized COX.

  9. Highly selective detection of microRNA based on distance-dependent electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between CdTe nanocrystals and Au nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yan; Lei, Jianping; Chen, Yunlong; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-01-15

    A distance-dependent electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ERET) system based on CdTe nanocrystals and Au nanoclusters (Au NCs) was designed with the aid of ligase for highly selective detection of microRNA (miRNA). First, Au NCs functionalized hairpin DNA was synthesized via Au-S chemistry, and characterized with transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The resulting hairpin DNA-Au NCs composite can be bound to the carboxylated CdTe nanocrystals via amide reaction on glass carbon electrode. The strong interaction between CdTe nanocrystals and AuNCs led to the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) quenching of CdTe nanocrystals. In the presence of assistant DNA and miRNA, the ligase can selectively ligate both of them on the strand of the hairpin DNA to form long DNA-RNA heteroduplexes. Thus the ECL signal was recovered due to the blocking of the ERET. As a comparison, when directly opening the hairpin DNA by the target, the ECL emission signal is weak owing to the presence of ERET effect at the short distance. Based on the distance-dependent ERET, a 'signal on' ECL system was utilized for the detection of miRNA with the advantages of 6 orders magnitude linear range and excellent sequence specificity. The total detection processing time of the biosensor was approximately 70 min. By substituting the hairpin DNA with different sequences, this strategy as a new signal transduction approach could be conveniently extended for detection of other short miRNA and DNA.

  10. Resonance and Fractal Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, Henk W.

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of resonance will be dealt with from the viewpoint of dynamical systems depending on parameters and their bifurcations. Resonance phenomena are associated to open subsets in the parameter space, while their complement corresponds to quasi-periodicity and chaos. The latter phenomena oc

  11. Determination of effective resonance energy for the 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction by the cadmium ratio method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak, Mustafa Guray; Karadag, Mustafa; Yücel, Haluk

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the effective resonance energy, Ebarr -value for the 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction was measured using cadmium ratio method. A dual monitor (197Au-98Mo), which has convenient resonance properties, was employed for characterization of the irradiation sites. Then analytical grade iridium oxide samples diluted with CaCO3 to lower neutron self-shielding effect stacked in small cylindrical Teflon boxes were irradiated once with a 1 mm thick Cd cylindrical box placed in a thermalized neutron field of an 241Am-Be neutron source then without it. The activities produced in samples during 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction were measured using a p-type HPGe detector γ-ray spectrometer with a 44.8% relative efficiency. The correction factors for thermal, epithermal neutron self-shielding (Gth, Gepi), true coincidence summing (Fcoi) and gamma-ray self-absorption (Fs) effects were determined with appropriate approaches and programs. Thus, the experimental Ebarr -value was determined to be 2.65 ± 0.61 eV for 193Ir target nuclide. The recent data for Q0 and FCd values for Ebarr determination were based on k0-NAA online database. The present experimental Ebarr value was calculated and compared with more recent values for Q0 and FCd for 193Ir. Additionally, the Ebarr -values was theoretically calculated from the up-to-date resonance data obtained from ENDF/B VII library using two different approaches. Since there is no experimentally determined Ebarr -value for the 193Ir isotope, the results are compared with the calculated ones given in the literature.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging signal reduction may precede volume loss in the pituitary gland of transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hekmatnia, Ali; Rahmani, Ali Asghar; Adibi, Atoosa (Image Processing and Signal Research Center, Dept. of Radiology, Isfahan Univ. of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran)); Radmard, Amir Reza (Dept. of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran Univ. of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran)); Khademi, Hooman (Shariati Hospital, Tehran Univ. of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran)), e-mail: radmard@ams.ac.ir

    2010-01-15

    Background: Pituitary iron overload in patients with transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia may lead to delayed puberty. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to estimate tissue iron concentration by detecting its paramagnetic effect and hypophyseal damage by measuring its dimensions indirectly. Purpose: To investigate the association of pituitary MRI findings and pubertal status in thalassemic patients as well as to demonstrate any priority in appearance of them. Material and Methods: Twenty-seven beta-thalassemic patients, aged 15-25 years, were divided into 13 with (group A) and 14 without hypogonadism (group B), matched by age, gender, duration of transfusion, and chelation therapy. Thirty-eight age- and sex-adjusted healthy control individuals were also included (group C). All participants underwent pituitary MRI using a 1.5T unit. Pituitary-to-fat signal intensity ratios (SIR) were calculated from coronal T2-weighted images. Estimated pituitary volumes were measured using pituitary height, width, and length on T1-weighted images. Results: The mean values of pituitary-to-fat SIRs were significantly lower in group A as compared with group B (P <0.001), and likewise group B had statistically lower values than group C (P=0.03). The pituitary height and volume were significantly decreased in group A compared to group B (P = 0.006 and P = 0.002, respectively), while these differences did not demonstrate statistically significance between groups B and C. Conclusion: Pituitary MRI findings such as signal intensity reduction and decrease in volume can be useful markers in estimating pituitary dysfunction in beta-thalassemic patients. Compared to healthy controls, lower values of pituitary-to-fat SIRs in thalassemic patients experiencing normal puberty, without marked decrease in volume, indicate that signal reduction may precede volume loss and could be expected first on MRI

  13. Ca2+ dependence of the distance between Cys-98 of troponin C and Cys-133 of troponin I in the ternary troponin complex. Resonance energy transfer measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, T; Gowell, E; Strasburg, G M; Gergely, J; Leavis, P C

    1989-07-11

    We have used resonance energy transfer to study the spatial relationship between Cys-98 of rabbit skeletal troponin C and Cys-133 of rabbit skeletal troponin I in the reconstituted ternary troponin complex. The donor was introduced by labeling either troponin C or troponin I with N-(iodoacetyl)-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine, while the acceptor was introduced by labeling either protein with N-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl-4'-azophenyl]maleimide. The extent of energy transfer was determined by measuring the quenching of the donor fluorescence decay. The results indicate first that the distance between these two sites is not fixed, suggesting that the protein regions involved possess considerable segmental flexibility. Second, the mean distance between the two sites is dependent on the metal-binding state of troponin C, being 39.1 A when none of the metal-binding sites are occupied, 41.0 A when Mg2+ ions bind at the high-affinity sites, and 35.5 A when Ca2+ ions bind to the low-affinity sites. Neither the magnitude of the distances nor the trend of change with metal ions differs greatly when the locations of the probes are switched or when steady-state fluorometry was used to determine the transfer efficiency. Since the low-affinity sites have been implicated as the physiological triggering sites, our findings suggest that one of the key events in Ca2+ activation of skeletal muscle contraction is a approximately 5-A decrease in the distance between the Cys-98 region of troponin C and the Cys-133 region of troponin I.

  14. Resonance Raman spectroscopy reveals pH-dependent active site structural changes of lactoperoxidase compound 0 and its ferryl heme O-O bond cleavage products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Piotr J; Thammawichai, Warut; Wiedenhoeft, Dennis; Kincaid, James R

    2015-01-14

    The first step in the enzymatic cycle of mammalian peroxidases, including lactoperoxidase (LPO), is binding of hydrogen peroxide to the ferric resting state to form a ferric-hydroperoxo intermediate designated as Compound 0, the residual proton temporarily associating with the distal pocket His109 residue. Upon delivery of this "stored" proton to the hydroperoxo fragment, it rapidly undergoes O-O bond cleavage, thereby thwarting efforts to trap it using rapid mixing methods. Fortunately, as shown herein, both the peroxo and the hydroperoxo (Compound 0) forms of LPO can be trapped by cryoradiolysis, with acquisition of their resonance Raman (rR) spectra now permitting structural characterization of their key Fe-O-O fragments. Studies were conducted under both acidic and alkaline conditions, revealing pH-dependent differences in relative populations of these intermediates. Furthermore, upon annealing, the low pH samples convert to two forms of a ferryl heme O-O bond-cleavage product, whose ν(Fe═O) frequencies reflect substantially different Fe═O bond strengths. In the process of conducting these studies, rR structural characterization of the dioxygen adduct of LPO, commonly called Compound III, has also been completed, demonstrating a substantial difference in the strengths of the Fe-O linkage of the Fe-O-O fragment under acidic and alkaline conditions, an effect most reasonably attributed to a corresponding weakening of the trans-axial histidyl imidazole linkage at lower pH. Collectively, these new results provide important insight into the impact of pH on the disposition of the key Fe-O-O and Fe═O fragments of intermediates that arise in the enzymatic cycles of LPO, other mammalian peroxidases, and related proteins.

  15. Temperature dependent behavior of localized and delocalized electrons in nitrogen-doped 6H SiC crystals as studied by electron spin resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savchenko, D., E-mail: dariyasavchenko@gmail.com [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 182 21 (Czech Republic); National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Kyiv 03056 (Ukraine); Kalabukhova, E.; Shanina, B.; Kiselov, V. [V.E. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine); Cichoň, S.; Honolka, J. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 182 21 (Czech Republic); Mokhov, E. [A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Saint-Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg 19710 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-28

    We have studied the temperature behavior of the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of nitrogen (N) donors in n-type 6H SiC crystals grown by Lely and sublimation sandwich methods (SSM) with donor concentration of 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} at T = 60–150 K. A broad signal in the ESR spectrum was observed at T ≥ 80 K with Lorentzian lineshape and g{sub ||} = 2.0043(3), g{sub ⊥} = 2.0030(3), which was previously assigned in the literature to the N donors in the 1s(E) excited state. Based on the analysis of the ESR lineshape, linewidth and g-tensor we attribute this signal to the conduction electrons (CE). The emergence of the CE ESR signal at T > 80 K was explained by the ionization of electrons from the 1s(A{sub 1}) ground and 1s(E) excited states of N donors to the conduction band while the observed reduction of the hyperfine (hf) splitting for the N{sub k1,k2} donors with the temperature increase is attributed to the motional narrowing effect of the hf splitting. The temperature dependence of CE ESR linewidth is described by an exponential law (Orbach process) with the activation energy corresponding to the energy separation between 1s(A{sub 1}) and 1s(E) energy levels for N residing at quasi-cubic sites (N{sub k1,k2}). The theoretical analysis of the temperature dependence of microwave conductivity measured by the contact-free method shows that due to the different position of the Fermi level in two samples the ionization of free electrons occurs from the energy levels of N{sub k1,k2} donors in Lely grown samples and from the energy level of N{sub h} residing at hexagonal position in 6H SiC grown by SSM.

  16. Comparison of blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and near-infrared spectroscopy recording during functional brain activation in patients with stroke and brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakatani, Kaoru; Murata, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Norio; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Shin; Kano, Tsuneo; Katayama, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    Blood-oxygen-level-dependent contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) has been used to perform functional imaging in brain disorders such as stroke and brain tumors. However, recent studies have revealed that BOLD-fMRI does not image activation areas correctly in such patients. To clarify the characteristics of the evoked cerebral blood oxygenation (CBO) changes occurring in stroke and brain tumors, we have been comparing near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and BOLD-fMRI recording during functional brain activation in these patients. We review our recent studies and related functional imaging studies on the brain disorders. In the primary sensorimotor cortex (PSMC) on the nonlesion side, the motor task consistently caused a decrease of deoxyhemoglobin (deoxy-Hb) with increases of oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) and total hemoglobin (t-Hb), which is consistent with the evoked CBO response observed in normal adults. BOLD-fMRI demonstrated robust activation areas on the nonlesion side. In stroke patients, severe cerebral ischemia (i.e., misery perfusion) caused an increase of deoxy-Hb during the task, associated with increases of oxy-Hb and t-Hb, in the PSMC on the lesion side. In addition, the activation volume of BOLD-fMRI was significantly reduced on the lesion side. The BOLD signal did not change in some areas of the PSMC on the lesion side, but it tended to decrease in other areas during the tasks. In brain tumors, BOLD-fMRI clearly demonstrated activation areas in the PSMC on the lesion side in patients who displayed a normal evoked CBO response. However, the activation volume on the lesion side was significantly reduced in patients who exhibited an increase of deoxy-Hb during the task. In both stroke and brain tumors, false-negative activations (i.e., marked reductions of activation volumes) in BOLD imaging were associated with increases of deoxy-Hb, which could cause a reduction in BOLD signal. BOLD-fMRI investigations of patients with brain disorders

  17. Temporally shifted hemodynamic response model helps to extract acupuncture-induced functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygenation-level dependent activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsung-Jung Ho; Jeng-Ren Duann; Chun-Ming Chen; Jeon-Hor Chen; Wu-Chung Shen; Tung-Wu Lu; Jan-Ray Liao; Zen-Pin Lin; Kuo-Ning Shaw; Jaung-Geng Lin

    2009-01-01

    Background The onsets of needling sensation introduced by acupuncture stimulus can vary widely from subject to subject.This should be explicitly accounted for by the model blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) time course used in general linear model (GLM) analysis to obtain more consistent across-subject group results.However,in standard GLM analysis,the model BOLD time course obtained by convolving a canonical hemodynamic response function with an experimental paradigm time course is assumed identical across subjects.Although some added-on properties to the model BOLD time course,such as temporal and dispersion derivatives,may be used to account for different BOLD response onsets,they can only account for the BOLD onset deviations to the extent of less than one repetition time (TR).Methods In this study,we explicitly manipulated the onsets of model BOLD time course by shifting it with-2,-1,or 1 TR and used these temporally shifted BOLD model to analyze the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data obtained from three acupuncture fMRI experiments with GLM analysis.One involved acupuncture stimulus on left ST42acupoint and the other two on left GB40 and left BL64 acupoints.Results The model BOLD time course with temporal shifts,in addition to temporal and dispersion derivatives,could result in better statistical power of the data analysis in terms of the average correlation coefficients between the used BOLD models and extracted BOLD responses from individual subject data and the T-values of the activation clusters in the grouped random effects.Conclusions The GLM analysis with ordinary BOLD model failed to catch the large variability of the onsets of the BOLD responses associated with the acupuncture needling sensation.Shifts in time with more than a TR on model BOLD time course might be required to better extract the acupuncture stimulus-induced BOLD activities from individual fMRI data.

  18. Adjustment and start-up of an irradiator self shielding model Isogamma LL.CO. in the Centre of Technological Applications and Nuclear Development; Ajuste y puesta en marcha en el centro de aplicaciones tecnologicas y desarrollo nuclear de un irradiador autoblindado modelo Isogamma LL.CO.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Dania Soguero; Ardanza, Armando Chavez, E-mail: sdania@ceaden.edu.cu [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), La Habana (Cuba)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the process of installation of a self-shielded irradiator category I, model ISOGAMMA LL.Co of {sup 60}Co, with a nominal 25 kCi activity, rate of absorbed dose 8 kG/h and 5 L workload. The stages are describe step by step: import, the customs procedure which included the interview with the master of the vessel transporter, the monitoring of the entire process by the head of radiological protection of the importing Center, control of the levels of surface contamination of the shipping container of the sources before the removal of the ship, the supervision of the national regulatory authority and the transportation to the final destination. Details of assembling of the installation and the opening of the container for transportation of supplies is outlined. The action plan previously developed for the case of occurrence of radiological successful events is presented, detailing the phase of the load of radioactive sources by the specialists of the company selling the facility (IZOTOP). Finally describes the setting and implementation of the installation and the procedure of licensing for exploitation.

  19. Q2 dependence of the S11(1535) photocoupling and evidence for a P-wave resonance in η electroproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denizli, H.; Mueller, J.; Dytman, S.; Leber, M. L.; Levine, R. D.; Miles, J.; Kim, K. Y.; Adams, G.; Amaryan, M. J.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Baillie, N.; Ball, J. P.; Baltzell, N. A.; Barrow, S.; Batourine, V.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bellis, M.; Benmouna, N.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchigny, S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Cetina, C.; Chen, S.; Cole, P. L.; Coleman, A.; Collins, P.; Coltharp, P.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; Cummings, J. P.; Dashyan, N.; Vita, R. De; Sanctis, E. De; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Dennis, L.; Deur, A.; Dhuga, K. S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Donnelly, J.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dzyubak, O. P.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Eugenio, P.; Farhi, L.; Fatemi, R.; Fedotov, G.; Feldman, G.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Forest, T. A.; Frolov, V.; Funsten, H.; Gaff, S. J.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girard, P.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gonenc, A.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hakobyan, R. S.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, K.; Hleiqawi, I.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Juengst, H. G.; Kalantarians, N.; Kelley, J. H.; Kellie, J. D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, J.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lachniet, J.; Laget, J. M.; Langheinrich, J.; Lawrence, D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, M.; Manak, J. J.; Markov, N.; McAleer, S.; McKinnon, B.; McNabb, J. W. C.; Mecking, B. A.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mibe, T.; Mikhailov, K.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Moriya, K.; Morrow, S. A.; Moteabbed, M.; Muccifora, V.; Mutchler, G. S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Nelson, S. O.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niroula, M. R.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Paterson, C.; Peterson, G.; Philips, S. A.; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P. D.; Sabatié, F.; Sabourov, K.; Salamanca, J.; Salgado, C.; Santoro, J. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Schumacher, R. A.; Serov, V. S.; Shafi, A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Shvedunov, N. V.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A. V.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, L. C.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Spraker, M.; Stavinsky, A.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stokes, B. E.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Tkabladze, A.; Tkachenko, S.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Wang, K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Weygand, D. P.; Williams, M.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2007-07-01

    New cross sections for the reaction ep→e'ηp are reported for total center-of-mass energy W=1.5-2.3 GeV and invariant squared momentum transfer Q2=0.13-3.3 GeV2. This large kinematic range allows the extraction of new information about response functions, photocouplings, and ηN coupling strengths of baryon resonances. A sharp structure is seen at W~1.7 GeV. The shape of the differential cross section is indicative of the presence of a P-wave resonance that persists to high Q2. Improved values are derived for the photocoupling amplitude for the S11(1535) resonance. The new data greatly expand the Q2 range covered, and an interpretation of all data with a consistent parametrization is provided.

  20. Q^2 Dependence of the S_{11}(1535) Photocoupling and Evidence for a P-wave resonance in eta electroproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haluk Denizli; James Mueller; Steven Dytman; M.L. Leber; R.D. Levine; J. Miles; Kui Kim; Gary Adams; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; G. Asryan; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; Steve Barrow; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Kevin Beard; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Nicola Bianchi; Angela Biselli; Billy Bonner; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Catalina Cetina; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Alan Coleman; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Dieter Cords; Pietro Corvisiero; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Lawrence Dennis; Alexandre Deur; Kalvir Dhuga; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; P. Dragovitsch; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; A. Empl; Paul Eugenio; Laurent Farhi; Renee Fatemi; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Robert Feuerbach; Tony Forest; Valera Frolov; Herbert Funsten; Sally Gaff; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Pascal Girard; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Matthieu Guillo; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; David Heddle; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Jingliang Hu; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; J.H. Kelley; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; K. Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Mike Klusman; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; K. Lukashin; Marion MacCormick; Joseph Manak; Nikolai Markov; Simeon McAleer; Bryan McKinnon; John McNabb; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; M. Moteabbed; Valeria Muccifora; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Steve Nelson; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Grant O' Rielly; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Gerald Peterson; Sasha Philips; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Ermanno Polli; S. Pozdniakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; David Rowntree; Philip Rubin; Franck Sabatie; Konstantin Sabourov; Julian Salamanca; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Aziz Shafi; Youri Sharabian; Jeremiah Shaw; Nikolay Shvedunov; Sebastio Simionatto; Alexander Skabelin; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Daria Sokhan; M. Spraker; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; I.I. Strakovsky; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Simon Taylor; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; R. Thompson; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Kebin Wang; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Henry Weller; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Junho Yun; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-07-01

    New cross sections for the reaction $ep \\to e'\\eta p$ are reported for total center of mass energy $W$=1.5--2.3 GeV and invariant squared momentum transfer $Q^2$=0.13--3.3 GeV$^2$. This large kinematic range allows extraction of new information about response functions, photocouplings, and $\\eta N$ coupling strengths of baryon resonances. A sharp structure is seen at $W\\sim$ 1.7 GeV. The shape of the differential cross section is indicative of the presence of a $P$-wave resonance that persists to high $Q^2$. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the $S_{11}$(1535) resonance. The new data greatly expands the $Q^2$ range covered and an interpretation of all data with a consistent parameterization is provided.

  1. Ion–Cyclotron Resonance Frequency Interval Dependence on the O VI Ion Number Density in the North Polar Coronal Hole 1.5–3 Region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Özgür Gültekin; Emine Rızaoǧlu; K. Gediz Akdeniz

    2013-12-01

    The frequency intervals in which O VI ions get in resonance with ion–cyclotron waves are calculated using the kinetic model, for the latest six values found in literature on O VI ion number densities in the 1.5–3 region of the NPCH. It is found that the common resonance interval is 1.5 kHz to 3 kHz. The -variations of wave numbers necessary for the above calculations are evaluated numerically, solving the cubic dispersion relation with the dielectric response derived from the quasi-linear Vlasov equation for the left-circularly polarized ion-cyclotron waves.

  2. Photoreactivity of the occipital cortex measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging-blood oxygenation level dependent in migraine patients and healthy volunteers: pathophysiological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Helena; Sánchez del Río, Margarita; de Silanes, Carlos López; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández, Juan Antonio; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-01-01

    The brain of migraineurs is hyperexcitable, particularly the occipital cortex, which is probably hypersensitive to light. Photophobia or hypersensitivity to light may be accounted for by an increased excitability of trigeminal, the visual pathways, and the occipital cortex. To study light sensitivity and photophobia by assessing the response to light stimuli with functional magnetic resonance imaging-blood oxygenation level dependent (fMRI-BOLD) of the occipital cortex in migraineurs and in controls. Also, to try to decipher the contribution of the occipital cortex to photophobia and whether the cortical reactivity of migraineurs may be part of a constitutional (defensive) mechanism or represents an acquired (sensitization) phenomenon. Nineteen patients with migraine (7 with aura and 12 without aura) and 19 controls were studied with fMRI-BOLD during 4 increasing light intensities. Eight axial image sections of 0.5 cm that covered the occipital cortex were acquired for each intensity. We measured the extension and the intensity of activation for every light stimuli. Photophobia was estimated according to a 0 to 3 semiquantitative scale of light discomfort. Migraineurs had a significantly higher number of fMRI-activated voxels at low (320.4 for migraineurs [SD = 253.9] and 164.3 for controls [SD = 102.7], P = .027) and medium-low luminance levels (501.2 for migraineurs [SD = 279.5] and 331.1 for controls [SD = 194.3], P = .034) but not at medium-high (579.5 for migraineurs [SD = 201.4] and 510.2 for controls [SD = 239.5], P = .410) and high light stimuli (496.2 for migraineurs [SD = 216.2] and 394.7 for controls [SD = 240], P = .210). No differences were found with respect to the voxel activation intensity (amplitude of the BOLD wave) between migraineurs and controls (8.98 [SD = 2.58] vs 7.99 [SD = 2.57], P = .25; 10.82 [SD = 3.27] vs 9.81 [SD = 3.19], P = .31; 11.90 [SD = 3.18] vs 11.06 [SD = 2.56], P = .62; 11.45 [SD = 2.65] vs 10.25 [SD = 2.22], P = .16). Light

  3. Atherosclerosis measured by whole body magnetic resonance angiography and carotid artery ultrasound is related to arterial compliance, but not to endothelium-dependent vasodilation - the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Lars; Andersson, Jessika; Hansen, Tomas; Johansson, Lars; Ahlström, Håkan

    2009-09-01

    Arterial compliance and endothelium-dependent vasodilation are two characteristics of the vessel wall. In the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study, we studied the relationships between arterial compliance and endothelium-dependent vasodilation versus atherosclerosis as measured with two imaging modalities. In the population-based PIVUS study (1016 subjects aged 70), arterial compliance was determined by ultrasound in the carotid artery and the stroke volume to pulse pressure ratio by echocardiography, while endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by the invasive forearm technique with acetylcholine and brachial artery ultrasound. Intima-media thickness was evaluated by ultrasound in the carotid artery (n = 954). Stenosis in the carotid, aorta, renal, upper and lower leg arteries were determined by magnetic resonance angiography in a random subsample of 306 subjects. After adjustments for gender, Framingham risk score, obesity, myocardial infarction and stroke, distensibility in the carotid artery and the stroke volume to pulse pressure ratio were both significantly related to a weighted index of stenosis in the five arterial territories evaluated by magnetic resonance angiography (p<0.02 for both). Distensibility in the carotid artery (P = 0.021), but not the stroke volume to pulse pressure ratio (P = 0.08), was also significantly related to intima-media thickness. In the elderly population, atherosclerosis is mainly related to arterial compliance, but not to endothelium-dependent vasodilation in peripheral conduit or resistance vessels.

  4. Geometric Stochastic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Savel'ev, Sergey E; Nori, Franco

    2015-01-01

    A Brownian particle moving across a porous membrane subject to an oscillating force exhibits stochastic resonance with properties which strongly depend on the geometry of the confining cavities on the two sides of the membrane. Such a manifestation of stochastic resonance requires neither energetic nor entropic barriers, and can thus be regarded as a purely geometric effect. The magnitude of this effect is sensitive to the geometry of both the cavities and the pores, thus leading to distinctive optimal synchronization conditions.

  5. Site-dependent cobalt electronic state in La-Co co-substituted magnetoplumbite-type ferrite: (59)Co nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Shimoda, Aiko; Waki, Takeshi; Tabata, Yoshikazu; Mény, Christian

    2016-09-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of (59)Co was measured over a wide frequency range in a powder sample crushed from a well-characterized single crystal of La-Co co-substituted magnetoplumbite-type strontium ferrite (SrFe12O19), a familiar base material for the ferrite permanent magnet. The simultaneous observation of both high- and low-frequency resonances suggests the coexistence of both high- and low-spin states of the substituted Co or the presence of Co orbital moment at a particular site. The possible presence of trivalent Co was also investigated. The results suggest that the Co atoms are distributed across different crystallographic sites with different local environments, and that the electronic state of Co is much more subtle than the conventional understanding.

  6. 3-DIMENSIONAL N-15-H-1-H-1 AND N-15-C-13-H-1 NUCLEAR-MAGNETIC-RESONANCE STUDIES OF HPR, A CENTRAL COMPONENT OF THE PHOSPHOENOLPYRUVATE-DEPENDENT PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE SYSTEM FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI - ASSIGNMENT OF BACKBONE RESONANCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANNULAND, NAJ; VANDIJK, AA; DIJKSTRA, K; VANHOESEL, FHJ; SCHEEK, RM; ROBILLARD, GT

    1992-01-01

    We have performed three-dimensional NMR studies on a central component of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli, denoted as HPr. The protein was uniformly enriched with N-15 and C-13 to overcome spectral overlap. Complete assignments were obtained for the ba

  7. Photothermal resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting photo-thermal absorbance of a material utilising a mechanically temperature sensitive resonator (20) and a sample being arrange in thermal communication with the temperature sensitive resonator. The present invention further relates to an ap......The present invention relates to a method for detecting photo-thermal absorbance of a material utilising a mechanically temperature sensitive resonator (20) and a sample being arrange in thermal communication with the temperature sensitive resonator. The present invention further relates...... to an apparatus for detecting photo-thermal absorbance of a sample....

  8. Temperature and magnetic field dependence of rare -earth ↔iron exchange resonance mode in a magnetic oxide studied with femtosecond magneto-optical Kerr effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Marwan; Molho, Pierre; Barbara, Bernard; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2016-08-01

    In magnetic materials, the exchange is the strongest quantum interaction due to the Pauli exclusion principle. For that reason it can induce high-frequency modes fexch of the magnetization precession. In this work we investigate these modes over a wide range of temperatures (50 -300 K ) and magnetic fields up to 10 T in a bismuth-doped garnet with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by performing femtosecond magneto-optical pump-probe experiments. Near the compensation temperature TM the divergence of 1 /fexch(T ) allows identifying unambiguously fexch with the rare-earth ↔ iron exchange mode. In addition, at low temperature fexch is independent of the field as usually observed. In contrast, we find that near TM,fexch decreases linearly with an increasing magnetic field. This behavior is explained in the context of the ferromagnetic resonance theory by including the perturbation term linear in the external applied field Hext.

  9. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  10. Self shielding of surfaces irradiated by intense energy fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varghese, P.L.; Howell, J.R.; Propp, A.

    1991-08-01

    This dissertation will outline a direct methods of temperature, density, composition, and velocity measurement which should be widely applicable to railgun systems. The measurements demonstrated here should prove usefull basis for further studies of plasma/target interaction.

  11. Structure of Self-shielding Electron Beam Installation for Sterilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to prevent terrorist using letters with anthrax germ or spores to postal route and disturbsociety, and defend the people’s life-safety China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) has developed aself-shielding electron beam installation for sterilization (SEBIS).

  12. Resonant interaction modified by the atomic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainz, I; Klimov, A B; Chumakov, S M [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, 44410, Guadalajara, Jal. (Mexico)

    2003-04-01

    The dynamics of a resonant atom interacting with a quantum cavity field in the presence of many off-resonant atoms is studied. In the framework of the effective Hamiltonian approach we show that the results of elimination of non-resonant transitions are (a) a dynamical Stark shift of the field frequency, dependent on the populations of non-resonant atoms, (b) dependence of the coupling constant between the resonant atom and the field on the populations of non-resonant atoms, and (c) an effective dipole-dipole interaction between non-resonant atoms. Two effects (the coherent influence and dephasing) of the off-resonant environment on the dynamics of the resonant atom are discussed.

  13. A Broadband Dipolar Resonance in THz Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Gopal, Achanta Venu; Prabhu, S S

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a THz metamaterial with broadband dipole resonance originating due to the hybridization of LC resonances. The structure optimized by finite element method simulations is fabricated by electron beam lithography and characterized by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Numerically, we found that when two LC metamaterial resonators are brought together, an electric dipole resonance arises in addition to the LC resonances. We observed a strong dependence of the width of these resonances on the separation between the resonators. This dependence can be explained based on series and parallel RLC circuit analogies. The broadband dipole resonance appears when both the resonators are fused together. The metamaterial has a stopband with FWHM of 0.47 THz centered at 1.12 THz. The experimentally measured band features are in reasonable agreement with the simulated ones. The experimental power extinction ratio of THz in the stopbands is found to be 15 dB.

  14. Dose-dependent vitamin C uptake and radical scavenging activity in human skin measured with in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Anna-Christina; Groth, Norbert; Haag, Stefan F; Darvin, Maxim E; Lademann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina C

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin C is a potent radical scavenger and a physiological part of the antioxidant system in human skin. The aim of this study was to measure changes in the radical-scavenging activity of human skin in vivo due to supplementation with different doses of vitamin C and at different time points. Therefore, 33 volunteers were supplemented with vitamin C or placebo for 4 weeks. The skin radical-scavenging activity was measured with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. After 4 weeks, the intake of 100 mg vitamin C/day resulted in a significant increase in the radical-scavenging activity by 22%. Intake of 180 mg/day even resulted in a significant increase of 37%. No changes were found in the placebo group. A part of the study population was additionally measured after 2 weeks: in this group radical scavenging had already reached maximal activity after 2 weeks. In conclusion, orally administered vitamin C increases the radical-scavenging activity of the skin. The effect occurs fast and is enhanced with higher doses of vitamin C.

  15. Temperature-Dependent Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies of Docosahexaenoic Acid and Gamma Linolenic Acid Effects on Phospholipid Membranes With and Without Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonar, D.; Horasanb, N.; Sünnetçioğlu, M. Maral

    2016-07-01

    Free docosahexaenoic acid (DHAn-3) and gamma linolenic acid (GLAn-6) effects on dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes were studied as a function of temperature by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acid (5-, 16-DS) spin labels were utilized to obtain information from the interfacial and alkyl chain region, respectively. In the studied temperature range, the presence of DHAn-3 or GLAn-6 caused decreases in maximum hyperfi ne splitting values and correlation times of DMPC membranes. Both in the interfacial region and depths of membrane, changes were more pronounced for DHAn-3 in pure DMPC. In the presence of cholesterol (CH), DHAn-3 and GLAn-6 effects were similar and more pronounced in the depths of the membrane. The changes in the structure and dynamics of samples were obtained from simulations of spectra, which indicated some changes in the number of spectral components by incorporation of DHAn-3 and GLAn-6. In the interfacial region and below the main phase transition temperature of DMPC, there was an increase in heterogeneity. For temperatures above the phase transition, a more homogeneous environment for spin label was obtained in the presence of fatty acids.

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  17. Metamaterial localized resonance sensors: prospects and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Asger;

    2010-01-01

    The prospects and limitations of metamaterial localized resonance sensors are investigated theoretically and experimentally. Gold split-ring resonators are employed as the model system where the light induced LC-resonance yields a figure-of-merit, sensitivity divided by linewidth, up to 54 depend...

  18. Note: theoretical study on the gas pressure dependence of x-ray yield in TE(111) cavity based electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumaran, T S; Sen, Soubhadra; Baskaran, R

    2014-11-01

    Adopting Langevin methodology, a pressure dependent frictional force term which represents the collisional effect is added to the Lorentz equation. The electrons are assumed to be starting from the uniformly distributed co-ordinates on the central plane. The trajectory of each electron is numerically simulated by solving the modified Lorentz equation for a given pressure. The Bremsstrahlung x-ray energy spectrum for each electron crossing the cavity wall boundary is obtained using the Duane-Hunt law. The total x-ray yield is estimated by adding the spectral contribution of each electron. The calculated yields are compared with the experimental results and a good agreement is found.

  19. Effect of ‘Al’ concentration on spin-dependent resonant tunnelling in InAs/Ga$_{1−y}$Al$_y$As symmetrical double-barrier heterostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L BRUNO CHANDRASEKAR; K GNANASEKAR; M KARUNAKARAN; R CHANDRAMOHAN

    2016-10-01

    The effect of ‘Al’ concentration on spin-dependent tunnelling in strained non-magnetic symmetric double-barrier semiconductor has been theoretically investigated. The separation between spin-up and spin-down components, barrier transparency, polarization efficiency and tunnelling lifetime were calculated using the transfer matrix approach. The separation between spin-up and spin-down resonances and tunnelling lifetime were reportedfor the first time in the case of InAs/Ga$_{1−y}$Al$_y$As heterostructures for various ‘Al’ concentrations and for various barrier widths. Cent percentage polarization can be obtained in this strained non-magnetic double-barriersemiconductor even without any external field.

  20. Determination of g-tensors of low-symmetry Nd{sup 3+} centers in LiNbO{sub 3} by rectification of angular dependence of electron paramagnetic resonance spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grachev, V., E-mail: grachev@physics.montana.edu; Malovichko, G. [Physics Department, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States); Munro, M. [Quantel Laser, Bozeman, Montana 59715 (United States); Kokanyan, E. [Institute of Physical Researches, Ashtarak (Armenia)

    2015-07-28

    Two procedures for facilitation of line tracing and deciphering of complicated spectra of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were developed: a correction of microwave frequencies for every orientation of external magnetic field on the base of known values of g-tensor components for a reference paramagnetic center and followed rectification of measured angular dependences using plots of effective deviation of g{sup 2}-factors of observed lines from effective g{sup 2}-factors of the reference center versus angles or squared cosines of angles describing magnetic field orientations. Their application to EPR spectra of nearly stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals doped with neodymium allowed identifying two axial and six different low-symmetry Nd{sup 3+} centers, to determine all components of their g-tensors, and to propose common divacancy models for a whole family of Nd{sup 3+} centers.

  1. Multiquark Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties has been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  2. Multiquark resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, A.; Pilloni, A.; Polosa, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties have been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  3. Extended T2-IVIM model for correction of TE dependence of pseudo-diffusion volume fraction in clinical diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, N. P.; d'Arcy, J. A.; Feiweier, T.; Koh, D.-M.; Leach, M. O.; Collins, D. J.; Orton, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    The bi-exponential intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) model for diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) fails to account for differential T 2 s in the model compartments, resulting in overestimation of pseudodiffusion fraction f. An extended model, T2-IVIM, allows removal of the confounding echo-time (TE) dependence of f, and provides direct compartment T 2 estimates. Two consented healthy volunteer cohorts (n  =  5, 6) underwent DWI comprising multiple TE/b-value combinations (Protocol 1: TE  =  62-102 ms, b  =  0-250 mm-2s, 30 combinations. Protocol 2: 8 b-values 0-800 mm-2s at TE  =  62 ms, with 3 additional b-values 0-50 mm-2s at TE  =  80, 100 ms scanned twice). Data from liver ROIs were fitted with IVIM at individual TEs, and with the T2-IVIM model using all data. Repeat-measures coefficients of variation were assessed for Protocol 2. Conventional IVIM modelling at individual TEs (Protocol 1) demonstrated apparent f increasing with longer TE: 22.4  ±  7% (TE  =  62 ms) to 30.7  ±  11% (TE  =  102 ms) T2-IVIM model fitting accounted for all data variation. Fitting of Protocol 2 data using T2-IVIM yielded reduced f estimates (IVIM: 27.9  ±  6%, T2-IVIM: 18.3  ±  7%), as well as T 2  =  42.1  ±  7 ms, 77.6  ±  30 ms for true and pseudodiffusion compartments, respectively. A reduced Protocol 2 dataset yielded comparable results in a clinical time frame (11 min). The confounding dependence of IVIM f on TE can be accounted for using additional b/TE images and the extended T2-IVIM model.

  4. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of 45Sc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim; Thi Hien, Nguyen; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (Gth) and resonance (Gepi) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (Fg) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction, with σo,Au = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and Io,Au = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σo,Sc = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be Io,Sc = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  5. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of {sup 45}Sc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Thi Hien, Nguyen [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guinyun, E-mail: gnkim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwangsoo [Department of Physics and Center for High Energy Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun [Department of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Manwoo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan 619-953 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ{sub 0}) and resonance integral (I{sub 0}) of the {sup 45}Sc(n,γ){sup 46}Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (G{sub th}) and resonance (G{sub epi}) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (F{sub g}) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the {sup 45}Sc(n,γ){sup 46}Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction, with σ{sub o,Au} = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and I{sub o,Au} = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σ{sub o,Sc} = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be I{sub o,Sc} = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  6. Baryon Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Oset, E; Sun, Bao Xi; Vacas, M J Vicente; Ramos, A; Gonzalez, P; Vijande, J; Torres, A Martinez; Khemchandani, K

    2009-01-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonance, as well as the prediction of one $1/2^+$ baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the $\\gamma p \\to K^+ \\Lambda$ reaction.

  7. Baryon Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oset, E. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Sarkar, S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sun Baoxi [Institute of Theoretical Physics, College of Applied Sciences, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Vicente Vacas, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Ramos, A. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gonzalez, P. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Vijande, J. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Martinez Torres, A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Khemchandani, K. [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2010-04-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the {lambda}(1405) resonance, as well as the prediction of one 1/2{sup +} baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda} reaction.

  8. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    sessions are achieved via adaptive action-analyzed activities. These interactive virtual environments are designed to empower patients’ creative and/or playful expressions via digital feedback stimuli. Unconscious self- pushing of limits result from innate distractive mechanisms offered by the alternative...... the unencumbered motion-to-computer-generated activities - ‘Music Making’, ‘Painting’, ‘Robotic’ and ‘Video Game’ control. A focus of this position paper is to highlight how Aesthetic Resonance, in this context, relates to the growing body of research on Neuroaesthetics to evolve Neuroaesthetic Resonance....

  9. Development of new atomic scale defect identification schemes in micro / nanoelectronics incorporating digital signal processing methods for investigating zero/low field spin dependent transport and passage effects in electrically detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Corey J.

    This work focuses on the development of new techniques for the study of spin dependent transport and trapping centers in fully processed micro and nanoelectronics. The first, and most interesting, technique offers a very low cost means to study spin dependent transport in microelectronics as an alternative to electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). EDMR measurements generally require strong static magnetic fields, typically 3 kG or greater, and high frequency oscillating electromagnetic fields, typically 9 GHz or higher. In this work, it is demonstrated that large spin dependent recombination and tunneling signals can be detected in the absence of the oscillating electromagnetic field at zero magnetic field. The physics behind this technique is based upon the mixing of singlet and triplet energy states of the electron spin pairs involved in the spin dependent processes. In this study, we show that this technique can be applied to Si and SiC based devices. Theoretically, it can be applicable to devices of all material systems in which defects play a role in spin dependent transport, some of which include CdTe and GaN. Although the resolution of the g value is sacrificed in this new measurement, the technique can detect electron-nuclear hyperfine interactions and possibly dipolar and exchange interactions. The technique also has great promise in microelectronic device reliability studies as it is directly applicable to time dependent dielectric breakdown in thin film dielectrics and bias temperature instabilities in transistors. Other applications of this new physics include self-calibrating magnetometers, spin based memories, quantum computation, and miniature EDMR spectrometers for wafer probing stations. The second technique involves the utilization of passage effects that arise when performing magnetic field modulation in EDMR. When certain conditions are met, the higher order harmonics of the spin dependent signal can contain much useful information

  10. Autostereogram resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  11. Optical resonance of metal-coated nanoshell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diao Jia-Jie(刁佳杰); Chen Guang-De(陈光德); Xi Cong(席聪); Z Y Fan; Yuan Jin-She(苑进社)

    2003-01-01

    Metal-coated nanoshell, the nanoparticle consisting of a nanometre-scale dielectric core coated with a thin metallic shell, exhibits three distinct optical resonant forms, the sphere cavity resonance (SCR), plasmon resonance (PR), and concentric dielectric sphere resonance (CDSR). The SCR, PR and CDSR of the metal-coated nanoshell reveal a geometric tunability controlled by the core radius and by the ratio of the core radius to the total radius. Classical electrodynamics and Mie scattering theory are used to treat the resonant forms and the transition state between the resonant forms. Based on previous experimental research, we present a group of resonant equations for all the resonant forms, which depend on the geometric structure of the metal-coated nanoshell.

  12. The positive effects of high-frequency right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on memory, correlated with increases in brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jun Qiao,1,2 Guixing Jin,1,2 Licun Lei,3 Lan Wang,1,2 Yaqiang Du,3 Xueyi Wang1,2 1Institute of Mental Health, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 2Brain Ageing and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Hebei Medical University, 3Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Hebei, People’s Republic of China Objective: To explore the effect of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS on memory, and its correlation with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. Materials and methods: In this randomized, double-blind sham-controlled trial, alcohol-dependent patients were enrolled and randomized into two groups: the experimental group (rTMS, 10 Hz, on right DLPFC, 20 sessions and the control group (sham stimulation. Memory function was assessed using Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R before and after treatment. 1H-MRS was used to detect the levels of N-acetyl aspartic acid (NAA, choline (Cho, and creatine (Cr in bilateral hippocampi before and after treatment. Results: Thirty-eight patients (18 in the experimental group and 20 in the control group were included in the analyses. The experimental group showed significantly greater changes in HVLT-R, BVMT-R, NAA/Cr, and Cho/Cr after rTMS from baseline than the control group. The percentage change in BVMT-R and HVLT-R correlated with the percentage change in NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr in the right brain. Conclusion: High-frequency right DLPFC rTMS was associated with improvement in memory dysfunction, which is correlated with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by 1H-MRS in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. Keywords: alcohol dependence, memory, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, MR spectroscopy

  13. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Neuroaesthetic Resonance emerged from a mature body of patient- centered gesture-control research investigating non-formal rehabilitation via ICT-enhanced-Art to question ‘Aesthetic Resonance’. Motivating participation, ludic engagement, and augmenting physical motion in non-formal (fun) treatment...... tailored channeling of sensory stimulus aligned as ‘art-making’ and ‘game playing’ core experiences. Thus, affecting brain plasticity and human motoric-performance via the adaptability (plasticity) of digital medias result in closure of the human afferent-efferent neural feedback loop closure through...

  14. SCALE Continuous-Energy Monte Carlo Depletion with Parallel KENO in TRITON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goluoglu, Sedat [ORNL; Bekar, Kursat B [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The TRITON sequence of the SCALE code system is a powerful and robust tool for performing multigroup (MG) reactor physics analysis using either the 2-D deterministic solver NEWT or the 3-D Monte Carlo transport code KENO. However, as with all MG codes, the accuracy of the results depends on the accuracy of the MG cross sections that are generated and/or used. While SCALE resonance self-shielding modules provide rigorous resonance self-shielding, they are based on 1-D models and therefore 2-D or 3-D effects such as heterogeneity of the lattice structures may render final MG cross sections inaccurate. Another potential drawback to MG Monte Carlo depletion is the need to perform resonance self-shielding calculations at each depletion step for each fuel segment that is being depleted. The CPU time and memory required for self-shielding calculations can often eclipse the resources needed for the Monte Carlo transport. This summary presents the results of the new continuous-energy (CE) calculation mode in TRITON. With the new capability, accurate reactor physics analyses can be performed for all types of systems using the SCALE Monte Carlo code KENO as the CE transport solver. In addition, transport calculations can be performed in parallel mode on multiple processors.

  15. From Autonomous Coherence Resonance to Periodically Driven Stochastic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhou-Jian; LI Peng-Fei; HU Gang

    2007-01-01

    In periodically driven nonlinear stochastic systems,noise may play a role of enhancing the output periodic signal (termed as stochastic resonance or SR).While in autonomous excitable systems,noise may play a role of increasing coherent motion(termed as coherence resonance or CR).So far the topics of SR and CR have been investigated separately as two major fields of studying the active roles of noise in nonlinear systems.We find that these two topics are closely related to each other.Specifically,SR occurs in such periodically driven systems that the corresponding autonomous systems show CR.The SR with sensitive frequency dependence can be observed when the corresponding autonomous system shows CR with finite characteristic frequency.Moreover,'resonant noise' and 'resonant frequency' of SR coincide with those of CR.

  16. Longitudial observation of dynamic changes in cortical function and white matter fibrous structure of patients with visual pathway lesions by blood oxygenation level dependent-functional magnetic resonance imaging combined with diffusion tensor imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is initially used for visual cortex location.However, the application of fMRI in investigating the development of visual pathway lesions needs to be further observed.OBJECTIVE: This study is to longitudially observe the dynamic changes in cortical function and white matter fibrous structure of patients with visual pathway lesions by blood oxygenation level dependent-functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) combined with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and to analyze the characteristics of brain function and structural recombination at convalescent period of lesions.DESIGN: Randomized controlled observation.SETTING: Department of Radiology, the General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: Eight patients with unilateral or bilateral visual disorder caused by visual pathway lesions,who admitted to Department of Radiology, the General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA from January to September 2006 were involved, and served as experimental subjects. The patients, 6 males and 2 females, were aged 16 - 67 years. They had visual disorder confirmed by clinical examination, i.e. visual pathway lesion, which was further diagnosed by MR or CT. Another 12 subjects generally matching to those patients of experimental group in gender, age and sight, who received health examination in synchronization were involved and served as controls. The subjects had no history of eye diseases. Their binocular visual acuity (or corrected visual acuity) was over 1.0. Both routine examination of ophthalmology and examination of fundus were normal. Informed consents of detected items were obtained from all the subjects.METHODS: Signa Excite HD 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging system with 16 passages (GE Company,USA) and coil with 8 passages were used; brain functional stimulus apparatus (SAV-8800. Meide Company) was used for showing experimental mission. At the early stage

  17. Geometrical tuning of nanoscale split-ring resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Kristensen, Anders; Xiao, Sanshui;

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the capacitance tuning of nanoscale split-ring resonators. An LC-model predicts a simple dependence of resonance frequency on slit aspect ratio. Experimental and numerical data follow the predictions of the LC-model....

  18. Theoretical and experimental investigation of microstrip rhombic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Charchafchi, S. H.; Boulkos, J.

    1990-06-01

    The resonant behavior of a novel microstrip rhombic resonator is investigated by analyzing an equivalent circuit based on transmission line modeling. Design curves showing the dependence of resonator performance on its parameters, as well as the substrate parameters, are presented. Experiments carried out showed a significant reduction in insertion loss when the rhombic resonator is dielectrically shielded. The resonator could be used as a microwave bandpass filter or a stabilization circuit for microwave oscillators in both hybrid and monolithic integrated circuits.

  19. Bimaterial Thermal Compensators for WGM Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    Bimaterial thermal compensators have been proposed as inexpensive means of preventing (to first order) or reducing temperature-related changes in the resonance frequencies of whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonators. A bimaterial compensator would apply, to a WGM resonator, a pressure that would slightly change the shape of the resonator and thereby change its resonance frequencies. Through suitable choice of the compensator dimensions and materials, it should be possible to make the temperature dependence of the pressure-induced frequency shift equal in magnitude and opposite in sign to the temperature dependence of the frequency shift of the uncompensated resonator so that, to first order, a change in temperature would cause zero net change in frequency.

  20. Nested Trampoline Resonators for Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Weaver, Matthew J; Luna, Fernando; Buters, Frank M; Eerkens, Hedwig J; Welker, Gesa; Perock, Blaise; Heeck, Kier; de Man, Sven; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating novel trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) Si$_3$N$_4$ with a distributed bragg reflector (DBR) mirror. We construct a nested double resonator structure that generates approximately 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface, eliminating the strong mounting dependence of the quality factor observed with single resonators. With the consistency provided by this isolation scheme we reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400,000 at room temperature. In addition these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181,000 $\\pm$ 1,000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  1. Controlling Metamaterial Resonances with Light

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Sangeeta; Wanare, Harshawardhan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the use of coherent optical fields as a means of dynamically controlling the resonant behaviour of a variety of composite metamaterials, wherein the metamaterial structures are embedded in a dispersive dielectric medium. Control and switching is implemented by coherently driving the resonant permittivity of the embedding medium by applied optical radiation. The effect of embedding Split ring resonators (SRR) in a frequency- dispersive medium with Lorentz-like dispersion or with dispersion engineered by electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT), is manifested in the splitting of the negative permeability band, the modified (frequency-dependent) filling fractions and dissipation factors. The modified material parameters are strongly linked to the resonant frequencies of the medium, while for an embedding medium exhibiting EIT, also to the strength and detuning of the control field. The robustness of control against the deleterious influence of dissipation associated with the metallic structures ...

  2. Coupled-channels optical calculation of positron-hydrogen resonances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Rong-Mei; Zhou Ya-Jun; Jiao Li-Guang; Cheng Yong-Jun

    2012-01-01

    An application of the coupled-channels optical method is given for the energy-dependent phenomena of positronhydrogen resonances below the n =2 excitation threshold.The equivalent local optical potential is used to account for the target polarization and positronium formation.The calculation includes 9 explicitly physical coupled channels.The lowest S-wave resonance energy position and new resonances are found.Angular dependence of the cross section in the resonance region are investigated.

  3. Noise from Two-Level Systems in Superconducting Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, C.; Barends, R.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mariantoni, M.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Ohya, S.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    Two-level systems (TLSs) present in amorphous dielectrics and surface interfaces are a significant source of decoherence in superconducting qubits. Linear microwave resonators offer a valuable instrument for characterizing the strongly power-dependent response of these TLSs. Using quarter-wavelength coplanar waveguide resonators, we monitored the microwave response of the resonator at a single near-resonant frequency versus time at varying microwave drive powers. We observe a time dependent variation of the resonator's internal dissipation and resonance frequency. The amplitude of these variations saturates with power in a manner similar to loss from TLSs. These results provide a means for quantifying the number and distribution of TLSs.

  4. Polarization effects in recoil-induced resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazebnyi, D. B.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the field polarization on the amplitude of recoil-induced resonances (RIRs) is considered for laser-cooled free atoms and for atoms in a working magneto-optical trap (MOT). For all closed dipole transitions, explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the polarization dependence of the resonance amplitudes within a perturbation theory. Optimal polarization conditions are found for the observation of resonances.

  5. Polarization effects in recoil-induced resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazebnyi, D. B., E-mail: becks.ddf@gmail.com; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The effect of the field polarization on the amplitude of recoil-induced resonances (RIRs) is considered for laser-cooled free atoms and for atoms in a working magneto-optical trap (MOT). For all closed dipole transitions, explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the polarization dependence of the resonance amplitudes within a perturbation theory. Optimal polarization conditions are found for the observation of resonances.

  6. Pressure effects in multiple resonant multiphoton transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïnos, C.; Le Duff, Y.; Castex, M. C.; Boursey, E.

    1989-02-01

    Although the rotational structure of a multiphoton process generally remains unaltered over a large range of gas pressure, this is not the case when multiple resonances are present. The rotational structure observed through intermediate rotational levels in a multiphoton process depends strongly on the resonance conditions. We show, for the NO molecule, that this structure changes drastically when the resonance conditions are modified by intermolecular collisions.

  7. Improving the spatial accuracy in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect: benefits from parallel imaging and a 32-channel head array coil at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, C; Doenitz, C; Finkenzeller, T; Jung, E M; Rennert, J; Schlaier, J

    2009-01-01

    Geometric distortions and low spatial resolution are current limitations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The aim of this study was to evaluate if application of parallel imaging or significant reduction of voxel size in combination with a new 32-channel head array coil can reduce those drawbacks at 1.5 T for a simple hand motor task. Therefore, maximum t-values (tmax) in different regions of activation, time-dependent signal-to-noise ratios (SNR(t)) as well as distortions within the precentral gyrus were evaluated. Comparing fMRI with and without parallel imaging in 17 healthy subjects revealed significantly reduced geometric distortions in anterior-posterior direction. Using parallel imaging, tmax only showed a mild reduction (7-11%) although SNR(t) was significantly diminished (25%). In 7 healthy subjects high-resolution (2 x 2 x 2 mm3) fMRI was compared with standard fMRI (3 x 3 x 3 mm3) in a 32-channel coil and with high-resolution fMRI in a 12-channel coil. The new coil yielded a clear improvement for tmax (21-32%) and SNR(t) (51%) in comparison with the 12-channel coil. Geometric distortions were smaller due to the smaller voxel size. Therefore, the reduction in tmax (8-16%) and SNR(t) (52%) in the high-resolution experiment seems to be tolerable with this coil. In conclusion, parallel imaging is an alternative to reduce geometric distortions in fMRI at 1.5 T. Using a 32-channel coil, reduction of the voxel size might be the preferable way to improve spatial accuracy.

  8. Membrane metamaterial resonators with a sharp resonance: A comprehensive study towards practical terahertz filters and sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyao Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the resonant properties of high quality-factor membrane-based metamaterial resonators functioning in the terahertz regime. A number of factors, including the resonator geometry, dielectric loss, and most importantly the membrane thickness are found to extensively influence the resonance strength and quality factor of the sharp resonance. Further studies on the membrane thickness-dependent-sensitivity for sensing applications reveal that high quality-factor membrane metamaterials with a moderate thickness ranging from 10 to 50 μm are the most promising option towards developing realistic integrated terahertz filters and sensors.

  9. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  10. Experiments with Helmholtz Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments that use Helmholtz resonators and have been designed for a sophomore-level course in oscillations and waves. Discusses the theory of the Helmholtz resonator and resonance curves. (JRH)

  11. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  12. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Dale R.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Bivens, Hugh M.; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  13. The resonance phenomena and state of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikura A.Y.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The question of dependence of the state of health is examined from the resonance phenomena in the liquid environments of organism, roles herein physical loadings. It is rotined that resonance waves can compensate structural violations on a tissue, system levels. The oppressive operating is the same compensated on the organism of man. The physical loading in a complex with other external resonance phenomena causes substantial resonance vibrations in all systems of organism. It is necessary to take into account it on employments on physical education and to use all necessary rehabilitation facilities.

  14. Feshbach Resonances in Kerr Frequency Combs

    CERN Document Server

    Matsko, Andrey B

    2014-01-01

    We show that both the power and repetition rate of a frequency comb generated in a nonlinear ring resonator, pumped with continuous wave (cw) coherent light, are modulated. The modulation is brought about by the interaction of the cw background with optical pulses excited in the resonator, and occurs in resonators with nonzero high-order chromatic dispersion and wavelength-dependent quality factor. The modulation frequency corresponds to the detuning of the pump frequency from the eigenfrequency of the pumped mode in the resonator.

  15. A MEMS diamond hemispherical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, J. J.; Bancu, M. G.; Cook, E. H.; Chaparala, M. V.; Teynor, W. A.; Weinberg, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we report the fabrication of hemispherical polycrystalline diamond resonators fabricated on a novel high-temperature glass substrate. The hemispherical resonator gyroscope is one of the most accurate and rugged of the mechanical gyroscopes, and can be operated in either rate or whole-angle mode due to its high degree of symmetry. A fabrication sequence for creating extremely symmetric 3D MEMS hemispheres is presented. Mode shapes and frequencies obtained with a laser vibrometer are shown, as well as curves of Q versus pressure, and the dependence of frequency on anchor size. Fundamental mode frequency matching to gyroscope operation in whole-angle mode.

  16. Silicon on Nothing Mems Electromechanical Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Durand, C; Ancey, P; Judong, F; Talbot, A; Quenouillere, R; Renaud, D; Borel, S; Florin, B; Buchaillot, L

    2008-01-01

    The very significant growth of the wireless communication industry has spawned tremendous interest in the development of high performances radio frequencies (RF) components. Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are good candidates to allow reconfigurable RF functions such as filters, oscillators or antennas. This paper will focus on the MEMS electromechanical resonators which show interesting performances to replace SAW filters or quartz reference oscillators, allowing smaller integrated functions with lower power consumption. The resonant frequency depends on the material properties, such as Young's modulus and density, and on the movable mechanical structure dimensions (beam length defined by photolithography). Thus, it is possible to obtain multi frequencies resonators on a wafer. The resonator performance (frequency, quality factor) strongly depends on the environment, like moisture or pressure, which imply the need for a vacuum package. This paper will present first resonator mechanisms and mechanical...

  17. Electron Spin Resonance at the Level of 1 04 Spins Using Low Impedance Superconducting Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, C.; Sigillito, A. J.; Lyon, S. A.; Petta, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    We report on electron spin resonance measurements of phosphorus donors localized in a 200 μ m2 area below the inductive wire of a lumped element superconducting resonator. By combining quantum limited parametric amplification with a low impedance microwave resonator design, we are able to detect around 2 ×1 04 spins with a signal-to-noise ratio of 1 in a single shot. The 150 Hz coupling strength between the resonator field and individual spins is significantly larger than the 1-10 Hz coupling rates obtained with typical coplanar waveguide resonator designs. Because of the larger coupling rate, we find that spin relaxation is dominated by radiative decay into the resonator and dependent upon the spin-resonator detuning, as predicted by Purcell.

  18. Stark-induced resonances in the photoionization of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glab, W.L.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    We report the first observation of electric-field-induced resonances in the multistep photoionization of hydrogen. Asymmetric profiles having blue wings are observed near the photoionization limit resulting from tunneling across the Stark-Coulomb combined potential (shape resonance). We measured the dependence of the spacing of the resonances on the electric field strength.

  19. Structural Colors from Fano Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yichen; Wang, Imbert; Stelmakh, Veronika; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-01-01

    Structural coloration is an interference phenomenon where colors emerge when visible light interacts with nanoscopically structured material, and has recently become a most interesting scientific and engineering topic. However, current structural color generation mechanisms either require thick (compared to the wavelength) structures or lack dynamic tunability. This report proposes a new structural color generation mechanism, that produces colors by the Fano resonance effect on thin photonic crystal slab. We experimentally realize the proposed idea by fabricating the samples that show resonance-induced colors with weak dependence on the viewing angle. Finally, we show that the resonance-induced colors can be dynamically tuned by stretching the photonic crystal slab fabricated on an elastic substrate.

  20. Demonstration of sharp multiple Fano resonances in optical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritake, Yuto; Kanamori, Yoshiaki; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrated multiple Fano resonances in optical metamaterials. By combination of two different sized asymmetric-double-bar (ADB) structures, triple Fano resonance was observed in the near-infrared region. In addition to Fano resonance due to anti-phase modes in isolated ADB structures, an anti-phase mode due to coupling among different sized ADBs was observed. Dependence of characteristics of resonances on size difference was also investigated. At specific conditions of size difference, quality factors of three Fano resonances were improved compared with ADB metamaterials consisting of one kind of ADBs. The results will help to realize applications using metamaterial resonators with multiple functionalities and high performance.

  1. Band structure approach to the resonant x-ray scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Elfimov, I. S.; Skorikov, N. A.; Anisimov, V. I.; Sawatzky, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    We study the resonance behaviour of the forbidden 600 and 222 x-ray Bragg peaks in Ge using LDA band structure methods. These Bragg peaks remain forbidden in the resonant dipole scattering approximation even taking into account the non local nature of the band states. However they become allowed at resonance if the eigenstates of the unoccupied conduction band involve a hybridization of p like and d like atomic states. We show that the energy dependence of the resonant behaviour, including th...

  2. Ray and wave chaos in asymmetric resonant optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Nöckel, J U; Noeckel, Jens U.

    1998-01-01

    Optical resonators are essential components of lasers and other wavelength-sensitive optical devices. A resonator is characterized by a set of modes, each with a resonant frequency omega and resonance width Delta omega=1/tau, where tau is the lifetime of a photon in the mode. In a cylindrical or spherical dielectric resonator, extremely long-lived resonances are due to `whispering gallery' modes in which light circulates around the perimeter trapped by total internal reflection. These resonators emit light isotropically. Recently, a new category of asymmetric resonant cavities (ARCs) has been proposed in which substantial shape deformation leads to partially chaotic ray dynamics. This has been predicted to give rise to a universal, frequency-independent broadening of the whispering-gallery resonances, and highly anisotropic emission. Here we present solutions of the wave equation for ARCs which confirm many aspects of the earlier ray-optics model, but also reveal interesting frequency-dependent effects charac...

  3. Resonance and Neck Length for a Spherical Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Corning

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the neck length of a spherical resonator and its period of fundamental resonance was investigated. This was done by measuring the frequency of fundamental resonance of the resonator at 6 different neck lengths. It was found that its resonance resembled Helmholtz resonance but was not that of ideal Helmholtz resonance.

  4. 共济失调患者手运动时脑激活区域的定量分析%Quantitative analysis of the hand motor cortex in ataxia patients using blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    元小冬; 王小洁; 王德; 赵丽君; 王守红

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the characteristics of the hand motor cortex in ataxia patients during active and passive finger-to-thumb opposition movements using bold oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI). Methods Ten right-handed healthy volunteers and 16 ataxia patients with motor cortex lesions were selected, and whole-brain BOLD-fMRI examinations were made while the subjects were performing the active and passive movements. Activated volume and intensity were recorded from the corresponding motor cortex and analyzed quantitatively. Meanwhile, the patients' coordination was evaluated using the international cooperative ataxia rating scale (ICARS). Results During passive movement of the ataxia patient's affected hands, the ipsilateral supplementary motor area (SMA) activated volume was larger than that during normal ipsilateral hand movement, and the activation intensity was also higher than that in the healthy controls. The ipsilateral cerebellum activated volume and intensity were significantly lower than those in the control group, and the frequency of appearance of the cerebellum was also less. The patients' activated volume and intensity in the ipsilateral cerebellum showed no correlation with ICARS scores. Conclusions When the ataxia patients' affected side cerebellum was dysfunctional, the ipsilateral SMA could compensate for the weak cerebellum function. The ICARS does not reflect cerebellum function.%目的 利用血氧水平依赖性功能性磁共振成像(BOLD-fMRI)技术,探讨共济失调患者在主动与被动复杂对指运动模式下关键脑功能区激活体积和强度的变化.方法 选取共济失调患者16例作为病例组,另选10名健康志愿者作为正常组.入选者均进行主动与被动复杂对指运动,在这两种运动模式下进行BOLD-fMRl检查,记录相应脑运动功能区的激活体积和强度并进行定量分析.采用共济失调量表(ICARS)对共济失调患者的

  5. Planar Resonators for Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blaha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an investigation into a combination of electric and magnetic planar resonators in order to design the building element of a volumetric metamaterial showing simultaneously negative electric and magnetic polarizabilities under irradiation by an electromagnetic wave. Two combinations of particular planar resonators are taken into consideration. These planar resonators are an electric dipole, a split ring resonator and a double H-shaped resonator. The response of the single resonant particle composed of a resonator with an electric response and a resonator with a magnetic response is strongly anisotropic. Proper spatial arrangement of these particles can make the response isotropic. This is obtained by proper placement of six planar resonators on the surface of a cube that now represents a metamaterial unit cell. The cells are distributed in space with 3D periodicity.

  6. Integral resonator gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  7. Nucleon Resonance Transition Form factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkert, Volker D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Mokeev, Viktor I. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Aznauryan, Inna G. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (YerPhI) (Armenia)

    2016-08-01

    We discuss recent results from CLAS on electromagnetic resonance transition amplitudes and their dependence on the distance scale (Q2). From the comparison of these results with most advanced theoretical calculations within QCD-based approaches there is clear evidence that meson-baryon contributions are present and important at large distances, i.e. small Q2, and that quark core contributions dominate the short distance behavior.

  8. Diels-Alder addition of some 6-and 5-member ring aromatic compounds on the Si(001)-2×1 surface: dependence of the binding energy on the resonance energy of the aromatic compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An energy decomposition scheme is proposed for understanding of the relative lowbinding energy of the [4+2] cycloaddition of benzene on the Si(001)-2×1 surface. By means ofdensity functional cluster model calculations, this scheme is demonstrated to be applicable tosome other 6-and 5-member ring aromatic compounds, giving a trend that the binding energy ofthe [4+2] cycloaddition products of those aromatic compounds on the Si(001) surface dependsstrongly on their resonance energy.

  9. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  10. Resonance Extraction from the SAID Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Workman, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Resonances are extracted from a number of energy-dependent and single-energy fits to scattering data. The influence of recent, precise EPECUR data is investigated. Results for the single-energy fits are derived using the L+P method of analysis and are compared to those obtained using contour integration applied to the global energy-dependent fits.

  11. Hybrid simulation of electron cyclotron resonance heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ropponen, T; Suominen, P; Koponen, T K; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2008-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating is a fundamentally important aspect in understanding the physics of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS). Absorption of the radio frequency (RF) microwave power by electron heating in the resonance zone depends on many parameters including frequency and electric field strength of the microwave, magnetic field structure and electron and ion density profiles. ECR absorption has been studied in the past by e.g. modelling electric field behaviour in the resonance zone and its near proximity. This paper introduces a new ECR heating code that implements damping of the microwave power in the vicinity of the resonance zone, utilizes electron density profiles and uses right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) electromagnetic waves to simulate electron heating in ECRIS plasma.

  12. Coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, M.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In this contribution the authors present the distinction between coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission. As a first step they determine whether an autoionization process is photoemission-like or Auger-like. The discussion is based on measurements for a weakly bonded adsorption system, Ar/Pt(111). This type of system is well adapted to investigate these effects since it yields distinctly shifted spectral features depending on the nature of the process. After this, the question of resonance photoemission in metallic systems is addressed. This is done in connection with measurements at the 2p edges for Ni metal. Ni has been one of the prototype systems for resonant photoemission. The resonances have been discussed in connection with the strong correlation and d-band localization effects in this system. Based on the results some general comments about the appearance of resonant effects in metallic systems are made.

  13. Hybrid simulation of electron cyclotron resonance heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)], E-mail: tommi.ropponen@phys.jyu.fi; Tarvainen, O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Suominen, P. [CERN Geneve 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Koponen, T.K. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Nanoscience Center, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2008-03-11

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating is a fundamentally important aspect in understanding the physics of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS). Absorption of the radio frequency (RF) microwave power by electron heating in the resonance zone depends on many parameters including frequency and electric field strength of the microwave, magnetic field structure and electron and ion density profiles. ECR absorption has been studied in the past by e.g. modelling electric field behaviour in the resonance zone and its near proximity. This paper introduces a new ECR heating code that implements damping of the microwave power in the vicinity of the resonance zone, utilizes electron density profiles and uses right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) electromagnetic waves to simulate electron heating in ECRIS plasma.

  14. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  15. Critical coupling in plasmonic resonator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2011-08-01

    We report critical coupling of electromagnetic waves to plasmonic cavity arrays fabricated on Moiré surfaces. Dark field plasmon microscopy imaging and polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection measurements reveal the critical coupling conditions of the cavities. The critical coupling conditions depend on the superperiod of the Moiré surface, which also defines the coupling between the cavities. Complete transfer of the incident power can be achieved for traveling wave plasmonic resonators, which have a relatively short superperiod. When the superperiod of the resonators increases, the coupled resonators become isolated standing wave resonators in which complete transfer of the incident power is not possible. Analytical and finite difference time domain calculations support the experimental observations.

  16. Microwave Resonators and Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    Examples of planar superconducting resonators Superconducting resonators are usually one of two types either planar, or three dimensional most often...also been employed. The term lumped element is used because the resonator comprises separated inductor and capacitor. In superconducting resonators the...implementation often is a miniature version in which the capacitor and inductor are combined in the same structure. Fig. 5 shows an example for CPW

  17. Monte Carlo analysis of the long-lived fission product neutron capture rates at the Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, A., E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [Grupo de Modelizacion de Sistemas Termoenergeticos, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Ramiro de Maeztu, 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.M. [Centro de Investigaciones Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense, 40, Ed. 17, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ismailov, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Lafuente, A. [Grupo de Modelizacion de Sistemas Termoenergeticos, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Ramiro de Maeztu, 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Nishihara, K. [Transmutation Section, J-PARC Center, JAEA, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Saito, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Stanculescu, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Sugawara, T. [Transmutation Section, J-PARC Center, JAEA, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TARC experiment benchmark capture rates results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Utilization of updated databases, included ADSLib. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Self-shielding effect in reactor design for transmutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of Lead nuclear data. - Abstract: The design of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) requires the development of simulation tools that are able to describe in a realistic way their nuclear performance and transmutation rate capability. In this publication, we present an evaluation of state of the art Monte Carlo design tools to assess their performance concerning transmutation of long-lived fission products. This work, performed under the umbrella of the International Atomic Energy Agency, analyses two important aspects for transmutation systems: moderation on Lead and neutron captures of {sup 99}Tc, {sup 127}I and {sup 129}I. The analysis of the results shows how shielding effects due to the resonances at epithermal energies of these nuclides affects strongly their transmutation rate. The results suggest that some research effort should be undertaken to improve the quality of Iodine nuclear data at epithermal and fast neutron energy to obtain a reliable transmutation estimation.

  18. Controlling Parametric Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Pettersen, Kristin Ytterstad

    2012-01-01

    Parametric resonance is a resonant phenomenon which takes place in systems characterized by periodic variations of some parameters. While seen as a threatening condition, whose onset can drive a system into instability, this chapter advocates that parametric resonance may become an advantage if t...

  19. Spin coupling and resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, M.L.; van Lenthe, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    The resonating block localize wave function (RBLW) method is introduced, a resonating modification of the block localized wave functions introduced by Mo et al. [Mo, Y.; Peyerimhoff, S. D. J. Chem. Phys. 1998, 109, 1687].This approach allows the evaluation of resonance energies following Pauling’s r

  20. New composition dependent cooling and heating curves for galaxy evolution simulations

    CERN Document Server

    De Rijcke, Sven; Vandenbroucke, Bert; Jachowicz, Natalie; Decroos, Jeroen; Cloet-Osselaer, Annelies; Koleva, Mina

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new calculation of composition-dependent radiative cooling and heating curves of low-density gas, intended primarily for use in numerical simulations of galaxy formation and evolution. These curves depend on only five parameters: temperature, density, redshift, [Fe/H], and [Mg/Fe]. They are easily tabulated and can be efficiently interpolated during a simulation. The ionization equilibrium of 14 key elements is determined for temperatures between 10K and 10^9K and densities up to 100 amu/cm^3 taking into account collisional and radiative ionization, by the cosmic UV background and an interstellar radiation field, and by charge-transfer reactions. These elements, ranging from H to Ni, are the ones most abundantly produced and/or released by SNIa, SNII, and intermediate-mass stars. Self-shielding of the gas at high densities by neutral Hydrogen is taken into account in an approximate way by exponentially suppressing the H-ionizing part of the cosmic UV background for HI densities abo...

  1. Feshbach resonances in ultracold {sup 39}K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, Chiara [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Zaccanti, Matteo [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Fattori, Marco [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' Enrico Fermi' , Compendio del Viminale, 00184 Roma (Italy); Roati, Giacomo [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Inguscio, Massimo [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Modugno, Giovanni [LENS and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Simoni, Andrea [Laboratoire de Physique des Atomes, Lasers, Molecules et Surfaces, UMR 6627 du CNRS and Universite de Rennes, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2007-07-15

    We discover several magnetic Feshbach resonances in collisions of ultracold {sup 39}K atoms, by studying atom losses and molecule formation. Accurate determination of the magnetic-field resonance locations allows us to optimize a quantum collision model for potassium isotopes. We employ the model to predict the magnetic-field dependence of scattering lengths and of near-threshold molecular levels. Our findings will be useful to plan future experiments on ultracold {sup 39}K atoms and molecules.

  2. Imprisonment dynamics of resonance radiation in gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosarev, N I; Shaparev, N Y, E-mail: kosarev_nikolai@mail.ru [Institute of Computational Modeling, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-28

    Imprisonment of resonant radiation in gases on the basis of the numerical solution of the rate balance equation for the excited atoms and the transfer resonant radiation equation is investigated. Calculations of the escape factor for the slab, cylinder and sphere at Doppler and Lorentz forms of absorption and scattering profiles are executed. Calculation results of the escape factor for the cylinder and slab are compared with Holsten's asymptotical solutions. The numerical data for time dependence of a spectrum, the intensity of resonant radiation and the spatial distribution of the excited atomic concentration in a regime of afterglow are also considered.

  3. Resonance enhancement by suitably chosen frequency detuning

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter we report new effects of resonance detuning on various dynamical parameters of a generic 3-wave system. Namely, for suitably chosen values of detuning the variation range of amplitudes can be significantly wider than for exact resonance. Moreover, the range of energy variation is not symmetric with respect to the sign of the detuning. Finally, the period of the energy oscillation exhibits non-monotonic dependency on the magnitude of detuning. These results have important theoretical implications where nonlinear resonance analysis is involved, such as geophysics, plasma physics, fluid dynamics. Numerous practical applications are envisageable e.g. in energy harvesting systems.

  4. Measurement of thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance integrals for sup 7 sup 1 Ga(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 2 Ga and sup 7 sup 5 As(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 6 As by using sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be isotopic neutron source

    CERN Document Server

    Karadag, M; Tan, M; Oezmen, A

    2003-01-01

    Thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance integrals for the sup 7 sup 1 Ga(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 2 Ga and sup 7 sup 5 As(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 6 As reactions were measured by the activation method. The experimental samples with and without a cylindrical Cd shield case in 1 mm wall thickness were irradiated in an isotropic neutron field of the sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be neutron source. The induced activities in the samples were measured by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry with a calibrated reverse-electrode germanium detector. Thermal neutron cross-sections for 2200 m/s neutrons and resonance integrals for the sup 7 sup 1 Ga(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 2 Ga and sup 7 sup 5 As(n,gamma) sup 7 sup 6 As reactions have been obtained relative to the reference values, sigma sub 0 =13.3+-0.1 b and I sub 0 =14.0+-0.3 b for the sup 5 sup 5 Mn(n,gamma) sup 5 sup 6 Mn reaction as a single comparator. The necessary correction factors for gamma attenuation, thermal neutron and resonance neutron self-shielding effects were taken into...

  5. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference.

  6. Wireless power transfer based on dielectric resonators with colossal permittivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingzhao; Belov, Pavel; Kapitanova, Polina

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic resonant wireless power transfer system based on dielectric disk resonators made of colossal permittivity (ɛ = 1000) and low loss (tan δ = 2.5 × 10-4) microwave ceramic is experimentally investigated. The system operates at the magnetic dipole mode excited in the resonators providing maximal power transfer efficiency of 90% at the frequency 232 MHz. By applying an impedance matching technique, the efficiency of 50% is achieved within the separation between the resonators d = 16 cm (3.8 radii of the resonator). The separation, misalignment and rotation dependencies of wireless power transfer efficiency are experimentally studied.

  7. Evidence of the Fano resonance in a temperature dependent Raman study of CaCu3Ti4O12 and SrCu3Ti4O12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Dileep K; Sathe, V G

    2012-06-27

    Phononic excitations have been investigated using Raman scattering studies on CaCu(3)Ti(4)O(12) and SrCu(3)Ti(4)O(12) compounds as a function of temperature down to 10 K. Evidence of the Fano resonance effect is found in the A(g)(1) mode with an asymmetric phonon line shape that occurs because of composite electron-phonon scattering due to the onset of metallic fractions in the system. The evolution of the Fano line shape with temperature affirms the existence of nanoscale phase separation and the prominence of orbitally disrupted metallic regions above 100 K. Anomalies in the evolution of the line width of the A(g)(1) Raman mode with temperature are observed around 100 K where these compounds show an orbital order/disorder transition. These anomalies manifest mutual coupling of orbital degrees of freedom to lattice degrees of freedom.

  8. Testing universality of Efimov physics across broad and narrow Feshbach resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Jacob; Desalvo, B. J.; Patel, Krutik; Chin, Cheng

    2017-08-01

    Efimov physics is a universal phenomenon in quantum three-body systems. For systems with resonant two-body interactions, Efimov predicted an infinite series of three-body bound states with geometric scaling symmetry. These Efimov states, first observed in cold caesium atoms, have been recently reported in a variety of other atomic systems. The intriguing prospect of a universal absolute Efimov resonance position across Feshbach resonances remains an open question. Theories predict a strong dependence on the resonance strength for closed-channel-dominated Feshbach resonances, whereas experimental results have so far been consistent with the universal prediction. Here we directly compare the Efimov spectra in a 6Li-133Cs mixture near two Feshbach resonances which are very different in their resonance strengths, but otherwise almost identical. Our result shows a clear dependence of the absolute Efimov resonance position on Feshbach resonance strength and a clear departure from the universal prediction for the narrow Feshbach resonance.

  9. Magnetoacoustic resonance in magnetoelectric bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, D. A.; Bichurin, M. I.; Petrov, V. M.; Srinivasan, G.

    2004-03-01

    Layered composites of ferrite and ferroelectric single crystal thin films are of interest for studies on magnetoelectric interactions [1,2]. Such interactions result in unique and novel effects that are absent in single phase materials. For example, in a single crystal composite it is possible to control the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) parameters for the ferrite by means of hypersonic oscillations induced in the ferroelectric phase. The absorption of acoustic oscillations by the ferrite results in variation in FMR line shape and power absorbed. One anticipates resonance absorption of elastic waves when the frequency of elastic waves coincides with the precession frequency of magnetization vector. This work is concerned with the nature of FMR under the influence of acoustic oscillations with the same frequency as FMR. Bilayers of ferrite and piezoelectric single crystals are considered. Hypersonic waves induced in the piezoelectric phase transmit acoustic power into ferrite due to mechanical connectivity between the phases. That transmission depends strongly on interface coupling [3]. We estimate the resulting variations in ferromagnetic resonance line shape. Estimates of magnetoelectric effect at magnetoacoustic resonance are also given. In addition, dependence of absorption of acoustic power on sample dimensions and compliances, electric and magnetic susceptibilities, piezoelectric and magnetostriction coefficients is discussed. The theory provided here is important for an understanding of interface coupling and the nature of magnetoelastic interactions in the composites. 1. M. I. Bichurin and V. M. Petrov, Zh. Tekh. Fiz. 58, 2277 (1988) [Sov. Phys. Tech. Phys. 33, 1389 (1988)]. 2. M.I. Bichurin, I. A. Kornev, V. M. Petrov, A. S. Tatarenko, Yu. V. Kiliba, and G. Srinivasan. Phys. Rev. B 64, 094409 (2001). 3. M. I. Bichurin, V. M. Petrov, and G. Srinivasan, J. Appl. Phys. 92, 7681 (2002). This work was supported by grants from the Russian Ministry of Education (

  10. Microwave microstrip resonators tuning without quality factor deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Y. Serhienko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stub and ring resonators with resonance frequency micromechanical tuning are presented. Benefits and main differences of micromechanical resonance frequency tuning method from other methods are shown. Normalized dependences of effective permittivity on normalized air gap values for various microstrip line electrode width to substrate height ratios are obtained. Effective permittivity analytical formulas for the case of infinitely wide electrodes are derived. Calculated and experimental dependences of resonance frequency on air gap value and stub experimental unloaded quality factor dependences are given. Air gap influence on resonance frequency value depending on substrate permittivity is shown in terms of the resonance frequency sensitivity. Error estimation for measured experimental data is presented. Adding tunable heterogeneity between the microstrip resonator signal electrode and the substrate provides not only the resonance frequency tuning but preserves unloaded quality factor. The preservation of the unloaded quality factor during the resonance frequency tuning achieved due to the metal and dielectric loss reduction. Air gap doesn’t have dissipative losses and has permittivity of one, which makes it the best solution for unloaded quality factor preservation. Another important conclusion is that insertion of the air heterogeneity reduces values of dielectric and metal losses arising when substrates with high permittivity are used. For dielectric loss reduction, it is important to maintain low ratio of microstrip line width to substrate height. In contrast to dielectric losses for metal loss reduction the ratio of microstrip line width to substrate height should be high. However, that ratio is limited by impedance permissible range.

  11. Thermally actuated resonant silicon crystal nanobalances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjam, Arash

    concentration of phosphorous, resulting in even slightly positive TCF for some of the devices. This is also expected to improve the phase noise characteristics of oscillators implemented utilizing such frequency references by eliminating the sharp dependence to electronic noise in the resonator bias current. Finally it is well known that non-uniformities in fabrication of MEMS resonators lead to variations in their frequency. I have proposed both active (non-permanent) and permanent frequency modification to compensate for variations in frequency of the MEMS resonators.

  12. The resonant body transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Dana; Bhave, Sunil A

    2010-04-14

    This paper introduces the resonant body transistor (RBT), a silicon-based dielectrically transduced nanoelectromechanical (NEM) resonator embedding a sense transistor directly into the resonator body. Combining the benefits of FET sensing with the frequency scaling capabilities and high quality factors (Q) of internal dielectrically transduced bar resonators, the resonant body transistor achieves >10 GHz frequencies and can be integrated into a standard CMOS process for on-chip clock generation, high-Q microwave circuits, fundamental quantum-state preparation and observation, and high-sensitivity measurements. An 11.7 GHz bulk-mode RBT is demonstrated with a quality factor Q of 1830, marking the highest frequency acoustic resonance measured to date on a silicon wafer.

  13. Dynamically generated resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Oset, E; Sarkar, S; Sun, Bao Xi; Vacas, M J Vicente; González, P; Vijande, J; Jido, D; Sekihara, T; Torres, A Martinez; Khemchandani, K

    2009-01-01

    In this talk I report on recent work related to the dynamical generation of baryonic resonances, some made up from pseudoscalar meson-baryon, others from vector meson-baryon and a third type from two meson-one baryon systems. We can establish a correspondence with known baryonic resonances, reinforcing conclusions previously drawn and bringing new light on the nature of some baryonic resonances of higher mass.

  14. Nucleon Resonance Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2016-10-01

    Recent results of meson photo-production at the existing electron machines with polarized real photon beams and the measurement of polarization observables of the final state baryons have provided high precision data that led to the discovery of new excited nucleon and Δ states using multi-channel partial wave analyses procedures. The internal structure of several prominent excited states has been revealed employing meson electroproduction processes. On the theoretical front, lattice QCD is now predicting the baryon spectrum with very similar characteristics as the constituent quark model, and continuum QCD, such as is represented in the Dyson-Schwinger equations approach and in light front relativistic quark models, describes the non-perturbative behavior of resonance excitations at photon virtuality of Q^2 > 1.5 GeV^2. In this talk I discuss the need to continue a vigorous program of nucleon spectroscopy and the study of the internal structure of excited states as a way to reveal the effective degrees of freedom underlying the excited states and their dependence on the distance scale probed.

  15. Subwavelength resonant nanostructured films for sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Edwards, Daniel L.; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-05-29

    We present a novel subwavelength nanostructure architecture that may be utilized for optical standoff sensing applications. The subwavelength structures are fabricated via a combination of nanoimprint lithography and metal sputtering to create metallic nanostructured films encased within a transparent media. The structures are based on the open ring resonator (ORR) architecture and have their analog in resonant LC circuits, which display a resonance frequency that is inversely proportional to the square root of the product of the inductance and capacitance. Therefore, any perturbation of the nanostructured films due to chemical or environmental effects can alter the inductive or capacitive behavior of the subwavelength features, which can shift the resonant frequency and provide an indication of the external stimulus. This shift in resonance can be interrogated remotely either actively using either laser illumination or passively using hyperspectral or multispectral sensing. These structures may be designed to be either anisotropic or isotropic, which can also provide polarization-sensitive interrogation. Due to the nanometer-scale of the structures, they can be tailored to be optically responsive in the visible or near infrared spectrum with a highly reflective resonant peak that is dependent solely on structural dimensions and material characteristics. We present experimental measurements of the optical response of these structures as a function of wavelength, polarization, and incident angle demonstrating the resonant effect in the near infrared region. Numerical modeling data showing the effect of different fabrication parameters such as structure parameters are also discussed.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Al'tshuler, S A

    2013-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is a comprehensive text on the field of electron paramagnetic resonance, covering both the theoretical background and the results of experiment. This book is composed of eight chapters that cover theoretical materials and experimental data on ionic crystals, since these are the materials that have been most extensively studied by the methods of paramagnetic resonance. The opening chapters provide an introduction to the basic principles of electron paramagnetic resonance and the methods of its measurement. The next chapters are devoted to the theory of spectra an

  17. Resonance control of mid-infrared metamaterials using arrays of split-ring resonator pairs

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2016-01-11

    We present our design, fabrication and characterization of resonance-controllable metamaterials operating at mid-infrared wavelengths. The metamaterials are composed of pairs of back-to-back or face-to-face U-shape split-ring resonators (SRRs). Transmission spectra of the metamaterials are measured using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the transmission resonance is dependent on the distance between the two SRRs in each SRR pair. The dips in the transmission spectrum shift to shorter wavelengths with increasing distance between the two SRRs for both the back-to-back and face-to-face SRR pairs. The position of the resonance dips in the spectrum can hence be controlled by the relative position of the SRRs. This mechanism of resonance control offers a promising way of developing metamaterials with tunability for optical filters and bio/chemical sensing devices in integrated nano-optics.

  18. Resonance control of mid-infrared metamaterials using arrays of split-ring resonator pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Weisheng; Wang, Zhihong; Whittaker, John; Schedin, Fredrik; Wu, Zhipeng; Han, Jiaguang

    2016-02-01

    We present our design, fabrication and characterization of resonance-controllable metamaterials operating at mid-infrared wavelengths. The metamaterials are composed of pairs of back-to-back or face-to-face U-shape split-ring resonators (SRRs). Transmission spectra of the metamaterials are measured using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the transmission resonance is dependent on the distance between the two SRRs in each SRR pair. The dips in the transmission spectrum shift to shorter wavelengths with increasing distance between the two SRRs for both the back-to-back and face-to-face SRR pairs. The position of the resonance dips in the spectrum can hence be controlled by the relative position of the SRRs. This mechanism of resonance control offers a promising way of developing metamaterials with tunability for optical filters and bio/chemical sensing devices in integrated nano-optics.

  19. Resonantly detecting axion-mediated forces with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-10-17

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 10(9) and 10(12) GeV or axion masses between 10(-6) and 10(-3) eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  20. Nicotine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine dependence Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Nicotine dependence ― also called tobacco dependence ― is an addiction to tobacco products caused by the drug nicotine. Nicotine dependence means you can't stop using the substance, ...

  1. Visuomotor resonance in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eBecchio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available When we observe the actions performed by others, our motor system ‘resonates' along with that of the observed agent. Is a similar visuomotor resonant response observed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD? Studies investigating action observation in ASD have yielded inconsistent findings. In this perspective article we examine behavioral and neuroscientific evidence in favor of visuomotor resonance in ASD, and consider the possible role of action-perception coupling in social cognition. We distinguish between different aspects of visuomotor resonance and conclude that while some aspects may be preserved in ASD, abnormalities exist in the way individuals with ASD convert visual information from observed actions into a program for motor execution. Such abnormalities, we surmise, may contribute to but also depend on the difficulties that individuals with ASD encounter during social interaction.

  2. Micro string resonators as temperature sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.; Schmid, S.; Boisen, A.

    2013-01-01

    expansion of the string and the frame clamping it. The sensitivity improves when the length and pre-stress are reduced and the difference in thermal expansion, Young's modulus and resonant mode are increased. At low tensile stress, the sensitivity becomes highly dependent on temperature. The investigation...... to the low thermal mass of the strings. A temperature resolution of 2.5×10-4 °C has been achieved with silicon nitride strings. The theoretical limit for the temperature resolution of 8×10-8 °C has not been reached yet and requires further improvement of the sensor.......The resonance frequency of strings is highly sensitive to temperature. In this work we have investigated the applicability of micro string resonators as temperature sensors. The resonance frequency of strings is a function of the tensile stress which is coupled to temperature by the thermal...

  3. Effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy-rich phosphates and prediction of estrogen dependence monitored by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of four human breast cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C A; Kristjansen, P E; Brünner, N

    1995-01-01

    The effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy metabolism was studied in four human breast cancer xenografts: the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 and ZR75-1 and the estrogen-independent ZR75/LCC-3 and MDA-MB-231. The tumors were grown in ovariectomized nude mice with a s.c. implanted estrogen pellet. After......:Pi ratio in the two estrogen-dependent xenografts, whereas this ratio remained unchanged in the estrogen-independent tumors. In ZR75/LCC-3 tumors a slight decrease in nucleoside triphosphate:Pi was observed following onset of estrogen stimulation after initial growth without estrogen. Extracts of freeze...

  4. Thermal neutron capture cross-section and resonance integral measurements of {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La and {sup 140}Ce(n, γ){sup 141}Ce using a Am-Be neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Karnataka (India)

    2017-03-15

    Thermal neutron capture cross-sections and resonance integrals of {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La and {sup 140}Ce (n, γ){sup 141}Ce are measured with respect to reference reactions {sup 197}Au(n, γ){sup 198}Au and {sup 55}Mn(n, γ){sup 56}Mn using the neutron activation technique. Measurements are carried out using neutrons from an Am-Be source located inside a concrete bunker. Two different methods are used for determining self-shielding factors of activation foils as well as for finding the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor. For {sup 139}La with reference to {sup 197}Au and {sup 55}Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 9.24 ± 0.25 b and 9.28 ± 0.37 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 12.18 ± 0.67 b and 11.81 ± 0.94 b, respectively. For {sup 140}Ce with reference to {sup 197}Au and {sup 55}Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 0.44 ± 0.01 b and 0.44 ± 0.02 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 0.55 ± 0.03 b and 0.54 ± 0.04 b, respectively. The present measurements are compared with earlier measurements and evaluations. Presently estimated values confirm the established {sup 139}La(n, γ){sup 140}La cross-sections. The presently measured thermal capture cross-section {sup 140}Ce(n, γ){sup 141}Ce, though lower than the evaluated data, is having higher accuracy compared to previous measurements with large uncertainties. The resonance integral measured is higher (like most previous measurements) than most evaluations requiring a revision of the evaluated data. (orig.)

  5. Thermal neutron capture cross-section and resonance integral measurements of 139La(n, γ)140La and 140Ce(n, γ)141Ce using a Am-Be neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkath, Priyada; Mohanakrishnan, P.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal neutron capture cross-sections and resonance integrals of 139La(n, γ)140La and 140Ce (n, γ)141Ce are measured with respect to reference reactions 197Au(n, γ)198Au and 55Mn(n, γ)56Mn using the neutron activation technique. Measurements are carried out using neutrons from an Am-Be source located inside a concrete bunker. Two different methods are used for determining self-shielding factors of activation foils as well as for finding the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor. For 139 La with reference to 197 Au and 55 Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 9.24 ± 0.25 b and 9.28 ± 0.37 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 12.18 ± 0.67 b and 11.81 ± 0.94 b, respectively. For 140 Ce with reference to 197 Au and 55 Mn the measured thermal cross sections are 0.44 ± 0.01 b and 0.44 ± 0.02 b, respectively, while the measured resonance integrals are 0.55 ± 0.03 b and 0.54 ± 0.04 b, respectively. The present measurements are compared with earlier measurements and evaluations. Presently estimated values confirm the established 139La(n, γ)140La cross-sections. The presently measured thermal capture cross-section 140Ce(n, γ)141Ce , though lower than the evaluated data, is having higher accuracy compared to previous measurements with large uncertainties. The resonance integral measured is higher (like most previous measurements) than most evaluations requiring a revision of the evaluated data.

  6. Split ring resonator resonance assisted terahertz antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Galal, Hossam; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2016-01-01

    We report on the computational development of novel architectures of low impedance broadband antennas, for efficient detection of Terahertz (THz) frequency beams. The conceived Split Ring Resonator Resonance Assisted (SRR RA) antennas are based on both a capacitive and inductive scheme, exploiting a 200 Ohm and 400 Ohm impedance, respectively. Moreover, the impedance is tunable by varying the coupling parameters in the exploited geometry, allowing for better matching with the detector circuit for maximum power extraction. Our simulation results have been obtained by assuming a 1.5 THz operation frequency.

  7. Nonenhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the calf arteries at 3 Tesla: intraindividual comparison of 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA and 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Gesine; Lauff, Marie-Teres; Hirsch, Sebastian; Schwenke, Carsten; Hamm, Bernd; Wagner, Moritz

    2016-12-01

    To prospectively compare 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA vs. 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA for assessment of the calf arteries at 3 Tesla. Forty-two patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease underwent nonenhanced MRA of calf arteries at 3 Tesla with 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA (fast spin echo sequence; 3D-FSE-MRA) and 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA (balanced steady-state-free-precession sequence; 2D-bSSFP-MRA). Moreover, all patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA) as standard-of-reference. Two readers performed a per-segment evaluation for image quality (4 = excellent to 0 = non-diagnostic) and severity of stenosis. Image quality scores of 2D-bSSFP-MRA were significantly higher compared to 3D-FSE-MRA (medians across readers: 4 vs. 3; p Tesla with significantly higher image quality and diagnostic accuracy compared to 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA (3D-FSE-MRA). • 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA (2D-bSSFP-MRA) is a robust NE-MRA technique at 3T • 2D-bSSFP-MRA outperforms 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA (3D-FSE-MRA) as NE-MRA of calf arteries • 2D-bSSFP-MRA is a promising alternative to CE-MRA for calf PAOD evaluation.

  8. A Theoretical Distinction Between Time-Resolved Resonance Raman andResonance Fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jing; DU Si-De; FAN Kang-Nian; Lee Soo-Ying

    2000-01-01

    Based on the time-dependent theory, an analysis of the distinction between resonance Raman (RR) and resonance fluorescence (RF) with pulse excitation was presented. The real population of the intermediate state gives two optical components-the independent time evolution of intermediate ket and bra states generates RR while RF originates from the phase coherent between ket and bra states. In cw limit, the transition probability of spontaneous emission with pulse excitation can be reduced to the classical theory.

  9. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Tomimatsu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance involving quantum Hall states (QHSs was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  10. Electrical Characterization of Microelectromechanical Silicon Carbide Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Zorman

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes the findings of a study to investigate the performance of SiC MEMS resonators with respect to resonant frequency and quality factor under a variety of testing conditions, including various ambient pressures, AC drive voltages, bias potentials and temperatures. The sample set included both single-crystal and polycrystalline 3C-SiC lateral resonators. The experimental results show that operation at reduced pressures increases the resonant frequency as damping due to the gas-rarefaction effect becomes significant. Both DC bias and AC drive voltages result in nonlinearities, but the AC drive voltage is more sensitive to noise. The AC voltage has a voltage coefficient of 1~4ppm/V at a DC bias of 40V. The coefficient of DC bias is about -11ppm/V to - 21ppm/V for poly-SiC, which is more than a factor of two better than a similarly designed polysilicon resonator (-54 ppm/V. The effective stiffness of the resonator decreases (softens as the bias potential is increased, but increases (hardens as drive voltage increase when scan is from low to high frequency. The resonant frequency decreases slightly with increasing temperature, exhibiting a temperature coefficient of -22 ppm/oC, between 22oC and 60oC. The thermal expansion mismatch between the SiC device and the Si substrate could be a reason that thermal coefficient for these SiC resonators is about twofold higher than similar polysilicon resonators. However, the Qs appear to exhibit no temperature dependence in this range.

  11. Temperature Sensors Based on WGM Optical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    A proposed technique for measuring temperature would exploit differences between the temperature dependences of the frequencies of two different electromagnetic modes of a whispering gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator. An apparatus based on this technique was originally intended to be part of a control system for stabilizing a laser frequency in the face of temperature fluctuations. When suitably calibrated, apparatuses based on this technique could also serve as precise temperature sensors for purposes other than stabilization of lasers. A sensor according to the proposal would include (1) a transparent WGM dielectric resonator having at least two different sets of modes characterized by different thermo-optical constants and (2) optoelectronic instrumentation for measuring the difference between the temperature-dependent shifts of the resonance frequencies of the two sets of modes.

  12. Neutrino Production of Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Paschos, E A; Yu, J Y; Paschos, Emmanuel A.; Sakuda, Makoto; Yu, Ji--Young

    2004-01-01

    We take a fresh look at the analysis of resonance production by neutrinos. We consider three resonances $P_{33}, P_{11}$ and $S_{11}$ with a detailed discussion of their form factors. The article presents results for free proton and neutron targets and discusses the corrections which appear on nuclear targets. The Pauli suppression factor is derived in the Fermi gas model and shown to apply to resonance production. The importance of the various resonances is demonstrated with numerical calculations. The $\\Delta$-resonance is described by two formfactors and its differential cross sections are compared with experimental data. The article is self-contained and could be helpful to readers who wish to reproduce and use these cross sections.

  13. Monolithic MACS micro resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Horn, J. A.; Jacquinot, J.-F.; Ginefri, J. C.; Bonhomme, C.; Sakellariou, D.

    2016-10-01

    Magic Angle Coil Spinning (MACS) aids improving the intrinsically low NMR sensitivity of heterogeneous microscopic samples. We report on the design and testing of a new type of monolithic 2D MACS resonators to overcome known limitations of conventional micro coils. The resonators' conductors were printed on dielectric substrate and tuned without utilizing lumped element capacitors. Self-resonance conditions have been computed by a hybrid FEM-MoM technique. Preliminary results reported here indicate robust mechanical stability, reduced eddy currents heating and negligible susceptibility effects. The gain in B1 /√{ P } is in agreement with the NMR sensitivity enhancement according to the principle of reciprocity. A sensitivity enhancement larger than 3 has been achieved in a monolithic micro resonator inside a standard 4 mm rotor at 500 MHz. These 2D resonators could offer higher performance micro-detection and ease of use of heterogeneous microscopic substances such as biomedical samples, microscopic specimens and thin film materials.

  14. Fundamentals of nanomechanical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Silvan; Roukes, Michael Lee

    2016-01-01

    This authoritative book introduces and summarizes the latest models and skills required to design and optimize nanomechanical resonators, taking a top-down approach that uses macroscopic formulas to model the devices. The authors cover the electrical and mechanical aspects of nano electromechanical system (NEMS) devices. The introduced mechanical models are also key to the understanding and optimization of nanomechanical resonators used e.g. in optomechanics. Five comprehensive chapters address: The eigenmodes derived for the most common continuum mechanical structures used as nanomechanical resonators; The main sources of energy loss in nanomechanical resonators; The responsiveness of micro and nanomechanical resonators to mass, forces, and temperature; The most common underlying physical transduction mechanisms; The measurement basics, including amplitude and frequency noise. The applied approach found in this book is appropriate for engineering students and researchers working with micro and nanomechanical...

  15. Photonic Feshbach resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Feshbach resonance is a resonance for two-atom scattering with two or more channels,in which a bound state is achieved in one channel.We show that this resonance phenomenon not only exists during the collisions of massive particles,but also emerges during the coherent transport of massless particles,that is,photons confined in the coupled resonator arrays linked by a separated cavity or a tunable two level system(TLS).When the TLS is coupled to one array to form a bound state in this setup,the vanishing transmission appears to display the photonic Feshbach resonance.This process can be realized through various experimentally feasible solid state systems,such as the couple defected cavities in photonic crystals and the superconducting qubit coupled to the transmission line.The numerical simulation based on the finite-different time-domain(FDTD) method confirms our assumption about the physical implementation.

  16. Anharmonic effects and double giant dipole resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Voronov, V V

    2001-01-01

    A brief review of recent results of the microscopic calculations to describe characteristics of the double giant dipole resonances (DGDR) is presented. A special attention is paid to a microscopic study of the anharmonic properties of the DGDR. It is found that the deviation of the energy centroid of the DGDR from the harmonic limit follows A sup - sup 1 dependence

  17. The CP-asymmetry in resonant leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimov, A. [Institut de Theorie des Phenomenes Physiques, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Broncano, A. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany); Pluemacher, M. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: pluemi@mppmu.mpg.de

    2006-03-06

    We study the resonantly enhanced CP-asymmetry in the decays of nearly mass-degenerate heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos for which different formulae have been presented in the literature, depending on the method used to calculate it. We consider two different techniques and show that they lead to the same result, thereby reconciling the different approaches.

  18. The CP-asymmetry in resonant leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Anisimov, A; Plümacher, M

    2006-01-01

    We study the resonantly enhanced CP-asymmetry in the decays of nearly mass-degenerate heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos for which different formulae have been presented in the literature, depending on the method used to calculate it. We consider two different techniques and show that they lead to the same result, thereby reconciling the different approaches.

  19. Resonant tunneling in a pulsed phonon field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kral, P.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1999-01-01

    , The nonequilibrium spectral function for the resonance displays the formation and decay of the phonon sidebands on ultrashort time scales. The time-dependent tunneling current through the individual phonon satellites reflects this quasiparticle formation by oscillations, whose time scale is set by the frequency...

  20. Ferromagnetic Resonance in Gd/Co Multilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. V. Svalov; V. O. Vas'kovskiy; J. M. Barandiaran; G. V. Kurlyandskaya; L. Lezama; J. Gutiérrez; N. G. Bebenin; D. Schmool

    2001-01-01

    Magnetometric and ferromagnetic resonance (MFR) measurements have been performed on the polycrystalline multilayered structure, [Gd(7.5 nm)/Co(3nm)]20. The temperature dependence of magnetization of the sample suggests a compensation temperature Tcomp in the region of 240K, implying that the Co and Gd layers are antiferromagnetically aligned. The FMR curves are strongly temperature dependent, particularly in the vicinity of Tcomp.

  1. Resonance Radiation and Excited Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Allan C. G.; Zemansky, Mark W.

    2009-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Physical and chemical effects connected with resonance radiation; 3. Absorption lines and measurements of the lifetime of the resonance state; 4. Collision processes involving excited atoms; 5. The polarization of resonance radiation; Appendix; Index.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  3. LABCOM resonator Phase 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keres, L.J.

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop quartz crystal resonator designs, production processes, and test capabilities for 5-MHz, 6.2-MHz, and 10-MHz resonators for Tactical Miniature Crystal Oscillator (TMXO) applications. GE Neutron Devices (GEND) established and demonstrated the capability to produce and test quartz crystal resonators for use in the TMXO developed by the US Army ERADCOM (now LABCOM). The goals in this project were based on the ERADCOM statement of work. The scope of work indicated that the resonator production facilities for this project would not be completely independent, but that they would be supported in part by equipment and processes in place at GEND used in US Department of Energy (DOE) work. In addition, provisions for production test equipment or or eventual technology transfer costs to a commercial supplier were clearly excluded from the scope of work. The demonstrated technical capability of the deep-etched blank design is feasible and practical. It can be manufactured in quantity with reasonable yield, and its performance is readily predictable. The ceramic flatpack is a very strong package with excellent hermeticity. The four-point mount supports the crystal to reasonable shock levels and does not perturb the resonator's natural frequency-temperature behavior. The package can be sealed with excellent yields. The high-temperature, high-vacuum processing developed for the TMXO resonator, including bonding the piezoid to its mount with conductive polyimide adhesive, is consistent with precision resonator fabrication. 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  4. Nonenhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the calf arteries at 3 Tesla: intraindividual comparison of 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA and 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knobloch, Gesine; Lauff, Marie-Teres; Hirsch, Sebastian; Hamm, Bernd; Wagner, Moritz [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Schwenke, Carsten [SCO:SSiS Statistical Consulting, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To prospectively compare 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA vs. 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA for assessment of the calf arteries at 3 Tesla. Forty-two patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease underwent nonenhanced MRA of calf arteries at 3 Tesla with 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA (fast spin echo sequence; 3D-FSE-MRA) and 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA (balanced steady-state-free-precession sequence; 2D-bSSFP-MRA). Moreover, all patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA) as standard-of-reference. Two readers performed a per-segment evaluation for image quality (4 = excellent to 0 = non-diagnostic) and severity of stenosis. Image quality scores of 2D-bSSFP-MRA were significantly higher compared to 3D-FSE-MRA (medians across readers: 4 vs. 3; p < 0.0001) with lower rates of non-diagnostic vessel segments on 2D-bSSFP-MRA (reader 1: <1 % vs. 15 %; reader 2: 1 % vs. 29 %; p < 0.05). Diagnostic performance of 2D-bSSFP-MRA and 3D-FSE-MRA across readers showed sensitivities of 89 % (214/240) vs. 70 % (168/240), p = 0.0153; specificities: 91 % (840/926) vs. 63 % (585/926), p < 0.0001; and diagnostic accuracies of 90 % (1054/1166) vs. 65 % (753/1166), p < 0.0001. 2D flow-independent non-subtractive MRA (2D-bSSFP-MRA) is a robust nonenhanced MRA technique for assessment of the calf arteries at 3 Tesla with significantly higher image quality and diagnostic accuracy compared to 3D flow-dependent subtractive MRA (3D-FSE-MRA). (orig.)

  5. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  6. Scattering by coupled resonating elements in air

    CERN Document Server

    Krynkin, Anton; Chong, Alvin Y B; Taherzadeh, Shahram; Attenborough, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Scattering by (a) a single composite scatterer consisting of a concentric arrangement of an outer N-slit rigid cylinder and an inner cylinder which is either rigid or in the form of a thin elastic shell and (b) by a finite periodic array of these scatterers in air has been investigated analytically and through laboratory experiments. The composite scatterer forms a system of coupled resonators and gives rise to multiple low frequency resonances. The corresponding analytical model employs polar angle dependent boundary conditions on the surface of the N-slit cylinder. The solution inside the slits assumes plane waves. It is shown also that in the low-frequency range the N-slit rigid cylinder can be replaced by an equivalent fluid layer. Further approximations suggest a simple square root dependence of the resonant frequencies on the number of slits and this is confirmed by data. The observed resonant phenomena are associated with Helmholtz-like behaviour of the resonator for which the radius and width of the o...

  7. Resonant power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2012-01-01

    This book is devoted to resonant energy conversion in power electronics. It is a practical, systematic guide to the analysis and design of various dc-dc resonant inverters, high-frequency rectifiers, and dc-dc resonant converters that are building blocks of many of today's high-frequency energy processors. Designed to function as both a superior senior-to-graduate level textbook for electrical engineering courses and a valuable professional reference for practicing engineers, it provides students and engineers with a solid grasp of existing high-frequency technology, while acquainting them wit

  8. Spin Resonance Strength Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, E. D.

    2009-08-01

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  9. Spin resonance strength calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  10. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alex K [Kensington, CA; Jensen, Kenneth J [Berkeley, CA; Girit, Caglar [Albany, CA; Mickelson, William E [San Francisco, CA; Grossman, Jeffrey C [Berkeley, CA

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  11. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  12. An embedded optical nanowire loop resonator refractometric sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Pruneri, Valerio; Finazzi, Vittoria; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2008-01-21

    A novel refractometric sensor based on an embedded optical nanowire loop resonator is presented. The device sensitivity has been studied in two typical configurations and its dependence on the nanowire diameter and coating thickness determined.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety ...

  16. Characterization of magnetically actuated resonant cantilevers in viscous fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vančura, Cyril; Lichtenberg, Jan; Hierlemann, Andreas; Josse, Fabien

    2005-10-01

    The vibration behavior of magnetically actuated resonant microcantilevers immersed in viscous fluids has been studied. A dependence of the resonance frequency and the quality factor (Q factor) on the fluid properties, such as density and viscosity and on the cantilever geometry is described. Various cantilever geometries are analyzed in pure water and glycerol solutions, and the results are explained in terms of the added displaced fluid mass and the fluid damping force for both the resonance frequency and the quality factor. An in-depth knowledge and understanding of such systems is necessary when analyzing resonant cantilevers as biochemical sensors in liquid environments.

  17. Analysis of superconducting microstrip resonator at various microwave power levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, G.P.; Jacob, M.V.; Jayakumar, M.; Bhatnagar, P.K. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi, South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Kataria, N.D. [National Physical Laboratory, K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110 012 (India)

    1997-05-01

    The real and imaginary parts of the surface impedance of YBCO superconductors have been studied at different microwave power levels. Using the relations for the critical current density and the grain boundary resistance, a relation for calculating the power dependence of the surface resistance has been obtained. Also, a relation to find the resonant frequency of a superconducting microstrip resonator at various input power levels has been derived. Measurements have been carried out on various microstrip resonators to study the variation of surface resistance and resonant frequency at different rf power levels. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical results. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015 (Fig.~1). A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions; what is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD?; where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers?; and what experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus.This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  19. Lattices of dielectric resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Trubin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the analytical theory of complex systems composed of a large number of high-Q dielectric resonators. Spherical and cylindrical dielectric resonators with inferior and also whispering gallery oscillations allocated in various lattices are considered. A new approach to S-matrix parameter calculations based on perturbation theory of Maxwell equations, developed for a number of high-Q dielectric bodies, is introduced. All physical relationships are obtained in analytical form and are suitable for further computations. Essential attention is given to a new unified formalism of the description of scattering processes. The general scattering task for coupled eigen oscillations of the whole system of dielectric resonators is described. The equations for the  expansion coefficients are explained in an applicable way. The temporal Green functions for the dielectric resonator are presented. The scattering process of short pulses in dielectric filter structures, dielectric antennas  and lattices of d...

  20. Piezoelectric MEMS resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Piazza, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces piezoelectric microelectromechanical (pMEMS) resonators to a broad audience by reviewing design techniques including use of finite element modeling, testing and qualification of resonators, and fabrication and large scale manufacturing techniques to help inspire future research and entrepreneurial activities in pMEMS. The authors discuss the most exciting developments in the area of materials and devices for the making of piezoelectric MEMS resonators, and offer direct examples of the technical challenges that need to be overcome in order to commercialize these types of devices. Some of the topics covered include: Widely-used piezoelectric materials, as well as materials in which there is emerging interest Principle of operation and design approaches for the making of flexural, contour-mode, thickness-mode, and shear-mode piezoelectric resonators, and examples of practical implementation of these devices Large scale manufacturing approaches, with a focus on the practical aspects associate...

  1. Resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Matthias F.M., E-mail: m.lutz@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Lange, Jens Sören, E-mail: Soeren.Lange@exp2.physik.uni-giessen.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Pennington, Michael, E-mail: michaelp@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Bettoni, Diego [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Brambilla, Nora [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Crede, Volker [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Eidelman, Simon [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Budker Istitute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Gillitzer, Albrecht [Institut für Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Gradl, Wolfgang [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Lang, Christian B. [Institut für Physik, Universität Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Metag, Volker [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Nakano, Takashi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); and others

    2016-04-15

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting ‘Resonances in QCD’, which took place at GSI October 12–14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: • What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? • Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? • What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy–light and heavy–heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  2. Resonance Production in Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Markert, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Hadronic resonances with short life times and strong coupling to the dense medium may exhibit mass shifts and width broadening as signatures of chiral symmetry restoration at the phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. Resonances with different lifetimes are also used to extract information about the time evolution and temperature of the expanding hadronic medium. In order to collect information about the early stage (at the phase transition) of a heavy-ion collision, resonances and decay particles which are unaffected by the hadronic medium have to be used. We explore a possible new technique to extract signals from the early stage through the selection of resonances from jets. A first attempt of this analysis, using the reconstructed $\\phi$(1020) from 200 GeV Au+Au collisions in STAR, is presented.

  3. Resonant Thermoelectric Nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Mauser, Kelly W; Kim, Seyoon; Fleischman, Dagny; Atwater, Harry A

    2016-01-01

    Photodetectors are typically based on photocurrent generation from electron-hole pairs in semiconductor structures and on bolometry for wavelengths that are below bandgap absorption. In both cases, resonant plasmonic and nanophotonic structures have been successfully used to enhance performance. In this work, we demonstrate subwavelength thermoelectric nanostructures designed for resonant spectrally selective absorption, which creates large enough localized temperature gradients to generate easily measureable thermoelectric voltages. We show that such structures are tunable and are capable of highly wavelength specific detection, with an input power responsivity of up to 119 V/W (referenced to incident illumination), and response times of nearly 3 kHz, by combining resonant absorption and thermoelectric junctions within a single structure, yielding a bandgap-independent photodetection mechanism. We report results for both resonant nanophotonic bismuth telluride-antimony telluride structures and chromel-alumel...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  5. Triple-resonant transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Stephen C

    2012-06-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of two novel multiple-resonant transducers which produce a wider transmit response than that of a conventional Tonpilz-type transducer. These multi-resonant transducers are Tonpilz-type longitudinal vibrators that produce three coupled resonances and are referred to as triple-resonant transducers (TRTs). One of these designs is a mechanical series arrangement of a tail mass, piezoelectric ceramic stack, central mass, compliant spring, second central mass, second compliant spring, and a piston-radiating head mass. The other TRT design is a mechanical series arrangement of a tail mass, piezoelectric ceramic stack, central mass, compliant spring, and head mass with a quarter-wave matching layer of poly(methyl methacrylate) on the head mass. Several prototype transducer element designs were fabricated that demonstrated proof-of-concept.

  6. Resonant Diphoton Phenomenology Simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Panico, Giuliano; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A framework is proposed to describe resonant diphoton phenomenology at hadron colliders in full generality. It can be employed for a comprehensive model-independent interpretation of the experimental data. Within the general framework, few benchmark scenarios are defined as representative of the various phenomenological options and/or of motivated new physics scenarios. Their usage is illustrated by performing a characterization of the 750 GeV excess, based on a recast of available experimental results. We also perform an assessment of which properties of the resonance could be inferred, after discovery, by a careful experimental study of the diphoton distributions. These include the spin J of the new particle and its dominant production mode. Partial information on its CP-parity can also be obtained, but only for J >= 2. The complete determination of the resonance CP properties requires studying the pattern of the initial state radiation that accompanies the resonance production.

  7. Resonances in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  8. Resonances in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Matthias F M; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B; Metag, Volker; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Steve L; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with ${\\it up}$, ${\\it down}$ and ${\\it strange}$ quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with ${\\it charm}$ quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  9. Perspective on resonances of metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Huang, Lirong

    2015-07-27

    Electromagnetic resonance as the most important characteristic of metamaterials enables lots of exotic phenomena, such as invisible, negative refraction, man-made magnetism, etc. Conventional LC-resonance circuit model as the most authoritative and classic model is good at explaining and predicting the fundamental resonance wavelength of a metamaterial, while feels hard for high-order resonances, especially for resonance intensity (strength of resonance, determining on the performance and efficiency of metamaterial-based devices). In present work, via an easy-to-understand mass-spring model, we present a different and comprehensive insight for the resonance mechanism of metamaterials, through which both the resonance wavelengths (including the fundamental and high-order resonance wavelengths) and resonance intensities of metamaterials can be better understood. This developed theory has been well verified by different-material and different-structure resonators. This perspective will provide a broader space for exploring novel optical devices based on metamaterials (or metasurfaces).

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Subthreshold Resonant Properties in Pyloric Dilator Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Vazifehkhah Ghaffari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various types of neurons exhibit subthreshold resonance oscillation (preferred frequency response to fluctuating sinusoidal input currents. This phenomenon is well known to influence the synaptic plasticity and frequency of neural network oscillation. This study evaluates the resonant properties of pacemaker pyloric dilator (PD neurons in the central pattern generator network through mathematical modeling. From the pharmacological point of view, calcium currents cannot be blocked in PD neurons without removing the calcium-dependent potassium current. Thus, the effects of calcium ICa and calcium-dependent potassium IKCa currents on resonant properties remain unclear. By taking advantage of Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of neuron and its equivalent RLC circuit, we examine the effects of changing resting membrane potential and those ionic currents on the resonance. Results show that changing the resting membrane potential influences the amplitude and frequency of resonance so that the strength of resonance (Q-value increases by both depolarization and hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential. Moreover, hyperpolarization-activated inward current Ih and ICa (in association with IKCa are dominant factors on resonant properties at hyperpolarized and depolarized potentials, respectively. Through mathematical analysis, results indicate that Ih and IKCa affect the resonant properties of PD neurons. However, ICa only has an amplifying effect on the resonance amplitude of these neurons.

  11. Mathematical modeling of subthreshold resonant properties in pyloric dilator neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazifehkhah Ghaffari, Babak; Kouhnavard, Mojgan; Aihara, Takeshi; Kitajima, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Various types of neurons exhibit subthreshold resonance oscillation (preferred frequency response) to fluctuating sinusoidal input currents. This phenomenon is well known to influence the synaptic plasticity and frequency of neural network oscillation. This study evaluates the resonant properties of pacemaker pyloric dilator (PD) neurons in the central pattern generator network through mathematical modeling. From the pharmacological point of view, calcium currents cannot be blocked in PD neurons without removing the calcium-dependent potassium current. Thus, the effects of calcium (I(Ca)) and calcium-dependent potassium (I(KCa)) currents on resonant properties remain unclear. By taking advantage of Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of neuron and its equivalent RLC circuit, we examine the effects of changing resting membrane potential and those ionic currents on the resonance. Results show that changing the resting membrane potential influences the amplitude and frequency of resonance so that the strength of resonance (Q-value) increases by both depolarization and hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential. Moreover, hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(h)) and I(Ca) (in association with I(KCa)) are dominant factors on resonant properties at hyperpolarized and depolarized potentials, respectively. Through mathematical analysis, results indicate that I h and I(KCa) affect the resonant properties of PD neurons. However, I(Ca) only has an amplifying effect on the resonance amplitude of these neurons.

  12. Path Dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Setterfield

    2015-01-01

    Path dependency is defined, and three different specific concepts of path dependency – cumulative causation, lock in, and hysteresis – are analyzed. The relationships between path dependency and equilibrium, and path dependency and fundamental uncertainty are also discussed. Finally, a typology of dynamical systems is developed to clarify these relationships.

  13. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively .+-.60.degree. away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency.

  14. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  15. Floating Rydberg crystals formed by resonant excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Gärttner, M; Gasenzer, T; Evers, J

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of a cloud of ultra-cold Rydberg atoms is studied at off-resonant laser driving. We find that excitation crystals are formed dynamically as a consequence of interaction-induced resonant excitations. These crystals have lattice constants independent of the trap length, are spatially not localized with respect to the trap, and sensitively depend on the shape of the interaction potential. Compared to previously proposed crystals, this leads to qualitatively different results for the spatial excitation density, the Mandel $Q$ parameter, and the total number of excitations.

  16. Roper resonance and the baryon spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, J. A.; Afnan, I. R.

    1989-10-01

    We present a method for calculating the baryon spectrum in the cloudy-bag model in which the masses of the baryons are identical to the poles of the S matrix in the complex energy plane. In particular, we demonstrate that the width for the decay of these resonances by pion emission is dependent on whether the calculations are carried out on the real energy axis or at the resonance poles, the latter being consistent with the scattering experiments that determine these widths. Results for N*(1440) are presented.

  17. Roper resonance and the baryon spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsey, J.A.; Afnan, I.R. (School of Physical Sciences, The Flinders University of South Australia, Bedford Park, South Australia 5042, Australia (AU))

    1989-10-01

    We present a method for calculating the baryon spectrum in the cloudy-bag model in which the masses of the baryons are identical to the poles of the {ital S} matrix in the complex energy plane. In particular, we demonstrate that the width for the decay of these resonances by pion emission is dependent on whether the calculations are carried out on the real energy axis or at the resonance poles, the latter being consistent with the scattering experiments that determine these widths. Results for {ital N}{sup *}(1440) are presented.

  18. Resonance and aspect matched adaptive radar (RAMAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Terence William

    2012-01-01

    The book describes a new form of radar for which the target response is frequency, i.e., resonance-dependent. The book provides both prototype designs and empirical results collected from a variety of targets. The new form of radar, called RAMAR (Resonance and Aspect Matched Adaptive Radar) advances radar - mere ranging and detection - to the level of RF spectroscopy, and permits an advance of spectroscopic methods from optical, through infra-red and into the RF spectral range. The book will describe how a target's response can be a function of frequency components in the transmitted signal's

  19. Dark Field Imaging of Plasmonic Resonator Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinli, Atilla; Balci, Sinan; Karademir, Ertugrul; Kocabas, Coskun

    2012-02-01

    We present critical coupling of electromagnetic waves to plasmonic cavity arrays fabricated on Moir'e surfaces. The critical coupling condition depends on the superperiod of Moir'e surface, which also defines the coupling between the cavities. Complete transfer of the incident power can be achieved for traveling wave plasmonic resonators, which have relatively short superperiod. When the superperiod of the resonators increases, the coupled resonators become isolated standing wave resonators in which complete transfer of the incident power is not possible. Dark field plasmon microscopy imaging and polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection measurements reveal the critical coupling conditions of the cavities. We image the light scattered from SPPs in the plasmonic cavities excited by a tunable light source. Tuning the excitation wavelength, we measure the localization and dispersion of the plasmonic cavity mode. Dark field imaging has been achieved in the Kretschmann configuration using a supercontinuum white light laser equipped with an acoustooptic tunable filter. Polarization dependent spectroscopic reflection and dark field imaging measurements are correlated and found to be in agreement with FDTD simulations.

  20. Impact load mitigation in sandwich beams using local resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, B

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic response of sandwich beams with resonators embedded in the cores subjected to impact loads is studied. Using finite element models the effectiveness of various local resonator frequencies under a given impact load is compared to the behavior of an equivalent mass beam. It is shown that addition of appropriately chosen local resonators into the sandwich beam is an effective method of improving its flexural bending behavior under impact loads. The effect of a given local resonance frequency under different impact load durations is also studied. It is demonstrated that the choice of appropriate local resonance frequency depends on the impact duration. Further, by performing transverse impact experiments, the finite element models are verified and the advantage of using internal resonators under impact loading conditions is demonstrated.

  1. Hybrid fiber resonator employing LRSPP waveguide coupler for gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Guang; Fu, Xing-Chang; Zhang, Li-Jiang; Tang, Jie; Liu, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Tong

    2017-01-01

    Polarization error and temperature noise are two main limits to the performance of resonant fiber optic gyroscope (RFOG). To overcome these limits, we demonstrated a hybrid resonator consisting of a polymer-based long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) waveguide coupler and a silica fiber. Single-polarization property of LRSPP waveguide and the offsetting of the opposite thermo-optical characteristics between the polymer-based LRSPP waveguide and the silica fiber can effectively inhibit both the polarization error and the temperature noise of RFOG. The measured resonance spectrum of the hybrid resonator shows the absence of polarization noise. The temperature dependence of wavelength shift (TDWS) of resonator dropped to about 2 pm/°C, or even to 0 pm/°C with optimal structure, which dramatically improves the temperature stability of gyroscope system. In addition, the hybrid resonator also shows tremendous application potential in rate-grade and tactical-grade gyroscopes. PMID:28117412

  2. Resonant indirect exchange via spatially separated two-dimensional channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhansky, I. V., E-mail: rozhansky@gmail.com [Ioffe Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland); Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Krainov, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S. [Ioffe Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Aronzon, B. A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute,” 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Davydov, A. B. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kugel, K. I. [Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tripathi, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Lähderanta, E. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, FI-53851 Lappeenranta (Finland)

    2015-06-22

    We apply the resonant indirect exchange interaction theory to explain the ferromagnetic properties of the hybrid heterostructure consisting of a InGaAs-based quantum well (QW) sandwiched between GaAs barriers with spatially separated Mn δ-layer. The experimentally obtained dependence of the Curie temperature on the QW depth exhibits a peak related to the region of resonant indirect exchange. We suggest the theoretical explanation and a fit to this dependence as a result of the two contributions to ferromagnetism—the intralayer contribution and the resonant exchange contribution provided by the QW.

  3. Graphene-based waveguide resonators for submillimeter-wave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilić, Andjelija Ž.; Bukvić, Branko; Ilić, Milan M.; Budimir, Djuradj

    2016-08-01

    Utilization of graphene covered waveguide inserts to form tunable waveguide resonators is theoretically explained and rigorously investigated by means of full-wave numerical electromagnetic simulations. Instead of using graphene-based switching elements, the concept we propose incorporates graphene sheets as parts of a resonator. Electrostatic tuning of the graphene surface conductivity leads to changes in the electromagnetic field boundary conditions at the resonator edges and surfaces, thus producing an effect similar to varying the electrical length of a resonator. The presented outline of the theoretical background serves to give phenomenological insight into the resonator behavior, but it can also be used to develop customized software tools for design and optimization of graphene-based resonators and filters. Due to the linear dependence of the imaginary part of the graphene surface impedance on frequency, the proposed concept was expected to become effective for frequencies above 100 GHz, which is confirmed by the numerical simulations. A frequency range from 100 GHz up to 1100 GHz, where the rectangular waveguides are used, is considered. Simple, all-graphene-based resonators are analyzed first, to assess the achievable tunability and to check the performance throughout the considered frequency range. Graphene-metal combined waveguide resonators are proposed in order to preserve the excellent quality factors typical for the type of waveguide discontinuities used. Dependence of resonator properties on key design parameters is studied in detail. Dependence of resonator properties throughout the frequency range of interest is studied using eight different waveguide sections appropriate for different frequency intervals. Proposed resonators are aimed at applications in the submillimeter-wave spectral region, serving as the compact tunable components for the design of bandpass filters and other devices.

  4. Experimental realization of extraordinary acoustic transmission using Helmholtz resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Crow

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic transmission through a solid barrier with an embedded Helmholtz resonator (HR is demonstrated. The Helmholtz resonator consists of an embedded cavity and two necks that protrude, one on each side of the barrier. Extraordinary transmission occurs for a narrow spectral range encompassing the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. We show that an amplitude transmission of 97.5% is achieved through a resonator whose neck creates an open area of 6.25% of the total barrier area. In addition to the enhanced transmission, we show that there is a smooth, continuous phase transition in the transmitted sound as a function of frequency. The frequency dependent phase transition is used to experimentally realize slow wave propagation for a narrow-band Gaussian wave packet centered at the maximum transmission frequency. The use of parallel pairs of Helmholtz resonators tuned to different resonant frequencies is experimentally explored as a means of increasing the transmission bandwidth. These experiments show that because of the phase transition, there is always a frequency between the two Helmholtz resonant frequencies at which destructive interference occurs whether the resonances are close or far apart. Finally, we explain how the phase transition associated with Helmholtz-resonator-mediated extraordinary acoustic transmission can be exploited to produce diffractive acoustic components including sub-wavelength thickness acoustic lenses.

  5. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the calf station at 3.0 T: intraindividual comparison of non-enhanced ECG-gated flow-dependent MRA, continuous table movement MRA and time-resolved MRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haneder, Stefan; Attenberger, Ulrike I.; Riffel, Philipp; Henzler, Thomas; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Michaely, Henrik J. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim-University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    To compare 3D non-enhanced ECG-gated inflow-dependent MRA (NE-MRA) vs. continuous table movement (CTM) MR-angiography and time-resolved TWIST-MRA in the calf station at 3.0 T in a clinical patient collective. 36 patients (27 male/9 female, 66.1 {+-} 14.4 years) with PAOD (stage II-IV) underwent during a single MRI: NE-MRA, contrast-enhanced CTM-MRA and TWIST-MRA with a single dose of a gadolinium-based contrast agent. The image quality (IQ) and the degree of stenoses were rated on a four-point scale. Positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV), sensitivity (SS) and specificity (SP) for stenoses detection were calculated for NE-MRA vs. CTM-MRA and vs. TWIST-MRA. Values were obtained for overall graduation of wall changes and for severe stenoses (>70%). With NE-MRA 122/288 segments were not assessable. Compared with CTM-MRA and TWIST-MRA the IQ was significantly inferior (p < 0.0001 to p = 0.0426). CTM-MRA/TWIST-MRA detected stenoses in 44.9%/46.1% of the segments, NE-MRA in 53.5%. SS/NPV of the NE-MRA ranged from 97.8 to 100%. The SP and PPV ranged from 72.7 to 85.5% and 66.7 to 78.2%. Contrast-enhanced MRA techniques are superior to NE-MRA regarding IQ and correct identification of stenoses. If technically successful, NE-MRA is characterised by high NPV and overestimation of the degree of stenoses. (orig.)

  6. Resonance Van Hove Singularities in Wave Kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Yi-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Wave kinetic theory has been developed to describe the statistical dynamics of weakly nonlinear, dispersive waves. However, we show that systems which are generally dispersive can have resonant sets of wave modes with identical group velocities, leading to a local breakdown of dispersivity. This shows up as a geometric singularity of the resonant manifold and possibly as an infinite phase measure in the collision integral. Such singularities occur widely for classical wave systems, including acoustical waves, Rossby waves, helical waves in rotating fluids, light waves in nonlinear optics and also in quantum transport, e.g. kinetics of electron-hole excitations (matter waves) in graphene. These singularities are the exact analogue of the critical points found by Van Hove in 1953 for phonon dispersion relations in crystals. The importance of these singularities in wave kinetics depends on the dimension of phase space $D=(N-2)d$ ($d$ physical space dimension, $N$ the number of waves in resonance) and the degree ...

  7. Flavour Covariant Formalism for Resonant Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Dev, P S Bhupal; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    We present a fully flavour-covariant formalism for transport phenomena and apply it to study the flavour-dynamics of Resonant Leptogenesis (RL). We show that this formalism provides a complete and unified description of RL, consistently accounting for three distinct physical phenomena: (i) resonant mixing and (ii) coherent oscillations between different heavy-neutrino flavours, as well as (iii) quantum decoherence effects in the charged-lepton sector. We describe the necessary emergence of higher-rank tensors in flavour space, arising from the unitarity cuts of partial self-energies. Finally, we illustrate the importance of this formalism within a minimal Resonant $\\tau$-Genesis model by showing that, with the inclusion of all flavour effects in a consistent way, the final lepton asymmetry can be enhanced by up to an order of magnitude, when compared to previous partially flavour-dependent treatments.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  9. Not-so-resonant, resonant absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, F.

    1987-07-01

    When an intense electromagnetic wave is incident obliquely on a sharply bounded overdense plasma, strong energy absorption can be accounted for by the electrons that are dragged into the vacuum and sent back into the plasma with velocities v~=vosc. This mechanism is more efficient than usual resonant absorption for vosc/ω>L, with L being the density gradient length. In the very high-intensity CO2-laser-target interaction, this mechanism may account for most of the energy absorption.

  10. Hyperbolic Resonances of Metasurface Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Keene, David

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new class of optical resonator structures featuring one or two metasurface reflectors or metacavities and predict that such resonators support novel hyperbolic resonances. As an example of such resonances we introduce hyperbolic Tamm plasmons (HTPs) and hyperbolic Fabry-Perot resonances (HFPs). The hyperbolic optical modes feature low-loss incident power re-distribution over TM and TE polarization output channels, clover-leaf anisotropic dispersion, and other unique properties which are tunable and are useful for multiple applications.

  11. Active dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, R F

    1995-02-01

    Although dependency has long been associated with passivity, weakness, and submissiveness, a review of the empirical literature reveals that, in certain situations and settings, dependent persons actually exhibit a variety of active, assertive behaviors. In this article, I: a) trace the historical roots of the dependency-passivity link; b) review empirical studies from developmental, social, and clinical psychology which indicate that, in certain circumstances, dependency is associated with active, assertive behavior on the part of the dependent person; c) offer an alternative conceptual model of dependency that accounts for the entire range of behaviors-both passive and active-that are exhibited by the dependent person; and d) discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of this alternative conceptual model of dependency.

  12. Electrothermally Tunable Arch Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2017-03-18

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of electrothermally actuated microelectromechanical arch beams. The beams are made of silicon and are intentionally fabricated with some curvature as in-plane shallow arches. An electrothermal voltage is applied between the anchors of the beam generating a current that controls the axial stress caused by thermal expansion. When the electrothermal voltage increases, the compressive stress increases inside the arch beam. This leads to an increase in its curvature, thereby increasing its resonance frequencies. We show here that the first resonance frequency can increase monotonically up to twice its initial value. We show also that after some electrothermal voltage load, the third resonance frequency starts to become more sensitive to the axial thermal stress, while the first resonance frequency becomes less sensitive. These results can be used as guidelines to utilize arches as wide-range tunable resonators. Analytical results based on the nonlinear Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared with the experimental data and the results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results. [2016-0291

  13. Split-ball resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I; Fu, Yuan Hsing; Viswanathan, Vignesh; Rahmani, Mohsen; Valuckas, Vytautas; Kivshar, Yuri; Pickard, Daniel S; Lukiyanchuk, Boris

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new concept of split-ball resonator and demonstrate a strong omnidirectional magnetic dipole response for both gold and silver spherical plasmonic nanoparticles with nanometer-scale cuts. Tunability of the magnetic dipole resonance throughout the visible spectral range is demonstrated by a change of the depth and width of the nanoscale cut. We realize this novel concept experimentally by employing the laser-induced transfer method to produce near-perfect spheres and helium ion beam milling to make cuts with the nanometer resolution. Due to high quality of the spherical particle shape, governed by strong surface tension forces during the laser transfer process, and the clean, straight side walls of the cut made by helium ion milling, magnetic resonance is observed at 600 nm in gold and at 565 nm in silver nanoparticles. Structuring arbitrary features on the surface of ideal spherical resonators with nanoscale dimensions provides new ways of engineering hybrid resonant modes and ultra-high near-f...

  14. The Resonant Transneptunian Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Gladman, B; Petit, J-M; Kavelaars, J; Jones, R L; Parker, J Wm; Van Laerhoven, C; Nicholson, P; Rousselot, P; Bieryla, A; Ashby, M L N

    2012-01-01

    The transneptunian objects (TNOs) trapped in mean-motion resonances with Neptune were likely emplaced there during planet migration late in the giant-planet formation process. We perform detailed modelling of the resonant objects detected in the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS) in order to provide population estimates and, for some resonances, constrain the complex internal orbital element distribution. Detection biases play a critical role because phase relationships with Neptune make object discovery more likely at certain longitudes. This paper discusses the 3:2, 5:2, 2:1, 3:1, 5:1, 4:3, 5:3, 7:3, 5:4, and 7:4 mean-motion resonances, all of which had CFEPS detections, along with our upper limit on 1:1 Neptune Trojans (which is consistent with their small population estimated elsewhere). For the plutinos (TNOs in the 3:2 resonance) we refine the orbital element distribution given in Kavelaars et al. (2009) and show that steep H-magnitude distributions (N(H) proportional to 10aH, with a=0.8-0.9) a...

  15. Overview of baryon resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie E.J.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The quest to understand the physics of any system cannot be said to be complete as long as one cannot predict and fully understand its resonance spectrum. Despite this, due to the experimental challenge of the required double polarization measurements and the difficulty in achieving unambiguous, model-independent extraction and interpretation of the nucleon resonance spectrum of many broad and overlapping resonances, understanding of the structure and dynamics of the nucleon has suffered. The recent improvement in statistical quality and kinematic range of the data made available by such full-solid-angle systems as the CB and TAPS constellation at MAMI, coupled with the high flux polarized photon beam provided by the Glasgow Photon Tagger, and the excellent properties of the Mainz Frozen Spin Target, when paired with new developments in Partial Wave Analysis (PWA methodology make this a very exciting and fruitful time in nucleon resonance studies. Here the recent influx of data and PWA developments are summarized, and the requirements for a complete, unambiguous PWA solution over the first and second resonance region are briefly reviewed.

  16. Polarization Dependent Coupling of Whispering Gallery Modes in Microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, G.; Wrbanek, S.; Floyd, B.; Crotty, M.

    2010-01-01

    Two sets of resonances in glass microspheres attached to a standard communication-grade single-mode optical fiber have been observed. It has been found that the strength of the resonances depends strongly on the polarization of the coupled light. Furthermore, the position of the resonances in the wavelength domain depends on the polarization of light in the optical fiber with maximum magnitudes shifted by approximately 45 .

  17. The new IBA self-shielded dynamitron accelerator for industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, R. A.; DeNeuter, S.; Lisanti, T. F.; Cleland, M. R.

    2004-09-01

    Radiation Dynamics Inc. (RDI), currently a member of the IBA Group (Ion Beam Applications based Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium), has been supplying accelerators since its founding in 1958. These systems supplied for both industrial processing and research application for electrons and ions have proven to be reliable and robust. Today's demands in the industrial sector have driven the design and development of a new version of our Dynamitron ®. This new system, envisioned to operate at electron energies up to 1.5 MeV, in many cases can be supplied with integral shielding providing a small footprint requirement for placement in a facility. In the majority of these lower energy applications this allows the appropriate material handling system to be installed inside the steel radiation enclosure. Designed to deliver beam power outputs as high as 100 kW, this new system is capable of servicing the high throughput demands of today's manufacturing lines. Still retaining the positive aspects of the industrially proven Dynamitron system, this compact system can be tailored to meet a variety of in-line or off-line processing applications.

  18. Self shielding of surfaces irradiated by intense energy fluxes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varghese, P.L.; Howell, J.R.; Propp, A.

    1991-08-01

    This dissertation will outline a direct methods of temperature, density, composition, and velocity measurement which should be widely applicable to railgun systems. The measurements demonstrated here should prove usefull basis for further studies of plasma/target interaction.

  19. Self-shielding printed circuit boards for high frequency amplifiers and transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, D.

    1969-01-01

    Printed circuit boards retaining as much copper as possible provide electromagnetic shielding between stages of the high frequency amplifiers and transmitters. Oscillation is prevented, spurious output signals are reduced, and multiple stages are kept isolated from each other, both thermally and electrically.

  20. Spin-orbit ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    In conventional magnetic resonance techniques the magnitude and direction of the oscillatory magnetic field are (at least approximately) known. This oscillatory field is used to probe the properties of a spin ensemble. Here, I will describe experiments that do the inverse. I will discuss how we use a magnetic resonance technique to map out the current-induced effective magnetic fields in the ferromagnetic semiconductors (Ga,Mn)As and (Ga,Mn)(As,P). These current-induced fields have their origin in the spin-orbit interaction. Effective magnetic fields are observed with symmetries which resemble the Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit interactions and which depend on the diagonal and off-diagonal strain respectively. Ferromagnetic semiconductor materials of different strains, annealing conditions and concentrations are studied and the results compared with theoretical calculations. Our original study measured the rectification voltage coming from the product of the oscillatory magnetoresistance, during magnetisation precession, and the alternating current. More recently we have developed an impedance matching technique which enables us to extract microwave voltages from these high resistance (10 k Ω) samples. In this way we measure the microwave voltage coming from the product of the oscillating magneto-resistance and a direct current. The direct current is observed to affect the magnetisation precession, indicating that anti-damping as well as field-like torques can originate from the spin-orbit interaction.

  1. Single-Molecule Stochastic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hayashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance (SR is a well-known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic (random or probabilistic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively transitions from folded to unfolded configurations under the action of an oscillating mechanical force applied with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigate the folding and unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measure several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that a good quantifier of the SR is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance-matching condition. Finally, we carry out experiments on short hairpins that show how SR might be useful for enhancing the detection of conformational molecular transitions of low SNR.

  2. Single-molecule stochastic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Manosas, M; Huguet, J M; Ritort, F; 10.1103/PhysRevX.2.031012

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a well known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively folding/unfolding transitions under the action of an applied oscillating mechanical force with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigated the folding/unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measured several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins is a good quantifier of the SR. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance match...

  3. Electrodynamic study of YIG filters and resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupka, Jerzy; Salski, Bartlomiej; Kopyt, Pawel; Gwarek, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Numerical solutions of coupled Maxwell and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations for a magnetized yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere acting as a one-stage filter are presented. The filter is analysed using finite-difference time-domain technique. Contrary to the state of the art, the study shows that the maximum electromagnetic power transmission through the YIG filter occurs at the frequency of the magnetic plasmon resonance with the effective permeability of the gyromagnetic medium μr ≈ −2, and not at a ferromagnetic resonance frequency. Such a new understanding of the YIG filter operation, makes it one of the most commonly used single-negative plasmonic metamaterials. The frequency of maximum transmission is also found to weakly depend on the size of the YIG sphere. An analytic electromagnetic analysis of resonances in a YIG sphere is performed for circularly polarized electromagnetic fields. The YIG sphere is situated in a free space and in a large spherical cavity. The study demonstrates that both volume resonances and magnetic plasmon resonances can be solutions of the same transcendental equations. PMID:27698467

  4. Resonant response of electromagnetic scattering from ellipsoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriloaia, Mihai-Bogdan; Vizireanu, Constantin-Radu; Neamtu, Catalin; Preda, Radu; Achimescu, Emanuel; Halunga, Simona

    2015-02-01

    Modern radars must provide in a very short time: existence, mobility and shape of objects evolving in airspace. Evaluation of the object shapes through active research by using synthetic aperture radar is limited in time, resolution, and cost. A new way of processing non-stationary signals is presented in this article. Signals are obtained from the reflection of the electromagnetic field by objects with complex shape when they are irradiated with linear frequency modulated signals. The amplitude of reflected signal is variable on the radio-impulse duration depending on object shape, causing a certain electromagnetic signature. This phenomenon is caused by specific electromagnetic resonance. The reflected signal has maximum amplitude when the frequency of the incident wave is the same with the resonant frequency of the investigated object. The structure of an radar target can be decomposed into simple geometric shapes such as spheres, ellipsoids, prisms, and so on. Using resonant effect that ensures pattern recognition is exemplified by an object with an aerodynamic profile accepted in many component elements of the aircraft, namely - an ellipsoid. It is a geometric shape used extensively in aviation, because it has a very low aerodynamic resistance. The resonant response of ellipsoid is evaluated in a decade frequency band, but the pattern recognition of this shape is enough for an octave band. The resonant response is assessed for cross polarization of incident electromagnetic field, as well. As a result, the radio-impulse shape can be used in a data base for pattern recognition.

  5. Phase modulation spectroscopy of space-charge wave resonances in Bi12SiO20

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasnetsov, M.; Buchhave, Preben; Lyuksyutov, S.

    1997-01-01

    A new experimental method for the study of resonance effects and space-charge wave excitation in photorefractive Bi12SiO20 crystals by using a combination of frequency detuning and phase modulation technique has been developed. The accuracy of the method allows a detection of resonance peaks...... and revealed its resonance dependence. A minimum of electric current through the sample corresponds to the main resonance detected by phase modulation technique....

  6. Superdimensional Metamaterial Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Greenleaf, Allan; Kurylev, Yaroslav; Lassas, Matti; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    We propose a fundamentally new method for the design of metamaterial arrays, valid for any waves modeled by the Helmholtz equation, including scalar optics and acoustics. The design and analysis of these devices is based on eigenvalue and eigenfunction asymptotics of solutions to Schr\\"odinger wave equations with harmonic and degenerate potentials. These resonators behave superdimensionally, with a higher local density of eigenvalues and greater concentration of waves than expected from the physical dimension, e.g., planar resonators function as 3- or higher-dimensional media, and bulk material as effectively of dimension 4 or higher. Applications include antennas with a high density of resonant frequencies and giant focussing, and are potentially broadband.

  7. Quartz resonator processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a single chamber ultra-high vacuum processing system for the oduction of hermetically sealed quartz resonators wherein electrode metallization and sealing are carried out along with cleaning and bake-out without any air exposure between the processing steps. The system includes a common vacuum chamber in which is located a rotatable wheel-like member which is adapted to move a plurality of individual component sets of a flat pack resonator unit past discretely located processing stations in said chamber whereupon electrode deposition takes place followed by the placement of ceramic covers over a frame containing a resonator element and then to a sealing stage where a pair of hydraulic rams including heating elements effect a metallized bonding of the covers to the frame.

  8. Resonance vector mode locking

    CERN Document Server

    Kolpakov, Stanislav A; Loika, Yuri; Tarasov, Nikita; Kalashnikov, Vladimir; Agrawal, Govind P

    2015-01-01

    A mode locked fibre laser as a source of ultra-stable pulse train has revolutionised a wide range of fundamental and applied research areas by offering high peak powers, high repetition rates, femtosecond range pulse widths and a narrow linewidth. However, further progress in linewidth narrowing seems to be limited by the complexity of the carrier-envelope phase control. Here for the first time we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a new mechanism of resonance vector self-mode locking where tuning in-cavity birefringence leads to excitation of the longitudinal modes sidebands accompanied by the resonance phase locking of sidebands with the adjacent longitudinal modes. An additional resonance with acoustic phonons provides the repetition rate tunability and linewidth narrowing down to Hz range that drastically reduces the complexity of the carrier-envelope phase control and so will open the way to advance lasers in the context of applications in metrology, spectroscopy, microwave photonics, astronomy...

  9. Electrothermally Tunable Bridge Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2016-12-05

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of an in-plane clamped-clamped microbeam, bridge, and resonator compressed by a force due to electrothermal actuation. We demonstrate that a single resonator can be operated at a wide range of frequencies. The microbeam is actuated electrothermally, by passing a DC current through it. We show that when increasing the electrothermal voltage, the compressive stress inside the microbeam increases, which leads eventually to its buckling. Before buckling, the fundamental frequency decreases until it drops to very low values, almost to zero. After buckling, the fundamental frequency increases, which is shown to be as high as twice the original resonance frequency. Analytical results based on the Galerkin discretization of the Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared to the experimental data and to simulation results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results.

  10. Tracking Neptune's Footprints with High-Perihelion Resonant TNOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaib, Nathan A.; Sheppard, Scott S.

    2016-10-01

    Recent surveys (Sheppard et al. 2016) have significantly increased the known number of high-perihelion trans-Neptunian objects located near mean motion resonances with Neptune. Many of these objects likely had their pericenters raised during Kozai cycling while they were trapped in resonance with Neptune. We numerically model the production of these objects under a variety of Neptune migration scenarios. We find that the modern semimajor axis distribution of this population is dependent on Neptune's early migration. If the total migration time is ~300 Myrs or longer, a significant fraction of high-perihelion objects will be located slightly closer to the Sun than the modern resonance locations. Meanwhile, if Neptune reaches its modern location within ~100 Myrs or less, nearly all high-perihelion objects will still be located at the resonance locations. This effect is strongest for resonances between the 7:3 and 4:1 MMR locations, which are located between ~53 and ~76 AU. For resonances further than the 4:1 (~76 AU), the dependence on Neptune's migration is not present because the timescales required for resonance capture and perihelion-lifting are very long. This distant resonant population represents a more recently generated set of orbits under any plausible migration scenario.

  11. Higgs-photon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A. [Fermilab; Fox, Patrick J. [Fermilab; Kearney, John [Fermilab

    2017-05-23

    We study models that produce a Higgs boson plus photon ($h^0 \\gamma$) resonance at the LHC. When the resonance is a $Z'$ boson, decays to $h^0 \\gamma$ occur at one loop. If the $Z'$ boson couples at tree-level to quarks, then the $h^0 \\gamma$ branching fraction is typically of order $10^{-5}$ or smaller. Nevertheless, there are models that would allow the observation of $Z' \\to h^0 \\gamma$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV with a cross section times branching fraction larger than 1 fb for a $Z'$ mass in the 200--450 GeV range, and larger than 0.1 fb for a mass up to 800 GeV. The 1-loop decay of the $Z'$ into lepton pairs competes with $h^0 \\gamma$, even if the $Z'$ couplings to leptons vanish at tree level. We also present a model in which a $Z'$ boson decays into a Higgs boson and a pair of collimated photons, mimicking an $h^0 \\gamma$ resonance. In this model, the $h^0 \\gamma$ resonance search would be the discovery mode for a $Z'$ as heavy as 2 TeV. When the resonance is a scalar, although decay to $h^0 \\gamma$ is forbidden by angular momentum conservation, the $h^0$ plus collimated photons channel is allowed. We comment on prospects of observing an $h^0 \\gamma$ resonance through different Higgs decays, on constraints from related searches, and on models where $h^0$ is replaced by a nonstandard Higgs boson.

  12. Reconfigurable optical routers based on Coupled Resonator Induced Transparency resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, M; Bettotti, P; Fedeli, J M; Pavesi, L

    2012-10-08

    The interferometric coupling of pairs of resonators in a resonator sequence generates coupled ring induced transparency (CRIT) resonances. These have quality factors an order of magnitude greater than those of single resonators. We show that it is possible to engineer CRIT resonances in tapered SCISSOR (Side Coupled Integrated Space Sequence of Resonator) to realize fast and efficient reconfigurable optical switches and routers handling several channels while keeping single channel addressing capabilities. Tapered SCISSORs are fabricated in silicon-on-insulator technology. Furthermore, tapered SCISSORs show multiple-channel switching behavior that can be exploited in DWDM applications.

  13. Resonance contributions to HBT correlation radii

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Heinz, Ulrich

    1996-01-01

    We study the effect of resonance decays on intensity interferometry for heavy ion collisions. Collective expansion of the source leads to a dependence of the two-particle correlation function on the pair momentum K. This opens the possibility to reconstruct the dynamics of the source from the K-dependence of the measured ``HBT radii''. Here we address the question to what extent resonance decays can fake such a flow signal. Within a simple parametrization for the emission function we present a comprehensive analysis of the interplay of flow and resonance decays on the one- and two-particle spectra. We discuss in detail the non-Gaussian features of the correlation function introduced by long-lived resonances and the resulting problems in extracting meaningful HBT radii. We propose to define them in terms of the second order q-moments of the correlator C(q,K). We show that this yields a more reliable characterisation of the correlator in terms of its width and the correlation strength $\\lambda$ than other commo...

  14. Properties of infrared doped semiconductor Mie resonators (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewi, Tomer; Iyer, Prasad P.; Butakov, Nikita A.; Schuller, Jon A.

    2015-09-01

    Dielectric optical antenna resonators have recently emerged as a viable alternative to plasmonic resonators for metamaterials and nanophotonic devices, due to their ability to support multipolar Mie resonances with low losses. In this work, we experimentally investigate the mid-infrared Mie resonances in Si and Ge subwavelength spherical particles. In particular, we leverage the electronic and optical properties of these semiconductors in the mid-infrared range to design and tune Mie resonators through free-carrier refraction. Si and Ge semiconductor spheres of varying sizes of 0.5-4 μm were fabricated using femtosecond laser ablation. Using single particle infrared spectroscopy, we first demonstrate size-dependent Si and Ge Mie resonances spanning the entire mid-infrared (2-16 μm) spectral range. Subsequently we show that the Mie resonances can be tuned by varying material properties rather than size or geometry. We experimentally demonstrate doping-dependent resonance frequency shifts that follow simple Drude models of free-carrier refraction. We show that Ge particles exhibit a stronger doping dependence than Si due to the smaller effective mass of the free carriers. Using the unique size and doping dispersion of the electric and magnetic dipole modes, we identify and demonstrate a size regime where these modes are spectrally overlapping. We also demonstrate the emergence of plasmonic resonances for high doping levels and long wavelengths. These findings demonstrate the potential for tuning infrared semiconductor Mie resonances by optically or electrically modulating charge carrier densities, thus providing an excellent platform for tunable electromagnetic metamaterials.

  15. Enhanced responsivity resonant RF photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R; Dev, S; Zhong, Y; Lu, R; Streyer, W; Allen, J W; Allen, M S; Wenner, B R; Gong, S; Wasserman, D

    2016-11-14

    The responsivity of room-temperature, semiconductor-based photodetectors consisting of resonant RF circuits coupled to microstrip buslines is investigated. The dependence of the photodetector response on the semiconductor material and RF circuit geometry is presented, as is the detector response as a function of the spatial position of the incident light. We demonstrate significant improvement in detector response by choice of photoconductive material, and for a given material, by positioning our optical signal to overlap with positions of RF field enhancement. Design of RF circuits with strong field enhancement are demonstrated to further improve detector response. The improved detector response demonstrated offers opportunities for applications in RF photonics, materials metrology, or single read-out multiplexed detector arrays.

  16. Pygmy resonances and nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Tsoneva, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    A microscopic theoretical approach based on a self-consistent density functional theory for the nuclear ground state and QRPA formalism extended with multi-phonon degrees of freedom for the nuclear excited states is implemented in investigations of new low-energy modes called pygmy resonances. Advantage of the method is the unified description of low-energy multiphonon excitations, pygmy resonances and core polarization effects. This is found of crucial importance for the understanding of the fine structure of nuclear response functions at low energies. Aspects of the precise knowledge of nuclear response functions around the neutron threshold are discussed in a connection to nucleosynthesis.

  17. Resonance classes of measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Torres De Squire

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend F. Holland's definition of the space of resonant classes of functions, on the real line, to the space R(Φpq (1≦p, q≦∞ of resonant classes of measures, on locally compact abelian groups. We characterize this space in terms of transformable measures and establish a realatlonship between R(Φpq and the set of positive definite functions for amalgam spaces. As a consequence we answer the conjecture posed by L. Argabright and J. Gil de Lamadrid in their work on Fourier analysis of unbounded measures.

  18. Acoustic Fano resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state with a continuum one. During the last decade this concept has been applied in plasmonics where the interference between a narrowband polariton and a broader one has been used to generate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) (M. Rahmani, et al., Laser Photon. Rev., 7, 329-349, 2013).

  19. Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Chang Hwa Lee,

    2010-11-01

    Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance vibration is made from an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated vertically aligned nanorod array. Only this structure works as a radio with demodulator without any electrical circuit using field emission phenomenon. A top-down fabrication method of an ITO coated nanorod array is proposed using a modified UV lithography. The received radio frequency and the resonance frequency of nanoantenna can be controlled by the fabrication condition through the height of a nanorod array. The modulated signals are received successfully with the transmission carrier wave frequency (248MHz) and the proposed nanoantenna is expected to be used in communication system for ultra small scale sensor. ©2010 IEEE.

  20. Hadronic Resonances from STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Masayuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of resonance particle productions (ρ0, ω, K*, ϕ, Σ*, and Λ* measured by the STAR collaboration at RHIC from various colliding systems and energies are presented. Measured mass, width, 〈pT〉, and yield of those resonances are reviewed. No significant mass shifts or width broadening beyond the experiment uncertainties are observed. New measurements of ϕ and ω from leptonic decay channels are presented. The yields from leptonic decay channels are compared with the measurements from hadronic decay channels and the two results are consistent with each other.

  1. Widely tunable infrared semiconductor Mie resonators (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewi, Tomer; Iyer, Prasad P.; Butakov, Nikita A.; Mikhailovsky, Alexander A.; Schuller, Jon A.

    2016-09-01

    Optical antenna metasurfaces have attracted substantial attention in recent years, as they may enable new classes of planar optical elements. However, actively tuning nanoantenna resonances, whether dielectric or plasmonic, remains an unresolved challenge. In this work, we investigate tuning mid-infrared (MIR) Mie resonances in semiconductor subwavelength particles by directly modulating the permittivity with free charge carriers. Using femtosecond laser ablation, we fabricate spherical silicon and germanium particles of varying sizes and doping concentrations. Single-particle infrared spectra reveal electric and magnetic dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole resonances. We first demonstrate size-dependent Si and Ge Mie resonances spanning the entire mid-infrared (2-16 μm) spectral range. We subsequently show doping-dependent resonance frequency shifts that follow simple Drude models. Taking advantage of the large doping dependence of Si and Ge MIR permittivities, we demonstrate a huge tunability of Mie resonance wavelengths (up to 9 μm) over a broad 2-16 μm MIR range. This tuning range corresponds to changes of permittivity as large as 30 within a single material system, culminating in the emergence of plasmonic modes at high carrier densities and long wavelengths. We also demonstrate dynamic tuning of intrinsic semiconductor antennas using thermo-optic effects. These findings demonstrate the potential for actively tuning infrared Mie resonances, thus providing an excellent platform for tunable metamaterials.

  2. Internal Resonance in a Vibrating Beam: A Zoo of Nonlinear Resonance Peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangussi, Franco; Zanette, Damián H

    2016-01-01

    In oscillating mechanical systems, nonlinearity is responsible for the departure from proportionality between the forces that sustain their motion and the resulting vibration amplitude. Such effect may have both beneficial and harmful effects in a broad class of technological applications, ranging from microelectromechanical devices to edifice structures. The dependence of the oscillation frequency on the amplitude, in particular, jeopardizes the use of nonlinear oscillators in the design of time-keeping electronic components. Nonlinearity, however, can itself counteract this adverse response by triggering a resonant interaction between different oscillation modes, which transfers the excess of energy in the main oscillation to higher harmonics, and thus stabilizes its frequency. In this paper, we examine a model for internal resonance in a vibrating elastic beam clamped at its two ends. In this case, nonlinearity occurs in the form of a restoring force proportional to the cube of the oscillation amplitude, which induces resonance between modes whose frequencies are in a ratio close to 1:3. The model is based on a representation of the resonant modes as two Duffing oscillators, coupled through cubic interactions. Our focus is put on illustrating the diversity of behavior that internal resonance brings about in the dynamical response of the system, depending on the detailed form of the coupling forces. The mathematical treatment of the model is developed at several approximation levels. A qualitative comparison of our results with previous experiments and numerical calculations on elastic beams is outlined.

  3. Internal Resonance in a Vibrating Beam: A Zoo of Nonlinear Resonance Peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangussi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    In oscillating mechanical systems, nonlinearity is responsible for the departure from proportionality between the forces that sustain their motion and the resulting vibration amplitude. Such effect may have both beneficial and harmful effects in a broad class of technological applications, ranging from microelectromechanical devices to edifice structures. The dependence of the oscillation frequency on the amplitude, in particular, jeopardizes the use of nonlinear oscillators in the design of time-keeping electronic components. Nonlinearity, however, can itself counteract this adverse response by triggering a resonant interaction between different oscillation modes, which transfers the excess of energy in the main oscillation to higher harmonics, and thus stabilizes its frequency. In this paper, we examine a model for internal resonance in a vibrating elastic beam clamped at its two ends. In this case, nonlinearity occurs in the form of a restoring force proportional to the cube of the oscillation amplitude, which induces resonance between modes whose frequencies are in a ratio close to 1:3. The model is based on a representation of the resonant modes as two Duffing oscillators, coupled through cubic interactions. Our focus is put on illustrating the diversity of behavior that internal resonance brings about in the dynamical response of the system, depending on the detailed form of the coupling forces. The mathematical treatment of the model is developed at several approximation levels. A qualitative comparison of our results with previous experiments and numerical calculations on elastic beams is outlined. PMID:27648829

  4. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  5. Dependent Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasiunas, Vaidas; Mezini, Mira; Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Virtual classes allow nested classes to be refined in subclasses. In this way nested classes can be seen as dependent abstractions of the objects of the enclosing classes. Expressing dependency via nesting, however, has two limitations: Abstractions that depend on more than one object cannot...... be modeled and a class must know all classes that depend on its objects. This paper presents dependent classes, a generalization of virtual classes that expresses similar semantics by parameterization rather than by nesting. This increases expressivity of class variations as well as the flexibility...... of their modularization. Besides, dependent classes complement multi-methods in scenarios where multi-dispatched abstractions rather than multi-dispatched method are needed. They can also be used to express more precise signatures of multi-methods and even extend their dispatch semantics. We present a formal semantics...

  6. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  8. Single spin magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  10. Wireless ferroelectric resonating sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viikari, Ville; Seppa, Heikki; Mattila, Tomi; Alastalo, Ari

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a passive wireless resonating sensor that is based on a ferroelectric varactor. The sensor replies with its data at an intermodulation frequency when a reader device illuminates it at 2 closely located frequencies. The paper derives a theoretical equation for the response of such a sensor, verifies the theory by simulations, and demonstrates a temperature sensor based on a ferroelectric varactor.

  11. Folded waveguide resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A waveguide resonator comprising a number of side walls defining a cavity enclosed by said sidewalls defining the cavity; and two or more conductive plates extending into the cavity, each conductive plate having a first side and a second side opposite the first side, and wherein the conductive...

  12. Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goennenwein, S.T.B.; Schink, S.W.; Brandlmaier, A.; Boger, A.; Opel, M.; Gross, R.; Keizer, R.S.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Gupta, A.; Huebl, H.; Bihler, C.; Brandt, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    We study the magnetoresistance properties of thin ferromagnetic CrO2 and Fe3O4 films under microwave irradiation. Both the sheet resistance ρ and the Hall voltage VHall characteristically change when a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) occurs in the film. The electrically detected ferromagnetic resonanc

  13. Resonant filtered fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Laurila, Marko; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent result on utilizing resonant/bandgap fiber designs to achieve high performance ytterbium doped fiber amplifers for achieving diffraction limited beam quality in large mode area fibers, robust bending performance and gain shaping for long wavelength operation of...

  14. Simulation of quartz resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, M.; Radius, R.; Mohr, R.

    Quartz resonators are suitable as novel sensor elements in the field of profilometry and three dimensional measurement techniques. This application requires a tailoring of the oscillator circuit which is performed by a network analysis program. The equivalent network parameters are computed by a finite element analysis. The mechanical loading of the quartz is modeled by a viscous damping approach.

  15. Resonant scanning mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, John; Newman, Mike; Gutierrez, Homero; Hoffman, Charlie; Quakenbush, Tim; Waldeck, Dan; Leone, Christopher; Ostaszewski, Miro

    2014-10-01

    Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. developed a Resonant Scanning Mechanism (RSM) capable of combining a 250- Hz resonant scan about one axis with a two-hertz triangular scan about the orthogonal axis. The RSM enables a rapid, high-density scan over a significant field of regard (FOR) while minimizing size, weight, and power requirements. The azimuth scan axis is bearing mounted allowing for 30° of mechanical travel, while the resonant elevation axis is flexure and spring mounted with five degrees of mechanical travel. Pointing-knowledge error during quiescent static pointing at room temperature across the full range is better than 100 μrad RMS per axis. The compact design of the RSM, roughly the size of a soda can, makes it an ideal mechanism for use on low-altitude aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. Unique aspects of the opto-mechanical design include i) resonant springs which allow for a high-frequency scan axis with low power consumption; and ii) an independent lower-frequency scan axis allowing for a wide FOR. The pointing control system operates each axis independently and employs i) a position loop for the azimuth axis; and ii) a unique combination of parallel frequency and amplitude control loops for the elevation axis. All control and pointing algorithms are hosted on a 200-MHz microcontroller with 516 KB of RAM on a compact 3"×4" digital controller, also of Ball design.

  16. Resonant MEMS tunable VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Chung, Il-Sug; Semenova, Elizaveta;

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how resonant excitation of a microelectro-mechanical system can be used to increase the tuning range of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser two-fold by enabling both blue- and red-shifting of the wavelength. In this way a short-cavity design enabling wide tuning range can be r...

  17. Resonance eigenfunctions in chaotic scattering systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Martin Sieber

    2009-09-01

    We study the semiclassical structure of resonance eigenstates of open chaotic systems. We obtain semiclassical estimates for the weight of these states on different regions in phase space. These results imply that the long-lived right (left) eigenstates of the non-unitary propagator are concentrated in the semiclassical limit ħ → 0 on the backward (forward) trapped set of the classical dynamics. On this support the eigenstates display a self-similar behaviour which depends on the limiting decay rate.

  18. Resonant Optical Absorption in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Li-Yuan; CAO Jun-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ We have calculated the intraband photon absorption coefficients of hot two-dimensional electrons interacting with polar-optical phonon modes in quantum wells. The dependence of the photon absorption coefficients on the photon wavelength λ is obtained both by using the quantum mechanical theory and by the balance-equation theory. It is found that the photon absorption spectrum displays a local resonant maximum, corresponding to LO energy, and the absorption peak vanishes with increasing the electronic temperature.

  19. Optical microfiber coil resonator refractometric sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Horak, Peter; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2007-06-11

    We present a novel refractometric sensor based on a coated all-coupling optical-fiber-nanowire microcoil resonator which is robust, compact, and comprises an intrinsic fluidic channel. We calculate the device sensitivity and find its dependence on the nanowire diameter and coating thickness. A sensitivity as high as 700 nm/RIU and a refractive index resolution as low as 10(-10) are predicted.

  20. Dependency Parsing

    CERN Document Server

    Kubler, Sandra; Nivre, Joakim

    2009-01-01

    Dependency-based methods for syntactic parsing have become increasingly popular in natural language processing in recent years. This book gives a thorough introduction to the methods that are most widely used today. After an introduction to dependency grammar and dependency parsing, followed by a formal characterization of the dependency parsing problem, the book surveys the three major classes of parsing models that are in current use: transition-based, graph-based, and grammar-based models. It continues with a chapter on evaluation and one on the comparison of different methods, and it close

  1. Isotopic Resonance Hypothesis: Experimental Verification by Escherichia coli Growth Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Xueshu

    2014-01-01

    Isotopic composition of reactants affects the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. As a rule, enrichment of heavy stable isotopes leads to slower reactions. But the recent isotopic resonance hypothesis suggests that the dependence of the reaction rate upon the enrichment degree is not monotonous; instead, at some resonance isotopic compositions, the kinetics increases, while at off resonance compositions the same reactions progress slower. To test the predictions of this hypothesis for the elements C, H, N and O, we designed a precise (standard error plus or minus 0.05%) experiment to measure the bacterial growth parameters in minimal media with varying isotopic compositions. A number of predicted resonance conditions were tested, which kinetic enhancements as strong as plus 3% discovered at these conditions. The combined evidence extremely strongly supports the existence of isotopic resonances. This phenomenon has numerous implications for the origin of life and astrobiology, and possible application...

  2. Bifurcation and resonance in a fractional Mathieu-Duffing oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J. H.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.; Liu, H. G.

    2015-11-01

    The bifurcation and resonance phenomena are investigated in a fractional Mathieu-Duffing oscillator which contains a fast parametric excitation and a slow external excitation. We extend the method of direct partition of motions to evaluate the response for the parametrically excited system. Besides, we propose a numerical method to simulate different types of local bifurcation of the equilibria. For the nonlinear dynamical behaviors of the considered system, the linear stiffness coefficient is a key factor which influences the resonance phenomenon directly. Moreover, the fractional-order damping brings some new results that are different from the corresponding results in the ordinary Mathieu-Duffing oscillator. Especially, the resonance pattern, the resonance frequency and the resonance magnitude depend on the value of the fractional-order closely.

  3. Electromagnetic coupling in a planar periodic configuration of resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jouvaud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We are studying arrays composed of a periodic arrangement of sub-wavelength resonators. An analytical model is developed inside an array of 4 by 4 multi-gap split ring resonators. To describe the frequency splitting of the single fundamental resonance, we propose a simple model based on the approximation of each resonator as an electrical dipole and a magnetic dipole that are driven by the same complex amplitude. We show that the relative strength of the two dipoles strongly depends on cell symmetry. With this approximation, the dispersion relation can be obtained for an infinite size array. A simple matrix diagonalization provides a powerful way to deduce the resonant frequencies for finite size array. These results are comforted by numerical simulations. Finally, an experimental demonstration of a tunable antenna based on this study is presented.

  4. Dynamical analysis of the buildup process near resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Villavicencio, J; Villavicencio, Jorge; Romo, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    The time evolution of the buildup process inside a double-barrier system for off-resonance incidence energies is studied by considering the analytic solution of the time dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with cutoff plane wave initial conditions. We show that the buildup process exhibits invariances under arbitrary changes on the system parameters, which can be successfully described by a simple and easy-to-use one-level formula. We find that the buildup of the off-resonant probability density is characterized by an oscillatory pattern modulated by the resonant case which governs the duration of the transient regime. This is evidence that off-resonant and resonant tunneling are two correlated processes, whose transient regime is characterized by the same transient time constant of two lifetimes.

  5. TEMPERATURE CONTROL CIRCUIT FOR SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVE (SAW RESONATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Mohamad Ashari

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW resonators are key components in oscillators, frequency synthesizers and transceivers. One of the drawbacks of SAW resonators are that its piezoelectric substrates are highly sensitive to ambient temperature resulting in performance degradation. This work propose a simple circuit design which stabalizes the temperature of the SAW resonator, making it independet of temperature change. This circuit is based on the oven control method which elevates the temperature of the resonator to a high temperature, making it tolerant to minor changes in ambient temperature.This circuit consist of a temperature sensor, heaters and a comparator which turn the heater on or off depending on the ambient temperature. Several SAW resonator were tested using this circuit. Experimental results indicate the temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF decreases from maximum of 130.44/°C to a minimum of -1.11/°C. 

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to remain perfectly still and follow breath-holding instructions while the images are being recorded. If you ... Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Videos related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Sponsored ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  13. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  14. Resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy of picogram samples with microstring resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Shoko; Schmid, Silvan; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report a demonstration of resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy using microstrings in mid-infrared region providing rapid identification of picogram samples. In our microelectromechanical resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy system, samples are deposited directly on microstrings using...... an in-situ sampling method and the resonance frequency of the string is measured optically. Resonance frequency shifts, proportional to the absorbed heat, are recorded in real time as monochromatic infrared light is being scanned over the mid-infrared range. These resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  20. Temporal behavior of laser induced elastic plate resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Jérôme; Prada, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the dependence on Poisson's ratio of local plate resonances in low attenuating materials. In our experiments, these resonances are generated by a pulse laser source and detected with a heterodyne interferometer measuring surface displacement normal to the plate. The laser impact induces a set of resonances that are dominated by Zero Group Velocity (ZGV) Lamb modes. For some Poisson's ratio, thickness-shear resonances are also detected. These experiments confirm that the temporal decay of ZGV modes follows a $t^{-0.5}$ law and show that the temporal decay of the thickness resonances is much faster. Similar decays are obtained by numerical simulations achieved with a finite difference code. A simple model is proposed to describe the thickness resonances. It predicts that a thickness mode decays as $t^{-1.5}$ for large times and that the resonance amplitude is proportional to $D^{-1.5}$ where $D$ is the curvature of the dispersion curve $\\omega(k)$ at $k=0$. This curvature depends on the ...